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Sample records for region influence mrna

  1. Mutations in a conserved region of RNA polymerase II influence the accuracy of mRNA start site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatpanah, D S; Young, R A

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive phenotypic assay has been used to identify mutations affecting transcription initiation in the genes encoding the two large subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2). The rpb1 and rpb2 mutations alter the ratio of transcripts initiated at two adjacent start sites of a delta-insertion promoter. Of a large number of rpb1 and rpb2 mutations screened, only a few affect transcription initiation patterns at delta-insertion promoters, and these mutations are in close proximity to each other within both RPB1 and RPB2. The two rpb1 mutations alter amino acid residues within homology block G, a region conserved in the large subunits of all RNA polymerases. The three strong rpb2 mutations alter adjacent amino acids. At a wild-type promoter, the rpb1 mutations affect the accuracy of mRNA start site selection by producing a small but detectable increase in the 5'-end heterogeneity of transcripts. These RNA polymerase II mutations implicate specific portions of the enzyme in aspects of transcription initiation. Images PMID:1922077

  2. Amygdala kindling increases fear responses and decreases glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression in hippocampal regions.

    PubMed

    Kalynchuk, Lisa E; Meaney, Michael J

    2003-12-01

    Amygdala kindling dramatically increases fearful behavior in rats. Because kindling-induced fear increases in magnitude as rats receive more stimulations, kindling provides an excellent model for studying the nature and neural mechanisms of fear sensitization. In the present experiment, we studied whether the development of kindling-induced fear is related to changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA expression in various brain regions. Rats received 20, 60 or 100 amygdala kindling stimulations or 100 sham stimulations. One day after the final stimulation, their fearful behavior was assessed in an unfamiliar open field. Then, the rats were sacrificed and their brains were processed for in situ hybridization of GR mRNA expression. We found that compared with the sham-stimulated rats, the rats that received 60 or 100 kindling stimulations were significantly more fearful in the open field and also had significantly less GR mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Importantly, the changes in fearful behavior were significantly correlated with the changes in GR mRNA expression. These results suggest that alterations in GR mRNA expression in hippocampal regions may play a role in the development of kindling-induced fear.

  3. A novel mRNA 3' untranslated region translational control sequence regulates Xenopus Wee1 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Ying; Charlesworth, Amanda; Byrd, Shannon M; Gregerson, Robert; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2008-05-15

    Cell cycle progression during oocyte maturation requires the strict temporal regulation of maternal mRNA translation. The intrinsic basis of this temporal control has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve distinct mRNA 3' UTR regulatory elements. In this study, we identify a novel translational control sequence (TCS) that exerts repression of target mRNAs in immature oocytes of the frog, Xenopus laevis, and can direct early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during oocyte maturation. The TCS is functionally distinct from the previously characterized Musashi/polyadenylation response element (PRE) and the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). We report that TCS elements exert translational repression in both the Wee1 mRNA 3' UTR and the pericentriolar material-1 (Pcm-1) mRNA 3' UTR in immature oocytes. During oocyte maturation, TCS function directs the early translational activation of the Pcm-1 mRNA. By contrast, we demonstrate that CPE sequences flanking the TCS elements in the Wee1 3' UTR suppress the ability of the TCS to direct early translational activation. Our results indicate that a functional hierarchy exists between these distinct 3' UTR regulatory elements to control the timing of maternal mRNA translational activation during oocyte maturation.

  4. Distinctive properties of the 5'-untranslated region of human hsp70 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Maria P; Sizova, Daria V; Dmitriev, Sergei E; Ivanov, Dmitri S; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2003-06-20

    A relaxed cap-dependence of translation of the mRNA-encoding mammalian heat shock protein Hsp70 may suggest that its 5'-untranslated region (UTR) possesses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, this possibility has been tested in transfected cells using plasmids that express dicistronic mRNAs. Using a reporter gene construct, Renilla luciferase/Photinus pyralis luciferase, we show that the 216-nt long 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA acts as an IRES that directs ribosomes to the downstream start codon by a cap-independent mechanism. The relative activity of this IRES (100-fold over the empty vector) is similar to that of the classical picornaviral IRESs. Additional controls indicate that this high expression of the downstream reporter is not due to readthrough from the upstream cistron, nor is it due to translation of cryptic monocistronic transcripts. The effect of small deletions within the 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA on the IRES activity varies in dependence on their position within the 5'-UTR sequence. With the exception of deletion of nt 33-50, it is small for the 5'-terminal half of the 5'-UTR and rather strong for the 3'-terminal section. However, neither of these small deletions abolishes the IRES activity completely. Excision of larger sections (>50 nt) by truncation of the 5'-UTR from the 5'-end or by internal deleting results in a dramatic impairment of the IRES function. Taken together, these data suggest that the IRES activity of the 5'-UTR of Hsp70 mRNA requires integrity of almost the entire sequence of the 5'-UTR. The data are discussed in terms of a model that allows a three-dimensional rather than linear mode of selection of the initiation region surrounding the start codon of Hsp70 mRNA.

  5. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels

    PubMed Central

    Boël, Grégory; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K.; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Aalberts, Daniel P.; Hunt, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyze the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  6. Identification of a competitive translation determinant in the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hann, L E; Webb, A C; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    We report that the competitive translational activity of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (CP RNA), a nonadenylated mRNA, is determined in part by the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Competitive translation was characterized both in vitro, with cotranslation assays, and in vivo, with microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. In wheat germ extracts, coat protein synthesis was constant when a fixed amount of full-length CP RNA was cotranslated with increasing concentrations of competitor globin mRNA. However, translation of CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR decreased significantly under competitive conditions. RNA stabilities were equivalent. In X. laevis oocytes, which are translationally saturated and are an inherently competitive translational environment, full-length CP RNA assembled into large polysomes and coat protein synthesis was readily detectable. Alternatively, CP RNA lacking the 3' UTR sedimented as small polysomes, and little coat protein was detected. Again, RNA stabilities were equivalent. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to localize RNA sequences or structures required for competitive translation. Since the CP RNA 3' UTR has an unusually large number of AUG nucleotide triplets, two AUG-containing sites were altered in full-length RNA prior to oocyte injections. Nucleotide substitutions at the sequence GAUG, 20 nucleotides downstream of the coat protein termination codon, specifically reduced full-length CP RNA translation, while similar substitutions at the next AUG triplet had little effect on translation. The competitive influence of the 3' UTR could be explained by RNA-protein interactions that affect translation initiation or by ribosome reinitiation at downstream AUG codons, which would increase the number of ribosomes committed to coat protein synthesis. PMID:9121448

  7. Identification of two proteins that bind to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, N; Baekelandt, V; Goritchenko, L; Benowitz, L I

    1997-01-01

    GAP-43 is a membrane phosphoprotein that is important for the development and plasticity of neural connections. In undifferentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, GAP-43 mRNA degrades rapidly ( t = 5 h), but becomes stable when cells are treated with nerve growth factor. To identify trans- acting factors that may influence mRNA stability, we combined column chromatography and gel mobility shift assays to isolate GAP-43 mRNA binding proteins from neonatal bovine brain tissue. This resulted in the isolation of two proteins that bind specifically and competitively to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of GAP-43 mRNA. Partial amino acid sequencing revealed that one of the RNA binding proteins coincides with FBP (far upstream element binding protein), previously characterized as a protein that resembles hnRNP K and which binds to a single-stranded, pyrimidine-rich DNA sequence upstream of the c -myc gene to activate its expression. The other binding protein shares sequence homology with PTB, a polypyrimidine tract binding protein implicated in RNA splicing and regulation of translation initiation. The two proteins bind to a 26 nt pyrimidine-rich sequence lying 300 nt downstream of the end of the coding region, in an area shown by others to confer instability on a reporter mRNA in transient transfection assays. We therefore propose that FBP and the PTB-like protein may compete for binding at the same site to influence the stability of GAP-43 mRNA. PMID:9092640

  8. The Signal Sequence Coding Region Promotes Nuclear Export of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs. PMID:18052610

  9. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  10. Sequence of the 3'-noncoding and adjacent coding regions of human gamma-globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, R; Kan, Y W; Boyer, H W

    1978-01-01

    In cloning human fetal globin cDNA in bacterial plasmids, we obtained a recombinant which contained a fragment of gammg-globin cDNA corresponding to the region from amino acid 99 to the poly A. We determined a sequence of 169 nucleotides which included the complete 3' non-coding region of the gamma-globin mRNA. The codon for amino acid 136 was GCA, indicating that this cloned fragment was derived from the Agamma-globin gene. In conjunction with the surrounding sequences, the GCA codon provides the Agamma-species with a unique CTGCAG hexanucleotide that is recognized by the restriction enzyme Pst I. The 3'-untranslated region of the gamma-globin mRNA consists of 90 nucleotides, and shares little homology with that of the human beta-globin mRNA. As in other mammalian mRNAs, a symmetrical sequence and the hexanucleotide AAUAAA are present. Images PMID:318163

  11. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  12. Challenging the Roles of NSP3 and Untranslated Regions in Rotavirus mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Gratia, Matthieu; Vende, Patrice; Charpilienne, Annie; Baron, Hilma Carolina; Laroche, Cécile; Sarot, Emeline; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Duarte, Mariela; Poncet, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus NSP3 is a translational surrogate of the PABP-poly(A) complex for rotavirus mRNAs. To further explore the effects of NSP3 and untranslated regions (UTRs) on rotavirus mRNAs translation, we used a quantitative in vivo assay with simultaneous cytoplasmic NSP3 expression (wild-type or deletion mutant) and electroporated rotavirus-like and standard synthetic mRNAs. This assay shows that the last four GACC nucleotides of viral mRNA are essential for efficient translation and that both the NSP3 eIF4G- and RNA-binding domains are required. We also show efficient translation of rotavirus-like mRNAs even with a 5’UTR as short as 5 nucleotides, while more than eleven nucleotides are required for the 3’UTR. Despite the weak requirement for a long 5’UTR, a good AUG environment remains a requirement for rotavirus mRNAs translation. PMID:26727111

  13. Developmental, regional, and cellular expression of SFT/UbcH5A and DMT1 mRNA in brain.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Mitchell; Menzies, Sharon; Connor, James; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2004-06-01

    Brain iron has marked developmental, regional, and cellular distribution patterns. To characterize better the potential mechanisms for iron transport into and within the brain, we have analyzed expression patterns of two factors: divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and stimulator of Fe transport (SFT). DMT1 is known to participate in brain iron uptake although functional information is lacking. Even less clear is the possible role of SFT, which is related to a member of the ubiquitin-conjugating E2 family UbcH5A, but previous studies have found SFT/Ubc5Ha mRNA expressed abundantly in mouse brain. Like DMT1, SFT function has been implicated in transferrin and nontransferrin-bound iron uptake. Comparative Northern analysis indicates that SFT/UbcH5A mRNA levels are threefold higher in 3-day-old mice than at later ages, whereas levels of DMT1 mRNA do not change. In situ analysis of neonatal mouse brain reveals prominent SFT/UbcH5A mRNA expression in epithelial and ependymal cells in the choroid plexus and neurons of the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cortex. Adult mouse brain expresses SFT/UbcH5A mRNA mainly in white matter of the cerebellum and pons. Using a multiple tissue expression (MTE) array containing 20 different human brain regions, the highest levels of both SFT/UbcH5A and DMT1 mRNA are detected in the corpus callosum and cerebellum. The significantly elevated levels of SFT/UbcH5A mRNA in the neonatal mouse and its localization to choroid plexus, a major site of brain iron acquisition, suggest that this factor may contribute to the rapid rate of brain iron uptake that occurs in the early postnatal period.

  14. Region effects influence local tree species diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E.; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  15. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  16. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species.

  17. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Seán E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. PMID:26590426

  18. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    DOE PAGES

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; et al

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on:more » inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.« less

  19. mRNA Transcript abundance during plant growth and the influence of Li(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Duff, M C; Kuhne, W W; Halverson, N V; Chang, C-S; Kitamura, E; Hawthorn, L; Martinez, N E; Stafford, C; Milliken, C E; Caldwell, E F; Stieve-Caldwell, E

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li(+) concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li(+) focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li(+) exposure in Arabidopsis with Li(+) uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li(+)-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li(+) resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li(+) exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li(+) exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li(+)-sensitive genes and a gene-based "response plan" for acute and chronic Li(+) exposure are delineated.

  20. Synthesis in Escherichia coli of human adenovirus type 12 transforming proteins encoded by early region 1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kimelman, D; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Ptashne, M; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad)-encoded early region 1A (E1A) tumor (T) antigens have been implicated in the positive regulation of viral early genes, the positive and negative regulation of some cellular genes, and cell immortalization and transformation. To further study the Ad E1A T antigens and to facilitate their purification, we have cloned cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA downstream of a hybrid Escherichia coli trp-lac (tac) promoter. Up to 8% of the protein synthesized in E. coli cells transformed by each of the two different Ad12 E1A cDNA constructs were immunoprecipitated as a Mr 47,000 protein by antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded in the Ad12 E1A DNA sequence. Both proteins produced in E. coli appear to be authentic and complete Ad12 E1A T antigens because they possess (i) the Ad12 E1A NH2-terminal amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence; (ii) the Ad12 E1A COOH-terminal sequence, as shown by immunoprecipitation with anti-peptide antibody; and (iii) a molecular weight and an acidic isoelectric point similar to that of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected and transformed mammalian cells. The T antigens were purified to near homogeneity in yields of 100-200 micrograms per g wet weight of transformed E. coli cells. Images PMID:6387701

  1. Differential targeting of VDAC3 mRNA isoforms influences mitochondria morphology

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Morgane; Ubrig, Elodie; Filleur, Sophie; Erhardt, Mathieu; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular targeting of mRNAs has recently emerged as a prevalent mechanism to control protein localization. For mitochondria, a cotranslational model of protein import is now proposed in parallel to the conventional posttranslational model, and mitochondrial targeting of mRNAs has been demonstrated in various organisms. Voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) are the most abundant proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the major transport pathway for numerous metabolites. Four nucleus-encoded VDACs have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation generate two VDAC3 mRNA isoforms differing by their 3′ UTR. By using quantitative RT-PCR and in vivo mRNA visualization approaches, the two mRNA variants were shown differentially associated with mitochondria. The longest mRNA presents a 3′ extension named alternative UTR (aUTR) that is necessary and sufficient to target VDAC3 mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Moreover, aUTR is sufficient for the mitochondrial targeting of a reporter transcript, and can be used as a tool to target an unrelated mRNA to the mitochondrial surface. Finally, VDAC3–aUTR mRNA variant impacts mitochondria morphology and size, demonstrating the role of mRNA targeting in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:24889622

  2. Complementarity between the mRNA 5' untranslated region and 18S ribosomal RNA can inhibit translation.

    PubMed

    Verrier, S B; Jean-Jean, O

    2000-04-01

    In eubacteria, base pairing between the 3' end of 16S rRNA and the ribosome-binding site of mRNA is required for efficient initiation of translation. An interaction between the 18S rRNA and the mRNA was also proposed for translation initiation in eukaryotes. Here, we used an antisense RNA approach in vivo to identify the regions of 18S rRNA that might interact with the mRNA 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Various fragments covering the entire mouse 18S rRNA gene were cloned 5' of a cat reporter gene in a eukaryotic vector, and translation products were analyzed after transient expression in human cells. For the largest part of 18S rRNA, we show that the insertion of complementary fragments in the mRNA 5' UTR do not impair translation of the downstream open reading frame (ORF). When translation inhibition is observed, reduction of the size of the complementary sequence to less than 200 nt alleviates the inhibitory effect. A single fragment complementary to the 18S rRNA 3' domain retains its inhibitory potential when reduced to 100 nt. Deletion analyses show that two distinct sequences of approximately 25 nt separated by a spacer sequence of 50 nt are required for the inhibitory effect. Sucrose gradient fractionation of polysomes reveals that mRNAs containing the inhibitory sequences accumulate in the fractions with 40S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that translation is blocked due to stalling of initiation complexes. Our results support an mRNA-rRNA base pairing to explain the translation inhibition observed and suggest that this region of 18S rRNA is properly located for interacting with mRNA.

  3. Translational control of maskin mRNA by its 3' untranslated region

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Hedda A.; Radford, Helois E.; Wilson, Lolita S.; Lissenden, Sarah; de Moor, Cornelia H.

    2007-01-01

    Background information. Maskin is a member of the acidic transforming coiled-coil (TACC) domain proteins found in Xenopus leavis oocytes and embryos. It is implicated in the coordination of the spindle and has been reported to mediate translational repression of cyclin B1 mRNA. Results We report here that maskin mRNA is translationally repressed at the level of initiation in stage 4 oocytes and becomes activated in stage 6 oocytes. The translational repression of maskin mRNA correlates with the presence of a short poly(A) tail on this mRNA in stage 4 oocytes. The 3' UTR of maskin can confer the translational regulation to a reporter mRNA, and so can the 3' UTR of human TACC3. A conserved GUCU repeat element was found to repress translation in both stage 4 and stage 6 oocytes, but deletion of this element did not abrogate repression in stage 4 oocytes. UV crosslinking experiments indicated that overlapping sets of proteins bind efficiently to both the maskin and the cyclin B1 3' UTRs. As previously reported, CPEB binds to the cyclin B1 3' UTR, but its binding to the maskin 3' UTR is minimal. By RNA affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified the embryonic deadenylation element binding protein (EDEN-BP) as one of the proteins binding to both the maskin and the cyclin B1 3' UTRs. Conclusion Maskin mRNA is translationally regulated by at least two repressor elements and an activation element. One of the repessor elements is the evolutionarily conserved GUCU repeat. EDEN-BP binds to both the maskin and cyclin B1 3' UTRs, indicating it may be involved in the deadenylation of these mRNAs. PMID:17241108

  4. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  5. A novel mRNA and a low molecular weight polypeptide encoded in the transforming region of adenovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Katze, M G; Persson, H; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation was used to identify adenovirus type 2 (ad2) tumor antigens synthesized in vivo. The antisera, prepared from tumor-bearing animals, reacted with a wide spectrum of ad2 early proteins including a 11 000-dalton (11 K) polypeptide. The gene for this polypeptide was mapped to the transforming region of the viral genome by hybridization selection followed by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation. Hybrid arrest translation revealed that the 11 K RNA was transcribed from the leftward reading strand (1-strand) in contrast to other mRNAs from this region. Sucrose gradient analysis of the selected 11 K mRNA revealed that the size of the mRNA was 20S corresponding to approximately 2000 nucleotides. Novel 1-strand transcripts of this length from the transforming region were identified by S1 endonuclease analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that both strands of the transforming region of ad2 DNA are actively transcribed into functional mRNA early after viral infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6985356

  6. Region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA in rat hypothalamic nuclei induced by forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Burcu; Gozen, Oguz; Koylu, Ersin O; Keser, Aysegul; Kuhar, Michael J; Pogun, Sakire

    2012-10-15

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are highly expressed in the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMH) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that these nuclei regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system activity, and feeding behavior. Our previous studies showed that forced swim stress augmented CART peptide expression significantly in whole hypothalamus of male rats. In another study, forced swim stress increased the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in female PVN, whereas no effect was observed in male PVN or in the ARC nucleus of either sex. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of forced swim stress on CART mRNA expression in PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei in both male and female rats. Twelve male (stressed and controls, n=6 each) and 12 female (stressed and controls, n=6 each) Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Control animals were only handled, whereas forced swim stress procedure was applied to the stressed groups. Brains were dissected and brain sections containing PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei were prepared. CART mRNA levels were determined by in situ hybridization. In male rats, forced swim stress upregulated CART mRNA expression in DMH and downregulated it in the ARC. In female rats, forced swim stress increased CART mRNA expression in PVN and DMH, whereas a decrease was observed in the ARC nucleus. Our results show that forced swim stress elicits region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA expression in rat hypothalamus that may help in explaining some of the effects of stress.

  7. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  8. Influence of cardiorespiratory fitness on PPARG mRNA expression using monozygotic twin case control.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Barbieri, Ricardo Augusto; Ferreira, Sandra Aires; Luchessi, André Ducati; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Kokubun, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The influence of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) on anthropometric variables and PPARG mRNA expression was investigated. Monozygotic twin pairs aged 11-18 years were grouped into discordant (D) and concordant (C) high and low VO2max groups. VO2max was determined by progressive maximal exercise test on treadmill with gas exchange analysis. Body mass (BM), BMI, waist circumference (WC), triceps (TR), and subscapular (SB) skinfold thicknesses were measured. Twins from the discordant group had differences in VO2max values (D-high = 45.9 ± 10.0 versus D-low = 32.4 ± 10.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.025), while no differences were found in the concordant group (C-high = 42.4 ± 9.2 versus C-low = 38.8 ± 9.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.952). In discordant group, VO2max was negatively correlated with TR + SB (r = -0.540, P = 0.021) and positively correlated with PPARG expression in leukocytes (r = 0.952, P = 0.001). Moreover, PPARG expression was directly correlated with BM (r = 0.714, P = 0.047) and height (r = 0.762, P = 0.028). In concordant twins, VO2max was inversely correlated with BM (r = -0.290, P = 0.027), BMI (r = -0.472, P = 0.001), WC (r = -0.426, P = 0.001), and TR + SB (r = -0.739, P = 0.001). Twins D-high had 1.78-fold greater PPARG expression when compared with twins D-low (P = 0.048). In conclusion, the cardiorespiratory fitness may modulate PPARG expression in childhood and adolescence, independently of the genetic background. PMID:25879043

  9. Influence of Cardiorespiratory Fitness on PPARG mRNA Expression Using Monozygotic Twin Case Control

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Barbieri, Ricardo Augusto; Ferreira, Sandra Aires; Luchessi, André Ducati; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Kokubun, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The influence of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) on anthropometric variables and PPARG mRNA expression was investigated. Monozygotic twin pairs aged 11–18 years were grouped into discordant (D) and concordant (C) high and low VO2max groups. VO2max was determined by progressive maximal exercise test on treadmill with gas exchange analysis. Body mass (BM), BMI, waist circumference (WC), triceps (TR), and subscapular (SB) skinfold thicknesses were measured. Twins from the discordant group had differences in VO2max values (D-high = 45.9 ± 10.0 versus D-low = 32.4 ± 10.6 mL·kg−1·min−1, P = 0.025), while no differences were found in the concordant group (C-high = 42.4 ± 9.2 versus C-low = 38.8 ± 9.8 mL·kg−1·min−1, P = 0.952). In discordant group, VO2max was negatively correlated with TR + SB (r = −0.540, P = 0.021) and positively correlated with PPARG expression in leukocytes (r = 0.952, P = 0.001). Moreover, PPARG expression was directly correlated with BM (r = 0.714, P = 0.047) and height (r = 0.762, P = 0.028). In concordant twins, VO2max was inversely correlated with BM (r = −0.290, P = 0.027), BMI (r = −0.472, P = 0.001), WC (r = −0.426, P = 0.001), and TR + SB (r = −0.739, P = 0.001). Twins D-high had 1.78-fold greater PPARG expression when compared with twins D-low (P = 0.048). In conclusion, the cardiorespiratory fitness may modulate PPARG expression in childhood and adolescence, independently of the genetic background. PMID:25879043

  10. How does a scanning ribosomal particle move along the 5'-untranslated region of eukaryotic mRNA? Brownian Ratchet model.

    PubMed

    Spirin, Alexander S

    2009-11-17

    A model of the ATP-dependent unidirectional movement of the 43S ribosomal initiation complex (=40S ribosomal subunit + eIF1 + eIF1A + eIF2.GTP.Met-tRNA(i) + eIF3) during scanning of the 5'-untranslated region of eukaryotic mRNA is proposed. The model is based on the principles of molecular Brownian ratchet machines and explains several enigmatic data concerning the scanning complex. In this model, the one-dimensional diffusion of the ribosomal initiation complex along the mRNA chain is rectified into the net-unidirectional 5'-to-3' movement by the Feynman ratchet-and-pawl mechanism. The proposed mechanism is organized by the heterotrimeric protein eIF4F (=eIF4A + eIF4E + eIF4G), attached to the scanning ribosomal particle via eIF3, and the RNA-binding protein eIF4B that is postulated to play the role of the pawl. The energy for the useful work of the ratchet-and-pawl mechanism is supplied from ATP hydrolysis induced by the eIF4A subunit: ATP binding and its hydrolysis alternately change the affinities of eIF4A for eIF4B and for mRNA, resulting in the restriction of backward diffusional sliding of the 43S ribosomal complex along the mRNA chain, while stochastic movements ahead are allowed.

  11. Protein kinase A stimulates binding of multiple proteins to a U-rich domain in the 3'-untranslated region of lactate dehydrogenase A mRNA that is required for the regulation of mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, D; Huang, D; Brown, R C; Jungmann, R A

    1998-10-23

    We have explored the molecular basis of the cAMP-induced stabilization of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) mRNA and identified four cytoplasmic proteins of 96, 67, 52, and 50 kDa that specifically bind to a 30-nucleotide uridine-rich sequence in the LDH 3'-untranslated region with a predicted stem-loop structure. Mutational analysis revealed that specific protein binding is dependent upon an intact primary nucleotide sequence in the loop as well as integrity of the adjoining double-stranded stem structure, thus indicating a high degree of primary and secondary structure specificity. The critical stem-loop region is located between nucleotides 1473 and 1502 relative to the mRNA cap site and contains a previously identified cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) required for LDH-A mRNA stability regulation by the protein kinase A pathway. The 3'-untranslated region binding activity of the proteins is up-regulated after protein kinase A activation, whereas protein dephosphorylation is associated with a loss of binding activity. These results imply a cause and effect relationship between LDH-A mRNA stabilization and CSR-phosphoprotein binding activity. We propose that the U-rich CSR is a recognition signal for CSR-binding proteins and for an mRNA processing pathway that specifically stabilizes LDH mRNA in response to activation of the protein kinase A signal transduction pathway.

  12. A eukaryotic-like 3′ untranslated region in Salmonella enterica hilD mRNA

    PubMed Central

    López-Garrido, Javier; Puerta-Fernández, Elena; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Long 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) are common in eukaryotic mRNAs. In contrast, long 3′UTRs are rare in bacteria, and have not been characterized in detail. We describe a 3′UTR of 310 nucleotides in hilD mRNA, a transcript that encodes a transcriptional activator of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Deletion of the hilD 3′UTR increases the hilD mRNA level, suggesting that the hilD 3′UTR may play a role in hilD mRNA turnover. Cloning of the hilD 3′UTR downstream of the green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene decreases green fluorescent protein (GFP) activity in both Escherichia coli and S. enterica, indicating that the hilD 3′UTR can act as an independent module. S. enterica mutants lacking either ribonuclease E or polynucleotide phosphorylase contain similar amounts of hilD and hilD Δ3′UTR mRNAs, suggesting that the hilD 3′UTR is a target for hilD mRNA degradation by the degradosome. The hilD 3′UTR is also necessary for modulation of hilD and SPI-1 expression by the RNA chaperone Hfq. Overexpression of SPI-1 in the absence of the hilD 3′UTR retards Salmonella growth and causes uncontrolled invasion of epithelial cells. Based on these observations, we propose that the S. enterica hilD 3′UTR is a cis-acting element that contributes to cellular homeostasis by promoting hilD mRNA turnover. PMID:24682814

  13. Control of c-myc mRNA half-life in vitro by a protein capable of binding to a coding region stability determinant.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, P L; Herrick, D J; Prokipcak, R D; Ross, J

    1992-04-01

    Polysome-associated c-myc mRNA is degraded relatively rapidly in cells and in an in vitro mRNA decay system containing extracts from cultured mammalian cells. Using this system, a competition/screening assay was devised to search for factors that bind to specific regions of polysome-associated c-myc mRNA and thereby alter its half-life. mRNA stability was first assayed in reactions containing exogenous competitor RNAs corresponding to portions of c-myc mRNA itself. The addition of a 182-nucleotide sense strand fragment from the carboxy-terminal portion of the c-myc-coding region destabilized c-myc mRNA by at least eightfold. This RNA fragment had no effect on the stability of other mRNAs tested. Moreover, c-myc mRNA was not destabilized in reactions containing unrelated competitor RNAs or sense strand RNA from the c-myc 5' region. Polysome-associated globin mRNA containing the c-myc-coding region segment in-frame was also destabilized in vitro by the 182-nucleotide RNA. As determined by UV-cross-linking experiments, the 182-nucleotide RNA fragment was recognized by and bound to an approximately 75-kD polysome-associated protein. On the basis of these data plus Northern blotting analyses of c-myc mRNA decay products, we suggest that the approximately 75-kD protein is normally bound to a c-myc-coding region determinant and protects that region of the mRNA from endonuclease attack. Possible links between the protective protein, translation, ribosome pausing, and c-myc mRNA turnover are discussed.

  14. Identification of a third region of cell-specific alternative splicing in human fibronectin mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, A.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors describe here a third region of variability in human fibronectin (FN) due to alternative RNA splicing. Two other positions of alternative splicing have been reported previously (ED and IIICS). The third region involves a 273-nucleotide exon encoding exactly one 91-amino acid repeat of type III homology, located between the DNA- and the cell-binding domains of FN, which is either included in or excluded from FN mRNA. The two mRNA variants arising by an exon-skipping mechanism are present in cells known to synthesize the cellular form of FN. However, liver cells, which are the source of plasma FN, produce only messengers without the extra type III sequence. Therefore, the region described here resembles, both structurally and functionally, the previously described ED (for extra domain) region, located toward the C terminus of the molecule between the cell- and heparin- (hep 2) binding domains. The authors conclude that both the extra type III repeat (names EDII) and ED represent sequences restricted to cellular FN. Combination of all the possible patterns of splicing in the three regions described to date may generate up to 20 distinct FN polypeptides from a single gene.

  15. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Zain, S.B.; Salim, M.; Chou, W.G.; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E.M.; Majocha, R.E.; Marotta, C.A.

    1988-02-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of ..beta..-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, the authors cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambdagt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the ..beta..-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approx. = 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, they conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product.

  16. Molecular cloning of amyloid cDNA derived from mRNA of the Alzheimer disease brain: coding and noncoding regions of the fetal precursor mRNA are expressed in the cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Zain, S B; Salim, M; Chou, W G; Sajdel-Sulkowska, E M; Majocha, R E; Marotta, C A

    1988-01-01

    To gain insight into factors associated with the excessive accumulation of beta-amyloid in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, the present studies were initiated to distinguish between a unique primary structure of the AD-specific amyloid precursor mRNA vis a vis other determinants that may affect amyloid levels. Previous molecular cloning experiments focused on amyloid derived from sources other than AD cases. In the present work, we cloned and characterized amyloid cDNA derived directly from AD brain mRNA. Poly(A)+ RNA from AD cortices was used for the preparation of lambda gt11 recombinant cDNA libraries. An insert of 1564 nucleotides was isolated that included the beta-amyloid domain and corresponded to 75% of the coding region and approximately equal to 70% of the 3'-noncoding region of the fetal precursor amyloid cDNA reported by others. On RNA blots, the AD amyloid mRNA consisted of a doublet of 3.2 and 3.4 kilobases. In control and AD cases, the amyloid mRNA levels were nonuniform and were independent of glial-specific mRNA levels. Based on the sequence analysis data, we conclude that a segment of the amyloid gene is expressed in the AD cortex as a high molecular weight precursor mRNA with major coding and 3'-noncoding regions that are identical to the fetal brain gene product. Images PMID:2893379

  17. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  18. Selenium Deficiency Influences the mRNA Expression of Selenoproteins and Cytokines in Chicken Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yilin; Zhao, Jinxin; Yao, Haidong; Zhao, Xia; Fan, Ruifeng; Zhao, Wenchao; Zhang, Ziwei; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-06-01

    Selenium (Se) deficiency induces hemolysis in chickens, but the molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Se primarily elicits its function through the activity of selenoproteins, which contain the unique amino acid selenocysteine (Sec). In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of Se deficiency on the expression of 24 selenoproteins and 10 cytokines. One hundred eighty chickens were randomly divided into 2 groups (90 chickens per group). During the entire experimental period, chickens were allowed ad libitum consumption of feed and water. The chickens were fed either a Se-deficient diet (0.008 mg Se/kg; produced in the Se-deficient area of Heilongjiang, China) or a Se-supplemented diet (as sodium selenite) at 0.2 mg/kg for 35 days. At the 35th day, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of 24 selenoproteins and 10 cytokines were examined in erythrocytes of 5 chickens per group, and the correlation was analyzed. The results showed that the expression of 24 selenoproteins and 7 cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12β, TGF-β4, and IFN-γ) decreased (P < 0.05), and the expression of 3 cytokines (IL-1γ, IL-6 and IL-7) was higher in the Se-deficient group. In both groups, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin 1 (Txnrd1), selenoprotein P1 (SELP), and selenoprotein synthetase (SPS2) were highly expressed compared to the other selenoproteins in chicken erythrocytes (P < 0.05). These data suggest that GPXs, Txnrd1, SELP, and SPS2 possibly play a more important role than the other selenoproteins. The increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1γ, IL-6, and IL-7) suggested that the immune system of chickens was damaged by the Se deficiency. Correlation analysis suggested that although the expression of 24 selenoproteins and 7 cytokines decreased and that of 3 cytokines increased, there was a close correlation between their expression levels and a Se diet. These results suggested that Se deficiency influenced the expressions of 24 selenoproteins

  19. A manganese-dependent ribozyme in the 3'-untranslated region of Xenopus Vg1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Nikolay G; Hartland, Emilia I; Huber, Paul W

    2008-10-01

    The smallest catalytic RNA identified to date is a manganese-dependent ribozyme that requires only a complex between GAAA and UUU to effect site-specific cleavage. We show here that this ribozyme occurs naturally in the 3'-UTR of Vg1 and beta-actin mRNAs. In accord with earlier studies with model RNAs, cleavage occurs only in the presence of manganese or cadmium ions and proceeds optimally near 30 degrees C and physiological pH. The time course of cleavage in Vg1 mRNA best fits a two-step process in which both steps are first-order. In Vg1 mRNA, the ribozyme is positioned adjacent to a polyadenylation signal, but has no influence on translation of the mRNA in Xenopus oocytes. Putative GAAA ribozyme structures are also near polyadenylation sites in yeast and rat actin mRNAs. Analysis of sequences in the PolyA Cleavage Site and 3'-UTR Database (PACdb) revealed no particular bias in the frequency or distribution of the GAAA motif that would suggest that this ribozyme is currently or was recently used for cleavage to generate processed transcripts. Nonetheless, we speculate that the complementary strands that comprise the ribozyme may account for the origin of sequence elements that direct present-day 3'-end processing of eukaryotic mRNAs.

  20. Risk of childhood asthma is associated with CpG-site polymorphisms, regional DNA methylation and mRNA levels at the GSDMB/ORMDL3 locus

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E.; Greco, Dario; Gref, Anna; Orsmark-Pietras, Christina; Persson, Helena; Pershagen, Göran; Hedlin, Gunilla; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Kere, Juha; Söderhäll, Cilla

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GSDMB (Gasdermin B) and ORMDL3 (ORMDL sphingolipid biosynthesis regulator 3) are strongly associated with childhood asthma, but the molecular alterations contributing to disease remain unknown. We investigated the effects of asthma-associated SNPs on DNA methylation and mRNA levels of GSDMB and ORMDL3. Genetic association between GSDMB/ORMDL3 and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma was confirmed in the Swedish birth-cohort BAMSE. CpG-site SNPs (rs7216389 and rs4065275) showed differences in DNA methylation depending on carrier status of the risk alleles, and were significantly associated with methylation levels in two CpG sites in the 5′ UTR (untranslated region) of ORMDL3. In the Swedish Search study, we found significant differences in DNA methylation between asthmatics and controls in five CpG sites; after adjusting for lymphocyte and neutrophil cell counts, three remained significant: one in IKZF3 [IKAROS family zinc finger 3 (Aiolos); cg16293631] and two in the CpG island (CGI) of ORMDL3 (cg02305874 and cg16638648). Also, cg16293631 and cg02305874 correlated with mRNA levels of ORMDL3. The association between methylation and asthma was independent of the genotype in rs7216389, rs4065275 and rs12603332. Both SNPs and CpG sites showed significant associations with ORMDL3 mRNA levels. SNPs influenced expression independently of methylation, and the residual association between methylation and expression was not mediated by these SNPs. We found a differentially methylated region in the CGI shore of ORMDL3 with six CpG sites less methylated in CD8+ T-cells. In summary, this study supports that there are differences in DNA methylation at this locus between asthmatics and controls; and both SNPs and CpG sites are independently associated with ORMDL3 expression. PMID:25256354

  1. Regional induction of c-fos and heat shock protein-72 mRNA following fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Raghupathi, R.; Welsh, F.A.; Gennarelli, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the cellular response to traumatic brain injury, the expression of mRNA for c-fos and the 72-kDa heat shock protein (hsp72) was determined using in situ hybridization following lateral fluid-percussion injury (2.2-2.4 atm) in rat brain. At 2 h after injury, induction of c-fos mRNA was restricted to regions of the cortex surrounding the contusion area. An increase in c-fos mRNA, but not hsp72 mRNA, was observed bilaterally in the CA{sub 3} subfield of the hippocampus and the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and in the thalamus ipsilateral to the impact site. By 6 h, increased expression of c-fos mRNA was observed only in the corpus callosum on the impact side; hsp72 mRNA persisted in the deep cortical layers and upper layers of the subcortical white matter below the site of maximal injury. By 24 h, both c-fos and hsp72 mRNA had returned to control levels in all regions of the brain. These results demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury triggers regionally and temporally specific expression of c-fos and hsp72 mRNA, which may be suggestive of differential neurochemical alterations in neurons and glia following experimental brain injury. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Structure of the coding region and mRNA variants of the apyrase gene from pea (Pisum sativum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Abe, S.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequences of a 49 kDa apyrase (ATP diphosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.5) from the cytoskeletal fraction of etiolated pea stems were used to derive oligonucleotide DNA primers to generate a cDNA fragment of pea apyrase mRNA by RT-PCR and these primers were used to screen a pea stem cDNA library. Two almost identical cDNAs differing in just 6 nucleotides within the coding regions were found, and these cDNA sequences were used to clone genomic fragments by PCR. Two nearly identical gene fragments containing 8 exons and 7 introns were obtained. One of them (H-type) encoded the mRNA sequence described by Hsieh et al. (1996) (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank Z32743), while the other (S-type) differed by the same 6 nucleotides as the mRNAs, suggesting that these genes may be alleles. The six nucleotide differences between these two alleles were found solely in the first exon, and these mutation sites had two types of consensus sequences. These mRNAs were found with varying lengths of 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR). There are some similarities between the 3'-UTR of these mRNAs and those of actin and actin binding proteins in plants. The putative roles of the 3'-UTR and alternative polyadenylation sites are discussed in relation to their possible role in targeting the mRNAs to different subcellular compartments.

  3. Influence of culture medium composition on relative mRNA abundances in domestic cat embryos.

    PubMed

    Hribal, R; Jewgenow, K; Braun, B C; Comizzoli, P

    2013-04-01

    Different culture conditions have been used to produce domestic cat embryos. As part of the in vitro procedures, the medium composition significantly affects the quality of the embryo development also. Quality assessments based on cleavage kinetics and blastomere symmetry are useful, but embryos also can differ in their relative gene expression patterns despite similar morphological characteristics. The aim of this study was to compare cat embryos produced with two different in vitro culture systems routinely used in two different laboratories [Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Washington D.C., USA (SCBI) and Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany (IZW)]. Specifically, relative mRNA expression patterns of critical genes for pre-implantation embryo development were assessed in both conditions. Embryos were produced in parallel in both culture systems by IVF using frozen-thawed ejaculated semen in the United States and fresh epididymal sperm in Germany. Success of embryo development in vitro was recorded as well as relative mRNA abundances [DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3A (DNMT1, DNMT3A), gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1), octamer-binding transcription factor 4 [OCT4], insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 receptors (IGF1R, IGF2R), beta-actin (ACTB)] in pools of days 4-5 morulae by semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay. Percentages of cleaved embryos were similar (p > 0.05) between both culture systems, regardless of the location. OCT4 mRNA abundance was higher (p < 0.05) in embryos derived in the SCBI culture system compared with those from the IZW system when epididymal sperm was used for IVF. No clear correlation between the expression pattern and the culture system could be found for all other genes. It is suggested that OCT4 expression might be affected by the media composition in some conditions and can be the indicator of a better embryo quality.

  4. CaMKIIalpha 3' untranslated region-directed mRNA translocation in living neurons: visualization by GFP linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rook, M. S.; Lu, M.; Kosik, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    The CaMKIIalpha mRNA extends into distal hippocampal dendrites, and the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) is sufficient to mediate this localization. We labeled the 3'UTR of the CaMKIIalpha mRNA in hippocampal cultures by using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)/MS2 bacteriophage tagging system. The CaMKIIalpha 3'UTR formed discrete granules throughout the dendrites of transfected cells. The identity of the fluorescent granules was verified by in situ hybridization. Over 30 min time periods these granules redistributed without a net increase in granule number; with depolarization there is a tendency toward increased numbers of granules in the dendrites. These observations suggest that finer time resolution of granule motility might reveal changes in the motility characteristics of granules after depolarization. So that motile granules could be tracked, shorter periods of observation were required. The movements of motile granules can be categorized as oscillatory, unidirectional anterograde, or unidirectional retrograde. Colocalization of CaMKIIalpha 3'UTR granules and synapses suggested that oscillatory movements allowed the granules to sample several local synapses. Neuronal depolarization increased the number of granules in the anterograde motile pool. Based on the time frame over which the granule number increased, the translocation of granules may serve to prepare the dendrite for mounting an adequate local translation response to future stimuli. Although the resident pool of granules can respond to signals that induce local translation, the number of granules in a dendrite might reflect its activation history.

  5. Conserved nucleotide sequences in the open reading frame and 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K E; Lloyd, R S; Burk, R F

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver selenoprotein P contains 10 selenocysteine residues in its primary structure (deduced). It is the only selenoprotein characterized to date that has more than one selenocysteine residue. Selenoprotein P cDNA has been cloned from human liver and heart cDNA libraries and sequenced. The open reading frames are identical and contain a signal peptide, indicating that the protein is secreted by both organs and is therefore not exclusively produced in the liver. Ten selenocysteine residues (deduced) are present. Comparison of the open reading frame of the human cDNA with the rat cDNA reveals a 69% identity of the nucleotide sequence and 72% identity of the deduced amino acid sequence. Two regions in the 3' untranslated portion have high conservation between human and rat. Each of these regions contains a predicted stable stem-loop structure similar to the single stem-loop structures reported in 3' untranslated regions of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase and glutathione peroxidase. The stem-loop structure of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase has been shown to be necessary for incorporation of the selenocysteine residue at the UGA codon. Because only two stem-loop structures are present in the 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA, it can be concluded that a separate stem-loop structure is not required for each selenocysteine residue. Images PMID:8421687

  6. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  7. Identification of sequences within the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA 3'-untranslated region that mediate mRNA stabilization induced by mitogen treatment of EL-4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Bickel, M; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1991-09-25

    Phorbol esters (TPA) and concanavalin A (ConA) are known to induce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production in murine thymoma EL-4 cells by mRNA stabilization. The role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in GM-CSF mRNA stabilization induced by TPA and ConA in EL-4 cells was examined by transfection studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructions. The GM-CSF 3'-UTR contains a 63-nucleotide region at its 3' end with repeating ATTTA motifs which is responsible for mRNA degradation in a variety of cell types (Shaw, G., and Kamen, R. (1986) Cell 46, 659-666). We produced constructs containing most of the GM-CSF 3'-UTR (303 nucleotides, pRSV-CATgm) or the 3'-terminal AT-rich region (116 nucleotides, pRSV-CATau) and measured CAT enzyme activity and CAT mRNA after transient transfection into EL-4 and NIH 3T3 cells. Low levels of CAT activity were seen in both cells with either plasmid compared with levels of CAT activity obtained with pRSV-CAT. TPA treatment caused an approximately 10-fold increase in CAT activity and mRNA in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATgm. No increases were seen in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATau or pRSV-CAT. No response to TPA was detected in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, indicating that the response to TPA is relatively cell-specific. There was no increase in CAT activity after ConA treatment in EL-4 or NIH 3T3 cells transfected with any of the constructs suggesting that the GM-CSF 3'-UTR lacks elements that can respond alone to ConA. Nuclear run-on and actinomycin D chase experiments in EL-4 cells showed that TPA induces CAT activity via mRNA stabilization. By linker-substitution mutagenesis we show that TPA inducibility depends on a 60-nucleotide region of the 3'-UTR whose 5' end is located 160 nucleotides upstream of the 5' end of the AU-rich region. PMID:1917935

  8. Pacing-induced regional differences in adenosine receptors mRNA expression in a swine model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, Silvia; Cabiati, Manuela; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Aquaro, Giovanni D; Martino, Alessandro; Mattii, Letizia; Morales, Maria-Aurora

    2012-01-01

    The adenosinergic system is essential in the mediation of intrinsic protection and myocardial resistance to insult; it may be considered a cardioprotective molecule and adenosine receptors (ARs) represent potential therapeutic targets in the setting of heart failure (HF). The aim of the study was to test whether differences exist between mRNA expression of ARs in the anterior left ventricle (LV) wall (pacing site: PS) compared to the infero septal wall (opposite region: OS) in an experimental model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac tissue was collected from LV PS and OS of adult male minipigs with pacing-induced HF (n = 10) and from a control group (C, n = 4). ARs and TNF-α mRNA expression was measured by Real Time-PCR and the results were normalized with the three most stably expressed genes (GAPDH, HPRT1, TBP). Immunohistochemistry analysis was also performed. After 3 weeks of pacing higher levels of expression for each analyzed AR were observed in PS except for A(1)R (A(1)R: C = 0.6±0.2, PS = 0.1±0.04, OS = 0.04±0.01, p<0.0001 C vs. PS and OS respectively; A(2A)R: C = 1.04±0.59, PS = 2.62±0.79, OS = 2.99±0.79; A(2B)R: C = 1.2±0.1, PS = 5.59±2.3, OS = 1.59±0.46; A(3)R: C = 0.76±0.18, PS = 8.40±3.38, OS = 4.40±0.83). Significant contractile impairment and myocardial hypoperfusion were observed at PS after three weeks of pacing as compared to OS. TNF-α mRNA expression resulted similar in PS (6.3±2.4) and in OS (5.9±2.7) although higher than in control group (3.4±1.5). ARs expression was mainly detected in cardiomyocytes. This study provided new information on ARs local changes in the setting of LV dysfunction and on the role of these receptors in relation to pacing-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion and contraction. These results suggest a possible therapeutic role of adenosine in patients with HF and dyssynchronous LV contraction.

  9. Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA: regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Sánchez de Miguel, L; Montón, M; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression may be involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation dysfunction associated with several vascular diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that eNOS mRNA contains a previously undescribed cis element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). A U+C-rich segment in the 3' UTR is critical in complex formation with bovine aortic endothelial cell cytosolic proteins. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which destabilizes eNOS mRNA, increased the binding activity of the cytosolic proteins in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest that endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' UTR of eNOS mRNA. These proteins may play a role in TNF-alpha-induced eNOS mRNA destabilization. PMID:9315630

  10. Hypoxia stimulates binding of a cytoplasmic protein to a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the 3'-untranslated region of rat tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Dominski, Z; Kole, R; Millhorn, D E

    1994-04-01

    Reduced oxygen tension (hypoxia) induces a 3-fold increase in stability of mRNA for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis, in the pheochromocytoma (PC12) clonal cell line. To investigate the possibility that RNA-protein interactions are involved in mediating this increase in stability, RNA gel shift assays were performed using different fragments of labeled TH mRNA and the S-100 fraction of PC12 cytoplasmic protein extracts. We identified a sequence within the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA that binds cytoplasmic protein. RNase T1 mapping revealed that the protein was bound to a 28 nucleotide long sequence that is located between bases 1551-1579 of TH mRNA. Moreover, protein binding to this fragment was prevented with an antisense oligonucleotide directed against bases 1551-1579 and subsequent RNase H digestion. This fragment of the 3'-untranslated region of TH mRNA is rich in pyrimidine nucleotides, and the binding of cytoplasmic protein to this fragment was reduced by competition with other polypyrimidine sequences including poly(C) but not poly(U) polymers. The binding of the protein to TH mRNA was increased when cytoplasmic proteins were extracted from PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia (5% O2) for 24 h. Electrophoresis of the UV cross-linked RNA-protein complex on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a complex of 74 kDa. The potential role of this protein-TH mRNA interaction in regulation of TH mRNA stability during hypoxia is discussed. PMID:7908289

  11. Regional and Duration of Illness Differences in the Alteration of NCAM-180 mRNA Expression within the Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A. S.; Thomas, E. A.; Dean, B

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been proposed to have a neurodevelopmental aetiology. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (NCAM1) is involved in several neurodevelopmental processes and abnormal expression of this gene has been associated in the pathology of schizophrenia and, thus, altered NCAM1 expression may be characteristic of the early stages of the illness. Alternative splicing of the NCAM1 transcript produces 3 major isoforms. Using qPCR we analysed mRNA expression of one of these isoforms; the 180 kDa isoform of NCAM1 (NCAM-180), in Brodmann Area (BA) 46, BA10 and BA17, postmortem, from 15 subjects with a short duration of illness of schizophrenia (<7 years) and 15 control subjects. NCAM-180 mRNA expression was increased in BA46 from subjects with schizophrenia compared to controls (P=0.013). By contrast, there were no significant differences in the expression of NCAM-180 mRNA in BA10 (P=0.575) or BA17 (P=0.772). We then analysed NCAM-180 mRNA expression in BA46 from 15 subjects with a longer duration of illness of schizophrenia (>22 years) and 15 controls. There was no significant difference in NCAM-180 mRNA expression in this second cohort. This data suggests NCAM-180 mRNA expression is altered in a regionally-specific manner in schizophrenia and these changes are associated with the early period following diagnosis. PMID:19411161

  12. Assessment of RNA quality by semi-quantitative RT-PCR of multiple regions of a long ubiquitous mRNA.

    PubMed

    Swift, G H; Peyton, M J; MacDonald, R J

    2000-03-01

    A simple method to assess the degree of degradation present in a total RNA preparation from cells or tissues is based on the increasing probability of RNA cleavage with increasing length of an RNA molecule. Under ideal conditions, reverse transcription of a particular mRNA species with oligo-dT as the primer generates a population of cDNAs, terminating at the 5' end of the mRNA if all template RNA molecules are intact, or at the first cleavage site 5' to the polyA if some template RNAs are partially degraded. Consequently, for cellular RNA preparations with some degradation, the 5' end of an mRNA is represented in the cDNA population to a lesser extent than the 3' end of the mRNA. We describe a sensitive assay of mRNA quality that compares the relative PCR amplification of 5' and 3' regions of a long and ubiquitous mRNA following oligo-dT-primed reverse transcription.

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase b mRNA of Drosophila melanogaster has a functional iron-responsive element in its 5'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S A; Henderson, B R; Kühn, L C

    1995-12-22

    Iron-responsive elements (IREs) are cis-acting mRNA stem-loop structures that specifically bind cytoplasmic iron regulatory proteins (IRPs). IRP-IRE interactions mediate the coordinate post-transcriptional regulation of key proteins in iron metabolism, such as ferritin, transferrin receptor, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase. Depending on whether the IRE is located in the 5'- or 3'-untranslated region (UTR), binding of IRP will inhibit mRNA translation or degradation, respectively. Here we describe a new IRE in the 5'-UTR of succinate dehydrogenase subunit b (SDHb) mRNA of Drosophila melanogaster. The SDHb IRE binds in vitro to vertebrate and insect IRPs with a high affinity equal to that of human ferritin H chain IRE. Under conditions of iron deprivation, SDHb mRNA of Drosophila SL-2 cells shifts to a non-polysome-bound pool. Moreover, translation of a human growth hormone mRNA with the SDHb IRE in its 5'-UTR is iron-dependent in stably transfected L cells. We conclude that the SDHb IRE mediates translational inhibition both in insect and vertebrate cells. This constitutes the first identification of a functional IRE in insects. Furthermore, Drosophila SDHb represents the second example, after porcine mitochondrial aconitase, of an enzyme of the citric acid cycle whose mRNA possesses all necessary features for translational regulation by cellular iron levels. PMID:8530520

  14. Life-long norepinephrine transporter (NET) knock-out leads to the increase in the NET mRNA in brain regions rich in norepinephrine terminals.

    PubMed

    Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Kusmider, Maciej; Pabian, Paulina; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Zurawek, Dariusz; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Swiderska, Bianka; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2015-08-01

    These studies aimed to identify the genes differentially expressed in the frontal cortex of mice bearing a life-long norepinephrine transporter knock-out (NET-KO) and wild-type animals (WT). Differences in gene expression in the mouse frontal cortex were studied using a whole-genome microarray approach. Using an alternative approach, i.e. RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) with primers complementary to various exons of the NET gene, as well as TaqMan arrays, the level of mRNA encoding the NET in other brain regions of the NET-KO mice was also examined. The analyses revealed a group of 92 transcripts (27 genes) that differentiated the NET-KO mice from the WT mice. Surprisingly, the studies have shown that the mRNA encoding NET accumulated in the brain regions rich in norepinephrine nerve endings in the NET-KO mice. Because there is no other source of NET mRNA besides the noradrenergic terminals in the brain regions studied, these results might speak in favor of the presence of mRNA in axon terminals. RNA-Binding Protein Immunoprecipitation approach indicated that mRNA encoding NET was detected in the Ago2 protein/mRNA complex. In addition, the amount of Ago2 protein in the frontal cortex was significantly higher in NET-KO mice as compared with that of the WT animals. These results are important for further characterization of the NET-KO mice, which - besides other merits - might serve as a good model to study the fate of truncated mRNA in neurons.

  15. The 3′-untranslated region of cytochrome oxidase II mRNA functions in RNA editing of African trypanosomes exclusively as a cis guide RNA

    PubMed Central

    GOLDEN, DANIEL E.; HAJDUK, STEPHEN L.

    2005-01-01

    RNA editing in trypanosomes is a post-transcriptional process responsible for correcting the coding sequences of many mitochondrial mRNAs. Uridines are specifically added or deleted from mRNA by an enzymatic cascade in which a pre-edited mRNA is specifically cleaved, uridines are added or removed, and the corrected mRNA is ligated. The process is directed by RNA molecules, termed guide RNAs (gRNA). The ability of this class of small, noncoding RNA to function in RNA editing is essential for these organisms. Typically, gRNAs are transcribed independent of the their cognate mRNA and anneal to form a binary RNA complex . An exception for this process may be cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) mRNA since a gene encoding a trans acting gRNA has not been identified. Using an in vitro editing assay we find that the 3′ UTR of COII, indeed, functions as a guide for both the site and number of uridines added to the coding region of the COII mRNA. We further show that the guiding sequence within the COII 3′ UTR can only function in COII editing when contiguous with the editing substrate, indicating that the 3′ UTR of COII lacks sequence or structure information necessary to function as a trans-acting gRNA. While other RNAs have been shown to “guide” RNA processing reactions, our discovery that the COII 3′ UTR directs editing of its cognate mRNA in cis, is a unique function for a 3′ UTR. The findings described here have led us to propose a new model for the evolution of gRNAs in kinetoplastids. PMID:15574518

  16. mRNA decay during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections: mutations that affect translation of an mRNA influence the sites at which it is cleaved by the HSV virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Lora A; Read, G Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    During lytic infections, the herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (Vhs) endoribonuclease degrades many host and viral mRNAs. Within infected cells it cuts mRNAs at preferred sites, including some in regions of translation initiation. Vhs binds the translation initiation factors eIF4H, eIF4AI, and eIF4AII, suggesting that its mRNA degradative function is somehow linked to translation. To explore how Vhs is targeted to preferred sites, we examined the in vitro degradation of a target mRNA in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing in vitro-translated Vhs. Vhs caused rapid degradation of mRNAs beginning with cleavages at sites in the first 250 nucleotides, including a number near the start codon and in the 5' untranslated region. Ligation of the ends to form a circular mRNA inhibited Vhs cleavage at the same sites at which it cuts capped linear molecules. This was not due to an inability to cut any circular RNA, since Vhs cuts circular mRNAs containing an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the same sites as linear molecules with the IRES. Cutting linear mRNAs at preferred sites was augmented by the presence of a 5' cap. Moreover, mutations that altered the 5' proximal AUG abolished Vhs cleavage at nearby sites, while mutations that changed sequences surrounding the AUG to improve their match to the Kozak consensus sequence enhanced Vhs cutting near the start codon. The results indicate that mutations in an mRNA that affect its translation affect the sites at which it is cut by Vhs and suggest that Vhs is directed to its preferred cut sites during translation initiation.

  17. mRNA Decay during Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infections: Mutations That Affect Translation of an mRNA Influence the Sites at Which It Is Cleaved by the HSV Virion Host Shutoff (Vhs) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shiflett, Lora A.

    2013-01-01

    During lytic infections, the herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (Vhs) endoribonuclease degrades many host and viral mRNAs. Within infected cells it cuts mRNAs at preferred sites, including some in regions of translation initiation. Vhs binds the translation initiation factors eIF4H, eIF4AI, and eIF4AII, suggesting that its mRNA degradative function is somehow linked to translation. To explore how Vhs is targeted to preferred sites, we examined the in vitro degradation of a target mRNA in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing in vitro-translated Vhs. Vhs caused rapid degradation of mRNAs beginning with cleavages at sites in the first 250 nucleotides, including a number near the start codon and in the 5′ untranslated region. Ligation of the ends to form a circular mRNA inhibited Vhs cleavage at the same sites at which it cuts capped linear molecules. This was not due to an inability to cut any circular RNA, since Vhs cuts circular mRNAs containing an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the same sites as linear molecules with the IRES. Cutting linear mRNAs at preferred sites was augmented by the presence of a 5′ cap. Moreover, mutations that altered the 5′ proximal AUG abolished Vhs cleavage at nearby sites, while mutations that changed sequences surrounding the AUG to improve their match to the Kozak consensus sequence enhanced Vhs cutting near the start codon. The results indicate that mutations in an mRNA that affect its translation affect the sites at which it is cut by Vhs and suggest that Vhs is directed to its preferred cut sites during translation initiation. PMID:23077305

  18. Posttranscriptional control of photosynthetic mRNA decay under stress conditions requires 3' and 5' untranslated regions and correlates with differential polysome association in rice.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Hyun; Chung, Pil Joong; Juntawong, Piyada; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Kim, Youn Shic; Jung, Harin; Bang, Seung Woon; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Do Choi, Yang; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2012-07-01

    Abiotic stress, including drought, salinity, and temperature extremes, regulates gene expression at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Expression profiling of total messenger RNAs (mRNAs) from rice (Oryza sativa) leaves grown under stress conditions revealed that the transcript levels of photosynthetic genes are reduced more rapidly than others, a phenomenon referred to as stress-induced mRNA decay (SMD). By comparing RNA polymerase II engagement with the steady-state mRNA level, we show here that SMD is a posttranscriptional event. The SMD of photosynthetic genes was further verified by measuring the half-lives of the small subunit of Rubisco (RbcS1) and Chlorophyll a/b-Binding Protein1 (Cab1) mRNAs during stress conditions in the presence of the transcription inhibitor cordycepin. To discern any correlation between SMD and the process of translation, changes in total and polysome-associated mRNA levels after stress were measured. Total and polysome-associated mRNA levels of two photosynthetic (RbcS1 and Cab1) and two stress-inducible (Dehydration Stress-Inducible Protein1 and Salt-Induced Protein) genes were found to be markedly similar. This demonstrated the importance of polysome association for transcript stability under stress conditions. Microarray experiments performed on total and polysomal mRNAs indicate that approximately half of all mRNAs that undergo SMD remain polysome associated during stress treatments. To delineate the functional determinant(s) of mRNAs responsible for SMD, the RbcS1 and Cab1 transcripts were dissected into several components. The expressions of different combinations of the mRNA components were analyzed under stress conditions, revealing that both 3' and 5' untranslated regions are necessary for SMD. Our results, therefore, suggest that the posttranscriptional control of photosynthetic mRNA decay under stress conditions requires both 3' and 5' untranslated regions and correlates with differential polysome

  19. The influence of immunohistochemistry on mRNA recovery from microdissected frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections.

    PubMed

    Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Abrahamsen, Helene N; Villegas, Berta; Sorensen, Boe S; Schmidt, Henrik; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    Laser-assisted microdissection (LAM) is now widely used to obtain specific cell populations from heterogeneous tissues. A major disadvantage of LAM is poor tissue morphology during microscopy, in part because coverslips are not used. Immunohistochemical labeling can improve identification of target cells but may affect the subsequent analysis of the microdissected tissue. We studied the effect of immunohistochemistry (IHC) on mRNA recovery from labeled cells after microdissection from both frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections, using Melan-A and Ki-67 staining in lymph nodes with metastatic melanoma as a model. We developed rapid protocols for immunostaining in an attempt to limit loss of mRNA during procedures. A sensitive real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR was used to measure mRNA. We found a marked decrease in the mRNA yield from 500 microdissected cells from frozen and paraffin sections after immunostaining for both markers. Recovery of mRNA decreased by up to 89%, comparing the immunostained with the routinely stained sections. Interestingly, the ratio between mRNA for the two markers was similar in all stains, indicating that immunostained sections may be used for mRNA analysis. We also investigated the effect of storing membrane-mounted sections for microdissection under different conditions. Slides mounted with paraffin sections could be stored at room temperature for up to 90 days with no significant decrease in mRNA recovery.

