Science.gov

Sample records for region reveals somatic

  1. Myeloma Ig heavy chain V region sequences reveal prior antigenic selection and marked somatic mutation but no intraclonal diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Vescio, R.A.; Cao, J.; Hong, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The IgV{sub H} region sequence in 48 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) was analyzed to characterize the malignant cell of origin. The sequences were obtained after amplification of bone marrow cDNA by using V{sub H} family-specific and C{sub H} primers, then compared with either directly sequenced patient germ-line or published V{sub H} gene sequences to assay for somatic mutation. Because somatic hypermutation of the V{sub H} gene occurs late in B cell development, its presence has been helpful in determining the cell of origin in other B cell malignancies. Overall, a median of 8.2% of the nucleotides had evidence of substitution within each V{sub H} gene sequence (range = 2.7% to 16.5%), which is more prevalent than in any other reported tumor type. Strong evidence of prior antigenic selection pressure was also evident. The ratio of nucleotide substitutions that resulted in amino acid replacement was significantly higher in the complementarity-determining region than in the framework region (3.25 vs. 1.56, respectively; p < 0.00005). No V{sub H} gene intraclonal diversity was noted, despite sequencing multiple clones (3-16) from each patient, nor was there evidence of further V{sub H} gene somatic mutation over the course of three patients` disease. These findings strongly imply that the malignant clone in MM evolves from a cell late in B cell development. 63 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Next generation sequencing in sporadic retinoblastoma patients reveals somatic mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Amitrano, Sara; Marozza, Annabella; Somma, Serena; Imperatore, Valentina; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Toti, Paolo; Galimberti, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Cetta, Francesco; Piu, Pietro; Di Marco, Chiara; Dosa, Laura; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Carignani, Giulia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    In about 50% of sporadic cases of retinoblastoma, no constitutive RB1 mutations are detected by conventional methods. However, recent research suggests that, at least in some of these cases, there is somatic mosaicism with respect to RB1 normal and mutant alleles. The increased availability of next generation sequencing improves our ability to detect the exact percentage of patients with mosaicism. Using this technology, we re-tested a series of 40 patients with sporadic retinoblastoma: 10 of them had been previously classified as constitutional heterozygotes, whereas in 30 no RB1 mutations had been found in lymphocytes. In 3 of these 30 patients, we have now identified low-level mosaic variants, varying in frequency between 8 and 24%. In 7 out of the 10 cases previously classified as heterozygous from testing blood cells, we were able to test additional tissues (ocular tissues, urine and/or oral mucosa): in three of them, next generation sequencing has revealed mosaicism. Present results thus confirm that a significant fraction (6/40; 15%) of sporadic retinoblastoma cases are due to postzygotic events and that deep sequencing is an efficient method to unambiguously distinguish mosaics. Re-testing of retinoblastoma patients through next generation sequencing can thus provide new information that may have important implications with respect to genetic counseling and family care. PMID:25712084

  3. Allelic Selection of Amplicons in Glioblastoma Revealed by Combining Somatic and Germline Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katherine; Pe'er, Itsik; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is a disease driven by a combination of inherited risk alleles coupled with the acquisition of somatic mutations, including amplification and deletion of genomic DNA. Potential relationships between the inherited and somatic aspects of the disease have only rarely been examined on a genome-wide level. Applying a novel integrative analysis of SNP and copy number measurements, we queried the tumor and normal-tissue genomes of 178 glioblastoma patients from the Cancer Genome Atlas project for preferentially amplified alleles, under the hypothesis that oncogenic germline variants will be selectively amplified in the tumor environment. Selected alleles are revealed by allelic imbalance in amplification across samples. This general approach is based on genetic principles and provides a method for identifying important tumor-related alleles. We find that SNP alleles that are most significantly overrepresented in amplicons tend to occur in genes involved with regulation of kinase and transferase activity, and many of these genes are known contributors to gliomagenesis. The analysis also implicates variants in synapse genes. By incorporating gene expression data, we demonstrate synergy between preferential allelic amplification and expression in DOCK4 and EGFR. Our results support the notion that combining germline and tumor genetic data can identify regions relevant to cancer biology. PMID:20824129

  4. Metabolite profiling reveals clear metabolic changes during somatic embryo development of Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Businge, Edward; Brackmann, Klaus; Moritz, Thomas; Egertsdotter, Ulrika

    2012-02-01

    Progress on industrial-scale propagation of conifers by somatic embryogenesis has been hampered by the differences in developmental capabilities between cell lines, which are limiting the capture of genetic gains from breeding programs. In this study, we investigated the metabolic events occurring during somatic embryo development in Norway spruce to establish a better understanding of the fundamental metabolic events required for somatic embryo development. Three embryogenic cell lines of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) with different developmental capabilities were studied during somatic embryo development from proliferation of proembryogenic masses to mature somatic embryos. The three different cell lines displayed normal, aberrant and blocked somatic embryo development. Metabolite profiles from four development stages in each of the cell lines were obtained using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate discriminant analyses of the metabolic data revealed significant metabolites (P  ≤  0.05) for each development stage and transition. The results suggest that endogenous auxin and sugar signaling affects initial stages of somatic embryo development. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of a timed stress response and the presence of stimulatory metabolites during late stages of embryo development.

  5. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  6. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  7. Characterization of conservative somatic instability of the CAG repeat region in Huntington`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, F.V.; Calikoglu, A.S.; Whetsell, L.H.

    1994-09-01

    Instability and enlargement of a CAG repeat region at the beginning of the huntingtin gene (IT-15) has been linked with Huntington`s disease. The CAG repeat size shows a highly significant correlation with age-of-onset of clinicial features in individuals with 40 or more repeats who have Huntington disease. The clinical status of nonsymptomatic individuals with 30 to 39 CAG repeats is considered ambiguous. In order to define more carefully the nature of the HD expansion instability, we examined patients in our HD population using a discriminating fluorescence-based PCR approach. The degree of somatic mutation increases with both earlier age of onset and the size of the inherited allele. A single prominent band one repeat larger than the index peak was typical in individuals with 40-41 CAG repeats. Three to four larger bands are typically discerned in individuals with 50 or more repeats. In an extreme example, an individual with approximately 95 repeats had at least 8 prominent bands. Plotting the degree of somatic mutation relative to the size of the HD allele shows somatic mutation activity increases with size. By this approach 40-60% of the alleles in a 40-41 CAG repeat HD loci is represented in the primary allele. In contrast, the primary allele represents a relatively minor proportion of the total alleles for expansions greater than 50 CAG repeats (10-20%). The limited range of somatic mutation suggest that the instability is restricted to very early stages of embryogenesis before tissue development diverges or that persistent somatic instability occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, the properties of somatic instability in Huntington`s disease have aspects that are both in common but also different from that found in other trinucleotide repeat expanding diseases such as myotonic muscular dystrophy and fragile X syndrome.

  8. Somatic copy number mosaicism in human skin revealed by induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abyzov, Alexej; Mariani, Jessica; Palejev, Dean; Zhang, Ying; Haney, Michael Seamus; Tomasini, Livia; Ferrandino, Anthony F; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A; Szekely, Anna; Wilson, Michael; Kocabas, Arif; Calixto, Nathaniel E; Grigorenko, Elena L; Huttner, Anita; Chawarska, Katarzyna; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Gerstein, Mark; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2012-12-20

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been suspected of causing de novo copy number variation. To explore this issue, here we perform a whole-genome and transcriptome analysis of 20 human iPSC lines derived from the primary skin fibroblasts of seven individuals using next-generation sequencing. We find that, on average, an iPSC line manifests two copy number variants (CNVs) not apparent in the fibroblasts from which the iPSC was derived. Using PCR and digital droplet PCR, we show that at least 50% of those CNVs are present as low-frequency somatic genomic variants in parental fibroblasts (that is, the fibroblasts from which each corresponding human iPSC line is derived), and are manifested in iPSC lines owing to their clonal origin. Hence, reprogramming does not necessarily lead to de novo CNVs in iPSCs, because most of the line-manifested CNVs reflect somatic mosaicism in the human skin. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that clonal expansion, and iPSC lines in particular, can be used as a discovery tool to reliably detect low-frequency CNVs in the tissue of origin. Overall, we estimate that approximately 30% of the fibroblast cells have somatic CNVs in their genomes, suggesting widespread somatic mosaicism in the human body. Our study paves the way to understanding the fundamental question of the extent to which cells of the human body normally acquire structural alterations in their DNA post-zygotically.

  9. Decoding regulatory landscape of somatic embryogenesis reveals differential regulatory networks between japonica and indica rice subspecies.

    PubMed

    Indoliya, Yuvraj; Tiwari, Poonam; Chauhan, Abhisekh Singh; Goel, Ridhi; Shri, Manju; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a unique process in plants and has considerable interest for biotechnological application. Compare to japonica, indica rice has been less responsive to in vitro culture. We used Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing platform for comparative transcriptome analysis between two rice subspecies at six different developmental stages combined with a tag-based digital gene expression profiling. Global gene expression among different samples showed greater complexity in japonica rice compared to indica which may be due to polyphyletic origin of two rice subspecies. Expression pattern in initial stage indicate major differences in proembryogenic callus induction phase that may serve as key regulator to observe differences between both subspecies. Our data suggests that phytohormone signaling pathways consist of elaborate networks with frequent crosstalk, thereby allowing plants to regulate somatic embryogenesis pathway. However, this crosstalk varies between the two rice subspecies. Down regulation of positive regulators of meristem development (i.e. KNOX, OsARF5) and up regulation of its counterparts (OsRRs, MYB, GA20ox1/GA3ox2) in japonica may be responsible for its better regeneration and differentiation of somatic embryos. Comprehensive gene expression information in the present experiment may also facilitate to understand the monocot specific meristem regulation for dedifferentiation of somatic cell to embryogenic cells.

  10. Clustering of Microarray Data Reveals Transcript Patterns Associated with Somatic Embryogenesis in Soybean1[w

    PubMed Central

    Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Shealy, Robin T.; Khanna, Anupama; Vodkin, Lila O.

    2003-01-01

    Globular somatic embryos can be induced from immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Jack) placed on high levels of the auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Somatic embryos develop from the adaxial side of the cotyledon, whereas the abaxial side evolves into a callus. Using a 9,280-cDNA clone array, we have compared steady-state RNA from the adaxial side from which embryos develop and from the abaxial callus at five time points over the course of the 4 weeks necessary for the development of globular embryos. In a second set of experiments, we have profiled the expression of each clone in the adaxial side during the same period. A total of 495 genes differentially expressed in at least one of these experiments were grouped according to the similarity of their expression profiles using a nonhierarchical clustering algorithm. Our results indicate that the appearance of somatic embryos is preceded by dedifferentiation of the cotyledon during the first 2 weeks on auxin. Changes in mRNA abundance of genes characteristic of oxidative stress and genes indicative of cell division in the adaxial side of the cotyledons suggest that the arrangement of the new cells into organized structures might depend on a genetically controlled balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Our data also suggest that the formation of somatic globular embryos is accompanied by the transcription of storage proteins and the synthesis of gibberellic acid. PMID:12746518

  11. Decoding regulatory landscape of somatic embryogenesis reveals differential regulatory networks between japonica and indica rice subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Indoliya, Yuvraj; Tiwari, Poonam; Chauhan, Abhisekh Singh; Goel, Ridhi; Shri, Manju; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a unique process in plants and has considerable interest for biotechnological application. Compare to japonica, indica rice has been less responsive to in vitro culture. We used Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing platform for comparative transcriptome analysis between two rice subspecies at six different developmental stages combined with a tag-based digital gene expression profiling. Global gene expression among different samples showed greater complexity in japonica rice compared to indica which may be due to polyphyletic origin of two rice subspecies. Expression pattern in initial stage indicate major differences in proembryogenic callus induction phase that may serve as key regulator to observe differences between both subspecies. Our data suggests that phytohormone signaling pathways consist of elaborate networks with frequent crosstalk, thereby allowing plants to regulate somatic embryogenesis pathway. However, this crosstalk varies between the two rice subspecies. Down regulation of positive regulators of meristem development (i.e. KNOX, OsARF5) and up regulation of its counterparts (OsRRs, MYB, GA20ox1/GA3ox2) in japonica may be responsible for its better regeneration and differentiation of somatic embryos. Comprehensive gene expression information in the present experiment may also facilitate to understand the monocot specific meristem regulation for dedifferentiation of somatic cell to embryogenic cells. PMID:26973288

  12. Metabolic Profiling of Somatic Tissues from Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Reveals Effects of Irradiation on Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Liangjian; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhang, Yongan

    2014-01-01

    A high-level of sexual sterility is of importance for the sterile insect technique (SIT). However, the use of high-dose-intensity gamma radiation to induce sterility has negative impacts not only on reproductive cells but also on somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the metabolite differences in somatic tissues between non-irradiated, 20-Gy-irradiated, and 40-Gy-irradiated male Monochamus alternatus, an important vector of the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which kills Asian pines. The results showed that metabolite levels changed moderately in the 20-Gy samples but were markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples compared with the non-irradiated samples. Twenty-six and 53 metabolites were disturbed by 20-Gy and 40-Gy radiation, respectively. Thirty-six metabolites were found to be markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples but were not changed significantly in the 20-Gy samples. The comprehensive metabolomic disorders induced by 40-Gy radiation dysregulated six metabolic pathways involved in the life process. The findings presented in this manuscript will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with gamma-radiation-induced damage to somatic cells and will allow for better exploration of the SIT for the control of this target pest. PMID:24937685

  13. Reversion of somatic mutations of the respiratory syncytial virus-specific human monoclonal antibody Fab19 reveal a direct relationship between association rate and neutralizing potency.

    PubMed

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Utley, Thomas J; Correia, Bruno E; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2013-04-01

    The role of affinity in determining neutralizing potency of mAbs directed against viruses is not well understood. We investigated the kinetic, structural, and functional advantage conferred by individual naturally occurring somatic mutations in the Ab H chain V region of Fab19, a well-described neutralizing human mAb directed to respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison of the affinity-matured Ab Fab19 with recombinant Fab19 Abs that were variants containing reverted amino acids from the inferred unmutated ancestor sequence revealed the molecular basis for affinity maturation of this Ab. Enhanced binding was achieved through mutations in the third H chain CDR (HCDR3) that conferred a markedly faster on-rate and a desirable increase in antiviral neutralizing activity. In contrast, most somatic mutations in the HCDR1 and HCDR2 regions did not significantly enhance Ag binding or antiviral activity. We observed a direct relationship between the measured association rate (Kon) for F protein and antiviral activity. Modeling studies of the structure of the Ag-Ab complex suggested the HCDR3 loop interacts with the antigenic site A surface loop of the respiratory syncytial virus F protein, previously shown to contain the epitope for this Ab by experimentation. These studies define a direct relationship of affinity and neutralizing activity for a viral glycoprotein-specific human mAb.

  14. Minisatellite instability at the Adh locus reveals somatic polymorphism in amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Cañestro, Cristian; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser; Albalat, Ricard

    2002-01-01

    Amphioxus (subphylum Cephalochordata) is the closest living relative to vertebrates and widely used for phylogenetic analyses of vertebrate gene evolution. Amphioxus genes are highly polymorphic, but the origin and nature of this variability is unknown. We have analyzed the alcohol dehydrogenase locus (Adh3) in two amphioxus species (Branchiostoma lanceolatum and Branchiostoma floridae) and found that genetic variation is related to repetitive DNA sequences, mainly minisatellites. Small pool-PCR assays indicated that allelic variants are generated by minisatellite instability. We conclude that the generation of new forms was not preferentially linked to germline processes but rather to somatic events leading to mosaic adult animals. Furthermore, most Adh minisatellites belong to a novel class, which we have named mirages. Their distinctive feature is that the repeat subunit spans the exon–intron boundaries and generates potential duplications of the splice sites. However, splicing may not be compromised as no aberrant mRNA variants were detected. PMID:12087171

  15. Switch recombination and somatic hypermutation are controlled by the heavy chain 3' enhancer region.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Collins, John T; Shi, Jian; Westfield, Gerwin; Fontaine, Clinton; Hakimpour, Paul; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2009-11-23

    Both class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) require transcription and the trans-acting factor activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and must be up-regulated during antigen-dependent differentiation of B lymphocytes. To test the role of the heavy chain 3' enhancers in both CSR and SHM, we used a BAC transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus. Using Cre-loxP recombination to delete a 28-kb region that contains the four known 3' heavy chain enhancers, we isolated lines of BAC transgenic mice with an intact heavy chain locus and paired lines in the same chromosomal insertion site lacking the 3' enhancers. Intact heavy chain transgenes undergo CSR to all heavy chain genes and mutate their transgenic VDJ exon. In paired transgenes lacking the 3' enhancer region, CSR to most heavy chain genes is reduced to approximately 1% of the levels for intact heavy chain loci; SHM is also reduced. Finally, we find that in B cells with a transgene lacking the 3' enhancers, interchromosomal recombination between the transgenic VDJ exon and the endogenous heavy chain C genes is more easily detected than CSR within the transgene.

  16. De novo transcriptome analysis reveals insights into dynamic homeostasis regulation of somatic embryogenesis in upland cotton (G. hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Han; Zhu, Hua-Guo; Tian, Wen-Gang; Zhu, Shou-Hong; Xiong, Xian-Peng; Sun, Yu-Qiang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Sun, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis (SE) is the key step for genetic improvement of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) through genetic engineering mediated by Agrobacteria, but the molecular mechanisms underlying SE in cotton is still unclear. Here, RNA-Sequencing was used to analyze the genes expressed during SE and their expression dynamics using RNAs isolated from non-embryogenic callus (NEC), embryogenic callus (EC) and somatic embryos (SEs). A total of 101, 670 unigenes were de novo assembled. The genes differentially expressed (DEGs) amongst NEC, EC and SEs were identified, annotated and classified. More DEGs were found between SEs and EC than between EC and NEC. A significant number of DEGs were related to hormone homeostasis, stress and ROS responses, and metabolism of polyamines. To confirm the expression dynamics of selected DEGs involved in various pathways, experiments were set up to investigate the effects of hormones (Indole-3-butytric acid, IBA; Kinetin, KT), polyamines, H2O2 and stresses on SE. Our results showed that exogenous application of IBA and KT positively regulated the development of EC and SEs, and that polyamines and H2O2 promoted the conversion of EC into SEs. Furthermore, we found that low and moderate stress is beneficial for proliferation of EC and SEs formation. Together, our global analysis of transcriptomic dynamics reveals that hormone homeostasis, polyamines, and stress response synergistically regulating SE in cotton. PMID:27511192

  17. The IgH 3′ regulatory region controls somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Rouaud, Pauline; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Saintamand, Alexis; Fiancette, Rémi; Marquet, Marie; Robert, Isabelle; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo; Pinaud, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Interactions with cognate antigens recruit activated B cells into germinal centers where they undergo somatic hypermutation (SHM) in V(D)J exons for the generation of high-affinity antibodies. The contribution of IgH transcriptional enhancers in SHM is unclear. The Eμ enhancer upstream of Cμ has a marginal role, whereas the influence of the IgH 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) enhancers (hs3a, hs1,2, hs3b, and hs4) is controversial. To clarify the latter issue, we analyzed mice lacking the whole 30-kb extent of the IgH 3′RR. We show that SHM in VH rearranged regions is almost totally abrogated in 3′RR-deficient mice, whereas the simultaneous Ig heavy chain transcription rate is only partially reduced. In contrast, SHM in κ light chain genes remains unaltered, acquitting for any global SHM defect in our model. Beyond class switch recombination, the IgH 3′RR is a central element that controls heavy chain accessibility to activation-induced deaminase modifications including SHM. PMID:23825188

  18. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  19. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga; Savova, Virginia; Krzystanek, Marcin; Li, Lewyn; Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Zak, Alexander; Flacker, Mary Jo; Li, Mei; Lin, Jessica J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Long, Henry; Szallasi, Zoltan; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Maruyama, Reo; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-06-16

    Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrated genetic and epigenetic (DNA methylation and chromatin) profiling. We found that the basal-like trait is generally dominant and is largely defined by epigenetic repression of luminal transcription factors. Definition of super-enhancers highlighted a core program common in luminal cells but a high degree of heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for luminal-basal fusions, and we identified EN1, TBX18, and TCF4 as candidate transcriptional regulators of the luminal-to-basal switch. Our findings highlight the remarkable epigenetic plasticity of breast cancer cells. PMID:26051943

  20. Thin and thick primary cutaneous melanomas reveal distinct patterns of somatic copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Apollo, Alessandro; Pescucci, Chiara; Licastro, Danilo; Urso, Carmelo; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lucio; Stecca, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive type of skin tumor. Early stage melanoma can be often cured by surgery; therefore current management guidelines dictate a different approach for thin (<1mm) versus thick (>4mm) melanomas. We have carried out whole-exome sequencing in 5 thin and 5 thick fresh-frozen primary cutaneous melanomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) identified two groups corresponding to thin and thick melanomas. The most striking difference between them was the much greater abundance of SCNAs in thick melanomas, whereas mutation frequency did not significantly change between the two groups. We found novel mutations and focal SCNAs in genes that are embryonic regulators of axon guidance, predominantly in thick melanomas. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets provided further support for a potential role of Ephrin receptors in melanoma progression. In addition, we have identified a set of SCNAs, including amplification of BRAF and ofthe epigenetic modifier EZH2, that are specific for the group of thick melanomas that developed metastasis during the follow-up. Our data suggest that mutations occur early during melanoma development, whereas SCNAs might be involved in melanoma progression. PMID:27095580

  1. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-09-20

    Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  2. Thin and thick primary cutaneous melanomas reveal distinct patterns of somatic copy number alterations.

    PubMed

    Montagnani, Valentina; Benelli, Matteo; Apollo, Alessandro; Pescucci, Chiara; Licastro, Danilo; Urso, Carmelo; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lucio; Stecca, Barbara

    2016-05-24

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive type of skin tumor. Early stage melanoma can be often cured by surgery; therefore current management guidelines dictate a different approach for thin (<1mm) versus thick (>4mm) melanomas. We have carried out whole-exome sequencing in 5 thin and 5 thick fresh-frozen primary cutaneous melanomas. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) identified two groups corresponding to thin and thick melanomas. The most striking difference between them was the much greater abundance of SCNAs in thick melanomas, whereas mutation frequency did not significantly change between the two groups. We found novel mutations and focal SCNAs in genes that are embryonic regulators of axon guidance, predominantly in thick melanomas. Analysis of publicly available microarray datasets provided further support for a potential role of Ephrin receptors in melanoma progression. In addition, we have identified a set of SCNAs, including amplification of BRAF and ofthe epigenetic modifier EZH2, that are specific for the group of thick melanomas that developed metastasis during the follow-up. Our data suggest that mutations occur early during melanoma development, whereas SCNAs might be involved in melanoma progression.

  3. Exome sequencing of lymphomas from three dog breeds reveals somatic mutation patterns reflecting genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Turner-Maier, Jason; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Johnson, Jeremy; Stewart, Chip; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Rosenberg, Mara; Thomas, Rachael; Mauceli, Evan; Getz, Gad; Palma, Federica Di; Modiano, Jaime F.; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Alföldi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy in developed countries. Outcome is strongly determined by molecular subtype, reflecting a need for new and improved treatment options. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoma, and the predisposition of certain breeds indicates genetic risk factors. Using the dog breed structure, we selected three lymphoma predisposed breeds developing primarily T-cell (boxer), primarily B-cell (cocker spaniel), and with equal distribution of B- and T-cell lymphoma (golden retriever), respectively. We investigated the somatic mutations in B- and T-cell lymphomas from these breeds by exome sequencing of tumor and normal pairs. Strong similarities were evident between B-cell lymphomas from golden retrievers and cocker spaniels, with recurrent mutations in TRAF3-MAP3K14 (28% of all cases), FBXW7 (25%), and POT1 (17%). The FBXW7 mutations recurrently occur in a specific codon; the corresponding codon is recurrently mutated in human cancer. In contrast, T-cell lymphomas from the predisposed breeds, boxers and golden retrievers, show little overlap in their mutation pattern, sharing only one of their 15 most recurrently mutated genes. Boxers, which develop aggressive T-cell lymphomas, are typically mutated in the PTEN-mTOR pathway. T-cell lymphomas in golden retrievers are often less aggressive, and their tumors typically showed mutations in genes involved in cellular metabolism. We identify genes with known involvement in human lymphoma and leukemia, genes implicated in other human cancers, as well as novel genes that could allow new therapeutic options. PMID:26377837

  4. Next-generation sequencing reveals somatic mutations that confer exceptional response to everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Sora; Ali, Siraj M.; Greenbowe, Joel R.; Yang, In Seok; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Lee, Jae Lyun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Lee, Jeeyun; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Hyo Song; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Hye Ryun; Moon, Yong Wha; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the modest responses to everolimus, a mTOR inhibitor, in multiple tumor types, there is a pressing need to identify predictive biomarkers for this drug. Using targeted ultra-deep sequencing, we aimed to explore genomic alterations that confer extreme sensitivity to everolimus. Results We collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor/normal pairs from 39 patients (22 with exceptional clinical benefit, 17 with no clinical benefit) who were treated with everolimus across various tumor types (13 gastric cancers, 15 renal cell carcinomas, 2 thyroid cancers, 2 head and neck cancer, and 7 sarcomas). Ion AmpliSeqTM Comprehensive Cancer Panel was used to identify alterations across all exons of 409 target genes. Tumors were sequenced to a median coverage of 552x. Cancer genomes are characterized by 219 somatic single-nucleotide variants (181 missense, 9 nonsense, 7 splice-site) and 22 frameshift insertions/deletions, with a median of 2.1 mutations per Mb (0 to 12.4 mutations per Mb). Overall, genomic alterations with activating effect on mTOR signaling were identified in 10 of 22 (45%) patients with clinical benefit and these include MTOR, TSC1, TSC2, NF1, PIK3CA and PIK3CG mutations. Recurrently mutated genes in chromatin remodeling genes (BAP1; n = 2, 12%) and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling (FGFR4; n = 2, 12%) were noted only in patients without clinical benefit. Conclusions Regardless of different cancer types, mTOR-pathway-activating mutations confer sensitivity to everolimus. Targeted sequencing of mTOR pathway genes facilitates identification of potential candidates for mTOR inhibitors. PMID:26859683

  5. A somatic cell hybrid panel for pig regional gene mapping characterized by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yerle, M; Echard, G; Robic, A; Mairal, A; Dubut-Fontana, C; Riquet, J; Pinton, P; Milan, D; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Gellin, J

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 27 pig x rodent somatic cell hybrids was produced and characterized cytogenetically. The first step of this study consisted of hybridizing a SINE probe to GTG-banded metaphases of each hybrid clone in order to count and identify the normal pig chromosomes and to detect rearranged ones. The second step consisted of using the DNA of each clone as a probe after pIRS-PCR (porcine interspersed repetitive sequence-polymerase chain reaction) amplification to highly enrich it in pig sequences. These probes, hybridized to normal pig metaphase chromosomes, enabled the identification of the complete porcine complement in the hybrid lines. Whole chromosomes and fragments were characterized quickly and precisely, and results were compared. In addition to this cytogenetic characterization, molecular verification was also carried out by using primers specific to six microsatellites and to one gene previously mapped to pig chromosomes. The results obtained allow us to conclude that we have produced a panel that is informative for all porcine chromosomes. This panel constitutes a highly efficient tool to establish not only assignments of genes and markers but also regional localizations on pig chromosomes. PMID:8697807

  6. Somatic sex-specific transcriptome differences in Drosophila revealed by whole transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding animal development and physiology at a molecular-biological level has been advanced by the ability to determine at high resolution the repertoire of mRNA molecules by whole transcriptome resequencing. This includes the ability to detect and quantify rare abundance transcripts and isoform-specific mRNA variants produced from a gene. The sex hierarchy consists of a pre-mRNA splicing cascade that directs the production of sex-specific transcription factors that specify nearly all sexual dimorphism. We have used deep RNA sequencing to gain insight into how the Drosophila sex hierarchy generates somatic sex differences, by examining gene and transcript isoform expression differences between the sexes in adult head tissues. Results Here we find 1,381 genes that differ in overall expression levels and 1,370 isoform-specific transcripts that differ between males and females. Additionally, we find 512 genes not regulated downstream of transformer that are significantly more highly expressed in males than females. These 512 genes are enriched on the × chromosome and reside adjacent to dosage compensation complex entry sites, which taken together suggests that their residence on the × chromosome might be sufficient to confer male-biased expression. There are no transcription unit structural features, from a set of features, that are robustly significantly different in the genes with significant sex differences in the ratio of isoform-specific transcripts, as compared to random isoform-specific transcripts, suggesting that there is no single molecular mechanism that generates isoform-specific transcript differences between the sexes, even though the sex hierarchy is known to include three pre-mRNA splicing factors. Conclusions We identify thousands of genes that show sex-specific differences in overall gene expression levels, and identify hundreds of additional genes that have differences in the abundance of isoform-specific transcripts. No

  7. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  8. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-04-19

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines.We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK.Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%.Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression.Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants.In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  9. [Micronuclear index of somatic cells in the population of Chernivtsi region and its ecological conditionality].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, S S; Morozova, T V; Kostyshyn, S S; Bezrukov, V F; Gorova, A I

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale estimation of micronuclear index in the population of different physical-geographic regions near Chernivtsi was performed for the first time. The authors managed to reveal the correlation between the rate of genetic changes in children from Bukovyna and the level of soil and water contamination with heavy metals and aluminum in settlements examined. PMID:12379013

  10. Deep sequencing of gastric carcinoma reveals somatic mutations relevant to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Globally, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death, with the majority of the health burden borne by economically less-developed countries. Methods Here, we report a genetic characterization of 50 gastric adenocarcinoma samples, using affymetrix SNP arrays and Illumina mRNA expression arrays as well as Illumina sequencing of the coding regions of 384 genes belonging to various pathways known to be altered in other cancers. Results Genetic alterations were observed in the WNT, Hedgehog, cell cycle, DNA damage and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition pathways. Conclusions The data suggests targeted therapies approved or in clinical development for gastric carcinoma would be of benefit to ~22% of the patients studied. In addition, the novel mutations detected here, are likely to influence clinical response and suggest new targets for drug discovery. PMID:21781349

  11. Molecular characterization of five human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody heavy chains reveals extensive somatic mutation typical of an antigen-driven immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Andris, J S; Johnson, S; Zolla-Pazner, S; Capra, J D

    1991-01-01

    We report the heavy chain variable region sequences from the cDNAs of five previously described monoclonal cell lines producing human antibodies specific for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and detail the molecular characteristics, germ-line origins, and extent of somatic mutation among these antibodies. Three of the five heavy chain variable regions derive from the VHIV gene family, but each has arisen from a different heavy chain variable region (VH) gene segment within the VHIV family. In addition, one is derived from a VHI gene segment, and one is derived from a VHV gene segment. Since four of the five antibodies arise from known germ-line VH elements, a precise determination of the extent of somatic variation is possible. The amount of variation from the closest germ-line sequence ranges from 4.5% to 14.8% among these antibodies, most of which is concentrated in the complementarity-determining regions. In general, the diversity (D) segments are long, characteristic of D-D fusions and/or extensive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity; however, definitive homologies cannot be found with the known germ-line D segments. Joining (JH) gene segment utilization appears random. The use of five different germ-line VH gene segments and extensive somatic mutation provides evidence that a polyclonal, antigen-driven immune response occurs during the natural infection with human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:1909030

  12. Conditional inactivation of Upstream Binding Factor reveals its epigenetic functions and the existence of a somatic nucleolar precursor body.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Nourdine; Stefanovsky, Victor Y; Tremblay, Michel G; Németh, Attila; Paquet, Eric; Lessard, Frédéric; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross; Moss, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) is a unique multi-HMGB-box protein first identified as a co-factor in RNA polymerase I (RPI/PolI) transcription. However, its poor DNA sequence selectivity and its ability to generate nucleosome-like nucleoprotein complexes suggest a more generalized role in chromatin structure. We previously showed that extensive depletion of UBF reduced the number of actively transcribed ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, but had little effect on rRNA synthesis rates or cell proliferation, leaving open the question of its requirement for RPI transcription. Using gene deletion in mouse, we now show that UBF is essential for embryo development beyond morula. Conditional deletion in cell cultures reveals that UBF is also essential for transcription of the rRNA genes and that it defines the active chromatin conformation of both gene and enhancer sequences. Loss of UBF prevents formation of the SL1/TIF1B pre-initiation complex and recruitment of the RPI-Rrn3/TIF1A complex. It is also accompanied by recruitment of H3K9me3, canonical histone H1 and HP1α, but not by de novo DNA methylation. Further, genes retain penta-acetyl H4 and H2A.Z, suggesting that even in the absence of UBF the rRNA genes can maintain a potentially active state. In contrast to canonical histone H1, binding of H1.4 is dependent on UBF, strongly suggesting that it plays a positive role in gene activity. Unexpectedly, arrest of rRNA synthesis does not suppress transcription of the 5S, tRNA or snRNA genes, nor expression of the several hundred mRNA genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis. Thus, rRNA gene activity does not coordinate global gene expression for ribosome biogenesis. Loss of UBF also unexpectedly induced the formation in cells of a large sub-nuclear structure resembling the nucleolar precursor body (NPB) of oocytes and early embryos. These somatic NPBs contain rRNA synthesis and processing factors but do not associate with the rRNA gene loci (NORs).

  13. Whole transcriptome profiling of maize during early somatic embryogenesis reveals altered expression of stress factors and embryogenesis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Stella A G D; Hirsch, Candice N; Buell, C Robin; Kaeppler, Shawn M; Kaeppler, Heidi F

    2014-01-01

    Embryogenic tissue culture systems are utilized in propagation and genetic engineering of crop plants, but applications are limited by genotype-dependent culture response. To date, few genes necessary for embryogenic callus formation have been identified or characterized. The goal of this research was to enhance our understanding of gene expression during maize embryogenic tissue culture initiation. In this study, we highlight the expression of candidate genes that have been previously regarded in the literature as having important roles in somatic embryogenesis. We utilized RNA based sequencing (RNA-seq) to characterize the transcriptome of immature embryo explants of the highly embryogenic and regenerable maize genotype A188 at 0, 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours after placement of explants on tissue culture initiation medium. Genes annotated as functioning in stress response, such as glutathione-S-transferases and germin-like proteins, and genes involved with hormone transport, such as PINFORMED, increased in expression over 8-fold in the study. Maize genes with high sequence similarity to genes previously described in the initiation of embryogenic cultures, such as transcription factors BABY BOOM, LEAFY COTYLEDON, and AGAMOUS, and important receptor-like kinases such as SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR LIKE KINASES and CLAVATA, were also expressed in this time course study. By combining results from whole genome transcriptome analysis with an in depth review of key genes that play a role in the onset of embryogenesis, we propose a model of coordinated expression of somatic embryogenesis-related genes, providing an improved understanding of genomic factors involved in the early steps of embryogenic culture initiation in maize and other plant species.

  14. Local sequence assembly reveals a high-resolution profile of somatic structural variations in 97 cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jiali; Weng, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Genomic structural variations (SVs) are pervasive in many types of cancers. Characterizing their underlying mechanisms and potential molecular consequences is crucial for understanding the basic biology of tumorigenesis. Here, we engineered a local assembly-based algorithm (laSV) that detects SVs with high accuracy from paired-end high-throughput genomic sequencing data and pinpoints their breakpoints at single base-pair resolution. By applying laSV to 97 tumor-normal paired genomic sequencing datasets across six cancer types produced by The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, we discovered that non-allelic homologous recombination is the primary mechanism for generating somatic SVs in acute myeloid leukemia. This finding contrasts with results for the other five types of solid tumors, in which non-homologous end joining and microhomology end joining are the predominant mechanisms. We also found that the genes recursively mutated by single nucleotide alterations differed from the genes recursively mutated by SVs, suggesting that these two types of genetic alterations play different roles during cancer progression. We further characterized how the gene structures of the oncogene JAK1 and the tumor suppressors KDM6A and RB1 are affected by somatic SVs and discussed the potential functional implications of intergenic SVs. PMID:26283183

  15. Germline variable region gene segment derivation of human monoclonal anti-Rh(D) antibodies. Evidence for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation and repertoire shift.

    PubMed Central

    Bye, J M; Carter, C; Cui, Y; Gorick, B D; Songsivilai, S; Winter, G; Hughes-Jones, N C; Marks, J D

    1992-01-01

    To date, there has been no systematic study of the process of affinity maturation of human antibodies. We therefore sequenced the variable region genes (V genes) of 14 human monoclonal antibodies specific for the erythrocyte Rh(D) alloantigen and determined the germline gene segments of origin and extent of somatic hypermutation. These data were correlated with determinations of antibody affinity. The four IgM antibodies (low affinity) appear to be derived from two germline heavy chain variable region gene segments and one or two germline light chain variable region gene segments and were not extensively mutated. The 10 IgG antibodies (higher affinity) appear to be derived from somatic hypermutation of these V gene segments and by use of new V gene segments or V gene segment combinations (repertoire shift). Affinity generally increased with increasing somatic hypermutation; on average, there were 8.9 point mutations in the V gene segments of the four IgM antibodies (Ka = 1-4 x 10(7)/M-1) compared with 19 point mutations in the V gene segments of the 10 IgG antibodies. The four highest affinity antibodies (Ka = 0.9-3 x 10(9)/M-1) averaged 25.5 point mutations. The use of repertoire shift and somatic hypermutation in affinity maturation of human alloantibodies is similar to data obtained in inbred mice immunized with haptens. PMID:1469099

  16. Single-Molecule Imaging of Nav1.6 on the Surface of Hippocampal Neurons Reveals Somatic Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Akin, Elizabeth J; Solé, Laura; Johnson, Ben; Beheiry, Mohamed El; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2016-09-20

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are responsible for the depolarizing phase of the action potential in most nerve cells, and Nav channel localization to the axon initial segment is vital to action potential initiation. Nav channels in the soma play a role in the transfer of axonal output information to the rest of the neuron and in synaptic plasticity, although little is known about Nav channel localization and dynamics within this neuronal compartment. This study uses single-particle tracking and photoactivation localization microscopy to analyze cell-surface Nav1.6 within the soma of cultured hippocampal neurons. Mean-square displacement analysis of individual trajectories indicated that half of the somatic Nav1.6 channels localized to stable nanoclusters ∼230 nm in diameter. Strikingly, these domains were stabilized at specific sites on the cell membrane for >30 min, notably via an ankyrin-independent mechanism, indicating that the means by which Nav1.6 nanoclusters are maintained in the soma is biologically different from axonal localization. Nonclustered Nav1.6 channels showed anomalous diffusion, as determined by mean-square-displacement analysis. High-density single-particle tracking of Nav channels labeled with photoactivatable fluorophores in combination with Bayesian inference analysis was employed to characterize the surface nanoclusters. A subpopulation of mobile Nav1.6 was observed to be transiently trapped in the nanoclusters. Somatic Nav1.6 nanoclusters represent a new, to our knowledge, type of Nav channel localization, and are hypothesized to be sites of localized channel regulation. PMID:27653482

  17. Regional characterization of a hamster-sheep somatic cell hybrid panel.

    PubMed

    Tabet-Aoul, K; Schibler, L; Vaiman, D; Oustry-Vaiman, A; Lantier, I; Saidi-Mehtar, N; Cribiu, E P; Lantier, F

    2000-01-01

    The regional characterization of a previously obtained hamster-sheep hybrid panel is reported. Using data available from ruminant maps (sheep, cattle, and goat), we have selected a set of 300 markers and have analyzed them by PCR in this hybrid panel. Results obtained for 204 markers show the presence of all sheep chromosomes (including gonosomes) in entire or fragmented form. Analysis of syntenies has given 130 types of answer defining segments of variable sizes. This study has led to the regional characterization of this panel and provides comparative data on a set of bovine and caprine markers. With the level of characterization now achieved for this hybrid panel, the regional assignment of new genes or markers to sheep chromosomes can be rapidly obtained. Finally, this panel will help to collect new data for comparative mapping of domestic animals and to highlight the conservation of syntenic groups between closely related species, that is, sheep, cattle, and goat. PMID:10602990

  18. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in Chinese patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Wan, Yanfang; Zou, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been long proposed to drive the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies. Previous investigations have revealed a high frequency of somatic mutations in the D-loop control region of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. However, little is known with regard to whether or not somatic mutations also occur in the coding regions of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. To test this possibility, in the present study we screened somatic mutations over the full-length mitochondrial genome of 31 osteosarcoma tumour tissue samples, and corresponding peripheral blood samples from the same cohort of patients. We detected a sum of 11 somatic mutations in the mtDNA coding regions in our series. Nine of them were missense or frameshift mutations that have the potential to hamper mitochondrial respiratory function. In combination with our earlier observations on the D-loop fragment, 71.0% (22/31) of patients with osteosarcoma carried at least one somatic mtDNA mutation, and a total of 40 somatic mutations were identified. Amongst them, 29 (72.5%) were located in the D-loop region, two (5%) were in the sequences of the tRNA genes, two (5%) were in the mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 6 gene and seven (17.5%) occurred in genes encoding components of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, somatic mtDNA mutation was not closely associated with the clinicopathological characteristics of osteosarcoma. Together, these findings suggest that somatic mutations are highly prevalent events in both coding and non-coding regions of mtDNA in osteosarcoma. Some missense and frameshift mutations are putatively harmful to proper mitochondrial activity and might play vital roles in osteosarcoma carcinogenesis. PMID:23441585

  19. Integrated Analysis of Whole Genome and Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Diverse Transcriptomic Aberrations Driven by Somatic Genomic Changes in Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Furuta, Mayuko; Tanaka, Hiroko; Chiba, Ken-ichi; Boroevich, Keith A.; Abe, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Ueno, Masaki; Gotoh, Kunihito; Ariizumi, Shun-ichi; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Nakano, Kaoru; Sasaki, Aya; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Kitada, Rina; Hayami, Shinya; Shigekawa, Yoshinobu; Marubashi, Shigeru; Yamada, Terumasa; Kubo, Michiaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Aikata, Hiroshi; Arihiro, Koji; Ohdan, Hideki; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamaue, Hiroki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Miyano, Satoru; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies applying high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified several recurrently mutated genes and pathways in multiple cancer genomes. However, transcriptional consequences from these genomic alterations in cancer genome remain unclear. In this study, we performed integrated and comparative analyses of whole genomes and transcriptomes of 22 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and their matched controls. Comparison of whole genome sequence (WGS) and RNA-Seq revealed much evidence that various types of genomic mutations triggered diverse transcriptional changes. Not only splice-site mutations, but also silent mutations in coding regions, deep intronic mutations and structural changes caused splicing aberrations. HBV integrations generated diverse patterns of virus-human fusion transcripts depending on affected gene, such as TERT, CDK15, FN1 and MLL4. Structural variations could drive over-expression of genes such as WNT ligands, with/without creating gene fusions. Furthermore, by taking account of genomic mutations causing transcriptional aberrations, we could improve the sensitivity of deleterious mutation detection in known cancer driver genes (TP53, AXIN1, ARID2, RPS6KA3), and identified recurrent disruptions in putative cancer driver genes such as HNF4A, CPS1, TSC1 and THRAP3 in HCCs. These findings indicate genomic alterations in cancer genome have diverse transcriptomic effects, and integrated analysis of WGS and RNA-Seq can facilitate the interpretation of a large number of genomic alterations detected in cancer genome. PMID:25526364

  20. Comparative analysis of somatic copy-number alterations across different human cancer types reveals two distinct classes of breakpoint hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Li; Ball, Robyn L.; Liang, Xinle; Li, Jianrong; Lin, Zhenguo; Liang, Han

    2012-01-01

    Somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) play a crucial role in the development of human cancer. However, it is not well understood what evolutionary mechanisms contribute to the global patterns of SCNAs in cancer genomes. Taking advantage of data recently available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, we performed a systematic analysis on genome-wide SCNA breakpoint data for eight cancer types. First, we observed a high degree of overall similarity among the SCNA breakpoint landscapes of different cancer types. Then, we compiled 19 genomic features and evaluated their effects on the observed SCNA patterns. We found that evolutionary indel and substitution rates between species (i.e. humans and chimpanzees) consistently show the strongest correlations with breakpoint frequency among all the surveyed features; whereas the effects of some features are quite cancer-type dependent. Focusing on SCNA breakpoint hotspots, we found that cancer-type-specific breakpoint hotspots and common hotspots show distinct patterns. Cancer-type-specific hotspots are enriched with known cancer genes but are poorly predicted from genomic features; whereas common hotspots show the opposite patterns. This contrast suggests that explaining high-frequency SCNAs in cancer may require different evolutionary models: positive selection driven by cancer genes, and non-adaptive evolution related to an intrinsically unstable genomic context. Our results not only present a systematic view of the effects of genetic factors on genome-wide SCNA patterns, but also provide deep insights into the evolutionary process of SCNAs in cancer. PMID:22899649

  1. Collapse of germline piRNAs in the absence of Argonaute3 reveals somatic piRNAs in flies.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjian; Vagin, Vasily V; Lee, Soohyun; Xu, Jia; Ma, Shengmei; Xi, Hualin; Seitz, Hervé; Horwich, Michael D; Syrzycka, Monika; Honda, Barry M; Kittler, Ellen L W; Zapp, Maria L; Klattenhoff, Carla; Schulz, Nadine; Theurkauf, William E; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D

    2009-05-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence transposons in animal germ cells. piRNAs are thought to derive from long transcripts spanning transposon-rich genomic loci and to direct an autoamplification loop in which an antisense piRNA, bound to Aubergine or Piwi protein, triggers production of a sense piRNA bound to the PIWI protein Argonaute3 (Ago3). In turn, the new piRNA is envisioned to produce a second antisense piRNA. Here, we describe strong loss-of-function mutations in ago3, allowing a direct genetic test of this model. We find that Ago3 acts to amplify piRNA pools and to enforce on them an antisense bias, increasing the number of piRNAs that can act to silence transposons. We also detect a second, Ago3-independent piRNA pathway centered on Piwi. Transposons targeted by this second pathway often reside in the flamenco locus, which is expressed in somatic ovarian follicle cells, suggesting a role for piRNAs beyond the germline. PMID:19395009

  2. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  3. The molecular basis of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Storb, U

    1996-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation amplifies the variable region repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. Recent experimental evidence has thrown light on various molecular models of somatic hypermutation. A link between somatic hypermutation and transcription coupled DNA repair is shaping up.

  4. Characterization of a panel of somatic cell hybrids for regional mapping of the mouse X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Avner, P.; Arnaud, D.; Amar, L.; Cambrou, J.; Winking, H.; Russell, L.B.

    1987-08-01

    A panel of five hybrid cell lines containing mouse X chromosomes with various deletions has been obtained by fusing splenocytes from male mice carrying one of a series of reciprocal X-autosome translocations with the azaguanine-resistant Chinese hamster cell line CH3g. These hybrids have been extensively characterized by using the allozymes hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (encoded by the Hprt locus) and ..cap alpha..-galactosidase (Ags) and a series of 11 X-chromosome-specific DNA probes whose localization had been previously established by linkage studies. Such studies have established the genetic breakpoints of the T(X;12)13R1 and T(X;2)14R1 X-autosome translocations on the X chromosome and provided additional information as to the X-chromosome genetic breakpoints of the T(X;16)16H, T(X;4)7R1, and T(X;7)6R1 translocations. The data establish clearly that both the T(X;7)5RI and T(X;12)13R1 X-chromosome breakpoints are proximal to Hprt, the breakpoint of the former being more centromeric, lying as it does in the 9-centimorgan interval between the ornithine transcarbamoylase (Otc) and DXPas7 (M2C) loci. These five hybrid cell lines provide, with the previously characterized EBS4 hybrid cell line, a nested series of seven mapping intervals distributed along the length of the mouse X chromosome. Their characterization not only allows further correlation of the genetic and cytological X-chromosome maps but also should permit the rapid identification of DNA probes specific for particular regions of the mouse X chromosome.

  5. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue. PMID:27152024

  6. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  7. Somatic diversification in the heavy chain variable region genes expressed by human autoantibodies bearing a lupus-associated nephritogenic anti-DNA idiotype

    SciTech Connect

    Demaison, C.; Chastagner, P.; Theze, J.; Zouali, M. )

    1994-01-18

    Monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies bearing a lupus nephritis-associated idiotype were derived from five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genes encoding their heavy (H)-chain variable (V[sub H]) regions were cloned and sequenced. When compared with their closest V[sub h] germ-line gene relatives, these sequences exhibit a number of silent (S) and replacement (R) substitutions. The ratios of R/S mutations were much higher in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the antibodies than in the framework regions. Molecular amplification of genomic V[sub H] genes and Southern hybridization with somatic CDR2-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that the configuration of the V[sub H] genes corresponding to V[sub H] sequences in the nephritogenic antibodies is not present in the patient's own germ-line DNA, implying that the B-cell clones underwent somatic mutation in vivo. These findings, together with the characteristics of the diversity and junctional gene elements utilized to form the antibody, indicate that these autoantibodies have been driven through somatic selection processes reminiscent of those that govern antibody responses triggered by exogenous stimuli.

  8. ISSR and isozyme characterization of androgenetic dihaploids reveals tetrasomic inheritance in tetraploid somatic hybrids between Solanum melongena and Solanum aethiopicum group Gilo.

    PubMed

    Toppino, Laura; Mennella, Giuseppe; Rizza, Fulvia; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Sihachakr, Darasinh; Rotino, Giuseppe L

    2008-01-01

    Gene exchanges between Solanum melongena and its allied relative Solanum aethiopicum are a crucial prerequisite for introgression of useful traits from the allied species into the cultivated eggplant. In order to evaluate the extent of genetic recombination between the 2 species, biochemical and molecular markers were employed. A dihaploid population obtained through anther culture of the corresponding tetraploid somatic hybrids was genetically analyzed. The extent of disomic/tetrasomic inheritance and segregation ratios of 3 isozyme systems and intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were evaluated. The dihaploids, being derived from microspores, allowed for simple, complete, and accurate analyses. The segregation of 280 ISSR markers (110 aethiopicum-specific, 104 melongena-specific, and 66 monomorphic) were evaluated in 71 dihaploids. According to the genetic constitution (simplex/duplex/triplex), almost 64% of the fragments revealed the tetrasomic and/or disomic inheritance. With regard to the assigned species-specific fragments, 68% and 4% were unambiguously the result of tetrasomic and disomic inheritance, respectively. Twenty-four of the 66 monomorphic ISSRs were inherited according to random chromatid segregation. The phenotypes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGDH), and shikimate dehydrogenase (SKDH) were studied in 70 dihaploids and inferences were made about the allelic state of their 5 loci. The isozyme markers segregated in the dihaploids in a distorted manner, their segregations did not fit in with any of the expected segregation ratios. However, tetrasomic inheritance might be suggested for G-6-PDH 2 and SKDH 1 loci. Our results demonstrated that gene exchanges occurred readily in the somatic hybrids between S. melongena and S. aethiopicum gr. Gilo.

  9. Improvement in affinity and HIV-1 neutralization by somatic mutation in the heavy chain first complementarity-determining region of antibodies triggered by HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Torán, J L; Sánchez-Pulido, L; Kremer, L; del Real, G; Valencia, A; Martínez-A, C

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the impact of somatic hypermutation in the framework region 1 (FR1) and complementarity-determining region 1 (CDR1) of three clonally-related heavy chains from the human monovalent antigen-binding fragments Fab S19, S8 and S20 on gp120 binding and HIV-1 neutralization capacity. Nucleotide changes were introduced in the heavy chains to revert single and multiple amino acid residues, and two Fab libraries were constructed with the same light chain to express equivalent amounts of parental and reverted phage Fab. We studied the contribution of each amino acid replacement to antigen binding by calculating the frequency of phage Fab retrieval after competitive library selection on gp120. Whereas mutations in FR1 had no effect on antigen binding, somatic replacements in the CDR1 of the heavy chain (HCDR1) appeared to produce significant changes. In S19 HCDR1, somatic mutation of residue 32 reduced gp120 binding. In Fab S20, the Arg(30) and Asp(31) somatically replaced residues in HCDR1 improved antigen binding. Both of these residues are necessary to increase Fab binding to gp120; reversion of either residue alone results in a decrease in binding. The impact of these two replacements was confirmed by the greater neutralization capacity of S20 compared to the other Fab. Molecular modeling of S20 HCDR1 suggests that Arg(30) and Asp(31) are the main interaction sites for gp120, increasing antibody affinity and promoting the enhanced neutralization ability of S20. These findings are consistent with a gp120-driven process, supporting a role for affinity maturation and intraclonal evolution of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies.

  10. Ultra-fast local-haplotype variant calling using paired-end DNA-sequencing data reveals somatic mosaicism in tumor and normal blood samples

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Subhajit; Gulukota, Kamalakar; Zhu, Yitan; Ober, Carole; Naughton, Katherine; Wentworth-Sheilds, William; Ji, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the existence of somatic mutations in a fraction of somatic cells in a single biological sample. Its importance has mainly been discussed in theory although experimental work has started to emerge linking somatic mosaicism to disease diagnosis. Through novel statistical modeling of paired-end DNA-sequencing data using blood-derived DNA from healthy donors as well as DNA from tumor samples, we present an ultra-fast computational pipeline, LocHap that searches for multiple single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that are scaffolded by the same reads. We refer to scaffolded SNVs as local haplotypes (LH). When an LH exhibits more than two genotypes, we call it a local haplotype variant (LHV). The presence of LHVs is considered evidence of somatic mosaicism because a genetically homogeneous cell population will not harbor LHVs. Applying LocHap to whole-genome and whole-exome sequence data in DNA from normal blood and tumor samples, we find wide-spread LHVs across the genome. Importantly, we find more LHVs in tumor samples than in normal samples, and more in older adults than in younger ones. We confirm the existence of LHVs and somatic mosaicism by validation studies in normal blood samples. LocHap is publicly available at http://www.compgenome.org/lochap. PMID:26420835

  11. Ultra-fast local-haplotype variant calling using paired-end DNA-sequencing data reveals somatic mosaicism in tumor and normal blood samples.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Subhajit; Gulukota, Kamalakar; Zhu, Yitan; Ober, Carole; Naughton, Katherine; Wentworth-Sheilds, William; Ji, Yuan

    2016-02-18

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the existence of somatic mutations in a fraction of somatic cells in a single biological sample. Its importance has mainly been discussed in theory although experimental work has started to emerge linking somatic mosaicism to disease diagnosis. Through novel statistical modeling of paired-end DNA-sequencing data using blood-derived DNA from healthy donors as well as DNA from tumor samples, we present an ultra-fast computational pipeline, LocHap that searches for multiple single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that are scaffolded by the same reads. We refer to scaffolded SNVs as local haplotypes (LH). When an LH exhibits more than two genotypes, we call it a local haplotype variant (LHV). The presence of LHVs is considered evidence of somatic mosaicism because a genetically homogeneous cell population will not harbor LHVs. Applying LocHap to whole-genome and whole-exome sequence data in DNA from normal blood and tumor samples, we find wide-spread LHVs across the genome. Importantly, we find more LHVs in tumor samples than in normal samples, and more in older adults than in younger ones. We confirm the existence of LHVs and somatic mosaicism by validation studies in normal blood samples. LocHap is publicly available at http://www.compgenome.org/lochap. PMID:26420835

  12. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Collins, Andrew R.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals divergent patterns of gene expression during zygotic and somatic embryo maturation of Theobroma cacao L., the chocolate tree

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Theobroma cacao L. is a tropical fruit tree, the seeds of which are used to create chocolate. In vitro somatic embryogenesis (SE) of cacao is a propagation system useful for rapid mass-multiplication to accelerate breeding programs and to provide plants directly to farmers. Two major limitations of cacao SE remain: the efficiency of embryo production is highly genotype dependent and the lack of full cotyledon development results in low embryo to plant conversion rates. With the goal to better understand SE development and to improve the efficiency of SE conversion we examined gene expression differences between zygotic and somatic embryos using a whole genome microarray. Results The expression of 28,752 genes was determined at 4 developmental time points during zygotic embryogenesis (ZE) and 2 time points during cacao somatic embryogenesis (SE). Within the ZE time course, 10,288 differentially expressed genes were enriched for functions related to responses to abiotic and biotic stimulus, metabolic and cellular processes. A comparison ZE and SE expression profiles identified 10,175 differentially expressed genes. Many TF genes, putatively involved in ethylene metabolism and response, were more strongly expressed in SEs as compared to ZEs. Expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, flavonoid biosynthesis and seed storage protein genes were also differentially expressed in the two types of embryos. Conclusions Large numbers of genes were differentially regulated during various stages of both ZE and SE development in cacao. The relatively higher expression of ethylene and flavonoid related genes during SE suggests that the developing tissues may be experiencing high levels of stress during SE maturation caused by the in vitro environment. The expression of genes involved in the synthesis of auxin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and secondary metabolites was higher in SEs relative to ZEs despite lack of lipid and metabolite accumulation

  14. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  15. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  16. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. I. Connection of somatic mutations with repeats. A statistical weighting method].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, V V; Rogozin, I V; Kolchanov, N A

    1989-01-01

    Based on the analysis of a number of immunoglobulin genes' nucleotide sequences, it has been suggested, that somatic mutations emerge by means of imperfect duplexes correction, formed by mispairing of complementary regions of direct and inverted repeats. In the present work provides new data, confirming this mechanism of somatic hypermutagenesis. It has been shown that the presented sample of V- and J-segments of immunoglobulin genes is abundant in nonrandom imperfect direct repeats and complementary palindromes. To prove the connection of somatic mutations with the correction of imperfect duplexes, made up by the regions of these repeats, we have developed the method of statistical weights, permitting us to analyse the samples of mutations and repeats and to reveal the reliability of the connection between them. Using this method we have investigated the collection of 203 nucleotide substitutions in V- and J-segments and have shown a statistically reliable (P less than 10(-4) connection of these mutation positions with imperfect repeats.