  20. The absence of the long 3'-non-translated region in mRNA coding for eye lens alpha A2-crystallin of the frog (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Dolgilevich, S M; Krayev, A S; Skryabin, K G; Gause, G G

    1983-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned cDNA (clone pRt(1)297; GENE (1982) 17, 131) coding for a 18 kDa polypeptide of the frog eye lens has been determined. The sequence, 791 nucleotide in length has only one long open reading frame (447 nucleotides). The derived amino acid sequence in this frame has greater than 90% homology with the region 25-173 of alpha A2-crystallin amino acid sequence from a related frog species Rana pipiens. The 5'-terminal part of mRNA corresponding to the first 24 amino acids of alpha A2-crystallin has been lost in cloning and substituted by an artefactual sequence. The 3'-terminal part appears to be intact as follows from the presence of the universal poly(A) addition site and poly(A) tract. The 3'-nontranslated region present in frog alpha A2-crystallin mRNA (130 nucleotides) is about 4-times shorter than in mammalian alpha A2-crystallin mRNA. Intact alpha A2-crystallin mRNA with a size of about 700 nucleotides as determined by Northern blot hybridization is about twice smaller than corresponding mammalian mRNAs.

  1. Regional mRNA expression of GABAergic receptor subunits in brains of C57BL/6J and 129P3/J mice: strain and heroin effects.

    PubMed

    Schlussman, S D; Buonora, M; Brownstein, A J; Zhang, Y; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    2013-07-26

    C57BL/6J and 129 substrains of mice are known to differ in their basal levels of anxiety and behavioral response to drugs of abuse. We have previously shown strain differences in heroin-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) between C57BL/6J (C57) and 129P3/J (129) mice, and in the regional expression of several receptor and peptide mRNAs. In this study, we examined the contribution of the GABAergic system in the cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and the region containing the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) to heroin reward by measuring mRNA levels of 7 of the most commonly expressed GABA-A receptor subunits, and both GABA-B receptor subunits, in these same mice following saline (control) or heroin administration in a CPP design. Using real-time PCR, we studied the effects of strain and heroin administration on GABA-A α1, α2, α3, β2, and γ2 subunits, which typically constitute synaptic GABA-A receptors, GABA-A α4 and δ subunits, which typically constitute extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors, and GABA-B R1 and R2 subunits. In saline-treated animals, we found an experiment-wise significant strain difference in GABA-Aα2 mRNA expression in the SN/VTA. Point-wise significant strain differences were also observed in GABA-Aα2, GABA-Aα3, and GABA-Aα4 mRNA expression in the NAc, as well as GABA-BR2 mRNA expression in the NAc and CPu, and GABA-BR1 mRNA expression in the cortex. For all differences, 129 mice had higher mRNA expression compared to C57 animals, with the exception of GABA-BR1 mRNA in the cortex where we observed lower levels in 129 mice. Therefore, it may be possible that known behavioral differences between these two strains are, in part, due to differences in their GABAergic systems. While we did not find heroin dose-related changes in mRNA expression levels in C57 mice, we did observe dose-related differences in 129 mice. These results may relate to our earlier behavioral finding that 129 mice are

  2. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5’-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2′-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers’ binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform Δ40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors. PMID:26513723

  3. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; Stieve-Caldwell, E.

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.

  4. The 3' untranslated region of the hsp 70 genes maintains the level of steady state mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei upon heat shock.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M G

    1998-01-01

    An increase in the transcriptional efficiency at elevated temperatures is a characteristic of transcription of heat shock protein (hsp) coding genes in most eukaryotes analyzed to date. The regulatory mechanism for hsp 70 genes expression in Trypanosoma brucei does not follow the conventional transcriptional induction mechanism. The hsp 70 locus of T.brucei appears in a permanently activated state, and transcriptional induction of hsp 70 genes by heat shock does not occur in this organism. Therefore, the differential expression of the hsp 70 genes in trypanosomes is, to a large extent, post-transcriptionally controlled. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional control of the hsp 70 gene expression were investigated. Procyclic trypanosomes were normally maintained at approximately 25 degreesC. Incubation of procyclic trypanosomes at 41 degreesC drastically reduced the steady state mRNA levels of many protein coding genes. In contrast, the expression of the hsp 70 genes is either maintained at a high level or is up-regulated. The hsp 70 intergenic region promoter together with its 3' splice acceptor sites and the 5' untranslated region (UTR) are not sufficient to maintain or up-regulate the mRNA level of a reporter gene upon heat shock. However, addition of the 3' UTR of hsp 70 genes to a reporter gene, driven by different promoters, maintained a high level expression of the mRNA during heat shock. These results suggested that the 3' UTR of the hsp 70 genes is primarily responsible for the maintenance of mRNA level during heat shock, while mRNA containing the 3' UTR from many other genes may be rapidly degraded by heat shock induced processes. PMID:9705515

  5. Influence of Industrialization in the Campinas Rural Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Alfonso Trujillo

    The Campinas region of Brazil was studied to determine if the introduction of industrial plants in rural areas influenced the life of the rural population. The purpose of this study was to obtain an insight into the manner by which the industrialization influence is functioning in the Campinas rural area. The region and its rural population were…

  6. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Interactions with a G quadruplex structure in the 3′-Untranslated Region of NR2B mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Snezana; DeMarco, Brett A.; Underwood, Ayana; Williams, Kathryn R.; Bassell, Gary J.; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by a trinucleotide CGG expansion in the 5′-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene, which leads to the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP, an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of specific mRNAs, has been shown to bind a subset of its mRNA targets by recognizing G quadruplex structures. It has been suggested that FMRP controls the local protein synthesis of several protein components of the Post Synaptic Density (PSD) in response to specific cellular needs. We have previously shown that the interactions between FMRP and mRNAs of the PSD scaffold proteins PSD-95 and Shank1 are mediated via stable G-quadruplex structures formed within the 3′-untranslated regions of these mRNAs. In this study we used biophysical methods to show that a comparable G quadruplex structure forms in the 3′-untranslated region of the glutamate receptor subunit NR2B mRNA encoding for a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is recognized specifically by FMRP, suggesting a common theme for FMRP recognition of its dendritic mRNA targets. PMID:26412477

  7. Intake of branched-chain amino acids influences the levels of MAFbx mRNA and MuRF-1 total protein in resting and exercising human muscle.

    PubMed

    Borgenvik, Marcus; Apró, William; Blomstrand, Eva

    2012-03-01

    Resistance exercise and amino acids are two major factors that influence muscle protein turnover. Here, we examined the effects of resistance exercise and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), individually and in combination, on the expression of anabolic and catabolic genes in human skeletal muscle. Seven subjects performed two sessions of unilateral leg press exercise with randomized supplementation with BCAA or flavored water. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the resting and exercising legs before and repeatedly after exercise to determine levels of mRNA, protein phosphorylation, and amino acid concentrations. Intake of BCAA reduced (P < 0.05) MAFbx mRNA by 30 and 50% in the resting and exercising legs, respectively. The level of MuRF-1 mRNA was elevated (P < 0.05) in the exercising leg two- and threefold under the placebo and BCAA conditions, respectively, whereas MuRF-1 total protein increased by 20% (P < 0.05) only in the placebo condition. Phosphorylation of p70(S6k) increased to a larger extent (∼2-fold; P < 0.05) in the early recovery period with BCAA supplementation, whereas the expression of genes regulating mTOR activity was not influenced by BCAA. Muscle levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine were reduced (13-17%) throughout recovery (P < 0.05) in the placebo condition and to a greater extent (32-43%; P < 0.05) following BCAA supplementation in both resting and exercising muscle. In conclusion, BCAA ingestion reduced MAFbx mRNA and prevented the exercise-induced increase in MuRF-1 total protein in both resting and exercising leg. Further-more, resistance exercise differently influenced MAFbx and MuRF-1 mRNA expression, suggesting both common and divergent regulation of these two ubiquitin ligases.

  8. Tetrodotoxin administration in the suprachiasmatic nucleus prevents NMDA-induced reductions in pineal melatonin without influencing Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ketema N; Gamble, Karen L; Fukuhara, Chiaki; Novak, Colleen M; Tosini, Gianluca; Albers, H Elliott

    2004-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus contains a light-entrainable circadian pacemaker. Neurons in the SCN are part of a circuit that conveys light information from retinal efferents to the pineal gland. Light presented during the night acutely increases mRNA levels of the circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 in the SCN, and acutely suppresses melatonin levels in the pineal gland. The present study investigated whether the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels requires sodium-dependent action potentials in the SCN. Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN and pineal melatonin levels were measured in Syrian hamsters injected with tetrodotoxin (TTX) prior to light exposure or injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). TTX inhibited the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels. TTX did not, however, influence the ability of NMDA to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, though it did inhibit the ability of NMDA to suppress pineal melatonin levels. These results demonstrate that action potentials in the SCN are not necessary for NMDA receptor activation to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, but are necessary for NMDA receptor activation to decrease pineal melatonin levels. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the pacemaker in the SCN is separate from and independent of the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the SCN cells whose efferents suppress pineal melatonin levels.

  9. Multiple, conserved iron-responsive elements in the 3'-untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA enhance binding of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Erlitzki, Ronit; Long, Joanne C; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2002-11-01

    Synthesis of proteins for iron homeostasis is regulated by specific, combinatorial mRNA/protein interactions between RNA stem-loop structures (iron-responsive elements, IREs) and iron-regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2), controlling either mRNA translation or stability. The transferrin receptor 3'-untranslated region (TfR-3'-UTR) mRNA is unique in having five IREs, linked by AU-rich elements. A C-bulge in the stem of each TfR-IRE folds into an IRE that has low IRP2 binding, whereas a loop/bulge in the stem of the ferritin-IRE allows equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding. Effects of multiple IRE interactions with IRP1 and IRP2 were compared between the native TfR-3'-UTR sequence (5xIRE) and RNA with only 3 or 2 IREs. We show 1) equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding to multiple TfR-IRE RNAs; 2) increased IRP-dependent nuclease resistance of 5xIRE compared with lower IRE copy-number RNAs; 3) distorted TfR-IRE helix structure within the context of 5xIRE, detected by Cu-(phen)(2) binding/cleavage, that coincides with ferritin-IRE conformation and enhanced IRP2 binding; and 4) variable IRP1 and IRP2 expression in human cells and during development (IRP2-mRNA predominated). Changes in TfR-IRE structure conferred by the full length TfR-3'-UTR mRNA explain in part evolutionary conservation of multiple IRE-RNA, which allows TfR mRNA stabilization and receptor synthesis when IRP activity varies, and ensures iron uptake for cell growth.

  10. Direct and Indirect ENSO Influences on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renguang

    2016-04-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is one of the strongest signals in the tropics and imposes large influences on climate in many regions, such as the Indian summer monsoon, central American precipitation, and the South China Sea precipitation. ENSO affects regional climate variability both directly and indirectly. The direct influence is through concurrent atmospheric circulation response to anomalous heating associated with equatorial central and eastern Pacific SST anomalies. The indirect influence is by first inducing regional SST anomalies through the so-called "atmospheric bridge" and then atmospheric circulation response to the regional SST anomalies. Previous studies are either focused on the direct influence of ENSO via concurrent atmospheric change or the indirect influence of ENSO via regional SST anomalies. In this talk, the presenter will distinguish the direct and indirect influences of ENSO and demonstrate how the two types of influences may play together in leading to regional climate variability. Summer climate anomalies in three regions will be used for illustration: the Indian summer monsoon, central American summer precipitation, and the South China Sea summer precipitation.

  11. [Fragment of mRNA coding part that is complementary to region 1638-1650 of wheat 18S rRNA functions as a translational enhancer].

    PubMed

    Zhigaĭlov, A V; Babaĭlova, E S; Polimbetova, N S; Graĭfer, D M; Karpova, G G; Iskakov, B K

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of 18S rRNA fragment 1638-1650 including basements of the helices h44 and h28 and nucleotides of the ribosomal decoding site in the cap-independent translation initiation on plant ribosomes is studied. This rRNA fragment is shown to be accessible for complementary interactions within the 40S ribosomal subunit. It is found that the sequence complementary to the 18S rRNA fragment 1638-1650 is able to enhance efficiency of a reporter mRNA translation when placed just after the initiation codon. The results obtained indicate that in the course of the cap-independent translation initiation, complementary interactions can occur between mRNA coding sequence and 18S rRNA fragment in the region of the ribosomal decoding site.

  12. Integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA gene expression microarrays: Influence on platelet reactivity, clopidogrel response and drug-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renata Caroline Costa de; Bortolin, Raul Hernandes; Lopes, Mariana Borges; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo; Silbiger, Vivian Nogueira; Luchessi, André Ducati

    2016-11-15

    Genetic and epigenetic variability may influence the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapies, including clopidogrel. Therefore, the miRNA-mRNA interactions and drug toxicity were investigated in silico using available microarray data. Expressions profiles of platelet miRNA (GSE59488) from acute coronary syndrome and mRNA in peripheral blood cells (GSE32226) from coronary artery disease patients were used to miRNA-target mRNA integrated analysis by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis 6 software (IPA). Results showed that ST13 mRNA is regulated by hsa-miR-107 (miR-103-3p); BTNL3 and CFD mRNAs are regulated by hsa-miR-4701-3p (miR-1262); SLC7A8 is regulated by hsa-miR-145-5p (miR-145-5p); and SENP5 mRNA is regulated by hsa-miR-15b-5p (miR-16-5p) and hsa-miR-26a-5p (miR-26a-5p). Drug toxicity IPA tool showed that these miRNAs/mRNAs are associated with clopidogrel-related liver and renal injury. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that differential expression of miRNAs in platelets and interactions with their target mRNAs are associated with variability in platelet reactivity, clopidogrel response and drug-induced toxicity. PMID:27543010

  13. Influence of moonlight on mRNA expression patterns of melatonin receptor subtypes in the pineal organ of a tropical fish.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Ju; Park, Ji-Gweon; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2014-04-01

    The goldlined spinefoot, Siganus guttatus, is a lunar-synchronized spawner, which repeatedly releases gametes around the first quarter moon during the reproductive season. A previous study reported that manipulating moonlight brightness at night disrupted synchronized spawning, suggesting involvement of this natural light source in lunar synchronization. The present study examined whether the mRNA expression pattern of melatonin receptor subtypes MT1 and Mel1c in the pineal organ of the goldlined spinefoot is related to moonlight. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the abundance of MT1 and Mel1c mRNA at midnight increased during the new moon phase and decreased during the full moon phase. Exposing fish to moonlight intensity during the full moon period resulted in a decrease in Mel1c mRNA abundance within 1h. Fluctuations in the melatonin receptor genes according to changes in the moon phase agreed with those of melatonin levels in the blood. These results indicate that periodic changes in cues from the moon influence melatonin receptor mRNA expression levels. The melatonin-melatonin receptor system may play a role in predicting the moon phase through changes in night brightness. PMID:24269345

  14. Influence of moonlight on mRNA expression patterns of melatonin receptor subtypes in the pineal organ of a tropical fish.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Ju; Park, Ji-Gweon; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2014-04-01

    The goldlined spinefoot, Siganus guttatus, is a lunar-synchronized spawner, which repeatedly releases gametes around the first quarter moon during the reproductive season. A previous study reported that manipulating moonlight brightness at night disrupted synchronized spawning, suggesting involvement of this natural light source in lunar synchronization. The present study examined whether the mRNA expression pattern of melatonin receptor subtypes MT1 and Mel1c in the pineal organ of the goldlined spinefoot is related to moonlight. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the abundance of MT1 and Mel1c mRNA at midnight increased during the new moon phase and decreased during the full moon phase. Exposing fish to moonlight intensity during the full moon period resulted in a decrease in Mel1c mRNA abundance within 1h. Fluctuations in the melatonin receptor genes according to changes in the moon phase agreed with those of melatonin levels in the blood. These results indicate that periodic changes in cues from the moon influence melatonin receptor mRNA expression levels. The melatonin-melatonin receptor system may play a role in predicting the moon phase through changes in night brightness.

  15. Plakophilins 1 and 3 Bind to FXR1 and Thereby Influence the mRNA Stability of Desmosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Kešo, Regina; Breuninger, Sonja; Hofmann, Sarah; Henn, Manuela; Röhrig, Theresa; Ströbel, Philipp; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilins 1 and 3 (PKP1/3) are members of the arm repeat family of catenin proteins and serve as structural components of desmosomes, which are important for cell-cell-adhesion. In addition, PKP1/3 occur as soluble proteins outside desmosomes, yet their role in the cytoplasm is not known. We found that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 coprecipitated with the RNA-binding proteins FXR1, G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1, and these PKP1/3 complexes also comprised desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNAs. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of PKP1/3 with G3BP, PABPC1, and UPF1 but not with FXR1 was RNase sensitive. To address the cytoplasmic function of PKP1/3, we performed gain-and-loss-of-function studies. Both PKP1 and PKP3 knockdown cell lines showed reduced protein and mRNA levels for desmoplakin and PKP2. Whereas global rates of translation were unaffected, desmoplakin and PKP2 mRNA were destabilized. Furthermore, binding of PKP1/3 to FXR1 was RNA independent, and both PKP3 and FXR1 stabilized PKP2 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that cytoplasmic PKP1/3 are components of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and act as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. PMID:25225333

  16. Myometrial oxytocin receptor mRNA concentrations at preterm and term delivery - the influence of external oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Liedman, Ragner; Hansson, Stefan Rocco; Igidbashian, Sarah; Akerlund, Mats

    2009-03-01

    The hormonal system for induction of term and preterm labour is not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated myometrial gene expressions for neurohypophyseal hormones and their receptors, prostaglandin F(2alpha) and ovarian steroid receptors in women delivered by Caesarean section. Myometrial tissue for real time PCR was collected from 39 women delivered at term before and after the onset of labour and preterm. Women delivered electively at term had significantly higher oxytocin receptor mRNA expressions (2.52 +/- 0.37 oxytocin receptor/actin; median +/- SEM) than those delivered with ongoing labour at term (1.01 +/- 0.34; p = 0.015) and those at preterm (1.08 +/- 0.25; p = 0.004). Sub-analyses revealed that the difference at term pregnancies solely was related to patients receiving oxytocin during labour (p = 0.007). These patients had higher oxytocin peptide mRNA levels than those without labour at term (p = 0.009). PGF(2alpha) receptor mRNA concentrations were 27.80 +/- 3.55, 11.46 +/- 2.87 and 19.54 +/- 5.52 PGF receptor/actin, respectively, for the groups. Women without labour at term had higher concentration than those with labour (p = 0.005). Our results suggest that oxytocin, its receptor and the PGF(2alpha) receptor are involved in the regulation of labour through a paracrine mechanism.

  17. Inverted Gcg/CGC trinucleotide microsatellites in the 5'-region of Mus IDS mRNA: recurrent induction of aberrant reverse transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lobo-Menendez, Fe; Bowman, Lewis H; Dewey, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    An investigation was initiated to explore previously published results indicating that approximately 80 bp of the 5'-end of the iduronate sulfatase (IDS) cDNA sequence (Accession No L07291) are 100% homologous with the 3'-UTR of isoform I of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (Acc. No. U51112). 5'-RACE carried out on IDS mRNA demonstrated the apparent homology to be a cloning artifact. A sequence comparison of the IDS 5'-RACE product with a mouse BAC clone covering the region, and with various IDS ESTs, suggested that the region is highly susceptible to cloning artifacts, a common one of which is template switching by reverse transcriptase. The nucleotide sequence flanking the translation start site is unusual in containing two inverted repeats composed of the complementary trinucleotide microsatellites, (GCG)9 and (CGC)6. These likely form a highly stable stem of 20-21 nt, through which reverse transcription is compromised. Such a stem could be involved in the regulation of IDS expression by directly affecting translation, message turnover, or serving as a substrate for siRNA production. Though such mRNA features are relatively rare, they may be more abundant but overlooked due to difficulties in their reverse transcription.

  18. An element in the 3' untranslated region of human LINE-1 retrotransposon mRNA binds NXF1(TAP) and can function as a nuclear export element.

    PubMed Central

    Lindtner, Susan; Felber, Barbara K; Kjems, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Export of unspliced mRNA to the cytoplasm is required for the replication of all retroviruses. In simian type D retroviruses, the RNA export is mediated by the constitutive transport element (CTE) that binds the cellular nuclear export factor 1, NXF1(TAP). To search for potential cellular RNA substrates for NXF1, we have set up an in vitro selection procedure, using an RNA library expressed from total human genomic DNA. A sequence that was isolated most frequently as independent clones exhibits extensive homology to the 3' untranslated region of expressed LINE1 (L1) retrotransposons. This region, termed L1-NXF1 binding element (L1-NBE) bears no structural resemblance to the viral CTE, but binds NXF1 as strongly as CTE, based on gel mobility shift competition assays. A deletion analysis of the NXF1 protein reveals that CTE and L1-NBE have different, but overlapping, binding domains on NXF1. Placed in an intron, L1-NBE is capable of mediating nuclear export of lariat RNA species in Xenopus laevis oocytes and of an unspliced HIV-1 derived RNA in human 293 cells, suggesting that it may function as a nuclear export element for the intronless L1 mRNA. PMID:12003494

  19. Replacement of the yeast TRP4 3' untranslated region by a hammerhead ribozyme results in a stable and efficiently exported mRNA that lacks a poly(A) tail.

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Katrin; Valerius, Oliver; Mangus, David A; Jacobson, Allan; Braus, Gerhard H

    2002-01-01

    The mRNA poly(A) tail serves different purposes, including the facilitation of nuclear export, mRNA stabilization, efficient translation, and, finally, specific degradation. The posttranscriptional addition of a poly(A) tail depends on sequence motifs in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the mRNA and a complex trans-acting protein machinery. In this study, we have replaced the 3' UTR of the yeast TRP4 gene with sequences encoding a hammerhead ribozyme that efficiently cleaves itself in vivo. Expression of the TRP4-ribozyme allele resulted in the accumulation of a nonpolyadenylated mRNA. Cells expressing the TRP4-ribozyme mRNA showed a reduced growth rate due to a reduction in Trp4p enzyme activity. The reduction in enzyme activity was not caused by inefficient mRNA export from the nucleus or mRNA destabilization. Rather, analyses of mRNA association with polyribosomes indicate that translation of the ribozyme-containing mRNA is impaired. This translational defect allows sufficient synthesis of Trp4p to support growth of trp4 cells, but is, nevertheless, of such magnitude as to activate the general control network of amino acid biosynthesis. PMID:12003493

  20. Influence of environmental enrichment on steady-state mRNA levels for EAAC1, AMPA1 and NMDA2A receptor subunits in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andin, Josefine; Hallbeck, Martin; Mohammed, Abdul H; Marcusson, Jan

    2007-10-12

    Interaction with the environment has a key role in refining the neuronal circuitry required for normal brain function throughout life. Profound effects of enriched environment have been shown on neuronal structure and chemistry in experimental animals. Epidemiological studies imply that this is true also in man, thus cognitive stimulation has a protective effect on neurodegeneration, e.g., in Alzheimer's disease. Glutamatergic pathways are imperative for cognitive functions, such as memory, learning and long-term potentiation, and relies on the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors and the hippocampus, with its specific subregions, is an important anatomical substrate in this. The glutamate signalling is also dependent on a fine-tuned transport system, in the hippocampus primarily achieved by the glutamate transporter EAAC1. In this study we show how environmental enrichment modulates these parts of the glutamatergic system using quantitative in situ hybridisation. This work demonstrates for the first time that environmental enrichment modulates the mRNA expression of EAAC1 which is significantly and region specifically decreased in the hippocampus. We also provide evidence for regional and hemisphere-specific upregulation of NMDA mRNA in the hippocampus after environmental enrichment. The current work also shows that AMPA mRNA of the hippocampus is not per se changed by environmental enrichment in adult animals. Taken together, our results extend the knowledge of the glutamatergic system of specific regions of the hippocampus and its modulation by environmental enrichment and could contribute to the development of strategies aimed at limiting pathological changes associated with glutamatergic dysfunctions.

  1. Structure of the mouse leukaemia inhibitory factor receptor gene: regulated expression of mRNA encoding a soluble receptor isoform from an alternative 5' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, I; Cozens, A; Broadbent, J; Robertson, M; Lee, M; Li, M; Smith, A

    1997-01-01

    The low-affinity leukaemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIF-R) is a component of cell-surface receptor complexes for the multifunctional cytokines leukaemia inhibitory factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, oncostatin M and cardiotrophin-1. Both soluble and transmembrane forms of the protein have been described and several LIF-R mRNAs have been reported previously. In order to determine the coding potential of LIF-R mRNAs we have isolated and characterized the mouse LIF-R gene. mRNA encoding soluble LIF-R (sLIF-R) is formed by inclusion of an exon in which polyadenylation signals are provided by a B2 repeat. This exon is located centrally within the LIF-R gene but is excluded from the transmembrane LIF-R mRNA by alternative splicing. The transmembrane receptor is encoded by 19 exons distributed over 38 kb. Two distinct 5' non-coding exons have been identified, indicating the existence of alternative promoters. One of these is G/C rich and possesses a consensus initiator sequence as well as potential Sp1 binding sites. Expression of exon 1 from this promoter occurs in a wide variety of tissues, whereas expression of the alternative 5' untranslated region (exon 1a) is normally restricted to liver, the principal source of sLIF-R. During pregnancy expression of exon 1a becomes detectable also in the uterus. Expression of exon 1a increases dramatically during gestation and is accompanied by a similar quantitative rise in expression of sLIF-R mRNA. These findings establish that expression of LIF-R is under complex transcriptional control and indicate that regulated expression of the soluble cytokine receptor isoform may be due principally to an increase in the activity of a dedicated promoter. PMID:9396734

  2. Photoperiodic Condition Is Associated with Region-Specific Expression of GNRH1 mRNA in the Preoptic Area of the Male Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)1

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Tyler J.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Ball, Gregory F.

    2009-01-01

    Many seasonally breeding avian species exhibit marked changes in hypothalamic content of gonadotropin-releasing vhormone 1 (GNRH1) protein that are reflective of breeding condition. We recently cloned the GNRH1 cDNA in European starlings and demonstrated that changes in GNRH1 mRNA levels occur with a time course similar to what has been observed with GNRH1 protein. However, we did not previously resolve whether these differences were attributable to changes in the number of cells expressing the gene. Herein, we investigated photoperiod-induced changes in the number and distribution of GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cells in the preoptic area of male starlings. GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cell number was significantly greater in breeding birds than in nonbreeding birds. Starlings maintained in short nonstimulatory day length (i.e., prebreeding) showed intermediate cell numbers. Detailed analysis of the rostrocaudal and mediolateral distribution revealed that breeding birds had greater numbers of cells expressing GNRH1 mRNA in the medial intermediate, mediocaudal, and lateral intermediate preoptic area compared with prebreeding and nonbreeding birds. These data demonstrate that photoperiodic changes in reproductive state in starlings are associated with region-specific alterations in the number of cells expressing the GNRH1 gene. It remains to be determined whether these changes reflect quantitative differences in gene expression among an otherwise stable population of cells or a phenotypic switch in which cells gain or lose the ability to make GNRH1 mRNA in response to environmental cues. PMID:19516022

  3. Photoperiodic condition is associated with region-specific expression of GNRH1 mRNA in the preoptic area of the male starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Tyler J; Bernard, Daniel J; Ball, Gregory F

    2009-10-01

    Many seasonally breeding avian species exhibit marked changes in hypothalamic content of gonadotropin-releasing vhormone 1 (GNRH1) protein that are reflective of breeding condition. We recently cloned the GNRH1 cDNA in European starlings and demonstrated that changes in GNRH1 mRNA levels occur with a time course similar to what has been observed with GNRH1 protein. However, we did not previously resolve whether these differences were attributable to changes in the number of cells expressing the gene. Herein, we investigated photoperiod-induced changes in the number and distribution of GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cells in the preoptic area of male starlings. GNRH1 mRNA-expressing cell number was significantly greater in breeding birds than in nonbreeding birds. Starlings maintained in short nonstimulatory day length (i.e., prebreeding) showed intermediate cell numbers. Detailed analysis of the rostrocaudal and mediolateral distribution revealed that breeding birds had greater numbers of cells expressing GNRH1 mRNA in the medial intermediate, mediocaudal, and lateral intermediate preoptic area compared with prebreeding and nonbreeding birds. These data demonstrate that photoperiodic changes in reproductive state in starlings are associated with region-specific alterations in the number of cells expressing the GNRH1 gene. It remains to be determined whether these changes reflect quantitative differences in gene expression among an otherwise stable population of cells or a phenotypic switch in which cells gain or lose the ability to make GNRH1 mRNA in response to environmental cues. PMID:19516022

  4. The regulation of gene expression in transformed maize aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. Analysis of promoter activity, intron enhancement, and mRNA untranslated regions on expression.

    PubMed

    Gallie, D R; Young, T E

    1994-11-01

    Gene expression in the aleurone and endosperm is highly regulated during both seed development and germination. Studies of alpha-amylase expression in the aleurone of barley (Hordeum vulgare) have generated the current paradigm for hormonal control of gene expression in germinating cereal grain. Gene expression studies in both the aleurone and endosperm tissues of maize (Zea mays) seed have been hampered because of a lack of an efficient transformation system. We report here the rapid isolation of protoplasts from maize aleurone and endosperm tissue, their transformation using polyethylene glycol or electroporation, and the regulation of gene expression in these cells. Adh1 promoter activity was reduced relative to the 35S promoter in aleurone and endosperm protoplasts compared to Black Mexican Sweet suspension cells in which it was nearly as strong as the 35S promoter. Intron-mediated stimulation of expression was substantially higher in transformed aleurone or endosperm protoplasts than in cell-suspension culture protoplasts, and the data suggest that the effect of an intron may be affected by cell type. To examine cytoplasmic regulation, the 5' and 3' untranslated regions from a barley alpha-amylase were fused to the firefly luciferase-coding region, and their effect on translation and mRNA stability was examined following the delivery of in vitro synthesized mRNA to aleurone and endosperm protoplasts. The alpha-amylase untranslated regions regulated translational efficiency in a tissue-specific manner, increasing translation in aleurone or endosperm protoplasts but not in maize or carrot cell-suspension protoplasts, in animal cells, or in in vitro translation lysates.

  5. Genome-wide associations between genetic and epigenetic variation influence mRNA expression and insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anders H; Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma A; Ladenvall, Claes; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-11-01

    Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may interact and together affect biological processes and disease development. However, most previous studies have investigated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms independently, and studies examining their interactions throughout the human genome are lacking. To identify genetic loci that interact with the epigenome, we performed the first genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human pancreatic islets. We related 574,553 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide DNA methylation data of 468,787 CpG sites targeting 99% of RefSeq genes in islets from 89 donors. We identified 67,438 SNP-CpG pairs in cis, corresponding to 36,783 SNPs (6.4% of tested SNPs) and 11,735 CpG sites (2.5% of tested CpGs), and 2,562 significant SNP-CpG pairs in trans, corresponding to 1,465 SNPs (0.3% of tested SNPs) and 383 CpG sites (0.08% of tested CpGs), showing significant associations after correction for multiple testing. These include reported diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY5, KCNJ11, HLA-DQA1, INS, PDX1 and GRB10. CpGs of significant cis-mQTLs were overrepresented in the gene body and outside of CpG islands. Follow-up analyses further identified mQTLs associated with gene expression and insulin secretion in human islets. Causal inference test (CIT) identified SNP-CpG pairs where DNA methylation in human islets is the potential mediator of the genetic association with gene expression or insulin secretion. Functional analyses further demonstrated that identified candidate genes (GPX7, GSTT1 and SNX19) directly affect key biological processes such as proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Finally, we found direct correlations between DNA methylation of 22,773 (4.9%) CpGs with mRNA expression of 4,876 genes, where 90% of the correlations were negative when CpGs were located in the region surrounding transcription start site. Our study demonstrates for the first time how genome-wide genetic and epigenetic

  6. Genome-wide associations between genetic and epigenetic variation influence mRNA expression and insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anders H; Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma A; Ladenvall, Claes; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-11-01

    Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may interact and together affect biological processes and disease development. However, most previous studies have investigated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms independently, and studies examining their interactions throughout the human genome are lacking. To identify genetic loci that interact with the epigenome, we performed the first genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human pancreatic islets. We related 574,553 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide DNA methylation data of 468,787 CpG sites targeting 99% of RefSeq genes in islets from 89 donors. We identified 67,438 SNP-CpG pairs in cis, corresponding to 36,783 SNPs (6.4% of tested SNPs) and 11,735 CpG sites (2.5% of tested CpGs), and 2,562 significant SNP-CpG pairs in trans, corresponding to 1,465 SNPs (0.3% of tested SNPs) and 383 CpG sites (0.08% of tested CpGs), showing significant associations after correction for multiple testing. These include reported diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY5, KCNJ11, HLA-DQA1, INS, PDX1 and GRB10. CpGs of significant cis-mQTLs were overrepresented in the gene body and outside of CpG islands. Follow-up analyses further identified mQTLs associated with gene expression and insulin secretion in human islets. Causal inference test (CIT) identified SNP-CpG pairs where DNA methylation in human islets is the potential mediator of the genetic association with gene expression or insulin secretion. Functional analyses further demonstrated that identified candidate genes (GPX7, GSTT1 and SNX19) directly affect key biological processes such as proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Finally, we found direct correlations between DNA methylation of 22,773 (4.9%) CpGs with mRNA expression of 4,876 genes, where 90% of the correlations were negative when CpGs were located in the region surrounding transcription start site. Our study demonstrates for the first time how genome-wide genetic and epigenetic

  7. Genome-Wide Associations between Genetic and Epigenetic Variation Influence mRNA Expression and Insulin Secretion in Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Anders H.; Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma A.; Ladenvall, Claes; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may interact and together affect biological processes and disease development. However, most previous studies have investigated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms independently, and studies examining their interactions throughout the human genome are lacking. To identify genetic loci that interact with the epigenome, we performed the first genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human pancreatic islets. We related 574,553 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide DNA methylation data of 468,787 CpG sites targeting 99% of RefSeq genes in islets from 89 donors. We identified 67,438 SNP-CpG pairs in cis, corresponding to 36,783 SNPs (6.4% of tested SNPs) and 11,735 CpG sites (2.5% of tested CpGs), and 2,562 significant SNP-CpG pairs in trans, corresponding to 1,465 SNPs (0.3% of tested SNPs) and 383 CpG sites (0.08% of tested CpGs), showing significant associations after correction for multiple testing. These include reported diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY5, KCNJ11, HLA-DQA1, INS, PDX1 and GRB10. CpGs of significant cis-mQTLs were overrepresented in the gene body and outside of CpG islands. Follow-up analyses further identified mQTLs associated with gene expression and insulin secretion in human islets. Causal inference test (CIT) identified SNP-CpG pairs where DNA methylation in human islets is the potential mediator of the genetic association with gene expression or insulin secretion. Functional analyses further demonstrated that identified candidate genes (GPX7, GSTT1 and SNX19) directly affect key biological processes such as proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Finally, we found direct correlations between DNA methylation of 22,773 (4.9%) CpGs with mRNA expression of 4,876 genes, where 90% of the correlations were negative when CpGs were located in the region surrounding transcription start site. Our study demonstrates for the first time how genome-wide genetic and epigenetic

  8. The 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 mRNA Enables Cap-Independent Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Eduardo; Landry, Dori M.; Cáceres, C. Joaquín; Pino, Karla; Rossi, Federico; Navarrete, Camilo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex human retrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia and of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The mRNA of some complex retroviruses, including the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV), can initiate translation using a canonical cap-dependent mechanism or through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, we present strong evidence showing that like HIV-1 and SIV, the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA harbors an IRES. Cap-independent translational activity was evaluated and demonstrated using dual luciferase bicistronic mRNAs in rabbit reticulocyte lysate, in mammalian cell culture, and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Characterization of the HTLV-1 IRES shows that its activity is dependent on the ribosomal protein S25 (RPS25) and that its function is highly sensitive to the drug edeine. Together, these findings suggest that the 5′UTR of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA enables internal recruitment of the eukaryotic translation initiation complex. However, the recognition of the initiation codon requires ribosome scanning. These results suggest that, after internal recruitment by the HTLV-1 IRES, a scanning step takes place for the 40S ribosomal subunit to be positioned at the translation initiation codon. IMPORTANCE The mechanism by which retroviral mRNAs recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit internally is not understood. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of translation initiation used by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The results show that the HTLV-1 mRNA can initiate translation via a noncanonical mechanism mediated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). This study also provides evidence showing the involvement of cellular proteins in HTLV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation. Together, the data presented in this report significantly contribute to the understanding of HTLV-1 gene

  9. Effects of acute diuresis stress on egr-1 (zif268) mRNA levels in brain regions associated with motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Aher, Chetan V; Duwaerts, Caroline C; Akama, Keith T; Lucas, Louis R

    2010-01-15

    Stressors evoke a well-studied physiological stress-response, namely, an immediate systemic release of catecholamines from the adrenals followed shortly afterwards by the release of adrenal steroids. The intensity of that response can often be inferred by the amount of adrenal steroids released into the circulatory system. It is still unclear however how the intensity and duration of the stressor affect a number of brain regions, including those in the motivational system. The present study sought to determine whether a brief stressor, such as an isotonic saline injection, activated the brain's motivational system in mesolimbic regions compared with a more intense stressor exemplified by pharmacological challenges caused by the administration of a diuretic. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were either injected (s.c.) with isotonic saline or 5mg of the diuretic, furosemide. Controls did not receive any injections. Animals were sacrificed at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection and trunk blood and brains were collected. Serum corticosterone and aldosterone levels were assessed through radioimmunoassay and mesolimbic brain activity was determined through in situ hybridization of mRNA expression of the immediate-early gene egr-1 in the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. While both adrenal steroids demonstrated an initial peak in both stress groups, levels were higher and longer lasting in rats treated with furosemide. Interestingly, egr-1 mRNA levels were significantly higher only in the furosemide-treated group compared with controls. These findings suggest that a selective activation of motivational circuits occurs under thirst and salt-appetite-induced conditions such as those caused by diuresis.

  10. The mRNA expression and histological integrity in rat forebrain motor and sensory regions are minimally affected by acrylamide exposure through drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, John F.; Latendresse, John R.; Delongchamp, Robert R.; Warbritton, Alan R.; Thomas, Monzy; Divine, Becky; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2009-11-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether alterations in the gene expression or overt histological signs of neurotoxicity in selected regions of the forebrain might occur from acrylamide exposure via drinking water. Gene expression at the mRNA level was evaluated by cDNA array and/or RT-PCR analysis in the striatum, substantia nigra and parietal cortex of rat after a 2-week acrylamide exposure. The highest dose tested (maximally tolerated) of approximately 44 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant decreased body weight, sluggishness, and locomotor activity reduction. These physiological effects were not accompanied by prominent changes in gene expression in the forebrain. All the expression changes seen in the 1200 genes that were evaluated in the three brain regions were <= 1.5-fold, and most not significant. Very few, if any, statistically significant changes were seen in mRNA levels of the more than 50 genes directly related to the cholinergic, noradrenergic, GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems in the striatum, substantia nigra or parietal cortex. All the expression changes observed in genes related to dopaminergic function were less than 1.5-fold and not statistically significant and the 5HT1b receptor was the only serotonin-related gene affected. Therefore, gene expression changes were few and modest in basal ganglia and sensory cortex at a time when the behavioral manifestations of acrylamide toxicity had become prominent. No histological evidence of axonal, dendritic or neuronal cell body damage was found in the forebrain due to the acrylamide exposure. As well, microglial activation was not present. These findings are consistent with the absence of expression changes in genes related to changes in neuroinflammation or neurotoxicity. Over all, these data suggest that oral ingestion of acrylamide in drinking water or food, even at maximally tolerable levels, induced neither marked changes in gene expression nor neurotoxicity in the motor and

  11. Splicing of goose parvovirus pre-mRNA influences cytoplasmic translation of the processed mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Pintel, David J.

    2012-04-25

    Translation of goose parvovirus (GPV) 72 kDa Rep 1 is initiated from unspliced P9-generated mRNAs in ORF1 from the first in-frame AUG (537 AUG); however, this AUG is bypassed in spliced P9-generated RNA: translation of the 52 kDa Rep 2 protein from spliced RNA is initiated in ORF2 at the next AUG downstream (650 AUG). Usage of the 537 AUG was restored in spliced RNA when the GPV intron was replaced with a chimeric SV40 intron, or following specific mutations of the GPV intron which did not appear in the final spliced mRNA. Additionally, 650 AUG usage was gained in unspliced RNA when the GPV intron splice sites were debilitated. Splicing-dependent regulation of translation initiation was mediated in cis by GPV RNA surrounding the target AUGs. Thus, nuclear RNA processing of GPV P9-generated pre-mRNAs has a complex, but significant, effect on alternative translation initiation of the GPV Rep proteins.

  12. Predictive combinatorial design of mRNA translation initiation regions for systematic optimization of gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Yang, Jae-Seong; Cho, Han-Saem; Yang, Jina; Kim, Seong Cheol; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, Sanguk; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Balancing the amounts of enzymes is one of the important factors to achieve optimum performance of a designed metabolic pathway. However, the random mutagenesis approach is impractical since it requires searching an unnecessarily large number of variants and often results in searching a narrow range of expression levels which are out of optimal level. Here, we developed a predictive combinatorial design method, called UTR Library Designer, which systematically searches a large combinatorial space of expression levels. It accomplishes this by designing synthetic translation initiation region of mRNAs in a predictive way based on a thermodynamic model and genetic algorithm. Using this approach, we successfully enhanced lysine and hydrogen production in Escherichia coli. Our method significantly reduced the number of variants to be explored for covering large combinatorial space and efficiently enhanced pathway efficiency, thereby facilitating future efforts in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. PMID:24682040

  13. Influence of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Wim; Davin, Edouard; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Demuzere, Matthias; Lhermitte, Stef; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    Although the African Great Lakes are important regulators for the East-African climate, their influence on atmospheric dynamics and the regional hydrological cycle remains poorly understood. We aim to assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation which resolves individual lakes and explicitly computes lake temperatures. The regional climate model COSMO-CLM, coupled to a state-of-the-art lake parameterization scheme and land surface model, is used to dynamically downscale the COSMO-CLM CORDEX-Africa evaluation simulation to 7 km grid spacing for the period 1999-2008. Evaluation of the model reveals good performance compared to both in-situ and satellite observations, especially for spatio-temporal variability of lake surface temperatures and precipitation. Model integrations indicate that the four major African Great Lakes almost double precipitation amounts over their surface relative to a simulation without lakes, but hardly exert any influence on precipitation beyond their shores. The largest lakes also cool their near-surface air, this time with pronounced downwind influence. The lake-induced cooling happens during daytime, when the lakes absorb incoming solar radiation and inhibit upward turbulent heat transport. At night, when this heat is released, the lakes warm the near-surface air. Furthermore, Lake Victoria has profound influence on atmospheric dynamics and stability as it induces cellular motion with over-lake convective inhibition during daytime, and the reversed pattern at night. Overall, this study shows the added value of resolving individual lakes and realistically representing lake surface temperatures for climate studies in this region. Thiery, W., Davin, E., Panitz, H.-J., Demuzere, M., Lhermitte, S., van Lipzig, N.P.M., The impact of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate, J. Climate (in review).

  14. A profile of UK unemployment: regional versus demographic influences.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Sessions, J G

    1997-06-01

    "This paper profiles the incidence of unemployment in the [United Kingdom] over the period 1985-91 using data derived from the British Social Attitudes Survey. The approach of the paper is to quantify the differential probabilities of unemployment faced by particular groups within the population, focusing in particular on the relative effects of demographic and regional influences. Our results indicate that, even after controlling for a plethora of demographic characteristics, regional disparities in unemployment risk are prevalent, with individuals in Northern Ireland, Wales, the North and West Midlands of England facing a higher chance of unemployment ceteris paribus." (EXCERPT) PMID:12293417

  15. A FOOD PREDICTIVE CUE MUST BE ATTRIBUTED WITH INCENTIVE SALIENCE FOR IT TO INDUCE c-FOS mRNA EXPRESSION IN CORTICO-STRIATAL-THALAMIC BRAIN REGIONS

    PubMed Central

    Flagel, Shelly B.; Cameron, Courtney M.; Pickup, Kristen N.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda; Robinson, Terry E.

    2011-01-01

    Cues associated with rewards acquire the ability to engage the same brain systems as rewards themselves. However, reward cues have multiple properties. For example, they not only act as predictors of reward capable of evoking conditional responses (CRs), but they may also acquire incentive motivational properties. As incentive stimuli they can evoke complex emotional and motivational states. Here we sought to determine whether the predictive value of a reward cue is sufficient to engage brain reward systems, or whether the cue must also be attributed with incentive salience. We took advantage of the fact that there are large individual differences in the extent to which reward cues are attributed with incentive salience. When a cue (conditional stimulus, CS) is paired with delivery of food (unconditional stimulus, US), the cue acquires the ability to evoke a CR in all rats; that is, it is equally predictive and supports learning the CS-US association in all. However, only in a subset of rats is the cue attributed with incentive salience, becoming an attractive and desirable incentive stimulus. We used in situ hybridization histochemistry to quantify the ability of a food cue to induce c-fos mRNA expression in rats that varied in the extent to which they attributed incentive salience to the cue. We found that a food cue induced c-fos mRNA in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum (caudate and nucleus accumbens), thalamus (paraventricular, intermediodorsal and central medial nuclei) and lateral habenula, only in rats that attributed incentive salience to the cue. Furthermore, patterns of “connectivity” between these brain regions differed markedly between rats that did or did not attribute incentive salience to the food cue. These data suggest that the predictive value of a reward cue is not sufficient to engage brain reward systems - the cue must also be attributed with incentive salience. PMID:21945724

  16. A-to-I editing in the miRNA seed region regulates target mRNA selection and silencing efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Hideaki; Hino, Kimihiro; Galipon, Josephine; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) is a post-transcriptional modification which results in a discrepancy between genomic DNA and the transcribed RNA sequence, thus contributing to the diversity of the transcriptome. Inosine preferentially base pairs with cytidine, meaning that A-to-I modifications in the mRNA sequences may be observed as A-to-G substitutions by the protein-coding machinery. Genome-wide studies have revealed that the majority of editing events occur in non-coding RNA sequences, but little is known about their functional meaning. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target mRNAs with complementarities to their seed region. Here, we confirm that A-to-I editing in the miRNA seed duplex globally reassigns their target mRNAs in vivo, and reveal that miRNA containing inosine in the seed region exhibits a different degree of silencing efficiency compared to the corresponding miRNA with guanosine at the same position. The difference in base-pairing stability, deduced by melting temperature measurements, between seed-target duplexes containing either C:G or I:C pairs may account for the observed silencing efficiency. These findings unequivocally show that C:G and I:C pairs are biologically different in terms of gene expression regulation by miRNAs. PMID:25056317

  17. Translation of a testis-specific Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) mRNA is regulated by a 65-kilodalton protein which binds to its 5' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, W; Hecht, N R

    1996-01-01

    Mouse testes contain two distinct superoxide dismutase (SOD-1) transcripts which differ by 114 nucleotides in their 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (W. Gu, C. Morales, and N. B. Hecht, J. Biol. Chem. 270:236-243, 1995). The shorter SOD-1 mRNA, a somatic type SOD-I mRNA (SSOD-1), is ubiquitously expressed in all somatic tissues as well as in testes. The larger SOD-1 mRNA, a testis-specific SOD-1 mRNA (TSOD-1), derived from an alternative upstream start site, is transcribed solely in postmeiotic germ cells and is translationally regulated during spermiogenesis. Since the two mRNAs have identical nucleotides except that TSOD-1 has an additional sequence at its 5' terminus, we have proposed that the extra 5' UTR sequence may be involved in the translational control of the TSOD-1 mRNA during spermiogenesis. Here we show that, when assayed in a cell-free system, TSOD-1 is translated only slightly less efficiently than SSOD-1. RNA gel retardation and UV cross-linking assays reveal that a testicular cytoplasmic protein (Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase RNA-binding protein [SOD-RBP]) of about 65 kDa specifically binds to the extended 5' UTR of TSOD-1. After purification of SOD-RBP by RNA affinity chromatography, we demonstrate that SOD-RBP can repress the in vitro translation of TSOD-1 mRNA but not SSOD-1 mRNA or cotranslated luciferase mRNA. We conclude that SOD-RBP serves as a repressor in the translation of TSOD-1 mRNA during spermiogenesis and thereby fine-tunes the level of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase produced in maturing germ cells. PMID:8754854

  18. Influence of the E region dynamo on equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.; Patterson, T. N. L.

    1983-01-01

    The integrated E region Pedersen conductivity can be an important parameter in determining whether the bottomside of the equatorial F layer will be stable against the Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability. The F layer is observed to become unstable when it rises to great heights after sunset. One effect of this height rise is to decrease the stabilizing influence of ion-neutral collisions at F region heights. It is shown here that the same eastward electric field that raises the F layer also decreases the Pedersen conductivity of the E region, which further destabilizes convective overturning. Because the conductivity of magnetic tubes that penetrate the main F layer is large compared to the E layer contribution, these effects are important only for the bottomside of the equatorial F layer.

  19. Flood regionalization: A hybrid geographic and predictor-variable region-of-influence regression method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Milly, P.C.D.; Tasker, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    To facilitate estimation of streamflow characteristics at an ungauged site, hydrologists often define a region of influence containing gauged sites hydrologically similar to the estimation site. This region can be defined either in geographic space or in the space of the variables that are used to predict streamflow (predictor variables). These approaches are complementary, and a combination of the two may be superior to either. Here we propose a hybrid region-of-influence (HRoI) regression method that combines the two approaches. The new method was applied with streamflow records from 1,091 gauges in the southeastern United States to estimate the 50-year peak flow (Q50). The HRoI approach yielded lower root-mean-square estimation errors and produced fewer extreme errors than either the predictor-variable or geographic region-of-influence approaches. It is concluded, for Q50 in the study region, that similarity with respect to the basin characteristics considered (area, slope, and annual precipitation) is important, but incomplete, and that the consideration of geographic proximity of stations provides a useful surrogate for characteristics that are not included in the analysis. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  20. A Viral mRNA Motif at the 3′-Untranslated Region that Confers Translatability in a Cell-Specific Manner. Implications for Virus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs contain several motifs that participate in the regulation of their translation. We have discovered a motif at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of viral mRNAs, constituted by three repeated sequences, which is involved in the translation of both SINV genomic and subgenomic mRNAs in insect, but not in mammalian cells. These data illustrate for the first time that an element present at the 3′-UTR confers translatability to mRNAs from an animal virus in a cell-specific manner. Sequences located at the beginning of the 5′-UTR may also regulate SINV subgenomic mRNA translation in both cell lines in a context of infection. Moreover, a replicon derived from Sleeping disease virus, an alphavirus that have no known arthropod vector for transmission, is much more efficient in insect cells when the repeated sequences from SINV are inserted at its 3′-UTR, due to the enhanced translatability of its mRNAs. Thus, these findings provide a clue to understand, at the molecular level, the evolution of alphaviruses and their host range. PMID:26755446

  1. The 3' Untranslated Region of the Cyclin B mRNA Is Not Sufficient to Enhance the Synthesis of Cyclin B during a Mitotic Block in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnerch, Dominik; Follo, Marie; Felthaus, Julia; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Antimitotic agents are frequently used to treat solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. However, one major limitation of antimitotic approaches is mitotic slippage, which is driven by slow degradation of cyclin B during a mitotic block. The extent to which cyclin B levels decline is proposed to be governed by an equilibrium between cyclin B synthesis and degradation. It was recently shown that the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the murine cyclin B mRNA contributes to the synthesis of cyclin B during mitosis in murine cells. Using a novel live-cell imaging-based technique allowing us to study synthesis and degradation of cyclin B simultaneously at the single cell level, we tested here the role of the human cyclin B 3'UTR in regulating cyclin B synthesis during mitosis in human cells. We observed that the cyclin B 3'UTR was not sufficient to enhance cyclin B synthesis in human U2Os, HeLa or hTERT RPE-1 cells. A better understanding of how the equilibrium of cyclin B is regulated in mitosis may contribute to the development of improved therapeutic approaches to prevent mitotic slippage in cancer cells treated with antimitotic agents. PMID:24058555

  2. Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression depends on chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)- and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (elF4E)-mediated nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Franziska; Fechir, Katrin; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Art, Julia; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is regulated on the expressional level mostly by post-transcriptional mechanisms modulating the mRNA stability. Another important step in the control of eukaryotic gene expression is the nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport. Most cellular mRNAs are exported via the TAP/Nxt complex of proteins. However, some mRNAs are transported by a different mechanism involving the nuclear export receptor CRM1. Treatment of DLD-1 cells with the CRM1 inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) or anti-CRM1 siRNAs reduced cytokine-induced iNOS expression. We could demonstrate that the iNOS mRNA is exported from the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. Since CRM1 itself does not possess any RNA binding affinity, an adapter protein is needed to mediate CRM1-dependent mRNA export. Western blot experiments showed that the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is retained in the nucleus after LMB treatment. Blockade of eIF4E by ribavirin or overexpression of the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) decreased iNOS expression due to reduced iNOS mRNA export from the nucleus. Transfection experiments provide evidence that the 3'-untranslated region of the iNOS mRNA is involved in eIF4E-mediated iNOS mRNA transport. In summary, CRM1 and eIF4E seem to play an important role in the nucleocytoplasmic export of human iNOS mRNA.

  3. Cortical kindling induces elevated levels of AMPA and GABA receptor subunit mRNA within the amygdala/piriform region and is associated with behavioral changes in the rat.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Amy K; Galic, Michael A; Teskey, G Campbell

    2009-11-01

    Cortical kindling causes alterations within the motor cortex and results in long-standing motor deficits. Less attention has been directed to other regions that also participate in the epileptiform activity. We examined if cortical kindling could induce changes in excitatory and inhibitory receptor subunit mRNA in the amygdala/piriform regions and if such changes are associated with behavioral deficits. After cortical kindling, amygdala/piriform regions were dissected to analyze mRNA levels of NMDA, AMPA, and GABA receptor subunits using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, or rats were subjected to a series of behavioral tests. Kindled rats had significantly greater amounts of GluR1 and GluR2 AMPA receptor mRNA, and alpha1 and alpha2 GABA receptor subunit mRNA, compared with sham controls, which was associated with greater anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and reduced freezing behaviors in the fear conditioning task. In summary, cortical kindling produces dynamic receptor subunit changes in regions in addition to the seizure focus.

  4. Temperature influences histone methylation and mRNA expression of the Jmj-C histone-demethylase orthologues during the early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Fellous, Alexandre; Favrel, Pascal; Riviere, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    In many groups, epigenetic mechanisms influence developmental gene regulation under environmental inputs. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to lophotrochozoans and its larval development is highly dependent on temperature, but the role of epigenetic mechanisms in this context is unknown despite high levels of the recently characterized Jumonji histone demethylase (JHDM) orthologues (Cg_Jumonji) suggesting a physiological relevance of histone methylation in the oyster development. Because in other species alterations of the histone methylation pattern have deleterious outcomes, we investigated the influence of temperature during the oyster larval life on histone methylation and JHDM expression. To shed light on this point, oyster embryonic and early larval development experiments were carried out at different temperatures (18 °C, 25 °C and 32 °C). Histone methylation levels were investigated using fluorescent ELISA at 6 and 24h post-fertilization. When compared to the 25 °C group, at 18 °C H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 residues were hypomethylated at 6h post fertilization (hpf) and hypermethylated at 24 hpf. In contrast, at 32 °C, 6hpf animals present a dramatic hypermethylation (ca. 4-fold) of all examined residues, which is minored but sustained at 24 hpf. RT-qPCR investigations of the mRNA expression of the nine oyster JHDMs, showed gene- and stage-specific temperature sensitivities throughout the early life of oysters. This study provides evidence of the biological significance of histone methylation during development in a lophotrochozoan species. Our results also indicate that temperature influences histone methylation, possibly through the expression level of putative actors of its regulation, which might participate in developmental control. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating a direct relationship between an epigenetic mark and an environmental parameter in marine molluscs. Such investigations could help better understand the

  5. The length of the combined 3' untranslated region and poly(A) tail does not control rates of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA translation in three species of parasitic protists.

    PubMed

    ter Kuile, B H; Sallés, F J

    2000-06-01

    Experimental observations suggested that the length of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA 3' end has a role in regulating rates of translation in the parasitic protists Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania donovani, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Using a PCR assay for poly(A) tail length, we measured the size of the RNA 3' end under different growth conditions in all three species. Our results showed that the combined 3' untranslated region and poly(A) tail of GAPDH mRNA do not vary with different rates of translation.

  6. Local and regional factors influencing bacterial community assembly.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Eva S; Langenheder, Silke

    2012-02-01

    The classical view states that microbial biogeography is not affected by dispersal barriers or historical events, but only influenced by the local contemporary habitat conditions (species sorting). This has been challenged during recent years by studies suggesting that also regional factors such as mass effect, dispersal limitation and neutral assembly are important for the composition of local bacterial communities. Here we summarize results from biogeography studies in different environments, i.e. in marine, freshwater and soil as well in human hosts. Species sorting appears to be the most important mechanism. However, this result might be biased since this is the mechanism that is easiest to measure, detect and interpret. Hence, the importance of regional factors may have been underestimated. Moreover, our survey indicates that different assembly mechanisms might be important for different parts of the total community, differing, for example, between generalists and specialists, and between taxa of different dispersal ability and motility. We conclude that there is a clear need for experimental studies, first, to clearly separate regional and local factors in order to study their relative importance, and second, to test whether there are differences in assembly mechanisms depending on different taxonomic or functional groups.

  7. Evaluating Observation Influence on Regional Water Budgets in Reanalyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Mocko, David; Robertson, Franklin R.; daSilva, Arlindo M.

    2014-01-01

    The assimilation of observations in reanalyses incurs the potential for the physical terms of budgets to be balanced by a term relating the fit of the observations relative to a forecast first guess analysis. This may indicate a limitation in the physical processes of the background model, or perhaps inconsistencies in the observing system and its assimilation. In the MERRA reanalysis, an area of long term moisture flux divergence over land has been identified over the Central United States. Here, we evaluate the water vapor budget in this region, taking advantage of two unique features of the MERRA diagnostic output; 1) a closed water budget that includes the analysis increment and 2) a gridded diagnostic output data set of the assimilated observations and their innovations (e.g. forecast departures). In the Central United States, an anomaly occurs where the analysis adds water to the region, while precipitation decreases and moisture flux divergence increases. This is related more to a change in the observing system than to a deficiency in the model physical processes. MERRAs Gridded Innovations and Observations (GIO) data narrow the observations that influence this feature to the ATOVS and Aqua satellites during the 06Z and 18Z analysis cycles. Observing system experiments further narrow the instruments that affect the anomalous feature to AMSUA (mainly window channels) and AIRS. This effort also shows the complexities of the observing system, and the reactions of the regional water budgets in reanalyses to the assimilated observations.

  8. Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Holman, K.; Zarrin, A.; Fluck, E.; Vavrus, S. J.; Bennington, V.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4. The Great Lakes dampen the variability in near-surface air temperature across the surrounding region, while reducing the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional surface energy budget include an increase (decrease) in turbulent fluxes during the cold (warm) season and an increase in surface downward shortwave radiation flux during summer due to diminished atmospheric moisture and convective cloud amount. Changes in the hydrologic budget due to the presence of the Great Lakes include increases in evaporation and precipitation during October-March and decreases during May-August, along with springtime reductions in snowmelt-related runoff. Circulation responses consist of a regionwide decrease in sea-level pressure in autumn-winter and an increase in summer, with enhanced ascent and descent in the two seasons, respectively. The most pronounced simulated impact of the Great Lakes on synoptic systems traversing the basin is a weakening of cold-season anticyclones.

  9. Regional association analysis delineates a sequenced chromosome region influencing antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Wittkop, B; Rezaidad, A; Hasan, M; Lipsa, F; Stein, A; Friedt, W

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the use of regional association analyses to delineate a sequenced region of a Brassica napus chromosome with a significant effect on antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds was mapped to the same position on B. napus chromosome A9 in biparental mapping populations from two different yellow-seeded × black-seeded B. napus crosses. Sequences of markers spanning the QTL region identified synteny to a sequence contig from the corresponding chromosome A9 in Brassica rapa. Remapping of sequence-derived markers originating from the B. rapa sequence contig confirmed their position within the QTL. One of these markers also mapped to a seed colour and fibre QTL on the same chromosome in a black-seeded × black-seeded B. napus cross. Consequently, regional association analysis was performed in a genetically diverse panel of dark-seeded, winter-type oilseed rape accessions. For this we used closely spaced simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the sequence contig covering the QTL region. Correction for population structure was performed using a set of genome-wide SSR markers. The identification of QTL-derived markers with significant associations to seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds in the association panel enabled the identification of positional and functional candidate genes for B. napus seed meal quality within a small segment of the B. rapa genome sequence.

  10. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  11. Geographical patterns in cyanobacteria distribution: climate influence at regional scale.

    PubMed

    Pitois, Frédéric; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2014-01-28

    Cyanobacteria are a component of public health hazards in freshwater environments because of their potential as toxin producers. Eutrophication has long been considered the main cause of cyanobacteria outbreak and proliferation, whereas many studies emphasized the effect of abiotic parameters (mainly temperature and light) on cell growth rate or toxin production. In view of the growing concerns of global change consequences on public health parameters, this study attempts to enlighten climate influence on cyanobacteria at regional scale in Brittany (NW France). The results show that homogeneous cyanobacteria groups are associated with climatic domains related to temperature, global radiation and pluviometry, whereas microcystins (MCs) occurrences are only correlated to local cyanobacteria species composition. As the regional climatic gradient amplitude is similar to the projected climate evolution on a 30-year timespan, a comparison between the present NW and SE situations was used to extrapolate the evolution of geographical cyanobacteria distribution in Brittany. Cyanobacteria composition should shift toward species associated with more frequent Microcystins occurrences along a NW/SE axis whereas lakes situated along a SW/NE axis should transition to species (mainly Nostocales) associated with lower MCs detection frequencies.

  12. Geographical Patterns in Cyanobacteria Distribution: Climate Influence at Regional Scale

    PubMed Central

    Pitois, Frédéric; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a component of public health hazards in freshwater environments because of their potential as toxin producers. Eutrophication has long been considered the main cause of cyanobacteria outbreak and proliferation, whereas many studies emphasized the effect of abiotic parameters (mainly temperature and light) on cell growth rate or toxin production. In view of the growing concerns of global change consequences on public health parameters, this study attempts to enlighten climate influence on cyanobacteria at regional scale in Brittany (NW France). The results show that homogeneous cyanobacteria groups are associated with climatic domains related to temperature, global radiation and pluviometry, whereas microcystins (MCs) occurrences are only correlated to local cyanobacteria species composition. As the regional climatic gradient amplitude is similar to the projected climate evolution on a 30-year timespan, a comparison between the present NW and SE situations was used to extrapolate the evolution of geographical cyanobacteria distribution in Brittany. Cyanobacteria composition should shift toward species associated with more frequent Microcystins occurrences along a NW/SE axis whereas lakes situated along a SW/NE axis should transition to species (mainly Nostocales) associated with lower MCs detection frequencies. PMID:24476711

  13. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  14. On how climate variability influences regional sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Kusche, Jürgen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Forootan, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    Regional trends in sea level change are strongly influenced by climate variations, such as ENSO (El-Nino Southern Oscillation), the IOD (Indian Ocean Dipole), or the PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation). Hence, before computing long term regional sea level change, these sea level variations need to be taken into account as they lead to strong dependencies of computed regional sea level trends on the time period of the investigation. In this study, sea level change during the years 1993 to 2013 is analysed to identify the dominant modes of sea level change caused by climate variations. Here, two different gridded altimetry products are analysed, namely ESA's combined CCI SeaLevel v1.1 ECV product (doi: 10.5270/esa-sea_level_cci-1993_2013-v_1.1-201412), and absolute dynamic topography produced by Ssalto/Duacs and distributed by Aviso, with support from Cnes (http://www.aviso.altimetry.fr/duacs/). Reconstructions using the different decomposition techniques including the standard principle component analysis (PCA), rotated empirical orthogonal functions (REOF) and independent component analysis (ICA) method are analysed. They are compared with sea level change modelled with the global finite-element sea-ice ocean model (FESOM). The results indicate that from the applied methods, ICA is most suitable to separate the individual climate variability signals in independent modes of sea level change. This especially holds for extracting the ENSO contribution in sea level changes, which was better separated by applying ICA, from both altimetry and modelled sea level products. In addition, it is presented how modelled sea level change reflects climate variations compared to that identified in the altimetry products.

  15. The VSV Polymerase can initiate at mRNA start sites located either up or downstream of a transcription termination signal but size of the intervening intergenic region affects efficiency of initiation

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J.N.; Tang, Xiaoling; Hinzman, Edward; Shen, Ruizhong; Wertz, Gail W.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription by the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) polymerase has been characterized as obligatorily sequential with transcription of each downstream gene dependant on termination of the gene immediately upstream. In studies described here we investigated the ability of the VSV RNA-dependant RNA polymerase (RdRp) to access mRNA initiation sites located at increasing distances either downstream or upstream of a transcription termination signal. Bicistronic subgenomic replicons were constructed containing progressively extended intergenic regions preceding the initiation site of a downstream gene. The ability of the RdRp to access the downstream sites was progressively reduced as the length of the intergenic region increased. Alternatively, bicistronic replicons were constructed containing a mRNA start signal located at increasing distances upstream of a termination site. Analysis of transcription of these "overlapped" genes showed that for an upstream mRNA start site to be recognized it had to contain not only the canonical 3'-UUGUCnnUAG-5' gene start signal, but that signal needed also to be preceded by a U7 tract. Access of these upstream mRNA initiation sites by the VSV RdRp was proportionately reduced with increasing distance between the termination site and the overlapped initiation signal. Possible mechanisms for how the RdRp accesses these upstream start sites are discussed. PMID:18241907

  16. Selection of the In Vitro Culture Media Influences mRNA Expression of Hedgehog Genes, Il-6, and Important Genes regarding Reactive Oxygen Species in Single Murine Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, N.; Baston-Büst, D. M.; Hirchenhain, J.; Friebe-Hoffmann, U.; Rein, D. T.; Krüssel, J. S.; Hess, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim of this paper was to determine the influence of different in vitro culture media on mRNA expression of Hedgehog genes, il-6, and important genes regarding reactive oxygen species in single mouse embryos. Methods. Reverse transcription of single embryos either cultured in vitro from day 0.5 until 3.5 (COOK's Cleavage medium or Vitrolife's G-1 PLUS medium) or in vivo until day 3.5 post coitum. PCR was carried out for β-actin followed by nested-PCR for shh, ihh, il-6, nox, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2. Results. The number of murine blastocysts cultured in COOK medium which expressed il-6, gpx4, gpx1, and prdx2 mRNA differed significantly compared to the in vivo group. Except for nox, the mRNA profile of the Vitrolife media group embryos varied significantly from the in vivo ones regarding the number of blastocysts expressing the mRNA of shh, ihh, il-6, gpx4, gpx1 and prdx2. Conclusions. The present study shows that different in vitro culture media lead to different mRNA expression profiles during early development. Even the newly developed in vitro culture media are not able to mimic the female reproductive tract. The question of long-term consequences for children due to assisted reproduction techniques needs to be addressed in larger studies. PMID:22919324

  17. Influence of Regional Climate Model spatial resolution on wind climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Nikulin, G.; Jones, C.

    2010-12-01

    Global and regional climate models are being run at increasingly fine horizontal and vertical resolution with the goal of increased skill. However, relatively few studies have quantified the change in modeled wind climates that derives from applying a Regional Climate Model (RCM) at varying resolutions, and the response to varying resolution may be highly non-linear since most models run in climate mode are hydrostatic. Thus, herein we examine the influence of grid-resolution on modelled wind speeds and gusts and derived extremes thereof over southern Scandinavia using output from the Rossby Centre (RCA3) RCM run at four different resolutions from 50 x 50 km to 6 x 6 km, and with two different vertical grid-spacings. Domain averaged fifty-year return period wind speeds and wind gusts derived using the method of moments approach to compute the Gumbel parameters, increase with resolution (Table 1), though the change is strongly mediated by the model grid-cell surface characteristics. Power spectra of the 3-hourly model time-step ‘instantaneous’ wind speeds and daily wind gusts at all four resolutions show clear peaks in the variance associated with bi-annual, annual, seasonal and synoptic frequencies. The variance associated with these peaks is enhanced with increased resolution, though not in a monotonic fashion, and is more marked in wind gusts than wind speeds. Relative to in situ observations, the model generally underestimates the variance, particularly associated with the synoptic time scale, even for the highest resolution simulations. There is some evidence to suggest that the change in the power spectra with horizontal resolution is less marked in the transition from 12.5 km to 6.25 km, than from 50 to 25 km, or 25 km to 12.5 km.Table 1. Domain averaged mean annual wind speed (U), 50-year return period extreme wind speed (U50yr) and wind gust (Gust50yr) (m/s) from the four RCA3 simulations at different resolution based on output from 1987-2008. The

  18. MiR-193a-5p Targets the Coding Region of AP-2α mRNA and Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji; Duan, Huaxin; Xie, Yu; Ning, Yichong; Zhang, Xing; Hui, Na; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor AP-2 alpha (AP-2α or TFAP2A) is a newly identified prognostic marker of chemotherapy; its expression is positively correlated with chemosensitivity and survival of cancer patients. Using computational programs, we predicted that the coding region of AP-2α gene contains a potential miRNA response element (MRE) of miR-193a-5p, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site (c.497A>G, rs111681798) resides within the predicted MRE. The results of luciferase assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-193a-5p negatively regulated the expression of AP-2α proteins, but have no influence on the mutant AP-2α (c.497A>G). Infection with lentiviral AP-2α gene or miR-193a-5p inhibitor in the bladder cancer cells decreased migration and cisplatin resistance, while knockdown of AP-2α gene or overexpression of miR-193a-5p in the urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1 increased migration and cisplatin resistances. We concluded that miR-193a-5p induced cisplatin resistance by repressing AP-2α expression in bladder cancer cells. PMID:27698912

  19. MiR-193a-5p Targets the Coding Region of AP-2α mRNA and Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji; Duan, Huaxin; Xie, Yu; Ning, Yichong; Zhang, Xing; Hui, Na; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor AP-2 alpha (AP-2α or TFAP2A) is a newly identified prognostic marker of chemotherapy; its expression is positively correlated with chemosensitivity and survival of cancer patients. Using computational programs, we predicted that the coding region of AP-2α gene contains a potential miRNA response element (MRE) of miR-193a-5p, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site (c.497A>G, rs111681798) resides within the predicted MRE. The results of luciferase assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-193a-5p negatively regulated the expression of AP-2α proteins, but have no influence on the mutant AP-2α (c.497A>G). Infection with lentiviral AP-2α gene or miR-193a-5p inhibitor in the bladder cancer cells decreased migration and cisplatin resistance, while knockdown of AP-2α gene or overexpression of miR-193a-5p in the urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1 increased migration and cisplatin resistances. We concluded that miR-193a-5p induced cisplatin resistance by repressing AP-2α expression in bladder cancer cells.

  20. p21X mRNA is expressed as a singly spliced pX transcript from defective provirus genomes having a partial deletion of the pol-env region in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orita, S; Kobayashi, H; Aono, Y; Saiga, A; Maeda, M; Igarashi, H

    1993-01-01

    In addition to the three typical transcripts such as genomic/gag-pol mRNA, env mRNA and tax/rex mRNA, we previously found the singly spliced pX mRNA, termed p21X mRNA, responsible for producing the p21X protein in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Our finding of the p21X mRNA being constitutively expressed in the fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with ATL has suggested that the expression mechanism is quite different from that of the others. In this paper, the expression mechanism of p21X mRNA was investigated by analyzing the organization of the proviral genomes present in the representative HTLV-1-infected cell lines which are positive or negative for the expression of p21X mRNA. Southern and PCR analyses show that most of the analyzed cell lines contain both one complete and one defective genome each. However, one cell line without the p21X mRNA expression, C91/PL, contains only the complete genome, suggesting that the complete HTLV-1 has no ability to express p21X mRNA in spite of having the ability to produce the infectious virus. The defective genomes of the p21X mRNA positive cell lines, MT-2 and H582, have a large deletion of the entire pol and parts of the gag and env regions including the common domain of the second exon of the doubly spliced tax/rex mRNA, while another defective genome of the p21X mRNA negative cell line, MT-1, has a deletion within the gag-pol gene. We show that these defective genomes have the ability to express their distinct, defective genomic mRNA, suggesting they are active. The defective genomic mRNAs in MT-2 and H582 cells retain the first splice donor and the second splice acceptor sites, suggesting the possibility of synthesizing p21X mRNA by splicing singly with these sites. These findings assume that defective HTLV-1 genomes deleting the second exon region acquire the ability to express p21X mRNA but no ability to express tax/rex mRNA. Such a deletion may explain the

  1. Ribosomal Protein S1 Specifically Binds to the 5′ Untranslated Region of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor rpoS mRNA in the Logarithmic Phase of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ševo, Milica; Buratti, Emanuele; Venturi, Vittorio

    2004-01-01

    The rpoS gene encodes the stationary-phase sigma factor (RpoS or σs), which was identified in several gram-negative bacteria as a central regulator controlling the expression of genes involved in cell survival in response to cessation of growth (stationary phase) and providing cross-protection against various stresses. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the levels of σs increase dramatically at the onset of the stationary phase and are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The P. aeruginosa rpoS gene is transcribed as a monocistronic rpoS mRNA transcript comprised of an unusually long 373-bp 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). In this study, the 5′ UTR and total protein extracts from P. aeruginosa logarithmic and stationary phases of growth were used in order to investigate the protein-RNA interactions that may modulate the translational process. It was observed that a 69-kDa protein, which corresponded to ribosomal protein S1, preferentially binds the 5′ UTR of the rpoS mRNA in the logarithmic phase and not in the stationary phase. This is the first report of a protein-rpoS mRNA 5′ UTR interaction in P. aeruginosa, and the possible involvement of protein S1 in translation regulation of rpoS is discussed. PMID:15262927

  2. Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) Pattern Recognition Algorithms

    2002-05-01

    We developed new pattern recognition (PR) algorithms based on a human visual perception model. We named these algorithms Visual Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) algorithms. To compare the new algorithm's effectiveness against othe PR algorithms, we benchmarked their clustering capabilities with a standard set of two-dimensional data that is well known in the PR community. The VERI algorithm succeeded in clustering all the data correctly. No existing algorithm had previously clustered all the pattens inmore » the data set successfully. The commands to execute VERI algorithms are quite difficult to master when executed from a DOS command line. The algorithm requires several parameters to operate correctly. From our own experiences we realized that if we wanted to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to provide a new data analysis tool to the PR community we would have to make the tool powerful, yet easy and intuitive to use. That was our motivation for developing graphical user interfaces (GUI's) to the VERI algorithms. We developed GUI's to control the VERI algorithm in a single pass mode and in an optimization mode. We also developed a visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization technique that allows users to graphically animate and visually inspect multi-dimensional data after it has been classified by the VERI algorithms. The visualization package is integrated into the single pass interface. Both the single pass interface and optimization interface are part of the PR software package we have developed and make available to other users. The single pass mode only finds PR results for the sets of features in the data set that are manually requested by the user. The optimization model uses a brute force method of searching through the cominations of features in a data set for features that produce

  3. Adolescent testosterone influences BDNF and TrkB mRNA and neurotrophin-interneuron marker relationships in mammalian frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Allen, Katherine; Fung, Samantha; Rothmond, Debora; Noble, Pam L; Handelsman, David J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-11-01

    Late adolescence in males is a period of increased susceptibility for the onset of schizophrenia, coinciding with increased circulating testosterone. The cognitive deficits prevalent in schizophrenia may be related to unhealthy cortical interneurons, which are trophically dependent on brain derived neurotrophic factor. We investigated, under conditions of depleted (monkey and rat) and replaced (rat) testosterone over adolescence, changes in gene expression of cortical BDNF and TrkB transcripts and interneuron markers and the relationships between these mRNAs and circulating testosterone. Testosterone removal by gonadectomy reduced gene expression of some BDNF transcripts in monkey and rat frontal cortices and the BDNF mRNA reduction was prevented by testosterone replacement. In rat, testosterone replacement increased the potential for classical TrkB signalling by increasing the full length to truncated TrkB mRNA ratio, whereas in the monkey cortex, circulating testosterone was negatively correlated with the TrkB full length/truncated mRNA ratio. We did not identify changes in interneuron gene expression in monkey frontal cortex in response to gonadectomy, and in rat, we showed that only somatostatin mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy but not restored by testosterone replacement. We identified complex and possibly species-specific, relationships between BDNF/TrkB gene expression and interneuron marker gene expression that appear to be dependent on the presence of testosterone at adolescence in rat and monkey frontal cortices. Taken together, our findings suggest there are dynamic relationships between BDNF/TrkB and interneuron markers that are dependent on the presence of testosterone but that this may not be a straightforward increase in testosterone leading to changes in BDNF/TrkB that contributes to interneuron health. PMID:26088421

  4. R and D -- Seismic report on the influence of the source region on regional seismic waveforms as inferred from modeling

    SciTech Connect

    App, F.N.; Jones, E.M.; Bos, R.J.

    1997-11-01

    The identification of an underground nuclear test from its seismic signal recorded by seismometers at regional distances is one of the fundamental scientific goals of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty R and D Program. The work being reported here addresses the issue of event discrimination through the use of computer models that use realistic simulations of nuclear explosions in various settings for the generation of near-regional and regional synthetic seismograms. The study exercises some unique, recently developed computer modeling capabilities that heretofore have not been available for discrimination studies. A variety of source conditions and regional paths are investigated. Under the assumptions of the study, conclusions are: (1) spall, non-linear deformation, and depth-of-burial do not substantially influence the near-regional signal and (2) effects due to basins along the regional path very much dominate over source region geology in influencing the signal at regional distances. These conclusions, however, are relevant only for the frequencies addressed, which span the range from 0.1 to 1 Hz for the regional calculations and 0.1 to 3 Hz for the near-regional calculations. They also are relevant only for the crudely ``China-like`` basin, crust, and mantle properties used in the study. If it is determined that further investigations are required, researchers may use this study as a template for such work.

  5. Tracheal dead space influences regional ventilation measurement in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunois, L.; Boileau, R.; Martin, R.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The lung volume at which airway closure begins during expiration (closing volume, CV) can be measured (1) with a radioactive bolus inspired at residual volume (RV) and (2) with the single-breath N2 elimination test. In previous studies in dogs, we observed that N2 CV was systematically larger than 133Xe bolus CV (Xe CV) (N2 CV %vital capacity (VC) = 35 +/- 2.3 (SE) vs. Xe CV %VC = 24 +/- 2.2, P less than 0.01). Because the regional RV in the dog is evenly distributed throughout the lung and all airways closed at RV, N2 CV is related to the regional distribution of the tracheal N2; differences between N2 and Xe CV could then be related to the size of the inhaled dead space. Simultaneous measurements of Xe and N2 CV were performed at various sites of Xe bolus injection while the regional distribution of the bolus was measured. Injections at the level of the carina increased Xe CV to a value (30 +/- 1.4%VC) near simultaneous N2 CV (32 +/- 1.5%VC) and increased the unevenness of regional distribution of the Xe bolus. The difference between N2 and Xe CV is then the result of the size of the inspired tracheal dead space. Moreover, comparisons between different values of Xe CV require injections of the boluses at the same distance from the carina.

  6. The short 5' untranslated region of the betaA3/A1-crystallin mRNA is responsible for leaky ribosomal scanning.

    PubMed

    Werten, P J; Stege, G J; de Jong, W W

    1999-08-01

    Leaky ribosomal scanning allows the expression of multiple proteins from a single mRNA by occasionally skipping the first start codon, and initiating translation at a subsequent one. BetaA3- and betaA1-crystallin, two members of the beta-crystallin family of vertebrate eye lens proteins, are produced via this mechanism, of which, until now, only very few examples have been found in eukaryotic genes. Since the two start codons on the betaA3/A1 messenger lie in the same reading frame, the two translated proteins are identical, except for the 17 residues shorter N-terminal extension of betaA1-crystallin. It has been suggested that the very short leader (5-7 nucleotides) of the betaA3/A1 messenger might cause slippage at the first start codon, although the unfavorable context of this start codon might also be responsible. Using transient transfections, we now demonstrate that increasing the length of the leader sequence to 67 nucleotides indeed completely abolishes translation initiation at the second start codon, and thus expression of the betaA1-crystallin protein. Messengers having a leader of 5, 7 or 14 nucleotides all express both betaA3- and betaA1-crystallin at very similar relative levels.

  7. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  8. Cloning, phylogeny, and regional expression of a Y5 receptor mRNA in the brain of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Megías, Manuel; Pombal, Manuel A

    2014-04-01

    The NPY receptors known as Y receptors are classified into three subfamilies, Y1, Y2, and Y5, and are involved in different physiological functions. The Y5 receptor is the only member of the Y5 subfamily, and it is present in all vertebrate groups, except for teleosts. Both molecular and pharmacological studies show that Y5 receptor is highly conserved during vertebrate evolution. Furthermore, this receptor is widely expressed in the mammalian brain, including the hypothalamus, where it is thought to take part in feeding and homeostasis regulation. Lampreys belong to the agnathan lineage, and they are thought to have branched out between the two whole-genome duplications that occurred in vertebrates. Therefore, they are in a key position for studies on the evolution of gene families in vertebrates. Here we report the cloning, phylogeny, and brain expression pattern of the sea lamprey Y5 receptor. In phylogenetic studies, the lamprey Y5 receptor clusters in a basal position, together with Y5 receptors of other vertebrates. The mRNA of this receptor is broadly expressed in the lamprey brain, being especially abundant in hypothalamic areas. Its expression pattern is roughly similar to that reported for other vertebrates and parallels the expression pattern of the Y1 receptor subtype previously described by our group, as it occurs in mammals. Altogether, these results confirm that a Y5 receptor is present in lampreys, thus being highly conserved during the evolution of vertebrates, and suggest that it is involved in many brain functions, the only known exception being teleosts.

  9. Processes influencing rainfall features in the Amazonian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Chamecki, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Katul, G. G.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Manzi, A. O.; Nascimento dos Santos, R. M.; von Randow, C.; Stoy, P. C.; Tota, J.; Trowbridge, A.; Schumacher, C.; Machado, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon is globally unique as it experiences the deepest atmospheric convection with important teleconnections to other parts of the Earth's climate system. In the Amazon Basin a large fraction of the local evapotranspiration is recycled through the formation of deep convective precipitating storms. Deep convection occurs due to moist thermodynamic conditions associated with elevated amounts of convective available potential energy. Aerosols invigorate the formation of convective storms in the Amazon via their unique concentrations, physical size, and chemical composition to activate into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but important aspects of aerosol/precipitation feedbacks remain unresolved. During the wet season, low atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevail in the pristine tropical air masses. These conditions have led to the Green Ocean hypothesis, which compares the clean tropical air to maritime air-masses and emphasizes biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks, to explain the features of the convective-type rainfall events in the Amazon. Field studies have been designed to investigate these relationships and the development of mesoscale convective systems through the Green Ocean Amazon project and the GOAmazon Boundary Layer Experiment. From March to October 2014 a field experiment was conducted at the Cuieiras Biological Reserve (2°51' S, 54°58' W), 80 km north of the city of Manaus, Brazil. This investigation spans the biological, chemical, and physical conditions influencing emissions and reactions of precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, VOCs), formation of aerosols and CCNs and transport out of the ABL, and their role in cloud formation and precipitation triggers. In this presentation we will show results on the magnitude turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat, CCN concentrations, and rain droplet size distribution for both the wet and dry season. Such influencing factors on precipitation, will be contrasted with the

  10. Influence of ketamine on regional brain glucose use

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.; Mans, A.M.; Biebuyck, J.F.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of ketamine on cerebral function at the level of individual brain structures as reflected by glucose use. Rats received either 5 or 30 mg/kg ketamine intravenously as a loading dose, followed by an infusion to maintain a steady-state level of the drug. An additional group received 30 mg/kg as a single injection only, and was studied 20 min later, by which time they were recovering consciousness (withdrawal group). Regional brain energy metabolism was evaluated with (6-/sup 14/C)glucose and quantitative autoradiography during a 5-min experimental period. A subhypnotic, steady-state dose (5 mg/kg) of ketamine caused a stimulation of glucose use in most brain areas, with an average increase of 20%. At the larger steady-state dose (30 mg/kg, which is sufficient to cause anesthesia), there was no significant effect on most brain regions; some sensory nuclei were depressed (inferior colliculus, -29%; cerebellar dentate nucleus, -18%; vestibular nucleus, -16%), but glucose use in the ventral posterior hippocampus was increased by 33%. In contrast, during withdrawal from a 30-mg/kg bolus, there was a stimulation of glucose use throughout the brain (21-78%), at a time when plasma ketamine levels were similar to the levels in the 5 mg/kg group. At each steady-state dose, as well as during withdrawal, ketamine caused a notable stimulation of glucose use by the hippocampus.

  11. Efficient translation initiation directed by the 900-nucleotide-long and GC-rich 5' untranslated region of the human retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA is strictly cap dependent rather than internal ribosome entry site mediated.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Sergey E; Andreev, Dmitri E; Terenin, Ilya M; Olovnikov, Ivan A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Merrick, William C; Shatsky, Ivan N

    2007-07-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5'UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5'UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5'UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5'UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5'UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5'UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5'UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5'UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5'UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5'UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event.

  12. Efficient Translation Initiation Directed by the 900-Nucleotide-Long and GC-Rich 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human Retrotransposon LINE-1 mRNA Is Strictly Cap Dependent Rather than Internal Ribosome Entry Site Mediated▿

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Terenin, Ilya M.; Olovnikov, Ivan A.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Merrick, William C.; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2007-01-01

    Retrotransposon L1 is a mobile genetic element of the LINE family that is extremely widespread in the mammalian genome. It encodes a dicistronic mRNA, which is exceptionally rare among eukaryotic cellular mRNAs. The extremely long and GC-rich L1 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) directs synthesis of numerous copies of RNA-binding protein ORF1p per mRNA. One could suggest that the 5′UTR of L1 mRNA contained a powerful internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Using transfection of cultured cells with the polyadenylated monocistronic (L1 5′UTR-Fluc) or bicistronic (Rluc-L1 5′UTR-Fluc) RNA constructs, capped or uncapped, it has been firmly established that the 5′UTR of L1 does not contain an IRES. Uncapping reduces the initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR to that of background. Moreover, the translation is inhibited by upstream AUG codons in the 5′UTR. Nevertheless, this cap-dependent initiation activity of the L1 5′UTR was unexpectedly high and resembles that of the beta-actin 5′UTR (84 nucleotides long). Strikingly, the deletion of up to 80% of the nucleotide sequence of the L1 5′UTR, with most of its stem loops, does not significantly change its translation initiation efficiency. These data can modify current ideas on mechanisms used by 40S ribosomal subunits to cope with complex 5′UTRs and call into question the conception that every long GC-rich 5′UTR working with a high efficiency has to contain an IRES. Our data also demonstrate that the ORF2 translation initiation is not directed by internal initiation, either. It is very inefficient and presumably based on a reinitiation event. PMID:17470553

  13. Bioclimatic regions influence genetic structure of four Jordanian Stipa species.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, H R; Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N; Durka, W; Schleuning, M; Hensen, I

    2013-09-01

    Strong environmental gradients can affect the genetic structure of plant populations, but little is known as to whether closely related species respond similarly or idiosyncratically to ecogeographic variation. We analysed the extent to which gradients in temperature and rainfall shape the genetic structure of four Stipa species in four bioclimatic regions in Jordan. Genetic diversity, differentiation and structure of Stipa species were investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. For each of the four study species, we sampled 120 individuals from ten populations situated in distinct bioclimatic regions and assessed the degree of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation within and among populations. The widespread ruderals Stipa capensis and S. parviflora had higher genetic diversity than the geographically restricted semi-desert species S. arabica and S. lagascae. In three of the four species, genetic diversity strongly decreased with precipitation, while genetic diversity increased with temperature in S. capensis. Most genetic diversity resided among populations in the semi-desert species (Φ(ST) = 0.572/0.595 in S. arabica/lagascae) but within populations in the ruderal species (Φ(ST) = 0.355/0.387 S. capensis/parviflora). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analysis showed that Stipa populations of all species clustered ecogeographically. A genome scan revealed that divergent selection at particular AFLP loci contributed to genetic differentiation. Irrespective of their different life histories, Stipa species responded similarly to the bioclimatic gradient in Jordan. We conclude that, in addition to predominant random processes, steep climatic gradients might shape the genetic structure of plant populations.

  14. Bioclimatic regions influence genetic structure of four Jordanian Stipa species.

    PubMed

    Hamasha, H R; Schmidt-Lebuhn, A N; Durka, W; Schleuning, M; Hensen, I

    2013-09-01

    Strong environmental gradients can affect the genetic structure of plant populations, but little is known as to whether closely related species respond similarly or idiosyncratically to ecogeographic variation. We analysed the extent to which gradients in temperature and rainfall shape the genetic structure of four Stipa species in four bioclimatic regions in Jordan. Genetic diversity, differentiation and structure of Stipa species were investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. For each of the four study species, we sampled 120 individuals from ten populations situated in distinct bioclimatic regions and assessed the degree of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation within and among populations. The widespread ruderals Stipa capensis and S. parviflora had higher genetic diversity than the geographically restricted semi-desert species S. arabica and S. lagascae. In three of the four species, genetic diversity strongly decreased with precipitation, while genetic diversity increased with temperature in S. capensis. Most genetic diversity resided among populations in the semi-desert species (Φ(ST) = 0.572/0.595 in S. arabica/lagascae) but within populations in the ruderal species (Φ(ST) = 0.355/0.387 S. capensis/parviflora). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analysis showed that Stipa populations of all species clustered ecogeographically. A genome scan revealed that divergent selection at particular AFLP loci contributed to genetic differentiation. Irrespective of their different life histories, Stipa species responded similarly to the bioclimatic gradient in Jordan. We conclude that, in addition to predominant random processes, steep climatic gradients might shape the genetic structure of plant populations. PMID:23369254

  15. Mapping contacts of the S12-S7 intercistronic region of str operon mRNA with ribosomal protein S7 of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Andrey; Spiridonova, Vera; Kopylov, Alexei

    2006-10-30

    In E. coli, S7 initiates 30S ribosome assembly by binding to 16S rRNA. It also regulates translation of the S12 and S7 cistrons of the 'streptomycin' operon transcript by binding to the S12-S7 intercistronic region. Here, we describe the contacts of N-terminally His(6)-tagged S7 with this region as mapped by UV-induced cross-linking. The cross-links are located at U(-34), U(-35), quite distant from the start codons of the two cistrons. In order to explain the mechanism of translational repression of S12-S7, we consider a possible conformational rearrangement of the intercistronic RNA structure induced by S7 binding.

  16. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  17. Influence of estradiol, progesterone, and nutrition on concentrations of gonadotropins and GnRH receptors, and abundance of mRNA for GnRH receptors and gonadotropin subunits in pituitary glands of beef cows.

    PubMed

    Looper, M L; Vizcarra, J A; Wettemann, R P; Malayer, J R; Braden, T D; Geisert, R D; Morgan, G L

    2003-01-01

    Nutritionally induced anovulatory cows (n = 28) were used to determine the effect of steroids on regulation of synthesis and secretion of gonadotropins. Anovulatory cows were ovariectomized and received intravaginal inserts containing estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), E2 and P4 (E2P4), or a sham intravaginal insert (C) for 7 d. Concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were quantified in serum and E2 and P4 were quantified in plasma. Cows were exsanguinated within 1 to 2 h after removal of intravaginal inserts and pituitary glands were collected and stored at -80 degrees C until messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) and gonadotropin subunits, pituitary content of GnRH-R, and LH and FSH were quantified. Pituitary glands from five proestrous cows were harvested to compare gonadotropin characteristics between ovariectomized, anovulatory cows and intact cows. Plasma concentrations of E2 were greater (P < 0.05) in E2-treated cows than in sham-treated cows. Concentrations of P4 were greater (P < 0.05) in cows treated with P4 than in sham-treated cows. Mean serum concentrations of LH and FSH were not significantly influenced by steroid treatments. However, frequency of LH pulses of ovariectomized, nutritionally induced anovulatory cows was increased (P < 0.05) by treatment with E2 and amplitude of LH pulses was greater (P < 0.05) in cows treated with E2 or P4 than in cows treated with E2P4 or sham-treated. Quantity of mRNA for LHbeta in the pituitary gland was greater when cows were treated with P4. Concentrations of LH in the pituitary gland were not affected by steroid treatments; however, pituitary concentrations of FSH were less (P < 0.1) in E2 cows than in sham-treated cows. The number of GnRH-R was increased (P < 0.05) in cows treated with E2, but P4 treatment did not influence the number of GnRH-R. Abundance of mRNA for GnRH-R, common alpha-subunit, and FSHbeta were not

  18. Broadly altered expression of the mRNA isoforms of FE65, a facilitator of beta amyloidogenesis, in Alzheimer cerebellum and other brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Jin, L W; Starbuck, M Y; Martin, G M

    2000-04-01

    FE65 is a key "adapter" protein that links a multiprotein complex to an intracellular domain of beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaPP). Its overexpression modulates the trafficking of betaPP and facilitates the generation of beta-amyloid (Abeta). FE65 is predominantly expressed in brain tissues. An exon 9-inclusive isoform is exclusively expressed in neurons, and an exon 9-exclusive isoform is only expressed in non-neuronal cells. We quantitated the two isoforms in middle temporal cortex, middle frontal cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate nucleus of 17 Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, 12 normal controls and 9 non-AD neurodegenerative disease controls by reverse transcription-competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-cPCR). Expression of the two isoforms was significantly and differentially altered, with a 30-57% decrease in levels of the neuronal form (P < 0.05-0.002) and a 73-135% increase in levels of non-neuronal form (P < 0.02-0.001), in the temporal and frontal cortex of AD brains. These alterations presumably reflect advanced neurodegenerative processes of these regions. Surprisingly, expression of both isoforms was significantly up-regulated by 42-66% in the cerebellar cortex and caudate nucleus of AD brains when compared to normal brains (P < 0.05-0.005). Diffuse Abeta-positive plaques were observed in the cerebellum of these AD subjects but not in the normal controls. Selective up-regulation of only the FE65 neuronal isoform was seen in the cerebellar cortex in association with other neurodegenerative diseases (largely Parkinson's disease). Because FE65 modulates trafficking of betaPP toward the production of Abeta, the up-regulation of FE65 in AD cerebellum may be relevant to the genesis of diffuse plaques. Thus, early biochemical alterations in AD, not complicated by advanced pathology, may be beneficially investigated in the less-affected regions of the brain, such as the cerebellum. PMID:10723070

  19. CFTR mRNA expression is regulated by an upstream open reading frame and RNA secondary structure in its 5' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Lukowski, Samuel W; Rothnagel, Joseph A; Trezise, Ann E O

    2015-02-15

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression through 5' untranslated region (5'UTR)-encoded cis-acting elements is an important mechanism for the control of protein expression levels. Through controlling specific aspects of translation initiation, expression can be tightly regulated while remaining responsive to cellular requirements. With respect to cystic fibrosis (CF), the overexpression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein trafficking mutants, such as delta-F508, is of great biological and clinical interest. By understanding the post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate CFTR expression, new procedures can be developed to enhance CFTR expression in homozygous delta-F508 CF patients. We have identified the key elements of a complex negative regulatory mechanism that is encoded within the human CFTR 5'UTR and show how these elements act in combination to restrict CFTR gene expression to a consistently low level in a transcript-specific manner. This study shows, for the first time, that endogenous human CFTR expression is post-transcriptionally regulated through a 5'UTR-mediated mechanism. We show that the very low levels of endogenous CFTR expression, compared with other low expression genes, are maintained through the co-operative inhibitory effects of an upstream open reading frame and a thermodynamically stable RNA secondary structure. PMID:25274779

  20. Conserved Non-Coding Sequences are Associated with Rates of mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Jacob B; Feltus, Frank Alex

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels are tightly regulated through a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms. The discovery of cis-acting DNA elements that encode these control mechanisms is of high importance. We have investigated the influence of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs), DNA patterns retained after an ancient whole genome duplication event, on the breadth of gene expression and the rates of mRNA decay in Arabidopsis thaliana. The absence of CNSs near α duplicate genes was associated with a decrease in breadth of gene expression and slower mRNA decay rates while the presence CNSs near α duplicates was associated with an increase in breadth of gene expression and faster mRNA decay rates. The observed difference in mRNA decay rate was fastest in genes with CNSs in both non-transcribed and transcribed regions, albeit through an unknown mechanism. This study supports the notion that some Arabidopsis CNSs regulate the steady-state mRNA levels through post-transcriptional control mechanisms and that CNSs also play a role in controlling the breadth of gene expression.

  1. Targeted Mutagenesis in Plant Cells through Transformation of Sequence-Specific Nuclease mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Thomas J.; Clasen, Benjamin M.; Baltes, Nicholas J.; Demorest, Zachary L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Zhang, Feng; Luo, Song

    2016-01-01

    Plant genome engineering using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) promises to advance basic and applied plant research by enabling precise modification of endogenous genes. Whereas DNA is an effective means for delivering SSNs, DNA can integrate randomly into the plant genome, leading to unintentional gene inactivation. Further, prolonged expression of SSNs from DNA constructs can lead to the accumulation of off-target mutations. Here, we tested a new approach for SSN delivery to plant cells, namely transformation of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding TAL effector nucleases (TALENs). mRNA delivery of a TALEN pair targeting the Nicotiana benthamiana ALS gene resulted in mutation frequencies of approximately 6% in comparison to DNA delivery, which resulted in mutation frequencies of 70.5%. mRNA delivery resulted in three-fold fewer insertions, and 76% were <10bp; in contrast, 88% of insertions generated through DNA delivery were >10bp. In an effort to increase mutation frequencies using mRNA, we fused several different 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) from Arabidopsis thaliana genes to the TALEN coding sequence. UTRs from an A. thaliana adenine nucleotide α hydrolases-like gene (At1G09740) enhanced mutation frequencies approximately two-fold, relative to a no-UTR control. These results indicate that mRNA can be used as a delivery vehicle for SSNs, and that manipulation of mRNA UTRs can influence efficiencies of genome editing. PMID:27176769

  2. An analysis of region-of-influence methods for flood regionalization in the Gulf-Atlantic Rolling Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Tasker, Gary D.; Milly, P.C.D.

    2005-01-01

    Region-of-influence (RoI) approaches for estimating streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites were applied and evaluated in a case study of the 50-year peak discharge in the Gulf-Atlantic Rolling Plains of the southeastern United States. Linear regression against basin characteristics was performed for each ungaged site considered based on data from a region of influence containing the n closest gages in predictor variable (PRoI) or geographic (GRoI) space. Augmentation of this count based cutoff by a distance based cutoff also was considered. Prediction errors were evaluated for an independent (split-sampled) dataset. For the dataset and metrics considered here: (1) for either PRoI or GRoI, optimal results were found when the simpler count based cutoff, rather than the distance augmented cutoff, was used; (2) GRoI produced lower error than PRoI when applied indiscriminately over the entire study region; (3) PRoI performance improved considerably when RoI was restricted to predefined geographic subregions.

  3. Influence investigation of a void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Ren, Shenghan; Qu, Xiaochao; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-20

    A void region exists in some biological tissues, and previous studies have shown that inaccurate images would be obtained if it were not processed. A hybrid radiosity-diffusion method (HRDM) that couples the radiosity theory and the diffusion equation has been proposed to deal with the void problem and has been well demonstrated in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) simple models. However, the extent of the impact of the void region on the accuracy of modeling light propagation has not been investigated. In this paper, we first implemented and verified the HRDM in 3D models, including both the regular geometries and a digital mouse model, and then investigated the influences of the void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium. Our investigation results show that the influence of the region can be neglected when the size of the void is less than a certain range, and other cases must be taken into account. PMID:23338186

  4. Influence investigation of a void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Defu; Chen, Xueli; Ren, Shenghan; Qu, Xiaochao; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin

    2013-01-20

    A void region exists in some biological tissues, and previous studies have shown that inaccurate images would be obtained if it were not processed. A hybrid radiosity-diffusion method (HRDM) that couples the radiosity theory and the diffusion equation has been proposed to deal with the void problem and has been well demonstrated in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) simple models. However, the extent of the impact of the void region on the accuracy of modeling light propagation has not been investigated. In this paper, we first implemented and verified the HRDM in 3D models, including both the regular geometries and a digital mouse model, and then investigated the influences of the void region on modeling light propagation in a heterogeneous medium. Our investigation results show that the influence of the region can be neglected when the size of the void is less than a certain range, and other cases must be taken into account.

  5. Influence of cartilage interstitial fluid on the mRNA levels of matrix proteins, cytokines, metalloproteases and their inhibitors in synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Hyc, Anna; Moskalewski, Stanislaw; Osiecka-Iwan, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Articular cartilage and the synovial membrane both ensure the smooth action of synovial joints; however, the influence of chondrocytes on synovial metabolism remains unclear. The secretory activity of chondrocytes is usually studied in cell cultures and may differ from that in intact cartilage. According to McCutchen's theory of 'weeping' joint lubrication, loading of the articular cartilage during motion squeezes the fluid with lubricating properties from the cartilage. The purpose of the study was to obtain cartilage interstitial fluid (CIF) from intact cartilage and to evaluate its influence on gene expression in the synovial membrane cells. CIF was rinsed out from the cartilage of newborn rats at a pressure of three bar. The chondrocytes survived rinsing and grew in culture. Cytokines in CIF were detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The influence of CIF and CIF-like cocktail (all cytokines found in CIF) on gene expression in the synovial membrane cells was studied after a 4 h-incubation, by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pair test or by the Mann‑Whitney U test. CIF contained basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)‑1, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), macrophage (M)-colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). CIF stimulated the expression of hyaluronan synthase (HAS)1 and 2, lubricin, collagen I, versican, aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)2 and 3, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1-3, interleukin (IL)-6 and TGFβ1, and decreased the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-1β. Incubation of the synovial membrane with CIF-like cocktail partially imitated the effects of CIF. Analysis of CIF composition may help to characterize the secretory activity of chondrocytes in their natural environment under various physiological and

  6. Influence of surface-albedo in subtropical regions on July circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y.; Fennessy, M.

    1981-01-01

    A simulation study to examine the influence of surface-albedo on July circulation in subtropical regions is presented. The results are based on two 47-day integrations. In the first integration, called the control run, surface albedos were normally prescribed, whereas in the second integration, called the anomaly run, the surface albedo was modified in four regions: the Sahel in Africa, the Great Plains in the United States, the Thar Desert border in the Indian subcontinent, and Brazil in South America. Each run was started from observed initial conditions for June 15, 1979 based on NMC analysis. The surface albedo in each of the regions was arbitrarily made 30%.

  7. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS OF SPATIAL INFLUENCES IN THE AMBOS NOGALES REGION OF THE US-MEXICAN BORDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air measurements collected from 1994 to 1995 were used in a preliminary assessment of potential source and spatial influences in the Ambos Nogales border region (Nogales, Arizona, USA and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico). In this assessment, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and...

  8. Global, Regional and Local Influences on Adult Literacy Policy in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between global, regional and local influences on adult literacy policy and practice in the UK through a discourse analysis of policy-related texts. The analysis is framed by theoretical perspectives from literacy studies and socio-material theory. The paper identifies a number of specific features in the UK…

  9. Structural domains within the HIV-1 mRNA and the ribosomal protein S25 influence cap-independent translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Felipe; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Walters, Beth; Contreras, Nataly; Hertz, Marla I; Olivares, Eduardo; Cáceres, Carlos J; Pino, Karla; Letelier, Alejandro; Thompson, Sunnie R; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 genomic RNA is a multifunctional region that folds into secondary/tertiary structures that regulate multiple processes during viral replication including translation initiation. In this work, we examine the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5' leader that drives translation initiation of the viral Gag protein under conditions that hinder cap-dependent translation initiation. We show that activity of the HIV-1 IRES relies on ribosomal protein S25 (eS25). Additionally, a mechanistic and mutational analysis revealed that the HIV-1 IRES is modular in nature and that once the 40S ribosomal subunit is recruited to the IRES, translation initiates without the need of ribosome scanning. These findings elucidate a mechanism of initiation by the HIV-1 IRES whereby a number of highly structured sites present within the HIV-1 5' leader leads to the recruitment of the 40S subunit directly at the site of initiation of protein synthesis. PMID:27191820

  10. External interannual ENSO forcing : which regions outside equatorial Pacific may influence the evolution of ENSO ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayan, H.; Vialard, J.; Izumo, T.; Lengaigne, M.; Terray, P.

    2012-04-01

    Low-frequency coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics intrinsic to the Pacific Ocean are essential to El Niño development. Some recent studies (e.g Annamalai 2005, Izumo and al. 2010, Rodriguez-Fonseca 2009, Terray 2010, Vimont and al. 2003) however suggest that external interannual forcing may influence the evolution of El Niño. In the present study, we aim at identifying regions outside the Pacific Ocean, which can affect the evolution of ENSO. Our assumption is that zonal wind anomalies within the Pacific equatorial waveguide are a necessary condition to influence ENSO evolution. We thus aim at identifying teleconnections between SST anomalies outside of the equatorial Pacific, and Pacific equatorial zonal wind anomalies that are independent of ENSO. To that end, we first remove the ENSO signal from interannual wind and SST anomalies in several re-analyses by regression to all the principal components of an EOF analysis of Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature which display significant correlations with Niño3.4 within 12 months of the ENSO peak. Results show that non-negligible (25% of interannual variance) ENSO-independent zonal winds anomalies remain in the western/central equatorial Pacific. We further show that SST anomalies in six regions (equatorial, northern and southern central Pacific; Tropical and southern Atlantic and southern Indian Ocean) display significant 0-3 months lead correlations to those ENSO-independent wind variations. These regions may hence influence ENSO evolution through remote influence on equatorial Pacific winds, as previously suggested by, e.g, Rodriguez-Fonseca (2009), Terray (2010), Vimont and al. (2003). While our statistical methodology did allow to isolate those regions, we still have to confirm from forced atmospheric and coupled simulations that: - SST anomalies in those regions can indeed influence zonal winds over the tropical Pacific, - the response of the Tropical Pacific coupled system to this external forcing can lead

  11. Individual and coupled influences of AMO and ENSO on regional precipitation characteristics and extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goly, Aneesh; Teegavarapu, Ramesh S. V.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the influences of Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) on regional precipitation extremes and characteristics in the state of Florida is the focus of this study. Exhaustive evaluations of individual and combined influences of these oscillations using, descriptive indices-based assessment of statistically significant changes in rainfall characteristics, identification of spatially varying influences of oscillations on dry and wet spell transition states, antecedent precipitation prior to extreme events, intraevent temporal distribution of precipitation and changes in temporal occurrences of extremes including dry/wet cycles are carried out. Rain gage and gridded precipitation data analysis using parametric hypothesis tests confirm statistically significant changes in the precipitation characteristics from one phase to another of each oscillation and also in coupled phases. Spatially nonuniform and uniform influences of AMO and ENSO, respectively, on precipitation are evident. AMO influences vary in peninsular and continental parts of Florida and the warm (cool) phase of AMO contributes to increased precipitation extremes during wet (dry) season. The influence of ENSO is confined to dry season with El Niño (La Niña) contributing to increase (decrease) in extremes and total precipitation. Wetter antecedent conditions preceding daily extremes are dominant in AMO warm phase compared to the cool and are likely to impact design floods in the region. AMO influence on dry season precipitation extremes is noted for ENSO neutral years. The two oscillations in different phases modulate each other with seasonal and spatially varying impacts and implications on flood control and water supply in the region.

  12. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  13. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sonya; Zhou, Shan; Onasch, Timothy B; Jaffe, Daniel A; Kleinman, Lawrence; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Briggs, Nicole L; Hee, Jonathan; Fortner, Edward; Shilling, John E; Worsnop, Douglas; Yokelson, Robert J; Parworth, Caroline; Ge, Xinlei; Xu, Jianzhong; Butterfield, Zachary; Chand, Duli; Dubey, Manvendra K; Pekour, Mikhail S; Springston, Stephen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-16

    Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, the regional and nearfield influences of wildfire emissions on ambient aerosol concentration and chemical properties in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were studied using real-time measurements from a fixed ground site located in Central Oregon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (∼2700 m a.s.l.) as well as near their sources using an aircraft. The regional characteristics of biomass burning aerosols were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), an index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE and plume aging. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresh emissions (∼1 h old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6-45 h), suggesting that biomass burning organic aerosol concentration and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate.

  14. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sonya; Zhou, Shan; Onasch, Timothy B; Jaffe, Daniel A; Kleinman, Lawrence; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Briggs, Nicole L; Hee, Jonathan; Fortner, Edward; Shilling, John E; Worsnop, Douglas; Yokelson, Robert J; Parworth, Caroline; Ge, Xinlei; Xu, Jianzhong; Butterfield, Zachary; Chand, Duli; Dubey, Manvendra K; Pekour, Mikhail S; Springston, Stephen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-16

    Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, the regional and nearfield influences of wildfire emissions on ambient aerosol concentration and chemical properties in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were studied using real-time measurements from a fixed ground site located in Central Oregon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (∼2700 m a.s.l.) as well as near their sources using an aircraft. The regional characteristics of biomass burning aerosols were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), an index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE and plume aging. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresh emissions (∼1 h old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6-45 h), suggesting that biomass burning organic aerosol concentration and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate. PMID:27398804

  15. Continuous Control of the Flow in Biochemical Pathways through 5′ Untranslated Region Sequence Modifications in mRNA Expressed from the Broad-Host-Range Promoter Pm ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lale, Rahmi; Berg, Laila; Stüttgen, Friederike; Netzer, Roman; Stafsnes, Marit; Brautaset, Trygve; Vee Aune, Trond Erik; Valla, Svein

    2011-01-01

    The inducible Pm promoter integrated into broad-host-range plasmid RK2 replicons can be fine-tuned continuously between the uninduced and maximally induced levels by varying the inducer concentrations. To lower the uninduced background level while still maintaining the inducibility for applications in, for example, metabolic engineering and synthetic (systems) biology, we report here the use of mutations in the Pm DNA region corresponding to the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). Five UTR variants obtained by doped oligonucleotide mutagenesis and selection, apparently reducing the efficiency of translation, were all found to display strongly reduced uninduced expression of three different reporter genes (encoding β-lactamase, luciferase, and phosphoglucomutase) in Escherichia coli. The ratio between induced and uninduced expression remained the same or higher compared to cells containing a corresponding plasmid with the wild-type UTR. Interestingly, the UTR variants also displayed similar effects on expression when substituted for the native UTR in another and constitutive promoter, P1 (Pantitet), indicating a broad application potential of these UTR variants. Two of the selected variants were used to control the production of the C50 carotenoid sarcinaxanthin in an engineered strain of E. coli that produces the precursor lycopene. Sarcinaxanthin is produced in this particular strain by expressing three Micrococcus luteus derived genes from the promoter Pm. The results indicated that UTR variants can be used to eliminate sarcinaxanthin production under uninduced conditions, whereas cells containing the corresponding plasmid with a wild-type UTR produced ca. 25% of the level observed under induced conditions. PMID:21335387

  16. Expression levels of Protocadherin-alpha transcripts are decreased by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay with frameshift mutations and by high DNA methylation in their promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Toyama, Tomoko; Taguchi, Yusuke; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    The mouse protocadherin (Pcdh) clusters, Pcdh-alpha, -beta, and -gamma, are located on chromosome 18. Many polymorphic variations are found in the Pcdh-alpha genes in wild-derived and laboratory mouse strains. In comparing the expression levels of Pcdh-alpha isoforms among several strains, we observed lower expression levels of Pcdh-alpha9 in BLG2 and BFM/2, and of Pcdh-alpha8 in C57BL/6 (B6) than in the other strains. For Pcdh-alpha8, high DNA methylation (72.7%) in the promoter region was found only in B6, whereas 36.4-44.3% methylation was seen in the other strains. On the other hand, the Pcdh-alpha9 DNA-methylation levels were similar (23.6-36.3%) among the strains regardless of the difference in expression levels. Interestingly, however, the Pcdh-alpha9 variable exon in both BLG2 and BFM/2 included a premature termination codon (PTC) generated by a nucleotide deletion or insertion. Treatment with emetine, a potent inhibitor of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), increased the expression level of Pcdh-alpha9 from the BLG2-Pcdh-alpha locus. These data indicate that the transcription levels of mature Pcdh-alpha mRNAs are decreased by the DNA-methylation state of the Pcdh-alpha promoter regions and by the NMD pathway during RNA maturation. And we correct some previous data on Sugino, H., Toyama, T., Taguchi, Y., Esumi, S., Miyazaki, M., Yagi, T., (2004) Negative and positive effects of an IAP-LTR on nearby Pcdaalpha gene expression in the central nervous system and neuroblastoma cell lines, Gene 337 91-103.

  17. Influences of dietary vitamin D restriction on bone strength, body composition and muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet: involvement of mRNA expression of MyoD in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Oku, Yuno; Tanabe, Rieko; Nakaoka, Kanae; Yamada, Asako; Noda, Seiko; Hoshino, Ayumi; Haraikawa, Mayu; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis and also influences skeletal muscle functions, differentiation and development. The present study investigated the influences of vitamin D restriction on the body composition, bone and skeletal muscle in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley strain male rats (11weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed experimental diets: a basic control diet (Cont.), a basic control diet with vitamin D restriction (DR), a high-fat diet (F) and a high-fat diet with vitamin D restriction (FDR). At 28days after starting the experimental diets, the visceral fat mass was significantly increased in the F group compared with Cont. group, and the muscle mass tended to decrease in the DR group compared with Cont. group. The total volume of the femur was significantly lower in the DR group compared with Cont. group, and the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur was significantly lower in the FDR group compared with F group. MyoD is one of the muscle-specific transcription factors. The levels of mRNA expression of MyoD of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles from the DR group were reduced markedly compared with those from the Cont. group. In conclusion, our findings revealed the influences of a vitamin D-restricted high-fat diet on the bone strength, body composition and muscle. Further studies on vitamin D insufficiency in the regulation of muscle as well as fat and bone metabolism would provide valuable data for the prevention of lifestyle-related disorders, including osteoporosis and sarcopenia. PMID:27142740

  18. [Influence factors of deposition induced by melt water erosion in Naqu region, China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-yuan; Cai, Qiang-guo; Li, Zhao-xia; Sun, Li-ying

    2015-02-01

    Melt water erosion is one of the important soil erosion forms caused by the melt water from glacier and snow in high altitude cold areas of China. This paper investigated the influencing factors of deposition caused by melt water erosion in Naqu region. Alluvial fan ratio was presented as an index to characterize the degree of the deposition induced by melt water erosion. Minimum polygon was determined based on spatial overlay technology of Geographic Information System (GIS). The regression equation between the deposition index and the influencing factors was established through the stepwise regression analysis based on minimum polygon. Key influencing factors were identified according to the stepwise regression equation. The results showed that large amounts of alluvial fan were observed in Naqu region; extensive alluvial fans were centered at gentle slope areas in the central part of Naqu region with great spatial differences; alluvial fans were mainly distributed at valley exits, most of which were at large scale with vast differences in area and thickness. Wind speed, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), K value of soil erodibility, annual temperature range and the steep slope area ratio were identified as the key influencing factors on the deposition induced by melt water erosion in the studied area. Index of deposition was positively correlated with the wind speed and NDVI, and showed negative relationships with the K value of soil erodibility, the annual temperature range and steep slope area ratio. PMID:26094471

  19. [Influence factors of deposition induced by melt water erosion in Naqu region, China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-yuan; Cai, Qiang-guo; Li, Zhao-xia; Sun, Li-ying

    2015-02-01

    Melt water erosion is one of the important soil erosion forms caused by the melt water from glacier and snow in high altitude cold areas of China. This paper investigated the influencing factors of deposition caused by melt water erosion in Naqu region. Alluvial fan ratio was presented as an index to characterize the degree of the deposition induced by melt water erosion. Minimum polygon was determined based on spatial overlay technology of Geographic Information System (GIS). The regression equation between the deposition index and the influencing factors was established through the stepwise regression analysis based on minimum polygon. Key influencing factors were identified according to the stepwise regression equation. The results showed that large amounts of alluvial fan were observed in Naqu region; extensive alluvial fans were centered at gentle slope areas in the central part of Naqu region with great spatial differences; alluvial fans were mainly distributed at valley exits, most of which were at large scale with vast differences in area and thickness. Wind speed, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), K value of soil erodibility, annual temperature range and the steep slope area ratio were identified as the key influencing factors on the deposition induced by melt water erosion in the studied area. Index of deposition was positively correlated with the wind speed and NDVI, and showed negative relationships with the K value of soil erodibility, the annual temperature range and steep slope area ratio.

  20. Analysis of the 3’ untranslated regions of α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA and the identification of CPEB in dark- and light-adapted octopus retinas

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shannan; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported the differential expression and translation of mRNA and protein in dark- and light-adapted octopus retinas, which may result from cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)–dependent mRNA masking and unmasking. Here we investigate the presence of CPEs in α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA and report the identification of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Methods 3’-RACE and sequencing were used to isolate and analyze the 3’-UTRs of α-tubulin and S-crystallin mRNA. Total retinal protein isolated from light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas was subjected to western blot analysis followed by CPEB antibody detection, PEP-171 inhibition of CPEB, and dephosphorylation of CPEB. Results The following CPE-like sequence was detected in the 3’-UTR of isolated long S-crystallin mRNA variants: UUUAACA. No CPE or CPE-like sequences were detected in the 3’-UTRs of α-tubulin mRNA or of the short S-crystallin mRNA variants. Western blot analysis detected CPEB as two putative bands migrating between 60-80 kDa, while a third band migrated below 30 kDa in dark- and light-adapted retinas. Conclusions The detection of CPEB and the identification of the putative CPE-like sequences in the S-crystallin 3’-UTR suggest that CPEB may be involved in the activation of masked S-crystallin mRNA, but not in the regulation of α-tubulin mRNA, resulting in increased S-crystallin protein synthesis in dark-adapted octopus retinas. PMID:18682811

  1. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  2. Influence of non-stationary field of magnetospheric convection on the D-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliseyev, A. YU.; Kashpar, Yu. V.; Nikitin, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    Perturbations of F region electron density caused by the extension of magnetospheric convection electric field to middle latitudes are already well known. For the D region of the first observations are believed to be reported by Eliseyev, Kashpar and Nikitin (1988). On several occasions, following the southward turning of the Bz-component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) small disturbances of the D region electron density were detected at night by steep-incidence VLF sounding, which may be attributed to the influence of the penetrated convection electric field (CEF). Some evidence is given of a local time dependence of the CEF effect in the D region and a rather good correlation is demonstrated at the initial stage of disturbance between high latitude magnetic field variations and simultaneous perturbation of the midlatitude ionospheric reflection height.

  3. mRNA Localization and Translational Control in Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasko, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Localization of an mRNA species to a particular subcellular region can complement translational control mechanisms to produce a restricted spatial distribution of the protein it encodes. mRNA localization has been studied most in asymmetric cells such as budding yeast, early embryos, and neurons, but the process is likely to be more widespread. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of mRNA localization and its functions in early embryonic development, focusing on Drosophila where the relevant knowledge is most advanced. Links between mRNA localization and translational control mechanisms also are examined. PMID:22865893

  4. Factors that influence attitudes and sexual behavior among constituency youth workers in Oshana Region, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Lawoyin, Olusheyi O; Kanthula, Ruth M

    2010-03-01

    This survey was carried out to assess attitudes and behaviour among youth within four constituencies in Oshana region, Namibia and to understand to how certain social and cultural factors inform attitudes and influence sexual behaviour among the population of young people surveyed. Using a structured questionnaire, data were collected from a random sample of eighty young men and women between the ages of 15-30 years from four constituencies in Oshana region. Survey outcomes revealed attitudes and certain factors that are linked to sexual risk behaviour such as multiple sexual partnerships. Outcomes also reveal an influence of established socio-cultural norms on gender dynamics within relationships and a culture of reserve around discussions of sex and sexuality among young people. Stakeholder interventions should be directed towards incorporating approaches that address these factors as part of efforts to curb the incidence of HIV among young people in Namibia.

  5. Polarized magnetic field fluctuations at the Apollo 15 site - Possible regional influence on lunar induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Smith, B. F.; Colburn, D. S.; Sonett, C. P.; Schwartz, K.

    1974-01-01

    High-frequency (5 to 40 millihertz) induced lunar magnetic fields, observed at the Apollo 15 site near the southeastern boundary of Mare Imbrium and the southwestern boundary of Mare Serenitatis, show a strong tendency toward linear polarization in a direction radial to the Imbrium basin and circumferential to the Serenitatis basin, a property that could be indicative of a possible regional influence on the induction.