  17. Some trends in the somatic development of children and adolescents under iodine-deficiency: materials from the Saratov region.

    PubMed

    Godina, Elena Z; Khomyakova, Irena A; Purundjan, Arsen L; Zadorozhnaya, Ludmila V; Stepanova, Alevtina V

    2005-07-01

    2,106 girls and 2,169 boys from 7 to 17 were investigated in 2002-2004 in three urban settlements of the Saratov region (Povolzhje area): the town of Khvalynsk, population 15,000, with a low level of industrialization; the city of Balakovo, population 220,000, highly industrialized and with a nuclear power station; and the city of Saratov, population around 1,000,000 a regional capital, and also highly industrialized. The whole area, particularly the location of Khvalynsk, is also characterized by iodine deficiency (iodine concentration is 0.78 mkg/kg v. normal values of 5-7 mkg/kg). The program included about 30 anthropometric measurements, evaluation of developmental stages of secondary sexual characteristics, and information on menarcheal age by the status quo method. Information on parental occupation and education, as well as number of children per family was collected by questionnaire. For the analysis all the data were standardized, and further comparisons were made irrespective of age groups. The significance of differences was assessed by one-way ANOVA. For height, weight and chest circumference there are significant differences among the three populations (p < 0.001), with Khvalynsk children being the smallest in body height and weight. However, in chest circumference they are close to or even bigger (girls) than Balakovo children. The children from Khvalynsk are characterized by the lowest values for subcutaneous fat layer, both on the trunk and extremities. For the age of menarche, Khvalynsk girls have the highest values: 13 years 5 months (13.42). In Balakovo and Saratov, the corresponding figures are identical: 13 years 2 months (13.17). Secular changes in Khvalynsk and Saratov children are discussed as compared to the literature.

  18. Somatic mosaicism and disease.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2014-06-16

    The large number of cell divisions required to make a human body inevitably leads to the accumulation of somatic mutations. Such mutations cause individuals to be somatic mosaics. Recent advances in genomic technology now allow measurement of somatic diversity. Initial studies confirmed the expected high levels of somatic mutations within individuals. Going forward, the big questions concern the degree to which those somatic mutations influence disease. Theory predicts that the frequency of mutant cells should vary greatly between individuals. Such somatic mutational variability between individuals could explain much of the diversity in the risk of disease. But how variable is mosaicism between individuals in reality? What is the relation between the fraction of cells carrying a predisposing mutation and the risk of disease? What kinds of heritable somatic change lead to disease besides classical DNA mutations? What molecular processes connect a predisposing somatic change to disease? We know that predisposing somatic mutations strongly influence the onset of cancer. Likewise, neurodegenerative diseases may often begin from somatically mutated cells. If so, both neurodegeneration and cancer may be diseases of later life for which much of the risk may be set by early life somatic mutations.

  19. Diversity of Somatic Coliphages in Coastal Regions with Different Levels of Anthropogenic Activity in São Paulo State, Brazil ▿

    PubMed Central

    Burbano-Rosero, E. M.; Ueda-Ito, M.; Kisielius, J. J.; Nagasse-Sugahara, T. K.; Almeida, B. C.; Souza, C. P.; Markman, C.; Martins, G. G.; Albertini, L.; Rivera, I. N. G.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and genetically diverse viruses on Earth, with complex ecology in both quantitative and qualitative terms. Somatic coliphages (SC) have been reported to be good indicators of fecal pollution in seawater. This study focused on determining the concentration of SC and their diversity by electron microscopy of seawater, plankton, and bivalve samples collected at three coastal regions in São Paulo, Brazil. The SC counts varied from <1 to 3.4 × 103 PFU/100 ml in seawater (73 samples tested), from <1 to 4.7 × 102 PFU/g in plankton (46 samples tested), and from <1 to 2.2 × 101 PFU/g in bivalves (11 samples tested). In seawater samples, a relationship between the thermotolerant coliforms and Escherichia coli and SC was observed at the three regions (P = 0.0001) according to the anthropogenic activities present at each region. However, SC were found in plankton samples from three regions: Baixada Santista (17/20), Canal de São Sebastião (6/14), and Ubatuba (3/12). In seawater samples collected from Baixada Santista, four morphotypes were observed: A1 (4.5%), B1 (50%), C1 (36.4%), and D1 (9.1%). One coliphage, Siphoviridae type T1, had the longest tail: between 939 and 995 nm. In plankton samples, Siphoviridae (65.8%), Podoviridae (15.8%), Microviridae (15.8%), and Myoviridae (2.6%) were found. In bivalves, only the morphotype B1 was observed. These SC were associated with enteric hosts: enterobacteria, E. coli, Proteus, Salmonella, and Yersinia. Baixada Santista is an area containing a high level of fecal pollution compared to those in the Canal de São Sebastião and Ubatuba. This is the first report of coliphage diversity in seawater, plankton, and bivalve samples collected from São Paulo coastal regions. A better characterization of SC diversity in coastal environments will help with the management and evaluation of the microbiological risks for recreation, seafood cultivation, and consumption. PMID:21531842

  20. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  1. Response of the goat mammary gland to infection with Staphylococcus aureus revealed by gene expression profiling in milk somatic and white blood cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background S. aureus is one of the main pathogens responsible for the intra-mammary infection in dairy ruminants. Although much work has been carried out to understand the complex physiological and cellular events that occur in the mammary gland in response to S. aureus, the protective mechanisms are still poorly understood. The objectives of the present study were to investigate gene expression during the early response of the goat mammary gland to an experimental challenge with S. aureus, in order to better understand the local and systemic response and to compare them in two divergent lines of goat selected for high and low milk somatic cell scores. Results No differences in gene expression were found between high and low SCS (Somatic Cells Score) selection lines. Analysing the two groups together, an expression of 300 genes were found to change from T0 before infection, and T4 at 24 hours and T5 at 30 hours following challenge. In blood derived white blood cells 8 genes showed increased expression between T0 and T5 and 1 gene has reduced expression. The genes showing the greatest increase in expression following challenge (5.65 to 3.16 fold change) play an important role in (i) immune and inflammatory response (NFKB1, TNFAIP6, BASP1, IRF1, PLEK, BATF3); (ii) the regulation of innate resistance to pathogens (PTX3); and (iii) the regulation of cell metabolism (CYTH4, SLC2A6, ARG2). The genes with reduced expression (−1.5 to −2.5 fold) included genes involved in (i) lipid metabolism (ABCG2, FASN), (ii) chemokine, cytokine and intracellular signalling (SPPI), and (iii) cell cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix (KRT19). Conclusions Analysis of genes with differential expression following infection showed an inverse relationship between immune response and lipid metabolism in the early response of the mammary gland to the S. aureus challenge. PTX3 showed a large change in expression in both milk and blood, and is therefore a candidate for further studies on

  2. Comparison of identical and functional Igh alleles reveals a nonessential role for Eμ in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubin; Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Feldman, Danielle A; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2010-11-15

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM), coupled with Ag selection, provides a mechanism for generating Abs with high affinity for invading pathogens. Class-switch recombination (CSR) ensures that these Abs attain pathogen-appropriate effector functions. Although the enzyme critical to both processes, activation-induced cytidine deaminase, has been identified, it remains unclear which cis-elements within the Ig loci are responsible for recruiting activation-induced cytidine deaminase and promoting its activity. Studies showed that Ig gene-transcription levels are positively correlated with the frequency of SHM and CSR, making the intronic, transcriptional enhancer Eμ a likely contributor to both processes. Tests of this hypothesis yielded mixed results arising, in part, from the difficulty in studying B cell function in mice devoid of Eμ. In Eμ's absence, V(H) gene assembly is dramatically impaired, arresting B cell development. The current study circumvented this problem by modifying the murine Igh locus through simultaneous insertion of a fully assembled V(H) gene and deletion of Eμ. The behavior of this allele was compared with that of a matched allele carrying the same V(H) gene but with Eμ intact. Although IgH transcription was as great or greater on the Eμ-deficient allele, CSR and SHM were consistently, but modestly, reduced relative to the allele in which Eμ remained intact. We conclude that Eμ contributes to, but is not essential for, these complex processes and that its contribution is not as a transcriptional enhancer but, rather, is at the level of recruitment and/or activation of the SHM/CSR machinery.

  3. Somatic symptom disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder ... history of abuse. SSD is similar to illness anxiety disorder . This is when a person is overly ...

  4. SubClonal Hierarchy Inference from Somatic Mutations: Automatic Reconstruction of Cancer Evolutionary Trees from Multi-region Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Noushin; Beleva-Guthrie, Violeta; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing of tumor samples and the ability to identify somatic mutations at low allelic fractions have opened the way for new approaches to model the evolution of individual cancers. The power and utility of these models is increased when tumor samples from multiple sites are sequenced. Temporal ordering of the samples may provide insight into the etiology of both primary and metastatic lesions and rationalizations for tumor recurrence and therapeutic failures. Additional insights may be provided by temporal ordering of evolving subclones—cellular subpopulations with unique mutational profiles. Current methods for subclone hierarchy inference tightly couple the problem of temporal ordering with that of estimating the fraction of cancer cells harboring each mutation. We present a new framework that includes a rigorous statistical hypothesis test and a collection of tools that make it possible to decouple these problems, which we believe will enable substantial progress in the field of subclone hierarchy inference. The methods presented here can be flexibly combined with methods developed by others addressing either of these problems. We provide tools to interpret hypothesis test results, which inform phylogenetic tree construction, and we introduce the first genetic algorithm designed for this purpose. The utility of our framework is systematically demonstrated in simulations. For most tested combinations of tumor purity, sequencing coverage, and tree complexity, good power (≥ 0.8) can be achieved and Type 1 error is well controlled when at least three tumor samples are available from a patient. Using data from three published multi-region tumor sequencing studies of (murine) small cell lung cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, in which the authors reconstructed subclonal phylogenetic trees by manual expert curation, we show how different configurations of our tools can identify either a single

  5. Extinction of Oct-3/4 gene expression in embryonal carcinoma [times] fibroblast somatic cell hybrids is accompanied by changes in the methylation status, chromatin structure, and transcriptional activity of the Oct-3/4 upstream region

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Shushan, E.; Pikarsky, E.; Klar, A.; Bergman, Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The OCT-3/4 gene provides an excellent model system with which to study the extinction phenomenon in somatic cell hybrids. The molecular mechanism that underlies the extinction of a tissue-specific transcription factor in somatic cell hybrides is evaluated and compared with its down-regulation in retinoic acid treated embryonal carcinoma cells. This study draws a connection between the shutdown of OCT-3/4 expression in retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells and its extinction in hybrid cells. This repression of OCT-3/4 expression is achieved through changes in the methylation status, chromatin structure, and transcriptional activity of the OCT-3/4 upstream regulatory region. 59 refs.

  6. Somatization, Paranoia, and Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxman, Thomas E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Free speech of subjects with somatization and paranoia was analyzed to identify and compare self-concept dimensions reflected in their lexical choices. The somatization disorder group conveyed a sense of negativism, distress, and preoccupation with an uncertain self-identity. The paranoid patients portrayed an artificially positive, grandiose…

  7. Cognitive and somatic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Kearsley, N

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and forty adults (including sports players, recreational exercisers, mediators and sedentary controls) completed three inventories purporting to measure cognitive and somatic aspects of anxiety. These were the Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Questionnaire (CSAQ) devised by Schwartz, Davidson & Goleman (Psychosomatic Medicine, 40, 321-328, 1978), the Worry-Emotionality Scale (WES, Morris, Davis & Hutchens, Journal of Educational Psychology, 73, 541-555, 1981) and the Lehrer-Woolfolk (1982) Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (LWASQ). Factor analysis of the CSAQ and WES identified distinct cognitive and somatic anxiety factors in both inventories. Higher somatic than cognitive ratings were recorded on the CSAQ and WES, while the pattern was reversed on the LWASQ. The CSAQ can tentatively be recommended as a useful measure of these two anxiety components. We were unable to confirm an observation made previously in the literature that practice of meditation is associated with reduced cognitive anxiety, or that exercise is linked with lower somatic anxiety.

  8. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is linked to transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Storb, U

    1996-01-01

    To identify DNA sequences that target the somatic hypermutation process, the immunoglobulin gene promoter located upstream of the variable (V) region was duplicated upstream of the constant (C) region of a kappa transgene. Normally, kappa genes are somatically mutated only in the VJ region, but not in the C region. In B cell hybridomas from mice with this kappa transgene (P5'C), both the VJ region and the C region, but not the region between them, were mutated at similar frequencies, suggesting that the mutation mechanism is related to transcription. The downstream promoter was not occluded by transcripts from the upstream promoter. In fact, the levels of transcripts originating from the two promoters were similar, supporting a mutation model based on initiation of transcripts. Several "hot-spots" of somatic mutation were noted, further demonstrating that this transgene has the hallmarks of somatic mutation of endogenous immunoglobulin genes. A model linking somatic mutation to transcription-coupled DNA repair is proposed.

  9. [Somatic hypermutagenesis in immunoglobulin genes. II. Properties of somatic mutations and clonal selection].

    PubMed

    Rogozin, I B; Solov'ev, V V

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the collection of 203 somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes was carried out. It was shown, that the high frequency of these mutations in CDRs of V-genes may be connected with the high concentration of repeats in these regions. In addition, the observed clusterization of mutations may emerge from simultaneous correction of several pertubations of complementarity in the heteroduplex, formed by the repeat regions. It was revealed, that somatic mutations in FRs are characterized by reliably smaller changes of some important amino acid physical-chemical properties than in CDRs. These data obviously indicate the occurrence of B-lymphocytes clonal selection. Analysis of synonymous substitutions has shown, that stabilizing selection seems to provide the conservatism of FRs (it leads to the conservation of the protein three-dimensional structure) and movement selection may provide the proliferation of B-lymphocytes with considerable changes in CDRs, if these mutations improve antigens binding. Preferential fixation of transitions in comparison with transversions, particularly expressed in FRs, may also be connected with the fact, that transitions lead to smaller changes of amino acid physical-chemical properties and they are rejected by selection to a smaller extent.

  10. Somatization and conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Trevor A

    2004-03-01

    Somatization is the psychological mechanism whereby psychological distress is expressed in the form of physical symptoms. The psychological distress in somatization is most commonly caused by a mood disorder that threatens mental stability. Conversion disorder occurs when the somatic presentation involves any aspect of the central nervous system over which voluntary control is exercised. Conversion reactions represent fixed ideas about neurologic malfunction that are consciously enacted, resulting in psychogenic neurologic deficits. Treatment is complex and lengthy; it includes recovery of neurologic function aided by narcoanalysis and identification and treatment of the primary psychiatric disorder, usually a mood disorder. PMID:15101499

  11. The human blood DNA methylome displays a highly distinctive profile compared with other somatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Robert; Slodkowicz, Greg; Goldman, Nick; Rakyan, Vardhman K

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, DNA methylation profiles vary substantially between tissues. Recent genome-scale studies report that blood displays a highly distinctive methylomic profile from other somatic tissues. In this study, we sought to understand why blood DNA methylation state is so different to the one found in other tissues. We found that whole blood contains approximately twice as many tissue-specific differentially methylated positions (tDMPs) than any other somatic tissue examined. Furthermore, a large subset of blood tDMPs showed much lower levels of methylation than tDMPs for other tissues. Surprisingly, these regions of low methylation in blood show no difference regarding genomic location, genomic content, evolutionary rates, or histone marks when compared to other tDMPs. Our results reveal why blood displays a distinctive methylation profile relative to other somatic tissues. In the future, it will be important to study how these blood specific tDMPs are mechanistically involved in blood-specific functions.

  12. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianming; Zhao, Zhiyong; Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants' Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  13. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall’s coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants’ Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  14. Risk factors for bulk milk somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts in smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, G; Green, L E; Guzmán, D; Esparza, H; Tadich, N

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the principal management factors that influenced bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) of smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile. One hundred and fifty smallholder milk producers were selected randomly from 42 milk collection centres (MCCs). In April and May of 2002, all farms were visited and a detailed interview questionnaire on dairy-cow management related to milk quality was conducted. In addition, the BMSCC and TBC results from the previous 2 months' fortnightly tests were obtained from the MCCs. The mean BMSCC and TBC were used as the dependent variables in the analyses and were normalised by a natural-logarithm transformation (LN). All independent management variables were categorised into binary outcomes and present (=1) was compared with absent (=0). Biserial correlations were calculated between the LNBMSCC or LNTBC and the management factors of the smallholder farms. Management factors with correlations with P0.05) factors. A random MCC effect was included in the models to investigate the importance of clustering of herds within MCC. In the null model for mean LNTBC, the random effect of MCCs was highly significant. It was explained by: milk collected once a day or less compared with collection twice a day, not cleaning the bucket after milking mastitic cows versus cleaning the bucket and cooling milk in a vat of water versus not cooling milk or using ice or a bulk tank to cool milk. Other factors that increased the LNTBC were a waiting yard with a soil or gravel floor versus concrete, use of plastic buckets for milking instead of metal, not feeding California mastitis test (CMT)-positive milk to calves and cows of dual-purpose breed. The final model explained 35% of the variance. The model predicted that a herd that complied with all the management practices had a mean

  15. Repression of somatic cell fate in the germline.

    PubMed

    Robert, Valérie J; Garvis, Steve; Palladino, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Germ cells must transmit genetic information across generations, and produce gametes while also maintaining the potential to form all cell types after fertilization. Preventing the activation of somatic programs is, therefore, crucial to the maintenance of germ cell identity. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mouse have revealed both similarities and differences in how somatic gene expression is repressed in germ cells, thereby preventing their conversion into somatic tissues. This review will focus on recent developments in our understanding of how global or gene-specific transcriptional repression, chromatin regulation, and translational repression operate in the germline to maintain germ cell identity and repress somatic differentiation programs. PMID:26043973

  16. Shusterman on Somatic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2010-01-01

    Richard Shusterman's "Body Consciousness" aims at formulating a theory of somaesthetics and somatic experience. There has indeed been a growing interest in the role of the body in experience. Shusterman examines the arguments of six important writers who have been influential in this discussion. The emphasis on the body is natural for a…

  17. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery.

  18. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  19. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed.

  20. Somatic reduction in cycads.

    PubMed

    Storey, W B

    1968-02-01

    Recurrent somatic reduction is a normal ontogenetic process in apogeotropic roots of cycads, which develop into dichotomously branching coralloid masses. The reduced cells make up part of a ring of differentiated cortical tissue lying midway between the pericycle and the epidermis; they serve as fillers among the large cells and become charged with slime. The differentiated tissue is colonized by a species of blue-green algae.

  1. Systems-based analyses of brain regions functionally impacted in Parkinson's disease reveals underlying causal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brigit E; Gardai, Shyra J; Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E; Schüle, Birgitt; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M; Langston, J William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression.

  2. Systems-Based Analyses of Brain Regions Functionally Impacted in Parkinson's Disease Reveals Underlying Causal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E.; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M.; Langston, J. William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:25170892

  3. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  4. Structure and Evolution of the Lunar Procellarum Region as Revealed by GRAIL Gravity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Besserer, Jonathan; Head, James W., III; Howett, Carly J. A.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Lucey, Paul J.; McGovern, Patrick J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Neumann, Gregory A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Schenk, Paul M.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    The Procellarum region is a broad area on the nearside of the Moon that is characterized by low elevations, thin crust, and high surface concentrations of the heat-producing elements uranium, thorium, and potassium. The Procellarum region has been interpreted as an ancient impact basin approximately 3200 km in diameter, though supporting evidence at the surface would have been largely obscured as a result of the great antiquity and poor preservation of any diagnostic features. Here we use data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to examine the subsurface structure of Procellarum. The Bouguer gravity anomalies and gravity gradients reveal a pattern of narrow linear anomalies that border the Procellarum region and are interpreted to be the frozen remnants of lava-filled rifts and the underlying feeder dikes that served as the magma plumbing system for much of the nearside mare volcanism. The discontinuous surface structures that were earlier interpreted as remnants of an impact basin rim are shown in GRAIL data to be a part of this continuous set of quasi-rectangular border structures with angular intersections, contrary to the expected circular or elliptical shape of an impact basin. The spatial pattern of magmatic-tectonic structures bounding Procellarum is consistent with their formation in response to thermal stresses produced by the differential cooling of the province relative to its surroundings, coupled with magmatic activity driven by the elevated heat flux in the region.

  5. Somatic responses in behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M; Wirick, Aaron; Holben, Heather

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, skin conductance responses (SCRs) were measured postdecision and prefeedback in a go/no-go (GNG) task in which participants used response feedback to learn when to respond or not to respond to numeric stimuli. Like somatic markers in gambling tasks and somatic reactions to error monitoring in choice reaction time tasks, SCR patterns distinguished between correct and incorrect trials over time. These somatic reactions were disrupted by a reversal of GNG contingencies, and they were facilitated by pretraining of the stimulus-response mappings. In all cases, however, the somatic reactions appeared to be a product of competent decision making rather than a contributor to performance. Differential somatic responses to good and bad choices appear to be a robust and fairly general phenomenon, but researchers should be cautious in assuming that the somatic responses contribute to performance.

  6. An efficient in vitro system for somatic embryogenesis and podophyllotoxin production in Podophyllum hexandrum Royle.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Manoharan; Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Jeyaraj, Murugaraj; Chackravarthy, Rajan; Manickavasagam, Markandan; Selvaraj, N; Ganapathi, Andy

    2014-09-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle known as Indian mayapple is an important medicinal plant found only in higher altitudes (2,700 to 4,200 m) of the Himalayas. The highly valued anticancer drug Podophyllotoxin is obtained from the roots of this plant. Due to over exploitation, this endemic plant species is on the verge of extinction. In vitro culture for efficient regeneration and the production of podophyllotoxin is an important research priority for this plant. Hence, in the present study, an efficient plant regeneration system for mass multiplication through somatic embryogenesis was developed. We have screened P. hexandrum seeds collected from three different regions in the Himalayas to find their regenerative potentials. These variants showed variation in germination percentage as well as somatic embryogenic frequency. The seeds collected from the Milam area of Pithoragarh district showed better germination response (99.3%) on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium fortified with Gibberellic acid (GA3 [5 mg/l]) and higher direct somatic embryogenic frequency (89.6%). Maximum production of embryogenic callus (1.2 g fresh weight [FW]) was obtained when cotyledons containing the direct somatic embryo clusters were cultured in MS medium supplemented with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D [1.5 mg/l]) after 4 week of culture in complete darkness. In the present investigation, somatic embryogenesis was accomplished either by direct organogenesis or callus mediated pathways. The latter method resulted in a higher frequency of somatic embryo induction in hormone-free MS medium yielding 47.7 embryos/50 mg of embryogenic callus and subsequent germination in MS medium supplemented with GA3 (5 mg/l). Seventy-nine percent of embryos attained complete maturity and germinated into normal plants with well-developed roots. Systematic histological analysis revealed the origin of somatic embryo and their ontogenesis. The higher level of podophyllotoxin (1.8 mg/g dry weight [DW]) was

  7. The Neurospora crassa carotenoid biosynthetic gene (albino 3) reveals highly conserved regions among prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, A; Romano, N; Ballario, P; Morelli, G; Macino, G

    1991-03-25

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa the biosynthesis of carotenoids is regulated by blue light. Here we report the characterization of the albino-3 (al-3) gene of N. crassa, which encodes the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase. This is the first geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase gene isolated. Nucleotide sequence comparison of al-3 genomic and cDNA clones revealed that the al-3 gene is not interrupted by introns. Transcription of the al-3 gene has been examined in dark-grown and light-induced mycelia. The analysis revealed that the al-3 gene is not expressed in the dark and that its transcription is induced by blue light (Nelson, M. A., Morelli, G., Carattoli, A., Romano, N., and Macino, G. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1271-1276). The al-3 gene encodes a polypeptide of 428 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of al-3 with the sequences of prenyltransferases of other species, from bacteria to humans, showed three highly conserved homologous regions. These homologous regions may be involved in the formation of the catalytic site of the prenyltransferases.

  8. Revealing spectacular, young and sequential star forming regions of the Trifid Nebula with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2004-12-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of a young HII region, the Trifid Nebula (M20), reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, with recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stars illuminating the surrounding molecular clouds from which they formed and unveiling large scale filamentary dark clouds, which demonstrate a special evolutionary stage of HII regions. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Infrared emission is detected from the central O star complex, including the protoplanetary disks. Large populations of young stars including three dozen protostars (Classes I and 0) and over one hundred Class II pre-main sequence stars, are identified. The protostars are clustered along the filamentary dark lanes on western side of M20, which include the reflection nebula in the northern portion of the Trifid. Class II stars are distributed along the ionization front at the circular shape of HII regions. We suggest that the distribution of the protostars revealed by Spitzer is a result of sequential star formation triggered by the expansion of the young HII region of the Trifid Nebula along the filamentary dark clouds, where the massive stars tend to form in groups. The Spitzer images revealed clusters of protostars within the Class 0 objects, which were previously believed to be "starless" cores. These Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, now uncover the Class 0 protostars in infrared that are powering the SiO and CO outflows. Clusters of protostars are also detected from each of the continuum peaks TC3 and TC4, and some of these sources feature silicate absorption lines in their spectral energy distribution. The driving infrared source of a SiO outflow and submillimeter core TC1, near the exciting O star, is detected within a heated, infrared shell surrounding a dark, cold envelope. Lastly, the images also unveil three infrared sources lying along axis of the photoionized jet HH399 and

  9. Endemic goitre in Sarawak, Malaysia: I. Somatic growth and aetiology.

    PubMed

    Maberly, G F; Eastman, C J

    1976-09-01

    A comparative epidemiological and anthropometric survey was conducted among Ibans, the largest indigenous ethnic group in Sarawak, in three regions where the endemicity of goitre exhibited marked differences , to assess the effect of endemic goitre on somatic growth. In the Ai river region the prevalence of goitre was 99.5%; 35% having grade 3 goitres, 55% grade 2 goitres and 9.5% grade 1 goitres. At Rubu the prevalence of endemic goitre was 74%; 3% having grade 3 goitre, 16% grade 2 goitre and 55% grade 1 goitre. In the Bajong region relatively few people were detected with goitre and most of these had migrated from other regions. Neurological cretinism was estimated at 3.6% in the severely goitrous Ai river population but was not detected in the other regions. Anthropometric data obtained from the three adult populations did not reveal any statistically significant differences in the following parameters: weight, height, weight/height ratio, height/sitting height ratios, head circumference, scapular skinfold thickness and left mid arm muscle circumference. The haemoglobin, serum total protein and serum albumin concentrations were similar in the three populations. It is concluded that endemic goitre occurs with a frequency of close to 100% in certain Iban populations which represents one of the highest incidences of endemic goitre in the world. Neurological cretinism is common in this population. Our observations suggest that body proportions and somatic growth do not vary among similar ethnic populations exhibiting greatly different endemicity of goitre. Although no iodine balance studies were performed, assessment of diets suggested that iodine deficiency is a significant contributory factor in the development of endemic goitre in Sarawak. Urgent attention to iodine supplementation is indicated to prevent the development of endemic goitre and neurological cretinism. PMID:1030847

  10. Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Besserer, Jonathan; Head, James W., III; Howett, Carly J. A.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Lucey, Paul J.; McGovern, Patrick J.; Melosh, H. Jay; Neumann, Gregory A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Schenk, Paul M.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2014-10-01

    The Procellarum region is a broad area on the nearside of the Moon that is characterized by low elevations, thin crust, and high surface concentrations of the heat-producing elements uranium, thorium, and potassium. The region has been interpreted as an ancient impact basin approximately 3,200 kilometres in diameter, although supporting evidence at the surface would have been largely obscured as a result of the great antiquity and poor preservation of any diagnostic features. Here we use data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to examine the subsurface structure of Procellarum. The Bouguer gravity anomalies and gravity gradients reveal a pattern of narrow linear anomalies that border Procellarum and are interpreted to be the frozen remnants of lava-filled rifts and the underlying feeder dykes that served as the magma plumbing system for much of the nearside mare volcanism. The discontinuous surface structures that were earlier interpreted as remnants of an impact basin rim are shown in GRAIL data to be a part of this continuous set of border structures in a quasi-rectangular pattern with angular intersections, contrary to the expected circular or elliptical shape of an impact basin. The spatial pattern of magmatic-tectonic structures bounding Procellarum is consistent with their formation in response to thermal stresses produced by the differential cooling of the province relative to its surroundings, coupled with magmatic activity driven by the greater-than-average heat flux in the region.

  11. Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C; Besserer, Jonathan; Head, James W; Howett, Carly J A; Kiefer, Walter S; Lucey, Paul J; McGovern, Patrick J; Melosh, H Jay; Neumann, Gregory A; Phillips, Roger J; Schenk, Paul M; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Zuber, Maria T

    2014-10-01

    The Procellarum region is a broad area on the nearside of the Moon that is characterized by low elevations, thin crust, and high surface concentrations of the heat-producing elements uranium, thorium, and potassium. The region has been interpreted as an ancient impact basin approximately 3,200 kilometres in diameter, although supporting evidence at the surface would have been largely obscured as a result of the great antiquity and poor preservation of any diagnostic features. Here we use data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to examine the subsurface structure of Procellarum. The Bouguer gravity anomalies and gravity gradients reveal a pattern of narrow linear anomalies that border Procellarum and are interpreted to be the frozen remnants of lava-filled rifts and the underlying feeder dykes that served as the magma plumbing system for much of the nearside mare volcanism. The discontinuous surface structures that were earlier interpreted as remnants of an impact basin rim are shown in GRAIL data to be a part of this continuous set of border structures in a quasi-rectangular pattern with angular intersections, contrary to the expected circular or elliptical shape of an impact basin. The spatial pattern of magmatic-tectonic structures bounding Procellarum is consistent with their formation in response to thermal stresses produced by the differential cooling of the province relative to its surroundings, coupled with magmatic activity driven by the greater-than-average heat flux in the region.

  12. Structure and evolution of the lunar Procellarum region as revealed by GRAIL gravity data.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C; Besserer, Jonathan; Head, James W; Howett, Carly J A; Kiefer, Walter S; Lucey, Paul J; McGovern, Patrick J; Melosh, H Jay; Neumann, Gregory A; Phillips, Roger J; Schenk, Paul M; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Zuber, Maria T

    2014-10-01

    The Procellarum region is a broad area on the nearside of the Moon that is characterized by low elevations, thin crust, and high surface concentrations of the heat-producing elements uranium, thorium, and potassium. The region has been interpreted as an ancient impact basin approximately 3,200 kilometres in diameter, although supporting evidence at the surface would have been largely obscured as a result of the great antiquity and poor preservation of any diagnostic features. Here we use data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to examine the subsurface structure of Procellarum. The Bouguer gravity anomalies and gravity gradients reveal a pattern of narrow linear anomalies that border Procellarum and are interpreted to be the frozen remnants of lava-filled rifts and the underlying feeder dykes that served as the magma plumbing system for much of the nearside mare volcanism. The discontinuous surface structures that were earlier interpreted as remnants of an impact basin rim are shown in GRAIL data to be a part of this continuous set of border structures in a quasi-rectangular pattern with angular intersections, contrary to the expected circular or elliptical shape of an impact basin. The spatial pattern of magmatic-tectonic structures bounding Procellarum is consistent with their formation in response to thermal stresses produced by the differential cooling of the province relative to its surroundings, coupled with magmatic activity driven by the greater-than-average heat flux in the region. PMID:25279919

  13. Context Differences Reveal Insulator and Activator Functions of a Su(Hw) Binding Region

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Misty D.; Geyer, Pamela K.

    2008-01-01

    Insulators are DNA elements that divide chromosomes into independent transcriptional domains. The Drosophila genome contains hundreds of binding sites for the Suppressor of Hairy-wing [Su(Hw)] insulator protein, corresponding to locations of the retroviral gypsy insulator and non-gypsy binding regions (BRs). The first non-gypsy BR identified, 1A-2, resides in cytological region 1A. Using a quantitative transgene system, we show that 1A-2 is a composite insulator containing enhancer blocking and facilitator elements. We discovered that 1A-2 separates the yellow (y) gene from a previously unannotated, non-coding RNA gene, named yar for y-achaete (ac) intergenic RNA. The role of 1A-2 was elucidated using homologous recombination to excise these sequences from the natural location, representing the first deletion of any Su(Hw) BR in the genome. Loss of 1A-2 reduced yar RNA accumulation, without affecting mRNA levels from the neighboring y and ac genes. These data indicate that within the 1A region, 1A-2 acts an activator of yar transcription. Taken together, these studies reveal that the properties of 1A-2 are context-dependent, as this element has both insulator and enhancer activities. These findings imply that the function of non-gypsy Su(Hw) BRs depends on the genomic environment, predicting that Su(Hw) BRs represent a diverse collection of genomic regulatory elements. PMID:18704163

  14. Medulloblastoma exome sequencing uncovers subtype-specific somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Trevor J; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Archer, Tenley C; Pomeranz Krummel, Daniel A; Auclair, Daniel; Bochicchio, James; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Erlich, Rachel L; Greulich, Heidi; Lawrence, Michael S; Lennon, Niall J; McKenna, Aaron; Meldrim, James; Ramos, Alex H; Ross, Michael G; Russ, Carsten; Shefler, Erica; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sogoloff, Brian; Stojanov, Petar; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P; Amani, Vladimir; Teider, Natalia; Sengupta, Soma; Francois, Jessica Pierre; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Yu, Furong; Crabtree, Gerald R; Kautzman, Amanda G; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T W; Lichter, Peter; Pfister, Stefan M; Roberts, Thomas M; Meyerson, Matthew; Pomeroy, Scott L; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2012-08-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumours in children. Identifying and understanding the genetic events that drive these tumours is critical for the development of more effective diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Recently, our group and others described distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma on the basis of transcriptional and copy number profiles. Here we use whole-exome hybrid capture and deep sequencing to identify somatic mutations across the coding regions of 92 primary medulloblastoma/normal pairs. Overall, medulloblastomas have low mutation rates consistent with other paediatric tumours, with a median of 0.35 non-silent mutations per megabase. We identified twelve genes mutated at statistically significant frequencies, including previously known mutated genes in medulloblastoma such as CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4 and TP53. Recurrent somatic mutations were newly identified in an RNA helicase gene, DDX3X, often concurrent with CTNNB1 mutations, and in the nuclear co-repressor (N-CoR) complex genes GPS2, BCOR and LDB1. We show that mutant DDX3X potentiates transactivation of a TCF promoter and enhances cell viability in combination with mutant, but not wild-type, β-catenin. Together, our study reveals the alteration of WNT, hedgehog, histone methyltransferase and now N-CoR pathways across medulloblastomas and within specific subtypes of this disease, and nominates the RNA helicase DDX3X as a component of pathogenic β-catenin signalling in medulloblastoma. PMID:22820256

  15. Somatic mosaicism and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-02-01

    For more than 50 years geneticists have assumed that variations in phenotypic expression are caused by alterations in genotype. Recent evidence shows that 'simple' mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained entirely by a gene or allelic alteration. In certain cases of androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene, phenotypic variability is caused by somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur only in certain androgen-sensitive cells. Recently, more than 30 other genetic conditions that exhibit variable expressivity have been linked to somatic mosaicism. Somatic mutations have also been identified in diseases such as prostate and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the concept of somatic mutations and mosaicism is likely to have far reaching consequences for genetics, in particular in areas such as genetic counseling.

  16. Somatic mosaicism and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-02-01

    For more than 50 years geneticists have assumed that variations in phenotypic expression are caused by alterations in genotype. Recent evidence shows that 'simple' mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained entirely by a gene or allelic alteration. In certain cases of androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene, phenotypic variability is caused by somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur only in certain androgen-sensitive cells. Recently, more than 30 other genetic conditions that exhibit variable expressivity have been linked to somatic mosaicism. Somatic mutations have also been identified in diseases such as prostate and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the concept of somatic mutations and mosaicism is likely to have far reaching consequences for genetics, in particular in areas such as genetic counseling. PMID:11173116

  17. Detection of somatic mosaicism in DMD using computer-assisted laser densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.E.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; MacKenzie, J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients have a deletion in the dystrophin gene located at Xp21.1. Two PCR-based multiplex systems have been developed which detect 98% of deletions in affected males. Diagnosis of carrier females requires densitometry of PCR products following gel electrophoresis to calculate dosage of specific exons. We have developed a system in which fluorescently labelled PCR products are analysed using a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyser (ABI). Dosage is determined using computer-assisted laser densitometry (CALD). Recently, we diagnosed somatic mosaicism in the mother of an affected boy using this method. PCR analysis showed that the patient had a deletion that included exons 47-51 of his dystrophin gene. CALD analysis on the patient`s 36-year-old mother revealed a 29-34% reduction in the intensity of the bands corresponding to the deleted region of the gene rather than the 50% reduction normally seen in carrier females. A skin biopsy was obtain and monoclonal fibroblast colonies were tested by CALD for the deletion. Four of the twenty colonies screened were found to be deleted while the remaining colonies had two intact copies of the gene. We conclude that this patient is a somatic mosaic for DMD and that the mutation was the result of a post-zygotic event. This is the only case of somatic mosaicism detected among 800 women from 400 DMD families tested using CALD in our laboratory. At least one other case of possible somatic mosaicism has been reported but not confirmed. Germinal mosaicism is thought to occur in approximately 10% of mothers of sporadic DMD patients. Our findings indicate that somatic mosaicism is a much rarer condition among DMD carriers, thus suggesting that mitotic mutations in the dystrophin gene are more likely to occur later in embryogenesis after differentiation of the germline.

  18. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  19. Lateral and Medial Ventral Occipitotemporal Regions Interact During the Recognition of Images Revealed from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Laar, Teus; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral sections of the ventral visual cortex in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial sections, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, 13 subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM)—a method to characterize network interactions—to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1), the lingual gyrus (LG) in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO). We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape—rather than by a single categorically specialized region—within the ventral visual cortex. PMID:26778997

  20. Small Retinoprotective Peptides Reveal a Receptor-binding Region on Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Kenealey, Jason; Subramanian, Preeti; Comitato, Antonella; Bullock, Jeanee; Keehan, Laura; Polato, Federica; Hoover, David; Marigo, Valeria; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The cytoprotective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) require interactions between an as of a yet undefined region with a distinct ectodomain on the PEDF receptor (PEDF-R). Here we characterized the area in PEDF that interacts with PEDF-R to promote photoreceptor survival. Molecular docking studies suggested that the ligand binding site of PEDF-R interacts with the neurotrophic region of PEDF (44-mer, positions 78–121). Binding assays demonstrated that PEDF-R bound the 44-mer peptide. Moreover, peptide P1 from the PEDF-R ectodomain had affinity for the 44-mer and a shorter fragment within it, 17-mer (positions 98–114). Single residue substitutions to alanine along the 17-mer sequence were designed and tested for binding and biological activity. Altered 17-mer[R99A] did not bind to the P1 peptide, whereas 17-mer[H105A] had higher affinity than the unmodified 17-mer. Peptides 17-mer, 17-mer[H105A], and 44-mer exhibited cytoprotective effects in cultured retina R28 cells. Intravitreal injections of these peptides and PEDF in the rd1 mouse model of retinal degeneration decreased the numbers of dying photoreceptors, 17-mer[H105A] being most effective. The blocking peptide P1 hindered their protective effects both in retina cells and in vivo. Thus, in addition to demonstrating that the region composed of positions 98–114 of PEDF contains critical residues for PEDF-R interaction that mediates survival effects, the findings reveal distinct small PEDF fragments with neurotrophic effects on photoreceptors. PMID:26304116

  1. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    PubMed

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  2. Analysis of plastome and chondriome genome types in potato somatic hybrids from Solanum tuberosum × Solanum etuberosum.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Jagesh K; Chandel, Poonam; Singh, Bir Pal; Bhardwaj, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasm types of the potato somatic hybrids from Solanum tuberosum × Solanum etuberosum were analysed using chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) organelle genomes-specific markers. Of the 29 markers (15 cpDNA and 14 mtDNA) amplified in the 26 genotypes, 5 cpDNA (H3, NTCP4, NTCP8, NTCP9, and ALC1/ALC3) and 13 mtDNA markers showed polymorphism. The cluster analysis based on the mtDNA markers detected higher diversity compared with the cpDNA markers. Presence of new mtDNA fragments of the markers, namely, T11-2, Nsm1, pumD, Nsm3, and Nsm4, were observed, while monomorphic loci revealed highly conserved genomic regions in the somatic hybrids. The study revealed that the somatic hybrids had diverse cytoplasm types consisting predominantly of T-, W-, and C-, with a few A- and S-type cp genomes; and α-, β-, and γ-type mt genomes. Somatic hybridization has unique potential to widen the cytoplasm types of the cultivated gene pools from wild species through introgression by breeding methods.

  3. Use of Combined MSAP and NGS Techniques to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions in Somaclones: A Case Study of Two Stable Somatic Wheat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Baránek, Miroslav; Čechová, Jana; Kovacs, Tamas; Eichmeier, Aleš; Wang, Shunli; Raddová, Jana; Nečas, Tomáš; Ye, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of somaclonal variability induced by in vitro cultivation is relatively frequent and can, in some cases, provide a valuable source of new genetic variation for crop improvement. The cause of this phenomenon remains unknown; however, there are a number of reports suggesting that epigenetics, including DNA methylations, are an important factor. In addition to the non-heritable DNA methylation changes caused by transient and reversible stress-responsive gene regulation, recent evidence supports the existence of mitotically and meiotically inherited changes. The induction of phenotypes via stable DNA methylation changes has occasionally great economical value; however, very little is known about the genetic or molecular basis of these phenotypes. We used a novel approach consisting of a standard MSAP analysis followed by deep amplicon sequencing to better understand this phenomenon. Our models included two wheat genotypes, and their somaclones induced using in vitro cultivation with a changed heritable phenotype (shortened stem height and silenced high molecular weight glutenin). Using this novel procedure, we obtained information on the dissimilarity of DNA methylation landscapes between the standard cultivar and its respective somaclones, and we extracted the sequences and genome regions that were differentially methylated between subjects. Transposable elements were identified as the most likely factor for producing changes in somaclone properties. In summary, the novel approach of combining MSAP and NGS is relatively easy and widely applicable, which is a rather unique feature compared with the currently available techniques in the epigenetics field. PMID:27792769

  4. Landscape of somatic mutations in 560 breast cancer whole-genome sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Nik-Zainal, Serena; Davies, Helen; Staaf, Johan; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Glodzik, Dominik; Zou, Xueqing; Martincorena, Inigo; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Martin, Sancha; Wedge, David C.; et al

    2016-05-02

    Here, we analysed whole-genome sequences of 560 breast cancers to advance understanding of the driver mutations conferring clonal advantage and the mutational processes generating somatic mutations. We found that 93 protein-coding cancer genes carried probable driver mutations. Some non-coding regions exhibited high mutation frequencies, but most have distinctive structural features probably causing elevated mutation rates and do not contain driver mutations. Mutational signature analysis was extended to genome rearrangements and revealed twelve base substitution and six rearrangement signatures. Three rearrangement signatures, characterized by tandem duplications or deletions, appear associated with defective homologous-recombination-based DNA repair: one with deficient BRCA1 function, anothermore » with deficient BRCA1 or BRCA2 function, the cause of the third is unknown. This analysis of all classes of somatic mutation across exons, introns and intergenic regions highlights the repertoire of cancer genes and mutational processes operating, and progresses towards a comprehensive account of the somatic genetic basis of breast cancer.« less

  5. Dombrock genotyping in Brazilian blood donors reveals different regional frequencies of the HY allele

    PubMed Central

    Piassi, Fabiana Chagas Camargos; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; de Castilho, Lilian Maria; Baleotti Júnior, Wilson; Suzuki, Rodrigo Buzinaro; da Cunha, Débora Moura

    2013-01-01

    Background Dombrock blood group system genotyping has revealed various rearrangements of the Dombrock gene and identified new variant alleles in Brazil (i.e., DO*A-SH, DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL). Because of the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population, interregional differences are expected during the investigation of Dombrock genotypes. Objective The present study aims to determine the frequencies of Dombrock genotypes in blood donors from Minas Gerais and compare the frequencies of the HY and JO alleles to those of another population in Brazil. Methods The frequencies of the DO alleles in Minas Gerais, a southeastern state of Brazil, were determined from the genotyping of 270 blood donors. Genotyping involved polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to identify the 323G>T, 350C>T, 793A>G, and 898C>G mutations, which are related to the HY, JO, DO*A/DO*B, and DO*A-WL/DO*B-WL alleles, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of rare HY and JO alleles were statistically compared using the chi-square test with data from another Brazilian region. Results The HY allele frequency in Minas Gerais (2.4%) was almost twice that of the JO allele (1.5%). The frequency of the HY allele was significantly higher (p-value = 0.001) than that in another Brazilian population and includes a rare homozygous donor with the Hy- phenotype. In addition, the DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL alleles, which were first identified in Brazil, were found in the state of Minas Gerais. Conclusions The data confirm that the frequencies of DO alleles differ between regions in Brazil. The population of Minas Gerais could be targeted in a screening strategy to identify the Hy- phenotype in order to develop a rare blood bank. PMID:24478605

  6. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    PubMed

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  7. Malarial EBA-175 region VI crystallographic structure reveals a KIX-like binding interface.

    PubMed

    Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Haire, Lesley F; Hackett, Fiona; Walker, Philip A; Howell, Steven A; Smerdon, Stephen J; Dodson, Guy G; Blackman, Michael J

    2008-01-18

    The malaria parasite proliferates in the bloodstream of its vertebrate host by invading and replicating within erythrocytes. To achieve successful invasion, a number of discrete and essential events need to take place at the parasite-host cell interface. Erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175) is a member of a family of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding proteins involved in the formation of a tight junction, a necessary step in invasion. Here we present the crystal structure of EBA-175 region VI (rVI), a cysteine-rich domain that is highly conserved within the protein family and is essential for EBA-175 trafficking. The structure was solved by selenomethionine single-wavelength anomalous dispersion at 1.8 A resolution. It reveals a homodimer, containing in each subunit a compact five-alpha-helix core that is stabilized by four conserved disulfide bridges. rVI adopts a novel fold that is likely conserved across the protein family, indicating a conserved function. It shows no similarity to the Duffy-binding-like domains of EBA-175 involved in erythrocyte binding, indicating a distinct role. Remarkably, rVI possesses structural features related to the KIX-binding domain of the coactivator CREB-binding protein, supporting the binding and trafficking roles that have been ascribed to it and providing a rational basis for further experimental investigation of its function.

  8. Seismic structure of the southern Apennines as revealed by waveform modelling of regional surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ökeler, Ahmet; Gu, Yu Jeffrey; Lerner-Lam, Arthur; Steckler, Michael S.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the crust and upper-mantle structures beneath the southern Apennine mountain chain using three-component seismograms from the Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction-Collision-Accretion Network (CAT/SCAN) array. Surface wave waveforms from three moderate-sized (Mw > 5.0) regional earthquakes are modelled using multiple frequencies (0.03-0.06 and 0.05-0.2 Hz) and both forward and linearized-inversion algorithms. Our best-fitting shear velocity models clearly reflect the major tectonic units where, for example, the average seismic structure at depths above 50 km beneath Apulia is substantially faster than beneath the Apennine mountain chain. We identify a prominent low-velocity channel under the mountain belt at depths below ~25-30 km and a secondary low-velocity zone at 6-12 km depth near Mt Vulture (a once active volcano). Speed variations between Love and Rayleigh waves provide further constraints on the fabric and dynamic processes. Our analysis indicates that the crustal low-velocity zones are highly anisotropic (maximum 14 per cent) and allow transversely polarized shear waves to travel faster than vertically polarized shear waves. The upper crustal anomaly reveals a layer of highly deformed rocks caused by past collisions and by the active normal faults cutting across the thrust sheets, whereas hot mantle upwelling may be responsible for a high-temperature, partially molten lower crust beneath the southern Apennines.

  9. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean – Adriatic – marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes. PMID:19284692

  10. Rapid regional perturbations to the recent global geomagnetic decay revealed by a new Hawaiian record

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, L. V.; Biggin, A. J.; Dekkers, M. J.; Langereis, C. G.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2013-01-01

    The dominant dipolar component of the Earth’s magnetic field has been steadily weakening for at least the last 170 years. Prior to these direct measurements, archaeomagnetic records show short periods of significantly elevated geomagnetic intensity. These striking phenomena are not captured by current field models and their relationship to the recent dipole decay is highly unclear. Here we apply a novel multi-method archaeomagnetic approach to produce a new high-quality record of geomagnetic intensity variations for Hawaii, a crucial locality in the central Pacific. It reveals a short period of high intensity occurring ~1,000 years ago, qualitatively similar to behaviour observed 200 years earlier in Europe and 500 years later in Mesoamerica. We combine these records with one from Japan to produce a coherent picture that includes the dipole decaying steadily over the last millennium. Strong, regional, short-term intensity perturbations are superimposed on this global trend; their asynchronicity necessitates a highly non-dipolar nature. PMID:24177390

  11. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation.

    PubMed

    Snoj, Ales; Marić, Sasa; Berrebi, Patrick; Crivelli, Alain J; Shumka, Spase; Susnik, Simona

    2009-02-02

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean-Adriatic-marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes.

  12. High temperature garnet growth in New England: regional temperature-time trends revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, N.; Ostwald, C.; Chu, X.; Baxter, E. F.; Ague, J. J.; Eckert, J. O.

    2013-12-01

    A series of localized ultrahigh-temperature (UHT)/high-temperature (HT) granulite facies regions have been identified within the regional amphibolite facies metamorphic zone of the Central Maine Terrane stretching from north-central New Hampshire, through central Massachusetts, and into northeastern Connecticut. Here, we aim to constrain the age and peak temperature of metamorphism at three localities within this region: Bristol, NH, Phillipston, MA and Willington, CT. Garnet-forming reactions are linked directly to peak metamorphic temperatures through thermodynamic modeling and/or Zr-in-rutile thermometry. Precise garnet geochronology allows us to identify the timing of these peak temperatures, as well as the duration of garnet growth. Geochronologic and thermodynamic work was done on 12 samples collected throughout a ~5 km2 metamorphic 'hotspot' previously identified in Bristol, NH (Chamberlain and Rumble, 1988; Journal of Petrology). The highest temperature assemblage within this hotspot is characterized by the presence of garnet + sillimanite + K-feldspar + cordierite and reached temperatures >820οC. The lowest temperature periphery of the hotspot is characterized by sillimanite + muscovite + K-feldspar + minor garnet and reached a maximum temperature of 650οC. Bulk garnet ages from samples within the hotspot range significantly from at least 400.0 × 2.5 Ma to 352.7 × 1.8 Ma with the youngest ages associated with the lower temperature samples. This collection of ages indicates a prolonged period (~50 Ma) of >650οC temperatures interspersed by period(s) of garnet growth. Zoned garnet geochronology will help reveal whether garnet growth and related heating was continuous or episodic. Further south, in Phillipston, MA, zoned garnet geochronology performed on a 2.5 cm diameter garnet porphyroblast indicates garnet growth spanning 389 - 363 Ma, reaching peak temperatures at the end of that time span of 920-940οC, followed by a younger event recorded in

  13. Interpersonal psychotherapy for somatizing patients.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Scott; Noyes, Russell

    2006-01-01

    The interpersonal model is important for understanding somatizing behavior. According to this model, somatizing behavior is a form of interpersonal communication driven by insecure attachment. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited, manual-based treatment designed to relieve symptoms and improve interpersonal functioning. Based on our experience using IPT with somatizing patients, we recommend a series of strategies for its successful implementation. These strategies include an emphasis on the therapeutic alliance within a bilaterally negotiated treatment contract, and aiming for improvement in interpersonal functioning rather than for alleviation of physical symptoms. Specific techniques include the use of bridging metaphors, communication analysis, and genuine positive reinforcement. With a focus on communication in a time-limited frame, fostered by a strong collaborative relationship, IPT appears to be a promising method of reducing somatizing behavior. We urge further research on the efficacy of this form of therapy. PMID:16785770

  14. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03-0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem.

  15. From Somatic Cells to Oocytes: A Novel Yolk Protein Produced by Ovarian Somatic Cells in a Stony Coral, Euphyllia ancora.

    PubMed

    Shikina, Shinya; Chiu, Yi-Ling; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2015-09-01

    To gain a better understanding of how corals form their eggs at both the molecular and cellular levels, we performed a differential screen (suppression subtractive hybridization) to identify genes related to oocyte development in a stony coral, Euphyllia ancora. Through the course of screening, a novel gene that contains three alternate repeats of fibronectin domain 2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains, as well as an additional calcium-binding EGF-like domain (EGF-CA), was identified and tentatively named euphy after the scientific name of the coral, E. ancora. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression levels of euphy increased in female colonies as the coral approached reproductive season. Tissue distribution analysis followed by mRNA in situ hybridization revealed that euphy is highly expressed in the ovarian (mesenterial) somatic cells in the body of E. ancora. Staining of tissue sections with an antibody against euphy protein (Euphy) revealed Euphy immunoreactivity in both ovarian somatic cells and oocytes. Subsequent Western blotting demonstrated the presence of abundant Euphy in unfertilized mature eggs. These results indicate that Euphy produced in the ovarian somatic cells is transported to and accumulates within oocytes as a yolk protein during oogenesis. We previously showed that two major yolk proteins, vitellogenin and egg protein, are similarly produced by ovarian somatic cells. Hence, the present study uncovered the third ovarian somatic-derived yolk protein in corals. Our data provide new information that contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of coral egg formation.