  6. The influence of regional deprivation index on personal happiness using multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kil Hun; Chun, Jin-Ho; Sohn, Hae Sook

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to identify the factors that influence the happiness index of community residents, by considering personal and regional aspects, and to use as evidence of efforts for improvement of the happiness index. METHODS: The study was conducted based on information from 16,270 participants who met the data requirement among those who participated in the 2011 South Gyeongsang Community Health Survey. Of the factors that can influence the happiness index, socioeconomic characteristics, health behavior, morbidity, and healthcare use, social contact, and participation in social activities were classified as personal factors; for regional factors, data from the 2010 census were used to extrapolate the regional deprivation indices at the submunicipal-level (eup, myeon, and dong) in South Gyeongsang Province. The happiness index for each characteristic was compared to that for others via t-test and ANOVA, and multilevel analysis was performed, using four models: a basic model for identification of only random effects, model 1 for identification of personal factors, model 2 for identification of regional factors, and model 3 for simultaneous consideration of both personal and regional factors. RESULTS: The mean happiness index was 63.2 points (64.6 points in males and 62.0 points in females), while the mean deprivation index was -1.58 points. In the multilevel analysis, the regional-level variance ratio of the basic model was 10.8%, confirming interregional differences. At the personal level, higher happiness indices were seen in groups consisting of males with high educational level, high income, high degree of physical activity, sufficient sleep, active social contact, and participation in social activities; whereas lower happiness indices were seen in people who frequently skipped breakfast, had unmet healthcare needs, and had accompanying diseases, as well as those with higher deprivation index. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed

  7. Preliminary assessments of spatial influences in the Ambos Nogales region of the US-Mexican border.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Mukerjee, S; Monroy, G J; Keene, F E

    2001-08-10

    Ambient air measurements collected from 1994 to 1995 were used in a preliminary assessment of potential source and spatial influences in the Ambos Nogales border region (Nogales, Arizona, USA and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico). In this assessment, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and particulate matter (PM) species were used from four sites, two on either side of the border. An examination of median levels and principal component analysis indicated the dominance of soil dusts and mobile sources. Pairwise comparisons of sites for VOCs associated with mobile sources revealed statistically significant differences between sites in the central Nogales area vs. the two sites furthest from the border. Particulate lead at Mexican sites was higher and significantly different vs. US sites. Although further analyses are necessary, findings suggest that local and immediate mobile/other anthropogenic and soil dust influences are present throughout Nogales, with particulate lead from leaded motor vehicle exhaust or soldering operations being a possible influence on the Mexican side.

  8. Influence of regional pollution and long range transport over western India: Analysis of ozonesonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shuchita; Lal, S.; Naja, M.; Venkataramani, S.; Gupta, S.

    2012-02-01

    Four years (April 2003 - July 2007) of ozonesonde observations over Ahmedabad have been studied for the first time using ten days backward trajectories in the boundary layer (lower 2 km) and lower troposphere (2.5-4 km). Ozone data are classified according to the residence times of air-masses over the North-Western India (NWI), marine and Northern Africa/Southern Europe (NASE) regions. Ozone increases linearly with increasing residence days over the NWI region for about six days with maximum increase rate (boundary layer ˜4.5 ± 1.1 ppbv/day, lower troposphere ˜3.4 ± 0.8 ppbv/day) during spring and minimum during winter (boundary layer ˜0.7 ± 0.8 ppbv/day, lower troposphere ˜0.8 ± 0.7 ppbv/day). The analysis of surface ozone over Ahmedabad confirms that ozone increase with residence days is largely due to photochemical build up. The estimated background ozone corresponding to zeroth residence day is found to be significantly lower during summer-monsoon (˜26.3 ± 3.3 ppbv) than winter (˜47.7 ± 3.2 ppbv) within the boundary layer. The air masses mainly influenced by NWI region, marine and NASE regions are termed as regionally polluted, marine and long range transport (LRT) respectively. The regionally polluted ozone is found to be higher than the average ozone during spring and summer-monsoon by 22-41% within the boundary layer and by 9-12% in the lower troposphere. The marine air shows lower ozone by 38% and 10% during spring and summer seasons respectively in the boundary layer. LRT plays a significant role in the lower troposphere during spring and summer seasons with an ozone enhancement of 9% and 27% respectively. The present work suggests that regional pollution and long range transport have significant influence on the seasonal distribution of ozone in the lower troposphere whereas the background ozone levels in summer-monsoon are mainly influenced by marine air mass over this region.

  9. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Ge, C.; Wang, J.; Eberwein, J. R.; Liang, L. L.; Allsman, L. A.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  10. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-01-01

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality. PMID:26556236

  11. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  12. Influence of Uncertainty in Atmospheric Transport Modeling on Regional and Continental Scale Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uliasz, M.; Schuh, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric transport modeling and its uncertainty play a crucial role in inversion studies with a goal to estimate fluxes of trace gases like carbon dioxide from available concentration measurements. Lagrangian particle models (e.g., CSU LPDM, STILT, FLEXPART) driven by regional meteorological models (e.g., WRF, RAMS) are state of the art tools in regional CO2 research including not only inversion studies, but also designing of tower network, or testing and supporting flight scenarios. They are typically used backward in time as an adjoint transport model providing, for each data point, influence functions (footprints) for surface fluxes and inflow fluxes across a domain perimeter. Modeling system used at CSU is based on SiB-RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System with Simple Biosphere model) providing meteorological fields for the LPDM (Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model). Our LPDM can be run both in a forward and backward in time mode. Therefore, we recommend to use the comparison of forward and backward in time simulations as a method to evaluate internal model uncertainty. In addition the LPDM concentration fields can be compared to tracer concentrations simulated directly by RAMS, i.e. Eulerian grid model. We will discuss how simulated concentration fields, and in turn, the results of atmospheric inversions are affected by (1) model simplifications and optimizations, (2) time and space resolution of meteorological fields, and (3) selection of a domain for inversion study. The simulations are performed for the North America and smaller regional domains for a passive tracer and a tracers resulting from different CO2 fluxes (assimilation and respiration). Finally, we would like to propose a framework for inter comparison of different LPDMs coupled to regional meteorological models. This framework includes a sparse matrix format for influence functions to facilitate exchange and further applications of this product by different research groups.

  13. Estimation on the influence of uncertain parameters on stochastic thermal regime of embankment in permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Jianzhou; Zhao, Xiaodong; Chen, Xing

    2016-07-01

    For embankments in permafrost regions, the soil properties and the upper boundary conditions are stochastic because of complex geological processes and changeable atmospheric environment. These stochastic parameters lead to the fact that conventional deterministic temperature field of embankment become stochastic. In order to estimate the influence of stochastic parameters on random temperature field for embankment in permafrost regions, a series of simulated tests are conducted in this study. We consider the soil properties as random fields and the upper boundary conditions as stochastic processes. Taking the variability of each stochastic parameter into account individually or concurrently, the corresponding random temperature fields are investigated by Neumann stochastic finite element method. The results show that both of the standard deviation under the embankment and the boundary increase with time when considering the stochastic effect of soil properties and boundary conditions. Stochastic boundary conditions and soil properties play a different role in random temperature field of embankment at different times. Each stochastic parameter has a different effect on random temperature field. These results can improve our understanding of the influence of stochastic parameters on random temperature field for embankment in permafrost regions.

  14. Climate Variability is Influencing Agricultural Expansion and Output in a Key Agricultural Region of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, S. A.; Cohn, A.; VanWey, L.; Mustard, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso has both expanded and intensified its agricultural production to become the country's leading producer of soy, corn, and cotton. Yet this increase in agricultural production may be threatened due to changes in the region's climate stemming from deforestation caused by the agricultural expansion itself. The sensitivity of Mato Grosso's agriculture to climate variability has important implications for both climate change mitigation and climate adaptation. The vast bulk of research on the drivers of land use change in the region has examined economic and institutional drivers. Leveraging a novel remote sensing-derived dataset classifying shifts between single (cultivating one commercial crop per growing season) and double cropping (cultivating two commercial crops per growing season), we investigated the influence of climate variability on land use change during the period 2000 to 2011. Over the past decade, over half of Mato Grosso's farm area transitioned from single cropping to double cropping. We used regression analysis (controlling for space and time fixed effects) to show monthly rainfall, monthly temperature, agricultural commodity prices, and agricultural revenue to be the main drivers of adoption of double cropping and reversion to single cropping in the region. The influence of climate varies as much as five orders of magnitude across these outcomes, with both temperature and precipitation exhibiting the largest climatic influence on the transition from single to double cropping. Temperature consistently proves to be more important, explaining three times more of the variance than precipitation for each outcome. Months at the beginning of a given first crop season, the end of that first crop season, and middle of the subsequent second crop season are particularly important for planting decisions in the subsequent growing year. Fitting our land transition models using remote-sensing derived

  15. Vertical variations in the influence of the amount effect: South American Summer Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Galewsky, J.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that convective recycling of atmospheric water vapor gives rise to the isotope "amount effect" in which d values are lower than predicted by simple Rayleigh distillation processes (i.e. (DdD = dDvapor ­- dDRayleigh < 0‰). Several studies have linked isotopes in precipitation [e.g. Vimeux et al., 2009] and atmospheric water vapor [e.g. Samuels-Crow et al., 2014] in the tropical Andes to upwind convection associated with the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM). The vertical structure of this convective influence, however, remains unknown. Understanding the vertical structure of the amount effect over South America is essential for improving theoretical constraints and developing better models of the influence of the SASM on southern hemisphere humidity. Additionally, evaluating the vertical and lateral extent of the SASM's convective influence can provide important constraints for interpreting paleoclimate proxies in the region. We use data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) to examine the vertical structure of the amount effect associated with the SASM and relate these results to regional convective precipitation and local subcloud equivalent potential temperature. Preliminary results show that DdD is below 0‰ from the boundary layer through the mid-troposphere over tropical South America during austral summer, and meridional averages show that convective precipitation is highest over these areas where DdD < 0‰ extends higher in the atmosphere. We hypothesize that the depth of convection in the monsoon region controls the vertical structure of DdD, which should also be coherently linked to local equivalent potential temperature. References Vimeux et al. (2009), Palaeogeogr Palaeocl, 281(3-4), 229-241, doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2008.03.054. Samuels-Crow et al. (2014), J Geophys Res-Atmos, doi:10.1002/(ISSN)2169-8996.

  16. Topographic and meteorological influences on space-time scaling of heavy convective rainfall in mountainous regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubert Godoy, A.; Nykanen, D.

    2003-04-01

    Characterizing the space-time scaling and dynamics of convective precipitation in mountainous terrain and the development of downscaling methods to transfer precipitation fields from one scale to another is the overall motivation for this research. Subtantiing a space-time statistical downscaling model for orographic convective precipitation based on the interplay between meteorological forcings and topographic influences on the scale-invariant properties of precipitation will be assessed.al progress has been made on characterizing the space-time organization of mid-western convective systems and tropical rainfall, which has lead to the development of statistical/dynamical downscaling models. Space-time analysis and downscaling of orographic precipitation has received much less attention due to the complexities of topographic influences. This study uses multi-scale statistical analysis to investigate the space-time scaling of organized thunderstorms that produced heavy rainfall and catastrophic flooding in mountainous regions. Focus is placed on the eastern and western slopes of the Appalachian region and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Parameter estimates are analyzed over time and focus is placed on linking changes in the multi-scale parameters with meteorological forcings and orographic influences on the rainfall. Influences of geographic region (e.g., western versus eastern United States) and predominant orographic controls (e.g., windward versus leeward forcing)on trends in multi-scale properties of precipitation are investigated. Spatial resolutions from 1 km to 50 km and temporal integrations from 5 minutes to 3 hours ae considered. This range of space-time scales is needed to bridge typical scale gaps between distributed hydrologic models and numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecasts and attempts to address the open research problem of scaling organized thunderstorms and convection in mountainous terrain down to 1-4 km scales. The potential for

  17. Region of influence regression for estimating the 50-year flood at ungaged sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.; Hodge, S.A.; Barks, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Five methods of developing regional regression models to estimate flood characteristics at ungaged sites in Arkansas are examined. The methods differ in the manner in which the State is divided into subrogions. Each successive method (A to E) is computationally more complex than the previous method. Method A makes no subdivision. Methods B and C define two and four geographic subrogions, respectively. Method D uses cluster/discriminant analysis to define subrogions on the basis of similarities in watershed characteristics. Method E, the new region of influence method, defines a unique subregion for each ungaged site. Split-sample results indicate that, in terms of root-mean-square error, method E (38 percent error) is best. Methods C and D (42 and 41 percent error) were in a virtual tie for second, and methods B (44 percent error) and A (49 percent error) were fourth and fifth best.

  18. The Influence of Regional Groundwater on the Dissolved Organic Matter in Costa Rican Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, E.; Osburn, C. L.; Oviedo-Vargas, D.; Genereux, D. P.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Dierick, D.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the role of regional groundwater in stream organic matter in two tropical watersheds in Costa Rica. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration, stable C isotopes, absorbance, and fluorescence were used to distinguish DOM sources in two adjacent watersheds, the Arboleda and the Taconazo, which are similar in size, soils, rainfall, and vegetation, yet differ because the Arboleda receives a significant input of regional groundwater that is chemically distinct from the local groundwater, whereas the Taconazo does not. Characteristics of the DOM differed largely among the two streams. Fluorescence and isotope data suggested that more degraded DOM was predominant during dry periods in the Arboleda due to the influence of regional groundwater in that stream. During wet periods, fresher soil-derived DOM was predominant in both streams, similar to the quality of DOM in the Taconazo during base flow. DOM δ13C values of the Arboleda during baseflow ranged from -23 to -34‰, while in the Taconazo values ranged from -25 to -34‰. During storm flow the ranges were smaller and more similar. The Taconazo ranged from -23 to -29‰ and the Arboleda ranged from -23 to -31‰. These differences were more noticeable at baseflow and during the dry season (December to April), suggesting that the DOM from regional groundwater entering the Arboleda had less of an impact when heavily diluted by soil DOM mobilized by precipitation. In both streams, during periods of heavy precipitation, DOM concentrations were much higher than during base flow. Further, at baseflow the Arboleda showed generally lower concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than the Taconazo, yet export of DOC from the Arboleda watershed was far higher than from the Taconazo due to the large contribution by regional groundwater to the Arboleda water export. Results from this research emphasize the role of regional groundwater in shaping the quality of the organic

  19. Influence of SSTs over Nino-3.4 Region on the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. S.; Gleixner, S.; K, M.

    2014-12-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) is sensitive to SST variations in the Pacific Ocean. In this study, the correlation coefficients between the SST in the Nino-3.4 region of season (June-August) and ISMR are evaluated using the datasets ERSST v3b and ISMR data (www.tropmet.res.in). An analysis of the mean monthly data of 64 years (1955-2013) reveals that the relationship between the SST in the Nino-3.4 region in June-August and the ISMR is changed after 1983. Seven drought years were reported between 1955 and 1983 and the warmest SST is in the equatorial eastern Pacific. After 1983, the warmest SST is shifted towards the central Pacific region during drought years. The coldest region in the central Pacific during wet years is shifted towards the eastern Pacific after 1983. The position of the sensitive area in the Pacific Ocean thus influences the drought/wet which is found to be changed in the recent epoch.

  20. Regional influence of climate patterns on the wave climate of the southwestern Pacific: The New Zealand region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoi, Victor A.; Bryan, Karin R.; Gorman, Richard M.

    2016-06-01

    This work investigates how the wave climate around New Zealand and the southwest Pacific is modulated by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), Zonal Wave-number-3 Pattern (ZW3), and Southern Annular Mode (SAM) during the period 1958-2001. Their respective climate indices were correlated with modeled mean wave parameters extracted from a 45 year (1957-2002) wave hindcast carried out with the WAVEWATCH III model using the wind and ice fields from the ERA-40 reanalysis project. The correlation was performed using the Pearson's correlation coefficient and the wavelet spectral analysis. Prior to that, mean annual and interannual variabilities and trends in significant wave height (Hs) were computed over 44 years (1958-2001). In general, higher annual and interannual variabilities were found along the coastline, in regions dominated by local winds. An increasing trend in Hs was found around the country, with values varying between 1 and 6 cm/decade at the shoreline. The greatest Hs trends were identified to the south of 48°S, suggesting a relationship with the positive trend in the SAM. Seasonal to decadal time scales of the SAM strongly influenced wave parameters throughout the period analyzed. In addition, larger waves were observed during extreme ENSO and IOD events at interannual time scale, while they were more evident at seasonal and intraseasonal time scales in the correlations with the ZW3. Negative phases of the ZW3 and ENSO and positive phases of the IOD, PDO, and SAM resulted in larger waves around most parts of New Zealand.

  1. [Influence of the technogenic environment on health new-borns infant children in Lugansk region].

    PubMed

    Kapranov, S V; Sapel'nikov, A Ia; Sapel'nikova, L Ia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the health of new-borns born to mothers who lived constantly influenced of the technogenic environmentat on health infant children in Luhansk region. We exameded evaluation of the influence of the technogenic environmental factors on the health of 1119 children in Alchevsk city, Perevalsk town with mining towns and rural villages of Perevalsky area of Lugansk region and Zhovtnev district of Lugansk region. The children were measured in anthropometric studies conducted body length, body weight, chest circumference and the head. Evaluation of the physical development of the children carried tsentilnym method. Prior to discharge from the hospital new-borns divided into three main groups--healthy, risk group, pathology. Also we have done the analysis of the statistical information on the health status of all newborns administrative units Lugansk region. Found that the percentage of new-borns with normal anthropometric variables (from 3 to 97 centile), body length and head circumference was significantly higher in rural areas Perevalsky area with more favorable environmental conditions compared to the industrial city of Alchevsk. New-borns with abnormal significantly higher in women who are domiciled in the city of Alchevsk (19.01% ± 1.44%) under the impact of emissions components ferrous metallurgy and coke-chemical, compared with Perevalskiy and mining towns (13.82% ± 2.20%), as well as rural villages Perevalsky area (11.90% ± 2.89%). Over the period 2004-2011, the incidence of congenital anomalies of new-borns weighing 1000 g or more (per 1000 live births and stillbirths) were significantly higher in the industrial cities of Luhansk region--19.70 ± 0.61 compared with rural areas--15.51 ± 0.73. The incidence of this pathology is one of the highest in Alchevsk--31.88 ± 2.48, which was significantly higher than.in urban areas, as well as in the whole of Luhansk region--19.13 ± 0.55. Therefore, the health of new-born babies is

  2. Numerical Modeling of Deep Borehole Disposal Performance: Influence of Regional Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, E. R.; Hammond, G. E.; Freeze, G. A.; Hadgu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term waste isolation at a deep borehole disposal facility is most favorable at a site where the crystalline basement is hydraulically isolated and groundwater flow is negligible. Site suitability guidelines include evidence of lack of fluid flow in basement, for example lack of significant topographic relief, or evidence of ancient and/or saline groundwater at depth. However, lack of local topographic relief does not preclude regional hydraulic gradients created by recharge and discharge at distant outcrops; and precisely because of hydraulic isolation, the crystalline basement has the potential to be over- or under-pressured relative to overlying units. In the absence of previous boreholes in the area of a potential site, hydraulic gradients at depth are difficult to predict, and the possibility remains that a deep borehole drilled for the disposal of waste will encounter vertical or lateral driving forces for fluid flow. This study asks the question: How large a driving force can be tolerated while still maintaining repository performance? We use PFLOTRAN (an open source, massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport code) and a 3-D model domain (representing a disposal borehole in crystalline basement overlain by sedimentary strata) to examine the influence of horizontal and vertical hydraulic gradients on the long-term performance of a deep borehole radioactive waste repository. Simulations include steady-state lateral hydraulic gradients and transient vertical hydraulic gradients, and predict radionuclide concentrations in an overlying aquifer to quantify the potential influence of regional hydraulic gradients on repository performance.

  3. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution.

    PubMed

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumulated over 40 000 generations in the course of the 'long-term evolution experiment'. We monitored the extent to which mutations influence minimum free energy (MFE) values, assuming that a substantial change in MFE is indicative of structural perturbation. Our principal finding is that purifying selection tends to eliminate those mutations in essential genes that lead to greater changes of MFE values and, therefore, may be more disruptive for the corresponding mRNA secondary structures. This effect implies that synonymous mutations disrupting mRNA secondary structures may directly affect the fitness of the organism. These results demonstrate that the need to maintain intact mRNA structures imposes additional evolutionary constraints on bacterial genomes, which go beyond preservation of structure and function of the encoded proteins.

  4. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  5. IL2/IL21 region polymorphism influences response to rituximab in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Dávila-Fajardo, Cristina Lucía; Robledo, Gema; Rubio, José Luis Callejas; de Ramón Garrido, Enrique; García-Hernández, Francisco J; González-León, Rocío; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Barrera, José Cabeza; González-Escribano, Ma Francisca; García, Ma Teresa Camps; Palma, Ma Jesús Castillo; del Mar Ayala, Ma; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Martín, Javier

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether the IL2/IL21 region, a general autoimmunity locus, contributes to the observed variation in response to rituximab in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as well as to analyze its influence in a cohort including other autoimmune diseases. rs6822844 G/T polymorphism at the IL2-IL21 region was analyzed by TaqMan assay in 84 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 60 different systemic autoimmune diseases Spanish patients receiving rituximab. Six months after the first infusion patients were classified, according to the EULAR criteria, as good responders, partial responders and non-responders. A statistically significant difference was observed in GG genotype frequency between responder (total and partial response) (83.56%) and non-responder (45.45%) SLE patients (p=0.010, odds ratio (OR)=6.10 [1.28-29.06]). No association with the response was evident in the group of patients with autoimmune diseases other than lupus. Furthermore, when both groups of patients were pooled in a meta-analysis, a reduced statistical significance of the association was observed (p=0.024, OR=3.53 [1.06-11.64]). Our results show for a first time that IL2-IL21 region seems to play a role in the response to rituximab in SLE patients but not in other autoimmune diseases.

  6. Understanding perception and factors influencing private voluntary health insurance policy subscription in the Lucknow region

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Tanuj; Paul, Ujjwal Kanti; Prasad, Himanshu Narayan; Das, Subodh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health insurance has been acknowledged by researchers as a valuable tool in health financing. In spite of its significance, a subscription paralysis has been observed in India for this product. People who can afford health insurance are also found to be either ignorant or aversive towards it. This study is designed to investigate into the socio-economic factors, individuals’ health insurance product perception and individuals’ personality traits for unbundling the paradox which inhibits people from subscribing to health insurance plans. Methods: This survey was conducted in the region of Lucknow. An online questionnaire was sent to sampled respondents. Response evinced by 263 respondents was formed as a part of study for the further data analysis. For assessing the relationships between variables T-test and F-test were applied as a part of quantitative measuring tool. Finally, logistic regression technique was used to estimate the factors that influence respondents’ decision to purchase health insurance. Results: Age, dependent family members, medical expenditure, health status and individual’s product perception were found to be significantly associated with health insurance subscription in the region. Personality traits have also showed a positive relationship with respondent’s insurance status. Conclusion: We found in our study that socio-economic factors, individuals’ product perception and personality traits induces health insurance policy subscription in the region. PMID:25674567

  7. Influence of conservation programs on amphibians using seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balas, Caleb J.; Euliss, Ned H.; Mushnet, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive modification of upland habitats surrounding wetlands to facilitate agricultural production has negatively impacted amphibian communities in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America. In attempts to mitigate ecosystem damage associated with extensive landscape alteration, vast tracks of upland croplands have been returned to perennial vegetative cover (i.e., conservation grasslands) under a variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture programs. We evaluated the influence of these conservation grasslands on amphibian occupancy of seasonal wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region. Using automated call surveys, aquatic funnel traps, and visual encounter surveys, we detected eight amphibian species using wetlands within three land-use categories (farmed, conservation grasslands, and native prairie grasslands) during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Seasonal wetlands within farmlands were used less frequently by amphibians than those within conservation and native prairie grasslands, and wetlands within conservation grasslands were used less frequently than those within native prairie grasslands by all species and life-stages we successfully modeled. Our results suggest that, while not occupied as frequently as wetlands within native prairie, wetlands within conservation grasslands provide important habitat for maintaining amphibian biodiversity in the Prairie Pothole Region

  8. mRNA transcript therapy.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Drew

    2015-02-01

    mRNA is the central molecule of all forms of life. It is generally accepted that current life on Earth descended from an RNA world. mRNA, after its first therapeutic description in 1992, has recently come into increased focus as a method to deliver genetic information. The recent solution to the two main difficulties in using mRNA as a therapeutic, immune stimulation and potency, has provided the basis for a wide range of applications. While mRNA-based cancer immunotherapies have been in clinical trials for a few years, novel approaches; including, in vivo delivery of mRNA to replace or supplement proteins, mRNA-based generation of pluripotent stem cells, or genome engineering using mRNA-encoded meganucleases are beginning to be realized. This review presents the current state of mRNA drug technologies and potential applications, as well as discussing the challenges and prospects in mRNA development and drug discovery. PMID:25359562

  9. Recruitment of the 40S Ribosome Subunit to the 3′-Untranslated Region (UTR) of a Viral mRNA, via the eIF4 Complex, Facilitates Cap-independent Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sohani Das; Kraft, Jelena J.; Miller, W. Allen; Goss, Dixie J.

    2015-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus mRNA, which lacks both cap and poly(A) tail, has a translation element (3′-BTE) in its 3′-UTR essential for efficient translation initiation at the 5′-proximal AUG. This mechanism requires eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), subunit of heterodimer eIF4F (plant eIF4F lacks eIF4A), and 3′-BTE-5′-UTR interaction. Using fluorescence anisotropy, SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) analysis, and toeprinting, we found that (i) 40S subunits bind to BTE (Kd = 350 ± 30 nm), (ii) the helicase complex eIF4F-eIF4A-eIF4B-ATP increases 40S subunit binding (Kd = 120 ± 10 nm) to the conserved stem-loop I of the 3′-BTE by exposing more unpaired bases, and (iii) long distance base pairing transfers this complex to the 5′-end of the mRNA, where translation initiates. Although 3′-5′ interactions have been recognized as important in mRNA translation, barley yellow dwarf virus employs a novel mechanism utilizing the 3′-UTR as the primary site of ribosome recruitment. PMID:25792742

  10. Primary structure of chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lonberg, N; Gilbert, W

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence corresponding to chicken muscle pyruvate kinase mRNA; the predicted coding region spans 529 amino acids and establishes the complete amino acid sequence for the vertebrate enzyme. We demonstrate that the level of mRNA for this enzyme is under developmental control and suggest a structural model for the protein kinase-mediated regulation of the mammalian liver isozyme. We report a method for the direct analysis of, and the preparation of cDNA probes from, mRNA which has been fractionated on methylmercury/agarose gels. Images PMID:6574503

  11. The influence of hazard models on GIS-based regional risk assessments and mitigation policies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernknopf, R.L.; Rabinovici, S.J.M.; Wood, N.J.; Dinitz, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are important tools for understanding and communicating the spatial distribution of risks associated with natural hazards in regional economies. We present a GIS-based decision support system (DSS) for assessing community vulnerability to natural hazards and evaluating potential mitigation policy outcomes. The Land Use Portfolio Modeler (LUPM) integrates earth science and socioeconomic information to predict the economic impacts of loss-reduction strategies. However, the potential use of such systems in decision making may be limited when multiple but conflicting interpretations of the hazard are available. To explore this problem, we conduct a policy comparison using the LUPM to test the sensitivity of three available assessments of earthquake-induced lateral-spread ground failure susceptibility in a coastal California community. We find that the uncertainty regarding the interpretation of the science inputs can influence the development and implementation of natural hazard management policies. Copyright ?? 2006 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  12. Influence of early linguistic experience on regional dialect categorization by an adult cochlear implant user: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tamati, Terrin N; Gilbert, Jaimie L; Pisoni, David B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the ability of a cochlear implant user to categorize talkers by region of origin and examine the influence of prior linguistic experience on the perception of regional dialect variation. A postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant user from the Southern region of the United States completed a six-alternative forced-choice dialect categorization task. The cochlear implant user was most accurate at categorizing unfamiliar talkers from his own region and another familiar dialect region, and least accurate at categorizing talkers from less familiar regions. Although the dialect-specific information made available by a cochlear implant may be degraded compared with information available to normal-hearing listeners, this experienced cochlear implant user was able to reliably categorize unfamiliar talkers by region of origin. The participant made use of dialect-specific acoustic-phonetic information in the speech signal and previously stored knowledge of regional dialect differences from early exposure before implantation despite an early hearing loss.

  13. Influences of updated land-use datasets on WRF simulations for two Austrian regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, Irene; Arnold Arias, Dèlia; Seibert, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out with the weather research and forecasting model to study the influence of different land-use datasets for two Austrian regions, the high-alpine Inn Valley area and the hilly Vienna Basin area. The three land-use datasets used were USGS, MODIS and a reclassified European dataset based on the CORINE CLC06 data. Simulations covered an episode in July 2007 applying a resolution of 0.8 km. Results were compared with surface observation data, radiosoundings, and satellite data. It was found that land-use both in the original CLC06 and the version where it had been reclassified to USGS classes for use in WRF was significantly more realistic than the built-in land-use datasets (USGS and MODIS). Synoptic processes during the episode considered were reproduced well by all simulations, where CLC06 and MODIS improved the model performance in both regions in terms of the surface temperatures and other meteorological parameters.

  14. Factors influencing the career choices of general practitioner trainees in North West Thames Regional Health Authority.

    PubMed Central

    Beardow, R; Cheung, K; Styles, W M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify those factors influencing general practitioner trainees when choosing their future place of work, with particular reference to those issues that might be relevant to a choice of practice in inner London. A questionnaire was sent to the 90 trainees undertaking the final component of general practice training within North West Thames Regional Health Authority in May 1991. Seventy five doctors responded to the questionnaire, of whom 47 (63%) were women. Forty five per cent of women indicated that they wished to work part time, compared with 6% of the men. Only 21 trainees (28%) said that they would consider working in inner London, 36 (48%) stating that they would definitely not work in this location, with only nine (12%) indicating a willingness to work in a single handed practice and 21 (28%) in a two doctor practice. Specific factors identified as important when choosing a practice included a good working relationship with partners and staff, the presence of a practice nurse and practice manager, attached health authority staff, opportunities for postgraduate education, and good relationships with hospitals. Of the 800 practices in the north west Thames region, 62% are either one or two doctor practices, these being more prevalent in inner London areas where training practices are less common. Given the preferences expressed by trainees, future recruitment in inner London is likely to be more difficult than elsewhere.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8292415

  15. Co-speech gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information.

    PubMed

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Hasson, Uri; Skipper, Jeremy I; Small, Steven L

    2009-11-01

    Everyday communication is accompanied by visual information from several sources, including co-speech gestures, which provide semantic information listeners use to help disambiguate the speaker's message. Using fMRI, we examined how gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information. The BOLD response was recorded while participants listened to stories under three audiovisual conditions and one auditory-only (speech alone) condition. In the first audiovisual condition, the storyteller produced gestures that naturally accompany speech. In the second, the storyteller made semantically unrelated hand movements. In the third, the storyteller kept her hands still. In addition to inferior parietal and posterior superior and middle temporal regions, bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus and left anterior inferior frontal gyrus responded more strongly to speech when it was further accompanied by gesture, regardless of the semantic relation to speech. However, the right inferior frontal gyrus was sensitive to the semantic import of the hand movements, demonstrating more activity when hand movements were semantically unrelated to the accompanying speech. These findings show that perceiving hand movements during speech modulates the distributed pattern of neural activation involved in both biological motion perception and discourse comprehension, suggesting listeners attempt to find meaning, not only in the words speakers produce, but also in the hand movements that accompany speech. PMID:19384890

  16. Regional Influences on Chinese Medicine Education: Comparing Australia and Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C. H.; Zhang, Anthony L.; Adams, Jon

    2016-01-01

    High quality education programs are essential for preparing the next generation of Chinese medicine (CM) practitioners. Currently, training in CM occurs within differing health and education policy contexts. There has been little analysis of the factors influencing the form and status of CM education in different regions. Such a task is important for understanding how CM is evolving internationally and predicting future workforce characteristics. This paper compares the status of CM education in Australia and Hong Kong across a range of dimensions: historical and current positions in the national higher education system, regulatory context and relationship to the health system, and public and professional legitimacy. The analysis highlights the different ways in which CM education is developing in these settings, with Hong Kong providing somewhat greater access to clinical training opportunities for CM students. However, common trends and challenges shape CM education in both regions, including marginalisation from mainstream health professions, a small but established presence in universities, and an emphasis on biomedical research. Three factors stand out as significant for the evolution of CM education in Australia and Hong Kong and may have international implications: continuing biomedical dominance, increased competition between universities, and strengthened links with mainland China. PMID:27379170

  17. Regional Influences on Chinese Medicine Education: Comparing Australia and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Caragh; Chung, Vincent C H; Zhang, Anthony L; Adams, Jon

    2016-01-01

    High quality education programs are essential for preparing the next generation of Chinese medicine (CM) practitioners. Currently, training in CM occurs within differing health and education policy contexts. There has been little analysis of the factors influencing the form and status of CM education in different regions. Such a task is important for understanding how CM is evolving internationally and predicting future workforce characteristics. This paper compares the status of CM education in Australia and Hong Kong across a range of dimensions: historical and current positions in the national higher education system, regulatory context and relationship to the health system, and public and professional legitimacy. The analysis highlights the different ways in which CM education is developing in these settings, with Hong Kong providing somewhat greater access to clinical training opportunities for CM students. However, common trends and challenges shape CM education in both regions, including marginalisation from mainstream health professions, a small but established presence in universities, and an emphasis on biomedical research. Three factors stand out as significant for the evolution of CM education in Australia and Hong Kong and may have international implications: continuing biomedical dominance, increased competition between universities, and strengthened links with mainland China. PMID:27379170

  18. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyl)lanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g., in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called "hinge region" of nisin (residues NMK) was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  19. Understanding Space Weather influence on earthquake triggering to shield people living in seismic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachikyan, Galina; Inchin, Alexander; Kim, Alexander; Khassanov, Eldar

    2016-07-01

    There is an idea at present that space weather can influence not only the technological infrastructure and people's health, but seismic activity as well. Space weather impact on the Earth results from magnetic reconnection between the Sun's and Earth's magnetic fields. The effectiveness of reconnection depends on sign and magnitude of Z-components in solar wind magnetic field and earth's magnetic field as measured in the geocentric solar magnetosphere (GSM) coordinate system. The more negative value of Zgsm in the solar wind magnetic field, and the more positive value of Zgsm in the geomagnetic field, the more solar wind energy penetrates into the earth's environment due to reconnection. It was found recently by Khachikyan et al. [2012, http://www.scirp.org/journal/ijg] that maximal possible earthquake magnitude in a particular seismic region (seismic potential - Mmax) may be determined, in first approximation, on the base of maximal geomagnetic Zgsm value in this region, namely: Mmax = (5.22 +- 0.17) + (0.78 +- 0.06) x [abs (Zgsm)]. In this report we present statistical results on association between variations in space weather and global seismic activity, and demonstrate that a great Sumatra earthquake (M=9.1, on December 26, 2004, at 00:58:53 GMT) indeed occurred in region where the geomagnetic Zgsm components are largest at the globe. In the time of earthquake occurrence, geomagnetic Zgsm value in the epicenter (3.30N, 95.980E) was equal to ~37147 nT. A range of possible maximal magnitude, as estimated from above relation, could be of 8.8 - 9.2. The recorded magnitude M=9.1 is within this range.

  20. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions.

  1. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions. PMID:27483196

  2. Fine-Scale Habitat Heterogeneity Influences Occupancy in Terrestrial Mammals in a Temperate Region of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Stirnemann, Ingrid; Mortelliti, Alessio; Gibbons, Philip; Lindenmayer, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most ecosystems, characterises the structure of habitat, and is considered an important driver of species distribution patterns. However, quantifying fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation cover can be time consuming, and therefore it is seldom measured. Here, we determine if heterogeneity is worthwhile measuring, in addition to the amount of cover, when examining species distribution patterns. Further, we investigated the effect of the surrounding landscape heterogeneity on species occupancy. We tested the effect of cover and heterogeneity of trees and shrubs, and the context of the surrounding landscape (number of habitats and distance to an ecotone) on site occupancy of three mammal species (the black wallaby [Wallabia bicolor], the long-nosed bandicoot [Perameles nasuta], and the bush rat [Rattus fuscipes]) within a naturally heterogeneous landscape in a temperate region of Australia. We found that fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation attributes is an important driver of mammal occurrence of two of these species. Further, we found that, although all three species responded positively to vegetation heterogeneity, different mammals vary in their response to different types of vegetation heterogeneity measurement. For example, the black wallaby responded to the proximity of an ecotone, and the bush rat and the long-nosed bandicoot responded to fine-scale heterogeneity of small tree cover, whereas none of the mammals responded to broad scale heterogeneity (i.e., the number of habitat types). Our results highlight the influence of methodological decisions, such as how heterogeneity vegetation is measured, in quantifying species responses to habitat structures. The findings confirm the importance of choosing meaningful heterogeneity measures when modelling the factors influencing occupancy of the species of interest. PMID:26394327

  3. Fine-Scale Habitat Heterogeneity Influences Occupancy in Terrestrial Mammals in a Temperate Region of Australia.

    PubMed

    Stirnemann, Ingrid; Mortelliti, Alessio; Gibbons, Philip; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most ecosystems, characterises the structure of habitat, and is considered an important driver of species distribution patterns. However, quantifying fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation cover can be time consuming, and therefore it is seldom measured. Here, we determine if heterogeneity is worthwhile measuring, in addition to the amount of cover, when examining species distribution patterns. Further, we investigated the effect of the surrounding landscape heterogeneity on species occupancy. We tested the effect of cover and heterogeneity of trees and shrubs, and the context of the surrounding landscape (number of habitats and distance to an ecotone) on site occupancy of three mammal species (the black wallaby [Wallabia bicolor], the long-nosed bandicoot [Perameles nasuta], and the bush rat [Rattus fuscipes]) within a naturally heterogeneous landscape in a temperate region of Australia. We found that fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation attributes is an important driver of mammal occurrence of two of these species. Further, we found that, although all three species responded positively to vegetation heterogeneity, different mammals vary in their response to different types of vegetation heterogeneity measurement. For example, the black wallaby responded to the proximity of an ecotone, and the bush rat and the long-nosed bandicoot responded to fine-scale heterogeneity of small tree cover, whereas none of the mammals responded to broad scale heterogeneity (i.e., the number of habitat types). Our results highlight the influence of methodological decisions, such as how heterogeneity vegetation is measured, in quantifying species responses to habitat structures. The findings confirm the importance of choosing meaningful heterogeneity measures when modelling the factors influencing occupancy of the species of interest.

  4. Orographic and Meteorological Influences on the Spatial Organization of Thunderstorms in Mountainous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykanen, D. K.; Godoy, A. R.

    2002-12-01

    The use of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to provide input of spatial rainfall patterns for distributed hydrologic models has gained increasing popularity over the past decade. One of the key challenges in this approach is the discrepancy between the typical scale of NWP forecasts and the scale needed for accurate hydrologic predictions, especially in moderate to extreme topography. Issues of scale also arise when driving hydrologic models with observed precipitation as the observations may have space-time resolutions that are too coarse (satellite) or fine (gage) for the needs of the hydrologic model. A better understanding of the space-time scaling and dynamics of convective precipitation across spatial resolutions from 1 km to 50 km and temporal integrations from 5 minutes to 3 hours is needed to bridge these scale gaps. Substantial progress has been made on characterizing the space-time organization of midwestern convective systems and tropical rainfall, which has lead to the development of statistical/dynamical downscaling models. Space-time analysis and downscaling of orographic precipitation has received much less attention due to the complexities of topographic influences on precipitation processes. Characterizing the space-time scaling and dynamics of orographic convective precipitation and the development of downscaling methods to transfer precipitation fields from one scale to another is the overall motivation for this research. This paper investigates the space-time organization of several heavy convective rainfall events in mountainous terrain using multi-scale statistical analysis. Focus is placed on the Appalachian region and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Case studies which are characteristic of organized thunderstorms that produce heavy rainfall and catastrophic flooding in mountainous regions have been studied to explore the multi-scaling behavior of orographic precipitation and specifically investigate differences in the

  5. The farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and its influencing factors in Poyang Lake Region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiqiu; Chen, Mengjiao; Lu, Yanfei; Wang, Liguo; Huang, Yujiao

    2016-01-01

    Individual farmers represent the main management entities of agricultural production under the family-contract responsibility system in China, and thus play crucial roles in the prevention and control of agricultural nonpoint source (ANPS) pollution. The analysis of the farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution as well as the factors affecting their perceptions can provide valuable information for relevant policy-making to preserve high quality water in Poyang Lake and regional quality of arable land. Through a survey titled 'Farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and farming behaviors in the Poyang Lake Region', the data related to the perceptions of farmers on ANPS pollution were collected. The factors that affect their awareness of ANPS pollution were identified with the method of boosted regression trees (BRT). The results indicated that the farmers had awareness of the risk of ANPS pollution to some extent, but they lacked adequate scientific knowledge. Generally, they had no consciousness about how to prevent and control ANPS pollution and did not understand techniques needed for proper scientifically sound application of fertilizers and pesticides. The main factors that influenced their perceptions of ANPS pollution are (from high to low): the ratio of total income which comes from farming, per capita farmland, age, education level, and household income. Some measures targeted to improve the prevention and control of ANPS pollution were proposed: developing modern agricultural techniques and promoting large-scale farming, increasing public campaigns related to ANPS pollution prevention and control with the goal of raising the level of awareness of farmers, and reforming the methods used to promote science and technology in agriculture and encourage the proper use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. PMID:27054730

  6. The farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and its influencing factors in Poyang Lake Region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiqiu; Chen, Mengjiao; Lu, Yanfei; Wang, Liguo; Huang, Yujiao

    2016-01-01

    Individual farmers represent the main management entities of agricultural production under the family-contract responsibility system in China, and thus play crucial roles in the prevention and control of agricultural nonpoint source (ANPS) pollution. The analysis of the farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution as well as the factors affecting their perceptions can provide valuable information for relevant policy-making to preserve high quality water in Poyang Lake and regional quality of arable land. Through a survey titled 'Farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and farming behaviors in the Poyang Lake Region', the data related to the perceptions of farmers on ANPS pollution were collected. The factors that affect their awareness of ANPS pollution were identified with the method of boosted regression trees (BRT). The results indicated that the farmers had awareness of the risk of ANPS pollution to some extent, but they lacked adequate scientific knowledge. Generally, they had no consciousness about how to prevent and control ANPS pollution and did not understand techniques needed for proper scientifically sound application of fertilizers and pesticides. The main factors that influenced their perceptions of ANPS pollution are (from high to low): the ratio of total income which comes from farming, per capita farmland, age, education level, and household income. Some measures targeted to improve the prevention and control of ANPS pollution were proposed: developing modern agricultural techniques and promoting large-scale farming, increasing public campaigns related to ANPS pollution prevention and control with the goal of raising the level of awareness of farmers, and reforming the methods used to promote science and technology in agriculture and encourage the proper use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

  7. The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, A.; Balzter, H.; George, C.

    2009-10-01

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions, and prolonged fire seasons caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency at a regional scale. Here, we present an analysis of satellite derived soil moisture anomaly data from ERS-1/2 (ERS: Earth Resources Satellite) scatterometer data and burned area maps from MODIS/AVHRR/ATSR (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) over Central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship of remotely sensed soil moisture deviations from the long-term mean and fire within the boreal biome on a sub-continental scale. Results show that wet surface soil moisture conditions limit the extent of burned area. They can prevent the outbreak of fires but the magnitude of a negative (dry) deviation does not determine the maximum size of fire affected areas. It is known from the literature, however, that an ignition is more likely to occur under low surface wetness conditions, such as those that we observed during July and August in both permafrost and non-permafrost regions. Although the burned area under drier conditions in July is lowest over non-permafrost, the actual number of fires is as high as over continuous permafrost. Approximately 80% of all events occurred under such conditions during that month. The fire size was below 50 km2 under moist conditions. Larger burned areas have in general not been detected when the surface wetness deviation exceeded +5%.

  8. Influence of ecohydrologic feedbacks from simulated crop growth on integrated regional hydrologic simulations under climate scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Walsum, P. E. V.; Supit, I.

    2012-06-01

    Hydrologic climate change modelling is hampered by climate-dependent model parameterizations. To reduce this dependency, we extended the regional hydrologic modelling framework SIMGRO to host a two-way coupling between the soil moisture model MetaSWAP and the crop growth simulation model WOFOST, accounting for ecohydrologic feedbacks in terms of radiation fraction that reaches the soil, crop coefficient, interception fraction of rainfall, interception storage capacity, and root zone depth. Except for the last, these feedbacks are dependent on the leaf area index (LAI). The influence of regional groundwater on crop growth is included via a coupling to MODFLOW. Two versions of the MetaSWAP-WOFOST coupling were set up: one with exogenous vegetation parameters, the "static" model, and one with endogenous crop growth simulation, the "dynamic" model. Parameterization of the static and dynamic models ensured that for the current climate the simulated long-term averages of actual evapotranspiration are the same for both models. Simulations were made for two climate scenarios and two crops: grass and potato. In the dynamic model, higher temperatures in a warm year under the current climate resulted in accelerated crop development, and in the case of potato a shorter growing season, thus partly avoiding the late summer heat. The static model has a higher potential transpiration; depending on the available soil moisture, this translates to a higher actual transpiration. This difference between static and dynamic models is enlarged by climate change in combination with higher CO2 concentrations. Including the dynamic crop simulation gives for potato (and other annual arable land crops) systematically higher effects on the predicted recharge change due to climate change. Crop yields from soils with poor water retention capacities strongly depend on capillary rise if moisture supply from other sources is limited. Thus, including a crop simulation model in an integrated

  9. Tillage and N-source influence soil-emitted nitrous oxide in the Alberta Parkland region

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke , R L.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Nyborg, M.; Solberg, E D.

    1999-01-01

    Zero tillage systems are receiving attention as possible strategies for sequestering atmospheric carbon. This benefit may be offset by increased N2O emissions, which have been reported for soils under zero tillage (ZT) compared to those under more intensive tillage (IT). Comparisons of N2O emissions from the two systems have been restricted to the growing season, but substantial losses of N2O have been reported during spring thaw events in many regions. Inorganic and organic additions of nitrogen and fallowing have also been shown to increase levels of soil-emitted N2O. The objectives for this study were: (i) to confirm that losses of N2O are higher under ZT than under IT in Alberta Parkland agroecosystems; (ii) to compare the relative influence of urea fertilizer (56 or 100 kg N h--1), field pea residue (dry matter at 5 Mg h--1), sheep manure (dry matter at 40 Mg h--1) additions, and fallow on total N2O losses; and (iii) to investigate possible interactions between fertility and tillage treatments. Gas samples were collected using vented soil covers at three sites near Edmonton, Alberta during 1993, 1994, and 1995. Gas samples were analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a 63Ni electron capture detector. Estimated annual N2O loss ranged from 0.1 to 4.0 kg N ha-1. Emissions during summer were slightly higher, similar, or lower on ZT compared to those under IT, but were consistently lower on ZT plots during spring thaw. Combined estimates (spring plus summer) of N2O loss under ZT were equal to or lower than those under IT. Highest overall losses were observed on fallow plots, followed by fertilizer, pea residue, and then either manure or control plots. We conclude that ZT management systems have potential for reducing agricultural greenhouse gas emissions in the Alberta Parkland region.

  10. Genetic variability in the tumor necrosis factor-lymphotoxin region influences susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, B.; Waldron-Lynch, F.; Adams, C.; O`Gara, F.

    1996-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class H1 tumor necrosis factor-tymphotoxin (TNF-LT) region (6p21.3) was investigated as a possible susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inheritance of five TNF microsatellite markers was determined in 50 multiplex families. Overall, 47 different haplotypes were observed. One of these, the TNF a6, b5, c1, d3, e3 (H1) haplotype, was present in 35.3% of affected, but in only 20.5% of unaffected, individuals (P < .005). This haplotype accounted for 21.5% of the parental haplotypes transmitted to affected offspring and only 7.3 % not transmitted to affected offspring (P = .0003). The TNF a6 and TNF c1 alleles were individually associated with RA (P = .0005 and .0008, respectively), as were the HLA-DRB1 {open_quotes}shared epitope{close_quotes} (SE) (P = .0001) and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = .0018). Both univariate and bivariate conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of TNF c1 and SE in increasing risk to RA (P < .001). Stratification by the presence of SE indicated an independent effect of the TNFc1 allele (P = .0003) and the HLA A1, BS, DR3 extended haplotype (always TNFa2, b3, c1, d1, e3) (P = .0027) in SE heterozygotes, while the H1 haplotype was associated with RA in SE homozygotes (P = .0018). The TNF-LT region appears to influence susceptibility to RA, distinct from HLA-DR. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Differential influences of emotion, task, and novelty on brain regions underlying the processing of speech melody.

    PubMed

    Ethofer, Thomas; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Wiethoff, Sarah; Wolf, Jonathan; Grodd, Wolfgang; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the functional characteristics of brain regions implicated in processing of speech melody by presenting words spoken in either neutral or angry prosody during a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment using a factorial habituation design. Subjects judged either affective prosody or word class for these vocal stimuli, which could be heard for either the first, second, or third time. Voice-sensitive temporal cortices, as well as the amygdala, insula, and mediodorsal thalami, reacted stronger to angry than to neutral prosody. These stimulus-driven effects were not influenced by the task, suggesting that these brain structures are automatically engaged during processing of emotional information in the voice and operate relatively independent of cognitive demands. By contrast, the right middle temporal gyrus and the bilateral orbito-frontal cortices (OFC) responded stronger during emotion than word classification, but were also sensitive to anger expressed by the voices, suggesting that some perceptual aspects of prosody are also encoded within these regions subserving explicit processing of vocal emotion. The bilateral OFC showed a selective modulation by emotion and repetition, with particularly pronounced responses to angry prosody during the first presentation only, indicating a critical role of the OFC in detection of vocal information that is both novel and behaviorally relevant. These results converge with previous findings obtained for angry faces and suggest a general involvement of the OFC for recognition of anger irrespective of the sensory modality. Taken together, our study reveals that different aspects of voice stimuli and perceptual demands modulate distinct areas involved in the processing of emotional prosody.

  12. The influence of sodium hypochlorite and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions. Seventy-two human incisors were decoronated at the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into six groups (n=12) according to irrigant and sealer technique: G1-Distilled water (DW) without sealer; G2-DW + AH Plus (Dentsply/Maillefer); G3-DW + Endofill (Dentsply/Maillefer); G4-5.251%NaOCl without sealer; G5-5.25% NaOCl + AH Plus; G6-5.25% NaOCl + Endofill. Specimens were stored in a humid environment for 30 days at 37 degrees C and were prepared with FRC Postec's drills for post insertion. The posts were cemented with Excite DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar/Vivadent). The specimens were sectioned through their long axis into three dental slices approximately 2.5 mm each, representing the cervical (C), middle (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root preparation. After calculating the adhered area of the specimens, they were submitted to the push-out test in a universal testing machine. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 5% significance level and to the Tukey test (p<0.05). The mean values (MPa) obtained for cervical, middle and apical areas of the root preparation, respectively, were: G1=8.6; 12.5 and 14.3, G2=13.5; 15.4 and 16.9; G3=6.9; 10.0 and 12.1; G4=13.0; 14.9 and 15.4; G5=11.3; 13.5 and 18.0; and G6=11.0; 11.8 and 11.5. Based on the results, the eugenol-based sealer (Endofill) resulted in significantly lower mean retention strength values compared with the resin-based sealer (AH Plus). The apical region showed the greatest retention. The lowest resistance to dislodgment was found in the cervical region, mainly in the groups that used distilled water for irrigating the root canal.

  13. Insights for empirically modeling evapotranspiration influenced by riparian and upland vegetation in semiarid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunting, Daniel P.; Kurc, Shirley A.; Glenn, Edward P.; Nagler, Pamela L.; Scott, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Water resource managers aim to ensure long-term water supplies for increasing human populations. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key component of the water balance and accurate estimates are important to quantify safe allocations to humans while supporting environmental needs. Scaling up ET measurements from small spatial scales has been problematic due to spatiotemporal variability. Remote sensing products provide spatially distributed data that account for seasonal climate and vegetation variability. We used MODIS products [i.e., Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and nighttime land surface temperatures (LSTn)] to create empirical ET models calibrated using measured ET from three riparian-influenced and two upland, water-limited flux tower sites. Results showed that combining all sites introduced systematic bias, so we developed separate models to estimate riparian and upland ET. While EVI and LSTn were the main drivers for ET in riparian sites, precipitation replaced LSTn as the secondary driver of ET in upland sites. Riparian ET was successfully modeled using an inverse exponential approach (r2 = 0.92) while upland ET was adequately modeled using a multiple linear regression approach (r2 = 0.77). These models can be used in combination to estimate ET at basin scales provided each region is classified and precipitation data is available.

  14. Streamflow hydrology in the boreal region under the influences of climate and human interference.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ming-Ko; Thorne, Robin; Szeto, Kit; Yang, Daqing

    2008-07-12

    The boreal region has a subarctic climate that is subject to considerable inter-annual variability and is prone to impacts of future warming. Climate influences the seasonal streamflow regime which typically exhibits winter low flow, terminated by spring freshet, followed by summer flow recession. The effects of climatic variation on streamflow cannot be isolated with confidence but the impact of human regulation of rivers can greatly alter the natural flow rhythm, changing the timing of flow to suit human demands. The effect of scenario climate change on streamflow is explored through hydrological simulation. Example of a Canadian basin under warming scenario suggests that winter flow will increase, spring freshet dates will advance but peak flow will decline, as will summer flow due to enhanced evaporation. While this simulation was site specific, the results are qualitatively applicable to other boreal areas. Future studies should consider the role of human activities as their impacts on streamflow will be more profound than those due to climate change.

  15. Regional tectonic influence on Early Cretaceous depositional patterns in Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.G.; Petta, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Integration of gravity, magnetic, seismic, and subsurface data from the Powder River basin indicates left-lateral wrenching caused principal and secondary shear compression to develop along northwest and east trends, respectively. This well-documented strain fabric caused by Laramide events has affected basin morphology and depositional patterns within the basin since the Early Cretaceous. Regional lineaments mapped at the surface have vertical displacements of tens of feet. These slightly displaced features can be correlated with wrench-related synthetic and antithetic fractures that display miles of subsurface lateral displacement. Results of detailed integrated forward modeling indicate these fractured zones had a significant effect on the distribution of Lower Cretaceous reservoir sands. Case histories from Buck Draw (Dakota Formation) and Bell Creek (Muddy Sandstone) fields illustrate how the consideration of basement tectonic influence is important to the proper evaluation of exploration leads. Proper use of all available data is essential to the reduction of exploratory risk and can aid in planning offset locations.

  16. Stable transformation of Theobroma cacao L. and influence of matrix attachment regions on GFP expression.

    PubMed

    Maximova, S; Miller, C; Antúnez de Mayolo, G; Pishak, S; Young, A; Guiltinan, M J

    2003-06-01

    We describe a protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Theobroma cacao L. using cotyledonary explants from primary somatic embryos (SEs) and A. tumefaciens strain AGL1. Transgenic plants carrying the visible marker, gene green fluorescent protein ( EGFP), the selectable marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase II ( NPTII), the class I chitinase gene from cacao ( Chi), and tobacco nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) in different combinations were successfully produced via regeneration of secondary SEs. The presence of the Chi gene or MARs did not influence the number of transgenic plants produced compared to the marker genes alone. However, the inclusion of MARs contributed to increased mean GFP expression in the population of transgenics. Additionally, the presence of MARs reduced the occurrence of gene silencing and stabilized high levels of GFP expression in lines of transgenic plants multiplied via reiterative somatic embryogenesis. Ninety-four transgenic plants were acclimated in a greenhouse and grown to maturity. Detailed growth analysis indicated that there were no differences in various growth parameters between transgenic and non-transgenic SE-derived plants. Seeds produced from two genetic crosses with one of the transgenic lines were analyzed for EGFP expression-a near-perfect 1:1 segregation was observed, indicating that this line resulted from the insertion of a single locus of T-DNA. PMID:12789505

  17. The influence of fine-scale habitat features on regional variation in population performance of alpine White-tailed Ptarmigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, B.; Martin, K.

    2011-01-01

    It is often assumed (explicitly or implicitly) that animals select habitat features to maximize fitness. However, there is often a mismatch between preferred habitats and indices of individual and population measures of performance. We examined the influence of fine-scale habitat selection on the overall population performance of the White-tailed Ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura), an alpine specialist, in two subdivided populations whose habitat patches are configured differently. The central region of Vancouver Island, Canada, has more continuous and larger habitat patches than the southern region. In 2003 and 2004, using paired logistic regression between used (n = 176) and available (n = 324) sites, we identified food availability, distance to standing water, and predator cover as preferred habitat components . We then quantified variation in population performance in the two regions in terms of sex ratio, age structure (n = 182 adults and yearlings), and reproductive success (n = 98 females) on the basis of 8 years of data (1995-1999, 2002-2004). Region strongly influenced females' breeding success, which, unsuccessful hens included, was consistently higher in the central region (n = 77 females) of the island than in the south (n = 21 females, P = 0.01). The central region also had a much higher proportion of successful hens (87%) than did the south (55%, P < 0.001). In light of our findings, we suggest that population performance is influenced by a combination of fine-scale habitat features and coarse-scale habitat configuration. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  18. Dynamic m6A mRNA methylation directs translational control of heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Wan, Ji; Gao, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingqian; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2015-01-01

    The most abundant mRNA post-transcriptional modification is N6-methyladenosine (m6A) that has broad roles in RNA biology1-5. In mammalian cells, the asymmetric distribution of m6A along mRNAs leaves relatively less methylation in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) compared to other regions6,7. However, whether and how 5′UTR methylation is regulated is poorly understood. Despite the crucial role of the 5′UTR in translation initiation, very little is known whether m6A modification influences mRNA translation. Here we show that in response to heat shock stress, m6A is preferentially deposited to the 5′UTR of newly transcribed mRNAs. We found that the dynamic 5′UTR methylation is a result of stress-induced nuclear localization of YTHDF2, a well characterized m6A “reader”. Upon heat shock stress, the nuclear YTHDF2 preserves 5′UTR methylation of stress-induced transcripts by limiting the m6A “eraser” FTO from demethylation. Remarkably, the increased 5′UTR methylation in the form of m6A promotes cap-independent translation initiation, providing a mechanism for selective mRNA translation under heat shock stress. Using Hsp70 mRNA as an example, we demonstrate that a single site m6A modification in the 5′UTR enables translation initiation independent of the 5′ end m7G cap. The elucidation of the dynamic feature of 5′UTR methylation and its critical role in cap-independent translation not only expands the breadth of physiological roles of m6A, but also uncovers a previously unappreciated translational control mechanism in heat shock response. PMID:26458103

  19. Influences of age, tongue region, and chorda tympani nerve sectioning on signal detection measures of lingual taste sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Heidt, Julie M; MacGillivray, Michael R; Dsouza, Merle; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Mirza, Natasha; Bigelow, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Although the ability to taste is critical for ingestion, nutrition, and quality of life, a clear understanding of the influences of age, sex, and chorda tympani (CT) resection on taste function in different regions of the anterior tongue is generally lacking. In this study we employed criterion-free signal detection analysis to assess electric and chemical taste function on multiple tongue regions in normal individuals varying in age and sex and in patients with unilateral CT resections. The subjects were 33 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, and 9 persons, 27 to 77 years of age, with unilateral CT lesions. The influences of age, sex, tongue region, and chorda tympani resections on signal detection sensitivity (d') and response bias (β) measures was assessed in 16 tongue regions to weak electric currents and solutions of sucrose, sodium chloride, and caffeine. Significant age-related decrements in d' were found for sucrose (p=0.012), sodium chloride (p=0.002), caffeine (p=0.006), and electric current (EC) (p=0.0001). Significant posterior to anterior, and medial to lateral, gradients of increasing performance were present for most stimuli. β was larger on the anterior than the posterior tongue for the electrical stimulus in the youngest subjects, whereas the opposite was true for sucrose in the oldest subjects. No sex differences were apparent. d' was depressed ipsilateral to the CT lesion side to varying degrees in all tongue regions, with the weakest influences occurring on the medial and anterior tongue. CT did not meaningfully influence β. This study is the first to employ signal detection analysis to assess the regional sensitivity of the tongue to chemical and electrical stimuli. It clearly demonstrates that tongue regions differ from one another in terms of their age-related sensitivity and their susceptibility to CT lesions.

  20. Time-Series Analysis of Remotely-Sensed SeaWiFS Chlorophyll in River-Influenced Coastal Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.; McMahon, Erin; Shen, Suhung; Hearty, Thomas; Casey, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The availability of a nearly-continuous record of remotely-sensed chlorophyll a data (chl a) from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) mission, now longer than ten years, enables examination of time-series trends for multiple global locations. Innovative data analysis technology available on the World Wide Web facilitates such analyses. In coastal regions influenced by river outflows, chl a is not always indicative of actual trends in phytoplankton chlorophyll due to the interference of colored dissolved organic matter and suspended sediments; significant chl a timeseries trends for coastal regions influenced by river outflows may nonetheless be indicative of important alterations of the hydrologic and coastal environment. Chl a time-series analysis of nine marine regions influenced by river outflows demonstrates the simplicity and usefulness of this technique. The analyses indicate that coastal time-series are significantly influenced by unusual flood events. Major river systems in regions with relatively low human impact did not exhibit significant trends. Most river systems with demonstrated human impact exhibited significant negative trends, with the noteworthy exception of the Pearl River in China, which has a positive trend.

  1. A regional biogeography of shore molluscs: influence of the Kuroshio current and the two capes.

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, Shun-Ichi

    2011-04-01

    The regional pattern of shore molluscan assemblages was investigated along a 650-km coastline of the Kii Peninsula in central Japan. Hydrography of the coastal waters differed between three subareas, the Inner Kii Channel (IKC), the Outer Kii Channel (OKC), and the Sea of Kumano (SOK), which are demarcated by the two prominent capes, Cape Hinomisaki and Cape Shionomisaki. The water of OKC was warm, saline, and transparent compared to that of the other subareas, due to the influence of the intruding Kuroshio current. Corresponding to this hydrographic difference, the composition of shore malacofauna differed between OKC and the other subareas. Species diversity and relative abundance of the southern species (< 35° N) increased southward and were higher in the OKC than in the other subareas. Multivariate analysis on various environmental and biotic parameters detected significant relationships between the temperature and geographic groups of species, and between substratum geology and trophic groups. The present and previous results elucidated the following biogeographic process in the study area. The Kuroshio washes the coast of the OKC, and enriches the southern species by increasing the temperature and providing their larvae; thus the diversified warm-water malacofauna of the OKC intervenes between the colderwater malacofaunas of the IKC and SOK. This major pattern is further modified by shore geology and the degree of wave exposure at local scales. The present survey method, a semi-quantitative timed search for intertidal assemblages required less time than, and yet yielded results similar to, the widely used dispersed quadrat survey for the parameters selected in the present analysis.

  2. Estimating the Influence of Biological Ice Nuclei on Clouds with Regional Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Matthias; Hoose, Corinna; Schaupp, Caroline; Möhler, Ottmar

    2014-05-01

    Cloud properties are largely influenced by the atmospheric formation of ice particles. Some primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP), e.g. certain bacteria, fungal spores or pollen, have been identified as effective ice nuclei (IN). The work presented here quantifies the IN concentrations originating from PBAP in order to estimate their influences on clouds with the regional scale atmospheric model COSMO-ART in a six day case study for Western Europe. The atmospheric particle distribution is calculated for three different PBAP (bacteria, fungal spores and birch pollen). The parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation of PBAP are derived from AIDA cloud chamber experiments with Pseudomonas syringae bacteria and birch pollen (Schaupp, 2013) and from published data on Cladosporium spores (Iannone et al., 2011). A constant fraction of ice-active bacteria and fungal spores relative to the total bacteria and spore concentration had to be assumed. At cloud altitude, average simulated PBAP number concentrations are ~17 L-1 for bacteria and fungal spores and ~0.03 L-1 for birch pollen, including large temporal and spatial variations of more than one order of magnitude. Thus, the average, 'diagnostic' in-cloud PBAP IN concentrations, which only depend on the PBAP concentrations and temperature, without applying dynamics and cloud microphysics, lie at the lower end of the range of typically observed atmospheric IN concentrations . Average PBAP IN concentrations are between 10-6 L-1 and 10-4 L-1. Locally but not very frequently, PBAP IN concentrations can be as high as 0.2 L-1 at -10° C. Two simulations are compared to estimate the cloud impact of PBAP IN, both including mineral dust as an additional background IN with a constant concentration of 100 L-1. One of the simulations includes additional PBAP IN which can alter the cloud properties compared to the reference simulation without PBAP IN. The difference in ice particle and cloud droplet concentration between

  3. Assessment of the MACC reanalysis and its influence as chemical boundary conditions for regional air quality modeling in AQMEII-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, L.; Brunner, D.; Flemming, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Im, U.; Bianconi, R.; Badia, A.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Chemel, C.; Curci, G.; Forkel, R.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Hirtl, M.; Hodzic, A.; Honzak, L.; Jorba, O.; Knote, C.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Makar, P. A.; Manders-Groot, A.; Neal, L.; Pérez, J. L.; Pirovano, G.; Pouliot, G.; San José, R.; Savage, N.; Schröder, W.; Sokhi, R. S.; Syrakov, D.; Torian, A.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Wolke, R.; Yahya, K.; Žabkar, R.; Zhang, Y.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) has now reached its second phase which is dedicated to the evaluation of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Sixteen modeling groups from Europe and five from North America have run regional air quality models to simulate the year 2010 over one European and one North American domain. The MACC re-analysis has been used as chemical initial (IC) and boundary conditions (BC) by all participating regional models in AQMEII-2. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the MACC re-analysis along with the participating regional models against a set of ground-based measurements (O3, CO, NO, NO2, SO2, SO42-) and vertical profiles (O3 and CO). Results indicate different degrees of agreement between the measurements and the MACC re-analysis, with an overall better performance over the North American domain. The influence of BC on regional air quality simulations is analyzed in a qualitative way by contrasting model performance for the MACC re-analysis with that for the regional models. This approach complements more quantitative approaches documented in the literature that often have involved sensitivity simulations but typically were limited to only one or only a few regional scale models. Results suggest an important influence of the BC on ozone for which the underestimation in winter in the MACC re-analysis is mimicked by the regional models. For CO, it is found that background concentrations near the domain boundaries are rather close to observations while those over the interior of the two continents are underpredicted by both MACC and the regional models over Europe but only by MACC over North America. This indicates that emission differences between the MACC re-analysis and the regional models can have a profound impact on model performance and points to the need for harmonization of inputs in future linked global/regional modeling studies.

  4. Dynamics of tRNA translocation, mRNA translocation and tRNA dissociation during ribosome translation through mRNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2014-07-01

    The ribosome can translate through the duplex region or secondary structure of mRNA. Recent single-molecule experimental data showed that downstream mRNA secondary structures have more sensitive effects on deacylated tRNA dissociation from the E site than on tRNA translocation in the 50S subunit. However, it is unclear how the downstream mRNA secondary structure can affect the tRNA dissociation from the E site, which is distant from the secondary structure. Here, based on our proposed ribosomal translocation model, we theoretically study the dynamics of tRNA translocation in the 50S subunit, mRNA translocation and tRNA dissociation, giving quantitative explanations of the single-molecule experimental data. It is shown that the effect of the downstream mRNA secondary structure on tRNA dissociation is via the effect on mRNA translocation, while the mRNA secondary structure has no effect on the rate of deacylated tRNA dissociation from the posttranslocation state. The slow mRNA translocation, which results in slow tRNA dissociation, derives from the occurrence of the futile transition, which is induced by the energy barrier from base pair unwinding to resist the forward translocation. The reduced translation rate through the mRNA secondary structure is induced by the slow mRNA translocation rather than the slow tRNA dissociation.

  5. The influence of external forcing on subdecadal variability of regional surface temperature in CMIP5 simulations of the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thanh; Sjolte, Jesper; Muscheler, Raimund

    2016-02-01

    We use Granger causality to investigate the influences of external forcings on subdecadal variability of regional near-surface air temperature (SAT) in past millennium simulations (period 850-1850 A.D.) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models. Our results strengthen the conclusion for robust influence of volcanic forcing on SAT during preindustrial times of the last millennium. The SAT response to solar variations is detected in tropical and subtropical regions. In other regions, this response is weak. The impact of greenhouse gases (GHGs) radiative forcing to regional SAT is weak and uncertain. This is most probably due to the low amplitude of the variations in GHGs and hence weak GHGs forcing during the preindustrial millennium. The low agreement between models in simulating the impacts of solar variations on SAT in several regions suggests the different dynamical responses in these models, possibly associated with inaccurate parameterization of the processes related to solar forcing. Our analysis suggests that internal climate variability played a more significant role than external forcings in short-term SAT variability in the regions of the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, the Arctic, the Antarctic Peninsula, and its surrounding oceans. The possibility of long-term impacts of external forcings on SAT and the uncertainties that might be contained due to effects of internal climate modes other than El Niño-Southern Oscillation underscore the necessity for a more detailed understanding of the dynamical response of SAT to external forcings.

  6. Strong Influence of Variable Treatment on the Performance of Numerically Defined Ecological Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, Ton; Lehmann, Anthony; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Leathwick, John; Allenbach, Karin

    2009-10-01

    Numerical clustering has frequently been used to define hierarchically organized ecological regionalizations, but there has been little robust evaluation of their performance (i.e., the degree to which regions discriminate areas with similar ecological character). In this study we investigated the effect of the weighting and treatment of input variables on the performance of regionalizations defined by agglomerative clustering across a range of hierarchical levels. For this purpose, we developed three ecological regionalizations of Switzerland of increasing complexity using agglomerative clustering. Environmental data for our analysis were drawn from a 400 m grid and consisted of estimates of 11 environmental variables for each grid cell describing climate, topography and lithology. Regionalization 1 was defined from the environmental variables which were given equal weights. We used the same variables in Regionalization 2 but weighted and transformed them on the basis of a dissimilarity model that was fitted to land cover composition data derived for a random sample of cells from interpretation of aerial photographs. Regionalization 3 was a further two-stage development of Regionalization 2 where specific classifications, also weighted and transformed using dissimilarity models, were applied to 25 small scale “sub-domains” defined by Regionalization 2. Performance was assessed in terms of the discrimination of land cover composition for an independent set of sites using classification strength (CS), which measured the similarity of land cover composition within classes and the dissimilarity between classes. Regionalization 2 performed significantly better than Regionalization 1, but the largest gains in performance, compared to Regionalization 1, occurred at coarse hierarchical levels (i.e., CS did not increase significantly beyond the 25-region level). Regionalization 3 performed better than Regionalization 2 beyond the 25-region level and CS values continued

  7. Influence of local and regional Mediterranean meteorology on SO₂ ground-level concentrations in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Santacatalina, Milagros; Carratalá, Adoración; Mantilla, Enrique

    2011-06-01

    This work presents the results of a 4-year study on sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) ground-level concentrations in an area of southeastern Spain, the L'Alacantí region, where the cement industry is important and coke use extends to other industries as well. The main source of SO(2) emissions in the area was found to be a the Lepold cement plant (one of the two cement plants in the area). The high levels of SO(2) probably extend back to 1920 when this plant began operations. Both local and Mediterranean-scale meteorological processes influence the SO(2) ground-level concentration and together explain the dispersion dynamics of this pollutant. The location and topography of the study zone result in NW Atlantic advections and E-SE sea breezes being the dominant atmospheric circulation patterns in the area. Under stable meteorological conditions, minor local circulations are also relevant to the SO(2) concentration levels. The high frequency of local circulations determines a concentration pattern that changes during the day, with impacts occurring preferentially in a W-NW direction from the source at midday (sea breeze and strong thermal mixture), and in a SE direction at night. This causes the SO(2) concentrations to present well-defined diurnal cycles with well-differentiated shapes depending on the location of the sampling station relative to the source. The dependence of SO(2) 10 min levels on the wind origin and speed throughout the day has been evaluated by studying statistical parameters including P95, P50 and arithmetic mean. Exceedances occur under specific dispersion conditions at distances less than 1 km from the source. However, the source is traceable at larger distances and the levels are higher than typical urban ones. P95 was used as an estimator of the occurrence of larger levels or impacts. Leeward of NW winds and the source, at night and in early morning, P95 levels are comprised between 30 and 55 µg m(-3). In contrast, with SE winds and at midday, P95

  8. Influence of mRNA expression of epiregulin and amphiregulin on outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-FU/LV plus irinotecan or irinotecan plus oxaliplatin as first-line treatment (FIRE 1-trial).

    PubMed

    Stahler, A; Heinemann, V; Giessen-Jung, C; Crispin, A; Schalhorn, A; Stintzing, S; Fischer von Weikersthal, L; Vehling-Kaiser, U; Stauch, M; Quietzsch, D; Held, S; von Einem, J C; Holch, J; Neumann, J; Kirchner, T; Jung, A; Modest, D P

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of EREG and AREG mRNA expression (by RT-qPCR) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (by immunohistochemistry) as well as RAS-and PIK3CA-mutations (by pyrosequencing) were assessed. Tumors of 208 mCRC patients receiving 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus irinotecan (FUFIRI) or irinotecan plus oxaliplatin (mIROX) within the FIRE-1 trial were analyzed for mutations. Molecular characteristics were correlated with response, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS). mRNA expression was evaluated using ROC-analysis in 192 tumors (AREG high n = 31 vs. low n = 161; EREG high n = 89 vs. low n = 103). High versus low AREG expression was associated with PFS of 10.0 versus 8.0 months (HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.402-0.940, p = 0.03) and OS of 24.6 versus 18.7 months (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.476-1.078, p = 0.11). High versus low EREG expression correlated with prolonged PFS (9.4 vs. 6.8 months, HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.460-0.846, p = 0.002) and OS (25.8 vs. 15.5 months, HR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.351-0.657, p < 0.001). The positive prognostic effect of high EREG expression was confirmed in a multivariate analysis and was neither affected by EGFR expression nor by mutations of RAS- and PIK3CA-genes. EREG expression appears as an independent prognostic marker in patients with mCRC receiving first-line irinotecan-based chemotherapy. PMID:26284333

  9. [Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster limk1 gene 3'-UTRs mRNA in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, A M; Zakharov, G A; Zhuravlev, A V; Padkina, M V; Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Sambuk, E V

    2014-06-01

    The stability of mRNA and its translation efficacy in higher eukaryotes are influenced by the interaction of 3'-untranscribed regions (3'-UTRs) with microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae lack microRNAs, it is possible to evaluate the contribution of only 3'-UTRs' and RNA-binding proteins' interaction in post-transcriptional regulation. For this, the post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila limk1 gene encoding for the key enzyme of actin remodeling was studied in yeast. Analysis of limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs revealed the potential sites of yeast transcriptional termination. Computer remodeling demonstrated the possibility of secondary structure formation in limkl mRNA 3'-UTRs. For an evaluation of the functional activity of Drosophila 3'-UTRs in yeast, the reporter gene PHO5 encoding for yeast acid phosphatase (AP) fused to different variants of Drosophila limk1 mRNA 3'-UTRs (513, 1075, 1554 bp) was used. Assessments of AP activity and RT-PCR demonstrated that Drosophila limkl gene 3'-UTRs were functionally active and recognized in yeast. Therefore, yeast might be used as an appropriate model system for studies of 3'-UTR's role in post-transcriptional regulation.

  10. Variable region domain exchange influences the functional properties of IgG.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Porter, S B; Trinh, K R; Wims, L A; Denham, J; Oi, V T

    1998-03-15

    In the present study we have characterized a family of anti-dansyl Abs with the variable region of the heavy chain on human Ckappa and the variable region of the light chain on different human gamma constant regions (creating inside-out molecules). Although fully assembled molecules were secreted, this variable region exchange slowed the kinetics of Ab assembly. Although the variable region exchange does not lead to a detectable change in the microenvironment of the combining site, it did alter the kinetic parameters of binding to immobilized Ag, slowing both the on and off rates. When effector functions were evaluated, inside-out IgG1 and IgG3 were more effective in complement-mediated cytolysis than their wild-type counterparts. Variable region domain exchange may be one approach to obtaining Abs of identical specificity with altered binding characteristics.

  11. Regional Genetic Structure and Environmental Variables Influence our Conservation Approach for Feather Heads (Ptilotus macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Collin W; James, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Continued alterations to the Australian environment compromise the long-term viability of many plant species. We investigate the population genetics of Ptilotus macrocephalus, a perennial herb that occurs in 2 nationally endangered communities on the Victorian Volcanic Plain Bioregion (VVP), Australia, to answer key questions regarding regional differentiation and to guide conservation strategies. We evaluate genetic structure and diversity within and among 17 P. macrocephalus populations from 3 regions of southeastern Australia using 17 microsatellite markers developed de novo. Genetic structure was present in P. macrocephalus between the 3 regions but not at the population level. Environmental factors, namely temperature and precipitation, significantly explained differentiation between the North region and the other 2 regions indicating isolation by environment. Within regions, genetic structure currently shows a high level of gene flow and genetic variation. Our results suggest that within-region gene flow does not reflect current habitat fragmentation in southeastern Australia whereas temperature and precipitation are likely to be responsible for the differentiation detected among regions. Climate change may severely impact P. macrocephalus on the VVP and test its evolutionary resilience. We suggest taking a proactive conservation approach to improve long-term viability by sourcing material for restoration to assist gene flow to the VVP region to promote an increased adaptive capacity. PMID:26865733

  12. Regional Genetic Structure and Environmental Variables Influence our Conservation Approach for Feather Heads (Ptilotus macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Collin W; James, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Continued alterations to the Australian environment compromise the long-term viability of many plant species. We investigate the population genetics of Ptilotus macrocephalus, a perennial herb that occurs in 2 nationally endangered communities on the Victorian Volcanic Plain Bioregion (VVP), Australia, to answer key questions regarding regional differentiation and to guide conservation strategies. We evaluate genetic structure and diversity within and among 17 P. macrocephalus populations from 3 regions of southeastern Australia using 17 microsatellite markers developed de novo. Genetic structure was present in P. macrocephalus between the 3 regions but not at the population level. Environmental factors, namely temperature and precipitation, significantly explained differentiation between the North region and the other 2 regions indicating isolation by environment. Within regions, genetic structure currently shows a high level of gene flow and genetic variation. Our results suggest that within-region gene flow does not reflect current habitat fragmentation in southeastern Australia whereas temperature and precipitation are likely to be responsible for the differentiation detected among regions. Climate change may severely impact P. macrocephalus on the VVP and test its evolutionary resilience. We suggest taking a proactive conservation approach to improve long-term viability by sourcing material for restoration to assist gene flow to the VVP region to promote an increased adaptive capacity.

  13. Influence of land use and climate on wetland breeding birds in the Prairie Pothole region of Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forcey, G.M.; Linz, G.M.; Thogmartin, W.E.; Bleier, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Bird populations are influenced by a variety of factors at both small and large scales that range from the presence of suitable nesting habitat, predators, and food supplies to climate conditions and land-use patterns. We evaluated the influences of regional climate and land-use variables on wetland breeding birds in the Canada section of Bird Conservation Region 11 (CA-BCR11), the Prairie Potholes. We used bird abundance data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey, land-use data from the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration, and weather data from the National Climatic Data and Information Archive to model effects of regional environmental variables on bird abundance. Models were constructed a priori using information from published habitat associations in the literature, and fitting was performed with WinBUGS using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Both land-use and climate variables contributed to predicting bird abundance in CA-BCR11, although climate predictors contributed the most to improving model fit. Examination of regional effects of climate and land use on wetland birds in CA-BCR11 revealed relationships with environmental covariates that are often overlooked by small-scale habitat studies. Results from these studies can be used to improve conservation and management planning for regional populations of avifauna. ?? 2007 NRC.

  14. Factors Influencing Student Satisfaction in Universities in the Gulf Region: Does Gender of Students Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parahoo, Sanjai K.; Harvey, Heather L.; Tamim, Rana M.

    2013-01-01

    While various research studies have focused on antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction, few studies have done so in the Gulf region. The objective of the present study was therefore to design and empirically examine a model of student satisfaction in a private university in the Gulf region that operates in a high-technology-enabled…

  15. Correlation of mRNA and protein in complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tobias; Güell, Marc; Serrano, Luis

    2009-12-17

    The correlation between mRNA and protein abundances in the cell has been reported to be notoriously poor. Recent technological advances in the quantitative analysis of mRNA and protein species in complex samples allow the detailed analysis of this pathway at the center of biological systems. We give an overview of available methods for the identification and quantification of free and ribosome-bound mRNA, protein abundances and individual protein turnover rates. We review available literature on the correlation of mRNA and protein abundances and discuss biological and technical parameters influencing the correlation of these central biological molecules.

  16. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  17. Toward a Quantitative Assessment of the Influence of Regional Emission Sources on Ozone Production in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Wolfe, D. E.; Tevlin, A.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Fischer, E. V.; Brown, S. S.; Angevine, W. M.; Edwards, P.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Photochemical ozone production results from the oxidation and reaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO). As with many US urban regions, ozone levels observed in the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Region of Colorado are influenced by urban emissions of NOx and VOCs. Despite nationwide decreases in these urban emissions, the Front Range of Colorado is one of the few US locations where ozone is currently increasing. It has also recently gone out of compliance with national ambient air quality standards for ozone during summer months. High ozone in Colorado may result from a number of factors, including long-range transport from Asia, increased influence of biomass burning, population increases, or increased emissions from oil and gas activities. The Front Range is home to the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin, which has recently been experiencing a rise in oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity associated with the increase in non-conventional drilling techniques. The VOC and NOx emissions from O&NG activity in close proximity to the urban area may uniquely influence ozone in this region. This presentation will focus on using reactive nitrogen (NOx, NOy) and ozone measurements from a tall (300 m) tower to study the influence of local emissions on Front Range ozone. The tower is located between the D-J Basin and agricultural areas to the north and the Denver metro area to the south. In-situ reactive nitrogen and ozone measurements were collected using a custom Cavity Ring-Down instrument. Additional CH4, CO, and NH3 measurements from the tower serve as tracers for O&NG, urban, and agricultural emissions. Concurrently measured aircraft data is used to confirm the relationships between the tracer species. This presentation will discuss methods for determining the contributions of different emission sources to Front Range ozone, with a focus on differentiating the influence of urban and O&NG sources.

  18. Assessment of regional influence from a petrochemical complex by modeling and fingerprint analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuan-Chang; Chen, Sheng-Po; Tong, Yu-Huei; Fan, Chen-Lun; Chen, Wei-Hao; Wang, Jia-Lin; Chang, Julius S.

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate a strategy to investigate the influence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on its neighboring districts from a gigantic petrochemical complex. Monitoring of the VOCs in the region was achieved by a nine-station network, dubbed photochemical assessment measurement stations (PAMS), which produced speciated mixing ratios of 54 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) to represent VOCs with an hourly resolution within a 20 km radius. One-year (2013/10/1-2014/9/30) worth of PAMS data from the network were used in forms of total NMHCs (called PAMS-TNMHC) and speciated mixing ratios. Three dimensional modeling coupled with PAMS measurements successfully elucidated how the study domain was affected by the petrochemical complex and distant sources under three typical seasonal wind patterns: northeast monsoonal, southwest monsoonal, and local-circulation. More exquisite analysis of influence on the neighboring districts was permitted with the use of speciated mixing ratios of VOCs provided by the PAMS network. The ratios of ethylene/acetylene (E/A) > 3 and propylene/acetylene (P/A) > 1.5 were used as indicators to reveal the PAMS sites affected by the petrochemical emissions. Consequently, the hourly speciated data from the nine PAMS sites enabled a finer assessment of the districts affected by the complex to calculate the percent time of influence (dubbed TI%) for all the sites (districts). It was found that the region was more affected by the complex under both the northeast monsoonal and the local-circulation wind types with some of the PAMS sites greater than 5% for the TI%. By contrast, influence on the region was found minimal under the southwest monsoonal flow with the TI% small than 1.5% across all sites. This study successfully devised a method of assessment with the use of speciated measurements of selected VOCs and modeling to assess the influence of a prominent source on the neighboring districts by filtering out irrelevant sources under

  19. The Large-Scale Oscillations Influence Over the Interdecadal Climate Variability in Mexico's Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre, R.; Brito-Castillo, L.; Tereshchenko, I.; Atmospheric Sciences Climatology Climate Variability

    2013-05-01

    Climate in the highlands of Mexico displays high variability due to its complex terrain and elevation. The knowledge to elucidate the principal forcings of these variations can be useful for forecasting annual and seasonal temperature and precipitation over this area. Due to its complexity a small area in the highlands was delimited with defined physical boundaries, encompassing several states of Mexico. The study area was defined as Mexico's Central Region (MCR), which is located between 19.5 ° - 22.5 ° N and 98.5 ° - 104 ° W. Most of this area overlies the plateau of Anahuac, whose physical boundaries extend to the north from the "Sierras Transversales" (composed by the "Sierra de Zacatecas", the "Sierra de la "Breña" and the "Sierra de San Luis") to the "Eje Neovolcánico" to the south; east and west boundaries are confined by the "Sierra Madre Oriental" and the "Sierra Madre Occidental", respectively. Daily data of maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation series from a total of 112 weather stations were obtained from CLICOM and ERICIII databases. Several climatic indices with average periods of phase oscillations greater than five years, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDOI), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMOI), The Arctic Oscillation (AOI), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAOI), and Aleutian Low Pressure (ALPI) on a monthly basis for all series, except the ALPI series which is on annual rate, were also used in this study. Indices data were obtained from the web site http://www.cicimar.ipn.mx/oacis/Indices_Climaticos.php/. The common period of all series was 1961-2000. We applied Principal Component Analysis to precipitation and temperature series to identify the principal modes of variation of the series. The first mode explained more than 68% of the variance in the original series and corresponds to annual variations. Contour maps were useful to elucidate that temperature variations are highly correlated with the terrain

  20. Far-field model of the regional influence of affluent plumes from Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW sub e OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW sub e OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW sub e OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW sub e OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  1. Far-field model of the regional influence of effluent plumes from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  2. Using FLEXPART-WRF to Identify Source Regions Influencing Arctic Trace Gases and Aerosols During the Summer 2014 NETCARE Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    In July and August 2014 the Canadian Network on Aerosols and Climate: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Regions (NETCARE) project conducted aircraft and ship based campaigns with the goal of identifying both emissions and atmospheric processes influencing Arctic trace gas and aerosol concentrations. The aircraft campaign was conducted using the Alfred Wegener Institute's POLAR 6 aircraft (based in Resolute Bay, Canada) and the ship based campaign was conducted onboard the CCGS Amundsen (icebreaker and Arctic Ocean research vessel). Here, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) to study meteorology and transport patterns that influence airmasses sampled during the aircraft campaign (5-21 July 2012) and research Legs 1a and 1b for Amundsen (1a: 8 - 24 July Quebec City to Resolute and 24 July - 14 August Resolute to Kugluktuk). The FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model driven by WRF meteorology (FLEXPART-WRF) run in backwards mode is used to study source regions that influenced enhanced concentrations in trace gases including DMS and NH3 as well as aerosols. Links between biomass burning in Northern Canada and measurements during the campaign are discussed. Finally FLEXPART-WRF run in forward mode is used to study links between shipping emissions from the Amundsen and enhanced pollution sampled by the POLAR 6 aircraft when both were operating in the same region of Lancaster Sound during the campaigns.

  3. Evaluation of the Analysis Influence on Transport in Reanalysis Regional Water Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, M. G.; Chen, J.; Robertson, F. R.

    2011-01-01

    Regional water cycles of reanalyses do not follow theoretical assumptions applicable to pure simulated budgets. The data analysis changes the wind, temperature and moisture, perturbing the theoretical balance. Of course, the analysis is correcting the model forecast error, so that the state fields should be more aligned with observations. Recently, it has been reported that the moisture convergence over continental regions, even those with significant quantities of radiosonde profiles present, can produce long term values not consistent with theoretical bounds. Specifically, long averages over continents produce some regions of moisture divergence. This implies that the observational analysis leads to a source of water in the region. One such region is the Unite States Great Plains, which many radiosonde and lidar wind observations are assimilated. We will utilize a new ancillary data set from the MERRA reanalysis called the Gridded Innovations and Observations (GIO) which provides the assimilated observations on MERRA's native grid allowing more thorough consideration of their impact on regional and global climatology. Included with the GIO data are the observation minus forecast (OmF) and observation minus analysis (OmA). Using OmF and OmA, we can identify the bias of the analysis against each observing system and gain a better understanding of the observations that are controlling the regional analysis. In this study we will focus on the wind and moisture assimilation.

  4. Vegetation response to Holocene climate change in monsoon-influenced region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Zicheng; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Jiawu; Yang, Bao

    2009-12-01

    Fossil pollen records from 31 sites with reliable chronologies and high-resolution data in the monsoonal region of China were synthesized to document Holocene vegetation and climate change and to understand the large-scale controls on these changes. The reconstruction of moisture histories was based on a four-class ordinal wetness index at 200-year time slices at individual sites. The vegetation experienced diverse changes over the Holocene in different regions: (1) between tropical seasonal rain forest and more open forest in tropical seasonal rain forest region; (2) from mixed evergreen and deciduous broadleaved forest to more deciduous or Pinus-dominated forest in subtropical region; (3) from mixed evergreen and deciduous broadleaved forest to deciduous forest in temperate deciduous forest region; (4) from deciduous broadleaved forest to conifer-deciduous forest in conifer-deciduous mixed forest region; (5) from steppe forest to steppe in temperate steppe region; and (6) from steppe forest/meadow to meadow/steppe in highland meadow/steppe region. Despite various vegetation sequences in different regions, our synthesis results show that a humid climate generally characterized the early and middle Holocene, and a drier climate prevailed during the late Holocene, with an abrupt shift at ca. 4.5 ka (1 ka = 1000 cal yr BP). Abrupt palynological changes based on a squared-chord distance of pollen assemblages occurred at 11-10, 6-5 and 2-1 ka from most sites. The synthesized pattern of moisture change is similar to the ones inferred from other independent climate proxies; however, gradual vegetation changes in the early Holocene lagged about 1000 yr behind the summer monsoon maximum as indicated by speleothem isotope records from Dongge and Sanbao caves. Human activities likely affected vegetation change greatly during the late Holocene, but the magnitude and precise timing are less clear and require further investigation.

  5. Marine aerosol source regions to Prince of Wales Icefield, Ellesmere Island, and influence from the tropical Pacific, 1979-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscitiello, Alison S.; Marshall, Shawn J.; Evans, Matthew J.; Kinnard, Christophe; Norman, Ann-Lise; Sharp, Martin J.

    2016-08-01

    Using a coastal ice core collected from Prince of Wales (POW) Icefield on Ellesmere Island, we investigate source regions of sea ice-modulated chemical species (methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and chloride (Cl-)) to POW Icefield and the influence of large-scale atmospheric variability on the transport of these marine aerosols (1979-2001). Our key findings are (1) MSA in the POW Icefield core is derived primarily from productivity in the sea ice zone of Baffin Bay and the Labrador Sea, with influence from waters within the North Water (NOW) polynya, (2) sea ice formation processes within the NOW polynya may be a significant source of sea-salt aerosols to the POW core site, in addition to offshore open water source regions primarily in Hudson Bay, and (3) the tropical Pacific influences the source and transport of marine aerosols to POW Icefield through its remote control on regional winds and sea ice variability. Regression analyses during times of MSA deposition reveal sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies favorable for opening of the NOW polynya and subsequent oceanic dimethyl sulfide production. Regression analyses during times of Cl- deposition reveal SLP anomalies that indicate a broader oceanic region of sea-salt sources to the core site. These results are supported by Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer- and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager-based sea ice reconstructions and air mass transport density analyses and suggest that the marine biogenic record may capture local polynya variability, while sea-salt transport to the site from larger offshore source regions in Baffin Bay is likely. Regression analyses show a link to tropical dynamics via an atmospheric Rossby wave.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  7. Influence of regional tectonics on halokinesis in the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, K.T.; Johansen, J.T.; Vendeville, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Seismic analysis of salt structures in the Nordkapp Basin, a deep salt basin in the southern Barents Sea, combined with experimental modeling suggests that regional tectonics closely controlled diapiric growth. Diapirs formed in the Early Triassic during basement-involved regional extension. The diapirs then rose rapidly by passive growth and exhausted their source layer. Regional extension in the Middle-Late Triassic triggered down-to-the-basin gravity gliding, which laterally shortened the diapirs. This squeezed salt out of diapir stems, forcing diapirs to rise, extrude, and form diapir overhangs. After burial under more than 1000 m of Upper Triassic-Lower Cretaceous sediments, the diapirs were rejuvenated by a Late Cretaceous episode of regional extension and gravity gliding, which deformed their thick roofs. After extension, diapirs stopped rising and were buried under 1500 m of lower Tertiary sediments. Regional compression of the Barents Sea region in the middle Tertiary caused one more episode of diapiric rise. Diapirs in the Nordkapp Basin are now extinct.

  8. Glucose metabolism in different regions of the rat brain under hypokinetic stress influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konitzer, K.; Voigt, S.

    1980-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in rats kept under long term hypokinetic stress was studied in 7 brain regions. Determination was made of the regional levels of glucose, lactate, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyrate and the incorporation of C-14 from plasma glucose into these metabolites, in glycogen and protein. From the content and activity data the regional glucose flux was approximated quantitatively. Under normal conditions the activity gradient cortex and frontal pole cerebellum, thalamus and mesencephalon, hypothalamus and pons and medulla is identical with that of the regional blood supply (measured with I131 serum albumin as the blood marker). Within the first days of immobilization a functional hypoxia occurred in all brain regions and the utilization of cycle amino acids for protein synthesis was strongly diminished. After the first week of stress the capillary volumes of all regions increased, aerobic glucose metabolism was enhanced (factors 1.3 - 2.0) and the incorporation of glucose C-14 via cycle amino acids into protein was considerably potentiated. The metabolic parameters normalized between the 7th and 11th week of stress. Blood supply and metabolic rate increased most in the hypothalamus.

  9. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  10. Evaluation in femoral neck fracture scintimetry: modes of region of interest selection and influence on results

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, S.; Mesko, L.; Stroemqvist, B.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1985-04-01

    Different sized ROIs within the femoral head and different modes of calculation were used in (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP scintimetry after femoral neck fracture. In preoperative scintimetry, correction for increased trochanteric uptake gave the best discrimination, whereas in postoperative scintimetry the direct ratio fractured/intact femoral head was superior. The change in ROI size had little influence.

  11. Glial inhibitors influence the mRNA and protein levels of mGlu2/3, 5 and 7 receptors and potentiate the analgesic effects of their ligands in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Osikowicz, Maria; Skup, Malgorzata; Mika, Joanna; Makuch, Wioletta; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2009-12-15

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, which are present on neurons and glial cells, have been shown to play a role in neuropathic pain. The present study sought to investigate how the glial inhibitors minocycline and pentoxifylline alter the effect that chronic constriction injury (CCI) has on the expression of mGlu receptors and on their associated ligands. RT-PCR analysis revealed that seven days after CCI, the mRNA levels of glial markers C1q and GFAP, as well as those of mGlu5 and mGlu3, but not mGlu7, were elevated in the lumbar spinal cord - ipsilateral to the injury. The protein levels of the microglial marker OX42, the astroglial marker GFAP, and mGlu5 receptor protein were increased, whereas the levels of mGlu2/3 and mGlu7 receptor proteins were reduced. Preemptive and repeated intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (16 and 1h before nerve injury and then twice daily for seven days) of minocycline (30mg/kg) and pentoxifylline (20mg/kg) prevented the injury-induced changes in the levels of mGlu3 and mGlu5 receptor mRNAs and the injury-induced changes in the protein levels of all the receptors. Repeated administration of minocycline and pentoxifylline significantly attenuated CCI-induced allodynia (von Frey test) and hyperalgesia (cold plate test) measured on day seven after injury and potentiated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of single i.p. and intrathecal (i.t.) injections of mGlu receptor ligands: MPEP, LY379268 or AMN082. We conclude that attenuation of injury-induced glial activation can reduce glutamatergic activity, thereby contributing to regulation of pain sensation. PMID:19782473

  12. A Study on the Influence of the Land Surface Processes on the Southwest Monsoon Simulations using a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Bhaskar Rao, D. V.; Hari Prasad, D.; Hari Prasad, K. B. R. R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-01

    Influence of the land surface processes as an important mechanism in the development of the Indian Summer Monsoon is studied by performing simulations with a regional atmospheric model. Seasonal scale simulations are conducted for two contrasting summer monsoons (MJJAS months) in 2008 & 2009 with the Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research regional model at a high resolution of 15 km using the boundary conditions derived from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data and using the NOAH land surface parameterization scheme. Simulations are evaluated by comparison of precipitation with 0.5° India Meteorological Department gridded rainfall data over land, atmospheric circulation fields with 1° resolution NCEP global final analysis, and surface fluxes with 0.75° resolution Era-Interim reanalysis. Results indicated significant variation in the evolution of the surface fluxes, air temperatures and flux convergence in the 2 contrasting years. A lower albedo, higher heating (sensible, latent heat fluxes), higher air temperatures, stronger flow and higher moisture flux convergence are noted over the subcontinent during the monsoon 2008 relative to the monsoon 2009. The simulated surface fluxes are in good comparison with observations. The stronger flow in 2008 is found to be associated with stronger heat flux gradients as well as stronger north-south geopotential/pressure gradients. The simulations revealed notable differences in many features such as zonal and meridional surface sensible heat gradients which, in turn, influenced the low-level pressure gradients, wind flow, and moisture transport. The present study reveals that, even at a regional scale, the physical processes of land-surface energy partitioning do influence the regional behavior of the monsoon system to a certain extent.

  13. The influence of surface waves on water circulation in a mid-Atlantic continental shelf region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Talay, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of wave-induced currents in different weather conditions and water depths (18.3 m and 36.6 m) is assessed in a mid-Atlantic continental-shelf region. A review of general circulation conditions is conducted. Factors which perturb the general circulation are examined using analytic techniques and limited experimental data. Actual wind and wave statistics for the region are examined. Relative magnitudes of the various currents are compared on a frequency of annual occurrence basis. Results indicated that wave-induced currents are often the same order of magnitude as other currents in the region and become more important at higher wind and wave conditions. Wind-wave and ocean-swell characteristics are among those parameters which must be monitored for the analytical computation of continental-shelf circulation.

  14. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Mankinen, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  15. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  16. MKP-1 mRNA Stabilization and Translational Control by RNA-Binding Proteins HuR and NF90▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Yuki; Kim, Hyeon Ho; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Pullmann, Rudolf; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Gorospe, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) plays a major role in dephosphorylating and thereby inactivating the MAP kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here, we examine the posttranscriptional events underlying the robust MKP-1 induction by oxidants in HeLa cells. H2O2 treatment potently stabilized the MKP-1 mRNA and increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with the translation machinery. Four RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) that influence mRNA turnover and/or translation (HuR, NF90, TIAR, and TIA-1) were found to bind to biotinylated transcripts spanning the MKP-1 AU-rich 3′ untranslated region. By using ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation analysis, we showed that H2O2 treatment increased the association of MKP-1 mRNA with HuR and NF90 and decreased its association with the translational repressors TIAR and TIA-1. HuR or NF90 silencing significantly diminished the H2O2-stimulated MKP-1 mRNA stability; HuR silencing also markedly decreased MKP-1 translation. In turn, lowering MKP-1 expression in HuR-silenced cultures resulted in substantially elevated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 after H2O2 treatment. Collectively, MKP-1 upregulation by oxidative stress is potently influenced by increased mRNA stability and translation, mediated at least in part by the RNA-BPs HuR and NF90. PMID:18490444

  17. Influence of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus 5' untranslated region on translation and neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Stein, S B; Zhang, L; Roos, R P

    1992-07-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), a picornavirus, causes a persistent, restricted infection and demyelinating disease in mice. In contrast, the GDVII strain causes an acute, fatal, neuronal disease and is highly neurovirulent. To investigate the role of the TMEV 5' untranslated region (UTR) in translational efficiency and the TMEV subgroup differences, we tested the translational efficiency of transcripts in vitro derived from plasmids containing DA, GDVII, or DA/GDVII chimeric 5' UTRs preceding a reporter gene or the rest of the TMEV genome. We demonstrated that GDVII RNA translates more efficiently in rabbit reticulocyte lysate than DA RNA and that this enhanced translation is mediated by multiple domains in the GDVII 5' UTR as well as a region of the genome outside of the 5' UTR. We also identified a region within DA nucleotides 14 to 395 which inhibits translation of DA RNA and could contribute to the persistent, restricted DA central nervous system infection; the predicted secondary structure of the 5' UTR demonstrates a remarkable stem-loop structure within this region that is relatively unique among picornaviruses. Data from experiments involving DA/GDVII chimeric 5' UTR full-length infectious cDNA clones suggested that sequences in the 5' UTR can affect the neurovirulence phenotype but that translational efficiency is necessary but not sufficient for neurovirulence. These studies emphasize the multigenic nature of neurovirulence and the importance of translation in the regulation of picornaviral gene expression.

  18. Influence of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus 5' untranslated region on translation and neurovirulence.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S B; Zhang, L; Roos, R P

    1992-01-01

    The DA strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), a picornavirus, causes a persistent, restricted infection and demyelinating disease in mice. In contrast, the GDVII strain causes an acute, fatal, neuronal disease and is highly neurovirulent. To investigate the role of the TMEV 5' untranslated region (UTR) in translational efficiency and the TMEV subgroup differences, we tested the translational efficiency of transcripts in vitro derived from plasmids containing DA, GDVII, or DA/GDVII chimeric 5' UTRs preceding a reporter gene or the rest of the TMEV genome. We demonstrated that GDVII RNA translates more efficiently in rabbit reticulocyte lysate than DA RNA and that this enhanced translation is mediated by multiple domains in the GDVII 5' UTR as well as a region of the genome outside of the 5' UTR. We also identified a region within DA nucleotides 14 to 395 which inhibits translation of DA RNA and could contribute to the persistent, restricted DA central nervous system infection; the predicted secondary structure of the 5' UTR demonstrates a remarkable stem-loop structure within this region that is relatively unique among picornaviruses. Data from experiments involving DA/GDVII chimeric 5' UTR full-length infectious cDNA clones suggested that sequences in the 5' UTR can affect the neurovirulence phenotype but that translational efficiency is necessary but not sufficient for neurovirulence. These studies emphasize the multigenic nature of neurovirulence and the importance of translation in the regulation of picornaviral gene expression. Images PMID:1602556

  19. When it matters how you pronounce it: the influence of regional accents on job interview outcome.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C; Mummendey, Amélie

    2011-11-01

    The visual dimension has featured prominently in person perception in the last 25 years. Alone, this dimension cannot give the complete 'picture' of others because language and speech (i.e., the auditory dimension) are also highly informative. Social-cognition research investigates the role of auditory information for impression formation. In a series of experiments, we tested perceived competence, hirability, and socio-intellectual status of different targets based on their regional accents. Given identical content of statements in different conditions of an alleged job interview, regional German accents (Saxon, Bavarian, and Berlin) resulted in lower perceived competence and hirability than standard German, even though the Bavarian accent at the same time resulted in higher ratings of socio-intellectual status compared to other regional accents (Experiment 1). These findings were confirmed when using a broader population sample and a 'matched guise' technique (Experiment 2). Our findings indicate that regional accents, similar to faces, can be very powerful in creating differentiated pictures of individuals. PMID:21988389

  20. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  1. Characterization of mesostasis regions in lunar basalts: Understanding late-stage melt evolution and its influence on apatite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Nicola J.; TartèSe, Romain; Anand, Mahesh; Westrenen, Wim; Griffiths, Alexandra A.; Barrett, Thomas J.; Franchi, Ian A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies geared toward understanding the volatile abundances of the lunar interior have focused on the volatile-bearing accessory mineral apatite. Translating measurements of volatile abundances in lunar apatite into the volatile inventory of the silicate melts from which they crystallized, and ultimately of the mantle source regions of lunar magmas, however, has proved more difficult than initially thought. In this contribution, we report a detailed characterization of mesostasis regions in four Apollo mare basalts (10044, 12064, 15058, and 70035) in order to ascertain the compositions of the melts from which apatite crystallized. The texture, modal mineralogy, and reconstructed bulk composition of these mesostasis regions vary greatly within and between samples. There is no clear relationship between bulk-rock basaltic composition and that of bulk-mesostasis regions, indicating that bulk-rock composition may have little influence on mesostasis compositions. The development of individual melt pockets, combined with the occurrence of silicate liquid immiscibility, exerts greater control on the composition and texture of mesostasis regions. In general, the reconstructed late-stage lunar melts have roughly andesitic to dacitic compositions with low alkali contents, displaying much higher SiO2 abundances than the bulk compositions of their host magmatic rocks. Relevant partition coefficients for apatite-melt volatile partitioning under lunar conditions should, therefore, be derived from experiments conducted using intermediate compositions instead of compositions representing mare basalts.

  2. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  3. Unravelling the competing influence of regional uplift and active normal faulting in SW Calabria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alex; Roda Boluda, Duna; Boulton, Sarah; Erhardt, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Neogene geological and geomorphological evolution of Southern Italy is complex and is fundamentally controlled by the subduction of the Ionian slab along the Apennine belt from the Calabrian Arc, and back-arc extension driven by trench rollback. In the area of Calabria and the Straits of Messina the presence of (i) uplifted, deformed and dissected basin sediments and marine terraces, ranging in age from the early to mid-Pleistocene and (ii) seismicity associated with NE-SW normal faults that have well-developed footwall topography and triangular facets have led workers to suggest that both significant regional uplift and extensional faulting in SW Calabria have played a role in generating relief in the area since the mid Pleistocene. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the rates of total surface uplift relative to sea level in both time and space, and the relative partitioning of this uplift between a mantle-driven regional signal, potentially related to a slab tear, and the active extensional structures. Additionally, despite the widespread recognition of normal faults in Calabria to which historical earthquakes are often linked, there is much less agreement on (i) which ones are active and for what length of time; (ii) how the faults interact; and (iii) what their throw and throw rates are. In particular, the ability to resolve both regional uplift and normal faulting in SW Calabria is essential in order to fully understand the tectonic history of the region, while an understanding of location and slip rate of active faults, in an area where the population numbers more than two million people, is essential to assess regional seismic hazards. Here we address these important questions using a combination of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology. We critically examine existing constraints on the rates and distribution of active normal faulting and regional uplift in the area, and we derive new constraints on the along-strike variation in throw

  4. Intracellular Availability of pDNA and mRNA after Transfection: A Comparative Study among Polyplexes, Lipoplexes, and Lipopolyplexes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristine; Akhter, Sohail; Pichon, Chantal; Midoux, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Intracellular availability of nucleic acids from synthetic vectors is critical and directly influences the transfection efficiency (TE). Herein, we evaluated the TE of polymer- and lipid-based nanoplexes (polyplexes, lipoplexes and lipopolyplexes) of EGFP-encoding mRNA and pDNA. To determine the translation and transcription efficiency of each nucleic acid nanoplex, in vitro expression was measured in HEK293T7 cells that permit gene expression in the cytoplasmic region. Globally, mRNA transfection profile was well corroborative with cytoplasmic transfection of pT7-pDNA as well as with nuclear transfection of pCMV-DNA. Irrespective of the nucleic acid, high TE was observed with histidinylated l-polyethylenimine (His-lPEI) polyplexes and dioleyl succinyl paromomycin/O,O-dioleyl-N-histamine phosphoramidate (DOPS/MM27) lipoplexes. Moreover, His-lPEI polyplexes yielded higher in vitro expression of EGFP for pDNA than for mRNA. Furthermore, a significant enhancement in the TE in the presence of an excess of His-lPEI was observed indicating that this polymer promotes cytosolic delivery. Compared to other nanoplexes, His-lPEI polyplex showed high intracellular availability of DNA and mRNA along with low cytotoxicity, owing to its rapid (complete or partial) unpacking in the cytosol and/or endosomes. This study gives an insight that, whether with mRNA or pDNA, enhancing nanoplex unpacking in the endosomes and cytosol would improve the delivery of nucleic acid in the cytosol and particularly in the case of pDNA where a sufficient available amount of pDNA in the cytoplasm would definitely improve its transport toward the nucleus. PMID:27486998

  5. The influence of regional Arctic sea-ice decline on stratospheric and tropospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Christine; Bracegirdle, Thomas; Shuckburgh, Emily; Haynes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Arctic sea-ice extent has rapidly declined over the past few decades, and most climate models project a continuation of this trend during the 21st century in response to greenhouse gas forcing. A number of recent studies have shown that this sea-ice loss induces vertically propagating Rossby waves, which weaken the stratospheric polar vortex and increase the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). SSWs have been shown to increase the probability of a negative NAO in the following weeks, thereby driving anomalous weather conditions over Europe and other mid-latitude regions. In contrast, other studies have shown that Arctic sea-ice loss strengthens the polar vortex, increasing the probability of a positive NAO. Sun et al. (2015) suggest these conflicting results may be due to the region of sea-ice loss considered. They find that if only regions within the Arctic Circle are considered in sea-ice projections, the polar vortex weakens; if only regions outwith the Arctic Circle are considered, the polar vortex strengthens. This is because the anomalous Rossby waves forced in the former/latter scenario constructively/destructively interfere with climatological Rossby waves, thus enhancing/suppressing upward wave propagation. In this study, we investigate whether Sun et al.'s results are robust to a different model. We also divide the regions of sea-ice loss they considered into further sub-regions, in order to examine the regional differences in more detail. We do this by using the intermediate complexity climate model, IGCM4, which has a well resolved stratosphere and does a good job of representing stratospheric processes. Several simulations are run in atmosphere only mode, where one is a control experiment and the others are perturbation experiments. In the control run annually repeating historical mean surface conditions are imposed at the lower boundary, whereas in each perturbation run the model is forced by SST perturbations imposed in a specific

  6. Investigating the influence of regional climate and oceanography on marine radiocarbon reservoir ages in southwest New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Jessica L.; Moy, Christopher M.; Prior, Christine A.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Wilson, Gary S.

    2015-12-01

    The New Zealand fjords are located at a latitude where distinct oceanic and atmospheric fronts separate carbon reservoirs of varying residence time. The marine radiocarbon reservoir age in this region is likely to deviate from the global average reservoir age over space and time as frontal boundaries migrate north and south. Here we present new estimates of modern radiocarbon reservoir age using the radiocarbon content of bivalve shells collected live before 1950. Multiple measurements from hydrographically distinct sites support the use of a ΔR, defined as the regional offset between measured and modeled marine radiocarbon reservoir age, of 59 ± 35 years for the New Zealand fjords. We also assess the radiocarbon content of bulk surface sediments throughout the fjord region. Sediment with a higher proportion of marine organic carbon has relatively less radiocarbon than more terrestrial sediment, suggesting a short residence time of organic carbon on land before deposition in the fjords. Additionally, we constrain reservoir age variability throughout the Holocene using coeval terrestrial and marine macrofossils. Although our modern results suggest spatial consistency in ΔR throughout the fjords, large deviations from the global average marine radiocarbon reservoir age exist in the paleo record. We find four ancient ΔR values, extending back to ˜10.2 cal kyr BP, to be negative or near zero. A likely cause of younger radiocarbon reservoir ages at select intervals throughout the Holocene is the increased influence of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, which cause extreme precipitation in the region that delivers terrestrial carbon, enriched in radiocarbon, to fjord basins. However, bivalve depth habitat may also influence radiocarbon content due to a stratified water column containing distinct carbon pools. This work highlights the need for thorough assessment of local radiocarbon cycling in similar regions of dynamic ocean/atmosphere frontal zones

  7. Assessing the influence of watershed characteristics on chlorophyll a in waterbodies at global and regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woelmer, Whitney; Kao, Yu-Chun; Bunnell, David; Deines, Andrew M.; Bennion, David; Rogers, Mark W.; Brooks, Colin N.; Sayers, Michael J.; Banach, David M.; Grimm, Amanda G.; Shuchman, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of primary production of lentic water bodies (i.e., lakes and reservoirs) is valuable to researchers and resource managers alike, but is very rarely done at the global scale. With the development of remote sensing technologies, it is now feasible to gather large amounts of data across the world, including understudied and remote regions. To determine which factors were most important in explaining the variation of chlorophyll a (Chl-a), an indicator of primary production in water bodies, at global and regional scales, we first developed a geospatial database of 227 water bodies and watersheds with corresponding Chl-a, nutrient, hydrogeomorphic, and climate data. Then we used a generalized additive modeling approach and developed model selection criteria to select models that most parsimoniously related Chl-a to predictor variables for all 227 water bodies and for 51 lakes in the Laurentian Great Lakes region in the data set. Our best global model contained two hydrogeomorphic variables (water body surface area and the ratio of watershed to water body surface area) and a climate variable (average temperature in the warmest model selection criteria to select models that most parsimoniously related Chl-a to predictor variables quarter) and explained ~ 30% of variation in Chl-a. Our regional model contained one hydrogeomorphic variable (flow accumulation) and the same climate variable, but explained substantially more variation (58%). Our results indicate that a regional approach to watershed modeling may be more informative to predicting Chl-a, and that nearly a third of global variability in Chl-a may be explained using hydrogeomorphic and climate variables.

  8. The variability of biomass burning and its influence on regional aerosol properties during the wheat harvest season in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Xin, Jinyuan; Li, Xingru; Wang, Yuesi

    2015-04-01

    The spatial-temporal variation of biomass burning in June during the wheat harvest season in the North China (32-41°N, 111-120°E) and its influence on the regional aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the chemical compositions of size-segregated aerosols in the urban environment were investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the burn ban policy and the influence on regional pollution. Fire events that occurred in early and middle June accounted for approximately 89% of the events during the month, and fire points located in mid-eastern China (32.5-35.5°N, 114-120°E) comprised 71%. The occurrences exhibit oscillatory changes with a minimum in 2008 (during the Beijing Olympics) and a peak and explosive growth in 2012. Under high relative humidity and south winds, fire emissions from straw burning combined with high urban/industrial emissions to produce intensive regional haze pollution in the North Plain. The formation of secondary inorganic particles was intensified due to the interactions of smoke plumes and urban/industrial pollutants in an urban environment. Higher concentrations and percentages (79%) of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and organic carbon in the fine particles under high relative humidity conditions contributed to a deteriorated urban visibility. Therefore, stronger management and a comprehensive ban on wheat straw burning in June are urgently needed, especially during years when the south wind is dominant.

  9. Influence of Atmospheric Solar Radiation Absorption on Photodestruction of Ions at D-Region Altitudes of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on the photodetachment, dissociative photodetachment, and photodissociation rate coefficients (photodestruction rate coefficients) of O-, Cl-, O2 -, O3 -, OH-, NO2 -, NO3 -, O4 -, OH-(H2O), CO3 -, CO4 -, ONOO-, HCO3 -, CO3 -(H2O), NO3 -(H2O), O2 +(H2O), O4 +, N4 +, NO+(H2O), NO+(H2O)2, H+(H2O) n for n = 2-4, NO+(N2), and NO+(CO2) at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere is studied. A numerical one-dimensional time-dependent neutral atmospheric composition model has been developed to estimate this influence. The model simulations are carried out for the geomagnetically quiet time period of 15 October 1998 at moderate solar activity over the Boulder ozonesonde. If the solar zenith angle is not more than 90° then the strongest influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions is found for photodissociation of CO4 - ions when CO3 - ions are formed. It follows from the calculations that decreases in the photodestruction rate coefficients of ions under consideration caused by this influence are less than 2 % at 70 km altitude and above this altitude if the solar zenith angle does not exceed 90°.

  10. Influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli

    2016-07-01

    Influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on the photodetachment, dissociative photodetachment, and photodissociation rate coefficients (photodestruction rate coefficients) of O ^{-}, Cl ^{-}, O _{2} ^{-}, O _{3} ^{-}, OH ^{-}, NO _{2} ^{-}, NO _{3} ^{-}, O _{4} ^{-}, OH ^{-}(H _{2}O), CO _{3} ^{-}, CO _{4} ^{-}, ONOO ^{-}, HCO _{3} ^{-}, CO _{3} ^{-}(H _{2}O), NO _{3} ^{-}(H _{2}O), O _{2} ^{+}(H _{2}O), O _{4} ^{+}, N _{4} ^{+}, NO ^{+}(H _{2}O), NO ^{+}(H _{2}O) _{2}, H ^{+}(H _{2}O) _{n} for n=2-4, NO ^{+}(N _{2}), and NO ^{+}(CO _{2}) at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere is studied. A numerical one-dimensional time-dependent neutral atmospheric composition model has been developed to estimate this influence. The model simulations are carried out for the geomagnetically quiet time period of 15 October 1998 at moderate solar activity over the Boulder ozonesonde. If the solar zenith angle is not more than 90 ° then the most strongest influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions is found for photodissociation of CO _{4} ^{-} ions when CO _{3} ^{-} ions are formed. It follows from the calculations that decreases in the photodestruction rate coefficients of ions under consideration caused by this influence are less than 2 % at 70 km altitude and above this altitude if the solar zenith angle does not exceed 90 °.

  11. mRNA stability changes precede changes in steady-state mRNA amounts during hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Molin, Claes; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Warringer, Jonas; Nerman, Olle; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2009-04-01

    Under stress, cells need to optimize the activity of a wide range of gene products during the response phases: shock, adaptation, and recovery. This requires coordination of several levels of regulation, including turnover and translation efficiencies of mRNAs. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways are implicated in many aspects of the environmental stress response, including initiation of transcription, translation efficiency, and mRNA turnover. In this study, we analyze mRNA turnover rates and mRNA steady-state levels at different time points following mild hyperosmotic shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The regulation of mRNA stability is transient and affects most genes for which there is a change in transcript level. These changes precede and prepare for the changes in steady-state levels, both regarding the initial increase and the later decline of stress-induced mRNAs. The inverse is true for stress-repressed genes, which become stabilized during hyperosmotic stress in preparation of an increase as the cells recover. The MAP kinase Hog1 affects both steady-state levels and stability of stress-responsive transcripts, whereas the Hog1-activated kinase Rck2 influences steady-state levels without a major effect on stability. Regulation of mRNA stability is a wide-spread, but not universal, effect on stress-responsive transcripts during transient hyperosmotic stress. By destabilizing stress-induced mRNAs when their steady-state levels have reached a maximum, the cell prepares for the subsequent recovery phase when these transcripts are to return to normal levels. Conversely, stabilization of stress-repressed mRNAs permits their rapid accumulation in the recovery phase. Our results show that mRNA turnover is coordinated with transcriptional induction.

  12. Influence of future cropland expansion on regional and global tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Oliver; Archibald, Alex; Telford, Paul; Pyle, John

    2013-04-01

    With the global population set to rise over the next 100 years, the fraction of land used for crop cultivation is likely to increase, the trend being most pronounced in developing regions such as Brazil and South East Asia. In these regions currently there stands natural rainforest, a high emitter of isoprene. As many staple crops, such as soy bean, are low emitters of isoprene, increasing the crop fraction in these regions will decrease isoprene emissions. Ozone over ~35 ppb has been shown to be damaging to plants, and as ground level ozone is sensitive to isoprene concentrations, altering isoprene emissions could increase ground level ozone, potentially resulting in crop damage. This mechanism was investigated by comparing two configurations of an atmospheric chemistry-climate model (UM-UKCA) under a 2100 climate following an IPCC scenario of moderate climate change. The first run had a present day crop distribution but isoprene emissions concurrent with 2100 temperatures and climatic conditions. The second run had isoprene emissions representative of both a 2100 climate and a 2100 crop distribution in accordance with the IMAGE model. By comparing these runs it was established that ozone increased by up to 8 ppb (~30%) due to crop land expansion. Over the Amazon (the most affected region) it was found that crops were exposed to a daily maximum 8-hour (DM8H) ozone above the 35 ppb threshold for up to 65 days more per year than in the base case. These conclusions suggest that increasing the crop fraction in current areas of natural rainforest could increase regional ground level ozone, having a significant effect on crop yield and air quality. The sensitivity of such conclusions to isoprene chemistry was examined by varying the isoprene chemistry scheme within the model. The CheT isoprene scheme used here (50 reactions) was compared with the AQUM (23 reactions) and CESM Superfast (2 reactions) isoprene schemes, all of which are currently used in Earth-system models

  13. Influence of urban morphometric modification on regional boundary-layer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Allen; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Lau, Alexis K. H.

    2013-04-01

    Fidelity in simulating urban boundary-layer (UBL) physics is recognized to prescribe the prognostic skill of subsequent regional air pollutant transport modeling. Conventional mesoscale meteorological models (MMM) deployed over the South China coast among urban locales have often yielded positive bias in surface wind speed. This bias has been hypothetically attributed to model parameterizations that yield inaccurate meteorological predictions due to underrepresentation of urban aerodynamic roughness. Chemical transport model (CTM) simulations that are forced by the overestimated UBL wind field may undergo excessive advection which results in negative bias in predicted pollutant concentration. This study aimed to corroborate the proposed causality between parameterized urban morphometry and UBL meteorology. Focus was placed on the urban meteorological adjustments induced by urban morphometry modifications rather than prediction improvements attributable to urban canopy parameterization (UCP). Case studies were devised to assess the sensitivity of an urban-meteorology model to a pervasive, region-wide urban morphometry modification. Performance of a UCP scheme was evaluated for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, a meso- β-scale subtropical coastal megalopolis. To benchmark the limits of UBL adjustments that were predominantly attributable to urban morphometric transformation, numerical experiments were conducted against two urban fabrics of vastly dissimilar morphometric compositions, each occupying identical topographic tracts. Differences in the diurnal evolution of UBL structure and in the mean and turbulent flow characteristics were analyzed. This UCP sensitivity study suggests that improved urban morphological realism is able to reduce positive wind speed bias observed in conventional mesoscale meteorological models when applied to the PRD region.

  14. High Arctic sea ice conditions influence marine birds wintering in Low Arctic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane Tranquilla, Laura; Hedd, April; Burke, Chantelle; Montevecchi, William A.; Regular, Paul M.; Robertson, Gregory J.; Stapleton, Leslie Ann; Wilhelm, Sabina I.; Fifield, David A.; Buren, Alejandro D.

    2010-09-01

    Ocean climate change is having profound biological effects in polar regions. Such change can also have far-reaching downstream effects in sub-polar regions. This study documents an environmental relationship between High Arctic sea ice changes and mortality events of marine birds in Low Arctic coastal regions. During April 2007 and March 2009, hundreds of beached seabird carcasses and moribund seabirds were found along the east and northeast coasts of Newfoundland, Canada. These seabird "wrecks" (i.e. dead birds on beaches) coincided with a period of strong, persistent onshore winds and heavily-accumulated sea ice that blocked bays and trapped seabirds near beaches. Ninety-two percent of wreck seabirds were Thick-billed Murres ( Uria lomvia). Body condition and demographic patterns of wreck murres were compared to Thick-billed Murres shot in the Newfoundland murre hunt. Average body and pectoral masses of wreck carcasses were 34% and 40% lighter (respectively) than shot murres, indicating that wreck birds had starved. The acute nature of each wreck suggested that starvation and associated hypothermia occurred within 2-3 days. In 2007, first-winter murres (77%) dominated the wreck. In 2009, there were more adults (78%), mostly females (66%). These results suggest that spatial and temporal segregation in ages and sexes can play a role in differential survival when stochastic weather conditions affect discrete areas where these groups aggregate. In wreck years, southward movement of Arctic sea ice to Low Arctic latitudes was later and blocked bays longer than in most other years. These inshore conditions corresponded with recent climate-driven changes in High Arctic ice break-up and ice extent; coupled with local weather conditions, these ice conditions appeared to be the key environmental features that precipitated the ice-associated seabird wrecks in the Low Arctic region.