  16. Temporal Regulation of Somatic Embryogenesis by Adjusting Cellular Polyamine Content in Eggplant1

    PubMed Central

    Singh Yadav, Jitender; Venkat Rajam, Manchikatla

    1998-01-01

    Four critical stages of embryogenesis, including callus induction, cellular acquisition of morphogenetic competence, expression of embryogenic program, and development and maturation of somatic embryos during somatic embryogenesis from leaf discs of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Temporal changes in arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity and polyamines (PAs) during critical stages of embryogenesis revealed that high levels of PAs (especially putrescine [PUT]), due to higher ADC activity in discs from the apical region (with high embryogenic capacity) than from the basal region of the leaf (with poor embryogenic capacity), were correlated with differential embryogenesis response. Kinetic studies of the up- and down-regulation of embryogenesis revealed that PUT and difluoromethylarginine pretreatments were most effective before the onset of embryogenesis. Basal discs pretreated with PUT for 4 to 7 d showed improved embryogenesis that was comparable to apical discs. PA content at various critical steps in embryogenesis from basal discs were found to be comparable to that of apical discs following adjustments of cellular PA content by PUT. In contrast, pretreatment of apical discs with difluoromethylarginine for 3 d significantly reduced ADC activity, cellular PA content, and embryogenesis to levels that were comparable to basal discs. Discs from the basal region of leaves treated with PUT for 3 d during the identified stages of embryogenesis improved their embryogenic potential. PMID:9490762

  17. Pacific slab beneath northeast China revealed by regional and teleseismic waveform modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, X.; Chen, Q. F.; Wei, S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate velocity and geometry of the slab is essential for better understanding of the thermal, chemical structure of the mantle earth, as well as geodynamics. Recent tomography studies show similar morphology of the subducting Pacific slab beneath northeast China, which was stagnant in the mantle transition zone with thickness of more than 200km and an average velocity perturbation of ~1.5% [Fukao and Obayashi, 2013]. Meanwhile, waveform-modeling studies reveal that the Pacific slab beneath Japan and Kuril Island has velocity perturbation up to 5% and thickness up to 90km [Chen et al., 2007; Zhan et al., 2014]. These discrepancies are probably caused by the smoothing and limited data coverage in the tomographic inversions. Here we adopted 1D and 2D waveform modeling methods to study the fine structure of Pacific slab beneath northeast China using dense regional permanent and temporary broadband seismic records. The residual S- and P-wave travel time, difference between data and 1D synthetics, shows significant difference between the eastern and western stations. S-wave travel time residuals indicate 5-10s earlier arrivals for stations whose ray path lies within the slab, compared with those out of the slab. Teleseimic waveforms were used to rule out the major contribution of the possible low velocity structure above 200km. Furthermore, we use 2D finite-difference waveform modeling to confirm the velocity perturbation and geometry of the slab. Our result shows that the velocity perturbation in the slab is significantly higher than those reported in travel-time tomography studies. ReferencesChen, M., J. Tromp, D. Helmberger, and H. Kanamori (2007), Waveform modeling of the slab beneath Japan, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 112(B2), 19, doi:10.1029/2006jb004394.Fukao, Y., and M. Obayashi (2013), Subducted slabs stagnant above, penetrating through, and trapped below the 660 km discontinuity, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 118(11), 5920-5938, doi:10.1002/2013jb010466

  18. Interglacial Surface Ocean Temperatures Reveal Strong Ocean-Atmosphere Linkages Between the Subtropical and Subpolar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiano, E.; Bauch, H. A.; Fahl, K.; Helmke, J.; Roehl, U.

    2008-12-01

    Investigating ocean-atmospheric processes of past interglaciations may provide a better understanding of the climatic development of the present warm period. Here we present a detailed reconstruction of the meridional sea surface temperature (SST) across MIS 11 using three sites: ODP 958 (off NW Africa), ODP 975 (western Mediterranean Sea) and M23414 (subpolar NE Atlantic). Sea surface temperatures (SST) were derived from foraminiferal assemblages and alkenones, further supported by planktic and benthic O-isotope records as well as by iron content, the latter as indicator for Saharan dust export and continental dryness. On a large scale, reconstructed SSTs reveal a close synchronism of environmental changes between all three sites. It shows that, before full interglacial conditions became established, there was a long-lasting, glacial- interglacial transition with a total temperature increase of about 10°C in the subtropical as well as in the subpolar North Atlantic. After the main glacial-interglacial transition was over, SSTs continued to rise and reached their maximum during, what could be considered, the upper main phase of high sea-level stand in MIS 11. In the western Mediterranean SSTs show several cooling events with amplitudes of up to 4°C during the early full-interglacial warm period. Off NW Africa this phase is characterized by rather humid conditions, as inferred from strongly decreased values of iron in the sediments, and successive changes in the foraminiferal assemblages. We assume that these rather wet conditions at the lower latitudes were related to an intensification of the West African monsoon that increased summer moisture flux over Northwest Africa and runoff into the Mediterranean. At the same time increased abundance of subtropical, deep- dwelling foraminiferal species are found in the subpolar region implying a strong linkage between the subtropical atmospheric circulation regime over NW Africa and the northward propagation, of

  19. Re-sequencing regions of the ovine Y chromosome in domestic and wild sheep reveals novel paternal haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J R S; Kijas, J W

    2009-02-01

    The male-specific region of the ovine Y chromosome (MSY) remains poorly characterized, yet sequence variants from this region have the potential to reveal the wild progenitor of domestic sheep or examples of domestic and wild paternal introgression. The 5' promoter region of the sex-determining gene SRY was re-sequenced using a subset of wild sheep including bighorn (Ovis canadensis), thinhorn (Ovis dalli spp.), urial (Ovis vignei), argali (Ovis ammon), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries). Seven novel SNPs (oY2-oY8) were revealed; these were polymorphic between but not within species. Re-sequencing and fragment analysis was applied to the MSY microsatellite SRYM18. It contains a complex compound repeat structure and sequencing of three novel size fragments revealed that a pentanucleotide element remained fixed, whilst a dinucleotide element displayed variability within species. Comparison of the sequence between species revealed that urial and argali sheep grouped more closely to the mouflon and domestic breeds than the pachyceriforms (bighorn and thinhorn). SNP and microsatellite data were combined to define six previously undetected haplotypes. Analysis revealed the mouflon as the only species to share a haplotype with domestic sheep, consistent with its status as a feral domesticate that has undergone male-mediated exchange with domestic animals. A comparison of the remaining wild species and domestic sheep revealed that O. aries is free from signatures of wild sheep introgression.

  20. Preferrential rearrangement in normal rabbits of the 3' VHa allotype gene that is deleted in Alicia mutants; somatic hypermutation/conversion may play a major role in generating the heterogeneity of rabbit heavy chain variable region sequences.

    PubMed

    Allegrucci, M; Young-Cooper, G O; Alexander, C B; Newman, B A; Mage, R G

    1991-02-01

    The rabbit is unique in having well-defined allotypes in the variable region of the heavy chain. Products of the VHa locus, (with alleles a1, a2, and a3), account for the majority of the serum immunoglobulins. A small percentage of the serum immunoglobulins are a-negative. In 1986, Kelus and Weiss described a mutation that depressed the expression of the Ig VH a2 genes in an a1/a2 rabbit. From this animal the Alicia rabbit strain was developed and the mutation was termed ali. We previously showed, using Southern analysis and the transverse alternating field electrophoresis technique, that the difference between the ali rabbit and normal is a relatively small deletion including some of the most 3' VH genes. The most JH proximal 3' VH1 genes in DNA from normal rabbits of a1, a2 and a3 haplotypes encode a1, a2 and a3 molecules respectively, and it has been suggested that these genes are responsible for allelic inheritance of VHa allotypes. The present study suggests that the 3' end of the VH locus probably plays a key role in regulation of VH gene expression in rabbits because VH gene(s) in this region are the target(s) of preferential VDJ rearrangements. This raises the possibility that mechanisms such as somatic gene conversion and hypermutation are at work to generate the antibody repertoire in this species. Our data support the view that the 3' VH1 gene may be the preferred target for rearrangement in normal rabbits, and for the normal chromosome in heterozygous ali animals. However, homozygous ali rabbits with a deletion that removed the a2-encoding VH1 on both chromosomes do survive, rearrange other VH genes and produce normal levels of immunoglobulins as well as a significant percentage of B cells which bear the a2 allotype. This challenges the view that one VH gene, VH1, is solely responsible for the inheritance pattern of VHa allotypes.

  1. Circular Dichroism Reveals Evidence of Coupling Between Immunoglobulin Constant and Variable Region Secondary Structure†

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Alena; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies (Ab) are bifunctional molecules with two domains, a constant region (C) that confers effector properties and a variable (V) region responsible of antigen (Ag) binding. Historically the C and V regions were considered to be functionally independent, with Ag specificity being solely determined by the V region. However, recent studies suggest that the C region can affect Ab fine specificity. This has led to the proposal that the CH domain influences the structure of the V region, thus affecting Ab affinity and fine specificity. An inference from this proposal is that V region identical monoclonal Abs (mAbs) differing in C region (eg isotype) would manifest different secondary structures arising from isotype-induced variation in the V-C region after Ag binding. We hypothesized that such effects could translate into differences in Circular Dichroism (CD) upon Ag-Ab complex formation. Consequently we studied the interaction of a set of V region identical IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 mAbs with glucuronoxylomannan (GXM). The native CD spectra of the pairs IgG1/IgG2a and IgG3/IgG2b were strikingly similar, implying similar secondary structure content. GXM binding by IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 produced different CD changes, with the pairs IgG1/IgG2a and IgG3/IgG2b again manifesting qualitatively similar trends in secondary structure changes. The magnitude of the changes differed among the isotypes with IgG2a > IgG3> IgG2b> IgG1. These differences in CD changes were interpreted to reflect differences in V-C secondary structure. PMID:20299100

  2. Diversity of Fusarium head blight populations and trichothecene toxin types reveals regional differences in pathogen composition and temporal dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of genetic diversity, trichothecene genotype composition, and population structure were conducted using 4,086 Fusarium graminearum isolates collected from wheat in eight Canadian provinces over a three year period between 2005 and 2007. The results revealed substantial regional differences ...

  3. Middle Atmosphere Temperature and Dynamics as Revealed from D-region Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilov, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of so-called meteorological control of the ionospheric D-region is presently undergoing development. According to this concept the electron concentration in this region is governed not only by solar and geomagnetic parameters but strongly depends on the temperature and dynamical regime of the mesosphere and stratosphere. How this connection between D-region and meteorological parameters can be used to obtain some information about middle atmosphere temperature and dynamics is examined. The essential points of the meteorological control concept are reviewed and the influence of turbulence on nitric oxide distribution and thus the ion production rate is discussed.

  4. DNA microarray analysis of functionally discrete human brain regions reveals divergent transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S.J.; Choudary, P.V.; Vawter, M.P.; Li, J.; Meador-Woodruff, J.H.; Lopez, J.F.; Burke, S.M.; Thompson, R.C.; Myers, R.M.; Jones, E.G.; Bunney, W.E.; Watson, S.J.; Akil, H.

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional profiles within discrete human brain regions are likely to reflect structural and functional specialization. Using DNA microarray technology, this study investigates differences in transcriptional profiles of highly divergent brain regions (the cerebellar cortex and the cerebral cortex) as well as differences between two closely related brain structures (the anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Replication of this study across three independent laboratories, to address false-positive and false-negative results using microarray technology, is also discussed. We find greater than a thousand transcripts to be differentially expressed between cerebellum and cerebral cortex and very few transcripts to be differentially expressed between the two neocortical regions. We further characterized transcripts that were found to be specifically expressed within brain regions being compared and found that ontological classes representing signal transduction machinery, neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, and transcription factors were most highly represented. PMID:14572446

  5. Ozone variations over the northern subtropical region revealed by ozonesonde observations in Hanoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, S.-Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Shiotani, M.; Hasebe, F.; Matsumoto, J.; Hoang, Thuy Ha T.; Nguyen, Tan Thanh T.

    2013-04-01

    Seasonal and subseasonal variations in the ozone mixing ratio (OMR) are investigated by using continuous 7 year ozonesonde data from Hanoi (21°N, 106°E), Vietnam. The mean seasonal variations for the 7 years show large amplitude at the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region (10-18 km) and at the lower troposphere (around 3 km) with standard deviations normalized by the annual mean value of about 30% for both regions. In the UTLS region, the seasonal variation in the OMR shows a minimum in winter and a maximum in spring to summer. The variation seems to be caused by the seasonal change in horizontal transport. Low OMR air masses are transported from the equatorial troposphere in winter by the anticyclonic flow associated with the equatorial convections, and high OMR air masses are transported from the midlatitude stratosphere in summer possibly due to Rossby wave breakings in the UT region and anticyclonic circulation associated with the Tibetan High in the LS region. In the lower troposphere, a spring maximum is found at 3 km height. Biomass burning and tropopause foldings are suggested as possible causes of this maximum. Subseasonal variations in the OMR show large amplitude in the UTLS region (at around 15 km) and in the boundary layer (below 1 km) with the standard deviations normalized by the annual mean larger than 40%. The OMR variations in the winter UTLS region have a negative correlation with the meridional wind. This relation indicates that the low OMRs observed at Hanoi has been transported from the equatorial region.

  6. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  7. A SOMATIC-MARKER THEORY OF ADDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Bechara, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Similar to patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC) lesions, substance abusers show altered decision-making, characterized by a tendency to choose the immediate reward, at the expense of negative future consequences. The somatic-marker model proposes that decision-making depends on neural substrates that regulate homeostasis, emotion and feeling. According to this model, there should be a link between alterations in processing emotions in substance abusers, and their impairments in decision-making. A growing evidence from neuroscientific studies indicate that core aspects of addiction may be explained in terms of abnormal emotional/homeostatic guidance of decision-making. Behavioural studies have revealed emotional processing and decision-making deficits in substance abusers. Neuroimaging studies have shown that altered decision-making in addiction is associated with abnormal functioning of a distributed neural network critical for the processing of emotional information, and the experience of “craving”, including the VMPC, the amygdala, the striatum, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the insular/somato-sensory cortices, as well as non-specific neurotransmitter systems that modulate activities of neural processes involved in decision-making. The aim of this paper is to review this growing evidence, and to examine the extent of which these studies support a somatic-marker theory of addiction. We conclude that there are at least two underlying types of dysfunctions where emotional signals (somatic-markers) turns in favor of immediate outcomes in addiction: (1) a hyperactivity in the amygdala or impulsive system, which exaggerates the rewarding impact of available incentives, and (2) hypoactivity in the prefrontal cortex or reflective system, which forecasts the long-term consequences of a given action. PMID:18722390

  8. GRACE storage-runoff hystereses reveal the dynamics of regional watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sproles, E. A.; Leibowitz, S. G.; Reager, J. T.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Patil, S. D.

    2015-07-01

    We characterize how regional watersheds function as simple, dynamic systems through a series of hysteresis loops using measurements from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites. These loops illustrate the temporal relationship between runoff and terrestrial water storage in three regional-scale watersheds (> 150 000 km2) of the Columbia River Basin, USA and Canada. The shape and size of the hysteresis loops are controlled by the climate, topography, and geology of the watershed. The direction of the hystereses for the GRACE signals moves in opposite directions from the isolated groundwater hystereses. The subsurface water (soil moisture and groundwater) hystereses more closely resemble the storage-runoff relationship of a soil matrix. While the physical processes underlying these hystereses are inherently complex, the vertical integration of terrestrial water in the GRACE signal encapsulates the processes that govern the non-linear function of regional-scale watersheds. We use this process-based understanding to test how GRACE data can be applied prognostically to predict seasonal runoff (mean Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.91) and monthly runoff during the low flow/high demand month of August (mean Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.77) in all three watersheds. The global nature of GRACE data allows this same methodology to be applied in other regional-scale studies, and could be particularly useful in regions with minimal data and in trans-boundary watersheds.

  9. Application of Somatic Embryogenesis in Woody Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yuan; Li, Shui-Gen; Fan, Xiao-Fen; Su, Zhen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a developmental process where a plant somatic cell can dedifferentiate to a totipotent embryonic stem cell that has the ability to give rise to an embryo under appropriate conditions. This new embryo can further develop into a whole plant. In woody plants, somatic embryogenesis plays a critical role in clonal propagation and is a powerful tool for synthetic seed production, germplasm conservation, and cryopreservation. A key step in somatic embryogenesis is the transition of cell fate from a somatic cell to embryo cell. Although somatic embryogenesis has already been widely used in a number of woody species, propagating adult woody plants remains difficult. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms of somatic embryogenesis and its practical applications in economic woody plants. Furthermore, we propose a strategy to improve the process of somatic embryogenesis using molecular means. PMID:27446166

  10. A temporary immersion system improves in vitro regeneration of peach palm through secondary somatic embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steinmacher, D. A.; Guerra, M. P.; Saare-Surminski, K.; Lieberei, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Secondary somatic embryogenesis has been postulated to occur during induction of peach palm somatic embryogenesis. In the present study this morphogenetic pathway is described and a protocol for the establishment of cycling cultures using a temporary immersion system (TIS) is presented. Methods Zygotic embryos were used as explants, and induction of somatic embryogenesis and plantlet growth were compared in TIS and solid culture medium. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to describe in vitro morphogenesis and accompany morpho-histological alterations during culture. Key Results The development of secondary somatic embryos occurs early during the induction of primary somatic embryos. Secondary somatic embryos were observed to develop continually in culture, resulting in non-synchronized development of these somatic embryos. Using these somatic embryos as explants allowed development of cycling cultures. Somatic embryos had high embryogenic potential (65·8 ± 3·0 to 86·2 ± 5·0 %) over the period tested. The use of a TIS greatly improved the number of somatic embryos obtained, as well as subsequent plantlet growth. Histological analyses showed that starch accumulation precedes the development of somatic embryos, and that these cells presented high nucleus/cytoplasm ratios and high mitotic indices, as evidenced by DAPI staining. Morphological and SEM observations revealed clusters of somatic embryos on one part of the explants, while other parts grew further, resulting in callus tissue. A multicellular origin of the secondary somatic embryos is hypothesized. Cells in the vicinity of callus accumulated large amounts of phenolic substances in their vacuoles. TEM revealed that these cells are metabolically very active, with the presence of numerous mitochondria and Golgi apparatuses. Light microscopy and TEM of the embryogenic sector revealed cells with numerous amyloplasts

  11. Comparison of somatic mutation frequency among immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Miwa, T; Suzuki, Y; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1994-02-01

    We analyzed the frequency of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes from hybridomas that secrete anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) monoclonal antibodies. A high frequency of mutation (3.3-4.4%) was observed in both the rearranged VH186.2 and V lambda 1 genes, indicating that somatic mutation occurs with similar frequency in these genes in spite of the absence of an intron enhancer in lambda 1 chain genes. In contrast to the high frequency in J-C introns, only two nucleotide substitutions occurred at positions -462 and -555 in the 5' noncoding region in one of the lambda 1-chain genes and in none of the other three so far studied. Since a similar low frequency of somatic mutation was observed in the 5' noncoding region of inactive lambda 2-chain genes rendered inactive because of incorrect rearrangement, this region may not be a target or alternatively, may be protected from the mutator system. We observed a low frequency of nucleotide substitution in unrearranged V lambda 1 genes (approximately 1/15 that of rearranged genes). Together with previous results (Azuma T., N. Motoyama, L. Fields, and D. Loh, 1993. Int. Immunol. 5:121), these findings suggest that the 5' noncoding region, which contains the promoter element, provides a signal for the somatic mutator system and that rearrangement, which brings the promoter into close proximity to the enhancer element, should increase mutation efficiency.

  12. Gene expression patterns in an onychophoran reveal that regionalization predates limb segmentation in pan-arthropods.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Budd, Graham E; Akam, Michael; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2010-01-01

    In arthropods, such as Drosophila melanogaster, the leg gap genes homothorax (hth), extradenticle (exd), dachshund (dac), and Distal-less (Dll) regionalize the legs in order to facilitate the subsequent segmentation of the legs. We have isolated homologs of all four leg gap genes from the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis and have studied their expression. We show that leg regionalization takes place in the legs of onychophorans even though they represent simple and nonsegmented appendages. This implies that leg regionalization evolved for a different function and was only later co-opted for a role in leg segmentation. We also show that the leg gap gene patterns in onychophorans (especially of hth and exd) are similar to the patterns in crustaceans and insects, suggesting that this is the plesiomorphic state in arthropods. The reversed hth and exd patterns in chelicerates and myriapods are therefore an apomorphy for this group, the Myriochelata, lending support to the Myriochelata and Tetraconata clades in arthropod phylogeny.

  13. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  14. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms a person feels are related to psychological factors. These symptoms can't be traced to a specific physical cause. In people who have a somatic symptom and related disorder, medical test results are either normal or don't explain ...

  15. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  16. Physical mechanisms of tropical climate feedbacks revealed by regional temperature and moisture trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Angus; Lambert, Hugo; Collins, Mat

    2015-04-01

    Climate models generally maintain close-to-constant tropospheric relative humidity in a warming climate. As a result, models with more negative lapse rate feedbacks tend to have more positive water vapour feedbacks. Despite this intermodel relationship, the regional structures of the tropical lapse rate and water vapour feedbacks are very different. What determines the regional structure of these feedbacks? Here we compare the modelled behaviour of tropical climate feedback processes with satellite observations over the period 1979-2010. We combine surface temperature data with upper-tropospheric temperature data from the Microwave Sounding Unit / Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU/AMSU) instruments as a metric of lapse rate feedback. We use data from the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 (~6.3 microns) to measure changes in upper-tropospheric relative humidity, a strong driver of the water vapour feedback. There is considerable uncertainty in the tropical-mean trend in upper-tropospheric relative humidity as derived from HIRS, since trends are small and variability is large. This makes it difficult to discern tropical-mean relative humidity trends. However, by investigating the regional structure of these trends we discover consistent signatures of processes driving lapse rate and water vapour feedbacks across climate models and observational datasets. Upper-tropospheric warming trends are relatively constant over the Tropics because the tropical atmosphere is unable to maintain strong temperature gradients. The regional structures of upper-tropospheric warming are similar between models and observations. Therefore, the majority of the regional variation in tropical lapse rate feedback actually comes from regional variation in surface temperature changes, not tropospheric temperature changes. The magnitude of upper-tropospheric moistening generally increases with surface warming as expected from simple moisture availability arguments, except in

  17. Genome-Wide Identification of Chromatin Transitional Regions Reveals Diverse Mechanisms Defining the Boundary of Facultative Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyao; Zhou, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Due to the self-propagating nature of the heterochromatic modification H3K27me3, chromatin barrier activities are required to demarcate the boundary and prevent it from encroaching into euchromatic regions. Studies in Drosophila and vertebrate systems have revealed several important chromatin barrier elements and their respective binding factors. However, epigenomic data indicate that the binding of these factors are not exclusive to chromatin boundaries. To gain a comprehensive understanding of facultative heterochromatin boundaries, we developed a two-tiered method to identify the Chromatin Transitional Region (CTR), i.e. the nucleosomal region that shows the greatest transition rate of the H3K27me3 modification as revealed by ChIP-Seq. This approach was applied to identify CTRs in Drosophila S2 cells and human HeLa cells. Although many insulator proteins have been characterized in Drosophila, less than half of the CTRs in S2 cells are associated with known insulator proteins, indicating unknown mechanisms remain to be characterized. Our analysis also revealed that the peak binding of insulator proteins are usually 1–2 nucleosomes away from the CTR. Comparison of CTR-associated insulator protein binding sites vs. those in heterochromatic region revealed that boundary-associated binding sites are distinctively flanked by nucleosome destabilizing sequences, which correlates with significant decreased nucleosome density and increased binding intensities of co-factors. Interestingly, several subgroups of boundaries have enhanced H3.3 incorporation but reduced nucleosome turnover rate. Our genome-wide study reveals that diverse mechanisms are employed to define the boundaries of facultative heterochromatin. In both Drosophila and mammalian systems, only a small fraction of insulator protein binding sites co-localize with H3K27me3 boundaries. However, boundary-associated insulator binding sites are distinctively flanked by nucleosome destabilizing sequences, which

  18. Altered spontaneous activity in antisocial personality disorder revealed by regional homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Liu, Wangyong; Chen, Jingang; Liao, Jian; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) stems from brain abnormalities. However, there are only a few studies investigating brain structure in ASPD. The aim of this study was to find regional coherence abnormalities in resting-state functional MRI of ASPD. Thirty-two ASPD individuals and 34 controls underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan. The regional homogeneity (ReHo) approach was used to examine whether ASPD was related to alterations in resting-state neural activity. Support vector machine discriminant analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity/specificity characteristics of the ReHo index in discriminating between the ASPD individuals and controls. The results showed that, compared with controls, ASPD individuals show lower ReHo in the right cerebellum posterior lobe (Crus1) and the right middle frontal gyrus, as well as higher ReHo in the right middle occipital gyrus (BA 19), left inferior temporal gyrus (BA 37), and right inferior occipital gyrus (cuneus, BA 18). All alternation regions reported a predictive accuracy above 70%. To our knowledge, this study was the first to study the change in regional activity coherence in the resting brain of ASPD individuals. These results not only elucidated the pathological mechanism of ASPD from a resting-state functional viewpoint but also showed that these alterations in ReHo may serve as potential markers for the detection of ASPD.

  19. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  20. Regional patterns of genetic diversity in Pinus flexilis (Pinaceae) reveal complex species history.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Stacy; Hamrick, J L; Wells, P V

    2002-05-01

    Pinus flexilis (limber pine) is patchily distributed within its large geographic range; it is mainly restricted to high elevations in the Rocky Mountains and the Basin and Range region of western North America. We examined patterns of allozyme diversity in 30 populations from throughout the species' range. Overall genetic diversity (H(e) = 0.186) was high compared with that of most other pine species but was similar to that of other pines widespread in western North America. The proportion of genetic diversity occurring among populations (G(ST) = 0.101) was also high relative to that for other pines. Observed heterozygosity was less than expected in 28 of the 30 populations. When populations were grouped by region, there were notable differences. Those in the Basin and Range region had more genetic diversity within populations, a higher proportion of genetic diversity among populations, and higher levels of inbreeding within populations than populations from either the Northern or Utah Rocky Mountain regions. Patterns of genetic diversity in P. flexilis have likely resulted from a complex distribution of Pleistocene populations and subsequent gene flow via pollen and seed dispersal. PMID:21665679

  1. Structural interrogation of phosphoproteome identified by mass spectrometry reveals allowed and disallowed regions of phosphoconformation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput mass spectrometric (HT-MS) study is the method of choice for monitoring global changes in proteome. Data derived from these studies are meant for further validation and experimentation to discover novel biological insights. Here we evaluate use of relative solvent accessible surface area (rSASA) and DEPTH as indices to assess experimentally determined phosphorylation events deposited in PhosphoSitePlus. Results Based on accessibility, we map these identifications on allowed (accessible) or disallowed (inaccessible) regions of phosphoconformation. Surprisingly a striking number of HT-MS/MS derived events (1461/5947 sites or 24.6%) are present in the disallowed region of conformation. By considering protein dynamics, autophosphorylation events and/or the sequence specificity of kinases, 13.8% of these phosphosites can be moved to the allowed region of conformation. We also demonstrate that rSASA values can be used to increase the confidence of identification of phosphorylation sites within an ambiguous MS dataset. Conclusion While MS is a stand-alone technique for the identification of vast majority of phosphorylation events, identifications within disallowed region of conformation will benefit from techniques that independently probe for phosphorylation and protein dynamics. Our studies also imply that trapping alternate protein conformations may be a viable alternative to the design of inhibitors against mutation prone drug resistance kinases. PMID:24618394

  2. Meteorite source regions as revealed by the near-Earth object population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R.; DeMeo, F.; Burt, B.; Polishook, D.; Burbine, T.; Bus, S.; Tokunaga, A.; Birlan, M.

    2014-07-01

    Spectroscopic and taxonomic information is now available for 1000 near-Earth objects, having been obtained through both targeted surveys (e.g. [1--3]) or resulting from all-sky surveys (e.g. [4]). We first evaluate these results within the framework of taxonomic types in the Bus-DeMeo system [5,6] and subsequently examine meteorite correlations based on spectral and mineralogical analysis (e.g. [7,8]). We correlate our spectral findings with the source region probabilities calculated using the methods of Bottke et al. [9]. The source regions evaluated are Mars Crossers, ν_6 resonance, 3:1 resonance, the Outer Belt, and Jupiter Family Comets. In terms of taxonomy, very clear sources are indicated: Q-, Sq-, and S-types most strongly associated with ordinary chondrite meteorites show clear source signatures through the innermost main-belt regions. V-types are relatively equally balanced between ν_6 and 3:1 resonance sources, consistent with the orbital dispersion of the Vesta family. Asteroid taxonomy classes interpreted as analogous to meteorites with primitive compositions, B- and C-types, show distinct source region preferences for the outer belt and for Jupiter family comets. Most strongly indicated is a Jupiter family comet source for the D-type near-Earth objects, implying a pronounced likelihood that these ''asteroidal'' bodies are extinct or dormant comets [10]. Similarly, near-Earth objects falling in the spectrally featureless ''X-type'' category also show a strong outer belt and Jupiter family comet source region preference; even though they lack albedo measurements, they may be interpreted as originating from among ''P-type'' primitive objects common in the outer belt. Finally the Xe-class of near-Earth objects, which most closely match the spectral properties of enstatite achondrite (aubrite) meteorites, show a source region preference consistent with a Hungaria origin (confirming [11]) by entering near-Earth space through the Mars crossing and ν_6

  3. Early changes in the hypothalamic region in prodromal Huntington disease revealed by MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soneson, Charlotte; Fontes, Magnus; Zhou, Yongxia; Denisov, Vladimir; Paulsen, Jane S.; Kirik, Deniz; Petersén, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat. Its length can be used to estimate the time of clinical diagnosis, which is defined by overt motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms begin before motor onset, and involve changes in hypothalamus-regulated functions such as sleep, emotion and metabolism. Therefore we hypothesized that hypothalamic changes occur already prior to the clinical diagnosis. We performed voxel-based morphometry and logistic regression analyses of cross-sectional MR images from 220 HD gene carriers and 75 controls in the Predict-HD study. We show that changes in the hypothalamic region are detectable before clinical diagnosis and that its grey matter contents alone is sufficient to distinguish HD gene carriers from control cases. In conclusion, our study shows, for the first time, that alterations in grey matter contents in the hypothalamic region occur at least a decade before clinical diagnosis in HD using MRI. PMID:20682340

  4. Application of colour magnification technique for revealing skin microcirculation changes under regional anaesthetic input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubins, Uldis; Spigulis, Janis; Miscuks, Aleksejs

    2013-11-01

    In this work the colour magnification technique was applied for monitoring of palm skin microcirculation changes under peripheral (Plexus Brachialis with axiliary access) Regional Anaesthesia (RA). During the RA procedure 20 minute video of patient's forearm was taken at steady light conditions. Video content was processed offline by custom developed Matlab software with build-in colour magnification algorithm that performs temporal filtering of video sequence near-heartbeat frequency, spatial decomposition of video and amplification of pulsatile signal in every pixel of skin image. Using this method, we are able to visualize the subcutaneous microcirculation changes in high spatial resolution. The results showed different blood pulse amplitude dynamics over the skin regions of palm and forearm during the RA. The colour magnification technique could be used for real-time monitoring of RA effect.

  5. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions (SCs) in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: (1) The supraoptoparaventricular region (SPV) is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. (2) The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2) and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1) portions. (3) Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. (4) Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote), and the alar SPV is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed. PMID:25691860

  6. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L.; Olds, Andrew D.; Connolly, Rod M.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. ‘Topographic’ exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them. PMID:27672510

  7. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L.; Olds, Andrew D.; Connolly, Rod M.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. ‘Topographic’ exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them.

  8. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Brooke; Schlacher, Thomas A; Weston, Michael A; Huijbers, Chantal M; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L; Olds, Andrew D; Connolly, Rod M; Schoeman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. 'Topographic' exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them. PMID:27672510

  9. Myelin organization in the nodal, paranodal, and juxtaparanodal regions revealed by scanning x-ray microdiffraction.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Hideyo; Liu, Jiliang; Makowski, Lee; Palmisano, Marilena; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has provided extensive information about the arrangement of lipids and proteins in multilamellar myelin. This information has been limited to the abundant inter-nodal regions of the sheath because these regions dominate the scattering when x-ray beams of 100 µm diameter or more are used. Here, we used a 1 µm beam, raster-scanned across a single nerve fiber, to obtain detailed information about the molecular architecture in the nodal, paranodal, and juxtaparanodal regions. Orientation of the lamellar membrane stacks and membrane periodicity varied spatially. In the juxtaparanode-internode, 198-202 Å-period membrane arrays oriented normal to the nerve fiber axis predominated, whereas in the paranode-node, 205-208 Å-period arrays oriented along the fiber direction predominated. In parts of the sheath distal to the node, multiple sets of lamellar reflections were observed at angles to one another, suggesting that the myelin multilayers are deformed at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. The calculated electron density of myelin in the different regions exhibited membrane bilayer profiles with varied electron densities at the polar head groups, likely due to different amounts of major myelin proteins (P0 glycoprotein and myelin basic protein). Scattering from the center of the nerve fibers, where the x-rays are incident en face (perpendicular) to the membrane planes, provided information about the lateral distribution of protein. By underscoring the heterogeneity of membrane packing, microdiffraction analysis suggests a powerful new strategy for understanding the underlying molecular foundation of a broad spectrum of myelinopathies dependent on local specializations of myelin structure in both the PNS and CNS.

  10. Switch II mutants reveal coupling between the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions in myosin V.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan V; David, Charles; Jacobs, Donald J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Conserved active-site elements in myosins and other P-loop NTPases play critical roles in nucleotide binding and hydrolysis; however, the mechanisms of allosteric communication among these mechanoenzymes remain unresolved. In this work we introduced the E442A mutation, which abrogates a salt-bridge between switch I and switch II, and the G440A mutation, which abolishes a main-chain hydrogen bond associated with the interaction of switch II with the γ phosphate of ATP, into myosin V. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer between mant-labeled nucleotides or IAEDANS-labeled actin and FlAsH-labeled myosin V to examine the conformation of the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions, respectively. We demonstrate that in the absence of actin, both the G440A and E442A mutants bind ATP with similar affinity and result in only minor alterations in the conformation of the nucleotide-binding pocket (NBP). In the presence of ADP and actin, both switch II mutants disrupt the formation of a closed NBP actomyosin.ADP state. The G440A mutant also prevents ATP-induced opening of the actin-binding cleft. Our results indicate that the switch II region is critical for stabilizing the closed NBP conformation in the presence of actin, and is essential for communication between the active site and actin-binding region.

  11. Genomic regions associated with the nitrogen limitation response revealed in a global wheat core collection.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Jacques; Ravel, C; Jaubertie, J P; Duperrier, B; Gardet, O; Heumez, E; Pissavy, A L; Charmet, G; Le Gouis, J; Balfourier, F

    2013-03-01

    Modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in Western Europe have mainly been bred, and selected in conditions where high levels of nitrogen-rich fertilizer are applied. However, high input crop management has greatly increased the risk of nitrates leaching into groundwater with negative impacts on the environment. To investigate wheat nitrogen tolerance characteristics that could be adapted to low input crop management, we supplied 196 accessions of a wheat core collection of old and modern cultivars with high or moderate amounts of nitrogen fertilizer in an experimental network consisting of three sites and 2 years. The main breeding traits were assessed including grain yield and grain protein content. The response to nitrogen level was estimated for grain yield and grain number per m(2) using both the difference and the ratio between performance at the two input levels and the slope of joint regression. A large variability was observed for all the traits studied and the response to nitrogen level. Whole genome association mapping was carried out using 899 molecular markers taking into account the five ancestral group structure of the collection. We identified 54 main regions involving almost all chromosomes that influence yield and its components, plant height, heading date and grain protein concentration. Twenty-three regions, including several genes, spread over 16 chromosomes were involved in the response to nitrogen level. These chromosomal regions may be good candidates to be used in breeding programs to improve the performance of wheat varieties at moderate nitrogen input levels.

  12. Switch II Mutants Reveal Coupling between the Nucleotide- and Actin-Binding Regions in Myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Darshan V.; David, Charles; Jacobs, Donald J.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Conserved active-site elements in myosins and other P-loop NTPases play critical roles in nucleotide binding and hydrolysis; however, the mechanisms of allosteric communication among these mechanoenzymes remain unresolved. In this work we introduced the E442A mutation, which abrogates a salt-bridge between switch I and switch II, and the G440A mutation, which abolishes a main-chain hydrogen bond associated with the interaction of switch II with the γ phosphate of ATP, into myosin V. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer between mant-labeled nucleotides or IAEDANS-labeled actin and FlAsH-labeled myosin V to examine the conformation of the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions, respectively. We demonstrate that in the absence of actin, both the G440A and E442A mutants bind ATP with similar affinity and result in only minor alterations in the conformation of the nucleotide-binding pocket (NBP). In the presence of ADP and actin, both switch II mutants disrupt the formation of a closed NBP actomyosin.ADP state. The G440A mutant also prevents ATP-induced opening of the actin-binding cleft. Our results indicate that the switch II region is critical for stabilizing the closed NBP conformation in the presence of actin, and is essential for communication between the active site and actin-binding region. PMID:22713570

  13. Historical whaling records reveal major regional retreat of Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotté, Cédric; Guinet, Christophe

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have provided evidence of a reduction of the Antarctic sea ice extent. However, these studies were conducted either at a global scale or at a regional scale, and possible inter-regional differences were not analysed. Using the long-term whaling database we investigated circum-Antarctic changes in summer sea ice extent from 1931 to 1987. Accounting for bias inherent in the whaling method, this analysis provides new insight into the historical ice edge reconstruction and inter-regional differences. We highlight a reduction of the sea ice extent occurring in the 1960s, mainly in the Weddell sector where the change ranged from 3° to 7.9° latitude through summer. Although the whaling method may not be appropriate for detecting fine-scale change, these results provide evidence for a heterogeneous circumpolar change of the sea ice extent. The shift is temporally and spatially consistent with other environmental changes detected in the Weddell sector and also with a shift in the Southern Hemisphere annular mode. The large reduction of the sea ice extent has probably influenced the ecosystem of the Weddell Sea, particularly the krill biomass.

  14. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yiping; Marcy, Guillaume; Lee, Eddy S M; Rozen, Steve; Mattar, Citra N Z; Waddington, Simon N; Goh, Eyleen L K; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS) when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6%) over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, p<0.004). Whole genome expression analysis showed differential gene expression between these regionally-derived NSC, which involved the Notch, epidermal growth factor as well as interleukin pathways. We have shown the presence of phenotypically-distinct regionally-derived NSC from the mid-trimester CNS, which may reflect the ontological differences occurring within the CNS. Aside from informing on the role of such cells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  15. Meteorite Source Regions as Revealed by the Near-Earth Object Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, Richard P.; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Burt, Brian J.; Polishook, David; Burbine, Thomas H.; Bus, Schelte J.; Tokunaga, Alan; Birlan, Mirel

    2014-11-01

    Spectroscopic and taxonomic information is now available for 1000 near-Earth objects, having been obtained through both targeted surveys (e.g. [1], [2], [3]) or resulting from all-sky surveys (e.g. [4]). We determine their taxonomic types in the Bus-DeMeo system [5] [6] and subsequently examine meteorite correlations based on spectral analysis (e.g. [7],[8]). We correlate our spectral findings with the source region probabilities calculated using the methods of Bottke et al. [9]. In terms of taxonomy, very clear sources are indicated: Q-, Sq-, and S-types most strongly associated with ordinary chondrite meteorites show clear source signatures through the inner main-belt. V-types are relatively equally balanced between nu6 and 3:1 resonance sources, consistent with the orbital dispersion of the Vesta family. B- and C-types show distinct source region preferences for the outer belt and for Jupiter family comets. A Jupiter family comet source predominates for the D-type near-Earth objects, implying these "asteroidal" bodies may be extinct or dormant comets [10]. Similarly, near-Earth objects falling in the spectrally featureless "X-type" category also show a strong outer belt and Jupiter family comet source region preference. Finally the Xe-class near-Earth objects, which most closely match the spectral properties of enstatite achondrite (aubrite) meteorites seen in the Hungaria region[11], show a source region preference consistent with a Hungaria origin by entering near-Earth space through the Mars crossing and nu6 resonance pathways. This work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant 0907766 and NASA Grant NNX10AG27G.[1] Lazzarin, M. et al. (2004), Mem. S. A. It. Suppl. 5, 21. [2] Thomas, C. A. et al. (2014), Icarus 228, 217. [3] Tokunaga, A. et al. (2006) BAAS 38, 59.07. [4] Hasselmann, P. H., Carvano, J. M., Lazzaro, D. (2011) NASA PDS, EAR-A-I0035-5-SDSSTAX-V1.0. [5] Bus, S.J., Binzel, R.P. (2002). Icarus 158, 146. [6] DeMeo, F.E. et al. (2009), Icarus

  16. The 2007 Sumatra seismic sequence revealed by a regional seismic network in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Inoue, H.; Kumagai, H.; Yamashina, T.; Sunarjo; Fauzi; Suhardjono

    2007-12-01

    distributed in a region extending about 300 km along the subduction zone of the Indo-Australian Plate. The depths of aftershocks range from 15 to 60 km. In the off-Bengkulu region, the earthquakes with M8 or above occurred in 1381, 1608 and 1833, approximately every 230 years. Now 174 years have been passed since the last event in 1833. We did not experience M8 class earthquakes during the last 210 years in the off-Padang region, which is to the north of off-Bengkulu. The off-Padang region corresponds to a seismic gap between the source regions of the 2007 Sumatra seismic sequence and M8.7 Nias earthquake on March 2005. The sequence of the M8.4, M8.0, and M6.8 earthquakes moving towards the northwest from off-Bengkulu in the 2007 seismic activity suggests the imminency of a large earthquake off Padang. We have been deploying broadband seismograph networks in Indonesia, including JISNET, by an international cooperation among Indonesia, Germany, China, and Japan, aiming at improving the capabilities to monitor seismic activity and tsunami generation in Indonesia. The seismic networks are now in operation, and totally 150 seismic stations will be installed by the end of 2008. Seismic monitoring based on these regional networks would contribute to early notification of a large earthquake anticipated to occur in the off-Padang region.

  17. Somatic mutation, genomic variation, and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one's parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease-even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example-resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development.

  18. Somatic Mutation, Genomic Variation, and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one’s parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease—even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example—resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

  19. Earthquake swarms reveal submarine magma unrest induced by distant mega-earthquakes: Andaman Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Vaněk, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about earthquake-triggered magma intrusions or eruptions of submarine volcanoes. The analysis of teleseismic earthquake occurrence performed in this study offers a tool to address such enigmatic and inaccessible processes. In the past ten years, the Andaman Sea region repeatedly became a site of shallow earthquake swarms that followed distant mega-earthquakes by days to weeks. The MW 9.1 December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was followed by two earthquake swarms about 600 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 30 and 35 days, respectively. Earthquakes of one of these seismic episodes, the extensive January 2005 earthquake swarm, migrated laterally at a rate of about 0.25 km per hour during the swarm evolution. The strong Indian Ocean MW 8.6 and 8.2 April 11, 2012 earthquake doublet west of Northern Sumatra was followed by an earthquake swarm approximately 800 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 13 days. All the three swarms that followed the 2004 and 2012 mega-earthquakes occurred beneath distinct seamounts and seafloor ridges. Based on the observations of migration of earthquakes during the swarm and swarm occurrence beneath distinct highs at the seafloor, we conclude that these earthquake swarms probably resulted as a consequence of magma unrest induced by static and/or dynamic stress changes following the distant mega-earthquakes. Repeated occurrence of such a phenomenon suggests that the arc magma reservoirs beneath the Andaman Sea have recently reached some form of criticality and are vulnerable to even small stress changes. The Andaman seafloor could thus become a site of submarine volcanic eruptions in near future and deserves close attention of Earth scientists.

  20. Complex Networks Reveal Persistent Global / Regional Structure and Predictive Information Content in Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhaeuser, K.; Chawla, N. V.; Ganguly, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Recent articles have posited that the skills of climate model projections, particularly for variables and scales of interest to decision makers, may need to be significantly improved. Here we hypothesize that there is information content in variables that are projected more reliably, for example, sea surface temperatures, which is relevant for improving predictions of other variables at scales which may be more crucial, for example, regional land temperature and precipitation anomalies. While this hypothesis may be partially supported based on conceptual understanding, a key question to explore is whether the relevant information content can be meaningfully extracted from observations and model simulations. Here we use climate reconstructions from reanalysis datasets to examine the question in detail. Our tool of choice is complex networks, which have provided useful insights in the context of descriptive analysis and change detection for climate in the recent literature. We describe a new adaptation of complex networks based on computational approaches which provide additional descriptive insights at both global and regional scales, specifically sea surface variables, and provide a unified framework for data-guided predictive modeling, specifically for regional temperature and precipitation over land. Complex networks were constructed from historical data to study the properties of the global climate system and characterize behavior at the global scale. Clusters based on community detection, which leverage the network distance, were used to identify regional structures. Persistence and stability of these features over time were evaluated. Predictive information content of ocean indicators with respect to land climate was extracted using a suite of regression models and validated on held-out data. Our results suggest that the new adaptation of complex networks may be well-suited to provide a unified framework for exploring climate teleconnections or long

  1. Central nervous system PET-CT imaging reveals regional impairments in pediatric patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zmyslowska, Agnieszka; Malkowski, Bogdan; Fendler, Wojciech; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Gnys, Piotr; Baranska, Dobromila; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease with main clinical features of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. However, various neurological defects may also be detected. The aim of this study was to evaluate aspects of brain structure and function using PET-CT (positron emission tomography and computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in pediatric patients with WFS. Regional changes in brain glucose metabolism were measured using standardized uptake values (SUVs) based on images of (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in 7 WFS patients aged 10.1-16.0 years (mean 12.9±2.4) and in 20 healthy children aged 3-17.9 years (mean 12.8±4.1). In all patients the diagnosis of WFS was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Hierarchical clustering showed remarkable similarities of glucose uptake patterns among WFS patients and their differences from the control group. SUV data were subsequently standardized for age groups <13 years old and>13 years old to account for developmental differences. Reduced SUVs in WFS patients as compared to the control group for the bilateral brain regions such as occipital lobe (-1.24±1.20 vs. -0.13±1.05; p = 0.028) and cerebellum (-1.11±0.69 vs. -0.204±1.00; p = 0.036) were observed and the same tendency for cingulate (-1.13±1.05 vs. -0.15±1.12; p = 0.056), temporal lobe (-1.10±0.98 vs. -0.15±1.10; p = 0.057), parietal lobe (-1.06±1.20 vs. -0.08±1.08; p = 0.058), central region (-1.01±1.04 vs. -0.09±1.06; p = 0.060), basal ganglia (-1.05±0.74 vs. -0.20±1.07; p = 0.066) and mesial temporal lobe (-1.06±0.82 vs. -0.26±1.08; p = 0.087) was also noticed. After adjusting for multiple hypothesis testing, the differences in glucose uptake were non-significant. For the first time, regional differences in brain glucose metabolism among patients with WFS were shown using PET-CT imaging.

  2. The Thatcher Illusion Reveals Orientation Dependence in Brain Regions Involved in Processing Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Psalta, Lilia; Young, Andrew W.; Thompson, Peter; Andrews, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the processing of facial identity is known to be sensitive to the orientation of the face, it is less clear whether orientation sensitivity extends to the processing of facial expressions. To address this issue, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to measure the neural response to the Thatcher illusion. This illusion involves a local inversion of the eyes and mouth in a smiling face—when the face is upright, the inverted features make it appear grotesque, but when the face is inverted, the inversion is no longer apparent. Using an fMRI-adaptation paradigm, we found a release from adaptation in the superior temporal sulcus—a region directly linked to the processing of facial expressions—when the images were upright and they changed from a normal to a Thatcherized configuration. However, this release from adaptation was not evident when the faces were inverted. These results show that regions involved in processing facial expressions display a pronounced orientation sensitivity. PMID:24264941

  3. The Thatcher illusion reveals orientation dependence in brain regions involved in processing facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Psalta, Lilia; Young, Andrew W; Thompson, Peter; Andrews, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Although the processing of facial identity is known to be sensitive to the orientation of the face, it is less clear whether orientation sensitivity extends to the processing of facial expressions. To address this issue, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to measure the neural response to the Thatcher illusion. This illusion involves a local inversion of the eyes and mouth in a smiling face-when the face is upright, the inverted features make it appear grotesque, but when the face is inverted, the inversion is no longer apparent. Using an fMRI-adaptation paradigm, we found a release from adaptation in the superior temporal sulcus-a region directly linked to the processing of facial expressions-when the images were upright and they changed from a normal to a Thatcherized configuration. However, this release from adaptation was not evident when the faces were inverted. These results show that regions involved in processing facial expressions display a pronounced orientation sensitivity.

  4. Regional movement patterns of a small-bodied shark revealed by stable-isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Munroe, S E M; Heupel, M R; Fisk, A T; Logan, M; Simpfendorfer, C A

    2015-05-01

    This study used stable-isotope analysis to define the nearshore regional residency and movements of the small-bodied Australian sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon taylori. Plasma and muscle δ(13) C and δ(15) N of R. taylori were collected from across five embayments and compared with values of seagrass and plankton from each bay. Linear distances between adjacent bays ranged from 30 to 150 km. There was a positive geographic correlation between R. taylori tissue and environmental δ(13) C values. Populations with the highest tissue δ(15) N were collected from bays that had the highest environmental δ(15) N values. These results suggest that R. taylori did not forage more than 100 km away from their capture location within 6 months to 1 year. The successful application of isotope analysis to define R. taylori movement demonstrates that this technique may be used in addition to traditional methods to study the movement of sharks, even within similar habitats across regionally small spatial scales (<100 km). PMID:25846994

  5. Phylogeographic patterns of Merodon hoverflies in the Eastern Mediterranean region: revealing connections and barriers.

    PubMed

    Ståhls, Gunilla; Vujić, Ante; Petanidou, Theodora; Cardoso, Pedro; Radenković, Snezana; Ačanski, Jelena; Pérez Bañón, Celeste; Rojo, Santos

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the phylogeographic patterns of Merodon species (Diptera, Syrphidae) in the Eastern Mediterranean. Ten species were sampled on five different islands and mainland sites as a minimum. All samples were screened for their mtDNA COI barcode haplotype diversity, and for some samples, we additionally generated genomic fingerprints. The recently established zoogeographic distribution categories classify these species as having (1) Balkan distribution; (2) Anatolian distribution; (3) continental areas and large islands distribution; and (4) with wide distribution. The ancestral haplotypes and their geographical localities were estimated with statistical parsimony (TCS). TCS networks identified as the ancestral haplotype samples that originated from localities situated within the distributional category of the species in question. Strong geographical haplotype structuring was detected for many Merodon species. We were particularly interested to test the relative importance of current (Aegean Sea) and past Mid-Aegean Trench) barriers to dispersal for Merodon flies in the Aegean. We employed phylogenetic β-diversity (Pβ total) and its partition in replacement (Pβ repl) and richness difference (Pβ rich) to test the importance of each explanatory variable (interisland distance, MAT, and island area) in interisland differences using partial Mantel tests and hierarchical partitioning of variation. β-Analyses confirmed the importance of both current and past barriers to dispersal on the evolution of group. Current interisland distance was particularly important to explain the replacement of haplotypes, while the MAT was driving differences in richness of haplotypes, revealing the MAT as a strong past barrier whose effects are still visible today in the phylogenetic history of the clade in the Aegean. These results support the hypothesis of a highly restricted dispersal and gene flow among Merodon populations between islands since late Pleistocene. Additionally

  6. Phylogeographic patterns of Merodon hoverflies in the Eastern Mediterranean region: revealing connections and barriers.

    PubMed

    Ståhls, Gunilla; Vujić, Ante; Petanidou, Theodora; Cardoso, Pedro; Radenković, Snezana; Ačanski, Jelena; Pérez Bañón, Celeste; Rojo, Santos

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the phylogeographic patterns of Merodon species (Diptera, Syrphidae) in the Eastern Mediterranean. Ten species were sampled on five different islands and mainland sites as a minimum. All samples were screened for their mtDNA COI barcode haplotype diversity, and for some samples, we additionally generated genomic fingerprints. The recently established zoogeographic distribution categories classify these species as having (1) Balkan distribution; (2) Anatolian distribution; (3) continental areas and large islands distribution; and (4) with wide distribution. The ancestral haplotypes and their geographical localities were estimated with statistical parsimony (TCS). TCS networks identified as the ancestral haplotype samples that originated from localities situated within the distributional category of the species in question. Strong geographical haplotype structuring was detected for many Merodon species. We were particularly interested to test the relative importance of current (Aegean Sea) and past Mid-Aegean Trench) barriers to dispersal for Merodon flies in the Aegean. We employed phylogenetic β-diversity (Pβ total) and its partition in replacement (Pβ repl) and richness difference (Pβ rich) to test the importance of each explanatory variable (interisland distance, MAT, and island area) in interisland differences using partial Mantel tests and hierarchical partitioning of variation. β-Analyses confirmed the importance of both current and past barriers to dispersal on the evolution of group. Current interisland distance was particularly important to explain the replacement of haplotypes, while the MAT was driving differences in richness of haplotypes, revealing the MAT as a strong past barrier whose effects are still visible today in the phylogenetic history of the clade in the Aegean. These results support the hypothesis of a highly restricted dispersal and gene flow among Merodon populations between islands since late Pleistocene. Additionally

  7. Single cell lineage tracing reveals that oriented cell division contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and regional specification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Miao, Lianjie; Shieh, David; Spiotto, Ernest; Li, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Paul, Antoni; Schwartz, Robert J.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Singer, Harold A.; Huang, Guoying; Wu, Mingfu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cardiac trabeculae are sheet-like structures extending from the myocardium that function to increase surface area. A lack of trabeculation causes embryonic lethality due to compromised cardiac function. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trabecular formation, we genetically labeled individual cardiomyocytes prior to trabeculation via the brainbow multicolor system, and traced and analyzed the labeled cells during trabeculation by whole-embryo clearing and imaging. The clones derived from labeled single cells displayed four different geometric patterns that are derived from different patterns of oriented cell division (OCD) and migration. Of the four types of clones, the inner, transmural, and mixed clones contributed to trabecular cardiomyocytes. Further studies showed that perpendicular OCD is an extrinsic asymmetric cell division that putatively contributes to trabecular regional specification. Furthermore, N-Cadherin deletion in labeled clones disrupted the clonal patterns. In summary, our data demonstrate that OCD contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and specification. PMID:27052172

  8. Transmembrane Signaling by the Aspartate Receptor: Engineered Disulfides Reveal Static Regions of the Subunit Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Chervitz, Stephen A.; Lin, Christina M.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand binding to the periplasmic domain of the transmembrane aspartate receptor generates an intramolecular conformational change which spans the bilayer and ultimately signals the cytoplasmic CheA histidine kinase, thereby triggering chemotaxis. The receptor is a homodimer stabilized by the interface between its two identical subunits: the present study investigates the role of the periplasmic and transmembrane regions of this interface in the mechanism of transmembrane signaling. Free cysteines and disulfide bonds are engineered into selected interfacial positions, and the resulting effects on the transmembrane signal are assayed by monitoring in vitro regulation of kinase activity. Three of the 14 engineered cysteine pairs examined, as well as six of the 14 engineered disulfides, cause perturbations of the interface structure which essentially destroy transmembrane regulation of the kinase. The remaining 11 cysteine pairs, and eight engineered disulfides covalently linking the two subunits at locations spanning positions 18–75, are observed to retain significant transmembrane kinase regulation. The eight functional disulfides positively identify adjacent faces of the two N-terminal helices in the native receptor dimer and indicate that large regions of the periplasmic and transmembrane subunit interface remain effectively static during the transmembrane signal. The results are consistent with a model in which the subunit interface plays a structural role, while the second membrane-spanning helix transmits the ligand-induced signal across the bilayer to the kinase binding domain. The effects of engineered cysteines and disulfides on receptor methylation in vitro are also measured, enabling direct comparison of the in vitro methylation and phosphorylation assays. PMID:7626643

  9. Preliminary array analysis reveals novel genes regulated by ovarian steroids in the monkey raphe region.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Arubala P; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2005-06-01

    We hypothesize that ovarian hormones may improve serotonin neuron survival. We sought the effect of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on novel gene expression in the macaque dorsal raphe region with Affymetrix array analysis. Nine spayed rhesus macaques were treated with either placebo, E or E+P via Silastic implant for 1 month prior to euthanasia (n=3 per treatment). RNA was extracted from a small block of midbrain containing the dorsal raphe and examined on an Agilent Bioanalyzer. The RNA from each monkey was labeled and hybridized to an Affymetrix HG_U95AV Human GeneChip Array. After filtering and sorting, 25 named genes remained that were regulated by E, and 24 named genes remained that were regulated by supplemental P. These genes further sorted into functional categories that would promote neuronal plasticity, transmitter synthesis, and trafficking, as well as reduce apoptosis. The relative abundance of four pivotal genes was examined in all nine animals with quantitative RT-PCR and normalized by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). E+/-P caused a significant threefold reduction in JNK-1 (a pro-apoptosis gene, p<0.007); and a significant sixfold decrease in kynurenine mono-oxygenase (produces neurotoxic quinolones, p<0.05). GABA-A receptor (alpha3 subunit; benzodiazepine site) and E2F1 (interferes with cytokine signaling) were unaffected by E, but increased sevenfold (p<0.02) and fourfold (p<0.009), respectively, upon treatment with P. In summary, subsets of genes related to tissue remodeling or apoptosis were up- or down-regulated by E and P in a tissue block containing the dorsal raphe. These changes could promote cellular resilience in the region where serotonin neurons originate.

  10. Proteome profiling reveals regional protein alteration in cerebrum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-03-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to selectively damage the calcarine and precentral cortices along deep sulci and fissures in adult cases, but the detailed mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to identify and analyze the differential proteome expression in two regions of the cerebrum (the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe including the calcarine sulcus) of the common marmoset exposed to MeHg using a shot-gun proteomic approach. A total of 1045 and 1062 proteins were identified in the frontal lobe (FL) and occipital lobe (OL), of which, 62 and 89 proteins were found significantly changed with MeHg exposure. Functional enrichment/depletion analysis showed that the lipid metabolic process and proteolysis were affected in both two lobes. Functional changes in FL were characterized in cell cycle and cell division, sulfur compound metabolic process, microtubule-based process and glycerolipid metabolic process. In comparison, proteins were enriched in the functions of transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, chemical caused homeostasis and regulation of body fluid levels in OL. Pathway analysis predicted that vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption was disturbed in MeHg-treated FL. Our results showed that MeHg induced regional specific protein changes in FL and OL but with similar endpoint effects such as energy diminish and disruption of water transport. APOE and GPX1 were shown to be possible key proteins targeted by MeHg leading to multiple functional changes in OL. This is the first report of the whole proteome changes of primate cerebrum for MeHg neurotoxicity, and the results will contribute to the understanding of molecular basis of MeHg intoxication in humans. PMID:27012723

  11. Proteome profiling reveals regional protein alteration in cerebrum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) exposed to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-03-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to selectively damage the calcarine and precentral cortices along deep sulci and fissures in adult cases, but the detailed mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to identify and analyze the differential proteome expression in two regions of the cerebrum (the frontal lobe and the occipital lobe including the calcarine sulcus) of the common marmoset exposed to MeHg using a shot-gun proteomic approach. A total of 1045 and 1062 proteins were identified in the frontal lobe (FL) and occipital lobe (OL), of which, 62 and 89 proteins were found significantly changed with MeHg exposure. Functional enrichment/depletion analysis showed that the lipid metabolic process and proteolysis were affected in both two lobes. Functional changes in FL were characterized in cell cycle and cell division, sulfur compound metabolic process, microtubule-based process and glycerolipid metabolic process. In comparison, proteins were enriched in the functions of transport, carbohydrate metabolic process, chemical caused homeostasis and regulation of body fluid levels in OL. Pathway analysis predicted that vasopressin-regulated water reabsorption was disturbed in MeHg-treated FL. Our results showed that MeHg induced regional specific protein changes in FL and OL but with similar endpoint effects such as energy diminish and disruption of water transport. APOE and GPX1 were shown to be possible key proteins targeted by MeHg leading to multiple functional changes in OL. This is the first report of the whole proteome changes of primate cerebrum for MeHg neurotoxicity, and the results will contribute to the understanding of molecular basis of MeHg intoxication in humans.

  12. Extensive genetic variation in somatic human tissues.

    PubMed

    O'Huallachain, Maeve; Karczewski, Konrad J; Weissman, Sherman M; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Snyder, Michael P

    2012-10-30

    Genetic variation between individuals has been extensively investigated, but differences between tissues within individuals are far less understood. It is commonly assumed that all healthy cells that arise from the same zygote possess the same genomic content, with a few known exceptions in the immune system and germ line. However, a growing body of evidence shows that genomic variation exists between differentiated tissues. We investigated the scope of somatic genomic variation between tissues within humans. Analysis of copy number variation by high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization in diverse tissues from six unrelated subjects reveals a significant number of intraindividual genomic changes between tissues. Many (79%) of these events affect genes. Our results have important consequences for understanding normal genetic and phenotypic variation within individuals, and they have significant implications for both the etiology of genetic diseases such as cancer and for immortalized cell lines that might be used in research and therapeutics.

  13. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. An integrative analysis of TFBS-clustered regions reveals new transcriptional regulation models on the accessible chromatin landscape.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hebing; Li, Hao; Liu, Feng; Zheng, Xiaofei; Wang, Shengqi; Bo, Xiaochen; Shu, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) define the accessible chromatin landscape and have revolutionised the discovery of distinct cis-regulatory elements in diverse organisms. Here, we report the first comprehensive map of human transcription factor binding site (TFBS)-clustered regions using Gaussian kernel density estimation based on genome-wide mapping of the TFBSs in 133 human cell and tissue types. Approximately 1.6 million distinct TFBS-clustered regions, collectively spanning 27.7% of the human genome, were discovered. The TFBS complexity assigned to each TFBS-clustered region was highly correlated with genomic location, cell selectivity, evolutionary conservation, sequence features, and functional roles. An integrative analysis of these regions using ENCODE data revealed transcription factor occupancy, transcriptional activity, histone modification, DNA methylation, and chromatin structures that varied based on TFBS complexity. Furthermore, we found that we could recreate lineage-branching relationships by simple clustering of the TFBS-clustered regions from terminally differentiated cells. Based on these findings, a model of transcriptional regulation determined by TFBS complexity is proposed. PMID:25682954

  15. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Andrew K.; Thompson, David R.; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit ∼ 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through ∼ 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571–6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign. PMID:27528660

  16. Comparative phylogeography reveals deep lineages and regional evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Dustin A.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Barr, Kelly R.; Inman, Richard D.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We explored lineage diversification within desert-dwelling fauna. Our goals were (1) to determine whether phylogenetic lineages and population expansions were consistent with younger Pleistocene climate fluctuation hypotheses or much older events predicted by pre-Pleistocene vicariance hypotheses, (2) to assess concordance in spatial patterns of genetic divergence and diversity among species and (3) to identify regional evolutionary hotspots of divergence and diversity and assess their conservation status. Location: Mojave, Colorado, and Sonoran Deserts, USA. Methods: We analysed previously published gene sequence data for twelve species. We used Bayesian gene tree methods to estimate lineages and divergence times. Within each lineage, we tested for population expansion and age of expansion using coalescent approaches. We mapped interpopulation genetic divergence and intra-population genetic diversity in a GIS to identify hotspots of highest genetic divergence and diversity and to assess whether protected lands overlapped with evolutionary hotspots. Results: In seven of the 12 species, lineage divergence substantially predated the Pleistocene. Historical population expansion was found in eight species, but expansion events postdated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in only four. For all species assessed, six hotspots of high genetic divergence and diversity were concentrated in the Colorado Desert, along the Colorado River and in the Mojave/Sonoran ecotone. At least some proportion of the land within each recovered hotspot was categorized as protected, yet four of the six also overlapped with major areas of human development. Main conclusions: Most of the species studied here diversified into distinct Mojave and Sonoran lineages prior to the LGM – supporting older diversification hypotheses. Several evolutionary hotspots were recovered but are not strategically paired with areas of protected land. Long-term preservation of species-level biodiversity would

  17. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Christian; Thorpe, Andrew K; Thompson, David R; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D; Aubrey, Andrew D; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O

    2016-08-30

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit [Formula: see text] 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through [Formula: see text] 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571-6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign. PMID:27528660

  18. Enhancement of American chestnut somatic seedling production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, G M; Merkle, S A

    2005-08-01

    Somatic embryogenesis holds promise for mass propagation of American chestnut trees bred or genetically engineered for resistance to chestnut blight. However, low germination frequency of chestnut somatic embryos has limited somatic seedling production for this forest tree. We tested the effects of culture regime (semi-solid versus liquid), cold treatment, AC and somatic embryo morphology (i.e., cotyledon number) on germination and conversion of the somatic embryos. Cold treatment for 12 weeks was critical for conversion of chestnut somatic embryos to somatic seedlings, raising conversion frequencies for one line to 47%, compared to 7% with no cold treatment. AC improved germination and conversion frequency for one line to 77% and 59%, respectively, and kept roots from darkening. For two lines that produced embryos with one, two or three-plus cotyledons, cotyledon number did not affect germination or conversion frequency. We also established embryogenic American chestnut suspension cultures and adapted a fractionation/plating system that allowed us to produce populations of relatively synchronous somatic embryos for multiple lines. Embryos derived from suspension cultures of two lines tested had higher conversion frequencies (46% and 48%) than those from cultures maintained on semi-solid medium (7% and 30%). The improvements in manipulation of American chestnut embryogenic cultures described in this study have allowed over a 100-fold increase in somatic seedling production efficiency over what we reported previously and thus constitute a substantial advance toward the application of somatic embryogenesis for mass clonal propagation of the tree.

  19. Rapid regional surface uplift of the northern Altiplano plateau revealed by multiproxy paleoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Nandini; Garzione, Carmala N.; Jaramillo, Carlos; Shanahan, Timothy; Carlotto, Victor; Pullen, Alex; Moreno, Federico; Anderson, Veronica; Moreno, Enrique; Eiler, John

    2016-08-01

    The central Altiplano is inferred to have experienced ∼ 2.5 ± 1km surface uplift between ∼10 and 6 Ma, while the southern Altiplano experienced a similar magnitude of surface uplift that began earlier, between ∼16 and 9 Ma. To properly constrain the along strike timing of the Altiplano plateau surface uplift, it is necessary to know how and when the northernmost part of the Altiplano plateau evolved. We reconstruct the paleoclimate and infer the corresponding paleoelevation from the Miocene-Pliocene deposits of the Descanso-Yauri basin (14-15°S) in the northernmost part of the Altiplano plateau using 4 different proxies, including carbonate clumped isotope composition (i.e., Δ47 values), carbonate δ18Oc, leaf wax δDwax and pollen assemblages from paleosol, lacustrine and palustrine carbonates and organic-rich sediments. The isotopic signatures reflect past climate conditions of mean annual air temperature (Δ47) and meteoric water isotope values (δ18Oc, δDwax). Our results show that the northernmost plateau remained at low elevation (0.9 ± 0.8 to 2.1 ± 0.9km) until late Miocene time (∼9 Ma) characterized by ∼15 °C warmer than modern temperature (mean annual air temperature of 23 ± 4 °C, 2σ), low elevation vegetation and precipitation signature with reconstructed □ δ18Omw (VSMOW) of - 8.3 ± 2.0 ‰ (2 σ) from carbonate (δ18Oc) and - 8.6 ± 1.8 ‰ (2 σ) from leaf wax (δDwax). Modern elevations of 4 km were not reached until 5.4 ± 1.0Ma, as indicated by a negative shift in δDwax (VSMOW) from - 143.4 ± 12.8 ‰ (2 σ) to - 209.2 ± 21.1 ‰ (2 σ) between 9.1 ± 0.7 and 5.4 ± 1.0Ma. The timing of surface uplift of the northernmost Altiplano is consistent with the evidence for late Miocene surface uplift of the central Altiplano (16-19°S) between 10 and 6 Ma, and indicates that regional scale uplift in the northern-central plateau significantly postdates the onset of surface uplift in the southern Altiplano (19-22°S) between ∼16

  20. Gravity waves, Tides and Planetary wave characteristics revealed by network of MLT radars over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Ramanjaneyulu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) mean winds, gravity waves, tidal and planetary wave characteristics are investigated using two years (2013-2015) of advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupathi (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India. The observations reveal the presence of high frequency gravity waves (30-120 minutes), atmospheric tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and terr-diurnal) along with long period oscillations in both zonal and meridional winds. Background mean zonal winds show clear semi-annual oscillation in the mesosphere, whereas meridional winds are characterized by annual oscillation as expected. Diurnal tide amplitudes are significantly larger (60-80 m/s) than semi-diurnal (10-20 m/s) and terr-diurnal (5-8 m/s) tides and larger in meridional than zonal winds. The measured meridional components are in good agreement with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09) predictions than zonal up to ~90 km in all the seasons, except fall equinox. Diurnal tidal phase matches well than the amplitudes between observations and model predictions. However, no similarity is being found in the semi-diurnal tides between observations and model. The measurements are further compared with nearby Thumba meteor radar (8.5oN, 77oE) observations. Some differences do exist between the measurements from Tirupati and Thumba meteor radar and model outputs at greater heights and the possible reasons are discussed. SVU meteor radar observations clearly showed the dominance of well-known ultra-fast kelvin waves (3.5 days), 5-8 day, 16 day, 27 day, and 30-40 day oscillations. Due to higher meteor count extending up to 110 km, we could investigate the variability of these PWs and oscillations covering wider range (70-110 km) for the first time. Significant change above 100 km is noticed in all the above mentioned PW activity and oscillations. We also used ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets available at 0.125x0.125 degree grids for investigating the characteristics of these PW right from surface to 1 h

  1. Somatic copy number losses on chromosome 9q21.33q22.33 encompassing the PTCH1 loci associated with cardiac fibroma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Tongjian; Wang, Dong; Liu, Jinxiu; Yu, Wenqian; Liu, Xiangju; Xiang, Xiaoli; Dong, Kai; You, Feng; Zhang, Guichun; Ju, Jifeng; Zhu, Meng; Duan, Wenyuan; Qiao, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac fibroma is an extremely rare benign tumor that remains poorly characterized genetically. Somatic copy number alterations are common in tumors and have been defined as a crucial factor leading to tumors. In this study, we present a child diagnosed with cardiac fibroma with somatic copy number losses of a total of three discontinuous segments from 9q21.33 to 9q22.33, including a mosaic deletion of PTCH1. PTCH1 has been associated with sporadic cardiac fibroma. Sequencing analysis of the PTCH1 gene has not revealed any causative mutation. Quantitative PCR analysis of PTCH1 further confirms somatic copy number losses. Our data narrow down the critical causative deletions for sporadic cardiac fibroma to a region more precise than any other previously reported one. Our results suggest important roles of somatic copy number losses on chromosome 9q21.33q22.33 in the development of sporadic cardiac fibroma; these findings may provide a better understanding of sporadic cardiac fibroma pathogenesis and contribute to the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers of this neoplasm. . PMID:26564558

  2. Revealing the flexoelectricity in the mixed-phase regions of epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng-En; Liu, Heng-Jui; Dinelli, Franco; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chang, Chen-Shiung; Chien, Forest Shih-Sen; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the elastic response on the nanoscale phase boundaries of multiferroics is an essential issue in order to explain their exotic behaviour. Mixed-phase BiFeO3 films, epitaxially grown on LaAlO3 (001) substrates, have been investigated by means of scanning probe microscopy to characterize the elastic and piezoelectric responses in the mixed-phase region of rhombohedral-like monoclinic (MI) and tilted tetragonal-like monoclinic (MII,tilt) phases. Ultrasonic force microscopy reveal that the regions with low/high stiffness values topologically coincide with the MI/MII,tilt phases. X-ray diffraction strain analysis confirms that the MI phase is more compliant than the MII,tilt one. Significantly, the correlation between elastic modulation and piezoresponse across the mixed-phase regions manifests that the flexoelectric effect results in the enhancement of the piezoresponse at the phase boundaries and in the MI regions. This accounts for the giant electromechanical effect in strained mixed-phase BiFeO3 films. PMID:25627445

  3. The histone chaperone CAF-1 safeguards somatic cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Cheloufi, Sihem; Elling, Ulrich; Hopfgartner, Barbara; Jung, Youngsook L; Murn, Jernej; Ninova, Maria; Hubmann, Maria; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ang, Cheen Euong; Tenen, Danielle; Wesche, Daniel J; Abazova, Nadezhda; Hogue, Max; Tasdemir, Nilgun; Brumbaugh, Justin; Rathert, Philipp; Jude, Julian; Ferrari, Francesco; Blanco, Andres; Fellner, Michaela; Wenzel, Daniel; Zinner, Marietta; Vidal, Simon E; Bell, Oliver; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Chang, Howard Y.; Almouzni, Genevieve; Lowe, Scott W; Rinn, John; Wernig, Marius; Aravin, Alexei; Shi, Yang; Park, Peter; Penninger, Josef M; Zuber, Johannes; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Cellular differentiation involves profound remodeling of chromatic landscapes, yet the mechanisms by which somatic cell identity is subsequently maintained remain incompletely understood. To further elucidate regulatory pathways that safeguard the somatic state, we performed two comprehensive RNAi screens targeting chromatin factors during transcription factor-mediated reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Remarkably, subunits of the chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) complex emerged as the most prominent hits from both screens, followed by modulators of lysine sumoylation and heterochromatin maintenance. Optimal modulation of both CAF-1 and transcription factor levels increased reprogramming efficiency by several orders of magnitude and facilitated iPSC formation in as little as 4 days. Mechanistically, CAF-1 suppression led to a more accessible chromatin structure at enhancer elements early during reprogramming. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in somatic heterochromatin domains, increased binding of Sox2 to pluripotency-specific targets and activation of associated genes. Notably, suppression of CAF-1 also enhanced the direct conversion of B cells into macrophages and fibroblasts into neurons. Together, our findings reveal the histone chaperone CAF-1 as a novel regulator of somatic cell identity during transcription factor-induced cell fate transitions and provide a potential strategy to modulate cellular plasticity in a regenerative setting. PMID:26659182

  4. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a somatic missense mutation of NBN in clear cell sarcoma of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jia, Zhen; Mao, Fengbiao; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rong Fa; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare, low-grade carcinoma commonly located in the distal extremities of young adults involving tendons and aponeuroses. CCS is characterized by its poor prognosis due to late diagnosis, multiple local recurrence, propensity to late metastases, and a high rate of tumor-related mortality. The genetic cause for CCS is thought to be EWSR1 gene translocation. However, CCS lacking a translocation may have other, as yet uncharacterized, genetic mutations that can cause the same pathological effect. A combination of whole‑exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing of cancer tissue and venous blood from a patient diagnosed with CCS of the salivary gland revealed a somatic missense mutation, c.1061C>T (p.P354L), in exon 9 of the Nibrin gene (NBN). This somatic missense mutation led to the conversion of proline to leucine (p.P354L), resulting in deleterious effects for the NBN protein. Multiple-sequence alignments showed that codon 354, where the mutation (c.1061C>T) occurs, is located within a phylogenetically conserved region. In conclusion, we here report a somatic missense mutation c.1061C>T (p.P354L) in the NBN gene in a patient with CCS lacking an EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Our findings broaden the genotypic spectrum of CCS and provide new molecular insight that should prove useful in the future clinical genetic diagnosis of CCS. PMID:27109316

  5. Clarifying the latent structure and correlates of somatic symptom distress: A bifactor model approach.

    PubMed

    Witthöft, Michael; Fischer, Susanne; Jasper, Fabian; Rist, Fred; Nater, Urs M

    2016-01-01

    Distressing somatic symptoms are ubiquitous both in mental disorders and medical diseases. From a psychometric perspective, the structure of somatic symptom distress is unclear, and little is known about the strengths of associations to related constructs, such as health anxiety and somatosensory amplification. To clarify the structure of somatic symptom distress and to explore associations to health anxiety, somatosensory amplification, and functional somatic syndromes, data sets of 2 samples of college students from Germany (N = 1,520) and Switzerland (N = 3,053) were investigated with confirmatory factor analysis with robust estimation. A bifactor model (with 1 general and 4 orthogonal specific symptom factors-gastrointestinal, fatigue, cardio-pulmonary, and pain symptoms) revealed the best model fit. Medium-sized associations were found among latent factors of general somatic symptom distress, health anxiety, and depression. First evidence for the construct validity of the latent variables within the proposed bifactor structure was gained by observing (a) strong associations between the general somatic symptom distress factor and somatosensory amplification and (b) significant associations between both the general somatic symptom factor as well as the symptom-specific factors with functional somatic syndromes. The results offer a theoretically and psychometrically plausible model for the structure of somatic symptom distress and suggest a distinction between cognitive-affective and sensory aspects of symptom perception. The findings are compatible with current cognitive psychological and neuropsychological approaches to symptom perception and imply that somatic symptom distress is a multidimensional phenomenon that is both strongly linked to but also clearly separable from related constructs. PMID:26029944

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of somatic frog nerve ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Seliverstov, George A.; Akchurin, George G.; Kudryashova, Svetlana Y.

    2004-06-01

    New techniques research mechanisms of photdynamic reactions at somatic frog nerve was approved. Dosimetry PDT with minimum time resolution ~1ms determined by changing the amplitude of compound action potential of somatic frog nerve. Light-induced inactivation of dynamic response of somatic frog nerve on electrical pulsed excitation was study ex vivo. The light-sensitive dyes: methylene blue (Mb), Indocianin green and eryhtrocin-B has been used on photodynamic induced inactivation of the processes generation nerve pulses. Inactivation of consequence action potential of somatic frog nerve using excitation of electical pulsed was achieved by irradiation with He-Ne laser light in a red spectral region (λ=633 nm, power level 2-20 mW), diode laser (λ=805 nm, P<0.1-1 W/cm2) in the case of Indocianin green and YAG:Nd laser (λ=532 nm, P~1mW) for eryhtrocin-B. It was discovered that methylene blue, Indocainine green and erytrocin-B decrease of the amplitude compound action potential of the ensemble neurons. The possible cell death mechanism was connected with damage of the sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (K-Na ATP) active transport which decrease of amplitude of compound action potential and decrease lifetime ionic channel of membrane nerve.

  7. Somatic complaints in childhood tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frank, M S; Sieg, K G; Gaffney, G R

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six children diagnosed with chronic tic disorders (18 with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and 8 with chronic motor tic disorder) were studied for unexplained physical complaints. Compared to normal controls, an excess of somatic complaints was found in the tic disorders group; this was similar to an excess of somatic complaints in a mixed psychiatric clinic group. Medication produced no significant effect on somatic complaints for patients in the tic and psychiatric clinic groups. Within the tic disorders group, no significant correlation was found between the increased somatic complaints and the severity of anxiety, dysphoria, or movement disorder. PMID:1961851

  8. BINNING SOMATIC MUTATIONS BASED ON BIOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR PREDICTING SURVIVAL: AN APPLICATION IN RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dokyoon; Li, Ruowang; Dudek, Scott M.; Wallace, John R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2014-01-01

    Enormous efforts of whole exome and genome sequencing from hundreds to thousands of patients have provided the landscape of somatic genomic alterations in many cancer types to distinguish between driver mutations and passenger mutations. Driver mutations show strong associations with cancer clinical outcomes such as survival. However, due to the heterogeneity of tumors, somatic mutation profiles are exceptionally sparse whereas other types of genomic data such as miRNA or gene expression contain much more complete data for all genomic features with quantitative values measured in each patient. To overcome the extreme sparseness of somatic mutation profiles and allow for the discovery of combinations of somatic mutations that may predict cancer clinical outcomes, here we propose a new approach for binning somatic mutations based on existing biological knowledge. Through the analysis using renal cell carcinoma dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified combinations of somatic mutation burden based on pathways, protein families, evolutionary conversed regions, and regulatory regions associated with survival. Due to the nature of heterogeneity in cancer, using a binning strategy for somatic mutation profiles based on biological knowledge will be valuable for improved prognostic biomarkers and potentially for tailoring therapeutic strategies by identifying combinations of driver mutations. PMID:25592572

  9. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  10. Crustal S-wave structure beneath Eastern Black Sea Region revealed by Rayleigh-wave group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Hakan; Alkan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the crustal S-wave structure beneath the Eastern Black Sea Region (including the Eastern Black Sea Basin (EBSB) and Eastern Pontides (EP)) has been revealed using inversion of single-station, fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities in the period range of 4-40 seconds. We used digital broadband recordings of 13 regional earthquakes that recently occurred in the easternmost EBSB recorded at stations of the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). The average group-velocity-dispersion curves were generated from 26 paths for the EBSB, and 16 paths for the EP, and they were inverted to determine the average 1-D shear-wave structure of the region. We have created a pseudo-section, roughly depicting the crustal structure of the region based on the group velocity inversion results of all station-earthquake paths. The thickness of the sedimentary layer reaches 12 km in the center of EBSB (Vs = 2.5-3.1 km/s) and decreases 4 km in the EP. There is a thin sedimentary layer in the EP (Vs = 2.7 km/s). A consolidated thin crust that exists in the EBSB possesses a high seismic velocity (Vs = 3.8 km/s). While a thin (∼26 km) and transitional crust exists beneath the EBSB, a thick (about 42 km) continental crust exists beneath the EP where the Conrad is clearly seen at about a 24 km depth. Thick continental crust in the EP region is clearly distinguished from a gradational velocity change (Vs = 3.4-3.8 km/s). The Moho dips approximately southwards, and the Vs velocity (4.25-4.15 km/s) beneath the Moho discontinuity decreases from the EBSB to the EP in the N-S direction. This may be an indication of a southward subduction.

  11. Molecular cloning and construction of the coding region for human acetylcholinesterase reveals a G + C-rich attenuating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soreq, H.; Ben-Aziz, R.; Prody, C.A.; Seidman, S.; Gnatt, A.; Neville, L.; Lieman-Hurwitz, J.; Lev-Lehman, E.; Ginzberg, D. ); Lapidot-Lifson, Y. Tel Aviv Univ. ); Zakut, H. )

    1990-12-01

    To study the primary structure of human acetylcholinesterase and its gene expression and amplification, cDNA libraries from human tissues expressing oocyte-translatable AcChoEase mRNA were constructed and screened with labeled oligodeoxynucleotide probes. Several cDNA clones were isolated that encoded a polypeptide with {ge}50% identically aligned amino acids to Torpedo AcChoEase and human butyrylcholinesterase. However, these cDNA clones were all truncated within a 300-nucleotide-long G + C-rich region with a predicted pattern of secondary structure having a high Gibbs free energy downstream from the expected 5{prime} end of the coding region. Screening of a genomic DNA library revealed the missing 5{prime} domain. When ligated to the cDNA and constructed into a transcription vector, this sequence encoded a synthetic mRNA translated in microinjected oocytes into catalytically active AcChoEase with marked preference for acetylthiocholine over butyrylthiocholine as a substrate, susceptibility to inhibition by the AcChoEase inhibitor BW284C51, and resistance to the AcChoEase inhibitor tetraisopropylpyrophosphoramide. Blot hybridization of genomic DNA from different individuals carrying amplified AcChoEase genes revealed variable intensities and restriction patterns with probes from the regions upstream and downstream from the predicted G + C-rich structure. Thus, the human AcChoEase gene includes a putative G + C-rich attenuator domain and is subject to structural alterations in cases of AcChoEase gene amplification.

  12. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  13. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of true morels (Morchella) reveals high levels of endemics in Turkey relative to other regions of Europe.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Hatira; Büyükalaca, Saadet; Hansen, Karen; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to better understand how the phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella) in Turkey compares with species found in other regions of the world. The current research builds on our recently published surveys of 10 Turkish provinces and the northern hemisphere in which DNA sequence data from 247 and 562 collections respectively were analyzed phylogenetically. Herein we report on phylogenetic analyses of 243 additional collections made in spring 2009 and 2010 from eight additional provinces in the Aegean, Black Sea, central Anatolia, eastern Anatolia and Marmara regions of Turkey. Our analysis revealed that five species within the Esculenta clade (yellow morels) and 15 species within the Elata clade (black morels) were present in Turkey. Our preliminary results also indicate that M. anatolica, recently described from a collection in Muğla province in the Aegean region of Turkey, is a closely related sister of M. rufobrunnea; these two species comprise a separate evolutionary lineage from the Esculenta and Elata clades. Nine species of Morchella currently are known only from Turkey, four species were present in Turkey and other European countries and seven species might have been introduced to Turkey anthropogenically. Three of the putatively exotic species in Turkey appear to be endemic to western North America; they are nested within a clade of fire-adapted morels that dates to the late Oligocene, 25 000 000 y ago. Our results indicate that there are roughly twice as many Morchella species in Turkey compared with the other regions of Europe sampled. Knowledge of Morchella species diversity and their biogeographic distribution are crucial for formulating informed conservation policies directed at preventing species loss and ensuring that annual morel harvests are sustainable and ecologically sound.

  15. Inherited and somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in Guam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Dana M; Spathis, Rita; Chan, Chim W; Vilar, Miguel G; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Lynch, Daniel; Ehrlich, Emily; Kerath, Samantha; Chowdhury, Risana; Robinowitz, Leah; Koji Lum, J; Garruto, Ralph M

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders, although the exact role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in this process is unresolved. We investigated inherited and somatic mtDNA substitutions and deletions in Guam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism-dementia (PD). Hypervariable segment 1 sequences of Chamorro mtDNA revealed that the odds ratio of a PD or ALS diagnosis was increased for individuals in the E1 haplogroup while individuals in the E2 haplogroup had decreased odds of an ALS or PD diagnosis. Once the disorders were examined separately, it became evident that PD was responsible for these results. When the entire mitochondrial genome was sequenced for a subset of individuals, the nonsynonymous mutation at nucleotide position 9080, shared by all E2 individuals, resulted in a significantly low odds ratio for a diagnosis of ALS or PD. Private polymorphisms found in transfer and ribosomal RNA regions were found only in ALS and PD patients in the E1 haplogroup. Somatic mtDNA deletions in the entire mtDNA genome were not associated with either ALS or PD. We conclude that mtDNA haplogroup effects may result in mitochondrial dysfunction in Guam PD and reflect Guam population history. Thus it is reasonable to consider Guam ALS and PD as complex disorders with both environmental prerequisites and small genetic effects.

  16. Characterization of Somatic Mutations in Air Pollution-Related Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian-Jun; Yang, Min-Jun; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Li-Chuan; Cheng, Xin; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Yun-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Hong; Li, Gao-Feng; He, Shui-Wang; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Liang; Pan, Chun-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chen, Hao-Bin; Hong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Xiao-Lu; Mao, Wen-Jing; Jin, Xiao-Long; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Qiang; Gu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Zi; Dong, Hui; Tian, Lin-Wei; Chen, Sai-Juan; Cao, Yi; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-06-01

    Air pollution has been classified as Group 1 carcinogenic to humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. In Xuanwei City of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China attributed to severe air pollution generated by combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis of air pollution. Here we analyzed the somatic mutations of 164 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from Xuanwei and control regions (CR) where smoky coal was not used. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mean of 289 somatic exonic mutations per tumor and the frequent C:G → A:T nucleotide substitutions in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Exome sequencing of 2010 genes showed that Xuanwei and CR NSCLCs had a mean of 68 and 22 mutated genes per tumor, respectively (p < 0.0001). We found 167 genes (including TP53, RYR2, KRAS, CACNA1E) which had significantly higher mutation frequencies in Xuanwei than CR patients, and mutations in most genes in Xuanwei NSCLCs differed from those in CR cases. The mutation rates of 70 genes (e.g., RYR2, MYH3, GPR144, CACNA1E) were associated with patients' lifetime benzo(a)pyrene exposure. This study uncovers the mutation spectrum of air pollution-related lung cancers, and provides evidence for pollution exposure-genomic mutation relationship at a large scale.

  17. Characterization of Somatic Mutations in Air Pollution-Related Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xian-Jun; Yang, Min-Jun; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Li-Chuan; Cheng, Xin; Wen, Zhe-Sheng; Huang, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Yun-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Hong; Li, Gao-Feng; He, Shui-Wang; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Ma, Liang; Pan, Chun-Ming; Wang, Ping; Chen, Hao-Bin; Hong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Xiao-Lu; Mao, Wen-Jing; Jin, Xiao-Long; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shu-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Qiang; Gu, Wen-Yi; Liu, Zi; Dong, Hui; Tian, Lin-Wei; Chen, Sai-Juan; Cao, Yi; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has been classified as Group 1 carcinogenic to humans, but the underlying tumorigenesis remains unclear. In Xuanwei City of Yunnan Province, the lung cancer incidence is among the highest in China attributed to severe air pollution generated by combustion of smoky coal, providing a unique opportunity to dissect lung carcinogenesis of air pollution. Here we analyzed the somatic mutations of 164 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) from Xuanwei and control regions (CR) where smoky coal was not used. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mean of 289 somatic exonic mutations per tumor and the frequent C:G → A:T nucleotide substitutions in Xuanwei NSCLCs. Exome sequencing of 2010 genes showed that Xuanwei and CR NSCLCs had a mean of 68 and 22 mutated genes per tumor, respectively (p < 0.0001). We found 167 genes (including TP53, RYR2, KRAS, CACNA1E) which had significantly higher mutation frequencies in Xuanwei than CR patients, and mutations in most genes in Xuanwei NSCLCs differed from those in CR cases. The mutation rates of 70 genes (e.g., RYR2, MYH3, GPR144, CACNA1E) were associated with patients' lifetime benzo(a)pyrene exposure. This study uncovers the mutation spectrum of air pollution-related lung cancers, and provides evidence for pollution exposure–genomic mutation relationship at a large scale. PMID:26288819

  18. Comparative genomics reveals a functional thyroid-specific element in the far upstream region of the PAX8 gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms leading to a fully differentiated thyrocite are still object of intense study even if it is well known that thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, NIS and TSHr are the marker genes of thyroid differentiation. It is also well known that Pax8, TTF-1, Foxe1 and Hhex are the thyroid-enriched transcription factors responsible for the expression of the above genes, thus are responsible for the differentiated thyroid phenotype. In particular, the role of Pax8 in the fully developed thyroid gland was studied in depth and it was established that it plays a key role in thyroid development and differentiation. However, to date the bases for the thyroid-enriched expression of this transcription factor have not been unraveled yet. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a functional thyroid-specific enhancer element located far upstream of the Pax8 gene. Results We hypothesized that regulatory cis-acting elements are conserved among mammalian genes. Comparison of a genomic region extending for about 100 kb at the 5'-flanking region of the mouse and human Pax8 gene revealed several conserved regions that were tested for enhancer activity in thyroid and non-thyroid cells. Using this approach we identified one putative thyroid-specific regulatory element located 84.6 kb upstream of the Pax8 transcription start site. The in silico data were verified by promoter-reporter assays in thyroid and non-thyroid cells. Interestingly, the identified far upstream element manifested a very high transcriptional activity in the thyroid cell line PC Cl3, but showed no activity in HeLa cells. In addition, the data here reported indicate that the thyroid-enriched transcription factor TTF-1 is able to bind in vitro and in vivo the Pax8 far upstream element, and is capable to activate transcription from it. Conclusions Results of this study reveal the presence of a thyroid-specific regulatory element in the 5' upstream region of the Pax8 gene. The

  19. Parental somatic mosaicism is underrecognized and influences recurrence risk of genomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian M; Yuan, Bo; Robberecht, Caroline; Pfundt, Rolph; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; McEntagart, Meriel E; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Bartnik, Magdalena; Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Plunkett, Katie S; Pursley, Amber N; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema R; Bacino, Carlos A; Vast, Mala; Marks, Karen; Patton, Michael; Olofsson, Peter; Patel, Ankita; Veltman, Joris A; Cheung, Sau Wai; Shaw, Chad A; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Vermeesch, Joris R; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2014-08-01

    New human mutations are thought to originate in germ cells, thus making a recurrence of the same mutation in a sibling exceedingly rare. However, increasing sensitivity of genomic technologies has anecdotally revealed mosaicism for mutations in somatic tissues of apparently healthy parents. Such somatically mosaic parents might also have germline mosaicism that can potentially cause unexpected intergenerational recurrences. Here, we show that somatic mosaicism for transmitted mutations among parents of children with simplex genetic disease is more common than currently appreciated. Using the sensitivity of individual-specific breakpoint PCR, we prospectively screened 100 families with children affected by genomic disorders due to rare deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) determined to be de novo by clinical analysis of parental DNA. Surprisingly, we identified four cases of low-level somatic mosaicism for the transmitted CNV in DNA isolated from parental blood. Integrated probabilistic modeling of gametogenesis developed in response to our observations predicts that mutations in parental blood increase recurrence risk substantially more than parental mutations confined to the germline. Moreover, despite the fact that maternally transmitted mutations are the minority of alleles, our model suggests that sexual dimorphisms in gametogenesis result in a greater proportion of somatically mosaic transmitting mothers who are thus at increased risk of recurrence. Therefore, somatic mosaicism together with sexual differences in gametogenesis might explain a considerable fraction of unexpected recurrences of X-linked recessive disease. Overall, our results underscore an important role for somatic mosaicism and mitotic replicative mutational mechanisms in transmission genetics.

  20. Parental Somatic Mosaicism Is Underrecognized and Influences Recurrence Risk of Genomic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian M.; Yuan, Bo; Robberecht, Caroline; Pfundt, Rolph; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; McEntagart, Meriel E.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Erez, Ayelet; Bartnik, Magdalena; Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Plunkett, Katie S.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Bi, Weimin; Lalani, Seema R.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Vast, Mala; Marks, Karen; Patton, Michael; Olofsson, Peter; Patel, Ankita; Veltman, Joris A.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Shaw, Chad A.; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Lupski, James R.; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    New human mutations are thought to originate in germ cells, thus making a recurrence of the same mutation in a sibling exceedingly rare. However, increasing sensitivity of genomic technologies has anecdotally revealed mosaicism for mutations in somatic tissues of apparently healthy parents. Such somatically mosaic parents might also have germline mosaicism that can potentially cause unexpected intergenerational recurrences. Here, we show that somatic mosaicism for transmitted mutations among parents of children with simplex genetic disease is more common than currently appreciated. Using the sensitivity of individual-specific breakpoint PCR, we prospectively screened 100 families with children affected by genomic disorders due to rare deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) determined to be de novo by clinical analysis of parental DNA. Surprisingly, we identified four cases of low-level somatic mosaicism for the transmitted CNV in DNA isolated from parental blood. Integrated probabilistic modeling of gametogenesis developed in response to our observations predicts that mutations in parental blood increase recurrence risk substantially more than parental mutations confined to the germline. Moreover, despite the fact that maternally transmitted mutations are the minority of alleles, our model suggests that sexual dimorphisms in gametogenesis result in a greater proportion of somatically mosaic transmitting mothers who are thus at increased risk of recurrence. Therefore, somatic mosaicism together with sexual differences in gametogenesis might explain a considerable fraction of unexpected recurrences of X-linked recessive disease. Overall, our results underscore an important role for somatic mosaicism and mitotic replicative mutational mechanisms in transmission genetics. PMID:25087610

  1. Depression, Life Events and Somatic Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozzini, Renzo; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between somatic symptoms, depression, and life events (health status, function, social satisfaction, income) in a population of 1,201 elderly persons living at home. Found depression was the most important factor in the appearance of somatic complaints; however, life events were important cofactors in defining…

  2. Five classic articles in somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Research on somatic cell reprogramming has progressed significantly over the past few decades, from nuclear transfer into frogs' eggs in 1952 to the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in the present day. In this article, I review five landmark papers that have laid the foundation for current efforts to apply somatic cell reprogramming in the clinic. PMID:20885901

  3. Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of Fenneropenaeus chinensis populations, as revealed by the analysis of mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiao Yu; Li, Yu Long; Shi, Wei; Kong, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis were investigated using sequence data of the complete mitochondrial control region (CR). Fragments of 993 bp of the CR were sequenced for 93 individuals from five localities over most of the species' range in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. There were 84 variable sites defining 68 haplotypes. Haplotype diversity levels were very high (0.95 ± 0.03-0.99 ± 0.02) in F. chinensis populations, whereas those of nucleotide diversity were moderate to low (0.66 ± 0.36%-0.84 ± 0.46%). Analysis of molecular variance and conventional population statistics (F(ST) ) revealed no significant genetic structure throughout the range of F. chinensis. Mismatch distribution, estimates of population parameters and neutrality tests revealed that the significant fluctuations and shallow coalescence of mtDNA genealogies observed were coincident with estimated demographic parameters and neutrality tests, in implying important past-population size fluctuations or range expansion. Isolation with Migration (IM) coalescence results suggest that F. chinensis, distributed along the coasts of northern China and the Korean Peninsula (about 1000 km apart), diverged recently, the estimated time-split being 12,800 (7,400-18,600) years ago.

  4. Somatic mosaicism in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Freed, Donald; Stevens, Eric L; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2014-12-11

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the occurrence of two genetically distinct populations of cells within an individual, derived from a postzygotic mutation. In contrast to inherited mutations, somatic mosaic mutations may affect only a portion of the body and are not transmitted to progeny. These mutations affect varying genomic sizes ranging from single nucleotides to entire chromosomes and have been implicated in disease, most prominently cancer. The phenotypic consequences of somatic mosaicism are dependent upon many factors including the developmental time at which the mutation occurs, the areas of the body that are affected, and the pathophysiological effect(s) of the mutation. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies has augmented existing array-based and cytogenetic approaches for the identification of somatic mutations. We outline the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and highlight recent insights into the role of somatic mosaicism in causing cancer, neurodegenerative, monogenic, and complex disease.

  5. Somatic Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Donald; Stevens, Eric L.; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the occurrence of two genetically distinct populations of cells within an individual, derived from a postzygotic mutation. In contrast to inherited mutations, somatic mosaic mutations may affect only a portion of the body and are not transmitted to progeny. These mutations affect varying genomic sizes ranging from single nucleotides to entire chromosomes and have been implicated in disease, most prominently cancer. The phenotypic consequences of somatic mosaicism are dependent upon many factors including the developmental time at which the mutation occurs, the areas of the body that are affected, and the pathophysiological effect(s) of the mutation. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies has augmented existing array-based and cytogenetic approaches for the identification of somatic mutations. We outline the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and highlight recent insights into the role of somatic mosaicism in causing cancer, neurodegenerative, monogenic, and complex disease. PMID:25513881

  6. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  7. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi.

    PubMed

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  8. Whole-genome sequencing reveals small genomic regions of introgression in an introduced crater lake population of threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Mori, Seiichi; Takahashi, Aya; Makino, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kitano, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species pose a major threat to biological diversity. Although introduced populations often experience population bottlenecks, some invasive species are thought to be originated from hybridization between multiple populations or species, which can contribute to the maintenance of high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genome sequencing enable us to trace the evolutionary history of invasive species even at whole-genome level and may help to identify the history of past hybridization that may be overlooked by traditional marker-based analysis. Here, we conducted whole-genome sequencing of eight threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) individuals, four from a recently introduced crater lake population and four of the putative source population. We found that both populations have several small genomic regions with high genetic diversity, which resulted from introgression from a closely related species (Gasterosteus nipponicus). The sizes of the regions were too small to be detected with traditional marker-based analysis or even some reduced-representation sequencing methods. Further amplicon sequencing revealed linkage disequilibrium around an introgression site, which suggests the possibility of selective sweep at the introgression site. Thus, interspecies introgression might predate introduction and increase genetic variation in the source population. Whole-genome sequencing of even a small number of individuals can therefore provide higher resolution inference of history of introduced populations. PMID:27069575

  9. Whole-genome sequencing reveals small genomic regions of introgression in an introduced crater lake population of threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Mori, Seiichi; Takahashi, Aya; Makino, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kitano, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species pose a major threat to biological diversity. Although introduced populations often experience population bottlenecks, some invasive species are thought to be originated from hybridization between multiple populations or species, which can contribute to the maintenance of high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genome sequencing enable us to trace the evolutionary history of invasive species even at whole-genome level and may help to identify the history of past hybridization that may be overlooked by traditional marker-based analysis. Here, we conducted whole-genome sequencing of eight threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) individuals, four from a recently introduced crater lake population and four of the putative source population. We found that both populations have several small genomic regions with high genetic diversity, which resulted from introgression from a closely related species (Gasterosteus nipponicus). The sizes of the regions were too small to be detected with traditional marker-based analysis or even some reduced-representation sequencing methods. Further amplicon sequencing revealed linkage disequilibrium around an introgression site, which suggests the possibility of selective sweep at the introgression site. Thus, interspecies introgression might predate introduction and increase genetic variation in the source population. Whole-genome sequencing of even a small number of individuals can therefore provide higher resolution inference of history of introduced populations.

  10. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  11. Deep sequencing of the tobacco mitochondrial transcriptome reveals expressed ORFs and numerous editing sites outside coding regions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to sequence and assemble the tobacco mitochondrial transcriptome and obtain a genomic-level view of steady-state RNA abundance. Plant mitochondrial genomes have a small number of protein coding genes with large and variably sized intergenic spaces. In the tobacco mitogenome these intergenic spaces contain numerous open reading frames (ORFs) with no clear function. Results The assembled transcriptome revealed distinct monocistronic and polycistronic transcripts along with large intergenic spaces with little to no detectable RNA. Eighteen of the 117 ORFs were found to have steady-state RNA amounts above background in both deep-sequencing and qRT-PCR experiments and ten of those were found to be polysome associated. In addition, the assembled transcriptome enabled a full mitogenome screen of RNA C→U editing sites. Six hundred and thirty five potential edits were found with 557 occurring within protein-coding genes, five in tRNA genes, and 73 in non-coding regions. These sites were found in every protein-coding transcript in the tobacco mitogenome. Conclusion These results suggest that a small number of the ORFs within the tobacco mitogenome may produce functional proteins and that RNA editing occurs in coding and non-coding regions of mitochondrial transcripts. PMID:24433288

  12. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  13. Voice-sensitive regions in the dog and human brain are revealed by comparative fMRI.

    PubMed

    Andics, Attila; Gácsi, Márta; Faragó, Tamás; Kis, Anna; Miklósi, Adám

    2014-03-01

    During the approximately 18-32 thousand years of domestication, dogs and humans have shared a similar social environment. Dog and human vocalizations are thus familiar and relevant to both species, although they belong to evolutionarily distant taxa, as their lineages split approximately 90-100 million years ago. In this first comparative neuroimaging study of a nonprimate and a primate species, we made use of this special combination of shared environment and evolutionary distance. We presented dogs and humans with the same set of vocal and nonvocal stimuli to search for functionally analogous voice-sensitive cortical regions. We demonstrate that voice areas exist in dogs and that they show a similar pattern to anterior temporal voice areas in humans. Our findings also reveal that sensitivity to vocal emotional valence cues engages similarly located nonprimary auditory regions in dogs and humans. Although parallel evolution cannot be excluded, our findings suggest that voice areas may have a more ancient evolutionary origin than previously known. PMID:24560578

  14. Somatic Treatments for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Moacyr A; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2012-01-01

    Somatic treatments for mood disorders represent a class of interventions available either as a stand-alone option, or in combination with psychopharmacology and/or psychotherapy. Here, we review the currently available techniques, including those already in clinical use and those still under research. Techniques are grouped into the following categories: (1) seizure therapies, including electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy, (2) noninvasive techniques, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and cranial electric stimulation, (3) surgical approaches, including vagus nerve stimulation, epidural electrical stimulation, and deep brain stimulation, and (4) technologies on the horizon. Additionally, we discuss novel approaches to the optimization of each treatment, and new techniques that are under active investigation. PMID:21976043

  15. Mutagenesis of tGCN5 core region reveals two critical surface residues F90 and R140

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Kinjal Rajesh; Chan, Yan M.; Lee, Man X.; Yang, Ching Yao; Voloshchuk, Natalya; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutagenesis of the tGCN5 core region reveals two residues important for function. {yields} Developed a fluorescent lysate-based activity assay to assess mutants. {yields} Surface-exposed residues F90 and R140 of tGCN5 are critical for H3 acetylation. -- Abstract: Tetrahymena General Control Non-Derepressor 5 (tGCN5) is a critical regulator of gene transcription via acetylation of histones. Since the acetylation ability has been attributed to the 'core region', we perform mutagenesis of residues within the tGCN5 'core region' in order to identify those critical for function and stability. Residues that do not participate in catalysis are identified, mutated and characterized for activity, structure and thermodynamic stability. Variants I107V, Q114L, A121T and A130S maintain the acetylation function relative to wild-type tGCN5, while variants F90Y, F112R and R140H completely abolish function. Of the three non-functional variants, since F112 is mutated into a non-homologous charged residue, a loss in function is expected. However, the remaining two variants are mutated into homologous residues, suggesting that F90 and R140 are critical for the activity of tGCN5. While mutation to homologous residue maintains acetylation of histone H3 for the majority of the variants, the two surface-exposed residues, F90 and R140, appear to be essential for tGCN5 function, structure or stability.

  16. Genetic variation between Schistosoma japonicum lineages from lake and mountainous regions in China revealed by resequencing whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhong; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Schistosomiasis japonica is endemic in mainland China along the Yangtze River, typically distributed in two geographical categories of lake and mountainous regions. Study on schistosome genetic diversity is of interest in respect of understanding parasite biology and transmission, and formulating control strategy. Certain genetic variations may be associated with adaptations to different ecological habitats. The aim of this study is to gain insight into Schistosoma japonicum genetic variation, evolutionary origin and associated causes of different geographic lineages through examining homozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) based on resequenced genome data. We collected S. japonicum samples from four sites, three in the lake regions (LR) of mid-east (Guichi and Tonglin in Anhui province, Laogang in Hunan province) and one in mountainous region (MR) (Xichang in Sichuan province) of south-west of China, resequenced their genomes using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, and made use of the available database of S. japonicum draft genomic sequence as a reference in genome mapping. A total of 14,575 SNPs from 2059 genes were identified in the four lineages. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed significant genetic variation exhibited between the different geographical lineages, and further revealed that the MR Xichang lineage is phylogenetically closer to LR Guich lineage than to other two LR lineages, and the MR lineage might be evolved from LR lineages. More than two thirds of detected SNPs were nonsynonymous; functional annotation of the SNP-containing genes showed that they are involved mainly in biological processes such as signaling and response to stimuli. Notably, unique nonsynonymous SNP variations were detected in 66 genes of MR lineage, inferring possible genetic adaption to mountainous ecological condition. PMID:27207135

  17. Somatic movement and oesophageal motility during isoflurane anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C; Raftery, S; Prys-Roberts, C

    1992-07-01

    The quantal responses for somatic movement, and spontaneous and provoked lower oesophageal contractions (motility) were noted at the time of incision in 72 patients aged 40-65 yr, receiving varying concentrations of isoflurane. Probit analysis of the alveolar concentration of isoflurane required to prevent somatic movement revealed an MAC or EC50 (95% confidence limits) of 1.00 (0.82-1.17)% and EC95 of 2.16 (1.69-3.89)%. The EC50 of isoflurane to suppress spontaneous lower oesophageal contractions was 1.27 (1.12-1.43)%, and the EC95 2.13 (1.78-3.22)%. The EC50 for provoked lower oesophageal contractions was 1.31 (0.93-3.48)% and the EC95 was 6.18% (unable to compute confidence limits).

  18. Differential Responses to a Visual Self-Motion Signal in Human Medial Cortical Regions Revealed by Wide-View Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Atsushi; Sakano, Yuichi; Ando, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Vision is important for estimating self-motion, which is thought to involve optic-flow processing. Here, we investigated the fMRI response profiles in visual area V6, the precuneus motion area (PcM), and the cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv)—three medial brain regions recently shown to be sensitive to optic-flow. We used wide-view stereoscopic stimulation to induce robust self-motion processing. Stimuli included static, randomly moving, and coherently moving dots (simulating forward self-motion). We varied the stimulus size and the presence of stereoscopic information. A combination of univariate and multi-voxel pattern analyses (MVPA) revealed that fMRI responses in the three regions differed from each other. The univariate analysis identified optic-flow selectivity and an effect of stimulus size in V6, PcM, and CSv, among which only CSv showed a significantly lower response to random motion stimuli compared with static conditions. Furthermore, MVPA revealed an optic-flow specific multi-voxel pattern in the PcM and CSv, where the discrimination of coherent motion from both random motion and static conditions showed above-chance prediction accuracy, but that of random motion from static conditions did not. Additionally, while area V6 successfully classified different stimulus sizes regardless of motion pattern, this classification was only partial in PcM and was absent in CSv. This may reflect the known retinotopic representation in V6 and the absence of such clear visuospatial representation in CSv. We also found significant correlations between the strength of subjective self-motion and univariate activation in all examined regions except for primary visual cortex (V1). This neuro-perceptual correlation was significantly higher for V6, PcM, and CSv when compared with V1, and higher for CSv when compared with the visual motion area hMT+. Our convergent results suggest the significant involvement of CSv in self-motion processing, which may give rise to its

  19. Somatic mutation in single human neurons tracks developmental and transcriptional history.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Michael A; Woodworth, Mollie B; Lee, Semin; Evrony, Gilad D; Mehta, Bhaven K; Karger, Amir; Lee, Soohyun; Chittenden, Thomas W; D'Gama, Alissa M; Cai, Xuyu; Luquette, Lovelace J; Lee, Eunjung; Park, Peter J; Walsh, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Neurons live for decades in a postmitotic state, their genomes susceptible to DNA damage. Here we survey the landscape of somatic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the human brain. We identified thousands of somatic SNVs by single-cell sequencing of 36 neurons from the cerebral cortex of three normal individuals. Unlike germline and cancer SNVs, which are often caused by errors in DNA replication, neuronal mutations appear to reflect damage during active transcription. Somatic mutations create nested lineage trees, allowing them to be dated relative to developmental landmarks and revealing a polyclonal architecture of the human cerebral cortex. Thus, somatic mutations in the brain represent a durable and ongoing record of neuronal life history, from development through postmitotic function. PMID:26430121

  20. Somatic mutation in single human neurons tracks developmental and transcriptional history

    PubMed Central

    Evrony, Gilad D.; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Karger, Amir; Lee, Soohyun; Chittenden, Thomas W.; D’Gama, Alissa M.; Cai, Xuyu; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Lee, Eunjung; Park, Peter J.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons live for decades in a postmitotic state, their genomes susceptible to DNA damage. Here we survey the landscape of somatic single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the human brain. We identified thousands of somatic SNVs by single-cell sequencing of 36 neurons from the cerebral cortex of three normal individuals. Unlike germline and cancer SNVs, which are often caused by errors in DNA replication, neuronal mutations appear to reflect damage during active transcription. Somatic mutations create nested lineage trees, allowing them to be dated relative to developmental landmarks and revealing a polyclonal architecture of the human cerebral cortex. Thus, somatic mutations in the brain represent a durable and ongoing record of neuronal life history, from development through postmitotic function. PMID:26430121

  1. Exploring the psychological and somatic impact of identity theft.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Tracy; Shreve-Neiger, Andrea; Fremouw, William; Kane, John; Hutton, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    Identity theft is a new and growing form of white-collar crime. This exploratory study examined the psychological and somatic impact of identity theft and coping methods utilized by victims. Thirty-seven victims of identity theft participated in regional victim focus groups. Participants completed a victim impact questionnaire designed by the authors and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18). The majority of participants expressed an increase in maladaptive psychological and somatic symptoms post victimization. Results on the BSI indicated that identity theft victims with unresolved cases, in contrast to those with resolved cases, were more likely to have clinically elevated scores when compared with a normative sample. Relatively similar coping mechanisms were utilized across victims. The results from this study suggest that victims of identity theft do have increased psychological and physical distress, and for those whose cases remain unresolved, distress is maintained over time.