  15. Regional water quality patterns in an alluvial aquifer: direct and indirect influences of rivers.

    PubMed

    Baillieux, A; Campisi, D; Jammet, N; Bucher, S; Hunkeler, D

    2014-11-15

    The influence of rivers on the groundwater quality in alluvial aquifers can be twofold: direct and indirect. Rivers can have a direct influence via recharge and an indirect one by controlling the distribution of fine-grained, organic-carbon rich flood deposits that induce reducing conditions. These direct and indirect influences were quantified for a large alluvial aquifer on the Swiss Plateau (50km(2)) in interaction with an Alpine river using nitrate as an example. The hydrochemistry and stable isotope composition of water were characterized using a network of 115 piezometers and pumping stations covering the entire aquifer. Aquifer properties, land use and recharge zones were evaluated as well. This information provided detailed insight into the factors that control the spatial variability of groundwater quality. Three main factors were identified: (1) diffuse agricultural pollution sources; (2) dilution processes resulting from river water infiltrations, revealed by the δ(18)OH2O and δ(2)HH2O contents of groundwater; and (3) denitrification processes, controlled by the spatial variability of flood deposits governed by fluvial depositional processes. It was possible to quantify the dependence of the nitrate concentration on these three factors at any sampling point of the aquifer using an end-member mixing model, where the average nitrate concentration in recharge from the agricultural area was evaluated at 52mg/L, and the nitrate concentration of infiltrating river at approximately 6mg/L. The study shows the importance of considering the indirect and direct impacts of rivers on alluvial aquifers and provides a methodological framework to evaluate aquifer scale water quality patterns.

  16. Regional water quality patterns in an alluvial aquifer: direct and indirect influences of rivers.

    PubMed

    Baillieux, A; Campisi, D; Jammet, N; Bucher, S; Hunkeler, D

    2014-11-15

    The influence of rivers on the groundwater quality in alluvial aquifers can be twofold: direct and indirect. Rivers can have a direct influence via recharge and an indirect one by controlling the distribution of fine-grained, organic-carbon rich flood deposits that induce reducing conditions. These direct and indirect influences were quantified for a large alluvial aquifer on the Swiss Plateau (50km(2)) in interaction with an Alpine river using nitrate as an example. The hydrochemistry and stable isotope composition of water were characterized using a network of 115 piezometers and pumping stations covering the entire aquifer. Aquifer properties, land use and recharge zones were evaluated as well. This information provided detailed insight into the factors that control the spatial variability of groundwater quality. Three main factors were identified: (1) diffuse agricultural pollution sources; (2) dilution processes resulting from river water infiltrations, revealed by the δ(18)OH2O and δ(2)HH2O contents of groundwater; and (3) denitrification processes, controlled by the spatial variability of flood deposits governed by fluvial depositional processes. It was possible to quantify the dependence of the nitrate concentration on these three factors at any sampling point of the aquifer using an end-member mixing model, where the average nitrate concentration in recharge from the agricultural area was evaluated at 52mg/L, and the nitrate concentration of infiltrating river at approximately 6mg/L. The study shows the importance of considering the indirect and direct impacts of rivers on alluvial aquifers and provides a methodological framework to evaluate aquifer scale water quality patterns. PMID:25249478

  17. Aerosol Size Distribution in a City Influenced by Both Rural and Urban Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. M.; Polanco, J.; Lozano, A.

    2006-12-01

    Most atmospheric studies have focused on sites located in either rural or urban areas. However, there are regions affected by air from both, such as the city of El Paso. Adjacent to the neighboring city of Juarez, Mexico, and in close proximity to rural areas, it is affected by desert particles and both biogenic, anthropogenic emissions. Aerosol properties largely depend upon particle size and this makes it the most important parameter for characterizing the aerosol. We focus on studies using inverse reconstruction models for particle size distribution using aerosol optical depth data. Our methodology uses Twomey's regularization technique that suppresses ill-posedness by imposing smoothing and non-negativity constraints on the desired size distributions. We have also applied T-matrix codes to study the scattering from irregularly shaped particles that exhibit rotational symmetry. Furthermore, our studies include analysis of aerosol size distributions using optic probes and soot photometers, sampled from aircraft at different heights. This work will lead to better characterization of aerosols and their impact in our rural-urban interface region. In addition, it will provide a more accurate assessment of regional transport and better boundary conditions for air quality models.

  18. Variations in CYP78A13 coding region influence grain size and yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Fang, Jun; Ou, Shujun; Gao, Shaopei; Zhang, Fengxia; Du, Lin; Xiao, Yunhua; Wang, Hongru; Sun, Xiaohong; Chu, Jinfang; Wang, Guodong; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-04-01

    Grain size is one of the most important determinants of crop yield in cereals. Here, we identified a dominant mutant, big grain2 (bg2-D) from our enhancer-trapping population. Genetic analysis and SiteFinding PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed that BG2 encodes a cytochrome P450, OsCYP78A13. Sequence search revealed that CYP78A13 has a paralogue Grain Length 3.2 (GL3.2, LOC_Os03g30420) in rice with distinct expression patterns, analysis of transgenic plants harbouring either CYP78A13 or GL3.2 showed that both can promote grain growth. Sequence polymorphism analysis with 1529 rice varieties showed that the nucleotide diversity at CYP78A13 gene body and the 20 kb flanking region in the indica varieties were markedly higher than those in japonica varieties. Further, comparison of the genomic sequence of CYP78A13 in the japonica cultivar Nipponbare and the indica cultivar 9311 showed that there were three InDels in the promoter region and eight SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) in its coding sequence. Detailed examination of the transgenic plants with chimaeric constructs suggested that variation in CYP78A13 coding region is responsible for the variation of grain yield. Taken together, our results suggest that the variations in CYP78A13 in the indica varieties hold potential in rice breeding for application of grain yield improvement.

  19. Regional and local phenomena influencing the thermal state in the Flysch belt of the northeastern part of Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcin, Dušan; Bilčík, Dušan; Kutas, Roman; Hlavňová, Petra; Bezák, Vladimír; Kucharič, Ľudovít

    2014-12-01

    The locality of the northeastern most part of Slovakian Flysch belt belongs to interesting areas in terms of the interpretation of geothermal conditions in mutual relation with the lithosphere structure and their tectonic development. The evaluation of the geothermal energy sources parameters of this locality is likewise worthwhile. The region under study has the centre in position of the borehole Zboj ZB-1 and spreads out Slovakia also in Poland and Ukraine. Our contribution provides the analyses of existing geothermal data enhanced by the construction of temperature field models corresponding to the global and local aspects that influence the temperature and heat flow density distributions. The analyses are related to the structures and effects of separate phenomena along as well as across the Carpathian arc. The model calculations were carried out both by analytical and numerical methods of solving the heat transfer equations including their steady state forms and transient cases too. Besides the regional trend of thermal activity decrease in direction from East-Slovakian Basin to the outer Carpathian units the combined local influences are applied: subsurface thermophysical parameters of rock complexes distributions, non-stationary sources from supposed subvolcanic bodies in close surroundings of borehole Zboj ZB-1, and the effects of the hydrological factors. Considering the observed higher thermal activity in arched zone along the Carpathian structures we discussed the thermal effects of rock complexes supposed as a source of regional Carpathian Conductivity Anomaly and the transfer of heat from East-Slovakian Basin to Outer Carpathian Flysch units. The analysis and the modelling results suggest that the mentioned activity is caused by the influences of source type phenomena mainly related to deep fault systems at the margin of the European Platform. That means the anomalies in heat flow density distribution can reach the value 70 mW/m2 and more in the zone

  20. Natural and Human Influences on Water Quality in a Shallow Regional Unconsolidated Aquifer, Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    Data collected from more than 400 wells in the surficial unconfined aquifer in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (New York through North Carolina) were compiled and analyzed to improve understanding of multiple natural and human influences on water quality in such shallow regional aquifers. Geochemical patterns were identified and described through principal components analysis on major ions, and correlation and logistic regression were used to relate observed concentrations of nitrate and selected pesticide compounds (atrazine, metolachlor, simazine, and deethylatrazine, an atrazine degradate) and volatile organic compounds (chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachlorethene, and methyl tert-butyl ether) to likely influences, such as observed geochemical patterns, land use, hydrogeology, and soils. Variability in major-ion concentrations is primarily related to ionic strength and redox condition. Concentrations of nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds are related to natural conditions, as well as the distribution of likely sources reflected in land use. Nitrate is most common in aerobic ground water and in relatively well-drained areas, for example; concentrations greater than 0.4 milligrams per liter may result from a variety of human activities, although concentrations greater than 3 milligrams per liter are more likely in agricultural areas. Atrazine, deethylatrazine, and metolachlor also are related to geochemical patterns, likely because ground-water geochemistry reflects hydrogeologic and soil conditions affecting pesticide transport to the water table. Results demonstrate the value of geochemical information along with the distribution of sources and other influences to understanding the regional occurrence of selected compounds in ground water. Such influences are not unique to the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain, and thus observations and interpretations are relevant to broader areas.

  1. Regional analysis of groundwater nitrate concentrations and trends in Denmark in regard to agricultural influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Dalgaard, T.; Thorling, L.; Sørensen, B.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-08-01

    The act of balancing between an intensive agriculture with a high potential for nitrate pollution and a drinking water supply almost entirely based on groundwater is a challenge faced by Denmark and similar regions around the globe. Since the 1980s, regulations implemented by Danish farmers have succeeded in optimizing the N (nitrogen) management at farm level. As a result, the upward agricultural N surplus trend has been reversed, and the N surplus has reduced by 30-55% from 1980 to 2007 depending on region. The reduction in the N surplus served to reduce the losses of N from agriculture, with documented positive effects on nature and the environment in Denmark. In groundwater, the upward trend in nitrate concentrations was reversed around 1980, and a larger number of downward nitrate trends were seen in the youngest groundwater compared with the oldest groundwater. However, on average, approximately 48% of the oxic monitored groundwater has nitrate concentrations above the groundwater and drinking water standards of 50 mg l-1. Furthermore, trend analyses show that 33% of all the monitored groundwater has upward nitrate trends, while only 18% of the youngest groundwater has upward nitrate trends according to data sampled from 1988-2009. A regional analysis shows a correlation between a high level of N surplus in agriculture, high concentrations of nitrate in groundwater and the largest number of downward nitrate trends in groundwater in the livestock-dense northern and western parts of Denmark compared with the southeastern regions with lower livestock densities. These results indicate that the livestock farms dominating in northern and western parts of Denmark have achieved the largest reductions in N surpluses. Groundwater recharge age determinations allow comparison of long-term changes in N surplus in agriculture with changes in oxic groundwater quality. The presented data analysis is based on groundwater recharged from 1952-2003, but sampled from 1988

  2. Regional analysis of groundwater nitrate concentrations and trends in Denmark in regard to agricultural influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Dalgaard, T.; Thorling, L.; Sørensen, B.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-05-01

    The act of balancing between an intensive agriculture with a high potential for nitrate pollution and a~drinking water supply almost entirely based on groundwater is a challenge faced by Denmark and similar regions around the globe. Since the 1980s, regulations implemented by Danish farmers have succeeded in optimizing the N (nitrogen) management at farm level. As a result, the upward agricultural N surplus trend has been reversed, and the N surplus has reduced by 30-55 % from 1980 to 2007 depending on region. The reduction in the N surplus served to reduce the losses of N from agriculture, with documented positive effects on nature and the environment in Denmark. In groundwater, the upward trend in nitrate concentration was reversed around 1980, and a larger number of downward nitrate trends were seen in the youngest groundwater compared with the oldest groundwater. However, on average, approximately 48 % of the oxic monitored groundwater has nitrate concentrations above the groundwater and drinking water standards of 50 mg l-1. Furthermore, trend analyses show that 33 % of all the monitored groundwater has upward nitrate trends, while only 18 % of the youngest groundwater has upward nitrate trends according to data sampled from 1988-2009. A regional analysis shows a correlation between a high level of N surplus in agriculture, high concentrations of nitrate in groundwater and the largest number of downward nitrate trends in groundwater in the livestock-dense northern and western parts of Denmark compared with the south-eastern regions with lower livestock densities. These results indicate that the livestock farms dominating in northern and western parts of Denmark have achieved the largest reductions in N surpluses. Groundwater recharge age determinations allow comparison of long-term changes in N surplus in agriculture with changes in oxic groundwater quality. The presented data analysis is based on groundwater recharged from 1952-2003, but sampled from 1988

  3. Late fertility decline in the Netherlands: the influence of religious denomination, socio-economic group and region.

    PubMed

    Van Poppel Fwa

    1985-11-01

    The factors affecting the modern decline in fertility in the Netherlands are explored using data from censuses from 1930 to 1971 and additional unpublished sources. Particular attention is paid to the influence of religion, socioeconomic status, and region. The author concludes that "a theory formulated by Lesthaeghe and Wilson on the relation between modes of production and secularization and the pace of fertility decline in Western Europe offers--in combination with van Heek's views on the special position of Dutch Roman Catholicism--a starting point for an explanation of why the fertility decline of Roman Catholics, self-employed and agricultural labourers lagged behind." (summary in FRE)

  4. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-09-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-microm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on

  5. Influence of a multiyear event of low salinity on the zooplankton from Mexican eco-regions of the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaniegos, Bertha E.

    2009-12-01

    Data are presented from the southern part of the California Current System (CCS) for the period 1997-2007, derived from the IMECOCAL monitoring program. Apart from El Niño 1997 to 1998, and La Niña 1998-1999 the strongest perturbation occurred in 2002 due to an intrusion of subarctic water affecting all the CCS. The response of zooplankton biomass to the strong cooling and freshening of the upper layer was an immediate drop followed by a progressive recovery between 2003 and 2007. Though the low salinity influence ended in 2006, the increased zooplankton trend continued, reinforced by increased upwelling activity beginning 2005 off north Baja California region (30-32°N) and beginning 2006 off central Baja California (24-30°N). Multiple regression analysis was done between regional variables and Upwelling Index (UI) and two basin-scale proxies: the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The significant influence of the NPGO on surface salinity, salinity stratification, zooplankton volume and secondary consumers (zooplankton carnivores) suggests a basin scale control on these variables more than local mechanisms. The signature of the NPGO was also evident in the base of the trophic web, but more related to the group of crustacean herbivores in the north eco-region, and the tunicates in central Baja California. In this last region, the effect from NPGO on the zooplankton volume and tunicates was antagonist with UI indicative of similar importance of basin and local processes. However, when the time interval is limited to the post-subarctic intrusion (2003-2007) the significance of multiple regression models and physical variables was lost. Therefore, though data and bio-physical coupling analysis off Baja California suggest a better relation with NPGO compared to PDO, it is still not sufficient to explain the magnitude of the perturbation observed in 2002.

  6. The influence of climate variability on chemical composition of European wines: a regional scale study (Italy and Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbante, Carlo; Polo, Fabio; Cozzi, Giulio; Ogrinc, Nives; Turetta, Clara

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is having an increasing influence on vine phenology and grape composition, affecting vinifications, wine chemistry and the quality of productions. Wine grape cultivation provides a good test case for measuring indirect impacts mediated by changes in agriculture, because viticulture is sensitive to climate and is concentrated in Mediterranean climate regions that are global biodiversity hotspots. Moreover, on a regional level and on a shorter time scale, the seasonal weather conditions modify the quality of yields determining the final properties of wine. In the present research, we studied wines from Italy and Slovenia with the purpose of differentiating them by the different vintages (from 2009 to 2012), which are supposed to be influenced by temperature and rain during each year's growing season. Specific chemical techniques were used, in particular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotopic mass spectrometry (IRMS), both of which are usually employed to detect wine adulterations and to establish the geographical provenance of wines. In particular, we investigated the relationship between macro- and micro-elements, Rare Earth Elements and stable isotopes [δ13C, δ18O, (D/H)I, (D/H)II]. The datasets were examined via statistical techniques to show their relation to weather conditions as well as their mutual connection. Italian and Slovenian wines were distinguished, with the exception of few samples, by both TEs and REEs results. This separation, due to different elemental compositions, may be justified as being part of two distinct environmental and geographical belongings (terroir) but also to the processes of wine production, from the harvest to the bottling, which have certainly interfered and characterized the products. In the case of Italian wines the weather conditions were evidenced with an important separation of stable isotopes which they confirmed to be very sensitive Regarding Slovenian wines, the studied regions were characterized of

  7. Regional and hemispheric influences on measured spring peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) mixing ratios at the Auchencorth UK EMEP supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malley, Christopher S.; Cape, J. Neil; Jones, Matthew R.; Leeson, Sarah R.; Coyle, Mhairi; Braban, Christine F.; Heal, Mathew R.; Twigg, Marsailidh M.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents 15-min averaged measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) obtained during spring 2014 (24/04/2014 - 06/05/2014) at the Auchencorth UK EMEP supersite (southeast Scotland). The aim of this analysis was to investigate the conditions producing the distribution of PAN mixing ratios at the supersite in spring 2014. Air mass back trajectories showed the majority of air masses to have spent substantial time over the UK, continental Europe or Scandinavia prior to arrival at Auchencorth. The median and 95th percentile PAN mixing ratios observed were 0.46 ppb and 1.03 ppb, respectively. The median mixing ratio was elevated compared with previous PAN measurements during springtime (April-May) in southeast Scotland (corresponding median mixing ratios April-May 1994-1998: 0.1-0.3 ppb), which is hypothesised to be due to conditions conducive to regional (European) photochemical PAN production. Additionally, PAN mixing ratios during regionally influenced conditions (0.4-1.5 ppb) were substantially more elevated from hemispheric background mixing ratios (0.4-0.6 ppb) than for ozone (O3, regional: 10-45 ppb, hemispheric: 30-40 ppb). PAN and O3 both impact upon vegetation and human health and it is necessary to understand the extent to which hemispheric and regional processes contribute to their abundances in different locations. Regional processes can both increase and decrease PAN and O3 mixing ratios compared to imported hemispheric background mixing ratios. This study concludes that during the measurement period in spring 2014 at the Auchencorth supersite, regional PAN and O3 modifying processes enhanced PAN mixing ratios more than for O3.

  8. Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Desai Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D; Davis, Kenneth; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Gough, Christopher M; Martin, Jonathan G; Ricciuto, Daniel M; Schmid, Hans Peter; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

  9. Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Ankur R; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D; Davis, Kenneth J; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G; Ricciuto, Daniel M; Schmid, Hans P; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

    2008-02-13

    Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be -290 ± 89, 408 ± 48, and 698 ± 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

  10. Analysis of the Influence of the Electrical Asynchrony on Regional Mechanics of the Infarcted Left Ventricle Using Electromechanical Heart Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Xin

    Asynchronous electrical activation, as induced by myocardial infarction, causes various abnormalities in left ventricle function. The influence of the electrical asynchrony on regional mechanics of the left ventricle is simulated using a mechanical heart model and an electrical heart model. The mechanical model accounts for the ventricular geometry, the fiber nature of the myocardial tissue, and the dependency of the activation sequence of the ventricular wall. The electrical model is based on a heart-torso model with realistic geometry, and different action potential waveforms with variables in duration are used to simulate the abnormal electrical activation after myocardial infarction. Regional deformation, strain and stress are calculated during systole phase. The preliminary results show that asynchronous electrical activation, as an important factor, significantly affects regional mechanical performance of the infarcted left ventricle, it indicates heterogeneous contraction pattern and elevated systolic stresses near the injured region. The simulated results are compared with solutions obtained in the literature. This simulation suggests that such coupled heart models can be used to assess the mechanical function of the left ventricle with diseases such as myocardial infarction, and more realistic models of cardiac function are essential for clinical evaluation of heart disease.

  11. Influence of the hinge region on complement activation, C1q binding, and segmental flexibility in chimeric human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L K; Shopes, R J; Oi, V T; Morrison, S L

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized a series of genetically engineered chimeric human IgG3 and IgG4 anti-dansyl (DNS) antibodies with identical antibody-combining sites but different hinge region amino acid compositions to determine how the hinge region influences Fab fragment segmental flexibility, C1q binding, and complement activation. Our data support the correlation between "upper hinge" length and Fab segmental flexibility; moreover, we confirm that a hinge region is essential for C1q binding and complement activation. However, the hinge length by itself is not sufficient for complement activity in IgG molecules. We have demonstrated that the IgG4 hinge, which imparts restricted segmental flexibility, reduces the ability of IgG3 molecules to activate complement. We also find that the IgG3 hinge region, which imparts greater segmental motion, is not sufficient to create complement activation activity in IgG4 anti-DNS antibodies. Finally, we conclude that (i) segmental motion is correlated with "upper hinge" length, (ii) hinge length and segmental flexibility is not enough to alter complement binding and activation, and (iii) segmental flexibility does not correlate with proficiency to activate the complement cascade. PMID:2296577

  12. Evidence that local land use practices influence regional climate, vegetation, and stream flow patterns in adjacent natural areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Chase, T.N.; Pielke, R.A.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Baron, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    We present evidence that land use practices in the plains of Colorado influence regional climate and vegetation in adjacent natural areas in the Rocky Mountains in predictable ways. Mesoscale climate model simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS) projected that modifications to natural vegetation in the plains, primarily due to agriculture and urbanization, could produce lower summer temperatures in the mountains. We corroborate the RAMS simulations with three independent sets of data: (i) climate records from 16 weather stations, which showed significant trends of decreasing July temperatures in recent decades; (ii) the distribution of seedlings of five dominant conifer species in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, which suggested that cooler, wetter conditions occurred over roughly the same time period; and (iii) increased stream flow, normalized for changes in precipitation, during the summer months in four river basins, which also indicates cooler summer temperatures and lower transpiration at landscape scales. Combined, the mesoscale atmospheric/land-surface model, short-term in regional temperatures, forest distribution changes, and hydrology data indicate that the effects of land use practices on regional climate may overshadow larger-scale temperature changes commonly associated with observed increases in CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

  13. Late Holocene anthropogenic and climatic influences on the regional vegetation of Mexico's Cuenca Oriental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Tripti; Byrne, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Scholars continue to debate the relative magnitude of pre- and post-Conquest anthropogenic landscape transformation in many regions of Mesoamerica. These debates have important implications for our understanding of the role of anthropogenic practices in the development, or at times degradation, of regional environments. Paleoecological records that provide long-term perspectives on climate change and human land-use patterns are critical to addressing these uncertainties. However, many regions of Mexico including the Cuenca Oriental, a semi-arid basin in the rain shadow of the Sierra Madre Oriental, remain poorly studied. We present a new paleoecological record from sediment cores recovered from Lake Aljojuca, located in the southern part of the basin. Stable isotope analyses of authigenic carbonates provide an independent record of past climate, while pollen and microscopic charcoal provide insights into past vegetation and fire history. The Aljojuca record is one of the only well-dated multi-proxy paleolimnological records from the Cuenca Oriental, and is one of few charcoal studies from highland Mexico. Zea mays pollen and increased fire activity at 2700 calendar years before present (cal yr. BP) suggest Formative period human settlement around the lake. Between 1700 and 800 cal yr BP, a drying climate combined with human uses of fire likely resulted in increases in the extent of xeric scrub vegetation. The Aljojuca record also documents important landscape changes during the historic period (~ 430 cal yr. BP-present) likely related to the introduction of invasive species and agricultural intensification. The Aljojuca record provides a unique perspective on human-environment relationships and highlights differences between landscape transformations in the pre- and post-Conquest periods.

  14. Polar predictability: exploring the influence of GCM and regional model uncertainty on future ice sheet climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluating uncertainty in GCMs and regional-scale forecast models is an essential step in the development of climate change predictions. Polar-region skill is particularly important due to the potential for changes affecting both local (ice sheet) and global (sea level) environments through more frequent/intense surface melting and changes in precipitation type/amount. High-resolution, regional-scale models also use GCMs as a source of boundary/initial conditions in future scenarios, thus inheriting a measure of GCM-derived externally-driven uncertainty. We examine inter- and intramodel uncertainty through statistics from decadal climatologies and analyses of variability based on self-organizing maps (SOMs), a nonlinear data analysis tool. We evaluate a 19-member CMIP5 subset and the 30-member CESM1.0-CAM5-BGC Large Ensemble (CESMLE) during polar melt seasons (boreal/austral summer) for recent (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100, RCP 8.5) decades. Regional-model uncertainty is examined with a subset of these GCMs driving Polar WRF simulations. Decadal climatologies relative to a reference (recent: the ERA-Interim reanalysis; future: a skillful modern GCM) identify model uncertainty in bulk, e.g., BNU-ESM is too warm, CMCC-CM too cold. While quite useful for model screening, diagnostic benefit is often indirect. SOMs extend our diagnostics by providing a concise, objective summary of model variability as a set of generalized patterns. Joint analysis of reference and test models summarizes the variability of multiple realizations of climate (all the models), benchmarks each model versus the reference (frequency analysis helps identify the patterns behind GCM bias), and places each GCM in a common context. Joint SOM analysis of CESMLE members shows how initial conditions contribute to differences in modeled climates, providing useful information about internal variability, such as contributions from each member to overall uncertainty using pattern frequencies. In the

  15. The Influence of Photolysis Rate Constants in Ozone Production for the Paso del Norte Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Fernando; Fitzgerald, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    In this research work we are focusing on understanding the relationship between photolysis rates and the photochemical ozone changes observed in the Paso del Norte region. The city of El Paso, Texas together with Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, forms the largest contiguous bi-national metropolitan area. This region suffers year-round ozone pollution events, and a better understanding is needed to mitigate them. Previous studies have found that ambient ozone concentrations tend to be higher on weekends rather than on weekdays, this phenomenon being referred to, as the ``weekend effect.'' If the ozone standard is exceeded more frequently on weekends, then this phenomenon must be considered in the design of ozone control strategies. In this work we investigate some of the most representative weekend ozone episodes at El Paso, TX, during the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using the ozone photolysis rates. In this research the TUV radiative-transfer model is used to calculate the local photolysis rates and a UV MFRSR instrument is used to obtain experimental parameters. Seasonal variations and the weekday-weekend effect is studied. The results of this research will help to understand the underlying behavior of the photolysis rate constants when different atmospheric conditions are present.

  16. Cluster and regional influences on suicide in a Southwestern American Indian tribe.

    PubMed

    Wissow, L S; Walkup, J; Barlow, A; Reid, R; Kane, S

    2001-11-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among American Indian youth. Elevated rates of suicide in Indian communities have been attributed both to outbreaks and to regional trends. We assessed the contribution of these two factors for a single tribe, and attempted to define a profile of individuals at risk. Data came from the tribe's registry of suicide attempts and completions for 1990-1993 and analysis of death certificates for the period 1985-1996. Using combined tribal and death certificate data, the average annual (age-adjusted) rate of completed suicide among tribal members was 44.7/100,000 for 1990-1993. Within the 45 suicide deaths and serious attempts in this time period, we identified one grouping of seven cases taking place in a 40-day period. All seven involved hanging and youth (13-28 years old). Using death certificate data alone, the average annual rate of suicide death for non-natives in the surrounding county in the period 1985-1996 was 22.7/100,000. Age-adjusted to the county population, the tribal rate for the same period was not significantly different (24.6/100,000). Tribal and county suicide patterns differed by age distribution and method but not by gender. We concluded that both regional trends and clustering contribute to suicide in this community. Further prevention efforts may need to focus on both unique tribal characteristics and shared factors among non-native neighbors.

  17. Regional Metabolite Levels and Turnover in the Awake Rat Brain under the Influence of Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Jiang, Lihong; Jiang, Yifeng; Ma, Xiaoxian; Graeme, F. Mason

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most widespread drugs of abuse, nicotine has long been known to impact the brain, particularly with respect to addiction. However, the regional effects of nicotine on the concentrations and kinetics of amino acid neurotransmitters and some energetically related neurochemicals have been little studied. In this investigation, acute effects of nicotine were measured by 1H-observed/13C-edited nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy method in extracts obtained from nicotine-naïve, freely moving rats given 0.7 mg/kg nicotine or saline, with [1-13C] glucose to track metabolism. Nicotine was observed to exert significant effects on the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), particularly in the striatum. Nicotine decreased brain glucose oxidation, glutamate-glutamine neurotransmitter cycling, and GABA synthesis regionally, including in the parietal and occipital cortices and the striatum. The olfactory bulb showed kinetics that differed markedly from those observed in the rest of the brain. Independently of nicotine, the concentration of glutamate was found to be correlated significantly with levels of NAA and GABA, suggesting a potential interplay of energetics and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. In summary, the study revealed that the neurochemicals were most affected in the cortex and striatum of the rat brain after acute nicotine treatment. PMID:20345764

  18. Wave propagation in a solar quiet region and the influence of the magnetic canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We seek indications or evidence of transmission/conversion of magnetoacoustic waves at the magnetic canopy, as a result of its impact on the properties of the wave field of the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We use cross-wavelet analysis to measure phase differences between intensity and Doppler signal oscillations in the Hα, Ca ii h, and G-band. We use the height of the magnetic canopy to create appropriate masks to separate internetwork (IN) and magnetic canopy regions. We study wave propagation and differences between these two regions. Results: The magnetic canopy affects wave propagation by lowering the phase differences of progressive waves and allowing the propagation of waves with frequencies lower than the acoustic cut-off. We also find indications in the Doppler signals of Hα of a response to the acoustic waves at the IN, observed in the Ca ii h line. This response is affected by the presence of the magnetic canopy. Conclusions: Phase difference analysis indicates the existence of a complicated wave field in the quiet Sun, which is composed of a mixture of progressive and standing waves. There are clear imprints of mode conversion and transmission due to the interaction between the p-modes and small-scale magnetic fields of the network and internetwork.

  19. [Influence of green roof application on water quantity and quality in urban region].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Min; Li, Xing-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Yu, Hui; Hao, You-Zhi; Yang, Wan-Yi

    2014-07-01

    Green roof is widely used in advanced stormwater management as a major measure now. Taking Huxi catchment in Chongqing University as the study area, the relationships between green roof installation with runoff volume and water quality in urban region were investigated. The results showed that roof greening in the urban region contributed to reducing the runoff volume and pollution load. In addition, the spatial distribution and area of green roof also had effects on the runoff water quality. With the conditions that the roof area was 25% of the total watershed area, rainfall duration was 15 min and rainfall intensity was 14.8 mm x h(-1), the peak runoff and total runoff volume were reduced by 5.3% and 31%, the pollution loads of total suspended solid (TSS), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) decreased by 40.0%, 31.6% and 29.8%, their peak concentrations decreased by 21.0%, 16.0% and -12.2%, and the EMCs (event mean concentrations) were cut down by 13.1%, 0.9% and -1.7%, respectively, when all impervious roofs were greened in the research area. With the increase of roof greening rate, the reduction rates of TSS and TP concentrations increased, while the reduction rate of TN concentration decreased on the whole. Much more improvement could be obtained with the use of green roofs near the outlet of the watershed.

  20. Influence of Climate Change on Damages to Crops Produced by Hail Events at Spanish Peninsular Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa Requejo, A.; Tarquis, A. M.; García Moreno, R.; Gascó, G.; Burgaz, F.; Díaz Alvarez, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    Climate, often the most critical factor for the sustainability of agricultural systems, dictates which crops will grow in a region. Specific weather events, such as hail, will affect yield or quality of crops depending on the affected species, the temperatures reached and the timing of phenology. Predicting the occurrence of hailstorms is one of the most complicated tasks in weather forecasting because of the small area of land that is usually affected, and because of the short time hail events last. The importance of the study is related to the insurance of the different crops, since the damages are perceived as increasing during the last years, and consequently the amount of the economical compensations to crop producers. Under these conditions the State Agricultural Insurance Body of the Ministry of Environment and Rural and Marine Affairs were interested to know the extent of the new changing conditions to analyze the viability of the actual system and the potential future changes. The results demonstrate trend variability on damage risk to different crops produced by hail events at the Spanish peninsula. Meanwhile in some provinces show a negative trend in others are positive. However, all of them present several oscillations that questionate these trends. The research evaluated also the average minimum temperatures in summer for 405 weather stations over the peninsular region of Spain since 1981 until 2007, time in which crop insurance data can be verified. This study doesn't confirm the results obtained in France that relate hail damage registered with the average minimum temperatures.

  1. Local and Remote Influences on Vertical Wind Shear over the Northern Tropical Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, R.; Zhu, X.

    2009-12-01

    Vertical wind shear is one of the most important parameters controlling the frequency and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes. It has been argued that in global warming scenarios, the mechanical effect of changing vertical wind shear may even trump the thermodynamic effect of increasing Atlantic sea surface temperatures, when it comes to projected trends in Atlantic hurricane activity. Despite its importance, little is known about the connection between vertical shear in the north Atlantic region and the global atmospheric circulation, apart from the well-known positive correlation with El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In this study, we analyze the statistical relationship between vertical shear and features of the large-scale circulation such as the distribution of sea surface temperature and vertical motion. We examine whether this relationship is different on interannual timescales associated with ENSO as compared to the decadal timescales associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). We also investigate how well the global general circulation models manage to simulate the observed vertical shear in this region, and its relationship to the large-scale circulation. Our analyses reveal an interesting sensitivity to air-sea coupling in model simulations of vertical shear. Another interesting property of vertical shear, as defined in the context of hurricane studies, is that it is positive definite, rather like precipitation. This means that it has a very nongaussian probability distribution on short timescales. We analyze how this nongaussianity changes when averaged over longer timescales.

  2. Musashi regulates the temporal order of mRNA translation during Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Wilczynska, Anna; Thampi, Prajitha; Cox, Linda L; MacNicol, Angus M

    2006-06-21

    A strict temporal order of maternal mRNA translation is essential for meiotic cell cycle progression in oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis. The molecular mechanisms controlling the ordered pattern of mRNA translational activation have not been elucidated. We report a novel role for the neural stem cell regulatory protein, Musashi, in controlling the translational activation of the mRNA encoding the Mos proto-oncogene during meiotic cell cycle progression. We demonstrate that Musashi interacts specifically with the polyadenylation response element in the 3' untranslated region of the Mos mRNA and that this interaction is necessary for early Mos mRNA translational activation. A dominant inhibitory form of Musashi blocks maternal mRNA cytoplasmic polyadenylation and meiotic cell cycle progression. Our data suggest that Musashi is a target of the initiating progesterone signaling pathway and reveal that late cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-directed mRNA translation requires early, Musashi-dependent mRNA translation. These findings indicate that Musashi function is necessary to establish the temporal order of maternal mRNA translation during Xenopus meiotic cell cycle progression.

  3. Sources and contributions of wood smoke during winter in London: assessing local and regional influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, L. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Yin, J.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Flynn, M.; Williams, P.; Zotter, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Heal, M. R.; Barlow, J. F.; Halios, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Szidat, S.; Mohr, C.

    2015-03-01

    Determining the contribution of wood smoke to air pollution in large cities such as London is becoming increasingly important due to the changing nature of domestic heating in urban areas. During winter, biomass burning emissions have been identified as a major cause of exceedances of European air quality limits. The aim of this work was to quantify the contribution of biomass burning in London to concentrations of PM2.5 and determine whether local emissions or regional contributions were the main source of biomass smoke. To achieve this, a number of biomass burning chemical tracers were analysed at a site within central London and two sites in surrounding rural areas. Concentrations of levoglucosan, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and K+ were generally well correlated across the three sites. At all the sites, biomass burning was found to be a source of OC and EC, with the largest contribution of EC from traffic emissions, while for OC the dominant fraction included contributions from secondary organic aerosols, primary biogenic and cooking sources. Source apportionment of the EC and OC was found to give reasonable estimation of the total carbon from non-fossil and fossil fuel sources based upon comparison with estimates derived from 14C analysis. Aethalometer-derived black carbon data were also apportioned into the contributions from biomass burning and traffic and showed trends similar to those observed for EC. Mean wood smoke mass at the sites was estimated to range from 0.78 to 1.0 μg m-3 during the campaign in January-February 2012. Measurements on a 160 m tower in London suggested a similar ratio of brown to black carbon (reflecting wood burning and traffic respectively) in regional and London air. Peaks in the levoglucosan and K+ concentrations were observed to coincide with low ambient temperature, consistent with domestic heating as a major contributing local source in London. Overall, the source of biomass smoke in London was concluded to be a

  4. Regional localization within the bone marrow influences the functional capacity of human HSCs.

    PubMed

    Guezguez, Borhane; Campbell, Clinton J V; Boyd, Allison L; Karanu, Francis; Casado, Fanny L; Di Cresce, Christine; Collins, Tony J; Shapovalova, Zoya; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Bhatia, Mickie

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the bone marrow (BM) niche plays a key role in mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function and involves contributions from a broad array of cell types. However, the composition and role of the human BM HSC niche have not been investigated. Here, using human bone biopsy specimens, we provide evidence of HSC propensity to localize to endosteal regions of the trabecular bone area (TBA). Through functional xenograft transplantation, we found that human HSCs localizing to the TBA have superior regenerative and self-renewal capacity and are molecularly distinct from those localizing to the long bone area (LBA). In addition, osteoblasts in the TBA possess unique characteristics and express a key network of factors that regulate TBA- versus LBA-localized human HSCs in vivo. Our study reveals that BM localization and architecture play a critical role in defining the functional and molecular properties of human HSCs.

  5. Influence of meteorological storms on ionospheric parameters in Baltic region in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Ivan; Borchevkina, Olga; Dadashev, Ruslan; Ilminskaya, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents observations of atmospheric and ionospheric parameters during strong meteorological disturbances (storms) in the Kaliningrad region. The critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) and the total electron content (TEC) were observed at the station Kaliningrad (20 °E, 54.20 °N). Atmospheric pressure and wind were taken to be the atmospheric parameters under study. The analysis of ionospheric observations has shown that during meteorological storms the amplitude of diurnal variations in TEC decreases to 50 %; and in foF2, to 15 % as compared to quiet days. The revealed changes in ionospheric conditions during meteorological storms are regularly registered and represent a characteristic feature of the meteorological effect on the ionosphere.

  6. Influence of vortical flow structures on the glottal jet location in the supraglottal region.

    PubMed

    Kniesburges, Stefan; Hesselmann, Christina; Becker, Stefan; Schlücker, Eberhard; Döllinger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Within the fully coupled multiphysics phonation process, the fluid flow plays an important role for sound production. This study addresses phenomena in the flow downstream of synthetic self-oscillating vocal folds. An experimental setup consisting of devices for producing and conditioning the flow including the main test channel was applied. The supraglottal channel was designed to prevent an acoustic coupling to the vocal folds. Hence, the oscillations were aerodynamically driven. The cross-section of the supraglottal channel was systematically varied by increasing the distance between the lateral channel walls. The vocal folds consisted of silicone rubber of homogenous material distribution generating self-sustained oscillations. The airflow was visualized in the immediate supraglottal region using a laser-sheet technique and a digital high-speed camera. Furthermore, the flow was studied by measuring the static pressure distributions on both lateral supraglottal channel walls. The results clearly showed different flow characteristics depending on the supraglottal configuration. In all cases with supraglottal channel, the jet was located asymmetrical and bent in medial-lateral direction. Furthermore, the side to which the jet was deflected changed in between the consecutive cycles showing a bifurcational behavior. Previously, this phenomenon was explained by the Coanda effect. However, the present data suggest that the deflection of the jet was mainly caused by large air vortices in the supraglottal channel produced by the flow field of previous oscillations. In contrast, for the case without supraglottal channel, the air jet was found totally symmetrical stabilized by the constant pressure in the ambient region. The emitted sound signal showed additional subharmonic tonal peaks for the asymmetric flow cases, which are characteristics for diplophonia. PMID:23911009

  7. Modeling the influence of land surface flux on the regional climate of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiqiang; Ma, Yaoming

    2016-07-01

    Land surface heat fluxes over the heterogeneous landscape of the Tibetan Plateau can serve as boundary conditions for modeling the regional climate and the Asian monsoon system. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric modeling system has enabled us to model the land surface heat flux through sensitivity experiments that utilize in situ observation data and the regional land-atmosphere exchanges of water and heat fluxes that are foundational to understanding the water and energy cycles present during the Asian monsoon period. A series of sensitivity experiments based on the WRF model and field observations has been proposed and tested for deriving the land surface heat fluxes (surface net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux) over a heterogeneous land surface. The sensitivity experiments were simulated over the field area of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period Asia-Australia Monsoon Project on the Tibetan Plateau (CEOP-CAMP/Tibet), located on the northern Tibetan Plateau of China. A WRF modeling period from July to August 2007 was selected for the summer monsoon conditions. To validate the modeling results, the ground-measured or calculated variables (e.g., net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux) were compared to the simulated values. The modeling results show that the derived model land surface heat fluxes are in agreement with the land surface observations over the study area in summer. Therefore, the WRF model sensitivity experiments were successful in simulating the land surface heat fluxes over the study area.

  8. Influence of local circulations on wind, moisture, and precipitation close to Manaus City, Amazon Region, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Mercel J.; Silva Dias, Maria A. F.; Freitas, Edmilson D.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents long-term-derived local wind patterns as well as their role on moisture transport and on spatial/temporal distribution of precipitation close to Manaus City region. In this analysis we used surface weather station data and rainfall estimates from TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) and CMORPH (Climate Prediction Center morphing method). The weather stations promoted information of wind direction and dew point temperature, used here as atmospheric moisture indicator. The 3-hourly average of accumulated precipitation, calculated using satellite estimates (TRMM and CMORPH), allowed to assess the spatial distribution of the rainfall diurnal cycle and how it is modulated by the local circulations. The station data results show that in the daytime, between 9:00 and 18:00 local time, winds away from the rivers are frequent, indicating action of the river breeze. This wind condition transports moist air from the rivers to the Manaus City. Winds toward rivers are commonly observed at night and in the morning, mostly at Ponta Pelada airport station, and are evidence of the land breeze occurrence. These local winds transport drier air from Manaus City to the river regions, as verified at Ponta Pelada station. The evidence of the local circulations and their impact on the moisture transport are more obvious in the dry season. The rainfall diurnal cycle has a spatial tendency varying according to the hour of the day. In the afternoon and in the evening, maximum precipitation values are observed over land, whereas reduced rainfall values are verified over rivers. At dawn and in the morning, the maximum values of accumulated precipitation are found over the rivers, mainly over and around the Amazon River. This rainfall spatial distribution is very likely modulated by local circulations and is much more evident in the rainiest quarter (March-May).

  9. Health insurance in Ghana: evaluation of policy holders’ perceptions and factors influencing policy renewal in the Volta region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health insurance is an important mechanism that succors individuals, states and the nation at large. The purpose of this study was to assess individual’s attitude towards health insurance policy and the factors that influence respondents’ decision to renew their health insurance policy when it expires. Methods This cross sectional study was conducted in the Volta region of Ghana. A total of 300 respondents were randomly sampled and interviewed for the study. Data was collected at the household level and analyzed with STATA software. Descriptive statistics was used to assess the demographic characteristics of the respondents while Logistic regression model was used to assess factors that influence respondents’ decision to take up health insurance policy and renew it. Results The study results indicate that 61.1% of respondents are currently being enrolled in the NHIS, 23.9% had not renewed their insurance after enrollment and 15% had never enrolled. Reasons cited for non-renewal of insurance included poor service quality (58%), lack of money (49%) and taste of other sources of care (23%). The gender, marital status, religion and perception of health status of respondents significantly influenced their decision to enroll and remain in NHIS. Conclusion NHIS has come to stay with clients testifying to its benefits in keeping them strong and healthy. Efforts therefore must be put in by all stakeholders including the community to educate the individuals on the benefits of health insurance to ensure all have optimal access. PMID:23822579

  10. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  11. Analysis on the preference for sequence matching between mRNA sequences and the corresponding introns in ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Meng, Hu; Jia, Yun; Xue, Hui; Bo, Sulin

    2016-03-01

    Introns after splicing still play an important role. Introns can accomplish gene expression and regulation by interaction with corresponding mRNA sequences. Based on the Smith-Waterman method, local comparing makes us get the optimal matched segments between intron sequences and mRNA sequences. Analyzing the distribution regulation of the optimal matching region on mRNA sequences of ribosomal protein genes about 27 species, we find a strong interaction between UTR region sequences and introns. There are a lot of the optimal matching regions and low matching ones, and the latter are supposed to be the combined regions of protein complexes. The optimal matching frequency distributions have obvious differences nearby the mRNA functional sites such as translation initiation and termination sites, exon-exon joints and EJC regions. This conclusion shows that intron sequences and mature mRNA sequences are co-evolved and interactive to play their functions. PMID:26707402

  12. Modeling the influence of various water stressors on regional water supply infrastructures and their embodied energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Weiwei; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Water supply consumes a substantial amount of energy directly and indirectly. This study aims to provide an enhanced understanding of the influence of water stressors on the embodied energy of water supply (EEWS). To achieve this goal, the EEWS in 75 North Carolina counties was estimated through an economic input-output based hybrid life cycle assessment. Ten water stressor indicators related to population, economic development, climate, water source, and land use were obtained for the 75 counties. A multivariate analysis was performed to understand the correlations between water stressor indicators and the EEWS. A regression analysis was then conducted to identify the statistically significant indicators in describing the EEWS. It was found that the total amount of water supply energy varies significantly among selected counties. Water delivery presents the highest energy use and water storage presents the least. The total embodied energy was found to be highly correlated with total population. The regression analysis shows that the total embodied energy can be best described by total population and temperature indicators with a relatively high R square value of 0.69.

  13. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The influence of forest shelterbelts on 137Cs fallout in Chernobyl affected areas (Tula region, Russia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Maxim; Shamshurina, Eugeniya; Tatyana, Paramonova; Vladimir, Belyaev; Angelina, Gavruchenkova; Nikolai, Lugovoy; Konstantinov, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The radioactive fallout after Chernobyl accident caused serious contamination by 137Cs along extensive area of East-European plain.Cs137 fall down on earth surface in two ways: gravitational - "dry" and rainfall - "wet" way. "Dry" fallout is a result of direct deposition of radionuclides from atmosphere with average speed of about 0.1-1 mm/sec. The fate of "dry fall"is far less than rainfall mechanism. Erupted water steam of reactor zone full of radioactive material enriched precipitation with 137Cs. Therefore, the derived spatial structure of contamination was under control of rainfall pattern in May-June 1986. On the areas affected by rainfall fallout was the Southern part of Tula region in Middle Russia. It got name as "Plava hot spot" by the town in the center of this area. Tula is a traditional rural region, the vast areas covered by chernozem soils are cultivated for centuries. During cultivation forest cover was reduced that urged growth of wind erosion and loss of soil fertility. Hence, in the middle of 20 the century large arrangements for creation of forest shelterbelts were conducted. High efficiency of shelterbelts made them a widely provided part of new human-transformed landscape. Usually shelterbelts are set as a regular network across main direction of winds in particular region. Such organization help to reduce speed of air steam in the lowest 20-30 m layer of atmosphere. In addition, shelterbelts are very good collectors of snow in winter time which increase total moisture of soil and its fertility. Represented investigation is conducted to find out any correlation between shelterbelts and fallout of radionuclides. If such correlation is significant, it has to be taken into account for further environmental surveys. Two shelterbelts on the interfluve positions were chosen for detailed examination. Both selected objects emerged before 1986 but have different width, floristic composition, orientation and type of construction. One of shelterbelts is

  15. Institutional factors influencing regional differences in the 1-year survival of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Satoshi; Nishi, Shinichi; Wakai, Kenji; Hanafusa, Norio; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Masakane, Ikuto

    2015-10-01

    There are regional differences in the survival of incident dialysis patients, but few studies have investigated the reasons. We assessed the effect of institutional factors on factors on survival (by both cross-sectional assessment and after a 1-year investigation) in a cohort of the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT). We investigated 20 institutional factors from 3958 dialysis institution data of the 47 prefectures in Japan in 2005 and the JSDT database of 102,011 patients who commenced dialysis during 2004-2006. Univariate regression analysis between 20 factors and 1-year survival rate, Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox's proportional hazard model between the upper 24 and the lower 23 prefectures of the significant factors were carried out. The age-adjusted 1-year survival rate was 0.832 ± 0.027. Deaths occurred in 15.0% in 24 upper survival prefectures and 18.7% in 23 lower survival prefectures (P < 0.0001, unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] of death in lower survival prefectures: 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.40). A total of five factors among males were significantly correlated with 1-year survival according to the univariate regression analysis. Among them, three factors (night-time center/total dialysis center ratio [males: P < 0.0001, age, genders, and presence of diabetes adjusted HR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.81-0.93], number of full-time dialysis nurses [males: P = 0.0427, 0.94, 0.87-1.00], number of full-time dialysis dietitians [males: P = 0.0084, 0.92, 0.85-0.98], respectively) were significant in Kaplan-Meier analysis, log-rank test, and the Cox's model. Institutional factors were closely related to the survival of incident dialysis patients, and regional differences in the survival may be explained, at least partly, by these factors.

  16. The influence of regional extensional tectonic stress on the eruptive behaviour of subduction-zone volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, M.; Cronin, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Regional tectonic stress is considered a trigger mechanism for explosive volcanic activity, but the related mechanisms at depth are not well understood. The unique geological setting of Ruapehu, New Zealand, allows investigation on the effect of enhanced regional extensional crustal tension on the eruptive behaviour of subduction-zone volcanoes. The composite cone is located at the southwestern terminus of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, one of the most active silicic magma systems on Earth, which extends through the central part of New Zealand's North Island. Rhyolitic caldera eruptions are limited to its central part where crustal extension is highest, whereas lower extension and additional dextral shear dominate in the southwestern and northeastern segments characterized by andesitic volcanism. South of Ruapehu, the intra-arc rift zone traverses into a compressional geological setting with updoming marine sequences dissected by reverse and normal faults. The current eruptive behaviour of Ruapehu is dominated by small-scaled vulcanian eruptions, but our studies indicate that subplinian to plinian eruptions have frequently occurred since ≥340 ka and were usually preceded by major rhyolitic caldera unrest in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Pre-existing structures related to the NNW-SSE trending subduction-zone setting are thought to extend at depth and create preferred pathways for the silicic magma bodies, which may facilitate the development of large (>100 km3) dyke-like upper-crustal storage systems prior to major caldera activity. This may cause enhanced extensional stress throughout the entire intra-arc setting, including the Ruapehu area. During periods of caldera dormancy, the thick crust underlying the volcano and the enhanced dextral share rate likely impede ascent of larger andesitic magma bodies, and storage of andesitic melts dominantly occurs within small-scaled magma bodies at middle- to lower-crustal levels. During episodes of major caldera unrest, ascent and

  17. Influence of feedbacks from simulated crop growth on integrated regional hydrologic simulations under climate scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Walsum, P. E. V.

    2011-11-01

    Climate change impact modelling of hydrologic responses is hampered by climate-dependent model parameterizations. Reducing this dependency was one of the goals of extending the regional hydrologic modelling system SIMGRO with a two-way coupling to the crop growth simulation model WOFOST. The coupling includes feedbacks to the hydrologic model in terms of the root zone depth, soil cover, leaf area index, interception storage capacity, crop height and crop factor. For investigating whether such feedbacks lead to significantly different simulation results, two versions of the model coupling were set up for a test region: one with exogenous vegetation parameters, the "static" model, and one with endogenous simulation of the crop growth, the "dynamic" model WOFOST. The used parameterization methods of the static/dynamic vegetation models ensure that for the current climate the simulated long-term average of the actual evapotranspiration is the same for both models. Simulations were made for two climate scenarios. Owing to the higher temperatures in combination with a higher CO2-concentration of the atmosphere, a forward time shift of the crop development is simulated in the dynamic model; the used arable land crop, potatoes, also shows a shortening of the growing season. For this crop, a significant reduction of the potential transpiration is simulated compared to the static model, in the example by 15% in a warm, dry year. In consequence, the simulated crop water stress (the unit minus the relative transpiration) is lower when the dynamic model is used; also the simulated increase of crop water stress due to climate change is lower; in the example, the simulated increase is 15 percentage points less (of 55) than when a static model is used. The static/dynamic models also simulate different absolute values of the transpiration. The difference is most pronounced for potatoes at locations with ample moisture supply; this supply can either come from storage release of a

  18. Connections Underlying Translation and mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Green, Rachel

    2016-09-11

    Gene expression and regulation in organisms minimally depends on transcription by RNA polymerase and on the stability of the RNA product (for both coding and non-coding RNAs). For coding RNAs, gene expression is further influenced by the amount of translation by the ribosome and by the stability of the protein product. The stabilities of these two classes of RNA, non-coding and coding, vary considerably: tRNAs and rRNAs tend to be long lived while mRNAs tend to be more short lived. Even among mRNAs, however, there is a considerable range in stability (ranging from seconds to hours in bacteria and up to days in metazoans), suggesting a significant role for stability in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we review recent experiments from bacteria, yeast and metazoans indicating that the stability of most mRNAs is broadly impacted by the actions of ribosomes that translate them. Ribosomal recognition of defective mRNAs triggers "mRNA surveillance" pathways that target the mRNA for degradation [Shoemaker and Green (2012) ]. More generally, even the stability of perfectly functional mRNAs appears to be dictated by overall rates of translation by the ribosome [Herrick et al. (1990), Presnyak et al. (2015) ]. Given that mRNAs are synthesized for the purpose of being translated into proteins, it is reassuring that such intimate connections between mRNA and the ribosome can drive biological regulation. In closing, we consider the likelihood that these connections between protein synthesis and mRNA stability are widespread or whether other modes of regulation dominate the mRNA stability landscape in higher organisms. PMID:27261255

  19. How the loop and middle regions influence the properties of Helicobacter pylori VacA channels.

    PubMed Central

    Tombola, F; Pagliaccia, C; Campello, S; Telford, J L; Montecucco, C; Papini, E; Zoratti, M

    2001-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming cytotoxin produced by Helicobacter pylori in several strain-specific isoforms, which have been classified in two main families, m1 and m2, according to the sequence of a variable "midregion." Both forms are associated with gastric pathologies and can induce vacuolation of cultured cells. The comparison of two representative toxins, m1 17874 and m2 9554, has indicated that the m2 form is less powerful in vacuolation assays and that its effects are more strongly cell type dependent. To rationalize these differences and to investigate structure-function relationships in this toxin, we have compared the properties of the channels formed by these two variants and by a construct derived from 17874 by deleting a loop that connects the two toxin domains, which is shorter in 9554 than in 17874. Although the channels formed by all three proteins are similar, m2 9554 channels have, on average, a lower conductance and are less anion-selective and more voltage-dependent than the m1 pores. Furthermore, the rate of incorporation of 9554 VacA into planar bilayers depends on lipid composition much more strongly than that of 17874. The comparison with the behavior of the loop deletion mutant indicates that this latter property, as well as a portion of the conductance decrease, may be attributed to the reduction in loop length. The differences in pore properties are proposed to account in part for the different cytotoxicity exhibited by the two toxin isoforms. We furthermore present evidence suggesting that the conformation of the membrane-embedded toxin may be influenced by the lipid composition of the membrane itself. PMID:11720986

  20. Influence of Large-scale Climate Modes on Atmospheric Rivers That Drive Regional Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, B.; Molotch, N. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow channels of enhanced meridional water vapor transport between the tropics and extratropics that drive precipitation extremes in the west coast areas of North America and other continents. The influence of large-scale climate modes on ARs is analyzed in terms of modulation on AR frequency and AR-related snow water equivalent (SWE) anomalies, with a focus on understanding the causes of the anomalously snowy winter season of 2010/2011 in California's Sierra Nevada. Mean SWE on 1 April 2011 was ~70% above normal averaged over 100 snow sensors. AR occurrence was anomalously high during the season, with 20 AR dates from November to March and 14 dates in the month of December 2010, compared to the mean occurrence of 9 dates per season. Most of the season's ARs occurred during negative phases of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern. Analysis of all winter ARs in California during water years 1998-2011 indicates more ARs occur during the negative phase of AO and PNA, with the increase between positive and negative phases being ~90% for AO, and ~50% for PNA. The circulation pattern associated with concurrent negative phases of AO and PNA, characterized by cyclonic anomalies centered northwest of California, provides a favorable dynamical condition for ARs. The analysis suggests that the massive Sierra Nevada snowpack during the 2010/2011 winter season is primarily related to anomalously high frequency of ARs favored by the joint phasing of -AO and -PNA, and that a secondary contribution is from increased snow accumulation during these ARs favored by colder air temperatures associated with -AO, -PNA and La Niña. The results have implications for subseasonal-to-seasonal predictability of AR activities and related weather and water extremes.

  1. Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Ryan R; Checkley, David M

    2008-02-12

    Upwelling of nutrient-rich, subsurface water sustains high productivity in the ocean's eastern boundary currents. These ecosystems support a rate of fish harvest nearly 100 times the global mean and account for >20% of the world's marine fish catch. Environmental variability is thought to be the major cause of the decadal-scale biomass fluctuations characteristic of fish populations in these regions, but the mechanisms relating atmospheric physics to fish production remain unexplained. Two atmospheric conditions induce different types of upwelling in these ecosystems: coastal, alongshore wind stress, resulting in rapid upwelling (with high vertical velocity, w); and wind-stress curl, resulting in slower upwelling (low w). We show that the level of wind-stress curl has increased and that production of Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) varies with wind-stress curl over the past six decades. The extent of isopycnal shoaling, nutricline depth, and chlorophyll concentration in the upper ocean also correlate positively with wind-stress curl. The size structure of plankton assemblages is related to the rate of wind-forced upwelling, and sardine feed efficiently on small plankters generated by slow upwelling. Upwelling rate is a fundamental determinant of the biological structure and production in coastal pelagic ecosystems, and future changes in the magnitude and spatial gradient of wind stress may have important and differing effects on these ecosystems. Understanding of the biological mechanisms relating fisheries production to environmental variability is essential for wise management of marine resources under a changing climate.

  2. Cultural influences on health care use: two regional groups in India.

    PubMed

    Basu, A M

    1990-01-01

    While health care services are increasingly being seen as a major proximate determinant of decreased mortality in a population, it also seems to be the case that the mere provision of services does not lead to their better utilization. However, in general, it is difficult to explore differences in utilization because the availability of services itself varies so greatly. This report presents the results of a study in India of two distinct regional groups of similar socioeconomic status, residing in the same locality and, therefore, theoretically exposed to the same health services. Both groups share a strong faith in modern medicine (especially if it is obtained from a private practitioner) for the treatment of most common illnesses. However, important cultural differentials exist in the medical services sought for childbirth and in the treatment of morbidity in children of different ages and sexes. These cultural commonalities and differentials are described, their possible causes--primary among these being the status of women--explored, and some policy recommendations made. PMID:2237996

  3. Regional Variations of Public Perception on Contaminated Industrial Sites in China and Its Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaonuo; Jiao, Wentao; Xiao, Rongbo; Chen, Weiping; Bai, Yanying

    2016-01-01

    Public involvement is critical in sustainable contaminated site management. It is important for China to improve public knowledge and participation, foster dialogue between urban managers and laypeople, and accelerate the remediation and redevelopment processes in contaminated site management. In this study, we collected 1812 questionnaires from nine cities around China through face-to-face interviews and statistically analyzed the perception of residents concerning contaminated sites. The results show that respondents’ concern about soil pollution was lower than for other environmental issues and their knowledge of soil contamination was limited. The risks posed by contaminated industrial sites were well recognized by respondents, but they were unsatisfied with the performance of local agencies regarding information disclosure, publicity and education and public participation. Respondents believed that local governments and polluters should take the primary responsibility for contaminated site remediation. Most of them were unwilling to pay for contaminated site remediation and preferred recreational or public service redevelopment. Moreover, our research indicated that public perception varied among different cities. This variation was mainly determined by implementations of policy instruments and additionally affected by remediation technology, pollutant type, regional policy response and living distance. PMID:27070632

  4. Do psychological factors influence recovery from complex regional pain syndrome type 1? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Heiss-Dunlop, Wolfgang; Lee, Arier C; Kydd, Robert R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the outcomes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) vary significantly between patients, but few studies have identified prognostic indicators. The aim of this study was to determine whether psychological factors are associated with recovery from recently onset CRPS amongst patients followed prospectively for 1 year. Sixty-six patients with CRPS (type 1) were recruited within 12 weeks of symptom onset and assessed immediately and at 6 and 12 months, during which time they received treatment as usual. At each assessment, the following were measured: signs and symptoms of CRPS, pain, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, pain-related fear, pain catastrophising, laterality task performance, body perception disturbance, and perceived ownership of the limb. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures were conducted to identify baseline variables associated with CRPS severity, pain, and disability over the 12 months. Results showed that scores for all 3 outcome variables improved over the study period. Males and those with lower levels of baseline pain and disability experienced the lowest CRPS severity scores over 12 months. Those with lower baseline anxiety and disability had the lowest pain intensity over the study period, and those with lower baseline pain and pain-related fear experienced the least disability over the 12 months. This suggests that anxiety, pain-related fear, and disability are associated with poorer outcomes in CRPS and could be considered as target variables for early treatment. The findings support the theory that CRPS represents an aberrant protective response to perceived threat of tissue injury.