  2. Diversity of Fusarium head blight populations and trichothecene toxin types reveals regional differences in pathogen composition and temporal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Clear, Randall M; O'Donnell, Kerry; McCormick, Susan; Turkington, T Kelly; Tekauz, Andy; Gilbert, Jeannie; Kistler, H Corby; Busman, Mark; Ward, Todd J

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of genetic diversity, trichothecene genotype composition, and population structure were conducted using 4086 Fusarium graminearum isolates collected from wheat in eight Canadian provinces over a three year period between 2005 and 2007. The results revealed substantial regional differences in Fusarium head blight pathogen composition and temporal population dynamics. The 3ADON trichothecene type consistently predominated in Maritime provinces (91%) over the sampled years, and increased significantly (P<0.05) between 2005 and 2007 in western Canada, accounting for 66% of the isolates in Manitoba by the end of the sampling period. In contrast, 3ADON frequency was lower (22%, P<0.001) in the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Québec and did not change significantly between 2005 and 2007, resulting in two distinct longitudinal clines in 3ADON frequency across Canada. Overall, genetic structure was correlated with toxin type, as the endemic population (NA1) was dominated by 15ADON isolates (86%), whereas a second population (NA2) consisted largely of 3ADON isolates (88%). However, the percentage of isolates with trichothecene genotypes that were not predictive of their genetic population assignment (recombinant genotypes) increased from 10% in 2005 to 17% in 2007, indicating that trichothecene type became an increasingly unreliable marker of population identity over time. In addition, there were substantial regional differences in the composition of recombinant genotypes. In western and maritime provinces, NA2 isolates with 15ADON genotypes were significantly more common than NA1 isolates with 3ADON genotypes (P<0.001), and the reverse was true in the eastern provinces of Québec and Ontario. Temporal trends in recombinant genotype composition also varied regionally, as the percentage of 15ADON isolates with NA2 genetic backgrounds increased approximately three fold in western and Maritime provinces, while the opposite trends were observed in Québec and

  3. Diversity of Fusarium head blight populations and trichothecene toxin types reveals regional differences in pathogen composition and temporal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Clear, Randall M; O'Donnell, Kerry; McCormick, Susan; Turkington, T Kelly; Tekauz, Andy; Gilbert, Jeannie; Kistler, H Corby; Busman, Mark; Ward, Todd J

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of genetic diversity, trichothecene genotype composition, and population structure were conducted using 4086 Fusarium graminearum isolates collected from wheat in eight Canadian provinces over a three year period between 2005 and 2007. The results revealed substantial regional differences in Fusarium head blight pathogen composition and temporal population dynamics. The 3ADON trichothecene type consistently predominated in Maritime provinces (91%) over the sampled years, and increased significantly (P<0.05) between 2005 and 2007 in western Canada, accounting for 66% of the isolates in Manitoba by the end of the sampling period. In contrast, 3ADON frequency was lower (22%, P<0.001) in the eastern Canadian provinces of Ontario and Québec and did not change significantly between 2005 and 2007, resulting in two distinct longitudinal clines in 3ADON frequency across Canada. Overall, genetic structure was correlated with toxin type, as the endemic population (NA1) was dominated by 15ADON isolates (86%), whereas a second population (NA2) consisted largely of 3ADON isolates (88%). However, the percentage of isolates with trichothecene genotypes that were not predictive of their genetic population assignment (recombinant genotypes) increased from 10% in 2005 to 17% in 2007, indicating that trichothecene type became an increasingly unreliable marker of population identity over time. In addition, there were substantial regional differences in the composition of recombinant genotypes. In western and maritime provinces, NA2 isolates with 15ADON genotypes were significantly more common than NA1 isolates with 3ADON genotypes (P<0.001), and the reverse was true in the eastern provinces of Québec and Ontario. Temporal trends in recombinant genotype composition also varied regionally, as the percentage of 15ADON isolates with NA2 genetic backgrounds increased approximately three fold in western and Maritime provinces, while the opposite trends were observed in Québec and

  4. Measurement and assessment of somatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Desai, Geetha

    2013-02-01

    Somatic symptoms are common presentations in health settings. They can manifest as symptoms of another underlying mental disorder or be termed as medically unexplained. When they are medically unexplained they are invariably subsumed under the diagnostic categories of somatoform disorders. They are associated with interference in functioning, poor quality of life and are burdensome on health resources. The measurement of these symptoms is essential for understanding the individual and planning treatment. There are various instruments that have somatic symptoms measurement in their items. The tools have included somatic symptoms measurement in measuring general psychopathology, somatic symptoms as part of anxiety and depression, somatic symptoms specifically, and as a screening instrument for somatoform disorders. The advantages and disadvantages of common measures have been discussed. It appears that no one measure fulfils the essential criteria of an ideal measure for somatic symptoms. The measures of somatic symptoms should also be culturally sensitive and serve diagnostic, prognostic and heuristic purposes. These aspects are highlighted in the review.

  5. Geochronology of Zircon in Eclogite Reveals Imbrication of the Ultrahigh-Pressure Western Gneiss Region of Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. J.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.; Root, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Eclogite provides the only record of kinematic events at the deepest levels of orogens. Integrating the U-Pb geochronology and trace element chemistry of zircon in eclogite reveals the most complete view of the PTt history, yet low concentrations of uranium and zirconium and drier compositions that hinder zircon growth at peak conditions render it a challenging rocktype for this approach. The iconic Western Gneiss Region (WGR) in Norway is one of the largest terranes of deeply subducted continental rocks in the world, and contains many indicators of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions (P>2.8 GPa) that developed during the Siluro-Devonian Caledonian Orogeny. A metamorphic transition from amphibolite-facies to ultrahigh-pressure eclogite facies broadly coincides with a km-scale shear zone that underlies the majority of the WGR. A critical unknown is the timing of movement on this feature, which emplaced allochthonous units above the Baltica basement, but might also have accommodated late-orogenic exhumation of the WGR from mantle depths. We carried out laser ablation split-stream ICPMS (LASS) and selected multigrain TIMS analyses of zircons from eleven eclogites across the southern WGR, of which eight are located within or above the shear zone. LASS spots on polished grains mostly yield weakly discordant Proterozoic intrusive ages, and often minimal indication of a Caledonian (U)HP metamorphic overprint. Direct ablation into unpolished zircon reveals thin rims of Caledonian age in some cases. Overall, the dataset shows that all samples began zircon growth at approximately the same time (ca. 430-420 Ma). Eclogite from lower levels of the shear zone does not contain any dates younger than ca. 410 Ma, however, while eclogite from higher levels continued growth until ca. 400 Ma. We interpret this to result from thrusting of the WGR above cooler basement after 410 Ma, terminating new zircon crystallization within the shear zone but allowing limited further growth in

  6. RNA-seq reveals regional differences in transcriptome response to heat stress in the marine snail Chlorostoma funebralis.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Lani U; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the role of gene expression in adaptation of marine ectotherms to different temperatures, we examined the transcriptome-wide thermal stress response in geographically separated populations of the intertidal snail Chlorostoma funebralis. Snails from two southern (heat tolerant) and two northern (heat sensitive) populations were acclimated to a common thermal environment, exposed to an environmentally relevant thermal stress and analysed using RNA-seq. Pooling across all populations revealed 306 genes with differential expression between control and heat-stressed samples, including 163 significantly upregulated and 143 significantly downregulated genes. When considered separately, regional differences in response were widely apparent. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were upregulated in both regions, but the magnitude of response was significantly greater in northern populations for most Hsp70s, while the southern populations showed greater upregulation for approximately half of the Hsp40s. Of 177 stress-responsive genes in northern populations, 55 responded to heat stress only in northern populations. Several molecular chaperones and antioxidant genes that were not differentially expressed in southern populations showed higher expression under control conditions compared with northern populations. This suggests that evolution of elevated expression of these genes under benign conditions preadapts the southern populations to frequent heat stress and contributes to their higher thermal tolerance. These results indicate that evolution has resulted in different transcriptome responses across populations, including upregulation of genes in response to stress and preadaptation of genes in anticipation of stress (based on evolutionary history of frequent heat exposure). The relative importance of the two mechanisms differs among gene families and among populations.

  7. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  8. Chromatin diminution in the copepod Mesocyclops edax: diminution of tandemly repeated DNA families from somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Guy

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin diminution, i.e., the loss of selected chromosomal regions during the differentiation of early embryonic cells into somatic cells, has been described in taxa as varied as ciliates, copepods, insects, nematodes, and hagfish. The nature of the eliminated DNA has been extensively studied in ciliate, nematode, and hagfish species. However, the small size of copepods, which makes it difficult to obtain enough DNA from early embryonic cells for cloning and sequencing, has limited such studies. Here, to identify the sequences eliminated from the somatic cells of a copepod species that undergoes chromatin diminution, we randomly amplified DNA fragments from germ line and somatic line cells of Mesocyclops edax, a freshwater cyclopoid copepod. Of 47 randomly amplified germ line clones, 45 (96%) contained short, tandemly repeated sequences composed of either 2 bp CA-repeats, 8 bp CAAATAGA-repeats, or 9 bp CAAATTAAA-repeats. In contrast, of 83 randomly amplified somatic line clones, only 47 (57%) contained such short, tandemly repeated sequences. As previously observed in some nematode species, our results therefore show that there is partial elimination of chromosomal regions containing (CAAATAGA and CAAATTAAA) repeated sequences during the chromatin diminution observed in the somatic cells of M. edax. We speculate that chromatin diminution might have evolved repeatedly by recruitment of RNAi-related mechanisms to eliminate nonfunctional tandemly repeated DNA sequences from the somatic genome of some species.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  10. [Somatization disorder - an overdiagnosed but underestimated illness].

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Juha T; Läksy, Kristian; Räsänen, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Physical symptoms often occur in the absence of physical illness. This is termed somatization when the symptoms are caused by psychic factors. When abundant symptoms affect the functional capacity and cause subjective harm and seeking healthcare services, a psychic disorder may be in question. Somatization may be associated with numerous psychic disorders. It may, however, also be a question of a somatoform disorder having a physical symptom picture. Somatization disorder is one of the somatoform disorders. Recognition of the disorder is often the problem in its treatment. Establishing a long-term treatment relationship actually forms the basis for therapy. PMID:26951025

  11. Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulka, J; First, N L; Loi, P; Moor, R M

    1998-10-01

    The birth of the first cloned mammals, produced by the introduction of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes, was an impressive and surprising development. Although the ethical debate has been intense, the important scientific questions raised by this work have been inadequately discussed and are still unresolved. In this essay we address three questions about nuclear transplantation in the eggs of mice and domestic animals. First, why were the recent experiments on somatic cell cloning successful, when so many others have failed? Second, were these exceptional cases, or is somatic cloning now open to all? Third, what are the future possibilities for increasing the efficiency and wider applicability of the cloning process?

  12. Quantitative woody cover reconstructions from eastern continental Asia of the last 22 kyr reveal strong regional peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang; Cao, Xianyong; Dallmeyer, Anne; Ni, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yongbo; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    We present a calibration-set based on modern pollen and satellite-based Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of woody cover (including needleleaved, broadleaved and total tree cover) in eastern continental Asia, which shows good performance under cross-validation with the modern analogue technique (all the coefficients of determination between observed and predicted values are greater than 0.65). The calibration-set is used to reconstruct woody cover from a taxonomically harmonized and temporally standardized fossil pollen dataset (including 274 cores) with 500-year resolution over the last 22 kyr. The spatial range of forest has not noticeably changed in eastern continental Asia during the last 22 kyr, although woody cover has, especially at the margin of the eastern Tibetan Plateau and in the forest-steppe transition area of north-central China. Vegetation was sparse during the LGM in the present forested regions, but woody cover increased markedly at the beginning of the Bølling/Allerød period (B/A; ca. 14.5 ka BP) and again at the beginning of the Holocene (ca. 11.5 ka BP), and is related to the enhanced strength of the East Asian Summer Monsoon. Forest flourished in the mid-Holocene (ca. 8 ka BP) possibly due to favourable climatic conditions. In contrast, cover was stable in southern China (high cover) and arid central Asia (very low cover) throughout the investigated period. Forest cover increased in the north-eastern part of China during the Holocene. Comparisons of these regional pollen-based results with simulated forest cover from runs of a global climate model (for 9, 6 and 0 ka BP (ECHAM5/JSBACH ∼1.125° spatial resolution)) reveal many similarities in temporal change. The Holocene woody cover history of eastern continental Asia is different from that of other regions, likely controlled by different climatic variables, i.e. moisture in eastern continental Asia; temperature in northern Eurasia and North America.

  13. Shuffling of discrete tRNASer regions reveals differently utilized identity elements in yeast and methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Gruic-Sovulj, Ita; Jaric, Jelena; Dulic, Morana; Cindric, Mario; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2006-08-01

    Seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRSs) from methanogenic archaea possess distinct evolutionary origin and show minimal sequence similarity with counterparts from bacteria, eukaryotes and other archaea. Here we show that SerRS from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis (ScSerRS and MmSerRS, respectively) display significantly different ability to serylate heterologous tRNA(Ser). Recognition in yeast was shown to be more stringent than in archaeon. While cross-aminoacylation of M. maripaludis tRNA(Ser) (MmtRNA(Ser)) by yeast SerRS barely occurs, yeast tRNA(Ser) (SctRNA(Ser)) was shown to be a good substrate for heterologous MmSerRS. To investigate the contribution of different tRNA regions for the recognition by yeast and archaeal SerRS, chimeric tRNAs bearing separated domains of SctRNA(Ser) in MmtRNA(Ser) framework were produced by in vitro transcription and subjected to kinetic and gel mobility shift analysis with both enzymes. Generally, the recognition in M. maripaludis seems to be relatively relaxed toward tertiary elements of tRNA(Ser) structure and relies on the direct recognition of identity nucleotides. On the other hand, expression of tRNA(Ser) identity elements in yeast seems to be more sensitive toward surrounding sequence context. In both systems variable arm of tRNA was recognized as a major identity region with a strong influence on SerRS:tRNA binding. Acceptor domain of SctRNA(Ser) was also shown to be important for serylation in yeast. We propose that cognate interactions between N-terminal domain of yeast SerRS and variable region of SctRNA(Ser) place the acceptor stem into the enzyme's active site and lead to increased affinity toward serine and efficient serylation of tRNA. The same effect was not observed in M. maripaludis. Unlike its yeast counterpart, MmSerRS forms only one type of covalent complex with MmtRNA(Ser), regardless of the tRNA/SerRS molar ratio. Stoichiometry of the complex, one tRNA per dimeric SerRS, was

  14. High-throughput engineering of a mammalian genome reveals building principles of methylation states at CG rich regions

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Arnaud R; Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Burger, Lukas; Schübeler, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mammalian promoters are CpG islands; regions of high CG density that require protection from DNA methylation to be functional. Importantly, how sequence architecture mediates this unmethylated state remains unclear. To address this question in a comprehensive manner, we developed a method to interrogate methylation states of hundreds of sequence variants inserted at the same genomic site in mouse embryonic stem cells. Using this assay, we were able to quantify the contribution of various sequence motifs towards the resulting DNA methylation state. Modeling of this comprehensive dataset revealed that CG density alone is a minor determinant of their unmethylated state. Instead, these data argue for a principal role for transcription factor binding sites, a prediction confirmed by testing synthetic mutant libraries. Taken together, these findings establish the hierarchy between the two cis-encoded mechanisms that define the DNA methylation state and thus the transcriptional competence of CpG islands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04094.001 PMID:25259795

  15. Diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in the Fildes Region (maritime Antarctica) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Neng Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fang; Wang, En Tao; He, Jian Feng; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Bo Tao; Liu, Jie; Ran, Xiang Bin; Zang, Jia Ye

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in four different soils (human-, penguin-, seal-colony impacted soils and pristine soil) in the Fildes Region (King George Island, Antarctica) using 454 pyrosequencing with bacterial-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia were abundant phyla in almost all the soil samples. The four types of soils were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community structure. Thermotogae, Cyanobacteria, Fibrobacteres, Deinococcus-Thermus, and Chlorobi obviously varied in their abundance among the 4 soil types. Considering all the samples together, members of the genera Gaiella, Chloracidobacterium, Nitrospira, Polaromonas, Gemmatimonas, Sphingomonas, and Chthoniobacter were found to predominate, whereas members of the genera Chamaesiphon, Herbaspirillum, Hirschia, Nevskia, Nitrosococcus, Rhodococcus, Rhodomicrobium, and Xanthomonas varied obviously in their abundance among the four soil types. Distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p < 0.01), phosphate phosphorus (p < 0.01), organic carbon (p < 0.05), and organic nitrogen (p < 0.05) were the most significant factors that correlated with the community distribution of soil bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the soil bacterial communities in human-, penguin-, and seal- colony impacted soils from ice-free areas in maritime Antarctica using high-throughput pyrosequencing. PMID:26579095

  16. Diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities in the Fildes Region (maritime Antarctica) as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng Fei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fang; Wang, En Tao; He, Jian Feng; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Bo Tao; Liu, Jie; Ran, Xiang Bin; Zang, Jia Ye

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in four different soils (human-, penguin-, seal-colony impacted soils and pristine soil) in the Fildes Region (King George Island, Antarctica) using 454 pyrosequencing with bacterial-specific primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia were abundant phyla in almost all the soil samples. The four types of soils were significantly different in geochemical properties and bacterial community structure. Thermotogae, Cyanobacteria, Fibrobacteres, Deinococcus-Thermus, and Chlorobi obviously varied in their abundance among the 4 soil types. Considering all the samples together, members of the genera Gaiella, Chloracidobacterium, Nitrospira, Polaromonas, Gemmatimonas, Sphingomonas, and Chthoniobacter were found to predominate, whereas members of the genera Chamaesiphon, Herbaspirillum, Hirschia, Nevskia, Nitrosococcus, Rhodococcus, Rhodomicrobium, and Xanthomonas varied obviously in their abundance among the four soil types. Distance-based redundancy analysis revealed that pH (p < 0.01), phosphate phosphorus (p < 0.01), organic carbon (p < 0.05), and organic nitrogen (p < 0.05) were the most significant factors that correlated with the community distribution of soil bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the soil bacterial communities in human-, penguin-, and seal- colony impacted soils from ice-free areas in maritime Antarctica using high-throughput pyrosequencing. PMID:26579095

  17. Barcoding Beetles: A Regional Survey of 1872 Species Reveals High Identification Success and Unusually Deep Interspecific Divergences

    PubMed Central

    Pentinsaari, Mikko; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Mutanen, Marko

    2014-01-01

    With 400 K described species, beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) represent the most diverse order in the animal kingdom. Although the study of their diversity currently represents a major challenge, DNA barcodes may provide a functional, standardized tool for their identification. To evaluate this possibility, we performed the first comprehensive test of the effectiveness of DNA barcodes as a tool for beetle identification by sequencing the COI barcode region from 1872 North European species. We examined intraspecific divergences, identification success and the effects of sample size on variation observed within and between species. A high proportion (98.3%) of these species possessed distinctive barcode sequence arrays. Moreover, the sequence divergences between nearest neighbor species were considerably higher than those reported for the only other insect order, Lepidoptera, which has seen intensive analysis (11.99% vs up to 5.80% mean NN divergence). Although maximum intraspecific divergence increased and average divergence between nearest neighbors decreased with increasing sampling effort, these trends rarely hampered identification by DNA barcodes due to deep sequence divergences between most species. The Barcode Index Number system in BOLD coincided strongly with known species boundaries with perfect matches between species and BINs in 92.1% of all cases. In addition, DNA barcode analysis revealed the likely occurrence of about 20 overlooked species. The current results indicate that DNA barcodes distinguish species of beetles remarkably well, establishing their potential to provide an effective identification tool for this order and to accelerate the discovery of new beetle species. PMID:25255319

  18. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shlien, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Fuligni, Fabio; Arnold, Roland; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Dronov, Serge; Mamanova, Lira; Rosic, Andrej; Ju, Young Seok; Cooke, Susanna L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Davies, Helen R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Jones, David R; Martin, Sancha; Marshall, John; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Barbashina, Violetta; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Mariani, Odette; Boyault, Sandrine; Fatima, Aquila; Langerød, Anita; Borg, Åke; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Polyak, Kornelia; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-08-16

    Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation.

  19. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shlien, Adam; Raine, Keiran; Fuligni, Fabio; Arnold, Roland; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Dronov, Serge; Mamanova, Lira; Rosic, Andrej; Ju, Young Seok; Cooke, Susanna L; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Davies, Helen R; Tarpey, Patrick S; Van Loo, Peter; Wedge, David C; Jones, David R; Martin, Sancha; Marshall, John; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hardy, Claire; Barbashina, Violetta; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Sauer, Torill; Garred, Øystein; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Mariani, Odette; Boyault, Sandrine; Fatima, Aquila; Langerød, Anita; Borg, Åke; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Polyak, Kornelia; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-08-16

    Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation. PMID:27498871

  20. Pilates, Mindfulness and Somatic Education.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Karen; Adams, Marianne; Quin, Rebecca; Harrison, Mandy; Greeson, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    The Pilates Method is a form of somatic education with the potential to cultivate mindfulness - a mental quality associated with overall well-being. However, controlled studies are needed to determine whether changes in mindfulness are specific to the Pilates Method or also result from other forms of exercise. This quasi-experimental study compared Pilates Method mat classes and recreational exercise classes on measures of mindfulness and well-being at the beginning, middle and end of a 15 week semester. Total mindfulness scores increased overall for the Pilates Method group but not for the exercise control group, and these increases were directly related to end of semester ratings of self-regulatory self-efficacy, perceived stress and mood. Findings suggest that the Pilates Method specifically enhances mindfulness, and these increases are associated with other measures of wellness. The changes in mindfulness identified in this study support the role of the Pilates Method in the mental well-being of its practitioners and its potential to support dancers' overall well-being. PMID:25328542

  1. Why do some psychiatric patients somatize?

    PubMed

    de León, J; Saiz-Ruiz, J; Chinchilla, A; Morales, P

    1987-08-01

    A study was made of a series of 139 outpatients referred by the medical and surgical services of a general hospital for evaluation by the psychiatry unit. In accordance with established criteria, this population was divided into somatizers (56) and non-somatizers (75), and the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of both groups were comparatively analyzed. The results show that the group of somatizers was younger, had more histrionic personality traits and more stress factors related with alterations in interpersonal relationships or death or disease of relatives. It is emphasized that somatization is poorly known by psychiatrists--whose diagnostic criteria practically omit these aspects--and by other physicians, in spite of its importance and frequency. PMID:3673644

  2. Stress and Somatic Complaints in Low-Income Urban Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Linda K.; O'Koon, Jeffrey H.; Papademetriou, Eros; Szczygiel, Sylvia; Grant, Kathryn E.

    2001-01-01

    Studied rates of somatic complaints and the association between stress and somatic complaints for 1,030 low-income urban adolescents in grades 6 through 8. For both boys and girls, somatization was the most commonly reported internalizing symptom, and heightened rates of urban stress predicted heightened rates of somatic complaints. (SLD)

  3. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  4. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  5. Progress in the reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tianhua; Xie, Min; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into nearly all types of cells in the body. This unique potential provides significant promise for cell-based therapies to restore tissues or organs destroyed by injuries, degenerative diseases, aging, or cancer. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology offers a possible strategy to generate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. However, because of concerns about the specificity, efficiency, kinetics, and safety of iPSC reprogramming, improvements or fundamental changes in this process are required before their effective clinical use. A chemical approach is regarded as a promising strategy to improve and change the iPSC process. Dozens of small molecules have been identified that can functionally replace reprogramming factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming. In addition to the prospect of deriving patient-specific tissues and organs from iPSCs, another attractive strategy for regenerative medicine is transdifferentiation-the direct conversion of one somatic cell type to another. Recent studies revealed a new paradigm of transdifferentiation: using transcription factors used in iPSC generation to induce transdifferentiation or called iPSC transcription factor-based transdifferentiation. This type of transdifferentiation not only reveals and uses the developmentally plastic intermediates generated during iPSC reprogramming but also produces a wide range of cells, including expandable tissue-specific precursor cells. Here, we review recent progress of small molecule approaches in the generation of iPSCs. In addition, we summarize the new concept of iPSC transcription factor-based transdifferentiation and discuss its application in generating various lineage-specific cells, especially cardiovascular cells.

  6. Proteogenomics connects somatic mutations to signalling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mertins, Philipp; Mani, D R; Ruggles, Kelly V; Gillette, Michael A; Clauser, Karl R; Wang, Pei; Wang, Xianlong; Qiao, Jana W; Cao, Song; Petralia, Francesca; Kawaler, Emily; Mundt, Filip; Krug, Karsten; Tu, Zhidong; Lei, Jonathan T; Gatza, Michael L; Wilkerson, Matthew; Perou, Charles M; Yellapantula, Venkata; Huang, Kuan-lin; Lin, Chenwei; McLellan, Michael D; Yan, Ping; Davies, Sherri R; Townsend, R Reid; Skates, Steven J; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Ding, Li; Paulovich, Amanda G; Fenyö, David; Ellis, Matthew J; Carr, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Somatic mutations have been extensively characterized in breast cancer, but the effects of these genetic alterations on the proteomic landscape remain poorly understood. Here we describe quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of 105 genomically annotated breast cancers, of which 77 provided high-quality data. Integrated analyses provided insights into the somatic cancer genome including the consequences of chromosomal loss, such as the 5q deletion characteristic of basal-like breast cancer. Interrogation of the 5q trans-effects against the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures, connected loss of CETN3 and SKP1 to elevated expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and SKP1 loss also to increased SRC tyrosine kinase. Global proteomic data confirmed a stromal-enriched group of proteins in addition to basal and luminal clusters, and pathway analysis of the phosphoproteome identified a G-protein-coupled receptor cluster that was not readily identified at the mRNA level. In addition to ERBB2, other amplicon-associated highly phosphorylated kinases were identified, including CDK12, PAK1, PTK2, RIPK2 and TLK2. We demonstrate that proteogenomic analysis of breast cancer elucidates the functional consequences of somatic mutations, narrows candidate nominations for driver genes within large deletions and amplified regions, and identifies therapeutic targets. PMID:27251275

  7. Bovine ooplasm partially remodels primate somatic nuclei following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Beyhan, Zeki; Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Iager, Amy E; Kaiser, German G; Chen, Ying; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-03-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) has the potential to become a useful tool to address basic questions about the nucleus-cytoplasm interactions between species. It has also been proposed as an alternative for the preservation of endangered species and to derive autologous embryonic stem cells. Using chimpanzee/ bovine iSCNT as our experimental model we studied the early epigenetic events that take place soon after cell fusion until embryonic genome activation (EGA). Our analysis suggested partial EGA in iSCNT embryos at the eight-cell stage, as indicated by Br-UTP incorporation and expression of chimpanzee embryonic genes. Oct4, Stella, Crabp1, CCNE2, CXCL6, PTGER4, H2AFZ, c-MYC, KLF4, and GAPDH transcripts were expressed, while Nanog, Glut1, DSC2, USF2, Adrbk1, and Lin28 failed to be activated. Although development of iSCNT embryos did not progress beyond the 8- to 16-cell stage, chromatin remodeling events, monitored by H3K27 methylation, H4K5 acetylation, and global DNA methylation, were similar in both intra- and interspecies SCNT embryos. However, bisulfite sequencing indicated incomplete demethylation of Oct4 and Nanog promoters in eight-cell iSCNT embryos. ATP production levels were significantly higher in bovine SCNT embryos than in iSCNT embryos, TUNEL assays did not reveal any difference in the apoptotic status of the nuclei from both types of embryos. Collectively, our results suggest that bovine ooplasm can partially remodel chimpanzee somatic nuclei, and provides insight into some of the current barriers iSCNT must overcome if further embryonic development is to be expected. PMID:19196039

  8. Comparison of Visceral Leishmaniasis Diagnostic Antigens in African and Asian Leishmania donovani Reveals Extensive Diversity and Region-specific Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Boelaert, Marleen; Miles, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), caused by infection with Leishmania donovani complex, remains a major public health problem in endemic regions of South Asia, East Africa, and Brazil. If untreated, symptomatic VL is usually fatal. Rapid field diagnosis relies principally on demonstration of anti-Leishmania antibodies in clinically suspect cases. The rK39 immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic test (RDT) is based on rK39, encoded by a fragment of a kinesin-related gene derived from a Brazilian L. chagasi, now recognised as L. infantum, originating from Europe. Despite its reliability in South Asia, the rK39 test is reported to have lower sensitivity in East Africa. A reason for this differential response may reside in the molecular diversity of the rK39 homologous sequences among East African L. donovani strains. Methodology/Principal Findings Coding sequences of rK39 homologues from East African L. donovani strains were amplified from genomic DNA, analysed for diversity from the rK39 sequence, and compared to South Asian sequences. East African sequences were revealed to display significant diversity from rK39. Most coding changes in the 5′ half of repeats were non-conservative, with multiple substitutions involving charge changes, whereas amino acid substitutions in the 3′ half of repeats were conservative. Specific polymorphisms were found between South Asian and East African strains. Diversity of HASPB1 and HASPB2 gene repeat sequences, used to flank sequences of a kinesin homologue in the synthetic antigen rK28 designed to reduce variable RDT performance, was also investigated. Non-canonical combination repeat arrangements were revealed for HASPB1 and HASPB2 gene products in strains producing unpredicted size amplicons. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that there is extensive kinesin genetic diversity among strains in East Africa and between East Africa and South Asia, with ample scope for influencing performance of rK39 diagnostic assays. We

  9. Extensive hydrothermal activity revealed by multi-tracer survey in the Wallis and Futuna region (SW Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konn, C.; Fourré, E.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Donval, J. P.; Guyader, V.; Birot, D.; Alix, A. S.; Gaillot, A.; Perez, F.; Dapoigny, A.; Pelleter, E.; Resing, J. A.; Charlou, J. L.; Fouquet, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The study area is close to the Wallis and Futuna Islands in the French EEZ. It exists on the western boundary of the fastest tectonic area in the world at the junction of the Lau and North-Fiji basins. At this place, the unstable back-arc accommodates the plate motion in three ways: (i) the north Fiji transform fault, (ii) numerous unstable spreading ridges, and (iii) large areas of recent volcanic activity. This instability creates bountiful opportunity for hydrothermal discharge to occur. Based on geochemical (CH4, TDM, 3He) and geophysical (nephelometry) tracer surveys: (1) no hydrothermal activity could be found on the Futuna Spreading Centre (FSC) which sets the western limit of hydrothermal activity; (2) four distinct hydrothermal active areas were identified: Kulo Lasi Caldera, Amanaki Volcano, Fatu Kapa and Tasi Tulo areas; (3) extensive and diverse hydrothermal manifestations were observed and especially a 2D distribution of the sources. At Kulo Lasi, our data and especially tracer ratios (CH4/3He 50×106 and CH4/TDM 4.5) reveal a transient CH4 input, with elevated levels of CH4 measured in 2010, that had vanished in 2011, most likely caused by an eruptive magmatic event. By contrast at Amanaki, vertical tracer profiles and tracer ratios point to typical seawater/basalt interactions. Fatu Kapa is characterised by a substantial spatial variability of the hydrothermal water column anomalies, most likely due to widespread focused and diffuse hydrothermal discharge in the area. In the Tasi Tulo zone, the hydrothermal signal is characterised by a total lack of turbidity, although other tracer anomalies are in the same range as in nearby Fatu Kapa. The background data set revealed the presence of a Mn and 3He chronic plume due to the extensive and cumulative venting over the entire area. To that respect, we believe that the joined domain composed of our active area and the nearby active area discovered in the East by Lupton et al. (2012) highly contribute to the

  10. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Amelung, F.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Massive groundwater extraction is very common in Mexico and is well known to result in land subsidence. However, most surveys dedicated to land subsidence focus on one single city, mainly Mexico City, and thus fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the problem. Here we use a space-based radar remote sensing technique, known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to detect land subsidence in the entire central Mexico area. We used data from the Japanese satellite ALOS, processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms to cover and area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We identify land subsidence in twenty-one areas, including seventeen cities, namely from east to west, Puebla, Mexico city, Toluca de Lerdo, Queretaro, San Luis de la Paz, south of San Luis de la Paz, Celaya, south of Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, west of Villa de Arista, Morelia, Salamanca, Irapuato, Silao, Leon, Aguascalientes, north of Aguascalientes, Zamora de Hidalgo, Guadalajara, Ahuacatlan, and Tepic. Subsidence rates of 30 cm/yr are observed in Mexico City, while in the other locations typical rates of 5-10 cm/yr are noticed. Regional surveys of this type are necessary for the development of hazard mitigation plans and efficient use of ground-based monitoring. We additionally correlate subsidence with land use, surface geology, and faults distribution and suggest that groundwater extraction for agricultural, urban, and industrial uses are the main causes of land subsidence. We also reveal that the limits of the subsiding areas often correlate with existing faults, motion on these faults being driven by water extraction rather than by tectonic activity. In all the subsiding locations we observe high ground velocity gradients emphasizing the significant risks associated with land subsidence in central Mexico. Averaged 2007-2011 ground velocity map from ALOS InSAR time-series in central Mexico, revealing land subsidence in 21

  11. Somatic Versus Zygotic Embryogenesis: Learning from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Traud

    2016-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis is a fascinating developmental program that is very successfully established in nature in seeds. In case of in vitro somatic embryogenesis this process is subjected to several limitations such as asynchronous differentiation and further development of somatic embryos, malformations and disturbed polarity, precocious germination, lack of maturity, early loss of embryogenic potential, and strong genotypic differences in the regeneration efficiency. Several studies have shown the similarity of somatic and zygotic embryos in terms of morphological, histological, biochemical, and physiological aspects. However, pronounced differences have also been reported and refer to much higher stress levels, less accumulation of storage compounds and a missing distinction of differentiation and germination by a quiescent phase in somatic embryos. Here, an overview on recent literature describing both embryogenesis pathways, comparing somatic and zygotic embryos and analyzing the role of the endosperm is presented. By taking zygotic embryos as the reference and learning from the situation in seeds, somatic embryogenesis can be improved and optimized in order to make use of the enormous potential this regeneration pathway offers for plant propagation and breeding.

  12. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Mary E.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  13. Somatic Versus Zygotic Embryogenesis: Learning from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Traud

    2016-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis is a fascinating developmental program that is very successfully established in nature in seeds. In case of in vitro somatic embryogenesis this process is subjected to several limitations such as asynchronous differentiation and further development of somatic embryos, malformations and disturbed polarity, precocious germination, lack of maturity, early loss of embryogenic potential, and strong genotypic differences in the regeneration efficiency. Several studies have shown the similarity of somatic and zygotic embryos in terms of morphological, histological, biochemical, and physiological aspects. However, pronounced differences have also been reported and refer to much higher stress levels, less accumulation of storage compounds and a missing distinction of differentiation and germination by a quiescent phase in somatic embryos. Here, an overview on recent literature describing both embryogenesis pathways, comparing somatic and zygotic embryos and analyzing the role of the endosperm is presented. By taking zygotic embryos as the reference and learning from the situation in seeds, somatic embryogenesis can be improved and optimized in order to make use of the enormous potential this regeneration pathway offers for plant propagation and breeding. PMID:26619857

  14. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Mary E; Murray, Andrew W

    2016-07-26

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  15. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E; Nöthen, Markus M; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U

    2016-04-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10(-2)). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10(-5); ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6-3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10(-9)). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  16. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  17. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations.

  18. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  19. A recurrent copy number variation of the NEB triplicate region: only revealed by the targeted nemaline myopathy CGH array.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Kirsi; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Löytynoja, Ari; Ahlstén, Liina; Laitila, Jenni; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Pelin, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    Recently, new large variants have been identified in the nebulin gene (NEB) causing nemaline myopathy (NM). NM constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders among the congenital myopathies, and disease-causing variants in NEB are a main cause of the recessively inherited form of NM. NEB consists of 183 exons and it includes homologous sequences such as a 32-kb triplicate region (TRI), where eight exons are repeated three times (exons 82-89, 90-97, 98-105). In human, the normal copy number of NEB TRI is six (three copies in each allele). Recently, we described a custom NM-CGH microarray designed to detect copy number variations (CNVs) in the known NM genes. The array has now been updated to include all the currently known 10 NM genes. The NM-CGH array is superior in detecting CNVs, especially of the NEB TRI, that is not included in the exome capture kits. To date, we have studied 266 samples from 196 NM families using the NM-CGH microarray, and identified a novel recurrent NEB TRI variation in 13% (26/196) of the families and in 10% of the controls (6/60). An analysis of the breakpoints revealed adjacent repeat elements, which are known to predispose for rearrangements such as CNVs. The control CNV samples deviate only one copy from the normal six copies, whereas the NM samples include CNVs of up to four additional copies. Based on this study, NEB seems to tolerate deviations of one TRI copy, whereas addition of two or more copies might be pathogenic. PMID:26197980

  20. Whole genomewide linkage screen for neural tube defects reveals regions of interest on chromosomes 7 and 10

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, E; Bassuk, A; Enterline, D; George, T; Siegel, D; Melvin, E; Aben, J; Allen, J; Aylsworth, A; Brei, T; Bodurtha, J; Buran, C; Floyd, L; Hammock, P; Iskandar, B; Ito, J; Kessler, J; Lasarsky, N; Mack, P; Mackey, J; McLone, D; Meeropol, E; Mehltretter, L; Mitchell, L; Oakes, W; Nye, J; Powell, C; Sawin, K; Stevenson, R; Walker, M; West, S; Worley, G; Gilbert, J; Speer, M

    2005-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the second most common birth defects (1 in 1000 live births) in the world. Periconceptional maternal folate supplementation reduces NTD risk by 50–70%; however, studies of folate related and other developmental genes in humans have failed to definitively identify a major causal gene for NTD. The aetiology of NTDs remains unknown and both genetic and environmental factors are implicated. We present findings from a microsatellite based screen of 44 multiplex pedigrees ascertained through the NTD Collaborative Group. For the linkage analysis, we defined our phenotype narrowly by considering individuals with a lumbosacral level myelomeningocele as affected, then we expanded the phenotype to include all types of NTDs. Two point parametric analyses were performed using VITESSE and HOMOG. Multipoint parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed using ALLEGRO. Initial results identified chromosomes 7 and 10, both with maximum parametric multipoint lod scores (Mlod) >2.0. Chromosome 7 produced the highest score in the 24 cM interval between D7S3056 and D7S3051 (parametric Mlod 2.45; nonparametric Mlod 1.89). Further investigation demonstrated that results on chromosome 7 were being primarily driven by a single large pedigree (parametric Mlod 2.40). When this family was removed from analysis, chromosome 10 was the most interesting region, with a peak Mlod of 2.25 at D10S1731. Based on mouse human synteny, two candidate genes (Meox2, Twist1) were identified on chromosome 7. A review of public databases revealed three biologically plausible candidates (FGFR2, GFRA1, Pax2) on chromosome 10. The results from this screen provide valuable positional data for prioritisation of candidate gene assessment in future studies of NTDs. PMID:15831595

  1. Local-scale models reveal ecological niche variability in amphibian and reptile communities from two contrasting biogeographic regions

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Xavier; Felicísimo, Ángel M.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological Niche Models (ENMs) are widely used to describe how environmental factors influence species distribution. Modelling at a local scale, compared to a large scale within a high environmental gradient, can improve our understanding of ecological species niches. The main goal of this study is to assess and compare the contribution of environmental variables to amphibian and reptile ENMs in two Spanish national parks located in contrasting biogeographic regions, i.e., the Mediterranean and the Atlantic area. The ENMs were built with maximum entropy modelling using 11 environmental variables in each territory. The contributions of these variables to the models were analysed and classified using various statistical procedures (Mann–Whitney U tests, Principal Components Analysis and General Linear Models). Distance to the hydrological network was consistently the most relevant variable for both parks and taxonomic classes. Topographic variables (i.e., slope and altitude) were the second most predictive variables, followed by climatic variables. Differences in variable contribution were observed between parks and taxonomic classes. Variables related to water availability had the larger contribution to the models in the Mediterranean park, while topography variables were decisive in the Atlantic park. Specific response curves to environmental variables were in accordance with the biogeographic affinity of species (Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean species) and taxonomy (amphibians and reptiles). Interestingly, these results were observed for species located in both parks, particularly those situated at their range limits. Our findings show that ecological niche models built at local scale reveal differences in habitat preferences within a wide environmental gradient. Therefore, modelling at local scales rather than assuming large-scale models could be preferable for the establishment of conservation strategies for herptile species in natural parks. PMID

  2. Somatic mutation profiling of follicular thyroid cancer by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Swierniak, Michal; Pfeifer, Aleksandra; Stokowy, Tomasz; Rusinek, Dagmara; Chekan, Mykola; Lange, Dariusz; Krajewska, Jolanta; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Jarzab, Michal; Jarzab, Barbara; Wojtas, Bartosz

    2016-09-15

    The molecular etiology of follicular thyroid tumors is largely unknown, rendering the diagnostics of these tumors challenging. The somatic alterations present in these tumors apart from RAS gene mutations and PAX8/PPARG translocations are not well described. To evaluate the profile of somatic alteration in follicular thyroid tumors, a total of 82 thyroid tissue samples derived from 48 patients were subjected to targeted Illumina HiSeq next generation sequencing of 372 cancer-related genes. New somatic alterations were identified in oncogenes (MDM2, FLI1), transcription factors and repressors (MITF, FLI1, ZNF331), epigenetic enzymes (KMT2A, NSD1, NCOA1, NCOA2), and protein kinases (JAK3, CHEK2, ALK). Single nucleotide and large structural variants were most and least frequently identified, respectively. A novel translocation in DERL/COX6C was detected. Many somatic alterations in non-coding gene regions with high penetrance were observed. Thus, follicular thyroid tumor somatic alterations exhibit complex patterns. Most tumors contained distinct somatic alterations, suggesting previously unreported heterogeneity.

  3. Somatic mutation profiling of follicular thyroid cancer by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Swierniak, Michal; Pfeifer, Aleksandra; Stokowy, Tomasz; Rusinek, Dagmara; Chekan, Mykola; Lange, Dariusz; Krajewska, Jolanta; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Jarzab, Michal; Jarzab, Barbara; Wojtas, Bartosz

    2016-09-15

    The molecular etiology of follicular thyroid tumors is largely unknown, rendering the diagnostics of these tumors challenging. The somatic alterations present in these tumors apart from RAS gene mutations and PAX8/PPARG translocations are not well described. To evaluate the profile of somatic alteration in follicular thyroid tumors, a total of 82 thyroid tissue samples derived from 48 patients were subjected to targeted Illumina HiSeq next generation sequencing of 372 cancer-related genes. New somatic alterations were identified in oncogenes (MDM2, FLI1), transcription factors and repressors (MITF, FLI1, ZNF331), epigenetic enzymes (KMT2A, NSD1, NCOA1, NCOA2), and protein kinases (JAK3, CHEK2, ALK). Single nucleotide and large structural variants were most and least frequently identified, respectively. A novel translocation in DERL/COX6C was detected. Many somatic alterations in non-coding gene regions with high penetrance were observed. Thus, follicular thyroid tumor somatic alterations exhibit complex patterns. Most tumors contained distinct somatic alterations, suggesting previously unreported heterogeneity. PMID:27283500

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals Regional Variations in the Micromechanical Properties of the Pericellular and Extracellular Matrices of the Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Wilusz, Rebecca E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Regional variations in the composition and architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and pericellular matrix (PCM) of the knee meniscus play important roles in determining the local mechanical environment of meniscus cells. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to spatially map the mechanical properties of matched ECM and perlecan-labeled PCM sites within the outer, middle, and inner porcine medial meniscus, and to evaluate the properties of the proximal surface of each region. The elastic modulus of the PCM was significantly higher in the outer region (151.4±38.2 kPa) than the inner region (27.5±8.8 kPa), and ECM moduli were consistently higher than region-matched PCM sites in both the outer (320.8±92.5 kPa) and inner (66.1±31.4 kPa) regions. These differences were associated with a higher proportion of aligned collagen fibers and lower glycosaminoglycan content in the outer region. Regional variations in the elastic moduli and some viscoelastic properties were observed on the proximal surface of the meniscus, with the inner region exhibiting the highest moduli overall. These results indicate that matrix architecture and composition play an important role in the regional micromechanical properties of the meniscus, suggesting that the local stress-strain environment of meniscal cells may vary significantly among the different regions. PMID:23568545

  5. Temporal Fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea Region Cattle Population Revealed by Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Marianna; Bläuer, Auli; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Harjula, Janne; Nyström Edmark, Veronica; Rannamäe, Eve; Lõugas, Lembi; Sajantila, Antti; Lidén, Kerstin; Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies. Results Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples), Medieval (14), and Post-Medieval (26) periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes) genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples) with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples) revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples) was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples). Conclusions The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle. PMID:25992976

  6. Replication of somatic micronuclei in bovine enucleated oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) was developed to introduce a low number of chromosomes into a host cell. We have designed a novel technique combining part of MMCT with somatic cell nuclear transfer, which consists of injecting a somatic micronucleus into an enucleated oocyte, and inducing its cellular machinery to replicate such micronucleus. It would allow the isolation and manipulation of a single or a low number of somatic chromosomes. Methods Micronuclei from adult bovine fibroblasts were produced by incubation in 0.05 μg/ml demecolcine for 46 h followed by 2 mg/ml mitomycin for 2 h. Cells were finally treated with 10 μg/ml cytochalasin B for 1 h. In vitro matured bovine oocytes were mechanically enucleated and intracytoplasmatically injected with one somatic micronucleus, which had been previously exposed [Micronucleus- injected (+)] or not [Micronucleus- injected (−)] to a transgene (50 ng/μl pCX-EGFP) during 5 min. Enucleated oocytes [Enucleated (+)] and parthenogenetic [Parthenogenetic (+)] controls were injected into the cytoplasm with less than 10 pl of PVP containing 50 ng/μl pCX-EGFP. A non-injected parthenogenetic control [Parthenogenetic (−)] was also included. Two hours after injection, oocytes and reconstituted embryos were activated by incubation in 5 μM ionomycin for 4 min + 1.9 mM 6-DMAP for 3 h. Cleavage stage and egfp expression were evaluated. DNA replication was confirmed by DAPI staining. On day 2, Micronucleus- injected (−), Parthenogenetic (−) and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos were karyotyped. Differences among treatments were determined by Fisher′s exact test (p≤0.05). Results All the experimental groups underwent the first cell divisions. Interestingly, a low number of Micronucleus-injected embryos showed egfp expression. DAPI staining confirmed replication of micronuclei in most of the evaluated embryos. Karyotype analysis revealed that all Micronucleus-injected embryos had fewer than 15

  7. Somatic markers, working memory, and decision making.

    PubMed

    Hinson, John M; Jameson, Tina L; Whitney, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The somatic marker hypothesis formulated by Damasio (e.g., 1994; Damasio, Tranel, & Damasio, 1991) argues that affective reactions ordinarily guide and simplify decision making. Although originally intended to explain decision-making deficits in people with specific frontal lobe damage, the hypothesis also applies to decision-making problems in populations without brain injury. Subsequently, the gambling task was developed by Bechara (Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994) as a diagnostic test of decision-making deficit in neurological populations. More recently, the gambling task has been used to explore implications of the somatic marker hypothesis, as well as to study suboptimal decision making in a variety of domains. We examined relations among gambling task decision making, working memory (WM) load, and somatic markers in a modified version of the gambling task. Increased WM load produced by secondary tasks led to poorer gambling performance. Declines in gambling performance were associated with the absence of the affective reactions that anticipate choice outcomes and guide future decision making. Our experiments provide evidence that WM processes contribute to the development of somatic markers. If WM functioning is taxed, somatic markers may not develop, and decision making may thereby suffer. PMID:12641178

  8. Secondary structures for 5′ regions of R2 retrotransposon RNAs reveal a novel conserved pseudoknot and regions that evolve under different constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Elzbieta; Christensen, Shawn M.; Eickbush, Thomas H.; Moss, Walter N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sequences from the 5′ region of R2 retrotransposons of four species of silk moth are reported. In Bombyx mori, this region of the R2 messenger RNA contains a binding site for R2 protein and mediates interactions critical to R2 element insertion into the host genome. A model of secondary structure for this RNA fragment is proposed on the basis of binding to oligonucleotide microarrays, chemical mapping, and comparative sequence analysis. Five regions of conserved secondary structure are identified, including a novel pseudoknot. There is an apparent transition from an entirely RNA structure coding function in most of the 5′ segment of the fragment to a protein coding function in the 3′ segment. This suggests that regions evolved under separate functional constraints (structural, coding, or both). PMID:19397915

  9. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  10. Fluid escape structures in the Graham Bank region (Sicily Channel, Central Mediterranean) revealing volcanic and neotectonic activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, Daniele; Pennino, Valentina; Basilone, Luca; Interbartolo, Francesco; Micallef, Aaron; Sulli, Attilio; Basilone, Walter

    2016-04-01

    morphometric analysis of these volcanoes has been conducted: they are up to about 115-160 m high and 500-1500 m wide. Most of them show very strongly inclined flanks with 30° of average slope. The SCV2 and SCV3 form the Graham Bank, 3.5X2.8 km wide, elongated in the NW-SE direction. At the top of SCV2 focused seepage plumes were observed in the entire water column, through the CHIRP data, where we calculated that they release, a volume of about 10950 m3 and 43960 m3of gases, respectively. In this work, we present the first results of a data collection that have got as main result the identification and mapping of the fluid escape structures revealing the relationship between the active tectonic with migration of fluids, to be used to assess the Submarine Geo-Hazard in the Sicily Channel. We identified two fluid escape fields whose genesis and evolution appear linked to the neotectonic and volcanic activities respectively, that represent the main controlling factors for the migration of fluid; considering the good correlation between pockmarks and the main identified fault systems. In conclusion, our results suggest that the degassing of fluids in this region is rooted at depth, and is mainly aligned with the NW-SE dip/strike slip fault systems, repeatedly reactivated, and linked to the volcanic activity.

  11. Consistently dated records from three Greenland ice cores reveal regional millennial-scale isotope gradients with possible Heinrich Event imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seierstad, Inger K.; Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    We here present records from the NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 ice cores tied to the same chronology for the past 104 ka at an unprecedented time resolution. The three ice cores have been linked by matching distinct peaks in volcanic proxy records and other impurity records from the three ice cores, assuming that these layers of elevated impurity content represent the same, instantaneous event in the past at all three sites. In total there are more than 900 identified marker horizons between the three cores including previously published match points, of which we introduce a minor revision. Our matching is independently confirmed by new and existing volcanic ash layers (tephra). The depth-depth relationship from the detailed matching is used to transfer the most recent and widely used Greenland ice core chronology, the GICC05modelext timescale, to the two Summit cores, GRIP and GISP2. Furthermore, we provide gas chronologies for the Summit cores that are consistent with the GICC05modelext timescale by utilizing both existing and new unpublished gas data. A comparison of the GICC05modelext and the former GISP2 timescale reveals major discrepancies in short time intervals during the glacial section. We detect a pronounced change in the relative annual layer thickness between the two Summit sites and NGRIP across the Last Glacial termination and early-to-mid Holocene, which can be explained by a relative accumulation increase at NGRIP compared to the Summit region as response to the onset of the Holocene and the climatic optimum. Between stadials and interstadials we infer that the accumulation contrast typically was nearly 10% greater at Summit compared to at NGRIP. The δ18O temperature-proxy records from NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 are generally very similar and display a synchronous behavior at climate transitions, but the δ18O differences between Summit and NGRIP is slowly changing over the last glacial-interglacial cycle superimposed by abrupt millennial-to centennial scale

  12. Latent Variable Analysis of Coping, Anxiety/Depression, and Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compas, Bruce E.; Boyer, Margaret C.; Stanger, Catherine; Colletti, Richard B.; Thomsen, Alexandra H.; Dufton, Lynette M.; Cole, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Reports of adolescents' coping with recurrent pain, symptoms of anxiety/depression, and somatic complaints were obtained from a sample of 164 adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain and their parents. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that coping consisted of 3 nonorthogonal factors: Primary Control Engagement Coping (problem solving,…

  13. Somatic Embryogenesis in Crocus sativus L.

    PubMed

    Sevindik, Basar; Mendi, Yesim Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important species in Crocus genus because of its effective usage. It is not only a very expensive spice, but it has also a big ornamental plant potential. Crocus species are propagated by corm and seed, and male sterility is the most important problem of this species. Hence, somatic embryogenesis can be regarded as a strategic tool for the multiplication of saffron plants. In this chapter, the production of saffron corms via somatic embryogenesis is described.

  14. Secondary structures for 5' regions of R2 retrotransposon RNAs reveal a novel conserved pseudoknot and regions that evolve under different constraints.

    PubMed

    Kierzek, Elzbieta; Christensen, Shawn M; Eickbush, Thomas H; Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H; Moss, Walter N

    2009-07-17

    Sequences from the 5' region of R2 retrotransposons of four species of silk moth are reported. In Bombyx mori, this region of the R2 messenger RNA contains a binding site for R2 protein and mediates interactions critical to R2 element insertion into the host genome. A model of secondary structure for a segment of this RNA is proposed on the basis of binding to oligonucleotide microarrays, chemical mapping, and comparative sequence analysis. Five conserved secondary structures are identified, including a novel pseudoknot. There is an apparent transition from an entirely RNA structure coding function in most of the 5' segment to a protein coding function near the 3' end. This suggests that local regions evolved under separate functional constraints (structural, coding, or both).

  15. [Isolation and characteristics of somatic cell hybrids of the Chinese hamster and American mink].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Radzhabli, S I; Gradov, A A; Serov, O L

    1981-01-01

    The paper deals with obtaining somatic cell hybrids of Chinese hamster and mink by means of inactivated Sendy virus. 39 hybrid clones segregating mink chromosomes were formed by fusing Chinese hamster cells deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyliransferase with normal cells of mink. Enzyme analyses of these hybrid clones revealed that in mink genes coding lactate dehydrogenase-A, lactate dehydrogenase-B, malate dehydrogenase-NAD (soluble), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are not syntenic. A possibility of successful utilization of these somatic cell hybrids for mapping mink genes is shown. PMID:6942558

  16. Episodic nature of earthquake activity in stable continental regions revealed by palaeoseismicity studies of Australian and North American Quaternary faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Bowman, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Palaeoseismic investigations of recent faulting in stable continental regions of Australia, North America and India show that these faults typically have a long-term behaviour characterised by episodes of activity separated by quiescent intervals of at least 10 000 and commonly 100 000 years or more. Long recurrence intervals such as these are well documented by detailed studies of the faults that ruptured during the 1986 Marryat Creek, South Australia and 1988 Tennant Creek, Northern Territory earthquakes. Thus, neotectonic features associated with stable continental region faults such as scarps and grabens commonly have subtle geomorphic expression and may be poorly preserved. Many potentially hazardous faults in stable continental regions are aseismic, which is one reason why the inventory of these faults is incomplete. Although they may be currently aseismic, faults in stable continental regions that are favourably oriented for movement in the current stress field could produce damaging earthquakes, often in unexpected places. Comprehensive palaeoseismic investigations of modern and prehistoric faulting events in stable continental regions are needed to understand the long-term behaviour of these faults, and thereby, improve seismic-hazard assessments.

  17. Somatic and gastrointestinal in vivo biotransformation rates of hydrophobic chemicals in fish.

    PubMed

    Lo, Justin C; Campbell, David A; Kennedy, Christopher J; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2015-10-01

    To improve current bioaccumulation assessment methods, a methodology is developed, applied, and investigated for measuring in vivo biotransformation rates of hydrophobic organic substances in the body (soma) and gastrointestinal tract of the fish. The method resembles the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 305 dietary bioaccumulation test but includes reference chemicals to determine both somatic and gastrointestinal biotransformation rates of test chemicals. Somatic biotransformation rate constants for the test chemicals ranged between 0 d(-1) and 0.38 (standard error [SE] 0.03)/d(-1) . Gastrointestinal biotransformation rate constants varied from 0 d(-1) to 46 (SE 7) d(-1) . Gastrointestinal biotransformation contributed more to the overall biotransformation in fish than somatic biotransformation for all test substances but 1. Results suggest that biomagnification tests can reveal the full extent of biotransformation in fish. The common presumption that the liver is the main site of biotransformation may not apply to many substances exposed through the diet. The results suggest that the application of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for somatic biotransformation rates and hepatic in vitro models to assess the effect of biotransformation on bioaccumulation can underestimate biotransformation rates and overestimate the biomagnification potential of chemicals that are biotransformed in the gastrointestinal tract. With some modifications, the OECD 305 test can generate somatic and gastrointestinal biotransformation data to develop biotransformation QSARs and test in vitro-in vivo biotransformation extrapolation methods.

  18. Morphallactic regeneration as revealed by region-specific gene expression in the digestive tract of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    PubMed

    Takeo, Makoto; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2008-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete, which primarily reproduces asexually by fragmentation and regeneration. For precise analysis of the pattern formation during regeneration, we isolated three region-specific genes (EjTuba, mino, and horu) expressed in the digestive tract. In growing worms, the expression of EjTuba in the head and mino in the trunk region just posterior to the head were observed in defined body segments, while the expression areas of EjTuba in the trunk and horu were proportional to the total number of body segments. In the regeneration process, expression of these genes disappeared once and recovered to their original pattern by day 7. In abnormal regeneration such as a bipolar head, mino was still expressed in the region next to both the normal and the ectopic heads. These results suggest that there is morphallactic as well as epimorphic or inductive regulation of the body patterning during regeneration of E. japonensis. PMID:18393309

  19. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN LARGE-DIAMETER H II REGIONS REVEALED BY THE FARADAY ROTATION OF COMPACT EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Madsen, G. J.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present a study of the line-of-sight magnetic fields in five large-diameter Galactic H II regions. Using the Faraday rotation of background polarized radio sources, as well as dust-corrected H{alpha} surface brightness as a probe of electron density, we estimated the strength and orientation of the magnetic field along 93 individual sight lines through the H II regions. Each of the H II regions displayed a coherent magnetic field. The magnetic field strength (line-of-sight component) in the regions ranges from 2 to 6 {mu}G, which is similar to the typical magnetic field strength in the diffuse interstellar medium. We investigated the relationship between magnetic field strength and electron density in the five H II regions. The slope of magnetic field versus density in the low-density regime (0.8 cm{sup -3} < n{sub e} <30 cm{sup -3}) is very slightly above zero. We also calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, {beta}{sub th}, for each data point, which fell in the range 1.01 < {beta}{sub th} < 25. Finally, we studied the orientation of the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood (d < 1.1 kpc) using our data from five H II regions along with existing measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength from polarized pulsars whose distances have been determined from their annual parallax. We identify a net direction for the magnetic field in the solar neighborhood, but find no evidence for a preferred vertical direction of the magnetic field above or below the Galactic plane.