  5. Geologic and anthropogenic factors influencing karst development in the Frederick region of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Karst features pervade the outcrop belts of Triassic, Ordovician, and Cambrian rocks in the Frederick Valley region of Maryland's western Piedmont. Detailed stratigraphic analysis and geologic and karst mapping demonstrate that individual stratigraphic units have differing susceptibilities of karst feature creation. Although the Triassic Leesburg Member of the Bull Run Formation and Rocky Springs Station Member of the Cambrian Frederick Formation have many surface depressions within their outcrop belts, the Lime Kiln Member of the Frederick Formation and the Ceresville, Fountain Rock, and Woodsboro members of the Ordovician Grove Formation have the greatest potential for development of catastrophic collapse sinkholes. Although these four members have the highest relative susceptibility, human activity can increase the potential for sinkhole activation in all units. Rerouting of surface drainage patterns, unlined drainage, and storm-water management areas and removal of significant overburden deposits significantly increase sinkhole development, but mainly, these units are inherently more susceptible to begin with. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of regional hydrology on nesting behavior and nest fate of the American alligator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ugarte, Cristina A.; Bass, Oron L.; Nuttle, William; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Whelan, Kevin R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic conditions are critical to the nesting behavior and reproductive success of crocodilians. In South Florida, USA, growing human settlement has led to extensive surface water management and modification of historical water flows in the wetlands, which have affected regional nesting of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Although both natural and anthropogenic factors are considered to determine hydrologic conditions, the aspects of hydrological patterns that affect alligator nest effort, flooding (partial and complete), and failure (no hatchling) are unclear. We deconstructed annual hydrological patterns using harmonic models that estimated hydrological matrices including mean, amplitude, timing of peak, and periodicity of surface water depth and discharge and examined their effects on alligator nesting using survey data from Shark Slough, Everglades National Park, from 1985 to 2005. Nest effort increased in years with higher mean and lesser periodicity of water depth. A greater proportion of nests were flooded and failed when peak discharge occurred earlier in the year. Also, nest flooding rates were greater in years with greater periodicity of water depth, and nest failure rate was greater when mean discharge was higher. This study guides future water management decisions to mitigate negative impacts on reproduction of alligators and provides wildlife managers with a tool for assessing and modifying annual water management plans to conserve crocodilians and other wetland species.

  7. Regional Variations of Public Perception on Contaminated Industrial Sites in China and Its Influencing Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonuo; Jiao, Wentao; Xiao, Rongbo; Chen, Weiping; Bai, Yanying

    2016-04-01

    Public involvement is critical in sustainable contaminated site management. It is important for China to improve public knowledge and participation, foster dialogue between urban managers and laypeople, and accelerate the remediation and redevelopment processes in contaminated site management. In this study, we collected 1812 questionnaires from nine cities around China through face-to-face interviews and statistically analyzed the perception of residents concerning contaminated sites. The results show that respondents' concern about soil pollution was lower than for other environmental issues and their knowledge of soil contamination was limited. The risks posed by contaminated industrial sites were well recognized by respondents, but they were unsatisfied with the performance of local agencies regarding information disclosure, publicity and education and public participation. Respondents believed that local governments and polluters should take the primary responsibility for contaminated site remediation. Most of them were unwilling to pay for contaminated site remediation and preferred recreational or public service redevelopment. Moreover, our research indicated that public perception varied among different cities. This variation was mainly determined by implementations of policy instruments and additionally affected by remediation technology, pollutant type, regional policy response and living distance. PMID:27070632

  8. Regional Variations of Public Perception on Contaminated Industrial Sites in China and Its Influencing Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaonuo; Jiao, Wentao; Xiao, Rongbo; Chen, Weiping; Bai, Yanying

    2016-04-08

    Public involvement is critical in sustainable contaminated site management. It is important for China to improve public knowledge and participation, foster dialogue between urban managers and laypeople, and accelerate the remediation and redevelopment processes in contaminated site management. In this study, we collected 1812 questionnaires from nine cities around China through face-to-face interviews and statistically analyzed the perception of residents concerning contaminated sites. The results show that respondents' concern about soil pollution was lower than for other environmental issues and their knowledge of soil contamination was limited. The risks posed by contaminated industrial sites were well recognized by respondents, but they were unsatisfied with the performance of local agencies regarding information disclosure, publicity and education and public participation. Respondents believed that local governments and polluters should take the primary responsibility for contaminated site remediation. Most of them were unwilling to pay for contaminated site remediation and preferred recreational or public service redevelopment. Moreover, our research indicated that public perception varied among different cities. This variation was mainly determined by implementations of policy instruments and additionally affected by remediation technology, pollutant type, regional policy response and living distance.

  9. The influence of topographic co-variables on the spatial variability of precipitation over small regions of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodato, Nazzareno

    2005-03-01

    Precipitation variability results from atmospheric circulation and complex site-specific bio-geoclimatic characteristics; therefore, climatic variables are expected to be correlated in a scale-dependent way. This paper studies the influence of topographic co-variables on the spatial variability of precipitation over small regions of complex terrain. For this purpose, the mutual benefits of an integrated geographic information system (GIS) and a geostatistics approach was used for spatial precipitation interpolation from rainfall observations measured at 51 climatic stations in a mountainous region of southern Italy (Benevento province). As no single method is optimal for all regions, it is important to compare the results obtained using alternative methods applied to the same data set. Therefore, besides ordinary kriging examination, two auxiliary variables were added for ordinary co-kriging of annual and seasonal precipitation: terrain elevation data and a topographic index. Cross-validation indicated that the ordinary kriging yielded the largest prediction errors. The smallest prediction errors were produced by a multivariate geostatistical method. However, the results favour the ordinary co-kriging with inclusion of information on the topographic index. The application of co-kriging is particularly justified in areas where there are nearby stations and where landform is very complex. We conclude that ordinary co-kriging is a very flexible and robust interpolation method because it may take into account several properties (soft and hard data) of the landscape.

  10. Processes for Identifying Regional Influences of and Responses to Increasing Atmospheric CO sub 2 and Climate Change --- The MINK Project

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, W.E. III; McKenney, M.S.; Rosenberg, N.J.; Lemon, K.M.

    1991-08-01

    The second report of a series Processes for Identifying Regional Influences of and Responses to Increasing Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and Climate Change -- The MINK Project is composed of two parts. This Report (IIB) deals with agriculture at the level of farms and Major Land Resource Areas (MLRAs). The Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC), a crop growth simulation model developed by scientists at the US Department of Agriculture, is used to study the impacts of the analog climate on yields of main crops in both the 1984/87 and the 2030 baselines. The results of this work with EPIC are the basis for the analysis of the climate change impacts on agriculture at the region-wide level undertaken in this report. Report IIA treats agriculture in MINK in terms of state and region-wide production and resource use for the main crops and animals in the baseline periods of 1984/87 and 2030. The effects of the analog climate on the industry at this level of aggregation are considered in both baseline periods. 41 refs., 40 figs., 46 tabs.

  11. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  12. Biomaterials for mRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K G; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R; Zetter, Bruce R; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  13. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program School in the Delta Region According to Administrator, Teacher, and Student Perceptions: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kimberly Jonetta

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors that have influenced the literacy success of the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of a mid-south state. The study examined the progress made since the implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program has made upon student…

  14. Factors Influencing the Improved Academic Success in Literacy at the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) Schools in the Delta Region According to Adult Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kimberly J.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored factors that have influenced literacy success of Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) students in the low-income, poverty stricken Delta Region of Arkansas. The study examined progress made since implementation of the KIPP Program and the influence the program had made upon student achievement in literacy at the…

  15. Evaluation of CTX-M steady-state mRNA, mRNA half-life and protein production in various STs of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Chelsie N.; Fowler, Randal C.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian; Weissman, Scott J.; Hawkey, Peter; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High levels of β-lactamase production can impact treatment with a β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination. Goals of this study were to: (i) compare the mRNA and protein levels of CTX-M-15- and CTX-M-14-producing Escherichia coli from 18 different STs and 10 different phylotypes; (ii) evaluate the mRNA half-lives and establish a role for chromosomal- and/or plasmid-encoded factors; and (iii) evaluate the zones of inhibition for piperacillin/tazobactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam. Methods Disc diffusion was used to establish zone size. RNA analysis was accomplished using real-time RT–PCR and CTX-M protein levels were evaluated by immunoblotting. Clinical isolates, transformants and transconjugants were used to evaluate mRNA half-lives. Results mRNA levels of CTX-M-15 were up to 165-fold higher compared with CTX-M-14. CTX-M-15 protein levels were 2–48-fold less than their respective transcript levels, while CTX-M-14 protein production was comparable to the observed transcript levels. Nineteen of 25 E. coli (76%) had extended CTX-M-15 mRNA half-lives of 5–15 min and 16 (100%) CTX-M-14 isolates had mRNA half-lives of <2–3 min. Transformants had mRNA half-lives of <2 min for both CTX-M-type transcripts, while transconjugant mRNA half-lives corresponded to the half-life of the donor. Ceftolozane/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥19 mm, while piperacillin/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥17 mm. Conclusions CTX-M-15 mRNA and protein production did not correlate. Neither E. coli ST nor phylotype influenced the variability observed for CTX-M-15 mRNA or protein produced. mRNA half-life is controlled by a plasmid-encoded factor and may influence mRNA transcript levels, but not protein levels. PMID:26612874

  16. Irregular G-quadruplexes Found in the Untranslated Regions of Human mRNAs Influence Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, François; Garant, Jean-Michel; Allard, Félix; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex structures are composed of coplanar guanines and are found in both DNA and RNA. They are formed by the stacking of two or more G-quartets that are linked together by three loops. The current belief is that RNA G-quadruplexes include loops of l to 7 nucleotides in length, although recent evidence indicates that the central loop (loop 2) can be longer if loops 1 and 3 are limited to a single nucleotide each. With the objective of broadening the definition of irregular RNA G-quadruplexes, a bioinformatic search was performed to find potential G-quadruplexes located in the untranslated regions of human mRNAs (i.e. in the 5′ and 3′-UTRs) that contain either a long loop 1 or 3 of up to 40 nucleotides in length. RNA molecules including the potential sequences were then synthesized and examined in vitro by in-line probing for the formation of G-quadruplex structures. The sequences that adopted a G-quadruplex structure were cloned into a luciferase dual vector and examined for their ability to modulate translation in cellulo. Some irregular G-quadruplexes were observed to either promote or repress translation regardless of the position or the size of the long loop they possessed. Even if the composition of a RNA G-quadruplex is not quite completely understood, the results presented in this report clearly demonstrate that what defines a RNA G-quadruplex is much broader than what we previously believed. PMID:27557661

  17. [Influence of land use structure on nitrogen output in the watershed of suburban agriculture regions].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Peng-ju; Yang, Shan-shan; Wu, Jin-shui; Hu, Rong-gui

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted in Jintuo watershed of Changsha City, Hunan Province, in the suburban agriculture regions, by selecting 8 sub-basins to examine the effect of land use on watershed runoff nitrogen output. The land use map of watershed was interpreted from Spot-5 image of 2009, and by using hydraulic analysis function and spatial analysis extensions of ArcGIS 9.3, the catchment areas were delineated from DEM. Water sampling was carried out from Dec. 2009 to Nov. 2010, and the relationships between different types of nitrogen export and land use were analyzed. The results showed that nitrogen pollution in the watershed was extremely serious. There was a distinct seasonal variation in the following order: WI > SP > SU approximately = FA in the output concentration of total nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen which was not observed in the nitrate output. Moreover, land use was a dominant factor that determined the export of nitrogen, and especially a significant correlation was figured out between the nitrate output concentration and the land use structure. Forest and water body had a negative impact on nitrate output concentration while dry land, paddy field and habitation road had a positive effect. However, the effects varied with time. Dry land had the most significant important effect on nitrate output concentration in winter and fall, but in spring and summer was the forest land. The correlation between land use structure and the output concentration of total nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen was not found. The resident number, pig number and fertilization also had a major impact on nitrogen output quantity.

  18. Do psychological factors influence recovery from complex regional pain syndrome type 1? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bean, Debbie J; Johnson, Malcolm H; Heiss-Dunlop, Wolfgang; Lee, Arier C; Kydd, Robert R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the outcomes of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) vary significantly between patients, but few studies have identified prognostic indicators. The aim of this study was to determine whether psychological factors are associated with recovery from recently onset CRPS amongst patients followed prospectively for 1 year. Sixty-six patients with CRPS (type 1) were recruited within 12 weeks of symptom onset and assessed immediately and at 6 and 12 months, during which time they received treatment as usual. At each assessment, the following were measured: signs and symptoms of CRPS, pain, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, pain-related fear, pain catastrophising, laterality task performance, body perception disturbance, and perceived ownership of the limb. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures were conducted to identify baseline variables associated with CRPS severity, pain, and disability over the 12 months. Results showed that scores for all 3 outcome variables improved over the study period. Males and those with lower levels of baseline pain and disability experienced the lowest CRPS severity scores over 12 months. Those with lower baseline anxiety and disability had the lowest pain intensity over the study period, and those with lower baseline pain and pain-related fear experienced the least disability over the 12 months. This suggests that anxiety, pain-related fear, and disability are associated with poorer outcomes in CRPS and could be considered as target variables for early treatment. The findings support the theory that CRPS represents an aberrant protective response to perceived threat of tissue injury. PMID:26133727

  19. Influence of particle properties on the wall region in packed capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Stefan; Stoeckel, Daniela; Smarsly, Bernd M; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2012-12-14

    Analytical columns (4.6 mm i.d.) packed with core-shell particles have shown a significantly reduced eddy dispersion contribution to band broadening compared to conventional fully porous particles. It has been speculated if this is caused by the narrow particle size distribution (PSD) of the core-shell particles, as an intrinsic advantage, or by an improved packing structure that specifically reduces the transcolumn velocity biases caused by wall effects. A recent simulation study has pointed against the former proposition [A. Daneyko et al., Anal. Chem. 83 (2011) 3903]. It is more likely that the slurry packing process for core-shell particles results in bed morphologies with reduced wall effects compared to the fully porous particles with a wide PSD. To access the latter proposition experimentally we slurry packed capillary columns (100 μm i.d.) with different fully porous (wide PSDs) and core-shell (narrow PSDs) particles and imaged their bed structures three-dimensionally using confocal laser scanning microscopy. This allowed us to resolve and analyze the bed morphology in these columns locally on all length scales contributing to eddy dispersion. On the transcolumn scale we observed a systematic difference between core-shell and fully porous particles: In the vicinity of the column wall the core-shell particles packed denser (closer to the bulk packing densities) and with a higher regularity than the fully porous particles. The bulk regions of all packings were effectively indistinguishable. This provides experimental evidence that the reduced eddy dispersion contribution with core-shell packings should be attributed to a higher transcolumn homogeneity rather than to an improved bed morphology on smaller length scales, e.g., to a reduced short-range disorder.

  20. The influence of ozone precursor emissions from four world regions on tropospheric composition and radiative climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Meridith M.; Naik, Vaishali; West, J. Jason; Schwarzkopf, M. Daniel; Fiore, Arlene M.; Collins, William J.; Dentener, Frank J.; Shindell, Drew T.; Atherton, Cyndi; Bergmann, Daniel; Duncan, Bryan N.; Hess, Peter; MacKenzie, Ian A.; Marmer, Elina; Schultz, Martin G.; Szopa, Sophie; Wild, Oliver; Zeng, Guang

    2012-04-01

    Ozone (O3) precursor emissions influence regional and global climate and air quality through changes in tropospheric O3 and oxidants, which also influence methane (CH4) and sulfate aerosols (SO42-). We examine changes in the tropospheric composition of O3, CH4, SO42- and global net radiative forcing (RF) for 20% reductions in global CH4 burden and in anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions (NOx, NMVOC, and CO) from four regions (East Asia, Europe and Northern Africa, North America, and South Asia) using the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution Source-Receptor global chemical transport model (CTM) simulations, assessing uncertainty (mean ± 1 standard deviation) across multiple CTMs. We evaluate steady state O3responses, including long-term feedbacks via CH4. With a radiative transfer model that includes greenhouse gases and the aerosol direct effect, we find that regional NOx reductions produce global, annually averaged positive net RFs (0.2 ± 0.6 to 1.7 ± 2 mWm-2/Tg N yr-1), with some variation among models. Negative net RFs result from reductions in global CH4 (-162.6 ± 2 mWm-2 for a change from 1760 to 1408 ppbv CH4) and regional NMVOC (-0.4 ± 0.2 to -0.7 ± 0.2 mWm-2/Tg C yr-1) and CO emissions (-0.13 ± 0.02 to -0.15 ± 0.02 mWm-2/Tg CO yr-1). Including the effect of O3 on CO2 uptake by vegetation likely makes these net RFs more negative by -1.9 to -5.2 mWm-2/Tg N yr-1, -0.2 to -0.7 mWm-2/Tg C yr-1, and -0.02 to -0.05 mWm-2/Tg CO yr-1. Net RF impacts reflect the distribution of concentration changes, where RF is affected locally by changes in SO42-, regionally to hemispherically by O3, and globally by CH4. Global annual average SO42- responses to oxidant changes range from 0.4 ± 2.6 to -1.9 ± 1.3 Gg for NOxreductions, 0.1 ± 1.2 to -0.9 ± 0.8 Gg for NMVOC reductions, and -0.09 ± 0.5 to -0.9 ± 0.8 Gg for CO reductions, suggesting additional research is needed. The 100-year global warming potentials (GWP100) are calculated for the global CH

  1. Influence of Pig Slurry on Microbial and Biochemical Characteristics of Soil in Albacete Region, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halil Yanardaǧ, Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    Soil quality is very important in terms of agricultural sustainability, ecosystem and terrestrial carbon (C) cycle. In turn, soil microbial and biochemical characteristics are indicative of nutrient cycling and soil organic matter dynamics. We investigated the effects of the pig slurries (raw pig slurry (RPS) and treated pig slurry (TPS) from liquid and solid feeding diets) on microbial and biochemical characteristics of soil under barley cropping system. Application doses of slurries are identified with legal doses of Castilla La Mancha Region, which is 210 kg N ha-1 year-1. Microbial biomass C, soluble C, black C and three soil enzymes (β-Glucosidase, β-galactosidase and Arylesterase enzymes) are studied to determine effect slurry on soil biochemical characteristics, which are very important in terms of C cycle in soil. Black carbon content and β-Glucosidase enzyme activities are increased with all pig slurry applications from liquid and traditional feeding diet, as well as microbial biomass and organic carbon content and β-galactosidase enzyme activities are increased with slurry from liquid feeding diet doses. However, pig slurry application from liquid feeding diet doses have increased yield, quality, length and total biomass content of barley. Bioavailable metal contents are increased with all slurry application and with using high doses of slurry can be caused soil pollution. Pig slurries from liquid feeding diet had positive impacts on microbial and biochemical characteristics in terms of soil quality in comparison to the different feeding diets. PS addition to soil had a very significant stimulating effect on the enzyme activities, microbial biomass, soluble and black C compared with different kind of PS and control plots on Mediterranean soil in barley monoculture. This effect may originate from the organic C, N, P and S compounds added with PS. The highest enzyme activity and microbial biomass were observed on the soil samples from the RPS treatment

  2. Optimization of 2.5 μm VECSEL: influence of the QW active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, P.; Rattunde, M.; Adler, S.; Bächle, A.; Diwo-Emmer, E.; Aidam, R.; Manz, C.; Köhler, K.; Wagner, J.

    2016-03-01

    Using the (AlGaIn)(AsSb) material system, VECSELs covering the 2 - 3 μm wavelength range can be realized. The best laser performance of GaSb-based VECSELs was achieved so far at emission wavelengths around 2.0 μm with a slope efficiency of more than 30 %, a low threshold pump power density of 1.1 kW/cm2 at 20°C heatsink temperature and concomitant a high output power exceeding 7 W in CW operation (depending on the mounting technology). These parameters were degrading significantly for longer wavelength devices emitting around 2.5 μm and 2.8 μm. But for applications like the generation of MWIR light (3-8 μm) by pumping ZGP-OPOs, high-power VECSELs around 2.5 μm are required to suppress absorption losses, while for medical laser treatment, high-power operation near the water absorption peak at around 2.9 μm is desirable. We will present results of our ongoing research strand for further optimization of the semiconductor heterostructure design of >= 2.5 μm emitting GaSb-based VECSELs. By using a low quantum deficit design (i.e. optical pumping at around 1.5 μm) in combination with highly strained QWs (compressive strain 2.1 %) we were able to realize a 2.5 μm emitting VECSEL with a slope efficiency above 30 %, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency exceeding 50 %, and a low threshold pump power density of 0.8 kW/cm2. These values are as good as those for the best performing 2.0 μm VECSELs. With a frontside SiC heatspreader and operated in a standard linear cavity, over 7 W of CW output power were achieved for this 2.5 μm emitting VECSEL structure when operated at 20°C. Furthermore, we will compare laser structures with different emission wavelengths and discuss the role of the QW strain, band-offset and active region composition on laser performance.

  3. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  4. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  5. The influence of plate boundary deformation on regional intraplate exhumation: evidence from the Irish Sea basin system, western UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holford, S. P.; Turner, J. P.; Green, P. F.; Williams, G. A.

    2005-12-01

    . These observations imply that, despite the often large distances (>1000 km) between the exhumed intraplate regions and the most proximal plate boundaries, plate boundary processes exert the dominant control on the exhumation histories of plate interiors through (i) the far-field transmission of stresses (compressional shortening/inversion) and (ii) rift-flank uplift associated with continental rifts and pull-apart basins. In NW Europe, the influence of boundary-independent phenomena such as plume-related uplift appears to be subsidiary to that of plate boundary deformation.

  6. Influence of the ocean surface temperature and sea ice concentration on regional climate changes in Eurasia in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. A.; Mokhov, I. I.; Latif, M.

    2012-07-01

    Numerical experiments with the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model have been performed in order to simulate the influence of changes in the ocean surface temperature (OST) and sea ice concentration (SIC) on climate characteristics in regions of Eurasia. The sensitivity of winter and summer climates to OST and SIC variations in 1998-2006 has been investigated and compared to those in 1968-1976. These two intervals correspond to the maximum and minimum of the Atlantic Long-Period Oscillation (ALO) index. Apart from the experiments on changes in the OST and SIC global fields, the experiments on OST anomalies only in the North Atlantic and SIC anomalies in the Arctic for the specified periods have been analyzed. It is established that temperature variations in Western Europe are explained by OST and SIC variations fairly well, whereas the warmings in Eastern Europe and Western Siberia, according to model experiments, are substantially (by a factor of 2-3) smaller than according to observational data. Winter changes in the temperature regime in continental regions are controlled mainly by atmospheric circulation anomalies. The model, on the whole, reproduces the empirical structure of changes in the winter field of surface pressure, in particular, the pressure decrease in the Caspian region; however, it substantially (approximately by three times) underestimates the range of changes. Summer temperature variations in the model are characterized by a higher statistical significance than winter ones. The analysis of the sensitivity of the climate in Western Europe to SIC variations alone in the Arctic is an important result of the experiments performed. It is established that the SIC decrease and a strong warming over the Barents Sea in the winter period leads to a cooling over vast regions of the northern part of Eurasia and increases the probability of anomalously cold January months by two times and more (for regions in Western Siberia). This effect is caused

  7. Distribution patterns and possible influencing factors of As speciation in ornithogenic sediments from the Ross Sea region, East Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lou, Chuangneng; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Wenqi; Wu, Libin; Nie, Yaguang; Emslie, Steven D

    2016-05-15

    Ornithogenic sediments are rich in toxic As (arsenic) compounds, posing a potential threat to local ecosystems. Here we analyzed the distribution of As speciation in three ornithogenic sediment profiles (MB6, BI and CC) collected from the Ross Sea region, East Antarctica. The distributions of total As and total P (phosphorus) concentrations were highly consistent in all three profiles, indicating that guano input is a major factor controlling total As distribution in the ornithogenic sediments. The As found in MB6 and CC is principally As(V) (arsenate), in BI As(III) (arsenite) predominates, but the As in fresh guano is largely composed of DMA (dimethylarsinate). The significant difference of As species between fresh guano and ornithogenic sediment samples may be related to diagenetic processes after deposition by seabirds. Based on analysis of the sedimentary environment in the studied sediments, we found that the redox conditions have an obvious influence on the As speciation distribution. Moreover, the distributions of As(III) and chlorophyll a in the MB6 and BI profiles are highly consistent, demonstrating that aquatic algae abundance may also influence the distribution patterns of As speciation in the ornithogenic sediments. PMID:26930318

  8. Axonal Amphoterin mRNA Is Regulated by Translational Control and Enhances Axon Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Coleman, Jennifer; Kim, Hak Hee; Kumar Sahoo, Pabitra; Gomes, Cynthia; Brito-Vargas, Paul; Rauvala, Heikki; Blesch, Armin; Yoo, Soonmoon

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins concentrate in the nucleus, interacting with chromatin. Amphoterin is an HMG protein (HMGB1) that has been shown to have extranuclear functions and can be secreted from some cell types. Exogenous amphoterin can increase neurite growth, suggesting that the secreted protein may have growth promoting activities in neurons. Consistent with this, we show that depletion of amphoterin mRNA from cultured adult rat DRG neurons attenuates neurite outgrowth, pointing to autocrine or paracrine mechanisms for its growth-promoting effects. The mRNA encoding amphoterin localizes to axonal processes and we showed recently that its 3′-UTR is sufficient for axonal localization of heterologous transcripts (Donnelly et al., 2013). Here, we show that amphoterin mRNA is transported constitutively into axons of adult DRG neurons. A preconditioning nerve injury increases the levels of amphoterin protein in axons without a corresponding increase in amphoterin mRNA in the axons. A 60 nucleotide region of the amphoterin mRNA 3′-UTR is necessary and sufficient for its localization into axons of cultured sensory neurons. Amphoterin mRNA 3′-UTR is also sufficient for axonal localization in distal axons of DRG neurons in vivo. Overexpression of axonally targeted amphoterin mRNA increases axon outgrowth in cultured sensory neurons, but axon growth is not affected when the overexpressed mRNA is restricted to the cell body. PMID:25855182

  9. Osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase mRNA is stabilized by binding to vimentin intermediary filaments.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Yvonne; Biniossek, Martin; Stark, G Björn; Finkenzeller, Günter; Simunovic, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Vascularization is essential in bone tissue engineering and recent research has focused on interactions between osteoblasts (hOBs) and endothelial cells (ECs). It was shown that cocultivation increases the stability of osteoblastic alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. We investigated the mechanisms behind this observation, focusing on mRNA binding proteins. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of ALP mRNA is necessary for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-mediated stabilization of osteoblastic ALP mRNA. Using pulldown experiments and nanoflow-HPLC mass spectrometry, vimentin was identified to bind to the 3'-UTR of ALP mRNA. Validation was performed by Western blotting. Functional experiments inhibiting intermediate filaments with iminodipropionitrile and specific inhibition of vimentin by siRNA transfection showed reduced levels of ALP mRNA and protein. Therefore, ALP mRNA binds to and is stabilized by vimentin. This data add to the understanding of intracellular trafficking of ALP mRNA, its function, and have possible implications in tissue engineering applications.

  10. A spatially explicit multi-isotope approach to map influence regions of plant-plant interactions after exotic plant invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Christine; Oldeland, Jens; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Exotic plant invasions impose profound alterations to native ecosystems, including changes of water, carbon and nutrient cycles. However, explicitly quantifying these impacts remains a challenge. Stable isotopes, by providing natural tracers of biogeochemical processes, can help to identify and measure such alterations in space and time. Recently, δ15N isoscapes, i.e. spatially continuous representations of isotopic values, derived from native plant foliage, enabled to accurately trace nitrogen introduced by the N2-fixing invasive Acacia longifolia into a native Portuguese dune system. It could be shown that the area of the system which was altered by the invasive species exceeded the area which was covered by the invader by far. But still, definition of clear regions of influence is to some extent ambiguous. Here, we present an approach using multiple isoscapes derived from measured foliar δ13C and δ15N values of a native, non-fixing species, Corema album. By clustering isotopic information, we obtained an objective classification of the study area. Properties and spatial position of clusters could be interpreted to distinguish areas that were or were not influenced by A. longifolia. Spatial clusters at locations where A. longifolia was present had δ15N values that were enriched, i.e. close to the atmospheric signal of 0 o compared to the depleted values of the uninvaded system (ca. -11 o). Furthermore, C. album individuals in these clusters were characterized by higher foliar N content and enriched δ13C. These results indicate that the N2-fixing A. longifolia added nitrogen to the system which originated from the atmosphere and was used by the native C. album, inducing functional changes, i.e. an increase in WUE. Additionally, clusters were identified that were presumably determined by inherent properties of the native system. Thus, combining isotope ecology with geostatistical methods is a promising approach for mapping regions of influence in multi

  11. Influence of regional climate change on meteorological characteristics and their subsequent effect on ozone dispersion in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang-Yi; Jian, Shan-Ping; Yang, Zhih-Min; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Tsuang, Ben-Jei

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the influence of regional climate change on local meteorological conditions and their subsequent effect on local ozone (O3) dispersion in Taiwan. The 33-year NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2 (NNR2) data set (1979-2011) was analyzed to understand the variations in regional-scale atmospheric conditions in East Asia and the western North Pacific. To save computational processing time, two scenarios representative of past (1979-86) and current (2004-11) atmospheric conditions were selected but only targeting the autumn season (September, October and November) when the O3 concentrations were at high levels. Numerical simulations were performed using weather research and forecasting (WRF) model and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for the past and current scenarios individually but only for the month of October because of limited computational resources. Analysis of NNR2 data exhibited increased air temperature, weakened Asian continental anticyclone, enhanced northeasterly monsoonal flow, and a deepened low-pressure system forming near Taiwan. With enhanced evaporation from oceans along with a deepened low-pressure system, precipitation amounts increased in Taiwan in the current scenario. As demonstrated in the WRF simulation, the land surface physical process responded to the enhanced precipitation resulting in damper soil conditions, and reduced ground temperatures that in turn restricted the development of boundary layer height. The weakened land-sea breeze flow was simulated in the current scenario. With reduced dispersion capability, air pollutants would tend to accumulate near the emission source leading to a degradation of air quality in this region. The conditions would be even worse in southwestern Taiwan due to the fact that stagnant wind fields would occur more frequently in the current scenario. On the other hand, in northern Taiwan, the simulated O3 concentrations are lower during the day in the current

  12. Towards integrating the influence of erosion on within field variability of C input, stock and stability in regional SOC estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meersmans, J.; Quine, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Improved management of the SOC pool has become an important issue for policymakers in order to maintain soil quality and reduce climate change. Hence, there exists an increased interest in accurate mapping of SOC at the regional scale. Most of these studies are limited to topsoil, consider only factors present at the landscape scale (e.g. climate, land use, soil type) and are at rather coarse resolution. Consequently, the variability of SOC at smaller scales in complex terrain driven by soil erosion, such as stable subsoil carbon buried in depositional areas, is still rather understudied and is not (well) presented in these estimates. Nevertheless, incorporating this smaller level of spatial detail will most probably have a major influence on regional SOC stock dynamics' calculations and mapping. In the present study we aim to unravel the variation in quantity and quality of SOC depth distributions along typical hillslope transects under cropland (Devon, UK) and relate these to soil redistribution rates and variations in C input, i.e. below and above ground biomass productivity. The radionuclide isotope Caesium-137 (137Cs) was used as proxy for erosion. The results show contrasting vertical patterns in SOC stock and stability depending on the rate and type of erosion. For example, sites characterized by deposition due to water erosion (i.e. foot slope) have much higher SOC values near the surface, but show a fast decline with depth, while sites characterized by deposition due to tillage erosion (i.e. most concave position) have moderated SOC surface values that stay constant until a depth of 50 cm, but with increasing stability with depth. The above ground biomass productivity is most linked to water erosion, since we found lowest above ground biomass at the steepest slope position and the highest above ground biomass at the foot slopes. Furthermore, root biomass in the most concave section is significantly higher as compared to any other topo-position. The present

  13. Evidence of influence of regional and local heterogeneities within a chalk karst aquifer based on nitrates and chlorides analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Janyani, S.; Dupont, J. P.; Massei, N.; Dörfliger, N.

    2012-04-01

    In Upper Normandy, a region located in the western Paris Basin, the main source of drinking water comes from the karst aquifer. Developing under the chalk plateaus, it is a covered aquifer overlaid by superficial formations of clay-with-flints and loess. Clay-with-flints result from chalk weathering whereas loess are wind periglacial deposits. The local geologic and hydrogelogic contexts are characterized by a mature development of sinkholes. The chalk karst is causing turbidity, often linked to the fast infiltration of surface water, carrying the products of river and slope erosion and associated contaminants into the aquifer through the sinkholes. Several authors have shown the potential of turbidity as a marker of suspended elements transport and karst conduits fast transport. In this study, we conducted monthly monitoring of 11 boreholes located in the upstream watershed near boreholes (surveyed by the French Geological Survey BRGM): Graveron-Semerville in the Southern department of Upper Normandy (Eure) and Rocquemont in the Norhtern department of Upper Normandy (Seine-Maritime). The monitoring carried out included water level and electrical conductivity (reflecting total water mineralization) measurements, and major elements analysis. In any case, the water levels are similar over time (in accordance with the reference borehole). High mineralizations are observed in the Eure boreholes with significant anomalies of nitrate (70 to 130 mg/l ) and chloride (35 to 90 mg/l). For the Seine Maritime boreholes, no anomalies in nitrates and chlorides were found. To explain such differences, the agricultural activities are not sufficiently different from the study site. The explanation would then come from different reservoirs involved in water storage: loessic formations, thicker and more spreaded in the Seine Maritime department and clay with flints, of significantly higher thickness on average in the Eure department. We also discuss the influence of the drainage

  14. Crop and agrotechnology influence on CO2 emission in case of representative agrolandscapes of Moscow region, RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazirov, Ilya; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    Agroecosystems have a very important role in the regional balance of greenhouse gases (GHG). However, the volume of existing data on the different crops and agrotechnologies influence on the GHG emission sharply varies. The European territory of Russia (ETR) is one of regions with strong deficit of this information. At the same time ETR is characterized by high heterogeneity of soil cover patterns, land-use technologies and land agroecological quality. Our research has been done in the fields of Precision farming experiment of Russian Timiryazev State Agrarian University (RTSAU) that soil cover and landscape patterns are typical for Moscow region of RF. The investigated fields include four 1-ha plots with winter wheat and potatoes with versions of traditional tillage and no-till. Each key plot comprises the representative sites for analysis the autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, and control ones. Carbon dioxide fluxes have been weekly measured in June - September 2012, by the portable infrared system gas analyzer LI-COR LI-6400XT. The carried out research has shown the crop strong influence on the soil CO2 emission. In case of field with winter wheat in June - August it was in 1.5-2.5 times higher (2,93 μmol m-2 s-1) than in potatoes one. The maximum difference has been fixed at the first half of August after the wheat harvest. July is characterize by gradual decrease soil carbon dioxide emission from 1.56 μmol m-2 s-1 to 1.06 μmol m-2 s-1. Comparative analysis of the model sites with differentiation of the autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration showed the absolute dominance of microorganism contribution: 1.56 μmol m-2 s-1 (76.3% of the total respiration). It is especially important that no-till sites have CO2 "microbial" emission in 24.8% less the traditional tillage ones. The carried out in June-September comparative analysis of investigated sites with forest control ones has shown the following set with increasing soil CO2 emission: "winter wheat

  15. The Abundant R2 mRNA Generated by Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Is Tricistronic, Encoding NS2, VP1, and VP2▿

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Cheng, Fang; Pintel, David

    2007-01-01

    The abundant R2 mRNA encoded by the single left-end promoter of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus is tricistronic; it not only expresses the capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 but is also the major source for the nonstructural protein NS2. A cis-acting sequence within the NS2 gene was shown to be required for efficient capsid protein production, and its effect displayed a distinct location dependence. Ribosome transit through the upstream NS2 gene region was necessary for efficient VP1 and VP2 expression; however, neither ablation nor improvement of the NS2 initiating AUG had an effect on capsid protein production, suggesting that the translation of the NS2 protein per se had little influence on VP1 and VP2 expression. Thus, proper control of the alternative translation of the tricistronic R2 mRNA, a process critical for viral replication, is governed in a complex manner. PMID:17428872

  16. Analysis and in vitro localization of internal methylated adenine residues in dihydrofolate reductase mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rana, A P; Tuck, M T

    1990-08-25

    A T7 RNA transcript coding for mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was utilized as a substrate for the N6-methyladenosine mRNA methyltransferase isolated from HeLa cell nuclei. This transcript acted as a 3 fold better substrate than either prolactin mRNA or a synthetic RNA substrate which contained multiple methylation consensus sequences. Formation of internal N6-methyladenine (m6A) residues in the DHFR transcript was shown to increase slightly by the absence of a 7-methylguanine-2'-O-methyl cap structure. Using T7 transcripts from different regions of the DHFR gene, the majority of the m6A residues were localized to the coding region and a segment of the transcript just 3' to the coding region. This data suggests that DHFR mRNA contains multiple methylation sites with most of these sites concentrated in the coding region of the transcript. PMID:2395644

  17. Coupling mRNA Synthesis and Decay

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.—Ecclesiastes 1:9 (New International Version) Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression has an important role in defining the phenotypic characteristics of an organism. Well-defined steps in mRNA metabolism that occur in the nucleus—capping, splicing, and polyadenylation—are mechanistically linked to the process of transcription. Recent evidence suggests another link between RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and a posttranscriptional process that occurs in the cytoplasm—mRNA decay. This conclusion appears to represent a conundrum. How could mRNA synthesis in the nucleus and mRNA decay in the cytoplasm be mechanistically linked? After a brief overview of mRNA processing, we will review the recent evidence for transcription-coupled mRNA decay and the possible involvement of Snf1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, in this process. PMID:25154419

  18. Factors Influencing Anti-Malarial Prophylaxis and Iron Supplementation Non-Compliance among Pregnant Women in Simiyu Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sambili, Benatus; Kimambo, Ronald; Peng, Yun; Ishunga, Elison; Matasha, Edna; Matumu, Godfrey; Noronha, Rita; Ngilangwa, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and iron-deficient anemia during pregnancy pose considerable risks for the mother and newborn. Intermittent Preventive Treatment during pregnancy with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) and iron supplement to prevent anemia to all pregnant women receiving antenatal care (ANC) services is highly recommended. However, their compliance remains low. This study aimed at identifying factors influencing non-compliance of medications among pregnant women. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Simiyu region in northwest Tanzania using a structured questionnaire to collect data from 430 women who were pregnant or gave birth 12 months prior to data collection. Data were analyzed using non-parametric statistical analysis with STATA 10. Overall, 284 (66%) and 195 (45%) of interviewed women received IPTp-SP and iron supplementation during their ANC visits, respectively. The majority (85%) of women whom received medications were aware if they had received IPTp-SP or iron supplementation. Of those received IPTp-SP, only 11% took all the three doses, while the remaining 89% took only two doses or one dose. For women who received iron supplementation, 29% reported that they did not take any dose at all. Reasons given for not complying with regiments included not liking the medications and disapproval from male partners. Our findings suggest that IPTp-SP and iron supplement compliance among pregnant women in Simiyu region is low. Intensification of community education, further qualitative research and administration of medication through directly-observed therapy (DOT) are recommended to address the problem. PMID:27347981

  19. Factors Influencing Anti-Malarial Prophylaxis and Iron Supplementation Non-Compliance among Pregnant Women in Simiyu Region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Sambili, Benatus; Kimambo, Ronald; Peng, Yun; Ishunga, Elison; Matasha, Edna; Matumu, Godfrey; Noronha, Rita; Ngilangwa, David P

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and iron-deficient anemia during pregnancy pose considerable risks for the mother and newborn. Intermittent Preventive Treatment during pregnancy with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) and iron supplement to prevent anemia to all pregnant women receiving antenatal care (ANC) services is highly recommended. However, their compliance remains low. This study aimed at identifying factors influencing non-compliance of medications among pregnant women. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Simiyu region in northwest Tanzania using a structured questionnaire to collect data from 430 women who were pregnant or gave birth 12 months prior to data collection. Data were analyzed using non-parametric statistical analysis with STATA 10. Overall, 284 (66%) and 195 (45%) of interviewed women received IPTp-SP and iron supplementation during their ANC visits, respectively. The majority (85%) of women whom received medications were aware if they had received IPTp-SP or iron supplementation. Of those received IPTp-SP, only 11% took all the three doses, while the remaining 89% took only two doses or one dose. For women who received iron supplementation, 29% reported that they did not take any dose at all. Reasons given for not complying with regiments included not liking the medications and disapproval from male partners. Our findings suggest that IPTp-SP and iron supplement compliance among pregnant women in Simiyu region is low. Intensification of community education, further qualitative research and administration of medication through directly-observed therapy (DOT) are recommended to address the problem. PMID:27347981

  20. The Influence of Ozone Precursor Emissions from Four World Regions on Tropospheric Composition and Radiative Climate Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Meridith; Naik, Vaishali; West, J. Jason; Schwarzkopf, M. Daniel; Fiore, Arlene M.; Collins, William J.; Dentener, Frank J.; Shindell, Drew T.; Atherton, Cyndi; Bergmann, Daniel; Duncan, Bryan N.; Hess, Peter; MacKenzie, Ian A.; Marmer, Elina; Schultz, Martin G.; Szopa, Sophie; Wild, Oliver; Zeng, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Ozone (O3) precursor emissions influence regional and global climate and air quality through changes in tropospheric O3 and oxidants, which also influence methane (CH4) and sulfate aerosols (SO4 (sup 2-)). We examine changes in the tropospheric composition of O3, CH4, SO4 (sup 2-) and global net radiative forcing (RF) for 20% reductions in global CH4 burden and in anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions (NOx, NMVOC, and CO) from four regions (East Asia, Europe and Northern Africa, North America, and South Asia) using the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution Source-Receptor global chemical transport model (CTM) simulations, assessing uncertainty (mean plus or minus 1 standard deviation) across multiple CTMs. We evaluate steady state O3 responses, including long-term feedbacks via CH4. With a radiative transfer model that includes greenhouse gases and the aerosol direct effect, we find that regional NOx reductions produce global, annually averaged positive net RFs (0.2 plus or minus 0.6 to 1.7 2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg N yr(sup -1), with some variation among models. Negative net RFs result from reductions in global CH4 (-162.6 plus or minus 2 mWm(sup -2) for a change from 1760 to 1408 ppbv CH4) and regional NMVOC (-0.4 plus or minus 0.2 to 0.7 plus or minus 0.2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg C yr(sup -1) and CO emissions (-0.13 plus or minus 0.02 to -0.15 plus or minus 0.02 mWm(sup-2)/Tg CO yr(sup-1). Including the effect of O3 on CO2 uptake by vegetation likely makes these net RFs more negative by -1.9 to- 5.2 mWm(sup -2)/Tg N yr(sup -1), -0.2 to -0.7 mWm(sup -2)/Tg C yr(sup -1), and -0.02 to -0.05 mWm(sup -2)/ Tg CO yr(sup -1). Net RF impacts reflect the distribution of concentration changes, where RF is affected locally by changes in SO4 (sup -2), regionally to hemispherically by O3, and globally by CH4. Global annual average SO4 2 responses to oxidant changes range from 0.4 plus or minus 2.6 to -1.9 plus or minus 1.3 Gg for NOx reductions, 0.1 plus or minus 1.2 to -0.9 plus

  1. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  2. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. PMID:25620012

  3. Inhibition of GLI1 Expression by Targeting the CRD-BP-GLI1 mRNA Interaction Using a Specific Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Kashif; Akhtar, Daud; Mackedenski, Sebastian; Wang, Chuyi; Lee, Chow H

    2016-06-01

    The stabilization of glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) mRNA by coding region determinant binding protein (CRD-BP) through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is implicated in the proliferation of colorectal cancer and basal cell carcinoma. Here, we set out to characterize the physical interaction between CRD-BP and GLI1 mRNA so as to find inhibitors for such interaction. Studies using CRD-BP variants with a point mutation in the GXXG motif at each KH domain showed that KH1 and KH2 domain are critical for the binding of GLI1 RNA. The smallest region of GLI1 RNA binding to CRD-BP was mapped to nucleotides (nts) 320-380. A 37-nt S1 RNA sense oligonucleotide, containing two distinct stem-loops present in nts 320-380 of GLI1 RNA, was found to be effective in blocking CRD-BP-GLI1 RNA interaction. Studies using various competitor RNAs with modifications to S1 RNA oligonucleotide further displayed that both the sequences and the structure of the two stem-loops are important for CRD-BP-GLI1 RNA binding. The role of the two-stem-loop motif in influencing CRD-BP-RNA interaction was further investigated in cells. The 2'-O-methyl derivative of the S1 RNA oligonucleotide significantly decreased GLI1, c-myc, and CD44 mRNA levels, in a panel of colon and breast cancer cells. The results from this study demonstrate the potential importance of the two-stem-loop motif as a target region for the inhibition of the CRD-BP-GLI1 RNA interaction and Hedgehog signaling pathway. Such results pave the way for the development of novel inhibitors that act by destabilizing the CRD-BP-GLI1 mRNA interaction. PMID:27036131

  4. Regulation of hypothalamic somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone mRNA levels by inhibin.

    PubMed

    Carro, E; Señarís, R M; Mallo, F; Diéguez, C

    1999-03-20

    Although it is well established that inhibin plays a major role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its influence in the regulation of other neuroendocrine functions is still poorly understood. Recent results indicate that inhibin suppresses plasma GH levels, but its site of action is yet unknown. Therefore, in the present work we investigated the effects of inhibin on somatostatin and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus by 'in situ' hybridization. We found that inhibin administration (4, 12 and 24 h, i.c.v.) led to an increase in somatostatin mRNA levels in the periventricular nucleus, and to a decrease in GHRH mRNA content in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that inhibin regulates the hypothalamic levels of somatostatin and GHRH mRNA.

  5. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    DOE PAGES

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scalemore » component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.« less

  6. The influence of microclimates and fog on stable isotope signatures used in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Gingerich, S.B.; Tribble, G.W.

    2002-01-01

    Stable isotopes of precipitation, ground water and surface water measured on the windward side of East Maui from 0 to 3055 m altitude were used to determine recharge sources for stream flow and ground water. Correct interpretation of the hydrology using rainfall ??18O gradients with altitude required consideration of the influence of fog, as fog samples had isotopic signatures enriched by as much as 3??? in ??18O and 21??? in ??D compared to volume-weighted average precipitation at the same altitude. The isotopic analyses suggested that fog drip was a major component of stream flow and shallow ground water at higher altitudes in the watershed. 18O/altitude gradients in rainfall were comparable for similar microclimates on Maui (this study) and Hawaii Island (1990-1995 study), however, East Maui ??18O values for rain in trade-wind and high-altitude microclimates were enriched compared to those from Hawaii Island. Isotopes were used to interpret regional hydrology in this volcanic island aquifer system. In part of the study area, stable isotopes indicate discharge of ground water recharged at least 1000 m above the sample site. This deep-flowpath ground water was found in springs from sea level up to 240 m altitude, indicating saturation to altitudes much higher than a typical freshwater lens. These findings help in predicting the effects of ground water development on stream flow in the area. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Characteristics of heavy metal transfer and their influencing factors in different soil-crop systems of the industrialization region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Yuan, Xuyin; Li, Tianyuan; Hu, Sun; Ji, Junfeng; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Soil heavy metals and their bioaccumulation in agricultural products have attracted widespread concerns, yet the transfer and accumulation characteristics of heavy metals in different soil-crop systems was rarely investigated. Soil and crop samples were collected from the typical agricultural areas in the Yangtze River Delta region, China. The concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Hg in the soils, roots and grains of rice (Oryza Sativa L.), wheat (Triticum L.) and canola (Brassica napus L.) were determined in this study. Transfer ability of heavy metals in soil-rice system was stronger than those in soil-wheat and soil-canola systems. The wheat showed a strong capacity to transfer Zn, Cu and Cd from root to the grain while canola presented a restricting effect to the intake of Cu and Cd. Soil pH and total organic matter were major factors influencing metal transfer from soil to rice, whereas soil Al2O3 contents presented a negative effect on heavy metal mobility in wheat and canola cultivation systems. The concentration of Zn and Cd in crop grains could well predicted according to the stepwise multiple linear regression models, which could help to quantitatively evaluate the ecologic risk of heavy metal accumulation in crops in the study area.

  8. Hydrologic Conditions that Influence Streamflow Losses in a Karst Region of the Upper Peace River, Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Lewelling, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Peace River from Bartow to Fort Meade, Florida, is described as a groundwater recharge area, reflecting a reversal from historical groundwater discharge patterns that existed prior to the 1950s. The upper Peace River channel and floodplain are characterized by extensive karst development, with numerous fractures, crevasses, and sinks that have been eroded in the near-surface and underlying carbonate bedrock. With the reversal in groundwater head gradients, river water is lost to the underlying groundwater system through these karst features. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the hydrologic conditions that influence streamflow losses in the karst region of the upper Peace River. The upper Peace River is located in a basin that has been altered substantially by phosphate mining and increases in groundwater use. These alterations have changed groundwater flow patterns and caused streamflow declines through time. Hydrologic factors that have had the greatest influence on streamflow declines in the upper Peace River include the lowering of the potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the riverbed elevation due to below-average rainfall (droughts), increases in groundwater use, and the presence of numerous karst features in the low-water channel and floodplain that enhance the loss of streamflow. Seepage runs conducted along the upper Peace River, from Bartow to Fort Meade, indicate that the greatest streamflow losses occurred along an approximate 2-mile section of the river beginning about 1 mile south of the Peace River at Bartow gaging station. Along the low-water and floodplain channel of this 2-mile section, there are about 10 prominent karst features that influence streamflow losses. Losses from the individual karst features ranged from 0.22 to 16 cubic feet per second based on measurements made between 2002 and 2007. The largest measured flow loss for all the karst features was about 50 cubic

  9. Mechanism of decay of the cry1Aa mRNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Cruz, C; Olmedo-Alvarez, G

    1997-01-01

    We undertook the study of the decay process of the cry1Aa mRNA of Bacillus thuringiensis expressed in B. subtilis. The cry1Aa transcript is a 3.7-kb mRNA expressed during sporulation whose transcriptional control has previously been studied in both B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. We found that the cry1Aa mRNA has a half-life of around 9 min and that its decay occurs through endoribonucleolytic cleavages which result in three groups of high-molecular-weight mRNA intermediates ranging in size from 2.7 to 0.5 kb. A comparative study carried out with Escherichia coli showed a similar pattern of degradation intermediates. Primer extension analysis carried out on RNA from B. subtilis revealed that most cleavages occur within two regions located toward the 5' and 3' ends of the mRNA. The most prominent processing site observed for the cry1Aa mRNA isolated from B. subtilis is only two bases away from that occurring on RNA isolated from E. coli. Most cleavage sites occur at seemingly single-stranded RNA segments rich in A and U nucleotides, suggesting that a common and conserved mechanism may process the cry1Aa mRNA. PMID:9335281

  10. mRNA levels of TLR4 and TLR5 are independent of H pylori

    PubMed Central

    Garza-González, Elvira; Bocanegra-García, Virgilio; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco Javier; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Moreno, Francisco; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the presence H pylori or its virulence affect toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5 mRNA expression levels. METHODS: For the in vivo assays, gastric biopsies were obtained from 40 patients and H pylori status was determined. For the in vitro assays, human gastric adenocarcinoma mucosal cells (AGS) were cultured in the presence or absence of twelve selected H pylori strains. H pylori strains isolated from culture-positive patients and selected strains were genotyped for cagA and vacA. The cDNA was obtained from mRNA extracted from biopsies and from infected AGS cells. TLR4 and TLR5 mRNA levels were examined by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The presence of H pylori did not affect the mRNA levels of TLR4 or TLR5 in gastric biopsies. The mRNA levels of both receptors were not influenced by the vacA status (P > 0.05 for both receptors) and there were no differences in TLR4 or TLR5 mRNA levels among the different clinical presentations/histological findings (P > 0.05). In the in vitro assay, the mRNA levels of TLR4 or TLR5 in AGS cells were not influenced by the vacAs1 status or the clinical condition associated with the strains (P > 0.05 for both TLR4 and TLR5). CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that the mRNA levels of TLR4 and TLR5 in gastric cells, both in vivo and in vitro, are independent of H pylori colonization and suggest that vacA may not be a significant player in the first step of innate immune recognition mediated by TLR4 or TLR5. PMID:18785283

  11. Androgen control of secretory component mRNA levels in the rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Lambert, R W; Wickham, L A; Banting, G; Sullivan, D A

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the known gender-related differences in, and the endocrine control of, the production of secretory component (SC) by the rat lacrimal gland are associated with alterations in SC mRNA content. Levels of SC mRNA were measured in lacrimal tissues of intact, sham-operated, castrated, hypophysectomized, and testosterone-treated male and female adult rats by Northern blot procedures, which utilized a specific, [alpha-32P]-labelled rat SC cDNA probe. For control purposes, SC mRNA amounts were standardized to the beta-actin content in experimental blots. The location of SC mRNA in lacrimal glands was evaluated by in situ hybridization techniques, which involved exposure of tissue sections to sense or anti-sense [35S]-labelled SC RNA probes. Our results demonstrate that: (1) lacrimal glands of male rats contain a significantly greater amount of SC mRNA than those of female rats, and that this difference co-exists with distinct, gender-associated variations in the distribution of SC mRNA in lacrimal tissue; (2) orchiectomy or hypophysectomy, but not ovariectomy or sham surgery, leads to a marked decline in the lacrimal SC mRNA content; and (3) testosterone, but not placebo, administration to castrated male and female rats induces a significant increase in the SC mRNA levels in lacrimal tissue. Overall, these findings show that gender, androgens and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis exert a considerable influence on the SC mRNA content in the rat lacrimal gland.

  12. 40 shades of black: regional differences in vegetation response to a changing human influence in the Low Countries during the Dark Ages (AD 300-1000).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw-Bouman, Marjolein T. I. J.; Donders, Timme H.; Hoek, Wim Z.

    2016-04-01

    During the Dark Ages, which includes the Late Roman Period (LRP, AD 300-500) and the Early Middle Ages (EMA, AD 500-1000), large scale vegetation development in Northwestern Europe is generally characterized by a forest regeneration. This forest redevelopment phase was not uniformous across the Netherlands. A comparison between existing pollen records shows that forest redevelopment started earlier and was more severe in the southern part of the Netherlands than in the northeastern Netherlands. The prevailing view advocates that the forest redevelopment is the result of a diminishing human influence on the landscape due to the collapse of the Roman Empire. Following this view, regional changes in forest regeneration are explained by varying population densities. However, existing climate-records indicate a colder and wetter climate during the Dark Ages and the geomorphological record points to a changing landscape. How and to what extent these climatic and environmental changes contributed to the changes in vegetation development or even to the decline of the Roman Empire is largely unknown. To understand the relative importance of the factors (climate, environment, economy and demography) influencing vegetation development it is important to accurately map regional differences in vegetation both on a regional and extra-regional scale. For an extra-regional overview all available pollen records in the Netherlands from this period are compiled to show differences in amplitude of the vegetation development during the Dark Ages. On a regional scale, vegetation reconstruction maps have been produced reflecting the influence of geological/geomorphological factors.

  13. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  14. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  15. Autoregulation of Musashi1 mRNA translation during Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Karthik; Macnicol, Melanie C; Macnicol, Angus M

    2012-08-01

    The mRNA translational control protein, Musashi, plays a critical role in cell fate determination through sequence-specific interactions with select target mRNAs. In proliferating stem cells, Musashi exerts repression of target mRNAs to promote cell cycle progression. During stem cell differentiation, Musashi target mRNAs are de-repressed and translated. Recently, we have reported an obligatory requirement for Musashi to direct translational activation of target mRNAs during Xenopus oocyte meiotic cell cycle progression. Despite the importance of Musashi in cell cycle regulation, only a few target mRNAs have been fully characterized. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a new Musashi target mRNA in Xenopus oocytes. We demonstrate that progesterone-stimulated translational activation of the Xenopus Musashi1 mRNA is regulated through a functional Musashi binding element (MBE) in the Musashi1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Mutational disruption of the MBE prevented translational activation of Musashi1 mRNA and its interaction with Musashi protein. Further, elimination of Musashi function through microinjection of inhibitory antisense oligonucleotides prevented progesterone-induced polyadenylation and translation of the endogenous Musashi1 mRNA. Thus, Xenopus Musashi proteins regulate translation of the Musashi1 mRNA during oocyte maturation. Our results indicate that the hierarchy of sequential and dependent mRNA translational control programs involved in directing progression through meiosis are reinforced by an intricate series of nested, positive feedback loops, including Musashi mRNA translational autoregulation. These autoregulatory positive feedback loops serve to amplify a weak initiating signal into a robust commitment for the oocyte to progress through the cell cycle and become competent for fertilization.

  16. Clinical Indicators of Child Development in the Capitals of Nine Brazilian States: The Influence of Regional Cultural Factors

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, André Laranjeira; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Grisi, Sandra Josefina Ferraz Ellero; de Ulhôa Escobar, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evaluating the interaction between mother or caregiver and infant through the Clinical Indicators of Risks in Infant Development and investigating whether local and cultural influences during infant development affect these clinical indicators. INTRODUCTION The Clinical Indicators of Risks in Infant Development was created in order to fully assess infants’ development and the subjective relationship between the babies and their caregivers. The absence of two or more Clinical Indicators of Risks in Infant Developments suggests a possibly inadequate mental development. Given the continental size of Brazil and its accentuated cultural differences, one might question how trustworthy these indicators can be when applied to each of the geographical regions of the country. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study with 737 infants from the capitals of 9 Brazilian states. The size of the initial sample population was based on a pilot study carried out in the cities of São Paulo and Brasília. The ages of children were grouped: 0–3 months, 4–7 months, 8–11 months and 12–18 months. The chi-square test was used together with analyses by the statistical software SPSS 13.0. RESULTS Statistical analysis of results from the different municipalities against the total sample did not reveal any statistically significant differences. Municipalities represented were Belém (p=0.486), Brasília (p=0.371), Porto Alegre (p=0.987), Fortaleza (p=0.259), Recife (p=0.630), Salvador (0.370), São Paulo (p=0.238), Curitiba (p=0.870), and Rio de Janeiro (p= 0.06). DISCUSSION Care for mental development should be considered a public health issue. Its evaluation and follow-up should be part of the already available mother-child assistance programs, which would then be considered to provide “full” care to children. CONCLUSIONS Local habits and culture did not affect the results of the Clinical Indicators of Risks in Infant Development indicators. Clinical Indicators of

  17. Assessing the Influence of the PTTC Principal's Competency in ICT on the Teachers' Integration of ICT in Teaching Science in PTTCs in Nyanza Region, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omwenga, Ezekiel; Nyabero, Charles; Okioma, Lazarous

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the influence of Primary Teacher Training College (PTTC) principal's competency in ICT on the teacher's integration of ICT in teaching science in PTTC's in Nyanza region in Kenya. The one research question and one research hypothesis guided the study. The population comprised of 21 principals and 159 tutors. Data…

  18. Program Plans for Group Meetings. Influences on Occupational Goals of Young People in Three Southern Subcultures. Information Series 2, Southern Regional Research Project S-63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    In recent years, the emphasis of career education has been placed on career guidance at a much earlier age. The S-63 Southern Regional Research Committee designed three programs for use in a study about influences on occupational goals of youths in three subcultures (rural and urban Negro and Appalachian rural white). Since children most…

  19. How Rainfall Variation Influences Reproductive Patterns of African Savanna Ungulates in an Equatorial Region Where Photoperiod Variation Is Absent.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, Joseph O; Owen-Smith, Norman; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Dublin, Holly T

    2015-01-01

    In high temperate latitudes, ungulates generally give birth within a narrow time window when conditions are optimal for offspring survival in spring or early summer, and use changing photoperiod to time conceptions so as to anticipate these conditions. However, in low tropical latitudes day length variation is minimal, and rainfall variation makes the seasonal cycle less predictable. Nevertheless, several ungulate species retain narrow birth peaks under such conditions, while others show births spread quite widely through the year. We investigated how within-year and between-year variation in rainfall influenced the reproductive timing of four ungulate species showing these contrasting patterns in the Masai Mara region of Kenya. All four species exhibited birth peaks during the putative optimal period in the early wet season. For hartebeest and impala, the birth peak was diffuse and offspring were born throughout the year. In contrast, topi and warthog showed a narrow seasonal concentration of births, with conceptions suppressed once monthly rainfall fell below a threshold level. High rainfall in the previous season and high early rains in the current year enhanced survival into the juvenile stage for all the species except impala. Our findings reveal how rainfall variation affecting grass growth and hence herbivore nutrition can govern the reproductive phenology of ungulates in tropical latitudes where day length variation is minimal. The underlying mechanism seems to be the suppression of conceptions once nutritional gains become insufficient. Through responding proximally to within-year variation in rainfall, tropical savanna ungulates are less likely to be affected adversely by the consequences of global warming for vegetation phenology than northern ungulates showing more rigid photoperiodic control over reproductive timing. PMID:26295154

  20. Relative Influence of Trans-Pacific and Regional Atmospheric Transport of PAHs in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Scott; Schrlau, Jill; Butler, Jack; Jia, Yuling; Harper, Barbara; Harris, Stuart; Bramer, Lisa M; Waters, Katrina M; Harding, Anna; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2015-12-01

    The relative influences of trans-Pacific and regional atmospheric transport on measured concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PAH derivatives (nitro- (NPAH) and oxy-(OPAH)), organic carbon (OC), and particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) were investigated in the Pacific Northwest, U.S. in 2010-2011. Ambient high volume PM2.5 air samples were collected at two sites in the Pacific Northwest: (1.) Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in the Oregon Cascade Range (2763 m above sea level (asl)) and 2.) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the Columbia River Gorge (CRG) (954 m asl). At MBO, the 1,8-dinitropyrene concentration was significantly positively correlated with the time a sampled air mass spent over Asia, suggesting that this NPAH may be a good marker for trans-Pacific atmospheric transport. At CTUIR, NOx, CO2, and SO2 emissions from a 585 MW coal fired power plant, in Boardman OR, were found to be significantly positively correlated with PAH, OPAH, NPAH, OC, and PM2.5 concentrations. By comparing the Boardman Plant operational time frames when the plant was operating to when it was shut down, the plant was found to contribute a large percentage of the measured PAH (67%), NPAH (91%), OPAH (54%), PM2.5 (39%), and OC (38%) concentrations at CTUIR and the CRG prior to Spring 2011 and likely masked trans-Pacific atmospheric transport events to the CRG. Upgrades installed to the Boardman Plant in the spring of 2011 dramatically reduced the plant's contribution to PAH and OPAH concentrations (by ∼72% and ∼40%, respectively) at CTUIR and the CRG, but not NPAH, PM2.5 or OC concentrations. PMID:26151337

  1. Impacts of pore to regional scale variations in authigenic composition and texture on anthropogenically influenced fluid-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Diagenetic history plays a dominant role in determining the suitability of subsurface rock units as hosts for fluids that have societal importance. The performance of subsurface aquifers and storage facilities for CO2, natural gas, and liquid waste, is largely tied to the evolution of pore space and distribution and composition of authigenic minerals. While geoscientists may be well aware of the importance and nuances of diagenesis, project managers and decision-makers are unlikely to have a geologic understanding of determining factors such as burial history, fluid flow, and mineral thermodynamics. Thus, if falls to the geoscientists to effectively communicate meaningful conceptual models that adequately capture diagenetic heterogeneity and the potential for temporal changes with anthropogenically-induced changes in subsurface chemistry. This can be particularly difficult in subsurface systems that are sparsely sampled. Here, we look at the example of the basal Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone and overlying Eau Claire Formation in the Illinois Basin, the respective reservoir and seal for the largest ongoing demonstration of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration in the United States. Relatively few cores are available to study the pore-scale composition and structure of these units, and those that are available show a complex and spatially variable diagenetic history. Compilation of past studies and new analyses from the Illinois Basin are combined to illustrate the burial history and fluid flow record that will influence how these units respond to the massive volumes of supercritical CO2 injected into the subsurface. Pore to regional scale differences in authigenic mineral composition and texture result in significantly different predicted fluid-rock interactions and various potential consequences of injection. This project provides examples of both successes and challenges associated with communicating the diagentic complexity to stakeholders and the potential

  2. How Rainfall Variation Influences Reproductive Patterns of African Savanna Ungulates in an Equatorial Region Where Photoperiod Variation Is Absent

    PubMed Central

    Ogutu, Joseph O.; Owen-Smith, Norman; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Dublin, Holly T.

    2015-01-01

    In high temperate latitudes, ungulates generally give birth within a narrow time window when conditions are optimal for offspring survival in spring or early summer, and use changing photoperiod to time conceptions so as to anticipate these conditions. However, in low tropical latitudes day length variation is minimal, and rainfall variation makes the seasonal cycle less predictable. Nevertheless, several ungulate species retain narrow birth peaks under such conditions, while others show births spread quite widely through the year. We investigated how within-year and between-year variation in rainfall influenced the reproductive timing of four ungulate species showing these contrasting patterns in the Masai Mara region of Kenya. All four species exhibited birth peaks during the putative optimal period in the early wet season. For hartebeest and impala, the birth peak was diffuse and offspring were born throughout the year. In contrast, topi and warthog showed a narrow seasonal concentration of births, with conceptions suppressed once monthly rainfall fell below a threshold level. High rainfall in the previous season and high early rains in the current year enhanced survival into the juvenile stage for all the species except impala. Our findings reveal how rainfall variation affecting grass growth and hence herbivore nutrition can govern the reproductive phenology of ungulates in tropical latitudes where day length variation is minimal. The underlying mechanism seems to be the suppression of conceptions once nutritional gains become insufficient. Through responding proximally to within-year variation in rainfall, tropical savanna ungulates are less likely to be affected adversely by the consequences of global warming for vegetation phenology than northern ungulates showing more rigid photoperiodic control over reproductive timing. PMID:26295154

  3. How Rainfall Variation Influences Reproductive Patterns of African Savanna Ungulates in an Equatorial Region Where Photoperiod Variation Is Absent.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, Joseph O; Owen-Smith, Norman; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Dublin, Holly T

    2015-01-01

    In high temperate latitudes, ungulates generally give birth within a narrow time window when conditions are optimal for offspring survival in spring or early summer, and use changing photoperiod to time conceptions so as to anticipate these conditions. However, in low tropical latitudes day length variation is minimal, and rainfall variation makes the seasonal cycle less predictable. Nevertheless, several ungulate species retain narrow birth peaks under such conditions, while others show births spread quite widely through the year. We investigated how within-year and between-year variation in rainfall influenced the reproductive timing of four ungulate species showing these contrasting patterns in the Masai Mara region of Kenya. All four species exhibited birth peaks during the putative optimal period in the early wet season. For hartebeest and impala, the birth peak was diffuse and offspring were born throughout the year. In contrast, topi and warthog showed a narrow seasonal concentration of births, with conceptions suppressed once monthly rainfall fell below a threshold level. High rainfall in the previous season and high early rains in the current year enhanced survival into the juvenile stage for all the species except impala. Our findings reveal how rainfall variation affecting grass growth and hence herbivore nutrition can govern the reproductive phenology of ungulates in tropical latitudes where day length variation is minimal. The underlying mechanism seems to be the suppression of conceptions once nutritional gains become insufficient. Through responding proximally to within-year variation in rainfall, tropical savanna ungulates are less likely to be affected adversely by the consequences of global warming for vegetation phenology than northern ungulates showing more rigid photoperiodic control over reproductive timing.

  4. Relative Influence of Trans-Pacific and Regional Atmospheric Transport of PAHs in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The relative influences of trans-Pacific and regional atmospheric transport on measured concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PAH derivatives (nitro- (NPAH) and oxy-(OPAH)), organic carbon (OC), and particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) were investigated in the Pacific Northwest, U.S. in 2010–2011. Ambient high volume PM2.5 air samples were collected at two sites in the Pacific Northwest: (1.) Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in the Oregon Cascade Range (2763 m above sea level (asl)) and 2.) Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the Columbia River Gorge (CRG) (954 m asl). At MBO, the 1,8-dinitropyrene concentration was significantly positively correlated with the time a sampled air mass spent over Asia, suggesting that this NPAH may be a good marker for trans-Pacific atmospheric transport. At CTUIR, NOx, CO2, and SO2 emissions from a 585 MW coal fired power plant, in Boardman OR, were found to be significantly positively correlated with PAH, OPAH, NPAH, OC, and PM2.5 concentrations. By comparing the Boardman Plant operational time frames when the plant was operating to when it was shut down, the plant was found to contribute a large percentage of the measured PAH (67%), NPAH (91%), OPAH (54%), PM2.5 (39%), and OC (38%) concentrations at CTUIR and the CRG prior to Spring 2011 and likely masked trans-Pacific atmospheric transport events to the CRG. Upgrades installed to the Boardman Plant in the spring of 2011 dramatically reduced the plant’s contribution to PAH and OPAH concentrations (by ∼72% and ∼40%, respectively) at CTUIR and the CRG, but not NPAH, PM2.5 or OC concentrations. PMID:26151337

  5. Regional estimation of soil C stocks and CO2 emissions as influenced by cropping systems and soil type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Roberta; Marchetti, Alessandro; Di Bene, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is of crucial importance for agricultural soil quality and fertility. At global level soil contains about three times the carbon stored in the vegetation and about twice that present in the atmosphere. Soil could act as source and sink of carbon, influencing the balance of CO2 concentration and consequently the global climate. The sink/source ratio depends on many factors that encompass climate, soil characteristics and different land management practices. Thus, the relatively large gross exchange of GHGs between atmosphere and soils and the significant stocks of carbon in soils, may have significant impact on climate and on soil quality. To quantify the dynamics of C induced by land cover change and the spatial and temporal dynamics of C sources and sinks at regional and, potentially, at national and global scales, we propose a methodology, based on a bio-physical model combined with a spatial explicit database to estimate C stock changes and emissions/removals. The study has been conducted in a pilot region in Italy (Apulia, Foggia province), considering the typical cropping systems of the area, namely rainfed cereals, tomato, vineyard and olives. For this purpose, the model RothC10N (Farina et al., 2013), that simulates soil C dynamics, has been modified to work directly in batch using data of climate, soil (over 290 georeferenced soil profiles), annual agriculture land use (1200 observations) The C inputs from crops have been estimated using statistics and data from literature. The model was run to equilibrium for each point of soil, in order to make all the data homogeneous in terms of time. The obtained data were interpolate with geostatisical procedures, obtaining a set of 30x30 km grid with the initial soil C. The new layer produced, together with soil and land use layers, were used for a long-term run (12 years). Results showed that olive groves and vineyards were able to stock a considerable amount of C (from 0.4 to 1.5 t ha-1 y

  6. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  7. Expression of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor vacuolating cytotoxin A (vac A) is influenced by a potential stem‐loop structure in the 5′ untranslated region of the transcript

    PubMed Central

    Amilon, Karin R.; Letley, Darren P.; Winter, Jody A.; Robinson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The vacuolating cytotoxin, VacA, is an important virulence factor secreted by the gastric pathogen H elicobacter pylori. Certain vac A genotypes are strongly associated with disease risk, but the association is not absolute. The factors determining vac A gene expression are not fully understood, and the mechanisms of its regulation are elusive. We have identified a potential mRNA stem‐loop forming structure in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the vac A transcript. Using site‐directed mutagenesis, we found that disruption of the stem‐loop structure reduced steady‐state mRNA levels between two‐ and sixfold (P = 0.0005) and decreased mRNA half‐life compared with wild type (P = 0.03). This led to a marked reduction in VacA protein levels and overall toxin activity. Additionally, during stressful environmental conditions of acid pH or high environmental salt concentrations, when general transcription of vac A was decreased or increased respectively, the stabilising effects of the stem‐loop were even more pronounced. Our results suggest that the stem‐loop structure in the vac A 5′ UTR is an important determinant of vac A expression through stabilisation of the vac A mRNA transcript and that the stabilising effect is of particular importance during conditions of environmental stress. PMID:26259667

  8. The influence of regional urbanization and abnormal weather conditions on the processes of human climatic adaptation on mountain resorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, M.; Golitsyn, G.; Senik, I.; Safronov, A.; Babyakin, A.; Efimenko, N.; Povolotskaya, N.; Topuriya, D.; Chalaya, E.

    2012-04-01

    This work is a further development in the study of weather pathogenic index (WPI) and negative influence of urbanization processes on the state of people's health with adaptation disorder. This problem is socially significant. According to the data of the WHO, in the world there are from 20 to 45% of healthy people and from 40 to 80% of people with chronic diseases who suffer from the raised meteosensitivity. As a result of our researches of meteosensitivity of people during their short-duration on mountain resorts there were used negative adaptive reactions (NAR) under 26 routine tests, stress-reactions under L.H. Garkavi's hemogram, vegetative indices, tests of neuro-vascular reactivity, signs of imbalance of vegetative and neurohumoral regulation according to the data of biorhythm fractal analysis and sudden aggravations of diseases (SAD) as an indicator of negative climatic and urbanization influence. In 2010-2011 the Caucasian mountain resorts were having long periods of climatic anomalies, strengthening of anthropogenic emissions and forest fires when record-breaking high waves of NAR and SAD were noticed. There have also been specified indices ranks of weather pathogenicity from results of comparison of health characteristics with indicators of synoptico-dynamic processes according to Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF); air ionization N+, N-, N+/N- spectra of aerosol particles (the size from 500 to 20000 nanometers) and concentrations of chemically active gases (O3, NO, NO2, ), volatile phytoorganic substances in the surface atmosphere, bactericidal characteristics of vegetation by criterion χ2 (not above 0,05). It has allowed us to develop new physiological optimum borders, norm and pessimum, to classify emergency ecologo-weather situations, to develop a new techniques of their forecasting and prevention of meteopathic reactions with meteosensitive patients (Method of treatment and the early (emergency) and planned prevention meteopatic reactions

  9. Differential regulation of renal cyclooxygenase mRNA by dietary salt intake.

    PubMed

    Jensen, B L; Kurtz, A

    1997-11-01

    Experiments were done to investigate the influence of dietary salt intake on renal cyclooxygenase (COX) I and II mRNA levels. To this end rats were fed either a low NaCl diet (LS; 0.02% NaCl wt/wt) or a high NaCl diet (HS diet; 4% NaCl wt/wt) for 5, 10 and 20 days. After 10 days Na excretion differed 760-fold, plasma renin activity and renin mRNA were increased eight- and threefold in LS compared to HS animals. Total renal COX I mRNA decreased 50% following the LS diet and did not change after the HS diet. Conversely, COX II mRNA declined after HS intake and transiently increased after salt depletion. COX I and II mRNAs were unevenly distributed along the cortical-medullary axis with ratios of the cortex:outer medulla:papilla of 1:3:23 and 1:1:2, respectively. Cortical COX mRNAs were inversely regulated by salt intake with eightfold changes in COX II. Conversely, in medullary zones, COX I mRNA correlated directly with salt intake. We conclude that dietary salt intake influences renal cyclooxygenase mRNAs zone-specifically with opposite responses between cortex and medulla. Cortical COX II-mediated prostaglandin formation is probably important in low salt states whereas medullary COX I-produced prostaglandins seem to be more important for renal adaptation to a high salt intake.

  10. Influence of phosphorus on the reduction of silicon in regions characterized by droplet flow of the smelting products

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Kim; N.V. Chainikova

    2008-08-15

    The influence of phosphorus on the thermodynamics of silicon reduction in Fe-Si-C melts is considered. The influence of the theoretical combustion temperature of coke in the tuyeres on the silicon content is studied in the blast-furnace smelting of low-phosphorus hot metal at AO Arcelor Mittal Temirtau.

  11. The influence of infant and child mortality on fertility in selected countries of the Asian and Pacific region.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    Data from the World Fertility Survey (WFS) on 10 countries are used to measure the strength of 1 of 3 types of behavior (insurance behavior, breastfeeding and replacement behavior) influencing the relationship between infant mortality and fertility. 2 variables, the use of contraception at the time of the survey and the stated desire to stop bearing children, are cross-classified by the parity of women, whether they had experienced the death of a child, and if so, whether it was the last or an earlier child. Other tabulations measure the effect of the death of sons, as opposed to daughters, on the decision to have another child. Demographic and socioeconomic controls are introduced using multiple classification analysis. The 10 countries surveyed in the region are Bangladesh, Fiji, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Results indicate that the replacement effect operated most strongly in countries such as Fiji and Korea which have relatively low fertility rates and high contraceptive practice. In countries with high mortality, e.g., Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan, the effect of replacement behavior on the practice of contraception was minimal. However, where the desire to have no more children was studied, women who had lost a child were far less likely to say they wanted no more children. The direct experience of losing a child tended to make women, especially low parity women, more pronatalist. While the measurable effects of child mortality on fertility were small, the findings about attitudes were highly suggestive. They support the belief that population which are pronatalist are so in part because high mortality causes concern about the ultimate chances of the survival of their children. It is thus not difficult to believe that people insure against the deaths of their children by trying to have more children than they need. Of the 10 countries surveyed, the evidence for such insurance behavior

  12. A multi-model analysis of the resolution influence on precipitation climatology in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuelei; Huang, Bohua; Kirtman, Ben P.; Kinter, James L.; Chiu, Long S.

    2016-05-01

    Using climate simulations from coupled and uncoupled general circulation models, this study investigates the influence of horizontal resolution in both atmospheric and oceanic model components on the mean precipitation over the Gulf Stream (GS) region. For this purpose, three sets of model experiments are analyzed. The first two examine the effects of increasing horizontal resolution of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) gradually from 100 to 10 km under fixed oceanic settings. Specifically, the AGCM is either forced with prescribed observed sea surface temperature (SST) (the first case) or coupled to a non-eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model (OGCM) at a fixed horizontal resolution near 100 km (the second case). The third set of experiments examines the effects of the oceanic resolution with a pair of long-term simulations by another coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM), in which the OGCM is run respectively at non-eddy-resolving (100 km) and eddy-resolving (10 km) resolutions, while the AGCM resolution remains fixed at 50 km for both runs. In general, all simulations qualitatively reproduce the gross features of the mean GS precipitation and its annual cycle. At similar AGCM resolutions, the uncoupled models produce a GS rain band that is more realistic in both structure and strength compared to the coupled models with non-eddy-resolving oceans. This is because the prescribed observed SST better represents the gradient near the oceanic front than the non-eddy-resolving OGCMs simulate. An increase from the baseline AGCM resolution produces enhanced climatological GS precipitation, both large-scale and convective, with the latter more tightly confined to the oceanic front. The enhancement, however, is moderate and further increases in resolution achieves diminishing results. On the other hand, an increase in oceanic resolution from non-eddy-resolving to eddy resolving scheme results in more consistent simulations with

  13. Temperature and altitudinal influence on karst dripwater chemistry: Implications for regional-scale palaeoclimate reconstructions from speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Andrea; Johnston, Vanessa E.; Frisia, Silvia; Miorandi, Renza; Corradini, Flavio

    2016-03-01

    The reconstruction of robust past climate records from speleothems requires a prior understanding of the environmental and hydrological conditions that lead to speleothem formation and the chemical signals encoded within them. On regional-scales, there has been little quantification of the dependency of cave dripwater geochemistry on meteorology (net infiltration, temperature), environmental and geographical factors (elevation, latitude, soil activity, vegetation cover, atmospheric aerosol composition) and geological properties of the aquifer (lithology, porosity and thickness). In the present study, we analysed over 200 karst waters collected in 11 caves of the Trentino region (NE Italy). The caves span sub-humid Mediterranean to cold-humid temperate climates and infiltration elevations (Zinf) ranging from 355 to 2400 m a.s.l., corresponding to infiltration mean annual temperatures (MATinf) between 12 and 0 °C. Since all the caves developed in pure carbonate rocks, soil pCO2 is found to be the main factor controlling the carbonate dissolution. For this reason, the parameters controlling the carbonate-carbonic acid system and calcite saturation state (SICC) are directly correlated with the MATinf, which influences the vegetation zones and eventually the production of CO2 in the soil. SICC linearly depends on MATinf (SICC = 0.09 MATinf - 0.4) and SICC = 0 is reached at Zinf = 1.66 km a.s.l., corresponding to a MATinf = 4.4 °C. This point identifies the "speleothem limit" defined here as the elevation (or corresponding MATinf) above which no sparitic speleothem precipitation usually occurs. We demonstrate that due to temperature-forced changes in the soil and vegetation and subsequently SICC, the speleothem limit shifts to higher altitudes during maximum interglacial conditions. Speleothems from high altitude caves (1.5-2.5 km a.s.l.) thus can identify optimum interglacial periods. By contrast, speleothems formed at lower altitudes are better suited as archives of

  14. Conceptual Modeling of mRNA Decay Provokes New Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Somekh, Judith; Haimovich, Gal; Guterman, Adi; Dori, Dov; Choder, Mordechai

    2014-01-01

    Biologists are required to integrate large amounts of data to construct a working model of the system under investigation. This model is often informal and stored mentally or textually, making it prone to contain undetected inconsistencies, inaccuracies, or even contradictions, not much less than a representation in free natural language. Using Object-Process Methodology (OPM), a formal yet visual and humanly accessible conceptual modeling language, we have created an executable working model of the mRNA decay process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the import of its components to the nucleus following mRNA decay. We show how our model, which incorporates knowledge from 43 articles, can reproduce outcomes that match the experimental findings, evaluate hypotheses, and predict new possible outcomes. Moreover, we were able to analyze the effects of the mRNA decay model perturbations related to gene and interaction deletions, and predict the nuclear import of certain decay factors, which we then verified experimentally. In particular, we verified experimentally the hypothesis that Rpb4p, Lsm1p, and Pan2p remain bound to the RNA 3′-untralslated region during the entire process of the 5′ to 3′ degradation of the RNA open reading frame. The model has also highlighted erroneous hypotheses that indeed were not in line with the experimental outcomes. Beyond the scientific value of these specific findings, this work demonstrates the value of the conceptual model as an in silico vehicle for hypotheses generation and testing, which can reinforce, and often even replace, risky, costlier wet lab experiments. PMID:25255440

  15. Methylation of bone SOST, its mRNA, and serum sclerostin levels correlate strongly with fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Sjur; Noer, Agate; Grimholt, Runa M; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Gautvik, Vigdis T; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Berg, Jens Petter; Datta, Harish; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lyle, Robert; Collas, Philippe; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2015-02-01

    Inhibition of sclerostin, a glycoprotein secreted by osteocytes, offers a new therapeutic paradigm for treatment of osteoporosis (OP) through its critical role as Wnt/catenin signaling regulator. This study describes the epigenetic regulation of SOST expression in bone biopsies of postmenopausal women. We correlated serum sclerostin to bone mineral density (BMD), fractures, and bone remodeling parameters, and related these findings to epigenetic and genetic disease mechanisms. Serum sclerostin and bone remodeling biomarkers were measured in two postmenopausal groups: healthy (BMD T-score > -1) and established OP (BMD T-score < -2.5, with at least one low-energy fracture). Bone specimens were used to analyze SOST mRNAs, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation changes. The SOST gene promoter region showed increased CpG methylation in OP patients (n = 4) compared to age and body mass index (BMI) balanced controls (n = 4) (80.5% versus 63.2%, p = 0.0001) with replication in independent cohorts (n = 27 and n = 36, respectively). Serum sclerostin and bone SOST mRNA expression correlated positively with age-adjusted and BMI-adjusted total hip BMD (r = 0.47 and r = 0.43, respectively; both p < 0.0005), and inversely to serum bone turnover markers. Five SNPs, one of which replicates in an independent population-based genomewide association study (GWAS), showed association with serum sclerostin or SOST mRNA levels under an additive model (p = 0.0016 to 0.0079). Genetic and epigenetic changes in SOST influence its bone mRNA expression and serum sclerostin levels in postmenopausal women. The observations suggest that increased SOST promoter methylation seen in OP is a compensatory counteracting mechanism, which lowers serum sclerostin concentrations and reduces inhibition of Wnt signaling in an attempt to promote bone formation.

  16. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export

    PubMed Central

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M.; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D.; Steiner, Michaela C.; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1–7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1–7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3′ untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3′ ends. PMID:26944680

  17. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  19. Analysis of mRNA nuclear export kinetics in mammalian cells by microinjection.

    PubMed

    Gueroussov, Serge; Tarnawsky, Stefan P; Cui, Xianying A; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F

    2010-12-04

    In eukaryotes, messenger RNA (mRNA) is transcribed in the nucleus and must be exported into the cytoplasm to access the translation machinery. Although the nuclear export of mRNA has been studied extensively in Xenopus oocytes and genetically tractable organisms such as yeast and the Drosophila derived S2 cell line, few studies had been conducted in mammalian cells. Furthermore the kinetics of mRNA export in mammalian somatic cells could only be inferred indirectly. In order to measure the nuclear export kinetics of mRNA in mammalian tissue culture cells, we have developed an assay that employs the power of microinjection coupled with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). These assays have been used to demonstrate that in mammalian cells, the majority of mRNAs are exported in a splicing dependent manner, or in manner that requires specific RNA sequences such as the signal sequence coding region (SSCR). In this assay, cells are microinjected with either in vitro synthesized mRNA or plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest. The microinjected cells are incubated for various time points then fixed and the sub-cellular localization of RNA is assessed using FISH. In contrast to transfection, where transcription occurs several hours after the addition of nucleic acids, microinjection of DNA or mRNA allows for rapid expression and allows for the generation of precise kinetic data.

  20. Developmental timing of mRNA translation--integration of distinct regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2010-08-01

    Targeted mRNA translation is emerging as a critical mechanism to control gene expression during developmental processes. Exciting new findings have revealed a critical role for regulatory elements within the mRNA untranslated regions to direct the timing of mRNA translation. Regulatory elements can be targeted by sequence-specific binding proteins to direct either repression or activation of mRNA translation in response to developmental signals. As new regulatory elements continue to be identified it has become clear that targeted mRNAs can contain multiple regulatory elements, directing apparently contradictory translational patterns. How is this complex regulatory input integrated? In this review, we focus on a new challenge area-how sequence-specific RNA binding proteins respond to developmental signals and functionally integrate to regulate the extent and timing of target mRNA translation. We discuss current understanding with a particular emphasis on the control of cell cycle progression that is mediated through a complex interplay of distinct mRNA regulatory elements during Xenopus oocyte maturation.

  1. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Márkus, Nóra M.; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F. S.; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C.; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T. Ian; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  2. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Nóra M; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F S; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T Ian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms.

  3. A HTAP Multi-Model Assessment of the Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and the Role of Intercontinental Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; West, J. Jason; Atherton, Cynthia S.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bergmann, Dan; Bey, Isabelle; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas; Forberth, Gerd; Hess, Peter; Schulz, Michael; Shindell, Drew; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tan, Qian

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we assess changes of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and direct radiative forcing (DRF) in response to the reduction of anthropogenic emissions in four major pollution regions in the northern hemisphere by using results from 10 global chemical transport models in the framework of the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP). The multi-model results show that on average, a 20% reduction of anthropogenic emissions in North America, Europe, East Asia and South Asia lowers the global mean AOD and DRF by about 9%, 4%, and 10% for sulfate, organic matter, and black carbon aerosol, respectively. The impacts of the regional emission reductions on AOD and DRF extend well beyond the source regions because of intercontinental transport. On an annual basis, intercontinental transport accounts for 10-30% of the overall AOD and DRF in a receptor region, with domestic emissions accounting for the remainder, depending on regions and species. While South Asia is most influenced by import of sulfate aerosol from Europe, North America is most influenced by import of black carbon from East Asia. Results show a large spread among models, highlighting the need to improve aerosol processes in models and evaluate and constrain models with observations.

  4. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  5. Assessing the influence of water level on schistosomiasis in Dongting Lake region before and after the construction of Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwu; Nie, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a severe public health problem in the Dongting Lake region, and its distribution, prevalence, and intensity of infection are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. In this study, the human and bovine schistosomiasis variations in the Dongting Lake region were studied from 1996 to 2010, and the relationships between schistosomiasis and water level were examined. Furthermore, based on these results, the potential effects of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) on schistosomiasis were investigated. Results showed an increase in human schistosomiasis and in the scope of seriously affected regions, along with a decrease in bovine schistosomiasis. Human schistosomiasis was negatively correlated with water level during wet season (from May to October), particularly the average water level in October. This finding indicated that the decreasing water level may be highly related to the increasing of human schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake region. Based on this result and the variation of schistosomiasis before and after the construction and operation of TGD, the impoundment of the Three Gorges reservoir is believed to decrease the water level and increase the contact between people and schistosomiasis. Therefore, the TGD, which is operated by regulating water and scheduling water operations, is not good for the control of human schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake region. Although the extent of the influence of the TGD on schistosomiasis remains unclear, the influence of the TGD on preventing and controlling schistosomiasis should not be ignored.

  6. Assessing the influence of water level on schistosomiasis in Dongting Lake region before and after the construction of Three Gorges Dam.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwu; Nie, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a severe public health problem in the Dongting Lake region, and its distribution, prevalence, and intensity of infection are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. In this study, the human and bovine schistosomiasis variations in the Dongting Lake region were studied from 1996 to 2010, and the relationships between schistosomiasis and water level were examined. Furthermore, based on these results, the potential effects of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) on schistosomiasis were investigated. Results showed an increase in human schistosomiasis and in the scope of seriously affected regions, along with a decrease in bovine schistosomiasis. Human schistosomiasis was negatively correlated with water level during wet season (from May to October), particularly the average water level in October. This finding indicated that the decreasing water level may be highly related to the increasing of human schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake region. Based on this result and the variation of schistosomiasis before and after the construction and operation of TGD, the impoundment of the Three Gorges reservoir is believed to decrease the water level and increase the contact between people and schistosomiasis. Therefore, the TGD, which is operated by regulating water and scheduling water operations, is not good for the control of human schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake region. Although the extent of the influence of the TGD on schistosomiasis remains unclear, the influence of the TGD on preventing and controlling schistosomiasis should not be ignored. PMID:26661964

  7. A ribonucleoprotein complex protects the interleukin-6 mRNA from degradation by distinct herpesviral endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mandy; Hutin, Stephanie; Marigold, Oliver; Li, Kathy H; Burlingame, Al; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2015-05-01

    During lytic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection, the viral endonuclease SOX promotes widespread degradation of cytoplasmic messenger RNA (mRNA). However, select mRNAs escape SOX-induced cleavage and remain robustly expressed. Prominent among these is interleukin-6 (IL-6), a growth factor important for survival of KSHV infected B cells. IL-6 escape is notable because it contains a sequence within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) that can confer protection when transferred to a SOX-targeted mRNA, and thus overrides the endonuclease targeting mechanism. Here, we pursued how this protective RNA element functions to maintain mRNA stability. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified a set of proteins that associate specifically with the protective element. Although multiple proteins contributed to the escape mechanism, depletion of nucleolin (NCL) most severely impacted protection. NCL was re-localized out of the nucleolus during lytic KSHV infection, and its presence in the cytoplasm was required for protection. After loading onto the IL-6 3' UTR, NCL differentially bound to the translation initiation factor eIF4H. Disrupting this interaction, or depleting eIF4H, reinstated SOX targeting of the RNA, suggesting that interactions between proteins bound to distant regions of the mRNA are important for escape. Finally, we found that the IL-6 3' UTR was also protected against mRNA degradation by the vhs endonuclease encoded by herpes simplex virus, despite the fact that its mechanism of mRNA targeting is distinct from SOX. These findings highlight how a multitude of RNA-protein interactions can impact endonuclease targeting, and identify new features underlying the regulation of the IL-6 mRNA. PMID:25965334

  8. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Müller, Maren; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Gommlich, Jessie; Balagopal, Vidya; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC) reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization. PMID:27543059

  9. Expression of beta 3-adrenoceptor mRNA in rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, B. A.; Papaioannou, M.; Bonazzi, V. R.; Summers, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. This study examines the expression of beta 3-adrenoceptor messenger RNA (beta 3-AR mRNA) in rat tissues to allow comparison with atypical beta-adrenoceptors determined by functional and radioligand binding techniques. 2. A reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction protocol has been developed for determining the relative amounts of beta 3-AR mRNA in rat tissues. 3. Measurement of adipsin and uncoupling protein (UCP) mRNA was used to examine all tissues for the presence of white and brown adipose tissue which may contribute beta 3-AR mRNA. 4. The beta 3-AR mRNA is expressed at high levels in brown and white adipose tissue, stomach fundus, the longitudinal/circular smooth muscle of both colon and ileum, and colon submucosa. There was substantial expression of adipsin in colon submucosa and moderate expression in fundus, suggesting that in these regions at least some of the beta 3-AR signal may be contributed by fat. Pylorus and colon mucosa showed moderate levels of beta 3-AR mRNA with lower levels of adipsin. Ileum mucosa and submucosa showed low but readily detectable levels of beta 3-AR. 5. Expression of adipsin in rat skeletal muscles coupled to very low levels of beta 3-AR mRNA indicates that the observed beta 3-AR may be due to the presence of intrinsic fat. beta 3-AR mRNA was virtually undetectable in heart, lung and liver. These results raise the possibility that the atypical beta-AR demonstrated by functional and/or binding studies in muscle and in heart is not the beta 3-AR. 6. By use of two different sets of primers for amplification of beta 3-AR cDNA, no evidence was found for differential splicing of the mRNA in any of the tissues examined. 7. The detection of beta 3-AR mRNA in the gut mucosa and submucosa suggests that in addition to its established roles in lipolysis, thermogenesis and regulation of gut motility beta 3-AR may subserve other functions in the gastrointestinal tract. The absence of beta 3-AR mRNA in rat heart or its presence with

  10. Regulation of mRNA transport, localization and translation in the nervous system of mammals (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DI LIEGRO, CARLO MARIA; SCHIERA, GABRIELLA; DI LIEGRO, ITALIA

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of mRNA trafficking and metabolism plays a critical role in the actualization and fine tuning of the genetic program of cells, both in development and in differentiated tissues. Cis-acting signals, responsible for post-transcriptional regulation, reside in the RNA message itself, usually in untranslated regions, 5′ or 3′ to the coding sequence, and are recognized by trans-acting factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and/or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNAs bind short mRNA sequences usually present in the 3′-untranslated (3′-UTR) region of their target messages. RBPs recognize specific nucleotide sequences and/or secondary/tertiary structures. Most RBPs assemble on mRNA at the moment of transcription and shepherd it to its destination, somehow determining its final fate. Regulation of mRNA localization and metabolism has a particularly important role in the nervous system where local translation of pre-localized mRNAs has been implicated in developing axon and dendrite pathfinding, and in synapse formation. Moreover, activity-dependent mRNA trafficking and local translation may underlie long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, responsible for learning and memory. This review focuses on the role of RBPs in neuronal development and plasticity, as well as possible connections between ncRNAs and RBPs. PMID:24452120

  11. The life of an mRNA in space and time.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Ya'ara; Brody, Yehuda; Kinor, Noa; Mor, Amir; Tsukamoto, Toshiro; Spector, David L; Singer, Robert H; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear transcribed genes produce mRNA transcripts destined to travel from the site of transcription to the cytoplasm for protein translation. Certain transcripts can be further localized to specific cytoplasmic regions. We examined the life cycle of a transcribed beta-actin mRNA throughout gene expression and localization, in a cell system that allows the in vivo detection of the gene locus, the transcribed mRNAs and the cytoplasmic beta-actin protein that integrates into the actin cytoskeleton. Quantification showed that RNA polymerase II elongation progressed at a rate of 3.3 kb/minute and that transactivator binding to the promoter was transient (40 seconds), and demonstrated the unique spatial structure of the coding and non-coding regions of the integrated gene within the transcription site. The rates of gene induction were measured during interphase and after mitosis, demonstrating that daughter cells were not synchronized in respect to transcription initiation of the studied gene. Comparison of the spatial and temporal kinetics of nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic mRNA transport showed that the beta-actin-localization response initiates from the existing cytoplasmic mRNA pool and not from the newly synthesized transcripts arising after gene induction. It was also demonstrated that mechanisms of random movement were predominant in mediating the efficient translocation of mRNA in the eukaryotic cell.

  12. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibin-α, growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), and bone morphogenic protein-15 (BMP15) mRNA and protein are influenced by photoperiod-induced ovarian regression and recrudescence in Siberian hamster ovaries.

    PubMed

    Shahed, Asha; Young, Kelly A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure of Siberian hamsters to short photoperiod (SD) inhibits ovarian function, including folliculogenesis, whereas function is restored with their transfer to long photoperiods (LD). To investigate the mechanism of photo-stimulated recrudescence, we assessed key folliculogenic factors-anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibin-α, growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9), and bone morphogenic protein-15 (BMP15)-across the estrus cycle and in photo-regressed and recrudescing ovaries. Adult hamsters were exposed to either LD or SD for 14 weeks, which respectively represent functional and regressed ovaries. Select regressed hamsters were transferred back to LD for 2 (post-transfer week 2; PTw2) or 8 weeks (PTw8). Ovaries were collected and fixed in formalin for immunohistochemistry or frozen in liquid nitrogen for real-time PCR. AMH, inhibin-α, GDF9, and BMP15 mRNA and protein were detected in all stages of the estrus cycle. Fourteen weeks of SD exposure increased (P < 0.05) ovarian AMH, GDF9, and BMP15, but not inhibin-α mRNA levels as compared to LD. Transfer of regressed hamsters to stimulatory long photoperiod for 8 weeks returned AMH and GDF9 mRNA levels to LD-treated levels, and further increased mRNA levels for inhibin-α and BMP15. Immunostaining for AMH, inhibin-α, GDF9, and BMP15 proteins was most intense in preantral/antral follicles and oocytes. The overall immunostaining extent for AMH and inhibin-α generally mirrored the mRNA data, though no changes were observed for GDF9 or BMP15 immunostaining. Shifts in mRNA and protein levels across photoperiod conditions suggest possible syncretic roles for these folliculogenic factors in photo-stimulated recrudescence via potential regulation of follicle recruitment, preservation, and development.

  13. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  14. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  15. Influence of the Valine Zipper Region on the Structure and Aggregation of the Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5)

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Reynolds, T. Steele; Middaugh, C. Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and non-reducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of alpha-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation. PMID:23067245

  16. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth.

  17. Insights into the Regulation of mRNA Processing of Polycistronic Transcripts Mediated by DRBD4/PTB2, a Trypanosome Homolog of the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Jäger, Adriana V; Izcovich, Ronan; Campo, Vanina A

    2016-07-01

    Trypanosomes regulate gene expression mostly by posttranscriptional mechanisms, including control of mRNA turnover and translation efficiency. This regulation is carried out via certain elements located at the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, which are recognized by RNA-binding proteins. In trypanosomes, trans-splicing is of central importance to control mRNA maturation. We have previously shown that TcDRBD4/PTB2, a trypanosome homolog of the human polypyrimidine tract-binding protein splicing regulator, interacts with the intergenic region of one specific dicistronic transcript, referred to as TcUBP (and encoding for TcUBP1 and TcUBP2, two closely kinetoplastid-specific proteins). In this work, a survey of TcUBP RNA processing revealed certain TcDRBD4/PTB2-regulatory elements within its intercistronic region, which are likely to influence the trans-splicing rate of monocistronic-derived transcripts. Furthermore, TcDRBD4/PTB2 overexpression in epimastigote cells notably decreased both UBP1 and UBP2 protein expression. This type of posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism could be extended to other transcripts as well, as we identified several other RNA precursor molecules that specifically bind to TcDRBD4/PTB2. Altogether, these findings support a model in which TcDRBD4/PTB2-containing ribonucleoprotein complexes can prevent trans-splicing. This could represent another stage of gene expression regulation mediated by the masking of trans-splicing/polyadenylation signals.

  18. hnRNP L binds to CA repeats in the 3'UTR of bcl-2 mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lim, Mi-Hyun; Youn, Dong-Ye; Jung, Seung Eun; Ahn, Young Soo; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2009-05-08

    We previously reported that the CA-repeat sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of bcl-2 mRNA is involved in the decay of bcl-2 mRNA. However, the trans-acting factor for the CA element in bcl-2 mRNA remains unidentified. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), an intron splicing factor, has been reported to bind to CA repeats and CA clusters in the 3'UTR of several genes. We reported herein that the CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA have the potential to form a distinct ribonuclear protein complex in cytoplasmic extracts of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (REMSA). A super-shift assay using the hnRNP L antibody completely shifted the complex. Immunoprecipitation with the hnRNP L antibody and MCF-7 cells followed by RT-PCR revealed that hnRNP L interacts with endogenous bcl-2 mRNA in vivo. Furthermore, the suppression of hnRNP L in MCF-7 cells by the transfection of siRNA for hnRNP L resulted in a delay in the degradation of RNA transcripts including CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between hnRNPL and CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA participates in destabilizing bcl-2 mRNA.

  19. Analysis of xanthine dehydrogenase mRNA levels in mutants affecting the expression of the rosy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Covington, M; Fleenor, D; Devlin, R B

    1984-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) mRNA levels were measured in a number of mutants and natural variants affecting XDH gene expression. Two variants, ry+4 and ry+10, contain cis-acting elements which map to a region flanking the 5' end of the XDH gene. Ry+4, which has 2-3 times more XDH protein than a wild type strain, has 3.2 times more XDH mRNA. Ry+10 has 50% of the wild type XDH level and 54% of the wild type XDH mRNA level. Three rosy mutants which map within the structural gene were also examined. Two of these had little if any XDH mRNA, but the third mutant had 1.3 times more XDH mRNA than wild type flies. Another mutant, ry2 , which contains no XDH protein and has a 9KB transposable element inserted into the XDH gene, has normal levels of XDH mRNA transcripts which are also the same size as those found in the wild type strain. Changes in XDH mRNA levels were measured during Drosophila development and found to parallel changes in the amount of XDH protein. In addition, there were no large changes in the size of XDH mRNA during development. Images PMID:6588363

  20. Chronic social subordination stress modulates glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Ryan; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic social subordination is a well-known precipitant of numerous psychiatric and physiological health concerns. In this study, we examine the effects of chronic social stress in the visible burrow system (VBS) on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in forebrain stress circuitry. Male rats in the VBS system form a dominance hierarchy, whereby subordinate males exhibit neuroendocrine and physiological profiles characteristic of chronic exposure to stress. We found that social subordination decreases GAD67 mRNA in the peri-paraventricular nucleus region of the hypothalamus and the interfascicular nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and increases in GAD67 mRNA in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and dorsal medial hypothalamus. Expression of BDNF mRNA increased in the dorsal region of the BNST, but remained unchanged in all other regions examined. Results from this study indicate that social subordination is associated with several region-specific alterations in GAD67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits, whereas changes in the expression of BDNF mRNA are limited to the BNST. PMID:26066725

  1. Postage for the messenger: Designating routes for Nuclear mRNA Export

    PubMed Central

    Natalizio, Barbara J.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of messenger(m) RNA occurs in the nucleus, making the translocation of mRNA across the nuclear envelope (NE) boundary a critical determinant of proper gene expression and cell survival. A major mRNA export route occurs via the NXF1-dependent pathway through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE. However, recent findings have discovered new evidence supporting the existence of multiple mechanisms for crossing the NE, including both NPC-mediated and NE budding-mediated pathways. An analysis of the trans-acting factors and cis components that define these pathways reveals shared elements as well as mechanistic differences. We review here the current understanding of the mechanisms that characterize each pathway and highlight the determinants that influence mRNA transport fate. PMID:23583578

  2. Regional brain shrinkage and change in cognitive performance over two years: The bidirectional influences of the brain and cognitive reserve factors.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ninni; Ghisletta, Paolo; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Yuan, Peng; Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-02-01

    We examined relationships between regional brain shrinkage and changes in cognitive performance, while taking into account the influence of chronological age, vascular risk, Apolipoprotein E variant and socioeconomic status. Regional brain volumes and cognitive performance were assessed in 167 healthy adults (age 19-79 at baseline), 90 of whom returned for the follow-up after two years. Brain volumes were measured in six regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC), and cognitive performance was evaluated in three domains: episodic memory (EM), fluid intelligence (Gf), and vocabulary (V). Average volume loss was observed in Hc, PhG and CbH, but reliable individual differences were noted in all examined ROIs. Average positive change was observed in EM and V performance but not in Gf scores, yet only the last evidenced individual differences in change. We observed reciprocal influences among neuroanatomical and cognitive variables. Larger brain volumes at baseline predicted greater individual gains in Gf, but differences in LPFC volume change were in part explained by baseline level of cognitive performance. In one region (PFw), individual change in volume was coupled with change in Gf. Larger initial brain volumes did not predict slower shrinkage. The results underscore the complex role of brain maintenance and cognitive reserve in adult development. PMID:26584866

  3. Regional brain shrinkage and change in cognitive performance over two years: The bidirectional influences of the brain and cognitive reserve factors.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ninni; Ghisletta, Paolo; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Yuan, Peng; Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-02-01

    We examined relationships between regional brain shrinkage and changes in cognitive performance, while taking into account the influence of chronological age, vascular risk, Apolipoprotein E variant and socioeconomic status. Regional brain volumes and cognitive performance were assessed in 167 healthy adults (age 19-79 at baseline), 90 of whom returned for the follow-up after two years. Brain volumes were measured in six regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC), and cognitive performance was evaluated in three domains: episodic memory (EM), fluid intelligence (Gf), and vocabulary (V). Average volume loss was observed in Hc, PhG and CbH, but reliable individual differences were noted in all examined ROIs. Average positive change was observed in EM and V performance but not in Gf scores, yet only the last evidenced individual differences in change. We observed reciprocal influences among neuroanatomical and cognitive variables. Larger brain volumes at baseline predicted greater individual gains in Gf, but differences in LPFC volume change were in part explained by baseline level of cognitive performance. In one region (PFw), individual change in volume was coupled with change in Gf. Larger initial brain volumes did not predict slower shrinkage. The results underscore the complex role of brain maintenance and cognitive reserve in adult development.

  4. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  5. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis.

  6. Down-regulation of otospiralin mRNA in response to acoustic stress in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Antonella; Pianese, Luigi; Saulino, Claudio; Di Leva, Francesca; Sequino, Luigi; Cocozza, Sergio; Marciano, Elio; Franzé, Annamaria

    2004-12-01

    Noise over-stimulation will induce or influence molecular pathways in the cochlea; one approach to the identification of the components of these pathways in the cochlea is to examine genes and proteins that change following different types and levels of stress. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction provides a method to look at differential expression of genes in the acoustic stress response. By using this technique we have revealed a down-regulation of the level of otospiralin mRNA in the cochlea of guinea pigs after white noise over-stimulation for 2 h at 108 dB SPL. Otospiralin represents an inner ear specific protein found in fibrocytes of spiral limbus and spiral ligament in the cochlea, and some regions of the vestibule as the stroma underlying the utricle and crista sensory epithelia and the subepithelial layer of the walls of semicircular canals and maculae. It has been recently reported that transient down-regulation of otospiralin in guinea pigs causes vestibular syndrome and deafness. Our results suggest a possible role of this gene in response to acoustical stress, although the exact mechanism remains to be resolved. PMID:15567600

  7. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  8. Influence of Regional Difference in Bone Mineral Density on Hip Fracture Site in Elderly Females by Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z L; Li, P F; Pang, Z H; Zheng, X H; Huang, F; Xu, H H; Li, Q L

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture is a kind of osteoporotic fractures in elderly patients. Its important monitoring indicator is to measure bone mineral density (BMD) using DXA. The stress characteristics and material distribution in different parts of the bones can be well simulated by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Our previous studies have demonstrated a linear positive correlation between clinical BMD and the density of three-dimensional finite element model of the femur. However, the correlation between the density variation between intertrochanteric region and collum femoris region of the model and the fracture site has not been studied yet. The present study intends to investigate whether the regional difference in the density of three-dimensional finite element model of the femur can be used to predict hip fracture site in elderly females. The CT data of both hip joints were collected from 16 cases of elderly female patients with hip fractures. Mimics 15.01 software was used to reconstruct the model of proximal femur on the healthy side. Ten kinds of material properties were assigned. In Abaqus 6.12 software, the collum femoris region and intertrochanteric region were, respectively, drawn for calculating the corresponding regional density of the model, followed by prediction of hip fracture site and final comparison with factual fracture site. The intertrochanteric region/collum femoris region density was [(1.20 ± 0.02) × 10(6)] on the fracture site and [(1.22 ± 0.03) × 10(6)] on the non-fracture site, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.03). Among 16 established models of proximal femur on the healthy side, 14 models were consistent with the actual fracture sites, one model was inconsistent, and one model was unpredictable, with the coincidence rate of 87.5 %. The intertrochanteric region or collum femoris region with lower BMD is more prone to hip fracture of the type on the corresponding site. PMID:27352330

  9. Regional nitrogen budgets and riverine N & P fluxes for the drainages to the North Atlantic Ocean: Natural and human influences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howarth, R.W.; Billen, G.; Swaney, D.; Townsend, A.; Jaworski, N.; Lajtha, K.; Downing, J.A.; Elmgren, Ragnar; Caraco, N.; Jordan, T.; Berendse, F.; Freney, J.; Kudeyarov, V.; Murdoch, P.; Zhu, Z.-L.

    1996-01-01

    We present estimates of total nitrogen and total phosphorus fluxes in rivers to the North Atlantic Ocean from 14 regions in North America, South America, Europe, and Africa which collectively comprise the drainage basins to the North Atlantic. The Amazon basin dominates the overall phosphorus flux and has the highest phosphorus flux per area. The total nitrogen flux from the Amazon is also large, contributing 3.3 Tg yr-1 out of a total for the entire North Atlantic region of 13.1 Tg yr-1. On a per area basis, however, the largest nitrogen fluxes are found in the highly disturbed watersheds around the North Sea, in northwestern Europe, and in the northeastern U.S., all of which have riverine nitrogen fluxes greater than 1,000 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources of nitrogen dominate riverine fluxes to the coast in all regions. River fluxes of total nitrogen from the temperate regions of the North Atlantic basin are correlated with population density, as has been observed previously for fluxes of nitrate in the world's major rivers. However, more striking is a strong linear correlation between river fluxes of total nitrogen and the sum of anthropogenically-derived nitrogen inputs to the temperate regions (fertilizer application, human-induced increases in atmospheric deposition of oxidized forms of nitrogen, fixation by leguminous crops, and the import/export of nitrogen in agricultural products). On average, regional nitrogen fluxes in rivers are only 25% of these anthropogenically derived nitrogen inputs. Denitrification in wetlands and aquatic ecosystems is probably the dominant sink, with storage in forests perhaps also of importance. Storage of nitrogen in groundwater, although of importance in some localities, is a very small sink for nitrogen inputs in all regions. Agricultural sources of nitrogen dominate inputs in many regions, particularly the Mississippi basin and the North Sea drainages. Deposition of oxidized nitrogen, primarily of industrial origin, is the

  10. Functions of maternal mRNA as a cytoplasmic factor responsible for pole cell formation in Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Togashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Okada, M.

    1986-12-01

    Injection of mRNA extracted from Drosophila cleavage embryos or mature oocytes restored pole cell-forming ability to embryos that had been deprived of this ability by uv irradiation. However, mRNA extracted from blastoderms did not show the restoration activity. Pole cells thus formed in uv-irradiated embryos bear similarities to normal pole cells both in their morphology and their ability to migrate to the gonadal rudiments. But this mRNA does not appear to be capable of rescuing uv-induced sterility, or inducing pole cells in the anterior polar region.

  11. Topoisomerase II alpha mRNA and tumour cell proliferation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lohri, A; Reuter, J; Gudat, F; Herrmann, R

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To elucidate potential mechanisms of drug resistance, levels of topoisomerase II alpha mRNA, a target for cytostatic drugs, were measured in cryopreserved tumour tissue from 36 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. To evaluate the potential association between topoisomerase II alpha and cell proliferation, Ki-67 immunostaining was also assessed. METHODS: The study population comprised 13 patients with low grade and 20 with high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three patients had recurrent disease. Topoisomerase II alpha mRNA was quantitated by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the PCR product measured by using HPLC. The MIB-1 monoclonal antibody was used for Ki-67 immunostaining. RESULTS: Levels of topoisomerase II alpha mRNA correlated strongly with the Ki-67 labelling index and were higher in high grade than in low grade lymphomas. Patients in complete clinical remission of high grade lymphoma had a higher Ki-67 labelling index and tended to have higher topoisomerase II alpha mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS: Although topoisomerase II alpha mRNA levels may be indicative of sensitivity to drugs, it is more likely that they reflect the proliferation status of the cell, which in turn involves a large number of additional molecular systems that influence response to treatment. PMID:9059350

  12. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  13. Public and Private School Distinction, Regional Development Differences, and Other Factors Influencing the Success of Primary School Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulku, Seher Nur; Abdioglu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing the success of students in primary schools in Turkey. TIMSS 2011 data for Turkey, measuring the success of eighth-grade students in the field of mathematics, were used in an econometric analysis, performed using classical linear regression models. Two hundred thirty-nine schools participated in the…

  14. High School Students' Perception of Career Technical Education and Factors that Influence Enrollment in Programs at a Regional Occupational Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Gean, Laurie M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn about the demographic profile of South Bay-area high school Career Technical Education (CTE) students (those who enroll in CTE courses outside the school day), their perceptions related to CTE, the people and other factors that influence them to enroll in CTE courses, and students' opinions on which…

  15. Distribution of neurotensin/neuromedin N mRNA in rat forebrain: Unexpected abundance in hippocampus and subiculum

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.J.; Miller, M.A.; Dorsa, D.M.; Bullock, B.P.; Helloni, R.H. Jr.; Dobner, P.R.; Leeman, S.E. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors have used in situ hybridization to determine the regional distribution of mRNA encoding the neurotensin/neuromedin N (NT/N) precursor in the forebrain of the adult male rat. Cells containing NT/N mRNA are widely distributed in the forebrain. These areas include the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, preoptic area, hypothalamus, amygdala, accumbens nucleus, caudate-putamen, and piriform and retrosplenial cortex. In general, the regional distribution of NT/N mRNA corresponds to the previously determined distribution of neurotensin-immunoreactive cell bodies; however, several notable exceptions were observed. The most striking difference occurs specifically in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where intense labeling is associated with the pyramidal cell layer despite the reported absence of neurotensin-immunoreactive cells in this region. A second major discrepancy between NT/N mRNA abundance and neurotensin-immunoreactivity occurs in the intensely labeled subiculum, a region that contains only scattered neurotensin-immunoreactive cells in the adult. These results suggest that, in specific regions of the forebrain, NT/N precursor is processed to yield products other than neurotensin. In addition, these results provide an anatomical basis for studying the physiological regulation of NT/N mRNA levels in the forebrain.

  16. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  17. Influence of sea surface temperature variations over the western Kuroshio-Oyashio confluence region on explosively developing extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hidetaka; Kawamura, Ryuichi; Kato, Masaya; Shinoda, Taro

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated how explosively developing extratropical cyclones respond to sea surface temperature (SST) variations over the western Kuroshio-Oyashio confluence (WKOC) region using regional cloud resolving simulations. We focused specifically on an explosive cyclone that moved along the southern side of the Kuroshio/Kuroshio Extension in early February 2014 and conducted a real SST experiment (CNTL run) and two SST sensitivity experiments with warm and cool SST anomalies over the WKOC region (warm and cool runs). The results derived from the CNTL run showed that moisture that evaporated from the WKOC region contributed substantially to latent heat release over the bent-back front with the aid of the cold conveyor belt (CCB), leading to the cyclone's development and to the transition from axisymmetric to asymmetric structure around the cyclone center. Such successive processes were more active in the warm run than in the cool run. The dominance of the zonally asymmetric structure caused a difference in sea level pressure around the bent-back front between the two runs. The WKOC SST variations have the potential to affect strong wind distributions along the CCB through the modification of the cyclone inner structure. Additional experiments with regard to two other cyclones indicated that the cyclone response to the WKOC SST variations became evident when the CCB north of the cyclone center overlapped with that region, confirming that the CCB plays a vital role in latent heat release over the bent-back front through enhanced moisture supply from warm currents.

  18. Mapping of N6-methyladenosine residues in bovine prolactin mRNA.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, S; Horowitz, A; Nilsen, T W; Munns, T W; Rottman, F M

    1984-09-01

    N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) residues, which are found internally in viral and cellular mRNA populations at the sequences Apm6ApC and Gpm6ApC, have been proposed to play a role in mRNA processing and transport. We have developed a sensitive approach to analyze the level and location of m6A in specific purified cellular mRNAs in an attempt to correlate m6A location with function. Polyadenylylated mRNA is hybridized to cDNA clones representing the full size mRNA under study or fragments of it, and the protected RNA is digested and labeled with polynucleotide kinase in vitro. After enrichment for m6A with anti-m6A antibody, the [32P]-pm6A is separated on TLC plates, and compared with the total amount of radiolabeled nucleotides. Using this combination of in vitro RNA labeling and antibody selection, we were able to detect m6A in purified stable mRNAs that cannot be readily labeled in cells with greater sensitivity than was possible by previous techniques. We applied this technique to bovine prolactin mRNA and showed that this mRNA contains m6A. Moreover, all of the m6A residues in this message are found within the 3' two-thirds of the molecule and are highly concentrated (61%) within a sequence of 108 nucleotides at the 3' noncoding region of the message. The nonrandom distribution of m6A in a specific cellular mRNA, as demonstrated for bovine prolactin, will have to be taken into account when designing a model for m6A function. PMID:6592581

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel mRNA present in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Eyman, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1997-07-15

    Previously, we reported the presence of a heterogeneous population of mRNAs in the squid giant axon. The construction of a cDNA library to this mRNA population has facilitated the identification of several of the constituent mRNAs which encode several cytoskeletal and motor proteins as well as enolase, a glycolytic enzyme. In this communication, we report the isolation of a novel mRNA species (pA6) from the axonal cDNA library. The pA6 mRNA is relatively small (550 nucleotides in length) and is expressed in both nervous tissue and skeletal muscle. The axonal localization of pA6 mRNA was unequivocally established by in situ hybridization histochemistry. The results of quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicate that there are 1.8 x 10(6) molecules of pA6 mRNA (approximately 0.45 pg) in the analyzed segment of the giant axon and suggest that the level of pA6 mRNA in the axonal domain of the giant fiber system might be equal to or greater than the level present in the parental cell soma. Sequence analysis of pA6 suggests that the mRNA encodes an integral membrane protein comprising 84 amino acids. The putative protein contains a single transmembrane domain located in the middle of the molecule and a phosphate-binding loop situated near the N terminus. The C-terminal region of the protein contains two potential phosphorylation sites. These four structural motifs manifest striking similarity to domains present in the ryanodine receptor, raising the possibility that pA6 represents a cephalopod intracellular calcium release channel protein.

  20. Molecular contacts of ribose-phosphate backbone of mRNA with human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Grosheva, Anastasia S; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Stahl, Joachim; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-08-01

    In this work, intimate contacts of riboses of mRNA stretch from nucleotides in positions +3 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon were studied using cross-linking of short mRNA analogs with oxidized 3'-terminal riboses bound to human ribosomes in the complexes stabilized by codon-anticodon interactions and in the binary complexes. It was shown that in all types of complexes cross-links of the mRNA analogs to ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 occur and the yield of these cross-links does not depend on the presence of tRNA and on sequences of the mRNA analogs. Site of the mRNA analogs cross-linking in rp uS3 was mapped to the peptide in positions 55-64 that is located away from the mRNA binding site. Additionally, in complexes with P site-bound tRNA, riboses of mRNA nucleotides in positions +4 to +7 cross-linked to the C-terminal tail of rp uS19 displaying a contact specific to the decoding site of the mammalian ribosome, and tRNA bound at the A site completely blocked this cross-linking. Remarkably, rps uS3 and uS19 were also able to cross-link to the fragment of HCV IRES containing unstructured 3'-terminal part restricted by the AUGC tetraplet with oxidized 3'-terminal ribose. However, no cross-linking to rp uS3 was observed in the 48S preinitiation complex assembled in reticulocyte lysate with this HCV IRES derivative. The results obtained show an ability of rp uS3 to interact with single-stranded RNAs. Possible roles of rp uS3 region 55-64 in the functioning of ribosomes are discussed.

  1. AUF1 contributes to Cryptochrome1 mRNA degradation and rhythmic translation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Wanil; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Jung, Youngseob; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Hong, Ka Young; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the mouse core clock gene cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) at the post-transcriptional level, particularly its translational regulation. Interestingly, the 3′UTR of Cry1 mRNA decreased its mRNA levels but increased protein amounts. The 3′UTR is widely known to function as a cis-acting element of mRNA degradation. The 3′UTR also provides a binding site for microRNA and mainly suppresses translation of target mRNAs. We found that AU-rich element RNA binding protein 1 (AUF1) directly binds to the Cry1 3′UTR and regulates translation of Cry1 mRNA. AUF1 interacted with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit B and also directly associated with ribosomal protein S3 or ribosomal protein S14, resulting in translation of Cry1 mRNA in a 3′UTR-dependent manner. Expression of cytoplasmic AUF1 and binding of AUF1 to the Cry1 3′UTR were parallel to the circadian CRY1 protein profile. Our results suggest that the 3′UTR of Cry1 is important for its rhythmic translation, and AUF1 bound to the 3′UTR facilitates interaction with the 5′ end of mRNA by interacting with translation initiation factors and recruiting the 40S ribosomal subunit to initiate translation of Cry1 mRNA. PMID:24423872

  2. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  3. The influence of solar active region evolution on solar wind streams, coronal hole boundaries and geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Dodson-Prince, H. W.; Hedeman, E. R.; Roelof, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Solar and interplanetary data are examined, taking into account the identification of the heliographic longitudes of the coronal source regions of high speed solar wind (SW) streams by Nolte and Roelof (1973). Nolte and Roelof have 'mapped' the velocities measured near earth back to the sun using the approximation of constant radial velocity. The 'Carrington carpet' for rotations 1597-1616 is shown in a graph. Coronal sources of high speed streams appear in the form of solid black areas. The contours of the stream sources are laid on 'evolutionary charts' of solar active region histories for the Southern and Northern Hemispheres. Questions regarding the interplay of active regions and solar wind are investigated, giving attention to developments during the years 1973, 1974, and 1975.

  4. The influence of carbonates in parent rocks on the biological properties of mountain soils of the Northwest Caucasus region