  20. Regional TNFα mapping in the brain reveals the striatum as a neuroinflammatory target after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Andreas; Magnet, Ingrid A.M.; Uray, Thomas; Stezoski, Jason P.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Drabek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) triggers neuroinflammation that could play a role in a delayed neuronal death. In our previously established rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF) CA characterized by extensive neuronal death, we tested the hypothesis that individual brain regions have specific neuroinflammatory responses, as reflected by regional brain tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and other cytokines. In a prospective study, rats were randomized to 6 min (CA6), 8 min (CA8) or 10 min (CA10) of VF CA, or sham group. Cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum were evaluated for TNFα and interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and interferon gamma at 3 h, 6 h or 14 d after CA by ELISA and Luminex. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the cell source of TNFα. CA resulted in a selective TNFα response with significant regional and temporal differences. At 3 h after CA, TNFα-levels increased in all regions depending on the duration of the insult. The most pronounced increase was observed in striatum that showed 20-fold increase in CA10 vs. sham, and 3-fold increase vs. CA6 or CA8 group, respectively (p < 0.01). TNFα levels in striatum decreased between 3 h and 6 h, but increased in other regions between 3 h and 14 d. TNFα levels remained twofold higher in CA6 vs. shams across brain regions at 14 d (p < 0.01). In contrast to pronounced TNFα response, other cytokines showed only a minimal increase in CA6 and CA8 groups vs. sham in all brain regions with the exception that IL-1β increased twofold in cerebellum and striatum (p < 0.01). TNFα colocalized with neurons. In conclusion, CA produced a duration-dependent acute TNFα response, with dramatic increase in the striatum where TNFα colocalized with neurons. Increased TNFα levels persist for at least two weeks. This TNFα surge contrasts the lack of an acute increase in other cytokines in brain after CA. Given that striatum is a selectively vulnerable brain region, our data

  1. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity. PMID:22961769

  2. Studies on Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweetpotato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas L.(Lam)l. Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryo-genesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants. They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  3. [Interdependance between somatic symptoms, sleep and dreams].

    PubMed

    Todorov, Assya

    2014-03-19

    Even in an established illness, somatic complains can hide other emotional inquiries. The therapist, always with a kind attitude, can ask more about patient's sexual life. This can be use of having a better idea of patient's life and problems. Talking about dreams can also be useful: it gives new and surprising elements about patient's personality and helps to progress on healing's way.

  4. Somatic Symptoms in Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Brittany B.; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B.; Truax, Tatyana V.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the…

  5. Writing Bodies: Somatic Mind in Composition Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleckenstein, Kristie S.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the somatic mind, a permeable materiality in which mind and body resolve into a single entity which is (re)formed by the constantly shifting boundaries of discursive and corporeal intertextualities. Addresses its importance in composition studies. Critiques the poststructuralist disregard of corporeality. (CR)

  6. Somatic Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly reviews number of theories which address role of psychological factors in etiology of somatic disorders. Focuses on psychological treatment approaches that have been used to alleviate or reduce symptomatic behaviors associated with eating disorders, elimination disorders, and headaches in children. Discusses role of school psychologists in…

  7. Sexual Abuse: Somatic and Emotional Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimza, Mary Ellen; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Chart reviews and telephone interviews with 72 sexual abuse victims found that 48 of the children had symptoms similar to the "rape trauma" syndrome. Two-thirds of victims commonly had somatic complaints (such as abdominal pain) and emotional/behavioral problems (runaway behavior, suicide attempts). (DB)

  8. Studies for Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweet Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L(Lam)). Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 mg/L). Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryogenesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  9. Epigenomic profiling of primary gastric adenocarcinoma reveals super-enhancer heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Wen Fong; Xing, Manjie; Xu, Chang; Yao, Xiaosai; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Lim, Mei Chee; Cao, Fan; Lim, Kevin; Babu, Deepak; Poon, Lai-Fong; Lin Suling, Joyce; Qamra, Aditi; Irwanto, Astrid; Qu Zhengzhong, James; Nandi, Tannistha; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Chan, Yang Sun; Tay, Su Ting; Lee, Ming Hui; Davies, James O. J.; Wong, Wai Keong; Soo, Khee Chee; Chan, Weng Hoong; Ong, Hock Soo; Chow, Pierce; Wong, Chow Yin; Rha, Sun Young; Liu, Jianjun; Hillmer, Axel M.; Hughes, Jim R.; Rozen, Steve; Teh, Bin Tean; Fullwood, Melissa Jane; Li, Shang; Tan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory enhancer elements in solid tumours remain poorly characterized. Here we apply micro-scale chromatin profiling to survey the distal enhancer landscape of primary gastric adenocarcinoma (GC), a leading cause of global cancer mortality. Integrating 110 epigenomic profiles from primary GCs, normal gastric tissues and cell lines, we highlight 36,973 predicted enhancers and 3,759 predicted super-enhancers respectively. Cell-line-defined super-enhancers can be subclassified by their somatic alteration status into somatic gain, loss and unaltered categories, each displaying distinct epigenetic, transcriptional and pathway enrichments. Somatic gain super-enhancers are associated with complex chromatin interaction profiles, expression patterns correlated with patient outcome and dense co-occupancy of the transcription factors CDX2 and HNF4α. Somatic super-enhancers are also enriched in genetic risk SNPs associated with cancer predisposition. Our results reveal a genome-wide reprogramming of the GC enhancer and super-enhancer landscape during tumorigenesis, contributing to dysregulated local and regional cancer gene expression. PMID:27677335

  10. Genetic improvement of mastitis through selection on somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Shook, G E

    1993-11-01

    Heredity influences both clinical mastitis and somatic cell score. Intramammary infection is the major cause of elevated somatic cell score. A nationwide program of genetic evaluation of dairy cattle for somatic cell score is being developed. Proper selection of artificial insemination sires, considering their genetic merit for both milk production and somatic cell score, will reduce the genetic increase in mastitis susceptibility that accompanies selection for high production. PMID:8242460

  11. Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of true morels (Morchella) reveals high levels of endemics in Turkey relative ot other regions of Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to better understand how the phylogenetic diversity of true morels (Morchella) in Turkey compares with species found in other regions of the world. The current research builds on our recently published survey of 10 Turkish provinces and another of the world in which D...

  12. Regional inactivations of primate ventral prefrontal cortex reveal two distinct mechanisms underlying negative bias in decision making

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Hannah F.; Horst, Nicole K.; Roberts, Angela C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the orbitofrontal and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices is implicated in anxiety and mood disorders, but the specific contributions of each region are unknown, including how they gate the impact of threat on decision making. To address this, the effects of GABAergic inactivation of these regions were studied in marmoset monkeys performing an instrumental approach–avoidance decision-making task that is sensitive to changes in anxiety. Inactivation of either region induced a negative bias away from punishment that could be ameliorated with anxiolytic treatment. However, whereas the effects of ventrolateral prefrontal cortex inactivation on punishment avoidance were seen immediately, those of orbitofrontal cortex inactivation were delayed and their expression was dependent upon an amygdala–anterior hippocampal circuit. We propose that these negative biases result from deficits in attentional control and punishment prediction, respectively, and that they provide the basis for understanding how distinct regional prefrontal dysregulation contributes to the heterogeneity of anxiety disorders with implications for cognitive-behavioral treatment strategies. PMID:25775597

  13. High-resolution physical mapping in Pennisetum squamulatum reveals extensive chromosomal heteromorphism of the genomic region associated with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yukio; Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2004-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is asexual reproduction as a consequence of parthenogenetic development of a chromosomally unreduced egg. The trait leads to the production of embryos with a maternal genotype, i.e. progeny are clones of the maternal plant. The application of the trait in agriculture could be a tremendous tool for crop improvement through conventional and nonconventional breeding methods. Unfortunately, there are no major crops that reproduce by apomixis, and interspecific hybridization with wild relatives has not yet resulted in commercially viable germplasm. Pennisetum squamulatum is an aposporous apomict from which the gene(s) for apomixis has been transferred to sexual pearl millet by backcrossing. Twelve molecular markers that are linked with apomixis coexist in a tight linkage block called the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), and several of these markers have been shown to be hemizygous in the polyploid genome of P. squamulatum. High resolution genetic mapping of these markers has not been possible because of low recombination in this region of the genome. We now show the physical arrangement of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing apomixis-linked molecular markers by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization on pachytene chromosomes. The size of the ASGR, currently defined as the entire hemizygous region that hybridizes with apomixis-linked bacterial artificial chromosomes, was estimated on pachytene and mitotic chromosomes to be approximately 50 Mbp (a quarter of the chromosome). The ASGR includes highly repetitive sequences from an Opie-2-like retrotransposon family that are particularly abundant in this region of the genome.

  14. Analysis of Genomic Regions Associated With Coronary Artery Disease Reveals Continent-Specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in North African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Daniela; Via, Marc; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Esteban, Esther; Chaabani, Hassen; Anaibar, Fatima; Harich, Nourdin; Habbal, Rachida; Ghalim, Noreddine; Moral, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, several genomic regions have been robustly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in different genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted mainly in people of European descent. These kinds of data are lacking in African populations, even though heart diseases are a major cause of premature death and disability. Methods Here, 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the top four CAD risk regions (1p13, 1q41, 9p21, and 10q11) were genotyped in 274 case-control samples from Morocco and Tunisia, with the aim of analyzing for the first time if the associations found in European populations were transferable to North Africans. Results The results indicate that, as in Europe, these four genetic regions are also important for CAD risk in North Africa. However, the individual SNPs associated with CAD in Africa are different from those identified in Europe in most cases (1p13, 1q41, and 9p21). Moreover, the seven risk variants identified in North Africans are efficient in discriminating between cases and controls in North African populations, but not in European populations. Conclusions This study indicates a disparity in markers associated to CAD susceptibility between North Africans and Europeans that may be related to population differences in the chromosomal architecture of these risk regions. PMID:26780859

  15. RNA sequencing reveals region-specific molecular mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis in a model of classical hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, A. S.; de Matos, A. H.; do Canto, A. M.; Rocha, C. S.; Carvalho, B. S.; Pascoal, V. D. B.; Norwood, B.; Bauer, S.; Rosenow, F.; Gilioli, R.; Cendes, F.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete transcriptome analysis of the dorsal (dDG) and ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) of a rat epilepsy model presenting a hippocampal lesion with a strict resemblance to classical hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We collected the dDG and vDG by laser microdissection 15 days after electrical stimulation and performed high-throughput RNA-sequencing. There were many differentially regulated genes, some of which were specific to either of the two sub-regions in stimulated animals. Gene ontology analysis indicated an enrichment of inflammation-related processes in both sub-regions and of axonal guidance and calcium signaling processes exclusively in the vDG. There was also a differential regulation of genes encoding molecules involved in synaptic function, neural electrical activity and neuropeptides in stimulated rats. The data presented here suggests, in the time point analyzed, a remarkable interaction among several molecular components which takes place in the damaged hippocampi. Furthermore, even though similar mechanisms may function in different regions of the DG, the molecular components involved seem to be region specific. PMID:26935982

  16. fMRI Reveals Distinct CNS Processing during Symptomatic and Recovered Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebel, A.; Becerra, L.; Wallin, D.; Moulton, E. A.; Morris, S.; Pendse, G.; Jasciewicz, J.; Stein, M.; Aiello-Lammens, M.; Grant, E.; Berde, C.; Borsook, D.

    2008-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in paediatric patients is clinically distinct from the adult condition in which there is often complete resolution of its signs and symptoms within several months to a few years. The ability to compare the symptomatic and asymptomatic condition in the same individuals makes this population interesting for the…

  17. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  18. Internal wave activity in the polar atmospheric regions during 2006 - 2009 revealed by COSMIC radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Liou, Yuei-An

    The satellite mission Formosat-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) consists of six micro-satellites, and each of them has four GPS-antennas. It was launched in April 2006, orbiting around the Earth at approximately 800 km. The primary scientific goal of the mission is to demonstrate the value of near-real-time radio occultation (RO) observations in improving operational numerical weather predictions (NWP). The goal is readily shown by assimilating the measurements of atmospheric parameters into used NWP-models. These parameters include density, temperature, pressure and relative humidity fields in the atmosphere. An analysis of their geographic and seasonal distributions is necessary to the understanding of the energy and momentum transfer and the reaction of the polar atmosphere in response to global warming. This task is especially important as the Polar Regions are very sensitive to the change in global temperature and it may be a major cause of global sea level rising. In this work, a statistical analysis of the internal gravity wave (IGW) activity in polar atmospheric regions (latitudes more than 60º) using Formosat-3/COSMIC RO temperature data collected from July 2006 to March 2009 has been performed. Geographic and seasonal distributions of the IGW potential energy (wave activity indicator) in the altitude interval from 15 to 35 km have been determined and analyzed. The obtained results show that the wave activity in the polar atmosphere is strong in winter and spring. The potential energy of IGWs in spring is largest in Antarctic atmospheric region, while it is largest in winter in Arctic region. The wave potential energy increases with altitude up to 35 km in the atmosphere of both Earth’s hemispheres. In Antarctic region, internal waves with high potential energy occur in the atmosphere over the Antarctic Peninsula. In Arctic region, a high wave activity is mainly observed over North Atlantic Ocean (Iceland

  19. Regional Coherence Alterations Revealed by Resting-State fMRI in Post-Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chen; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Deng-Ling; Jiao, Yun; Tang, Tian-Yu; Ju, Shenghong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Post-stroke cognitive dysfunction greatly influences patients’ quality of life after stroke. However, its neurophysiological basis remains unknown. This study utilized resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the alterations in regional coherence in patients after subcortical stroke. Methods Resting-state fMRI measurements were acquired from 16 post-stroke patients with poor cognitive function (PSPC), 16 post-stroke patients with good cognitive function (PSGC) and 30 well-matched healthy controls (HC). Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to detect alterations in regional coherence. Abnormalities in regional coherence correlated with scores on neuropsychological scales. Results Compared to the HC and the PSGC, the PSPC showed remarkably decreased ReHo in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus. ReHo in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex positively correlated with the scores on the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (r = 0.399, P = 0.036) and the Complex Figure Test-delayed recall subtest (r = 0.397, P = 0.036) in all post-stroke patients. Moreover, ReHo in the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus positively correlated with the scores on the Forward Digit Span Test (r = 0.485, P = 0.009) in all post-stroke patients. Conclusions Aberrant regional coherence was observed in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices in post-stroke patients with cognitive dysfunction. ReHo could represent a promising indicator of neurobiological deficiencies in post-stroke patients. PMID:27454170

  20. Somatic embryogenesis of a wild passion fruit species Passiflora cincinnata Masters: histocytological and histochemical evidences.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diego Ismael; Vieira, Lorena Melo; Tanaka, Francisco André Ossamu; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Otoni, Wagner Campos

    2012-07-01

    The characterization of cellular changes that occur during somatic embryogenesis is essential for understanding the factors involved in the transition of somatic cells into embryogenically competent cells and determination of cells and/or tissues involved. The present study describes the anatomical and ultrastructural events that lead to the formation of somatic embryos in the model system of the wild passion fruit (Passiflora cincinnata). Mature zygotic embryos were inoculated in Murashige and Skoog induction media supplemented with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 6-benzyladenine. Zygotic embryo explants at different development stages were collected and processed by conventional methods for studies using light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Histochemical tests were used to examine the mobilization of reserves. The differentiation of the somatic embryos began in the abaxial side of the cotyledon region. Protuberances were formed from the meristematic proliferation of the epidermal and mesophyll cells. These cells had large nuclei, dense cytoplasm with a predominance of mitochondria, and a few reserve compounds. The protuberances extended throughout the abaxial surface of the cotyledons. The ongoing differentiation of peripheral cells of these structures led to the formation of proembryogenic zones, which, in turn, dedifferentiated into somatic embryos of multicellular origin. In the initial stages of embryogenesis, the epidermal and mesophyll cells showed starch grains and less lipids and protein reserves than the starting explant. These results provide detailed information on anatomical and ultrastructural changes involved in the acquisition of embryogenic competence and embryo differentiation that has been lacking so far in Passiflora.

  1. Genetic structure and demographic history reveal migration of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from the southern to northern regions of China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Bao-Cai; Gong, Ya-Jun; Jin, Gui-Hua; Chen, Xue-Xin; Meng, Xiang-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is one of the most destructive insect pests of cruciferous plants worldwide. Biological, ecological and genetic studies have indicated that this moth is migratory in many regions around the world. Although outbreaks of this pest occur annually in China and cause heavy damage, little is known concerning its migration. To better understand its migration pattern, we investigated the population genetic structure and demographic history of the diamondback moth by analyzing 27 geographical populations across China using four mitochondrial genes and nine microsatellite loci. The results showed that high haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity occurred in the diamondback moth populations, a finding that is typical for migratory species. No genetic differentiation among all populations and no correlation between genetic and geographical distance were found. However, pairwise analysis of the mitochondrial genes has indicated that populations from the southern region were more differentiated than those from the northern region. Gene flow analysis revealed that the effective number of migrants per generation into populations of the northern region is very high, whereas that into populations of the southern region is quite low. Neutrality testing, mismatch distribution and Bayesian Skyline Plot analyses based on mitochondrial genes all revealed that deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and sudden expansion of the effective population size were present in populations from the northern region but not in those from the southern region. In conclusion, all our analyses strongly demonstrated that the diamondback moth migrates within China from the southern to northern regions with rare effective migration in the reverse direction. Our research provides a successful example of using population genetic approaches to resolve the seasonal migration of insects.

  2. Genetic structure and demographic history reveal migration of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from the southern to northern regions of China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Bao-Cai; Gong, Ya-Jun; Jin, Gui-Hua; Chen, Xue-Xin; Meng, Xiang-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is one of the most destructive insect pests of cruciferous plants worldwide. Biological, ecological and genetic studies have indicated that this moth is migratory in many regions around the world. Although outbreaks of this pest occur annually in China and cause heavy damage, little is known concerning its migration. To better understand its migration pattern, we investigated the population genetic structure and demographic history of the diamondback moth by analyzing 27 geographical populations across China using four mitochondrial genes and nine microsatellite loci. The results showed that high haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity occurred in the diamondback moth populations, a finding that is typical for migratory species. No genetic differentiation among all populations and no correlation between genetic and geographical distance were found. However, pairwise analysis of the mitochondrial genes has indicated that populations from the southern region were more differentiated than those from the northern region. Gene flow analysis revealed that the effective number of migrants per generation into populations of the northern region is very high, whereas that into populations of the southern region is quite low. Neutrality testing, mismatch distribution and Bayesian Skyline Plot analyses based on mitochondrial genes all revealed that deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and sudden expansion of the effective population size were present in populations from the northern region but not in those from the southern region. In conclusion, all our analyses strongly demonstrated that the diamondback moth migrates within China from the southern to northern regions with rare effective migration in the reverse direction. Our research provides a successful example of using population genetic approaches to resolve the seasonal migration of insects. PMID:23565158

  3. Molecular cloning, structural and expression profiling of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhizhen; Lai, Chengchun; Zhang, Yaling; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-01-01

    To clone and examine expression profiles of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour. Thirty cDNA sequences and two genomic sequences encoding DlRan proteins were isolated from longan embryogenic cultures. Structural analysis of DlRan genes revealed that the longan Ran gene family is more expanded than that of Arabidopsis. Expression analysis of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis uncovered a high abundance of DlRan genes in early embryogenic cultures and heart- and torpedo-shaped embryos. The expression of DlRan genes in embryogenic calli was affected by exogenous 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treatment. DlRan is involved in 2,4-D induced somatic embryogenesis and development of somatic embryos in longan. PMID:27026877

  4. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG overlapping regulatory region reveals LD structure and functional variants in association with leprosy in unrelated indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rupali; Ali, Shafat; Srivastava, Amit K; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Jena, Mamta; Garg, Vijay K; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations.

  5. Importance of the converter region for the motility of myosin as revealed by the studies on chimeric Chara myosins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masaya; Kashiyama, Taku; Hachikubo, You; Ito, Kohji; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2004-11-19

    A long alpha-helix in myosin head constitutes a lever arm together with light chains. It is known from X-ray crystallographic studies that the first three turns of this lever arm alpha-helix are inserted into the converter region of myosin. We previously showed that chimeric Chara myosin in which the motor domain of Chara myosin was connected to the lever arm alpha-helix of Dictyostelium myosin had motility far less than that expected for the motor domain of Chara myosin. Here, we replaced the inserted three turns of alpha-helix of Dictyostelium myosin with that of the Chara myosin and found that the replacement enhanced the motility 2.6-fold without changing the ATPase activity so much. The result clearly showed the importance of interaction between the converter region and the lever arm alpha-helix for the efficient motility of myosin.

  6. Mangrove habitat use by juvenile reef fish: meta-analysis reveals that tidal regime matters more than biogeographic region.

    PubMed

    Igulu, Mathias M; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Dorenbosch, Martijn; Grol, Monique G G; Harborne, Alastair R; Kimirei, Ismael A; Mumby, Peter J; Olds, Andrew D; Mgaya, Yunus D

    2014-01-01

    Identification of critical life-stage habitats is key to successful conservation efforts. Juveniles of some species show great flexibility in habitat use while other species rely heavily on a restricted number of juvenile habitats for protection and food. Considering the rapid degradation of coastal marine habitats worldwide, it is important to evaluate which species are more susceptible to loss of juvenile nursery habitats and how this differs across large biogeographic regions. Here we used a meta-analysis approach to investigate habitat use by juvenile reef fish species in tropical coastal ecosystems across the globe. Densities of juvenile fish species were compared among mangrove, seagrass and coral reef habitats. In the Caribbean, the majority of species showed significantly higher juvenile densities in mangroves as compared to seagrass beds and coral reefs, while for the Indo-Pacific region seagrass beds harbored the highest overall densities. Further analysis indicated that differences in tidal amplitude, irrespective of biogeographic region, appeared to be the major driver for this phenomenon. In addition, juvenile reef fish use of mangroves increased with increasing water salinity. In the Caribbean, species of specific families (e.g. Lutjanidae, Haemulidae) showed a higher reliance on mangroves or seagrass beds as juvenile habitats than other species, whereas in the Indo-Pacific family-specific trends of juvenile habitat utilization were less apparent. The findings of this study highlight the importance of incorporating region-specific tidal inundation regimes into marine spatial conservation planning and ecosystem based management. Furthermore, the significant role of water salinity and tidal access as drivers of mangrove fish habitat use implies that changes in seawater level and rainfall due to climate change may have important effects on how juvenile reef fish use nearshore seascapes in the future. PMID:25551761

  7. Phylogenetic footprinting reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene that enhance cell-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Givens, Marjory L; Kurotani, Reiko; Rave-Harel, Naama; Miller, Nichol L G; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive function is controlled by the hypothalamic neuropeptide, GnRH, which serves as the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH expression is limited to a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus. Targeting this minute population of neurons (as few as 800 in the mouse) requires regulatory elements upstream of the GnRH gene that remain to be fully characterized. Previously, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved promoter region (-173 to +1) and an enhancer (-1863 to -1571) in the rat gene that targets a subset of the GnRH neurons in vivo. In the present study, we used phylogenetic sequence comparison between human and rodents and analysis of the transcription factor clusters within conserved regions in an attempt to identify additional upstream regulatory elements. This approach led to the characterization of a new upstream enhancer that regulates expression of GnRH in a cell-specific manner. Within this upstream enhancer are nine binding sites for Octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (OCT1), known to be an important transcriptional regulator of GnRH gene expression. In addition, we have identified nuclear factor I (NF1) binding to multiple elements in the GnRH-regulatory regions, each in close proximity to OCT1. We show that OCT1 and NF1 physically and functionally interact. Moreover, the OCT1 and NF1 binding sites in the regulatory regions appear to be essential for appropriate GnRH gene expression. These findings indicate a role for this upstream enhancer and novel OCT1/NF1 complexes in neuron-restricted expression of the GnRH gene.

  8. Mangrove habitat use by juvenile reef fish: meta-analysis reveals that tidal regime matters more than biogeographic region.

    PubMed

    Igulu, Mathias M; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Dorenbosch, Martijn; Grol, Monique G G; Harborne, Alastair R; Kimirei, Ismael A; Mumby, Peter J; Olds, Andrew D; Mgaya, Yunus D

    2014-01-01

    Identification of critical life-stage habitats is key to successful conservation efforts. Juveniles of some species show great flexibility in habitat use while other species rely heavily on a restricted number of juvenile habitats for protection and food. Considering the rapid degradation of coastal marine habitats worldwide, it is important to evaluate which species are more susceptible to loss of juvenile nursery habitats and how this differs across large biogeographic regions. Here we used a meta-analysis approach to investigate habitat use by juvenile reef fish species in tropical coastal ecosystems across the globe. Densities of juvenile fish species were compared among mangrove, seagrass and coral reef habitats. In the Caribbean, the majority of species showed significantly higher juvenile densities in mangroves as compared to seagrass beds and coral reefs, while for the Indo-Pacific region seagrass beds harbored the highest overall densities. Further analysis indicated that differences in tidal amplitude, irrespective of biogeographic region, appeared to be the major driver for this phenomenon. In addition, juvenile reef fish use of mangroves increased with increasing water salinity. In the Caribbean, species of specific families (e.g. Lutjanidae, Haemulidae) showed a higher reliance on mangroves or seagrass beds as juvenile habitats than other species, whereas in the Indo-Pacific family-specific trends of juvenile habitat utilization were less apparent. The findings of this study highlight the importance of incorporating region-specific tidal inundation regimes into marine spatial conservation planning and ecosystem based management. Furthermore, the significant role of water salinity and tidal access as drivers of mangrove fish habitat use implies that changes in seawater level and rainfall due to climate change may have important effects on how juvenile reef fish use nearshore seascapes in the future.

  9. Mangrove Habitat Use by Juvenile Reef Fish: Meta-Analysis Reveals that Tidal Regime Matters More than Biogeographic Region

    PubMed Central

    Igulu, Mathias M.; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Dorenbosch, Martijn; Grol, Monique G. G.; Harborne, Alastair R.; Kimirei, Ismael A.; Mumby, Peter J.; Olds, Andrew D.; Mgaya, Yunus D.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of critical life-stage habitats is key to successful conservation efforts. Juveniles of some species show great flexibility in habitat use while other species rely heavily on a restricted number of juvenile habitats for protection and food. Considering the rapid degradation of coastal marine habitats worldwide, it is important to evaluate which species are more susceptible to loss of juvenile nursery habitats and how this differs across large biogeographic regions. Here we used a meta-analysis approach to investigate habitat use by juvenile reef fish species in tropical coastal ecosystems across the globe. Densities of juvenile fish species were compared among mangrove, seagrass and coral reef habitats. In the Caribbean, the majority of species showed significantly higher juvenile densities in mangroves as compared to seagrass beds and coral reefs, while for the Indo-Pacific region seagrass beds harbored the highest overall densities. Further analysis indicated that differences in tidal amplitude, irrespective of biogeographic region, appeared to be the major driver for this phenomenon. In addition, juvenile reef fish use of mangroves increased with increasing water salinity. In the Caribbean, species of specific families (e.g. Lutjanidae, Haemulidae) showed a higher reliance on mangroves or seagrass beds as juvenile habitats than other species, whereas in the Indo-Pacific family-specific trends of juvenile habitat utilization were less apparent. The findings of this study highlight the importance of incorporating region-specific tidal inundation regimes into marine spatial conservation planning and ecosystem based management. Furthermore, the significant role of water salinity and tidal access as drivers of mangrove fish habitat use implies that changes in seawater level and rainfall due to climate change may have important effects on how juvenile reef fish use nearshore seascapes in the future. PMID:25551761

  10. Cytoterminology of cortical components of ciliates: somatic and oral kinetids.

    PubMed

    Lynn, D H

    1988-01-01

    The terminology of cortical structures in ciliated protists is determined partly by the organizational perspective from which these organisms are viewed. A general descriptive terminology is to be preferred to a particular and specialized one since the latter approach will lead to inflation in the number of terms. For the components of the ciliate kinetid, postciliary (microtubular) ribbons, transverse (microtubular) ribbons, nematodesma and kinetodesmal fibril are preferred terms. One, two and more than two kinetosome kinetids are referred to as mono-, di- and polykinetids, whether in somatic or oral regions of the cortex. In the oral region, adoral, circumoral, and paroral are the preferred descriptive adjectives, modified by the name of the taxonomic category in which the structures are found.

  11. Characterization of field and vaccine infectious bursal disease viruses from Nigeria revealing possible virulence and regional markers in the VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks.

    PubMed

    Adamu, J; Owoade, A A; Abdu, P A; Kazeem, H M; Fatihu, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious bursal disease in vaccinated chicken flocks are frequent in Nigeria. For the control of infectious bursal disease, live vaccines based on foreign infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains are used. The present study investigated the phylogenetic relationship between field and vaccine IBDV strains from northwestern Nigeria. Thirty field IBDV strains and three commercial vaccines strains were characterized through sequencing the VP2 hypervariable region. In addition, the complete genome segment A coding region for two vaccines and two field strains was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences (position 212 to 331) of IBDV strains from Nigeria and other regions of the world were aligned and possible regional and virulence markers were identified associated with VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks. Reversion to virulence of a vaccine strain with a Q to L mutation at position 253 was observed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a unique cluster of northwest Nigerian field IBDV strains alone or related to imported characterized classical and very virulent IBDV vaccines. The results suggest that when IBDV strains spread from their region of origin to a different region they mutate alongside indigenous field strains but may retain their identity on the VP2 region. PMID:23919308

  12. Regional Variation of White Matter Development in the Cat Brain Revealed by Ex Vivo Diffusion MR Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Guangping; Das, Avilash; Hayashi, Emiko; Chen, Qin; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of developing fiber pathways is essential to assessing the developmental course of fiber pathways in the whole brain. We applied diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) tractography to five juvenile ex vivo cat brains at postnatal day (P) 35, when the degree of myelination varies across brain regions. We quantified diffusion properties (fractional anisotropy [FA] and apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) and other measurements (number, volume, and voxel count) on reconstructed pathways for projection (cortico-spinal and thalamo-cortical), corpus callosal, limbic (cingulum and fornix), and association (cortico-cortical) pathways, and characterized regional differences in maturation patterns by assessing diffusion properties. FA values were significantly higher in cortico-cortical pathways within the right hemisphere compared to those within the left hemisphere, while the other measurements for the cortico-cortical pathways within the hemisphere did not show asymmetry. ADC values were not asymmetric in both types of pathways. Interestingly, tract count and volume were significantly larger in the left thalamo-cortical pathways compared to the right thalamo-cortical pathways. The bilateral thalamo-cortical pathways showed high FA values compared to the other fiber pathways. On the other hand, ADC values did not show any differences across pathways studied. These results demonstrate that DSI tractography successfully depicted regional variations of white matter tracts during development when myelination is incomplete. Low FA and high ADC values in the cingulum bundle suggest that the cingulum bundle is less mature than the others at this developmental stage. PMID:27568056

  13. Sequence specificity of viral end DNA binding by HIV-1 integrase reveals critical regions for protein-DNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, D; Craigie, R

    1998-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase specifically recognizes and cleaves viral end DNA during the initial step of retroviral integration. The protein and DNA determinants of the specificity of viral end DNA binding have not been clearly identified. We have used mutational analysis of the viral end LTR sequence, in vitro selection of optimal viral end sequences, and specific photocrosslinking to identify regions of integrase that interact with specific bases in the LTR termini. The results highlight the involvement of the disordered loop of the integrase core domain, specifically residues Q148 and Y143, in binding to the terminal portion of the viral DNA ends. Additionally, we have identified positions upstream in the LTR termini which interact with the C-terminal domain of integrase, providing evidence for the role of that domain in stabilization of viral DNA binding. Finally, we have located a region centered 12 bases from the viral DNA terminus which appears essential for viral end DNA binding in the presence of magnesium, but not in the presence of manganese, suggesting a differential effect of divalent cations on sequence-specific binding. These results help to define important regions of contact between integrase and viral DNA, and assist in the formulation of a molecular model of this vital interaction. PMID:9755183

  14. Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Bong-Seok; Koh, In-Uk; Bae, Jae-Bum; Yu, Ho-Yeong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Hae-Young; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Murim; Choi, Sun Shim

    2016-08-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the main causes of heart failure (called cardiomyopathies) in adults. Alterations in epigenetic regulation (i.e., DNA methylation) have been implicated in the development of DCM. Here, we identified a total of 1828 differentially methylated probes (DMPs) using the Infinium 450K HumanMethylation Bead chip by comparing the methylomes between 18 left ventricles and 9 right ventricles. Alterations in DNA methylation levels were observed mainly in lowly methylated regions corresponding to promoter-proximal regions, which become hypermethylated in severely affected left ventricles. Subsequent mRNA microarray analysis showed that the effect of DNA methylation on gene expression regulation is not unidirectional but is controlled by the functional sub-network context. DMPs were significantly enriched in the transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) we tested. Alterations in DNA methylation were specifically enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of cardiac development genes, the majority of which are involved in ventricular development (e.g., TBX5 and HAND1).

  15. GPCRs Direct Germline Development and Somatic Gonad Function in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir; Jamal, Ayana; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-05-01

    Planarians display remarkable plasticity in maintenance of their germline, with the ability to develop or dismantle reproductive tissues in response to systemic and environmental cues. Here, we investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in this dynamic germline regulation. By genome-enabled receptor mining, we identified 566 putative planarian GPCRs and classified them into conserved and phylum-specific subfamilies. We performed a functional screen to identify NPYR-1 as the cognate receptor for NPY-8, a neuropeptide required for sexual maturation and germ cell differentiation. Similar to NPY-8, knockdown of this receptor results in loss of differentiated germ cells and sexual maturity. NPYR-1 is expressed in neuroendocrine cells of the central nervous system and can be activated specifically by NPY-8 in cell-based assays. Additionally, we screened the complement of GPCRs with expression enriched in sexually reproducing planarians, and identified an orphan chemoreceptor family member, ophis, that controls differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). ophis is expressed in somatic cells of male and female gonads, as well as in accessory reproductive tissues. We have previously shown that somatic gonadal cells are required for male GSC specification and maintenance in planarians. However, ophis is not essential for GSC specification or maintenance and, therefore, defines a secondary role for planarian gonadal niche cells in promoting GSC differentiation. Our studies uncover the complement of planarian GPCRs and reveal previously unappreciated roles for these receptors in systemic and local (i.e., niche) regulation of germ cell development.

  16. GPCRs Direct Germline Development and Somatic Gonad Function in Planarians

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Amir; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Planarians display remarkable plasticity in maintenance of their germline, with the ability to develop or dismantle reproductive tissues in response to systemic and environmental cues. Here, we investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in this dynamic germline regulation. By genome-enabled receptor mining, we identified 566 putative planarian GPCRs and classified them into conserved and phylum-specific subfamilies. We performed a functional screen to identify NPYR-1 as the cognate receptor for NPY-8, a neuropeptide required for sexual maturation and germ cell differentiation. Similar to NPY-8, knockdown of this receptor results in loss of differentiated germ cells and sexual maturity. NPYR-1 is expressed in neuroendocrine cells of the central nervous system and can be activated specifically by NPY-8 in cell-based assays. Additionally, we screened the complement of GPCRs with expression enriched in sexually reproducing planarians, and identified an orphan chemoreceptor family member, ophis, that controls differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). ophis is expressed in somatic cells of male and female gonads, as well as in accessory reproductive tissues. We have previously shown that somatic gonadal cells are required for male GSC specification and maintenance in planarians. However, ophis is not essential for GSC specification or maintenance and, therefore, defines a secondary role for planarian gonadal niche cells in promoting GSC differentiation. Our studies uncover the complement of planarian GPCRs and reveal previously unappreciated roles for these receptors in systemic and local (i.e., niche) regulation of germ cell development. PMID:27163480

  17. GPCRs Direct Germline Development and Somatic Gonad Function in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir; Jamal, Ayana; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-05-01

    Planarians display remarkable plasticity in maintenance of their germline, with the ability to develop or dismantle reproductive tissues in response to systemic and environmental cues. Here, we investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in this dynamic germline regulation. By genome-enabled receptor mining, we identified 566 putative planarian GPCRs and classified them into conserved and phylum-specific subfamilies. We performed a functional screen to identify NPYR-1 as the cognate receptor for NPY-8, a neuropeptide required for sexual maturation and germ cell differentiation. Similar to NPY-8, knockdown of this receptor results in loss of differentiated germ cells and sexual maturity. NPYR-1 is expressed in neuroendocrine cells of the central nervous system and can be activated specifically by NPY-8 in cell-based assays. Additionally, we screened the complement of GPCRs with expression enriched in sexually reproducing planarians, and identified an orphan chemoreceptor family member, ophis, that controls differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). ophis is expressed in somatic cells of male and female gonads, as well as in accessory reproductive tissues. We have previously shown that somatic gonadal cells are required for male GSC specification and maintenance in planarians. However, ophis is not essential for GSC specification or maintenance and, therefore, defines a secondary role for planarian gonadal niche cells in promoting GSC differentiation. Our studies uncover the complement of planarian GPCRs and reveal previously unappreciated roles for these receptors in systemic and local (i.e., niche) regulation of germ cell development. PMID:27163480

  18. Cloning mammary cell cDNAs from 17q12-q23 using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cerosaletti, K.M.; Shapero, M.H.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned human genes that are encoded in the region 17q12-q23 and expressed in breast tissue using interspecific somatic cell hybrids and subtractive hybridization. Two mouse microcell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 17 with a nonoverlap region at 17q12-q23 were generated by microcell transfer. Radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized from the hybrid cell containing the 17q12-q23 interval and was subtracted with an excess of RNA from the hybrid cell lacking the interval. Resulting cDNA probes enriched for sequences from 17q12-q23 were used to screen a human premenopausal breast cDNA library, and 60 cDNAs were identified. Three of these cDNAs mapped to the hybrid cell nonoverlap region. These cDNAs were expressed in mammary epithelial cell hybrids, although none appeared to be breast-specific. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs revealed that clone 93A represents a previously unidentified gene, clone 98C has homology to an expressed sequence tag from goat mammary tissue, and clone 200A is identical to the human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene. These genes map outside a 1-cM region linked to early onset familial breast cancer but may be useful genetic markers in the 17q12-q23 region. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Somatic growth dynamics of West Atlantic hawksbill sea turtles: a spatio-temporal perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorndal, Karen A.; Chaloupka, Milani; Saba, Vincent S.; Diez, Carlos E.; van Dam, Robert P.; Krueger, Barry H.; Horrocks, Julia A.; Santos, Armando J. B.; Bellini, Cláudio; Marcovaldi, Maria A. G.; Nava, Mabel; Willis, Sue; Godley, Brendan J.; Gore, Shannon; Hawkes, Lucy A.; McGowan, Andrew; Witt, Matthew J.; Stringell, Thomas B.; Sanghera, Amdeep; Richardson, Peter B.; Broderick, Annette C.; Phillips, Quinton; Calosso, Marta C.; Claydon, John A. B.; Blumenthal, Janice; Moncada, Felix; Nodarse, Gonzalo; Medina, Yosvani; Dunbar, Stephen G.; Wood, Lawrence D.; Lagueux, Cynthia J.; Campbell, Cathi L.; Meylan, Anne B.; Meylan, Peter A.; Burns Perez, Virginia R.; Coleman, Robin A.; Strindberg, Samantha; Guzmán-H, Vicente; Hart, Kristen M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Lundgren, Ian; Boulon, Ralf H.; Connett, Stephen; Outerbridge, Mark E.; Bolten, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic growth dynamics are an integrated response to environmental conditions. Hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) are long-lived, major consumers in coral reef habitats that move over broad geographic areas (hundreds to thousands of kilometers). We evaluated spatio-temporal effects on hawksbill growth dynamics over a 33-yr period and 24 study sites throughout the West Atlantic and explored relationships between growth dynamics and climate indices. We compiled the largest ever data set on somatic growth rates for hawksbills – 3541 growth increments from 1980 to 2013. Using generalized additive mixed model analyses, we evaluated 10 covariates, including spatial and temporal variation, that could affect growth rates. Growth rates throughout the region responded similarly over space and time. The lack of a spatial effect or spatio-temporal interaction and the very strong temporal effect reveal that growth rates in West Atlantic hawksbills are likely driven by region-wide forces. Between 1997 and 2013, mean growth rates declined significantly and steadily by 18%. Regional climate indices have significant relationships with annual growth rates with 0- or 1-yr lags: positive with the Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation Index (correlation = 0.99) and negative with Caribbean sea surface temperature (correlation = −0.85). Declines in growth rates between 1997 and 2013 throughout the West Atlantic most likely resulted from warming waters through indirect negative effects on foraging resources of hawksbills. These climatic influences are complex. With increasing temperatures, trajectories of decline of coral cover and availability in reef habitats of major prey species of hawksbills are not parallel. Knowledge of how choice of foraging habitats, prey selection, and prey abundance are affected by warming water temperatures is needed to understand how climate change will affect productivity of consumers that live in association with coral reefs. Main

  20. Non-Linear and Flexible Regions of the Human Notch1 Extracellular Domain Revealed by High-Resolution Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    Weisshuhn, Philip C.; Sheppard, Devon; Taylor, Paul; Whiteman, Pat; Lea, Susan M.; Handford, Penny A.; Redfield, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Notch receptor is a key component of a core metazoan signaling pathway activated by Delta/Serrate/Lag-2 ligands expressed on an adjacent cell. This results in a short-range signal with profound effects on cell-fate determination, cell proliferation, and cell death. Key to understanding receptor function is structural knowledge of the large extracellular portion of Notch which contains multiple repeats of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Here we investigate the EGF4-13 region of human Notch1 (hN1) using a multidisciplinary approach. Ca2+-binding measurements, X-ray crystallography, {1H}-15N heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings support a non-linear organization for the EGF4-13 region with a rigid, bent conformation for EGF4-7 and a single flexible linkage between EGF9 and EGF10. These data allow us to construct an informed model for EGF10-13 which, in conjunction with comparative binding studies, demonstrates that EGF10 has an important role in determining Notch receptor sensitivity to Dll-4. PMID:26996961

  1. Genome-Wide Profiling of PARP1 Reveals an Interplay with Gene Regulatory Regions and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Nalabothula, Narasimharao; Al-jumaily, Taha; Eteleeb, Abdallah M.; Flight, Robert M.; Xiaorong, Shao; Moseley, Hunter; Rouchka, Eric C.; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) is a nuclear enzyme involved in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and gene expression. PARP1 interactions with chromatin architectural multi-protein complexes (i.e. nucleosomes) alter chromatin structure resulting in changes in gene expression. Chromatin structure impacts gene regulatory processes including transcription, splicing, DNA repair, replication and recombination. It is important to delineate whether PARP1 randomly associates with nucleosomes or is present at specific nucleosome regions throughout the cell genome. We performed genome-wide association studies in breast cancer cell lines to address these questions. Our studies show that PARP1 associates with epigenetic regulatory elements genome-wide, such as active histone marks, CTCF and DNase hypersensitive sites. Additionally, the binding of PARP1 to chromatin genome-wide is mutually exclusive with DNA methylation pattern suggesting a functional interplay between PARP1 and DNA methylation. Indeed, inhibition of PARylation results in genome-wide changes in DNA methylation patterns. Our results suggest that PARP1 controls the fidelity of gene transcription and marks actively transcribed gene regions by selectively binding to transcriptionally active chromatin. These studies provide a platform for developing our understanding of PARP1’s role in gene regulation. PMID:26305327

  2. Statistical characteristics of convective initiation in the Beijing-Tianjin region revealed by six-year radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Han, Lei; Wang, Hongqing

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of convective initiation (CI) in the Beijing-Tianjin region during the warm season of 2008-2013 are examined. A total of 38877 CI cases are identified by a thunderstorm identification, tracking, analysis, and nowcasting algorithm. CI cases are evaluated in the context of associated terrain, weather systems, and land cover properties. The spatial distribution of all CI cases shows that there are dense CI activities around the 200-m elevation, which means that convective storms are more easily triggered over foothills. From 1500-1800 to 0300-0600 BT (Beijing Time), the high-occurrence CI region tends to propagate southeastward (i.e., from mountains to plains, then to ocean). Among the four local weather systems, the Mongolian cold vortex has the highest CI frequency while the after-trough system has the lowest CI frequency. For the land cover relationships with CI, the urban land cover has the highest CI density and the forest-type land cover has the second highest CI density; these two types of land cover are more conducive to CI formation.

  3. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  4. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  5. Crustal thickening and attenuation as revealed by regional fold interference patterns: Ciudad Rodrigo basement area (Salamanca, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gómez Barreiro, Juan; Martínez Catalán, José R.; Ayarza, Puy

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the Ciudad Rodrigo area (Iberian Massif, Central Iberian Zone) has been revisited in order to integrate new geological data with recent models of the evolution of the Iberian Massif. Detailed mapping of fold structures along with a compilation of field data have been used to constrain the geometry and relative timing of ductile deformation events in this section of the hinterland of the Variscan belt. The structural evolution shows, in the first place, the development of a regional train of overturned folds with associated axial planar foliation (D1). Towards the lower structural levels, the deflection of the fold limbs and a subhorizontal crenulation cleavage depict the upper structural boundary of a superimposed low angle shear zone (D2), which extends at least to the deepest parts of the basement exposed in the study area. The amplification and rotation of D1 folds about a horizontal axis also occurred within this shear zone. The flat-lying character of the D2 structures accounts for the attenuation of the previously thickened crust, which developed following gravity gradients during thermal re-equilibration. Subsequent deformation led to the formation of two orthogonal sets of upright folds (D3), representing a new shift between crustal thinning and crustal thickening in the region.

  6. Diet of a piscivorous seabird reveals spatiotemporal variation in abundance of forage fishes in the Monterey Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Lisa A.; Harvey, James T.

    2015-06-01

    Brandt's Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus) diet was investigated using regurgitated pellets (n = 285) collected on 19 sampling days at three locations during the 2006-07 and 2007-08 nonbreeding seasons in the Monterey Bay region. The efficacy of using nested sieves and the all-structure technique to facilitate prey detection in the pellets was evaluated, but this method did not increase prey enumeration and greatly decreased efficiency. Although 29 prey species were consumed, northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) dominated and speckled sanddab (Citharichthys stigmaeus) also was important in the diet. Few rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) and market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) were consumed compared with great prevalence in previous studies during the 1970s. El Niño and La Niña during the study provided a unique opportunity to examine predator response to variation in prey availability. Patterns of prey number and diversity were not consistent among locations. Greatest number and diversity of prey occurred at locations within Monterey Bay during La Niña, results not evident at the outer coast location. Short-term specialization occurred but mean prey diversity indicated a generalist feeding mode. This study demonstrated the importance of periodic sampling at multiple locations within a region to detect spatiotemporal variability in the diet of opportunistic generalists.

  7. 3D reconstruction of the Shigella T3SS transmembrane regions reveals 12-fold symmetry and novel features throughout

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Julie L.; Horsley, Ashley; Stabat, David; Simon, Martha; Johnson, Steven; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Morris, Edward P.; Wall, Joseph S.; Lea, Susan M.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2009-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) mediate bacterial protein translocation into eukaryotic cells, a process essential for virulence of many Gram-negative pathogens. They are composed of a cytoplasmic secretion machinery and a base bridging both bacterial membranes into which a hollow, external needle is embedded. When isolated, the latter two parts are termed ‘needle complex’ (NC). Incomplete understanding of NC structure hampers studies of T3SS function. To estimate the stoichiometry of its components, the mass f its sub-domains was measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Subunit symmetries were determined by analysis of top and side views within negatively stained samples in low dose transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Application of 12-fold symmetry allowed generation of a 21-25Å resolution three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the NC base, revealing many new features and permitting tentative docking of the crystal structure of EscJ, an inner membrane component. PMID:19396171

  8. Multiple Sex-Associated Regions and a Putative Sex Chromosome in Zebrafish Revealed by RAD Mapping and Population Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome. PMID:22792396

  9. Novel two-dimensional morphometric maps and quantitative analysis reveal marked growth and structural recovery of the rat hippocampal regions from early hypothyroid retardation.

    PubMed

    Farahvar, Arash; Meisami, Esmail

    2007-04-01

    Effects of postnatal hypothyroidism and recovery from this condition on regional growth of the rat hippocampus (HC) were studied using two-dimensional (2D) foldout, morphometric maps of HC and its constituent CA1-CA4 regions. The maps were derived from unfolding serial coronal sections of the rat forebrain, consisting of the entire rostrocaudal extent of HC pyramidal cell layer in the normal control and hypothyroid weanling (P25, postnatal day 25) and young adult (P90) male rats, as well as animals allowed to recover from hypothyroid-induced growth retardation at weaning. The maps revealed novel views of HC regions for assessment of topological relationships and measurement of surface areas of the HC cortical sheet (pyramidal cell layer). In normal control P90 rats, the unfolded HC on each side extended 4 times more laterally than rostrocaudally; total HC surface area was about 40 mm(2), compared to 30 mm(2) in the weanling, indicating 35% growth from P25 to P90; CA1 took up 52% of the total HC surface area, followed by CA3 (31%) and CA2 and CA4, 8% each. Hypothyroidism resulted in significant (p<0.01) 11% and 20% reductions in the HC surface area in P25 and P90 rats, respectively; CA1 and CA4 regions suffered the most reductions while CA3 and CA2 regions the least. Recovering rats examined at P90 exhibited remarkable growth plasticity and recovery in HC regions, as evident by their near normal HC cortical surface area values, compared to age-matched controls. The 2D maps also revealed growth deficits in all HC regions of the hypothyroid rats; recovery in these parameters occurred across all dimensions, although the anterior-posterior growth was more severely affected than the mediolateral one. These results are confirmed and extended by volumetric analysis of laminar volumes of HC regions presented in a companion paper [Farahvar, A., Darwish, N., Sladek, S., Meisami, E., in press. Marked recovery of functional metabolic activity and laminar volumes in the rat

  10. Charcoal records reveal past occurrences of disturbances in the forests of the Kisangani region, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshibamba Mukendi, John; Hubau, Wannes; Ntahobavuka, Honorine; Boyemba Bosela, Faustin; De Cannière, Charles; Beeckman, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Past disturbances have modified local density, structure and floristic composition of Central African rainforests. As such, these perturbations represent a driving force for forest dynamics and they were presumably at the origin of present-day forest mosaics. One of the most prominent disturbances within the forest is fire, leaving behind charcoal as a witness of past forest dynamics. Quantification and identification of ancient charcoal fragments found in soil layers (= pedoanthracology) allows a detailed reconstruction of forest history, including the possible occurrence of past perturbations. The primary objective of this study is to present palaeoenvironmental evidence for the existence of past disturbances in the forests of the Kisangani region (Democratic Republic of the Congo) using a pedoanthracological approach. We quantified and identified charcoal fragments from pedoanthracological excavations in the Yangambi, Yoko, Masako and Kole forest regions. Charcoal sampling was conducted in pit intervals of 10 cm, whereby pottery fragments were also registered and quantified. Floristic identifications were conducted using former protocols based on wood anatomy, which is largely preserved after charcoalification. 14 excavations were conducted and charcoal was found in most pit intervals. Specifically, 52 out of 56 sampled intervals from the Yangambi forest contained charcoal, along with 47 pit intervals from the Yoko forest reserve, 34 pit intervals from the Masako forest and 16 from the Kole forest. Highest specific anthracomasses were recorded in Yoko (167 mg charcoal per kg soil), followed by Yangambi (133 mg/kg), Masako (71,89 mg/kg) and finally Kole (42,4 mg/kg). Charcoal identifications point at a manifest presence of the family of Fabaceae (Caesalpinioideae). This family is characteristic for the tropical humid rainforest. The presence of charcoal fragments from these taxa, associated with pottery sherds on different depths within the profiles, suggests

  11. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E.; Schief, William R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-04-15

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate - and structurally plastic - layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated {beta}-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A 'layered' gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a {beta}-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  12. Recombination Analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Reveals a Bias toward GC Content and the Inverted Repeat Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubin; Kolb, Aaron W.; Sverchkov, Yuriy; Cuellar, Jacqueline A.; Craven, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes recurrent mucocutaneous ulcers and is the leading cause of infectious blindness and sporadic encephalitis in the United States. HSV-1 has been shown to be highly recombinogenic; however, to date, there has been no genome-wide analysis of recombination. To address this, we generated 40 HSV-1 recombinants derived from two parental strains, OD4 and CJ994. The 40 OD4-CJ994 HSV-1 recombinants were sequenced using the Illumina sequencing system, and recombination breakpoints were determined for each of the recombinants using the Bootscan program. Breakpoints occurring in the terminal inverted repeats were excluded from analysis to prevent double counting, resulting in a total of 272 breakpoints in the data set. By placing windows around the 272 breakpoints followed by Monte Carlo analysis comparing actual data to simulated data, we identified a recombination bias toward both high GC content and intergenic regions. A Monte Carlo analysis also suggested that recombination did not appear to be responsible for the generation of the spontaneous nucleotide mutations detected following sequencing. Additionally, kernel density estimation analysis across the genome found that the large, inverted repeats comprise a recombination hot spot. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) virus is the leading cause of sporadic encephalitis and blinding keratitis in developed countries. HSV-1 has been shown to be highly recombinogenic, and recombination itself appears to be a significant component of genome replication. To date, there has been no genome-wide analysis of recombination. Here we present the findings of the first genome-wide study of recombination performed by generating and sequencing 40 HSV-1 recombinants derived from the OD4 and CJ994 parental strains, followed by bioinformatics analysis. Recombination breakpoints were determined, yielding 272 breakpoints in the full data set. Kernel density analysis determined that the large

  13. A comparative antibody analysis of pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Cone, Angela C; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  14. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  15. Somatic Cell Reprogramming into Cardiovascular Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Plonowska, Karolina; Wu, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiac disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world. The inability of the adult mammalian heart to adequately repair itself has motivated stem cell researchers to explore various strategies to regenerate cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. Over the past century, progressive gains in our knowledge about the cellular mechanisms governing fate determination have led to recent advances in cellular reprogramming. The identification of specific factors capable of inducing pluripotent phenotype in somatic cells as well as factors that can directly reprogram somatic cells into cardiomyocytes suggests the potential for these approaches to translate into clinical therapies in the future. While conceptually appealing, the field of cell lineage reprogramming is in its infancy and further research will be needed to improve the efficiency of the reprogramming process and the fidelity of the reprogrammed cells to their in vivo counterpart. PMID:24764131

  16. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, spectrums, and roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses as well as the challenges ahead translating these genomic data into clinical impacts. PMID:24022702

  17. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ian R; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA have enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in a large number of tumour samples. In this Review, we describe recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep-sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates and spectra, as well as the roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches that are used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses, as well as the future challenges of translating these genomic data into clinical impacts.

  18. Magnitude and extent of land subsidence in central Mexico revealed by regional InSAR ALOS time-series survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, Estelle; Amelung, Falk; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    The societal impacts of land subsidence are colossal, both in terms of decrease in water resources and in threat to human life due to buildings damages and increase in flood risk from rivers. Most subsidence surveys in Mexico focus on Mexico City, known to subside since the 1950s, while a few studies have documented the occurrence of land subsidence in other medium to large-seized cities of central Mexico. However, because most works target one single city, they fail to reveal the bigger picture. Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time-series analysis of ALOS L-band SAR data to resolve land subsidence in an area of 200,000 km2 in central Mexico. We processed over 600 SAR images acquired between 2007-2011 and produced over 3000 interferograms. The data reveal significant subsidence in seventeen cities, including sixteen with over 100, 000 inhabitants and allow mapping of subsidence with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Land subsidence is detected, from east to west, in Puebla (population of 2.5 million), Mexico city (population of 21 million), Toluca de Lerdo (population of 427K), Queretaro (population of 825K), San Luis de la Paz (population of 101K), Celaya (population of 266K), San Luis Potosi (population of 936K), Morelia (population of 537K), Salamanca (population of 144K), Irapuato (population of 317K), Silao (population of 147K), Leon (population of 1.4 million), Aguascalientes (population of 735K), Zamora de Hidalgo (population of 186K), Guadalajara (population of 3.8 million), Ahuacatlan (population of 6.5K), and Tepic (population of 261K). We additionally identify subsidence in 3 agricultural areas outside major urban centers: 20 km southwest of the city of San Luis de la Paz, south of Villa de Reyes (40 km south of San Luis Potosi), and west of villa de Arista (50 km north of San Luis Potosi). The time-series suggest nearly constant rates of subsidence at most the locations over the 2-years period spanned by the SAR

  19. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  20. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Shantha S. N.; Umino, Norihito; Hasegawa, Akira; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2009-07-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ~30° at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  1. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the Shigella T3SS transmembrane regions reveals 12-fold symmetry and novel features throughout

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, J.L.; Wall, J.; Horsley, A.; Stabat, S.; Simon, M.; Johnson, S.; da Fonseca, P. C. A.; Morris, E. P.; Lea, S. M.; Blocker, A. J.

    2009-05-18

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) mediate bacterial protein translocation into eukaryotic cells, a process essential for virulence of many Gram-negative pathogens. They are composed of a cytoplasmic secretion machinery and a base that bridges both bacterial membranes, into which a hollow, external needle is embedded. When isolated, the latter two parts are termed the 'needle complex'. An incomplete understanding of the structure of the needle complex has hampered studies of T3SS function. To estimate the stoichiometry of its components, we measured the mass of its subdomains by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We determined subunit symmetries by analysis of top and side views within negatively stained samples in low-dose transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Application of 12-fold symmetry allowed generation of a 21-25-{angstrom} resolution, three-dimensional reconstruction of the needle complex base, revealing many new features and permitting tentative docking of the crystal structure of EscJ, an inner membrane component.

  2. Physical Connectivity Mapping by Circular Permutation of Human Telomerase RNA Reveals New Regions Critical for Activity and Processivity.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Melissa A; Zappulla, David C

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of chromosomes to counteract telomere shortening. However, increased telomerase activity is associated with ∼90% of human cancers. The telomerase enzyme minimally requires an RNA (hTR) and a specialized reverse transcriptase protein (TERT) for activity in vitro. Understanding the structure-function relationships within hTR has important implications for human disease. For the first time, we have tested the physical-connectivity requirements in the 451-nucleotide hTR RNA using circular permutations, which reposition the 5' and 3' ends. Our extensive in vitro analysis identified three classes of hTR circular permutants with altered function. First, circularly permuting 3' of the template causes specific defects in repeat-addition processivity, revealing that the template recognition element found in ciliates is conserved in human telomerase RNA. Second, seven circular permutations residing within the catalytically important core and CR4/5 domains completely abolish telomerase activity, unveiling mechanistically critical portions of these domains. Third, several circular permutations between the core and CR4/5 significantly increase telomerase activity. Our extensive circular permutation results provide insights into the architecture and coordination of human telomerase RNA and highlight where the RNA could be targeted for the development of antiaging and anticancer therapeutics. PMID:26503788

  3. Handmade somatic cell cloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vajta, Gàbor; Lewis, Ian M; Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur

    2006-01-01

    Apart from the biological and ethical problems, technical difficulties also hamper the improvement and widespread application of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT). Recently introduced zona-free procedures may offer a solution for the latter problem. The most radical approach of these techniques is the so-called handmade cloning (HMC). It does not require micromanipulators because the manipulations required for both enucleation and nucleus transfer are performed by hand. The HMC technique includes manual bisection of zona-free oocytes, selection of cytoplasts by staining, and the simultaneous fusion of the somatic cell with two cytoplasts to produce a cloned embryo. HMC is a rapid and efficient technique that suits large-scale NT programs. It requires less expertise and time than traditional NT methods and the cost of equipment is significantly less. Production efficiency is high and embryo quality, in terms of pregnancy rates and live births, is not compromised. Although HMC has been developed particularly for bovine NT, the technique is applicable to other species. The method may become a useful tool for both experimental and commercial somatic cell cloning because it allows for standardization of procedures and provides the possibility of automation.

  4. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  5. The social evolution of somatic fusion.

    PubMed

    Aanen, Duur K; Debets, Alfons J M; de Visser, J Arjan G M; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2008-11-01

    The widespread potential for somatic fusion among different conspecific multicellular individuals suggests that such fusion is adaptive. However, because recognition of non-kin (allorecognition) usually leads to a rejection response, successful somatic fusion is limited to close kin. This is consistent with kin-selection theory, which predicts that the potential cost of fusion and the potential for somatic parasitism decrease with increasing relatedness. Paradoxically, however, Crozier found that, in the short term, positive-frequency-dependent selection eliminates the required genetic polymorphism at allorecognition loci. The 'Crozier paradox' may be solved if allorecognition is based on extrinsically balanced polymorphisms, for example at immune loci. Alternatively, the assumption of most models that self fusion is mutually beneficial is wrong. If fusion is on average harmful, selection will promote unconditional rejection. However, we propose that fusion within individuals is beneficial, selecting for the ability to fuse, but fusion between individuals on average costly, selecting for non-self recognition (rather than non-kin recognition). We discuss experimental data on fungi that are consistent with this hypothesis. PMID:18937373

  6. Somatic Embryogenesis and Genetic Modification of Vitis.

    PubMed

    Dhekney, Sadanand A; Li, Zhijian T; Grant, Trudi N L; Gray, Dennis J

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine embryogenic cultures are ideal target tissues for inserting desired traits of interest and improving existing cultivars via precision breeding (PB). PB is a new approach that, like conventional breeding, utilizes only DNA fragments obtained from sexually compatible grapevine plants. Embryogenic culture induction occurs by placing leaves or stamens and pistils on induction medium with a dark/light photoperiod cycle for 12-16 weeks. Resulting cultures produce sectors of embryogenic and non-embryogenic callus, which can be identified on the basis of callus morphology and color. Somatic embryo development occurs following transfer of embryogenic callus to development medium and cultures can be maintained for extended periods of time by transfer of the proliferating proembryonic masses to fresh medium at 4-6-week intervals. To demonstrate plant recovery via PB, somatic embryos at the mid-cotyledonary stage are cocultivated with Agrobacterium containing the desired gene of interest along with a, non-PB, enhanced green fluorescent protein/neomycin phosphotransferase II (egfp/nptII) fusion gene. Modified cultures are grown on proliferation and development medium to produce uniformly modified somatic embryos via secondary embryogenesis. Modified embryos identified on the basis of green fluorescence and kanamycin resistance are transferred to germination medium for plant development. The resulting plants are considered to prototype examples of the PB approach, since they contain egfp/nptII, a non-grapevine-derived fusion gene. Uniform green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence can be observed in all tissues of regenerated plants.

  7. Cloned mice derived from somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, K; Ohi, S; Ando, A; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K

    2000-12-01

    In 1997, a cloned sheep "Dolly" was produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell. The first birth of cloned mice derived from some somatic cells were succeeded in 1998. At present, it is shown that somatic cells, cumulus cells, fibroblasts and Sertoli cells can be used to the study of cloned animal as nuclear donor. In this study investigation was designed to compare with efficiency on the production of cloned embryos by using the microinjection and the electrofusion methods for nuclear transfer. Oocyte enucleation was performed with a micromanipulator. The oocyte was held by holding pipette, and was enucleated using a beveled pipette. Microinjection method: Cell's nucleus injection was carried out by piezo-micromanipulator. Cytochalasin B treated cumulus cell was aspirated into a injection pipette, and was broken its plasma membrane using the injection pipette. Then, the cumulus cell was injected into the enucleated ooplasm directly. Electrofusion method: The cell was aspirated into a beveled pipette, and then an aspirated cell was inserted into perivitelline space. Then, the pair of enucleated oocyte and cell was fused using electrical cell fusion apparatus. The reconstituted embryos were activated after nuclear transfer using St2+. Reconstituted embryos had been produced by the microinjection showed the embryonic development to over 8-cell stages. But, the rate of fragmentation of reconstituted embryos by the microinjection showed a little high rate in comparison with the electrofusion. When some reconstituted embryos by the microinjection were transplanted to pseudopregnant females' oviduct, 9 fetuses were observed at 14 days post coitum. PMID:11329940

  8. QTL mapping in three tropical maize populations reveals a set of constitutive and adaptive genomic regions for drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Makumbi, Dan; Magorokosho, Cosmos; Nair, Sudha; Borém, Aluízio; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Bänziger, Marianne; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Crossa, Jose; Babu, Raman

    2013-03-01

    Despite numerous published reports of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for drought-related traits, practical applications of such QTL in maize improvement are scarce. Identifying QTL of sizeable effects that express more or less uniformly in diverse genetic backgrounds across contrasting water regimes could significantly complement conventional breeding efforts to improve drought tolerance. We evaluated three tropical bi-parental populations under water-stress (WS) and well-watered (WW) regimes in Mexico, Kenya and Zimbabwe to identify genomic regions responsible for grain yield (GY) and anthesis-silking interval (ASI) across multiple environments and diverse genetic backgrounds. Across the three populations, on average, drought stress reduced GY by more than 50 % and increased ASI by 3.2 days. We identified a total of 83 and 62 QTL through individual environment analyses for GY and ASI, respectively. In each population, most QTL consistently showed up in each water regime. Across the three populations, the phenotypic variance explained by various individual QTL ranged from 2.6 to 17.8 % for GY and 1.7 to 17.8 % for ASI under WS environments and from 5 to 19.5 % for GY under WW environments. Meta-QTL (mQTL) analysis across the three populations and multiple environments identified seven genomic regions for GY and one for ASI, of which six mQTL on chr.1, 4, 5 and 10 for GY were constitutively expressed across WS and WW environments. One mQTL on chr.7 for GY and one on chr.3 for ASI were found to be 'adaptive' to WS conditions. High throughput assays were developed for SNPs that delimit the physical intervals of these mQTL. At most of the QTL, almost equal number of favorable alleles was donated by either of the parents within each cross, thereby demonstrating the potential of drought tolerant × drought tolerant crosses to identify QTL under contrasting water regimes.

  9. Partial lateral forcing experiments reveal how multi-scale processes induce devastating rainfall: a new application of regional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongwei; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    rainfall but significant reduction of the rainfall in South China. The IS forcing has dominant contributions to the seasonal-mean rainfall anomalies over all three sub-regions of China (North China, the YRB, and South China). The IA forcing mainly enhances the rainfall in South China but reduces the precipitation in the YRB slightly. This study portends a promising application of regional climate models to identify key factors causing extreme climate events. The PLF methodology can be used to study a broad range of climate phenomena and to understand the effects of variety of dynamic and physical processes in climate variability and predictability.

  10. Co-Localization of Somatic and Meiotic Double Strand Breaks Near the Myc Oncogene on Mouse Chromosome 15

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Siemon H.; Maas, Sarah A.; Petkov, Petko M.; Mills, Kevin D.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Both somatic and meiotic recombinations involve the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that occur at preferred locations in the genome. Improper repair of DSBs during either mitosis or meiosis can lead to mutations, chromosomal aberration such as translocations, cancer and/or cell death. Currently, no model exists that explains the locations of either spontaneous somatic DSBs or programmed meiotic DSBs or relates them to each other. One common class of tumorigenic translocations arising from DSBs is chromosomal rearrangements near the Myc oncogene. Myc translocations have been associated with Burkitt lymphoma in humans, plasmacytoma in mice and immunocytoma in rats. Comparing the locations of somatic and meiotic DSBs near the mouse Myc oncogene, we demonstrated that the placement of these DSBs is not random and that both events clustered in the same short discrete region of the genome. Our work shows that both somatic and meiotic DSBs tend to occur in proximity to each other within the Myc region, suggesting that they share common originating features. It is likely that some regions of the genome are more susceptible to both somatic and meiotic DSBs, and the locations of meiotic hotspots may be an indicator of genomic regions more susceptible to DNA damage. PMID:19603522

  11. Genomic and functional overlap between somatic and germline chromosomal rearrangements.

    PubMed

    van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Simonis, Marieke; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Brand, Harrison; Kuijk, Ewart W; de Luca, Kim L; Lansu, Nico; Braat, A Koen; Menelaou, Androniki; Hao, Wensi; Korving, Jeroen; Snijder, Simone; van der Veken, Lars T; Hochstenbach, Ron; Knegt, Alida C; Duran, Karen; Renkens, Ivo; Alekozai, Najla; Jager, Myrthe; Vergult, Sarah; Menten, Björn; de Bruijn, Ewart; Boymans, Sander; Ippel, Elly; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Talkowski, Michael E; Lichtenbelt, Klaske; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P

    2014-12-24

    Genomic rearrangements are a common cause of human congenital abnormalities. However, their origin and consequences are poorly understood. We performed molecular analysis of two patients with congenital disease who carried de novo genomic rearrangements. We found that the rearrangements in both patients hit genes that are recurrently rearranged in cancer (ETV1, FOXP1, and microRNA cluster C19MC) and drive formation of fusion genes similar to those described in cancer. Subsequent analysis of a large set of 552 de novo germline genomic rearrangements underlying congenital disorders revealed enrichment for genes rearranged in cancer and overlap with somatic cancer breakpoints. Breakpoints of common (inherited) germline structural variations also overlap with cancer breakpoints but are depleted for cancer genes. We propose that the same genomic positions are prone to genomic rearrangements in germline and soma but that timing and context of breakage determines whether developmental defects or cancer are promoted. PMID:25497101

  12. Targeted mutagenesis of intergenic regions in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae gonococcal genetic island reveals multiple regulatory mechanisms controlling type IV secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Meghan E.; Bender, Tobias; Klimowicz, Amy K.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Yamamoto, Ami; Jolicoeur, Adrienne; Callaghan, Melanie M.; Wassarman, Karen M.; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gonococci secrete chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment using a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The secreted DNA acts in natural transformation and initiates biofilm development. Although the DNA and its effects are detectable, structural components of the T4SS are present at very low levels, suggestive of uncharacterized regulatory control. We sought to better characterize the expression and regulation of T4SS genes and found that the four operons containing T4SS genes are transcribed at very different levels. Increasing transcription of two of the operons through targeted promoter mutagenesis did not increase DNA secretion. The stability and steady-state levels of two T4SS structural proteins were affected by a homolog of tail-specific protease. An RNA switch was also identified that regulates translation of a third T4SS operon. The switch mechanism relies on two putative stem-loop structures contained within the 5’ untranslated region of the transcript, one of which occludes the ribosome binding site and start codon. Mutational analysis of these stem-loops supports a model in which induction of an alternative structure relieves repression. Taken together, these results identify multiple layers of regulation, including transcriptional, translational, and post-translational mechanisms controlling T4SS gene expression and DNA secretion. PMID:26076069

  13. Targeted mutagenesis of intergenic regions in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae gonococcal genetic island reveals multiple regulatory mechanisms controlling type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Bender, Tobias; Klimowicz, Amy K; Hackett, Kathleen T; Yamamoto, Ami; Jolicoeur, Adrienne; Callaghan, Melanie M; Wassarman, Karen M; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2015-09-01

    Gonococci secrete chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment using a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The secreted DNA acts in natural transformation and initiates biofilm development. Although the DNA and its effects are detectable, structural components of the T4SS are present at very low levels, suggestive of uncharacterized regulatory control. We sought to better characterize the expression and regulation of T4SS genes and found that the four operons containing T4SS genes are transcribed at very different levels. Increasing transcription of two of the operons through targeted promoter mutagenesis did not increase DNA secretion. The stability and steady-state levels of two T4SS structural proteins were affected by a homolog of tail-specific protease. An RNA switch was also identified that regulates translation of a third T4SS operon. The switch mechanism relies on two putative stem-loop structures contained within the 5' untranslated region of the transcript, one of which occludes the ribosome binding site and start codon. Mutational analysis of these stem loops supports a model in which induction of an alternative structure relieves repression. Taken together, these results identify multiple layers of regulation, including transcriptional, translational and post-translational mechanisms controlling T4SS gene expression and DNA secretion.

  14. Region-specific variation in the properties of skeletal adipocytes reveals regulated and constitutive marrow adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Erica L.; Doucette, Casey R.; Learman, Brian S.; Cawthorn, William P.; Khandaker, Shaima; Schell, Benjamin; Wu, Brent; Ding, Shi-Ying; Bredella, Miriam A.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Khoury, Basma; Jepsen, Karl J.; Pilch, Paul F.; Klibanski, Anne; Rosen, Clifford J.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2015-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) accumulates in diverse clinical conditions but remains poorly understood. Here we show region-specific variation in MAT adipocyte development, regulation, size, lipid composition, gene expression and genetic determinants. Early MAT formation in mice is conserved, whereas later development is strain dependent. Proximal, but not distal tibial, MAT is lost with 21-day cold exposure. Rat MAT adipocytes from distal sites have an increased proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids and expression of Scd1/Scd2, Cebpa and Cebpb. Humans also have increased distal marrow fat unsaturation. We define proximal ‘regulated' MAT (rMAT) as single adipocytes interspersed with active haematopoiesis, whereas distal ‘constitutive' MAT (cMAT) has low haematopoiesis, contains larger adipocytes, develops earlier and remains preserved upon systemic challenges. Loss of rMAT occurs in mice with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4, whereas both rMAT and cMAT are preserved in mice with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 3. Consideration of these MAT subpopulations may be important for future studies linking MAT to bone biology, haematopoiesis and whole-body metabolism. PMID:26245716

  15. Phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal RNA coding regions reveal a monophyletic lineage of euglyphid testate amoebae (Order Euglyphida).

    PubMed

    Wylezich, Claudia; Meisterfeld, Ralf; Meisterfeld, Susanne; Schlegel, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The Testaceafilosia includes amoebae with filopodia and with a proteinaceous, agglutinated or siliceous test. To explore the deeper phylogeny of this group, we sequenced the small subunit ribosomal RNA coding region of 13 species, including the first sequence of an amoeba with an agglutinated test, Pseudodifflugia sp. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods as well as neighbor joining method yielded the following results: the order Euglyphida forms a monophyletic lineage with the sarcomonads as sister group. The next related taxa are the Chlorarachnea and the unidentified filose strain N-Por. In agreement with the previous studies the Phytomyxea branch off at the base of this lineage. The Monadofilosa (Testaceafilosia and Sarcomonadea) appear monophyletic. The Testaceafilosia are polyphyletic, because Pseudodifflugia sp. is positioned as the sister taxon to the sarcomonads. Within the order Euglyphida Paulinella branches off first, together with Cyphoderia followed by Tracheleuglypha. In maximum likelihood and neighbor joining analyses, the genus Euglypha is monophyletic. The branching pattern within the order Euglyphida reflects the evolution of shell morphology from simple to complex built test.

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of intergenic regions in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae gonococcal genetic island reveals multiple regulatory mechanisms controlling type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Bender, Tobias; Klimowicz, Amy K; Hackett, Kathleen T; Yamamoto, Ami; Jolicoeur, Adrienne; Callaghan, Melanie M; Wassarman, Karen M; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2015-09-01

    Gonococci secrete chromosomal DNA into the extracellular environment using a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The secreted DNA acts in natural transformation and initiates biofilm development. Although the DNA and its effects are detectable, structural components of the T4SS are present at very low levels, suggestive of uncharacterized regulatory control. We sought to better characterize the expression and regulation of T4SS genes and found that the four operons containing T4SS genes are transcribed at very different levels. Increasing transcription of two of the operons through targeted promoter mutagenesis did not increase DNA secretion. The stability and steady-state levels of two T4SS structural proteins were affected by a homolog of tail-specific protease. An RNA switch was also identified that regulates translation of a third T4SS operon. The switch mechanism relies on two putative stem-loop structures contained within the 5' untranslated region of the transcript, one of which occludes the ribosome binding site and start codon. Mutational analysis of these stem loops supports a model in which induction of an alternative structure relieves repression. Taken together, these results identify multiple layers of regulation, including transcriptional, translational and post-translational mechanisms controlling T4SS gene expression and DNA secretion. PMID:26076069

  17. Mitogenomics reveals phylogeny and repeated motifs in control regions of the deep-sea family Siboglinidae (Annelida).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanning; Kocot, Kevin M; Schander, Christoffer; Santos, Scott R; Thornhill, Daniel J; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2015-04-01

    Deep-sea tubeworms in the annelid family Siboglinidae have drawn considerable interest regarding their ecology and evolutionary biology. As adults, they lack a digestive tract and rely on endosymbionts for nutrition. Moreover, they are important members of chemosynthetic environments including hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, muddy sediments, and whale bones. Evolution and diversification of siboglinids has been associated with host-symbiont relationships and reducing habitats. Despite their importance, the taxonomy and phylogenetics of this clade are debated due to conflicting results. In this study, 10 complete and 2 partial mitochondrial genomes and one transcriptome were sequenced and analyzed to address siboglinid evolution. Notably, repeated nucleotide motifs were found in control regions of these mt genomes, which may explain previous challenges of sequencing siboglinid mt genomes. Phylogenetic analyses of amino acid and nucleotide datasets were conducted in order to infer evolutionary history. Both analyses generally had strong nodal support and suggest Osedax is most closely related to the Vestimentifera+Sclerolinum clade, rather than Frenulata, as recently reported. These results imply Osedax, the only siboglinid lineage with heterotrophic endosymbionts, evolved from a lineage utilizing chemoautotrophic symbionts.

  18. Expression profile analysis of aorta-gonad-mesonephros region-derived stromal cells reveals genes that regulate hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Kenji; Ohta, Takayuki; Hinohara, Atsushi; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Hagiwara, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yoshitake; Yoneya, Takashi; Sohma, Yoshiaki; Heike, Toshio; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Inagaki, Yoshimasa Nishikawa, Mitsuo

    2008-12-05

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is involved in the generation and maintenance of the first definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). A mouse AGM-derived cell line, AGM-S3, was shown to support the development of HSCs. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating early hematopoiesis, we obtained subclones from AGM-S3, one of which was hematopoiesis supportive (S3-A9) and the other one of which was non-supportive (S3-A7), and we analyzed their gene expression profiles by gene chip analysis. In the present study, we found that Glypican-1 (GPC1) was highly expressed in the supportive subclone AGM-S3-A9. Over-expression of GPC1 in non-supportive cells led to the proliferation of progenitor cells in human cord blood when cocultured with the transfected-stromal cells. Thus, GPC1 may have an important role in the establishment of a microenvironment that supports early events in hematopoiesis.

  19. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with Parkinson's disease accompanied by depressive symptoms, as revealed by regional homogeneity and functional connectivity in the prefrontal-limbic system.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ke; Fang, Weidong; Su, Meilan; Li, Rong; Zou, Dezhi; Han, Yu; Wang, Xuefeng; Cheng, Oumei

    2014-01-01

    As patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are at high risk for comorbid depression, it is hypothesized that these two diseases are sharing common pathogenic pathways. Using regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity approaches, we characterized human regional brain activity at resting state to examine specific brain networks in patients with PD and those with PD and depression (PDD). This study comprised 41 PD human patients and 25 normal human subjects. The patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and were further divided into two groups: patients with depressive symptoms and non-depressed PD patients (nD-PD). Compared with the non-depressed patients, those with depressive symptoms exhibited significantly increased regional activity in the left middle frontal gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus, and decreased ReHo in the left amygdala and bilateral lingual gyrus. Brain network connectivity analysis revealed decreased functional connectivity within the prefrontal-limbic system and increased functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex and lingual gyrus in PDD compared with the nD-PD group. In summary, the findings showed regional brain activity alterations and disruption of the mood regulation network in PDD patients. The pathogenesis of PDD may be attributed to abnormal neural activity in multiple brain regions.

  20. Proterozoic structure, cambrian rifting, and younger faulting as revealed by a regional seismic reflection network in the Southern Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, C.J.; Drahovzal, J.A.; Sargent, M.L.; McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Four high-quality seismic reflection profiles through the southern Illinois Basin, totaling 245 km in length, provide an excellent regional subsurface stratigraphic and structural framework for evaluation of seismic risk, hydrocarbon occurrence, and other regional geologic studies. These data provide extensive subsurface information on the geometry of the intersection of the Cambrian Reelfoot and Rough Creek rifts, on extensive Proterozoic reflection sequences, and on structures (including the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex and Hicks Dome) that underlie a transitional area between the well-defined New Madrid seismic zone (to the southwest) and a more diffuse area of seismicity in the southern Illinois Basin. Our principal interpretations from these data are listed here in order of geologic age, from oldest to youngest: 1. Prominent Proterozoic layering, possibly equivalent to Proterozoic (???1 Ga) Middle Run Formation clastic strata and underlying (1.3-1.5 Ga) volcanic rocks of the East Continent rift basin, has been strongly deformed, probably as part of the Grenville foreland fold and thrust belt. 2. A well-defined angular unconformity is seen in many places between Proterozoic and Cambrian strata; a post-Grenville Proterozoic sequence is also apparent locally, directly beneath the base of the Cambrian. 3. We infer a major reversal in Cambrian rift polarity (accommodation zone) in the Rough Creek Graben in western Kentucky. 4. Seismic facies analysis suggests the presence of basin-floor fan complexes at and near the base of the Cambrian interval and within parts of a Proterozoic post-Grenville sequence in several parts of the Rough Creek Graben. 5. There is an abrupt pinchout of the Mount Simon Sandstone against crystalline basement beneath the Dale Dome (near the Texaco no. 1 Cuppy well, Hamilton County) in southeastern Illinois, and a more gradual Mount Simon pinchout to the southeast. 6. Where crossed by the seismic reflection line in southeast Illinois, some

  1. Human and ecotoxicological impacts assessment from the Mexican oil industry in the Coatzacoalcos region, as revealed by the USEtox model.

    PubMed

    Morales-Mora, M A; Rodríguez-Pérez, B; Martínez-Delgadillo, S A; Rosa-Domínguez, E; Nolasco-Hipólito, C

    2014-01-01

    Human and ecotoxicological impacts were analyzed in the lower basin of the Coatzacoalcos River (Veracruz, State in Mexico). High pollution levels of contaminants from the oil industry have been reported in natural streams and the Coatzacoalcos River and in their sediments. USEtox model was employed to evaluate environmental fate, exposure, and effect of nine organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and one of which was in the group of polychlorinated biphenyls), a heavy metal (lead), and the effect of the industrial wastewater emitted into the river, on the Coatzacoalcos region. Most of these compounds are highly toxic; they bioaccumulate in human and animal tissue, mainly in the fatty tissues and can damage different organs and systemic targets such as the liver, kidney, hormonal system, nervous system, etc., of both humans and wildlife. The model estimates that 96% (3,247 kg/day) of organic compounds is transferred from the water into air, whereas only 4% (151 kg/day) remains in the water. In addition, it predicts that humans are mainly exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners (28 and 153) by eating contaminated fish, due to PCBs accumulating in the fish fat tissue. The number of cases of cancer and noncancer (1 in 862 habitants per additional kilogram) is expected to have an increment due to the higher PCBs exposure of human population. Genetic damages in fishes, earthworms, and toads have been observed and related to higher exposure to organic compounds. The relationship between the field reported data and those one predicted by the USEtox model have been confirmed empirically by using the nonparametric correlation analysis (Spearman's rho). Based on the USEtox model, the environmental stress in the Coatzacoalcos industrial zone is between 2 and 6 orders of magnitude over geometric mean of acute aquatic EC₅₀s. We think that USEtox model can be used to expand the number of substances that have the current water quality guidelines to

  2. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P.; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M.; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence–absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains’ core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification. PMID:27358423

  3. SCAM analysis reveals a discrete region of the pore turret that modulates slow inactivation in Kv1.5.

    PubMed

    Eduljee, Cyrus; Claydon, Thomas W; Viswanathan, Vijay; Fedida, David; Kehl, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    In Kv1.5, protonation of histidine 463 in the S5-P linker (turret) increases the rate of depolarization-induced inactivation and decreases the peak current amplitude. In this study, we examined how amino acid substitutions that altered the physico-chemical properties of the side chain at position 463 affected slow inactivation and then used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to probe the turret region (E456-P468) to determine whether residue 463 was unique in its ability to modulate the macroscopic current. Substitutions at position 463 of small, neutral (H463G and H463A) or large, charged (H463R, H463K, and H463E) side groups accelerated inactivation and induced a dependency of the current amplitude on the external potassium concentration. When cysteine substitutions were made in the distal turret (T462C-P468C), modification with either the positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) or negatively charged sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl) methanethiosulfonate reagent irreversibly inhibited current. This inhibition could be antagonized either by the R487V mutation (homologous to T449V in Shaker) or by raising the external potassium concentration, suggesting that current inhibition by MTS reagents resulted from an enhancement of inactivation. These results imply that protonation of residue 463 does not modulate inactivation solely by an electrostatic interaction with residues near the pore mouth, as proposed by others, and that residue 463 is part of a group of residues within the Kv1.5 turret that can modulate P/C-type inactivation.

  4. Somatic mutation and CDR3 lengths of immunoglobulin kappa light chains expressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, S L; Lee, S K; Johnson, M L; Lavelle, J C; Fowler, P G; Koopman, W J; Schroeder, H W

    1995-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion by plasma cells infiltrating synovial membranes is a prominent feature of RA. Previous analyses of a cDNA library generated from synovium of RA patient BC revealed immunoglobulin kappa light chain transcripts with extensive somatic mutation, frequent N region addition, and unexpected variation in the lengths of CDR3 regions which form the center of the antigen binding site. To determine if these characteristics are present in other individuals, we performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequenced > or = 10 V kappa-containing amplicons from nine tissue samples: synovia of three individuals with long-standing RA (including patient BC), PBLs of two of these individuals, and PBLs or splenocytes of four normal individuals. Increased levels of somatic mutation in PBLs appeared to correlate with increased age, which may reflect accumulation of circulating memory cells and/or decreased bone marrow production of naive B lymphocytes. Two of three RA synovial samples and both RA PBL samples exhibited increased proportions of clones with unusual CDR3 lengths. Enrichment for these antibody binding sites could be due to abnormal regulation of the emerging repertoire or to selection for B lymphocytes bearing antibodies of unusual specificity, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA. Images PMID:7635977

  5. Tracking wild sockeye salmon smolts to the ocean reveals distinct regions of nocturnal movement and high mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy D; Furey, Nathan B; Rechisky, Erin L; Gale, Marika K; Jeffries, Ken M; Porter, Aswea D; Casselman, Matthew T; Lotto, Andrew G; Patterson, David A; Cooke, Steven J; Farrell, Anthony P; Welch, David W; Hinch, Scott G

    2016-06-01

    Few estimates of migration rates or descriptions of behavior or survival exist for wild populations of out-migrating Pacific salmon smolts from natal freshwater rearing areas to the ocean. Using acoustic transmitters and fixed receiver arrays across four years (2010-2013), we tracked the migration of > 1850 wild sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts from Chilko Lake, British Columbia, to the coastal Pacific Ocean (> 1000 km distance). Cumulative survival to the ocean ranged 3-10% among years, although this may be slightly underestimated due to technical limitations at the final receiver array. Distinct spatial patterns in both behavior and survival were observed through all years. In small, clear, upper-river reaches, downstream migration largely occurred at night at speeds up to 50 km/d and coincided with poor survival. Among years, only 57-78% of smolts survived the first 80 km. Parallel laboratory experiments revealed excellent short-term survival and unhindered swimming performance of dummy-tagged smolts, suggesting that predators rather than tagging effects were responsible for the initial high mortality of acoustic-tagged smolts. Migration speeds increased in the Fraser River mainstem (~220 km/d in some years), diel movement patterns ceased, and smolt survival generally exceeded 90% in this segment. Marine movement rates and survival were variable across years, with among-year segment-specific survival being the most variable and lowest (19-61%) during the final (and longest, 240 km) marine migration segment. Osmoregulatory preparedness was not expected to influence marine survival, as smolts could maintain normal levels of plasma chloride when experimentally exposed to saltwater (30 ppt) immediately upon commencing their migration from Chilko Lake. Transportation of smolts downstream generally increased survival to the farthest marine array. The act of tagging may have affected smolts in the marine environment in some years as dummy-tagged fish had

  6. Tracking wild sockeye salmon smolts to the ocean reveals distinct regions of nocturnal movement and high mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy D; Furey, Nathan B; Rechisky, Erin L; Gale, Marika K; Jeffries, Ken M; Porter, Aswea D; Casselman, Matthew T; Lotto, Andrew G; Patterson, David A; Cooke, Steven J; Farrell, Anthony P; Welch, David W; Hinch, Scott G

    2016-06-01

    Few estimates of migration rates or descriptions of behavior or survival exist for wild populations of out-migrating Pacific salmon smolts from natal freshwater rearing areas to the ocean. Using acoustic transmitters and fixed receiver arrays across four years (2010-2013), we tracked the migration of > 1850 wild sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) smolts from Chilko Lake, British Columbia, to the coastal Pacific Ocean (> 1000 km distance). Cumulative survival to the ocean ranged 3-10% among years, although this may be slightly underestimated due to technical limitations at the final receiver array. Distinct spatial patterns in both behavior and survival were observed through all years. In small, clear, upper-river reaches, downstream migration largely occurred at night at speeds up to 50 km/d and coincided with poor survival. Among years, only 57-78% of smolts survived the first 80 km. Parallel laboratory experiments revealed excellent short-term survival and unhindered swimming performance of dummy-tagged smolts, suggesting that predators rather than tagging effects were responsible for the initial high mortality of acoustic-tagged smolts. Migration speeds increased in the Fraser River mainstem (~220 km/d in some years), diel movement patterns ceased, and smolt survival generally exceeded 90% in this segment. Marine movement rates and survival were variable across years, with among-year segment-specific survival being the most variable and lowest (19-61%) during the final (and longest, 240 km) marine migration segment. Osmoregulatory preparedness was not expected to influence marine survival, as smolts could maintain normal levels of plasma chloride when experimentally exposed to saltwater (30 ppt) immediately upon commencing their migration from Chilko Lake. Transportation of smolts downstream generally increased survival to the farthest marine array. The act of tagging may have affected smolts in the marine environment in some years as dummy-tagged fish had

  7. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, S T; Knight, S J; Peters, J F; Stayton, C L; Consalez, G G; Zhang, F P

    1990-01-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT-,G6PD+ phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28. These somatic cell hybrids, containing Xq27.3-qter as the sole human DNA, will aid the search for DNA associated with the fragile X site and will augment the high resolution genomic analysis of Xq28, including the identification of candidate genes for genetic-disease loci mapping to this region. Images PMID:2339126

  8. Guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell and bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Jayarao, B M; Pillai, S R; Sawant, A A; Wolfgang, D R; Hegde, N V

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to establish guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell count and bacterial counts, and to understand the relationship between different bacterial groups that occur in bulk tank milk. One hundred twenty-six dairy farms in 14 counties of Pennsylvania participated, each providing one bulk tank milk sample every 15 d for 2 mo. The 4 bulk tank milk samples from each farm were examined for bulk tank somatic cell count and bacterial counts including standard plate count, preliminary incubation count, laboratory pasteurization count, coagulase-negative staphylococcal count, environmental streptococcal count, coliform count, and gram-negative noncoliform count. The milk samples were also examined for presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Mycoplasma. The bacterial counts of 4 bulk tank milk samples examined over an 8-wk period were averaged and expressed as mean bacterial count per milliliter. The study revealed that an increase in the frequency of isolation of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae was significantly associated with an increased bulk tank somatic cell count. Paired correlation analysis showed that there was low correlation between different bacterial counts. Bulk tank milk with low (<5000 cfu/mL) standard plate count also had a significantly low level of mean bulk tank somatic cell count (<200,000 cells/mL), preliminary incubation count (<10,000 cfu/mL), laboratory pasteurization count (<100 cfu/mL), coagulase-negative staphylococci and environmental streptococcal counts (<500 cfu/mL), and noncoliform count (<200 cfu/mL). Coliform count was less likely to be associated with somatic cell or other bacterial counts. Herd size and farm management practices had considerable influence on somatic cell and bacterial counts in bulk tank milk. Dairy herds that used automatic milking detachers, sand as bedding material, dip cups for teat dipping instead of spraying, and practiced pre

  9. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-09-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared with other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT upregulation in cancer distinct from previously observed amplifications and point mutations.

  10. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caleb F.; Ricketts, Christopher; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C.; Hacker, Kathryn E.; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A.; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S.; Hsieh, James J.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A. Gordon; Laird, Peter W.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Park, Peter J.; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A.; Linehan, W. Marston; Gibbs, Richard A.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and whole genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared to other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT up-regulation in cancer distinct from previously-observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  11. Activation Domain-dependent Degradation of Somatic Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Laura; Simanski, Scott; Squire, Christopher; Smith, Anthony; Cartzendafner, Jeff; Cavett, Valerie; Caldwell Busby, Jennifer; Sato, Trey; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is dependent upon coordinate regulation of kinase and proteolytic pathways. Inhibitors of cell cycle transitions are degraded to allow progression into the subsequent cell cycle phase. For example, the tyrosine kinase and Cdk1 inhibitor Wee1 is degraded during G2 and mitosis to allow mitotic progression. Previous studies suggested that the N terminus of Wee1 directs Wee1 destruction. Using a chemical mutagenesis strategy, we report that multiple regions of Wee1 control its destruction. Most notably, we find that the activation domain of the Wee1 kinase is also required for its degradation. Mutations in this domain inhibit Wee1 degradation in somatic cell extracts and in cells without affecting the overall Wee1 structure or kinase activity. More broadly, these findings suggest that kinase activation domains may be previously unappreciated sites of recognition by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. PMID:20038582

  12. The somatic genomic landscape of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caleb F; Ricketts, Christopher J; Wang, Min; Yang, Lixing; Cherniack, Andrew D; Shen, Hui; Buhay, Christian; Kang, Hyojin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Bhanot, Gyan; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Chu, Andy; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Biehl, Michael; Seth, Sahil; Kaipparettu, Benny A; Bristow, Christopher A; Donehower, Lawrence A; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B; Tickoo, Satish K; Tamboli, Pheroze; Reuter, Victor; Schmidt, Laura S; Hsieh, James J; Choueiri, Toni K; Hakimi, A Ari; Chin, Lynda; Meyerson, Matthew; Kucherlapati, Raju; Park, Woong-Yang; Robertson, A Gordon; Laird, Peter W; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Park, Peter J; Morgan, Margaret; Shuch, Brian; Muzny, Donna; Wheeler, David A; Linehan, W Marston; Gibbs, Richard A; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Creighton, Chad J

    2014-09-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations of 66 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (ChRCCs) on the basis of multidimensional and comprehensive characterization, including mtDNA and whole-genome sequencing. The result is consistent that ChRCC originates from the distal nephron compared with other kidney cancers with more proximal origins. Combined mtDNA and gene expression analysis implicates changes in mitochondrial function as a component of the disease biology, while suggesting alternative roles for mtDNA mutations in cancers relying on oxidative phosphorylation. Genomic rearrangements lead to recurrent structural breakpoints within TERT promoter region, which correlates with highly elevated TERT expression and manifestation of kataegis, representing a mechanism of TERT upregulation in cancer distinct from previously observed amplifications and point mutations. PMID:25155756

  13. Somatic hypermutations in the immunoglobulin genes of two new human lymphoma lines of lymphatic follicle origin.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Tuomikoski, T; Eray, M; Mattila, P; Knuutila, S; Kaartinen, M

    1994-03-01

    Variable immunoglobulin heavy-chain regions (VDJ) of two newly established human lymphoma cell lines (HF-1 and HF-4) were sequenced. The most homologous germline VH gene found for both the HF-1 and HF-4 sequences was VH26 of the VH3a (V gene) family (82% and 91% homologies, respectively). The JH region of the HF-4 heavy-chain sequence contained two nucleotide differences compared to the published germline JH3 gene. The DHJH region of the HF-1 gene had a record high number (20%) of somatic mutations. The numerous hypermutations found in the HF-1 cell line support the hypothesis that in some human follicular lymphomas, mutations continue to accumulate in immunoglobulin genes during the malignant growth. Follicular lymphoma cell lines, which have an active mutational machinery, in future may help to solve the molecular events behind the somatic hypermutations modifying immunoglobulin genes of B lymphocytes.

  14. Somatic hybridization for citrus rootstock breeding: an effective tool to solve some important issues of the Mediterranean citrus industry.

    PubMed

    Dambier, Dominique; Benyahia, Hamid; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Aka Kaçar, Yildiz; Froelicher, Yann; Belfalah, Zina; Lhou, Beniken; Handaji, Najat; Printz, Bruno; Morillon, Raphael; Yesiloglu, Turgut; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of sour orange rootstock in the southern and eastern part of the Mediterranean Basin is presently threatened by the spread of Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) and its main vector Toxoptera citricida, combined with abiotic constraints such as drought, salinity and alkalinity. The search for alternative CTV-resistant rootstocks that also withstand the other constraints is now considered an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry in the area. Complementary progenitors can be found in citrus germplasm to combine the desired traits, particularly between Poncirus and Citrus genera. The production of somatic hybrids allows cumulating all dominant traits irrespective of their heterozygosity level, and would appear to be an effective way to solve the rootstock challenge facing the Mediterranean citrus industry. This paper presents the results obtained during a regional collaborative effort between five countries, to develop new rootstocks by somatic hybridization. New embryogenic callus lines to be used for somatic hybridization have been created. Protoplast fusions have been performed at CIRAD and IVIA laboratories, focusing on intergeneric combinations. Analysis of ploidy level by flow cytometry and molecular markers confirmed the acquisition of new interesting tetraploid somatic hybrids for six combinations. Diploid cybrids with intergeneric (Citrus × Poncirus) nucleus and C. reticulata or C. aurantifolia mitochondria were also identified for four combinations. The agronomical performance of a pre-existing somatic hybrid between Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata was validated in calcareous soils in Morocco. Somatic hybridization is now integrated into the breeding programs of the five Mediterranean countries. PMID:21225429

  15. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-09-03

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency.

  16. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  17. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick G; Das, Sudipto; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Alcock, Leah; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-05-15

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in different neuroblastic tumor subtypes and cell lines, revealing higher order organization and clinically relevant alterations of the epigenome. The methylation status of 33,485 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and RefSeq gene promoters was assessed in primary neuroblastic tumors and cell lines. A comparison of genes that were hypermethylated exclusively in the clinically favorable ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma tumors revealed that nine genes were associated with poor clinical outcome when overexpressed in the unfavorable neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Moreover, an integrated DNA methylation and copy number analysis identified 80 genes that were recurrently concomitantly deleted and hypermethylated in NB, with 37 reactivated by 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Lower expression of four of these genes was correlated with poor clinical outcome, further implicating their inactivation in aggressive disease pathogenesis. Analysis of genome-wide hypermethylation patterns revealed 70 recurrent large-scale blocks of contiguously hypermethylated promoters/CpG islands, up to 590 kb in length, with a distribution bias toward telomeric regions. Genome-wide hypermethylation events in neuroblastic tumors are extensive and frequently occur in large-scale blocks with a significant bias toward telomeric regions, indicating that some methylation alterations have occurred in a coordinated manner. Our results indicate that methylation contributes toward the clinicopathological features of neuroblastic tumors, revealing numerous genes associated with poor patient survival in NB.

  18. Multilocus phylogeography of a widespread savanna-woodland-adapted rodent reveals the influence of Pleistocene geomorphology and climate change in Africa's Zambezi region.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Molly M; Šumbera, Radim; Mazoch, Vladimír; Ferguson, Adam W; Phillips, Caleb D; Bryja, Josef

    2015-10-01

    Understanding historical influences of climate and physiographic barriers in shaping patterns of biodiversity remains limited for many regions of the world. For mammals of continental Africa, phylogeographic studies, particularly for West African lineages, implicate both geographic barriers and climate oscillations in shaping small mammal diversity. In contrast, studies for southern African species have revealed conflicting phylogenetic patterns for how mammalian lineages respond to both climate change and geologic events such as river formation, especially during the Pleistocene. However, these studies were often biased by limited geographic sampling or exclusively focused on large-bodied taxa. We exploited the broad southern African distribution of a savanna-woodland-adapted African rodent, Gerbilliscus leucogaster (bushveld gerbil) and generated mitochondrial, autosomal and sex chromosome data to quantify regional signatures of climatic and vicariant biogeographic phenomena. Results indicate the most recent common ancestor for all G. leucogaster lineages occurred during the early Pleistocene. We documented six divergent mitochondrial lineages that diverged ~0.270-0.100 mya, each of which was geographically isolated during periods characterized by alterations to the course of the Zambezi River and its tributaries as well as regional 'megadroughts'. Results demonstrate the presence of a widespread lineage exhibiting demographic expansion ~0.065-0.035 mya, a time that coincides with savanna-woodland expansion across southern Africa. A multilocus autosomal perspective revealed the influence of the Kafue River as a current barrier to gene flow and regions of secondary contact among divergent mitochondrial lineages. Our results demonstrate the importance of both climatic fluctuations and physiographic vicariance in shaping the distribution of southern African biodiversity.

  19. Multilocus phylogeography of a widespread savanna-woodland-adapted rodent reveals the influence of Pleistocene geomorphology and climate change in Africa's Zambezi region.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Molly M; Šumbera, Radim; Mazoch, Vladimír; Ferguson, Adam W; Phillips, Caleb D; Bryja, Josef

    2015-10-01

    Understanding historical influences of climate and physiographic barriers in shaping patterns of biodiversity remains limited for many regions of the world. For mammals of continental Africa, phylogeographic studies, particularly for West African lineages, implicate both geographic barriers and climate oscillations in shaping small mammal diversity. In contrast, studies for southern African species have revealed conflicting phylogenetic patterns for how mammalian lineages respond to both climate change and geologic events such as river formation, especially during the Pleistocene. However, these studies were often biased by limited geographic sampling or exclusively focused on large-bodied taxa. We exploited the broad southern African distribution of a savanna-woodland-adapted African rodent, Gerbilliscus leucogaster (bushveld gerbil) and generated mitochondrial, autosomal and sex chromosome data to quantify regional signatures of climatic and vicariant biogeographic phenomena. Results indicate the most recent common ancestor for all G. leucogaster lineages occurred during the early Pleistocene. We documented six divergent mitochondrial lineages that diverged ~0.270-0.100 mya, each of which was geographically isolated during periods characterized by alterations to the course of the Zambezi River and its tributaries as well as regional 'megadroughts'. Results demonstrate the presence of a widespread lineage exhibiting demographic expansion ~0.065-0.035 mya, a time that coincides with savanna-woodland expansion across southern Africa. A multilocus autosomal perspective revealed the influence of the Kafue River as a current barrier to gene flow and regions of secondary contact among divergent mitochondrial lineages. Our results demonstrate the importance of both climatic fluctuations and physiographic vicariance in shaping the distribution of southern African biodiversity. PMID:26340076

  20. Population-based resequencing analysis of wild and cultivated barley revealed weak domestication signal of selection and bottleneck in the Rrs2 scald resistance gene region.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2012-02-01

    Many plant disease resistance (R) genes have been cloned, but the potential of utilizing these plant R-gene genomic resources for genetic inferences of plant domestication history remains unexplored. A population-based resequencing analysis of the genomic region near the Rrs2 scald resistance gene was made in 51 accessions of wild and cultivated barley from 41 countries. Fifteen primer pairs were designed to sample the genomic region with a total length of 10 406 bp. More nucleotide diversity was found in wild (π = 0.01846) than cultivated (π = 0.01507) barley samples. Three distinct groups of 29 haplotypes were detected for all 51 samples, and they were well mixed with wild and cultivated barley samples from different countries and regions. The neutrality tests by Tajima's D were not significant, but a significant (P < 0.05) case by Fu and Li's D* and F* was found in the barley cultivar samples. The estimate of selection intensity by K(a)/K(s) was 0.691 in wild barley and 0.580 in cultivated barley. The estimate of the minimum recombination events was 16 in wild barley and 19 in cultivated barley. A coalescence simulation revealed a bottleneck intensity of 1.5 to 2 since barley domestication. Together, the domestication signal in the genomic region was weak both in human selection and domestication bottleneck.

  1. Localization and Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Theobroma cacao L. Somatic Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    ALEMANNO, L.; RAMOS, T.; GARGADENEC, A.; ANDARY, C.; FERRIERE, N.

    2003-01-01

    Cocoa breeders and growers continue to face the problem of high heterogeneity between individuals derived from one progeny. Vegetative propagation by somatic embryogenesis could be a way to increase genetic gains in the field. Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. This study was conducted to investigate the phenolic composition of cocoa flowers (the explants used to achieve somatic embryogenesis) and how it changes during the process, by means of histochemistry and conventional chemical techniques. In flowers, all parts contained polyphenolics but their locations were specific to the organ considered. After placing floral explants in vitro, the polyphenolic content was qualitatively modified and maintained in the calli throughout the culture process. Among the new polyphenolics, the three most abundant were isolated and characterized by 1H‐ and 13C‐NMR. They were hydroxycinnamic acid amides: N‐trans‐caffeoyl‐l‐DOPA or clovamide, N‐trans‐p‐coumaroyl‐l‐tyrosine or deoxiclovamide, and N‐trans‐caffeoyl‐l‐tyrosine. The same compounds were found also in fresh, unfermented cocoa beans. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non‐embryogenic conditions. Given the antioxidant nature of these compounds, they could reflect the stress status of the tissues. PMID:12933367

  2. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  3. Ancient origin of somatic and visceral neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A key to understanding the evolution of the nervous system on a large phylogenetic scale is the identification of homologous neuronal types. Here, we focus this search on the sensory and motor neurons of bilaterians, exploiting their well-defined molecular signatures in vertebrates. Sensorimotor circuits in vertebrates are of two types: somatic (that sense the environment and respond by shaping bodily motions) and visceral (that sense the interior milieu and respond by regulating vital functions). These circuits differ by a small set of largely dedicated transcriptional determinants: Brn3 is expressed in many somatic sensory neurons, first and second order (among which mechanoreceptors are uniquely marked by the Brn3+/Islet1+/Drgx+ signature), somatic motoneurons uniquely co-express Lhx3/4 and Mnx1, while the vast majority of neurons, sensory and motor, involved in respiration, blood circulation or digestion are molecularly defined by their expression and dependence on the pan-visceral determinant Phox2b. Results We explore the status of the sensorimotor transcriptional code of vertebrates in mollusks, a lophotrochozoa clade that provides a rich repertoire of physiologically identified neurons. In the gastropods Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica, we show that homologues of Brn3, Drgx, Islet1, Mnx1, Lhx3/4 and Phox2b differentially mark neurons with mechanoreceptive, locomotory and cardiorespiratory functions. Moreover, in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis, we show that Phox2 marks the stellate ganglion (in line with the respiratory — that is, visceral— ancestral role of the mantle, its target organ), while the anterior pedal ganglion, which controls the prehensile and locomotory arms, expresses Mnx. Conclusions Despite considerable divergence in overall neural architecture, a molecular underpinning for the functional allocation of neurons to interactions with the environment or to homeostasis was inherited from the urbilaterian ancestor by

  4. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Compton, P J; Hooper, K; Smith, M T

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutation can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed. PMID:1954924

  5. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  6. INTER- AND INTRA-CLUSTER AGE GRADIENTS IN MASSIVE STAR FORMING REGIONS AND INDIVIDUAL NEARBY STELLAR CLUSTERS REVEALED BY MYStIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric; Kuhn, Michael A.; Broos, Patrick S; Townsley, Leisa K.; Naylor, Tim; Povich, Matthew S.; Luhman, Kevin; Garmire, Gordon

    2014-08-01

    The MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) project seeks to characterize 20 OB-dominated young star forming regions (SFRs) at distances <4 kpc using photometric catalogs from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, UKIRT and 2MASS surveys. As part of the MYStIX project, we developed a new stellar chronometer that employs near-infrared and X-ray photometry data, AgeJX. Computing AgeJX averaged over MYStIX (sub)clusters reveals previously unknown age gradients across most of the MYStIX regions as well as within some individual rich clusters. Within the SFRs, the inferred AgeJX ages are youngest in obscured locations in molecular clouds, intermediate in revealed stellar clusters, and oldest in distributed stellar populations. Noticeable intra-cluster gradients are seen in the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) star cluster and the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC): stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than stars in cluster halos. The latter result has two important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. Clusters likely form slowly: they do not arise from a single nearly-instantaneous burst of star formation. The simple models where clusters form inside-out are likely incorrect, and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  7. [Stress theories and the somatization process].

    PubMed

    Dantzer, R

    1995-12-01

    Stress theories aim at understanding pathophysiology of psychosomatic disorders. The first stress theories have been inspired by the principles of homeostasis. They view the response to stressors as a quasi reflex reaction which aims at normalizing disturbed homeostasis. More modern stress theories emphasize the intermediate role of cognitive and behavioural processes in the determinism of neuroendocrine and neurovegetative responses to stressors. Active attempts to control the situation are associated with activation of the sympathetic and adrenal medullary system whereas loss of control is associated with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Since the functional consequences of the activation of each of these physiological systems are not the same, the risk factors corresponding to each coping strategy are not the same. Whatever their details, physiological and psychobiological stress theories all emphasize the influence of psychic factors on bodily functions. However, mental states do not function independently of bodily functions. In the case of the influences of stress on immunity for instance, it has been shown that these influences represent the counterpart of feedback regulatory mechanisms in which the ability of the brain to regulate immune responses depends on the capacity of the immune system to influence brain functions. Activation of the immune system during infection or inflammation is accompanied by profound metabolic, neuroendocrine and behavioural changes which are mediated by the effects of immune products known as cytokines on brain cell targets. In view of the reciprocal relationships between peripheral organic systems and the brain, a purely psychosomatic view, from the psyche to the soma, is therefore no longer tenable. In addition, biological accounts of somatization processes run into the risk of minimizing the importance of perception and representation of somatic symptoms. Amplification of somatic symptoms is a common

  8. Mechanisms and models of somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of somatic cells to pluripotency by defined factors is a long and complex process that yields embryonic stem cell-like cells that vary in their developmental potential. To improve the quality of resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which is important for potential therapeutic applications, and to address fundamental questions about control of cell identity, molecular mechanisms of the reprogramming process must be understood. Here we discuss recent discoveries regarding the role of reprogramming factors in remodeling the genome, including new insights into the function of c-Myc, and describe the different phases, markers and emerging models of reprogramming. PMID:23681063

  9. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Renard, Bernhard Y; de Graaf, Jos; Wagner, Meike; Paret, Claudia; Kneip, Christoph; Türeci, Ozlem; Diken, Mustafa; Britten, Cedrik; Kreiter, Sebastian; Koslowski, Michael; Castle, John C; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR), to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence) and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence). All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50), none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  10. Emotional distress in the Hebrew Bible. Somatic or psychological?

    PubMed

    Mumford, D B

    1992-01-01

    A systematic search was made in the Hebrew Bible for expressions of emotional distress. A wide range of somatic and psychological vocabulary was found, especially in the Psalms and other poetic literature. Somatic expressions most frequently involved the heart, bowels, belly, bones, and eyes. Head symptoms were rare. Metaphors referring to the heart were common; other somatic expressions appeared to be descriptions of actual physical sensations. Usually somatic and psychological expressions were paired together, utilising the 'parallelism' of Hebrew verse form. Biblical Hebrew thus incorporated a powerful and sophisticated language of emotional expression.

  11. Blastocysts derivation from somatic cell fusion with premature oocytes (prematuration somatic cell fusion).

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Islam M; Khoirinaya, Candrani; Kim, Su Jin; Moon, Joon Ho; Almadaly, Essam; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the development of immature oocytes after their fusion with male somatic cells expressing red fluorescence protein (RFP). RFP-expressing cells were fused with immature oocytes, matured in vitro and then parthenogenetically activated. Somatic nuclei showed spindle formation, 1st polar body extrusion after in vitro maturation and protruded the 2nd polar body after parthenogenetic activation. RFP was expressed in the resultant embryos; two-cell stage and blastocysts. Chromosomal analysis showed aneuploidy in 81.82% of the resulting blastocysts while 18.18% of the resulting blastocysts were diploid. Among eight RFP-expressing blastocysts, Xist mRNAs was detected in six while Sry mRNA was detected in only one blastocyst. We propose "prematuration somatic cell fusion" as an approach to generate embryos using somatic cells instead of spermatozoa. The current approach, if improved, would assist production of embryos for couples where the male partner is sterile, however, genetic and chromosomal analysis of the resultant embryos are required before transfer to the mothers.

  12. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos. PMID:27459580

  13. Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    1996-05-01

    Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Somatic mutations found in the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman demonstrate oligoclonal hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Holstege, Henne; Pfeiffer, Wayne; Sie, Daoud; Hulsman, Marc; Nicholas, Thomas J.; Lee, Clarence C.; Ross, Tristen; Lin, Jue; Miller, Mark A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Brugman, Martijn H.; Staal, Frank J.T.; Holstege, Gert; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Levy, Samuel; Sistermans, Erik A.

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutation burden in healthy white blood cells (WBCs) is not well known. Based on deep whole-genome sequencing, we estimate that approximately 450 somatic mutations accumulated in the nonrepetitive genome within the healthy blood compartment of a 115-yr-old woman. The detected mutations appear to have been harmless passenger mutations: They were enriched in noncoding, AT-rich regions that are not evolutionarily conserved, and they were depleted for genomic elements where mutations might have favorable or adverse effects on cellular fitness, such as regions with actively transcribed genes. The distribution of variant allele frequencies of these mutations suggests that the majority of the peripheral white blood cells were offspring of two related hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones. Moreover, telomere lengths of the WBCs were significantly shorter than telomere lengths from other tissues. Together, this suggests that the finite lifespan of HSCs, rather than somatic mutation effects, may lead to hematopoietic clonal evolution at extreme ages. PMID:24760347

  15. Comparative Genome Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Genes Within Newly Identified High Variability Regions Associated With Drug Resistance Development

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Khatun, Jainab; Kanavy, Dona M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rise of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported in several clinical studies. Though the mutation of resistance genes and their role in drug resistance has been researched, the process by which the bacterium acquires high-level resistance is still not well understood. How does the genomic evolution of P. aeruginosa affect resistance development? Could the exposure of antibiotics to the bacteria enrich genomic variants that lead to the development of resistance, and if so, how are these variants distributed through the genome? To answer these questions, we performed 454 pyrosequencing and a whole genome analysis both before and after exposure to ciprofloxacin. The comparative sequence data revealed 93 unique resistance strain variation sites, which included a mutation in the DNA gyrase subunit A gene. We generated variation-distribution maps comparing the wild and resistant types, and isolated 19 candidates from three discrete resistance-associated high variability regions that had available transposon mutants, to perform a ciprofloxacin exposure assay. Of these region candidates with transposon disruptions, 79% (15/19) showed a reduction in the ability to gain high-level resistance, suggesting that genes within these high variability regions might enrich for certain functions associated with resistance development. PMID:23808957

  16. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  17. Genetic basis of olfactory cognition: extremely high level of DNA sequence polymorphism in promoter regions of the human olfactory receptor genes revealed using the 1000 Genomes Project dataset

    PubMed Central

    Ignatieva, Elena V.; Levitsky, Victor G.; Yudin, Nikolay S.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Kolchanov, Nikolay A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of olfactory cognition is very complicated. Olfactory cognition is initiated by olfactory receptor proteins (odorant receptors), which are activated by olfactory stimuli (ligands). Olfactory receptors are the initial player in the signal transduction cascade producing a nerve impulse, which is transmitted to the brain. The sensitivity to a particular ligand depends on the expression level of multiple proteins involved in the process of olfactory cognition: olfactory receptor proteins, proteins that participate in signal transduction cascade, etc. The expression level of each gene is controlled by its regulatory regions, and especially, by the promoter [a region of DNA about 100–1000 base pairs long located upstream of the transcription start site (TSS)]. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms using human whole-genome data from the 1000 Genomes Project and revealed an extremely high level of single nucleotide polymorphisms in promoter regions of olfactory receptor genes and HLA genes. We hypothesized that the high level of polymorphisms in olfactory receptor promoters was responsible for the diversity in regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of olfactory receptor proteins. Such diversity of regulatory mechanisms may cause the great variability of olfactory cognition of numerous environmental olfactory stimuli perceived by human beings (air pollutants, human body odors, odors in culinary etc.). In turn, this variability may provide a wide range of emotional and behavioral reactions related to the vast variety of olfactory stimuli. PMID:24715883

  18. AID to overcome the limitations of genomic information by introducing somatic DNA alterations.

    PubMed

    Honjo, Tasuku; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Shinkura, Reiko

    2006-05-01

    The immune system has adopted somatic DNA alterations to overcome the limitations of the genomic information. Activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an essential enzyme to regulate class switch recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM) and gene conversion (GC) of the immunoglobulin gene. AID is known to be required for DNA cleavage of S regions in CSR and V regions in SHM. However, its molecular mechanism is a focus of extensive debate. RNA editing hypothesis postulates that AID edits yet unknown mRNA, to generate specific endonucleases for CSR and SHM. By contrast, DNA deamination hypothesis assumes that AID deaminates cytosine in DNA, followed by DNA cleavage by base excision repair enzymes. We summarize the basic knowledge for molecular mechanisms for CSR and SHM and then discuss the importance of AID not only in the immune regulation but also in the genome instability. PMID:25873751

  19. Developmentally and stress-induced small heat shock proteins in cork oak somatic embryos.

    PubMed

    Puigderrajols, Pere; Jofré, Anna; Mir, Gisela; Pla, Maria; Verdaguer, Dolors; Huguet, Gemma; Molinas, Marisa

    2002-06-01

    The timing and tissue localization of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) during cork oak somatic embryo development was investigated under normal growing culture conditions and in response to stress. Western blot analyses using polyclonal antibodies raised against cork oak recombinant HSP17 showed a transient accumulation of class I sHSPs during somatic embryo maturation and germination. Moreover, the amount of protein increased at all stages of embryo development in response to exogenous stress. The developmentally accumulated proteins localized to early differentiating, but not the highly dividing, regions of the root and shoot apical meristems. By contrast, these highly dividing regions were strongly immunostained after heat stress. Findings support the hypothesis of a distinct control for developmentally and stress-induced accumulation of class I sHSPs. The possible role of sHSPs is discussed in relation to their tissue specific localization.

  20. Are Early Somatic Embryos of the Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) Organised?

    PubMed Central

    Petrek, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Bartusek, Karel; Anjum, Naser A.; Pereira, Eduarda; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Background Somatic embryogenesis in conifer species has great potential for the forestry industry. Hence, a number of methods have been developed for their efficient and rapid propagation through somatic embryogenesis. Although information is available regarding the previous process-mediated generation of embryogenic cells to form somatic embryos, there is a dearth of information in the literature on the detailed structure of these clusters. Methodology/Principal Findings The main aim of this study was to provide a more detailed structure of the embryogenic tissue clusters obtained through the in vitro propagation of the Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). We primarily focused on the growth of early somatic embryos (ESEs). The data on ESE growth suggested that there may be clear distinctions between their inner and outer regions. Therefore, we selected ESEs collected on the 56th day after sub-cultivation to dissect the homogeneity of the ESE clusters. Two colourimetric assays (acetocarmine and fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining) and one metabolic assay based on the use of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride uncovered large differences in the metabolic activity inside the cluster. Next, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The ESE cluster seemed to be compactly aggregated during the first four weeks of cultivation; thereafter, the difference between the 1H nuclei concentration in the inner and outer clusters was more evident. There were clear differences in the visual appearance of embryos from the outer and inner regions. Finally, a cluster was divided into six parts (three each from the inner and the outer regions of the embryo) to determine their growth and viability. The innermost embryos (centripetally towards the cluster centre) could grow after sub-cultivation but exhibited the slowest rate and required the longest time to reach the common growth rate. To confirm our hypothesis on the organisation of the ESE cluster, we

  1. Somatic embryogenesis in Picea suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Generation of somatic embryos in spruce is achieved through the execution of five steps designated as: (1) induction of embryogenic tissue, (2) maintenance of embryogenic tissue, (3) embryo development, (4) embryo maturation, and (5) conversion into plants. Depending on species and genotypes within the same species, each step must be optimized for obtaining maximum results. In general, embryogenic tissue is generated from immature and mature zygotic embryos and maintained in either liquid or solid conditions in the presence of plant growth regulators auxin and cytokinin. Initiation of embryo development in suspension cultured is induced by removal of plant growth regulators, whereas continuation of development and completion of maturation require applications of abscisic acid and imposition of a desiccation period. Both treatments are needed for conferring morphological and physiological maturation to the embryos. Mature somatic embryos are germinated in the absence of plant regulators and embryo conversion (i.e., formation of a functional shoot and root, occurs after a few weeks in culture). PMID:16673908

  2. Slow Narrow Spectral Width E Region Echoes Observed During the March 17-2015 Storm and What They Reveal About the Disturbed Ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Maurice, J. P.; Chau, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    As auroral-type disturbances moved equatorward during the March 17-2015 storm, coherent E region echoes were observed simultaneously with three radar links separated by 40 km each in the east-west direction in northern Germany. One radar operated at 36.2, and the other two at 32.55 MHz. One of the latter operated in a bistatic configuration. On each radar site five separate antennas were used to locate the echoes using interferometry. The unique configuration provided an unsurpassed opportunity to study the origin and evolution of ionospheric structures in a wide field of view during a strong storm. A most noticeable feature was that over a few time intervals, several minutes in duration each, very narrow spectra were observed, with Doppler shifts roughly 1/2 the ion-acoustic speed (often called "type III" echoes in the past). The inferred location indicated that the echoes came from below 100 km altitude. Echoes moving at the nominal ion-acoustic speed came from higher up and/or different flow angles. In one particularly clear instance the "Type III" echo region came from a region 50 to 75 km in extent drifting at roughly 1.5 km/s, while moving at some small (but non-zero) flow angle with respect to the line-of-sight. In view of the observations, a reevaluation of existing theories indicates that the echoes cannot be related to ion cyclotron waves. Instead, their low altitude and flow angle dependence reveal that they are the by-product of the ion Pedersen instability, which has been investigated by a few groups in relation to a non-isothermal treatment of the Farley-Buneman instability. In our present treatment of the problem, nonlinear effects are invoked to compute the final Doppler shift of the resulting structures. We find that the stronger the electric field is, the closer the region of slow echoes has to be to the ExB direction. In our most dramatic example of Type III structures, the size of the echo region pointed to a region of high energy precipitation

  3. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Kruse, Torben A; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is extensively applied to catalogue somatic mutations in cancer, in research settings and increasingly in clinical settings for molecular diagnostics, guiding therapy decisions. Somatic variant callers perform paired comparisons of sequencing data from cancer tissue and matched normal tissue in order to detect somatic mutations. The advent of many new somatic variant callers creates a need for comparison and validation of the tools, as no de facto standard for detection of somatic mutations exists and only limited comparisons have been reported. We have performed a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2 and Virmid for the detection of single nucleotide mutations and small deletions and insertions. We report a large variation in the number of calls from the nine somatic variant callers on the same sequencing data and highly variable agreement. Sequencing depth had markedly diverse impact on individual callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high sensitivity and robustness to changes in sequencing depths.

  4. Evaluation of Nine Somatic Variant Callers for Detection of Somatic Mutations in Exome and Targeted Deep Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Thomassen, Mads; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Kruse, Torben A.; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is extensively applied to catalogue somatic mutations in cancer, in research settings and increasingly in clinical settings for molecular diagnostics, guiding therapy decisions. Somatic variant callers perform paired comparisons of sequencing data from cancer tissue and matched normal tissue in order to detect somatic mutations. The advent of many new somatic variant callers creates a need for comparison and validation of the tools, as no de facto standard for detection of somatic mutations exists and only limited comparisons have been reported. We have performed a comprehensive evaluation using exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing data of paired tumor-normal samples from five breast cancer patients to evaluate the performance of nine publicly available somatic variant callers: EBCall, Mutect, Seurat, Shimmer, Indelocator, Somatic Sniper, Strelka, VarScan 2 and Virmid for the detection of single nucleotide mutations and small deletions and insertions. We report a large variation in the number of calls from the nine somatic variant callers on the same sequencing data and highly variable agreement. Sequencing depth had markedly diverse impact on individual callers, as for some callers, increased sequencing depth highly improved sensitivity. For SNV calling, we report EBCall, Mutect, Virmid and Strelka to be the most reliable somatic variant callers for both exome sequencing and targeted deep sequencing. For indel calling, EBCall is superior due to high sensitivity and robustness to changes in sequencing depths. PMID:27002637

  5. Factor structure and validity of the State-Trait Inventory for Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Karen E; Hart, Trevor A; Eastwood, John D

    2016-02-01

    The State-Trait Inventory for Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety (STICSA; Ree, French, MacLeod, & Locke, 2008) is a relatively new measure of anxiety. The current research investigated the factor structure and reliability of scores on the STICSA and the validity of the interpretation of STICSA scores in a sample of undergraduate students. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires online, including measures of anxiety, depression, affect, and social desirability. Scores on the 4 subscales of the STICSA-Trait Cognitive, Trait Somatic, State Cognitive, and State Somatic-exhibited good internal consistencies (αs ≥ .92). Results of a confirmatory factor analysis provided support for a hierarchical model of the STICSA including a global anxiety factor plus 4 specific factors corresponding to the STICSA subscales. Support was also found for a four-factor model, with factors corresponding to the STICSA subscales. Pearson product-moment correlations with other measures of anxiety provided evidence of the convergent validity of the interpretation of STICSA scores, and Pearson product-moment correlations with measures of depression and affect provided evidence of the divergent validity of the interpretation of STICSA scores. The STICSA is the only existing self-report anxiety measure that contains scales measuring state and trait anxiety as well as cognitive and somatic anxiety. Comparisons between the convergent and divergent validity of test score interpretations of the STICSA and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI; Spielberger et al., 1983) revealed that the STICSA has better convergent validity with measures of somatic anxiety and better divergent validity with measures of depression and affect. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26011481

  6. Loss of CMD2-mediated resistance to cassava mosaic disease in plants regenerated through somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Wagaba, Henry; Moll, Theodore; Alicai, Titus; Miano, Douglas; Carrington, James C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-09-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are the two most important viral diseases affecting cassava production in Africa. Three sources of resistance are employed to combat CMD: polygenic recessive resistance, termed CMD1, the dominant monogenic type, named CMD2, and the recently characterized CMD3. The farmer-preferred cultivar TME 204 carries inherent resistance to CMD mediated by CMD2, but is highly susceptible to CBSD. Selected plants of TME 204 produced for RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated resistance to CBSD were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis and tested in confined field trials in East Africa. Although micropropagated, wild-type TME 204 plants exhibited the expected levels of resistance, all plants regenerated via somatic embryogenesis were found to be highly susceptible to CMD. Glasshouse studies using infectious clones of East African cassava mosaic virus conclusively demonstrated that the process of somatic embryogenesis used to regenerate cassava caused the resulting plants to become susceptible to CMD. This phenomenon could be replicated in the two additional CMD2-type varieties TME 3 and TME 7, but the CMD1-type cultivar TMS 30572 and the CMD3-type cultivar TMS 98/0505 maintained resistance to CMD after passage through somatic embryogenesis. Data are presented to define the specific tissue culture step at which the loss of CMD resistance occurs and to show that the loss of CMD2-mediated resistance is maintained across vegetative generations. These findings reveal new aspects of the widely used technique of somatic embryogenesis, and the stability of field-level resistance in CMD2-type cultivars presently grown by farmers in East Africa, where CMD pressure is high.

  7. Compound Evolutionary History of the Rhesus Macaque Mhc Class I B Region Revealed by Microsatellite Analysis and Localization of Retroviral Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; Heijmans, Corrine M. C.; Bonhomme, Maxime; Otting, Nel; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the single polymorphic B locus of the major histocompatibility complex is linked to the microsatellite MIB. In rhesus macaques, however, haplotypes are characterized by the presence of unique combinations of multiple B genes, which may display different levels of polymorphism. The aim of the study was to shed light on the evolutionary history of this highly complex region. First, the robustness of the microsatellite MIB-linked to almost half of the B genes in rhesus macaques (Mamu-B)–for accurate B haplotyping was studied. Based on the physical map of an established haplotype comprising 7 MIB loci, each located next to a certain Mamu-B gene, two MIB loci, MIB1 and MIB6, were investigated in a panel of MHC homozygous monkeys. MIB1 revealed a complex genotyping pattern, whereas MIB6 analysis resulted in the detection of one or no amplicon. Both patterns are specific for a given B haplotype, show Mendelian segregation, and even allow a more precise haplotype definition than do traditional typing methods. Second, a search was performed for retroelements that may have played a role in duplication processes as observed in the macaque B region. This resulted in the description of two types of duplicons. One basic unit comprises an expressed Mamu-B gene, adjacent to an HERV16 copy closely linked to MIB. The second type of duplicon comprises a Mamu-B (pseudo)gene, linked to a truncated HERV16 structure lacking its MIB segment. Such truncation seems to coincide with the loss of B gene transcription. Subsequent to the duplication processes, recombination between MIB and Mamu-B loci appears to have occurred, resulting in a hyperplastic B region. Thus, analysis of MIB in addition to B loci allows deciphering of the compound evolutionary history of the class I B region in Old World monkeys. PMID:19172173

  8. Residues of a proposed gate region in type I ATP-binding cassette import systems are crucial for function as revealed by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Heuveling, Johanna; Wardelmann, Kristina; Landmesser, Heidi; Sani, Katayoun Behnam; Worth, Catherine L; Preissner, Robert; Schneider, Erwin

    2013-09-01

    The type I ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer for positively charged amino acids of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus consists of the extracellular solute binding protein, ArtJ, and a homodimer each of the transmembrane subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding and -hydrolyzing subunit, ArtP. We have investigated the functional consequences of mutations affecting conserved residues from two peptide regions in ArtM, recently proposed to form a 'gate' by which access of a substrate to the translocation path is controlled (Hollenstein et al., 2007 [14]). Transporter variants were reconstituted into proteoliposomes and assayed for ArtJ/arginine-stimulated ATPase activity. Replacement of residues from region 1 (Arg-63, Pro-66) caused no or only moderate reduction in ATPase activity. In contrast, mutating residues from gate region 2 (Lys-159, Leu-163) resulted in a substantial increase in ATPase activity which, however, as demonstrated for variants ArtM(K159I) and ArtM(K159E), is not coupled to transport. Replacing homologous residues in the closely related histidine transporter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (HisJ-QMP2) caused different phenotypes. Mutation to isoleucine of HisQ(K163) or HisM(H172), both homologous to ArtM(K159), abolished ATPase activity. The mutations most likely caused a structural change as revealed by limited proteolysis. In contrast, substantial, albeit reduced, enzymatic activity was observed with variants of HisQ(L167→G) or HisM(L176→G), both homologous to ArtM(L163). Our study provides the first experimental evidence in favor of a crucial role of residues from the proposed gate region in type I ABC importer function.

  9. Residues of a proposed gate region in type I ATP-binding cassette import systems are crucial for function as revealed by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Heuveling, Johanna; Wardelmann, Kristina; Landmesser, Heidi; Sani, Katayoun Behnam; Worth, Catherine L; Preissner, Robert; Schneider, Erwin

    2013-09-01

    The type I ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer for positively charged amino acids of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus consists of the extracellular solute binding protein, ArtJ, and a homodimer each of the transmembrane subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding and -hydrolyzing subunit, ArtP. We have investigated the functional consequences of mutations affecting conserved residues from two peptide regions in ArtM, recently proposed to form a 'gate' by which access of a substrate to the translocation path is controlled (Hollenstein et al., 2007 [14]). Transporter variants were reconstituted into proteoliposomes and assayed for ArtJ/arginine-stimulated ATPase activity. Replacement of residues from region 1 (Arg-63, Pro-66) caused no or only moderate reduction in ATPase activity. In contrast, mutating residues from gate region 2 (Lys-159, Leu-163) resulted in a substantial increase in ATPase activity which, however, as demonstrated for variants ArtM(K159I) and ArtM(K159E), is not coupled to transport. Replacing homologous residues in the closely related histidine transporter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (HisJ-QMP2) caused different phenotypes. Mutation to isoleucine of HisQ(K163) or HisM(H172), both homologous to ArtM(K159), abolished ATPase activity. The mutations most likely caused a structural change as revealed by limited proteolysis. In contrast, substantial, albeit reduced, enzymatic activity was observed with variants of HisQ(L167→G) or HisM(L176→G), both homologous to ArtM(L163). Our study provides the first experimental evidence in favor of a crucial role of residues from the proposed gate region in type I ABC importer function. PMID:23747295

  10. The somatic marker theory in the context of addiction: contributions to understanding development and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Vegard V; Lugo, Ricardo G; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical accounts of addiction have acknowledged that addiction to substances and behaviors share inherent similarities (eg, insensitivity to future consequences and self-regulatory deficits). This recognition is corroborated by inquiries into the neurobiological correlates of addiction, which has indicated that different manifestations of addictive pathology share common neural mechanisms. This review of the literature will explore the feasibility of the somatic marker hypothesis as a unifying explanatory framework of the decision-making deficits that are believed to be involved in addiction development and maintenance. The somatic marker hypothesis provides a neuroanatomical and cognitive framework of decision making, which posits that decisional processes are biased toward long-term prospects by emotional marker signals engendered by a neuronal architecture comprising both cortical and subcortical circuits. Addicts display markedly impulsive and compulsive behavioral patterns that might be understood as manifestations of decision-making processes that fail to take into account the long-term consequences of actions. Evidence demonstrates that substance dependence, pathological gambling, and Internet addiction are characterized by structural and functional abnormalities in neural regions, as outlined by the somatic marker hypothesis. Furthermore, both substance dependents and behavioral addicts show similar impairments on a measure of decision making that is sensitive to somatic marker functioning. The decision-making deficits that characterize addiction might exist a priori to addiction development; however, they may be worsened by ingestion of substances with neurotoxic properties. It is concluded that the somatic marker model of addiction contributes a plausible account of the underlying neurobiology of decision-making deficits in addictive disorders that is supported by the current neuroimaging and behavioral evidence. Implications for future

  11. When somatization is not the only thing you suffer from: Examining comorbid syndromes using latent profile analysis, parenting practices and adolescent functioning.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Miri; Mayseless, Ofra; Rousseau, Sofie

    2016-10-30

    Understanding somatization presents a challenge to clinicians because it is often associated with other syndromes. We addressed somatization's comorbidity with other internalizing syndromes (anxiety, depression, withdrawal) using latent profile analysis. A representative sample of 3496 Israeli middle and high-school youths reported their internalizing symptoms, perceived parenting practices, psychosocial functioning, and health behaviors. Four profiles, similar across age and gender, were identified: overall-low (65.4%), moderately-high anxiety/depression/withdrawal (24.4%), high somatization (4.8%), and overall-high (5.4%). MANOVAs and follow-up ANOVAs revealed that for the most part the overall-high profile evinced the worst parenting, psychosocial functioning, and health behaviors (smoking and drinking), while the overall-low group evinced the best. For most variables the high somatization and moderately high profiles displayed midway results. However, the moderately-high profile reported higher levels of harsh parenting than the high somatization profile. The high somatization profile reported similar or higher levels of smoking, risk taking, vandalism, and rule violation than the overall-high group. High somatization, either alone or alongside anxiety, depression, and withdrawal, was associated with disruptive and risk-taking behaviors. This link might reflect problems in emotion and anger regulation and become stronger in adolescence because of dysregulation processes characterizing this period. Implications for practice are discussed. PMID:27455145

  12. Peculiar high energy cosmic ray stratospheric event reveals a heavy primary origin particle above the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopenkin, V.; Fujimoto, Y.

    2005-01-15

    We wish to put forward an explanation for a peculiar cosmic ray event with energy {sigma}E{sub {gamma}}{>=}2x10{sup 15} eV detected in 1975 by the balloon borne emulsion chamber experiment performed in the stratosphere, at the altitude {>=}30 km above sea level. For almost 30 years the event has been described as unusual, invoking new exotic mechanisms or models. In our opinion there is no need for an extraordinary explanation. Contrary to the widespread belief, the event gives us an example of 'unrecognized standard physics'. At the same time this event revealed a variety of features which are of considerable interest for cosmic rays, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. Here we show that the observed family is most likely to be a result of a heavy nucleus interaction with an air nucleus. In this case a primary particle would originally have been in the energy region above 'the knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  13. Depression, Health, and Somatic Complaints in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahurin, Kathleen A.; Gatz, Margaret

    Although depression is considered to be common in the elderly, reliable rates of prevalence are lacking. Studies have shown that age differences on measures of depressive symptomatology can be attributed to higher levels of somatic complaints. In order to examine whether the association between somatic and depressive symptoms varies as a function…

  14. Natural Attributes and Agricultural Implications of Somatic Genome Variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of genome network, describes different variations of the somatic genome network, and reviews the agricultural implications of such variations. All genetic materials in a cell constitute the genome network of the cell and can jointly influence the cell's function and fate. The somatic genome of a plant is the genome network of cells in somatic tissues and of nonreproductive cells in pollen and ovules. Somatic genome variation (SGV, approximately equivalent to somagenetic variation) occurs at multiple levels, including stoichiometric, ploidy, and sequence variations. For a multicellular organism, the term "somatic genome variation" covers both the variation in part of the organism and the generation of new genotype individuals through somatic means from a sexually produced original genotype. For unicellular organisms, genome variation in somatic nuclei occurs at the whole organism level because there is only a single cell per individual. Growth, development and evolution of living organisms require both stability and instability of their genomes. Somatic genome variation displays many more attributes than genetic mutation and has strong implications for agriculture. PMID:26636317

  15. Changes in somatic cell structure during senescence of Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Pommerville, J C; Kochert, G D

    1981-06-01

    Senescence of the terminally differentiated somatic cells of the green alga, Volvox carteri f. weismannia, was investigated by light, fluorescence, and electron microscopy. Viability of the somatic cell population, as determined by trypan blue or erythrosin B exclusion, showed a sharp reduction beginning 144 h after the somatic cells had lost the ability to divide. This increased mortality rate was correlated at the light microscopic level with a retraction of the somatic cell cytoplasm, a reduction in chloroplast autofluorescence (and total chlorophyll content), and a decline in the number of vacuoles which could be localized with 9-aminoacridine fluorescence microscopy. Nuclear fluorescence with acridine orange remained unaffected during this time. Lipid bodies increased in older cells, and total lipid analysis showed a sharp increase beginning 96 h after the somatic cells had stopped dividing. Electron microscopic comparison between young (48--72 h) and old (168 h) somatic cells showed a disorganization of chloroplast structure, a decline in the number of cytoplasmic ribosomes, and, substantiating the light microscopy, and accumulation of lipid bodies in the cytoplasm of the older cells. The results demonstrate progressive changes in somatic cell structure with age and are suggestive of cells under nutrient stress even though they are in nutrient medium. Therefore senescence and death of the V. carteri somatic cells may be caused, in part, by an inability to take up or utilize nutrients present in the culture medium. PMID:7285941

  16. Somatics in the Dance Studio: Embodying Feminist/Democratic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnidge, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1970s, somatics have increasingly become a part of the dance training landscape. Although the psychophysical benefits seem sufficient in themselves to warrant inclusion in dance, this article explores another possible outcome of embracing somatic pedagogical principles, a change that affects not "what" is taught in a dance class, but…

  17. Somatic Symptoms in Children from Three Ethnic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canino, Glorisa; Gonzalez, Gloria; Ramirez, Rafael

    A study compared the rates of somatic symptoms associated with anxiety disorder in African Americans, Hispanics residing in Puerto Rico, and European American children. A total of 1,285 children were interviewed, along with their primary caretakers. Headaches were the most frequently endorsed somatic symptom, with half of the total sample…

  18. Fault structure and kinematics of the Long Valley Caldera region, California, revealed by high-accuracy earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanism stress inversions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, S.; Ellsworth, W.; Zoback, M.; Waldhauser, F.

    2002-01-01

    We have determined high-resolution hypocenters for 45,000+ earthquakes that occurred between 1980 and 2000 in the Long Valley caldera area using a double-difference earthquake location algorithm and routinely determined arrival times. The locations reveal numerous discrete fault planes in the southern caldera and adjacent Sierra Nevada block (SNB). Intracaldera faults include a series of east/west-striking right-lateral strike-slip faults beneath the caldera's south moat and a series of more northerly striking strike-slip/normal faults beneath the caldera's resurgent dome. Seismicity in the SNB south of the caldera is confined to a crustal block bounded on the west by an east-dipping oblique normal fault and on the east by the Hilton Creek fault. Two NE-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults are responsible for most seismicity within this block. To understand better the stresses driving seismicity, we performed stress inversions using focal mechanisms with 50 or more first motions. This analysis reveals that the least principal stress direction systematically rotates across the studied region, from NE to SW in the caldera's south moat to WNW-ESE in Round Valley, 25 km to the SE. Because WNW-ESE extension is characteristic of the western boundary of the Basin and Range province, caldera area stresses appear to be locally perturbed. This stress perturbation does not seem to result from magma chamber inflation but may be related to the significant (???20 km) left step in the locus of extension along the Sierra Nevada/Basin and Range province boundary. This implies that regional-scale tectonic processes are driving seismic deformation in the Long Valley caldera.

  19. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  20. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  1. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  2. Somatic Embryogenesis: Still a Relevant Technique in Citrus Improvement.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ahmad A; Dutt, Manjul; Gmitter, Frederick G; Grosser, Jude W

    2016-01-01

    The genus Citrus contains numerous fresh and processed fruit cultivars that are economically important worldwide. New cultivars are needed to battle industry threatening diseases and to create new marketing opportunities. Citrus improvement by conventional methods alone has many limitations that can be overcome by applications of emerging biotechnologies, generally requiring cell to plant regeneration. Many citrus genotypes are amenable to somatic embryogenesis, which became a key regeneration pathway in many experimental approaches to cultivar improvement. This chapter provides a brief history of plant somatic embryogenesis with focus on citrus, followed by a discussion of proven applications in biotechnology-facilitated citrus improvement techniques, such as somatic hybridization, somatic cybridization, genetic transformation, and the exploitation of somaclonal variation. Finally, two important new protocols that feature plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis are provided: protoplast transformation and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of embryogenic cell suspension cultures.

  3. Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented with 2,4-D and BAP.

    PubMed

    Omar, Genesia F; Mohamed, Fouad H; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Sarg, Sawsan H; Morsey, Mohamed M

    2013-09-01

    Somatic embryo-like structures (SELS) were produced in vitro from leaf disk and petiole explants of two cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) on Murashige and Skoog medium with different concentrations and combinations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and sucrose to check the embryonic nature of these structures histologically. A large number of SELS could be regenerated in both cultivars on media with 2-4 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in combination with 0.5 -1 mg L(-1) BAP and 50 g x L(-1) sucrose. Histological examination of SELS revealed the absence of a root pole. Therefore these structures cannot be strictly classified as somatic embryos. The SELS formed under the tested culture conditions represent malformed shoot-like and leaf-like structures. The importance of these results for the propagation of strawberries via somatic embryogenesis is discussed. PMID:24377134

  4. Somatic embryo-like structures of strawberry regenerated in vitro on media supplemented with 2,4-D and BAP.

    PubMed

    Omar, Genesia F; Mohamed, Fouad H; Haensch, Klaus-Thomas; Sarg, Sawsan H; Morsey, Mohamed M

    2013-09-01

    Somatic embryo-like structures (SELS) were produced in vitro from leaf disk and petiole explants of two cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch) on Murashige and Skoog medium with different concentrations and combinations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and sucrose to check the embryonic nature of these structures histologically. A large number of SELS could be regenerated in both cultivars on media with 2-4 mg L(-1) 2,4-D in combination with 0.5 -1 mg L(-1) BAP and 50 g x L(-1) sucrose. Histological examination of SELS revealed the absence of a root pole. Therefore these structures cannot be strictly classified as somatic embryos. The SELS formed under the tested culture conditions represent malformed shoot-like and leaf-like structures. The importance of these results for the propagation of strawberries via somatic embryogenesis is discussed.

  5. A physically anchored genetic map and linkage to avirulence reveals recombination suppression over the proximal region of Hessian fly chromosome A2.

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Susanta K; Valicente, Fernando H; Rider, S Dean; Shun-Chen, Ming; Jackson, Scott; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) to the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor), a major insect pest of wheat, is based on a gene-for-gene interaction. Close linkage (3 +/- 2 cM) was discovered between Hessian fly avirulence genes vH3 and vH5. Bulked segregant analysis revealed two DNA markers (28-178 and 23-201) within 10 cM of these loci and only 3 +/- 2 cM apart. However, 28-178 was located in the middle of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome A2 whereas 23-201 was located in the middle of the long arm of chromosome A2, suggesting the presence of severe recombination suppression over its proximal region. To further test that possibility, an AFLP-based genetic map of the Hessian fly genome was constructed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 20 markers on the genetic map to the polytene chromosomes of the Hessian fly indicated good correspondence between the linkage groups and the four Hessian fly chromosomes. The physically anchored genetic map is the first of any gall midge species. The proximal region of mitotic chromosome A2 makes up 30% of its length but corresponded to <3% of the chromosome A2 genetic map. PMID:15166159

  6. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Aspidisca (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Euplotida) revealed by ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Yi, Zhenzhen; Miao, Miao; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Song, Weibo

    2011-03-01

    The internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and 5.8S rRNA genes were sequenced in six populations of four Aspidisca species, namely A. leptaspis, A. orthopogon, A. magna and A. aculeata. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by means of Bayesian inference (BI), Maximum Parsimony (MP), Neighbor-Joining (NJ), and Maximum Likelihood (ML) to assess the inter- and intra-species relationships within the genus Aspidisca. All trees show similar topologies with stable supports and indicate that: (1) four well known groups, i.e., Oligotrichia, Stichotrichia, Choreotrichia and Hypotrichia, are distinctly outlined within the class Spirotrichea, and all are monophyletic other than Hypotrichia; (2) members of Aspidisca can be distinguished well, based on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequences, and A. leptaspis and A. magna shared a closer relationship than other species; (3) Aspidisca and Euplotes branch early in the subclass Hypotrichia. To compare the phylogenetic relationships based on different genes, SSU rRNA trees were also constructed with nearly the same species inclusion, which revealed different topologies of inter-species, inter-genera and inter-subclasses.

  7. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    PubMed Central

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P21 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P21 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-­barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-­barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family. PMID:19770509

  8. The somatic genomic landscape of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Cameron W; Verhaak, Roel G W; McKenna, Aaron; Campos, Benito; Noushmehr, Houtan; Salama, Sofie R; Zheng, Siyuan; Chakravarty, Debyani; Sanborn, J Zachary; Berman, Samuel H; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bernard, Brady; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Genovese, Giannicola; Shmulevich, Ilya; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Zou, Lihua; Vegesna, Rahulsimham; Shukla, Sachet A; Ciriello, Giovanni; Yung, W K; Zhang, Wei; Sougnez, Carrie; Mikkelsen, Tom; Aldape, Kenneth; Bigner, Darell D; Van Meir, Erwin G; Prados, Michael; Sloan, Andrew; Black, Keith L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Andrews, David W; Guha, Abhijit; Iacocca, Mary; O'Neill, Brian P; Foltz, Greg; Myers, Jerome; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Penny, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Gibbs, Richard; Marra, Marco; Mills, Gordon B; Lander, Eric; Spellman, Paul; Wilson, Richard; Sander, Chris; Weinstein, John; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey; Laird, Peter W; Haussler, David; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-10

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multidimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors, including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer.

  9. Somatic symptoms in traumatized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Brittany B; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B; Truax, Tatyana V; Storch, Eric A

    2012-10-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Two composite measures of SS were formed to represent both child- and caregiver-rated SS. Over 95% of children endorsed at least one SS on the child-rated measure. Children who had experienced sexual abuse had higher rates of SS relative to children who had not. Child-rated SS were highly correlated with the CDI total score and the TSCC subscales of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, dissociation, and anger. The TSCC anxiety subscale mediated the relationship between sexual abuse and child-rated SS.

  10. The Somatic Genomic Landscape of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Cameron W.; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; McKenna, Aaron; Campos, Benito; Noushmehr, Houtan; Salama, Sofie R.; Zheng, Siyuan; Chakravarty, Debyani; Sanborn, J. Zachary; Berman, Samuel H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bernard, Brady; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Genovese, Giannicola; Shmulevich, Ilya; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Zou, Lihua; Vegesna, Rahulsimham; Shukla, Sachet A.; Ciriello, Giovanni; Yung, WK; Zhang, Wei; Sougnez, Carrie; Mikkelsen, Tom; Aldape, Kenneth; Bigner, Darell D.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Prados, Michael; Sloan, Andrew; Black, Keith L.; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Andrews, David W.; Guha, Abhijit; Iacocca, Mary; O’Neill, Brian P.; Foltz, Greg; Myers, Jerome; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Penny, Robert; Kucherlapati, Raju; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil; Gibbs, Richard; Marra, Marco; Mills, Gordon B.; Lander, Eric; Spellman, Paul; Wilson, Richard; Sander, Chris; Weinstein, John; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey; Laird, Peter W.; Haussler, David; Getz, Gad; Chin, Lynda

    2013-01-01

    We describe the landscape of somatic genomic alterations based on multi-dimensional and comprehensive characterization of more than 500 glioblastoma tumors (GBMs). We identify several novel mutated genes as well as complex rearrangements of signature receptors including EGFR and PDGFRA. TERT promoter mutations are shown to correlate with elevated mRNA expression, supporting a role in telomerase reactivation. Correlative analyses confirm that the survival advantage of the proneural subtype is conferred by the G-CIMP phenotype, and MGMT DNA methylation may be a predictive biomarker for treatment response only in classical subtype GBM. Integrative analysis of genomic and proteomic profiles challenges the notion of therapeutic inhibition of a pathway as an alternative to inhibition of the target itself. These data will facilitate the discovery of therapeutic and diagnostic target candidates, the validation of research and clinical observations and the generation of unanticipated hypotheses that can advance our molecular understanding of this lethal cancer. PMID:24120142

  11. Links among emotional awareness, somatic awareness and autonomic homeostatic processing.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Emotional awareness and somatic interoceptive awareness are essential processes for human psychosomatic health. A typical trait of lacking emotional awareness related to psychosomatic symptoms is alexithymia. In contrast, alexisomia refers to the trait of lacking somatic awareness. Links between emotional and somatic awareness and homeostatic processing are also significant for the psychosomatic health. The purpose of the present paper is to review the links among emotional awareness, somatic interoceptive awareness and autonomic homeostatic processing. On the basis of the collected evidence, the following arguments were presented(1): (1) The main subcortical neural substrates for these processes are limbic-related systems, which are also responsible for autonomic functions for optimization of homeostatic efficiency. (2) Considerable studies have shown that autonomic activity and/or reactivity to stress correlate with both emotional and interoceptive awareness. A hypothesis was advocated about the links between the two types of awareness and autonomic function: Autonomic dysfunction, especially high sympathetic tone at baseline and/or attenuated reactivity or variability to stress, appears to be involved in disturbance of emotional and interoceptive awareness. (3) Several studies suggest that a link or a cooperative relationship exists between emotional and somatic awareness, and that somatic awareness is the more fundamental of the two types of awareness. Emotional awareness, somatic awareness and autonomic homeostatic processing generally occur in parallel or concurrently. However, some complex features of pathologies include coexistence of reduced interoceptive awareness and somatosensory amplification. The autonomic homeostatic process is fundamentally involved in emotional and somatic awareness. Investigation of these types of awareness with both neuroimaging evaluations and estimation of peripheral autonomic function are required as next steps for exploration

  12. Quantitative meta-analysis of fMRI and PET studies reveals consistent activation in fronto-striatal-parietal regions and cerebellum during antisaccades and prosaccades

    PubMed Central

    Jamadar, Sharna D.; Fielding, Joanne; Egan, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    The antisaccade task is a classic task of oculomotor control that requires participants to inhibit a saccade to a target and instead make a voluntary saccade to the mirror opposite location. By comparison, the prosaccade task requires participants to make a visually-guided saccade to the target. These tasks have been studied extensively using behavioral oculomotor, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging in both non-human primates and humans. In humans, the antisaccade task is under active investigation as a potential endophenotype or biomarker for multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders. A large and growing body of literature has used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the neural correlates of the antisaccade and prosaccade tasks. We present a quantitative meta-analysis of all published voxel-wise fMRI and PET studies (18) of the antisaccade task and show that consistent activation for antisaccades and prosaccades is obtained in a fronto-subcortical-parietal network encompassing frontal and supplementary eye fields (SEFs), thalamus, striatum, and intraparietal cortex. This network is strongly linked to oculomotor control and was activated to a greater extent for antisaccade than prosaccade trials. Antisaccade but not prosaccade trials additionally activated dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. We also found that a number of additional regions not classically linked to oculomotor control were activated to a greater extent for antisaccade vs. prosaccade trials; these regions are often reported in antisaccade studies but rarely commented upon. While the number of studies eligible to be included in this meta-analysis was small, the results of this systematic review reveal that antisaccade and prosaccade trials consistently activate a distributed network of regions both within and outside the classic definition of the oculomotor network. PMID:24137150

  13. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies. PMID:27492765

  14. Clinical study report on milk production in the offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hideki; Hamano, Seizo; Inaba, Toshio; Kawate, Noritoshi; Tamada, Hiromichi

    2013-12-17

    This study examined two female offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow that had reproduction problems and milk production performance issues. The two offspring heifers, which showed healthy appearances and normal reproductive characteristics, calved on two separate occasions. The mean milk yields of the heifers in the first lactation period were 9,037 kg and 7,228 kg. The relative mean milk yields of these cows were 111.2% and 88.9%, respectively, when compared with that of the control group. No particular clinical abnormalities were revealed in milk yields and milk composition rate [e.g., fat, protein and solids-not-fat (SNF)], and reproductive characteristics of the offspring of the somatic cell cloned Holstein cow suggested that the cloned offspring had normal milk production.

  15. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling Controls Somatic Cell Reprogramming in a Stage-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Liao, Bing; Tao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Xiao, Feng; Gu, Junjie; Gao, Shaorong; Jin, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is critical for early lineage specification of mouse embryonic stem cells and early embryos. However, its roles in somatic cell reprogramming remain unknown. Here, we report that calcineurin-NFAT signaling has a dynamic activity and plays diverse roles at different stages of reprogramming. At the early stage, calcineurin-NFAT signaling is transiently activated and its activation is required for successful reprogramming. However, at the late stage of reprogramming, activation of calcineurin-NFAT signaling becomes a barrier for reprogramming and its inactivation is critical for successful induction of pluripotency. Mechanistically, calcineurin-NFAT signaling contributes to the reprogramming through regulating multiple early events during reprogramming, including mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), cell adhesion and emergence of SSEA1(+) intermediate cells. Collectively, this study reveals for the first time the important roles of calcineurin-NFAT signaling during somatic cell reprogramming and provides new insights into the molecular regulation of reprogramming.

  16. Paternal Somatic Mosaicism of a Novel Frameshift Mutation in ELANE Causing Severe Congenital Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a bone marrow failure disease with an autosomal dominant inheritance from mutations in ELANE. Here, we report a 7-week-old Korean male with SCN. His elder sister died from pneumonia at 2 years. Direct sequencing of ELANE in the proband identified a heterozygous novel frameshift mutation: c.658delC (p.Arg220Glyfs20*). Family study involving his asymptomatic parents with normal cell counts revealed that his father had the same mutation, but at a lower burden than expected in a typical heterozygous state. Further molecular investigation demonstrated somatic mosaicism with ~18% mutant alleles. We concluded the proband inherited the mutation from his somatic mosaic father.

  17. Systematic analysis of somatic mutations impacting gene expression in 12 tumour types

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiarui; McConechy, Melissa K.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Ha, Gavin; Chun Chan, Fong; Funnell, Tyler; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Reimand, Jüri; Bashashati, Ali; Bader, Gary D.; Huntsman, David; Aparicio, Samuel; Condon, Anne; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel hierarchical Bayes statistical model, xseq, to systematically quantify the impact of somatic mutations on expression profiles. We establish the theoretical framework and robust inference characteristics of the method using computational benchmarking. We then use xseq to analyse thousands of tumour data sets available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, to systematically quantify somatic mutations impacting expression profiles. We identify 30 novel cis-effect tumour suppressor gene candidates, enriched in loss-of-function mutations and biallelic inactivation. Analysis of trans-effects of mutations and copy number alterations with xseq identifies mutations in 150 genes impacting expression networks, with 89 novel predictions. We reveal two important novel characteristics of mutation impact on expression: (1) patients harbouring known driver mutations exhibit different downstream gene expression consequences; (2) expression patterns for some mutations are stable across tumour types. These results have critical implications for identification and interpretation of mutations with consequent impact on transcription in cancer. PMID:26436532

  18. Clinical Study Report on Milk Production in the Offspring of a Somatic Cell Cloned Holstein Cow

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Masahiro; TSUCHIYA, Hideki; HAMANO, Seizo; INABA, Toshio; KAWATE, Noritoshi; TAMADA, Hiromichi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study examined two female offspring of a somatic cell cloned Holstein cow that had reproduction problems and milk production performance issues. The two offspring heifers, which showed healthy appearances and normal reproductive characteristics, calved on two separate occasions. The mean milk yields of the heifers in the first lactation period were 9,037 kg and 7,228 kg. The relative mean milk yields of these cows were 111.2% and 88.9%, respectively, when compared with that of the control group. No particular clinical abnormalities were revealed in milk yields and milk composition rate [e.g., fat, protein and solids-not-fat (SNF)], and reproductive characteristics of the offspring of the somatic cell cloned Holstein cow suggested that the cloned offspring had normal milk production. PMID:23955271

  19. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinoma: Use of Host Cell Machineries and Somatic Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) is a distinct subtype of gastric carcinoma, consisting of clonal growth of EBV-infected epithelial cells. Its unique characteristics have been demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical and pathological studies using in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNAs. An oncogenic process for EBVaGC has also been revealed. EBV uses various host-cell machineries, including cell division machinery to propagate clonal virus genomes, DNA-methylation machinery to epigenetically control infected cells, and microRNA and exosome machineries to modify the behavior and microenvironment of infected cells. Recent comprehensive molecular analyses from The Cancer Genome Atlas project demonstrate that EBVaGC is a representative molecular subtype that is distinct from microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosome unstable subtypes. In addition to having the highest level of DNA methylation in CpG islands of promoter regions, EBVaGC harbors particular gene alterations, including a high frequency of mutations in PIK3CA and ARID1A, mutation in BCOR, and amplification of PD-L1 and PD-L2. Although currently undetermined, the virus might use the altered cellular functions that are induced by these somatic mutations. Further investigation of virus-driven oncogenesis will enable hitherto unknown functions of stomach epithelial cell machineries to be elucidated, which may reveal potential therapeutic targets for EBVaGC. PMID:26337667

  20. Analysis of protein coding mutations in hiPSCs and their possible role during somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Gore, Athurva; Li, Zhe; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Montserrat, Nuria; Fung, Ho-Lim; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Bilic, Josipa; Batchelder, Erika M.; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R.; Zhang, Kun; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) contain genomic structural variations and point mutations in coding regions. However, these studies have focused on fibroblast-derived hiPSCs, and it is currently unknown whether the use of alternative somatic cell sources with varying reprogramming efficiencies would result in different levels of genetic alterations. Here we characterize the genomic integrity of eight hiPSC lines derived from five different non-fibroblast somatic cell types. We show that protein-coding mutations are a general feature of the hiPSC state and are independent of somatic cell source. Furthermore, we analyze a total of 17 point mutations found in hiPSCs and demonstrate that they do not generally facilitate the acquisition of pluripotency and thus are not likely to provide a selective advantage for reprogramming. PMID:23340422

  1. Somatic Embryogenesis of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Through Cell Suspension Culture.

    PubMed

    Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2016-01-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the oldest and most economically important plant species distributed in the hot arid regions of the world. Propagation of date palm by seeds produces heterogeneous offspring with inferior field performance and poor fruit quality. Traditionally, date palm is propagated by offshoots, but this method is inefficient for mass propagation because of limited availability of offshoots. Plant regeneration through tissue culture is able to provide technologies for the large-scale propagation of healthy true-to-type plants. The most commonly used technology approach is somatic embryogenesis which presents a great potential for the rapid propagation and genetic resource preservation of this species. Significant progress has been made in the development and optimization of this regeneration pathway through the establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures. This chapter focuses on the methods employed for the induction of callus from shoot tip explants, establishment of cell suspension culture, and subsequent somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration. PMID:27108330

  2. Peer emotion socialization and somatic complaints in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Parr, Naomi J; Zeman, Janice; Braunstein, Kara; Price, Natalee

    2016-07-01

    Somatic symptoms tend to increase during early adolescence and although youth's social environments and emotional functioning play a role in somatic symptoms, few studies have examined mechanisms through which social interaction could influence youth's somatic wellbeing. Participants were 132 youth (61.6% girls, Mage = 12.61 years, 84.7% Caucasian) and their mothers. Reciprocated best-friend dyads participated in a video-taped problem discussion task to assess peer emotion socialization responses. Two supportive friend responses (i.e., emotion-focused, problem-focused) and two unsupportive responses (i.e., punitive, neglect) were examined. Mothers reported on their child's somatic complaints. Friends who provided emotion-focused, problem-focused, punitive, and neglect responses to their close friend's emotional disclosures had significantly fewer somatic symptoms. However, youth who received punitive responses to their emotional disclosures from their close friends had more somatic complaints. These findings provide initial evidence of a link between emotion socialization responses within close friendships and somatic complaints in early adolescence. PMID:27176784

  3. Empirical Testing of an Algorithm for Defining Somatization in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eisman, Howard D.; Fogel, Joshua; Lazarovich, Regina; Pustilnik, Inna

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A previous article proposed an algorithm for defining somatization in children by classifying them into three categories: well, medically ill, and somatizer; the authors suggested further empirical validation of the algorithm (Postilnik et al., 2006). We use the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to provide this empirical validation. Method Parents of children seen in pediatric clinics completed the CBCL (n=126). The physicians of these children completed specially-designed questionnaires. The sample comprised of 62 boys and 64 girls (age range 2 to 15 years). Classification categories included: well (n=53), medically ill (n=55), and somatizer (n=18). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical comparisons. Discriminant function analysis was conducted with the CBCL subscales. Results There were significant differences between the classification categories for the somatic complaints (p=<0.001), social problems (p=0.004), thought problems (p=0.01), attention problems (0.006), and internalizing (p=0.003) subscales and also total (p=0.001), and total-t (p=0.001) scales of the CBCL. Discriminant function analysis showed that 78% of somatizers and 66% of well were accurately classified, while only 35% of medically ill were accurately classified. Conclusion The somatization classification algorithm proposed by Postilnik et al. (2006) shows promise for classification of children and adolescents with somatic symptoms. PMID:18421368

  4. Advances in Conifer Somatic Embryogenesis Since Year 2000.

    PubMed

    Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Hargreaves, Catherine; Lelu-Walter, Marie-Anne; Trontin, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    This review compiles research results published over the last 14 years on conifer somatic embryogenesis (SE). Emphasis is placed on the newest findings that affect the response of seed embryos (typical explants) and shoot primordia (rare explants) to the induction of SE and long-term culture of early somatic embryos. Much research in recent years has focused on maturation of somatic embryos, with respect to both yield and quality, as an important stage for the production of a large number of vigorous somatic seedlings. Attempts to scale up somatic embryo production numbers and handling have resulted in a few bioreactor designs, the utility of which may prove beneficial for an industrial application. A few simplified cryopreservation methods for embryonal masses (EM) were developed as a means to ensure cost-efficient long-term storage of genotypes during clonal field testing. Finally, recent long-term studies on the growth of somatic trees in the field, including seed production yield and comparison of seed parameters produced by somatic versus seed-derived trees, are described.

  5. Somatic mutations in disorders with disrupted brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mutations occur during cell division in all somatic lineages. Because neurogenesis persists throughout human life, somatic mutations in the brain arise during development and accumulate with the aging process. The human brain consists of 100 billion neurons that form an extraordinarily intricate network of connections to achieve higher level cognitive functions. Due to this network architecture, perturbed neuronal functions are rarely restricted to a focal area; instead, they are often spread via the neuronal network to affect other connected areas. Although somatic diversity is an evident feature of the brain, the extent to which somatic mutations affect the neuronal structure and function and their contribution to neurological disorders associated with disrupted brain connectivity remain largely unexplored. Notably, recent reports indicate that brain somatic mutations can indeed play a critical role that leads to the structural and functional abnormalities of the brain observed in several neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, I review the extent and significance of brain somatic mutations and provide my perspective regarding these mutations as potential molecular lesions underlying relatively common conditions with disrupted brain connectivity. Moreover, I discuss emerging technical platforms that will facilitate the detection of low-frequency somatic mutations and validate the biological functions of the identified mutations in the context of brain connectivity. PMID:27282107

  6. Somatic embryogenesis for efficient micropropagation of guava (Psidium guajava L.).

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) is well known for edible fruit, environment friendly pharmaceutical and commercial products for both national and international market. The conventional propagation and in vitro organogenesis do not meet the demand for the good quality planting materials. Somatic embryogenesis for efficient micropropagation of guava (P. guajava L.) has been developed to fill up the gap. Somatic embryogenesis and plantlets regeneration are achieved from 10-week post-anthesis zygotic embryo explants by 8-day inductive treatment with different concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) on MS agar medium containing 5% sucrose. Subsequent development and maturation of somatic embryos occur after 8 days on MS basal medium supplemented with 5% sucrose without plant growth regulator. The process of somatic embryogenesis shows the highest relative efficiency in 8-day treatment of zygotic embryo explants with 1.0 mg L(-1) 2,4-D. High efficiency germination of somatic embryos and plantlet regeneration takes place on half strength semisolid MS medium amended with 3% sucrose within 2 weeks of subculture. Somatic plantlets are grown for additional 2 weeks by subculturing in MS liquid growth medium containing 3% sucrose. Well-grown plantlets from liquid medium have survived very well following 2-4 week hardening process. The protocol of somatic embryogenesis is optimized for high efficiency micropropagation of guava species.

  7. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs.

  8. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs. PMID:26619874

  9. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  10. Somatic hypermutations and isotype restricted exceptionally long CDR3H contribute to antibody diversification in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Azad K; Kehrli, Marcus E; Kurtz, A; Ng, S; Koti, M; Shojaei, F; Saini, Surinder S

    2009-01-15

    Antibody diversification in IgM and IgG antibodies was analyzed in an 18-month old bovine (Bos taurus) suffering from naturally occurring chronic and recurrent infections due to bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). The BLAD, involving impaired leukocyte beta2 integrin expression on leukocytes, develops due to a single point mutation in conserved region of the CD18 gene resulting in substitution of aspartic acid128 with glycine (D128G). Twenty four VDJCmu and 25 VDJCgamma recombinations from randomly constructed cDNA libraries, originating from peripheral blood lymphocytes, were examined for the variable-region structural characteristics in IgM and IgG antibody isotypes. These analyses led to conclude that: (a) expression of exceptionally long CDR3H is isotype restricted to cattle IgM antibody; (b) VDJ recombinations encoding IgM with exceptionally long CDR3H undergo clonal selection and affinity maturation via somatic mutations similar to conventional antibodies; (c) somatic mutations contribute significantly to both IgM and IgG antibody diversification but significant differences exist in the patterns of 'hot spot' in the FR1, FR3 and CDR1H and, also, position-dependant amino acid diversity; and (d) transition nucleotide substitutions predominate over transversions in both VDJCmu and VDJCgamma recombinations consistent with the evolutionary conservation of somatic mutation machinery. Overall, these studies suggest that both somatic mutations and exceptional CDR3H size generation contribute to IgM and IgG antibody diversification in cattle during the development of immune response to naturally occurring chronic and multiple microbial infections. PMID:19012969

  11. Chronic lead and brain development: intraocular brain grafts as a method to reveal regional and temporal effects in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerklund, H.; Olson, L.; Seiger, A.; Hoffer, B.

    1980-06-01

    A model is presented for selective studies of regional and temporal effects of chronic lead exposure on brain development, based on intraocular brain tissue grafting. Adult rat recipients were given lead acetate (1 to 2%) in their drinking water. Controls received sodium acetate in the drinking water or tap water. One week later, developing brain tissues obtained prenatally from different regions of the central nervous system were homologously grafted to the anterior chamber of the eye. Survival, vascularization, and growth were followed in oculo by repeated measurements of graft size. Growth curves were thus obtained for grafts from isolated selected brain areas, grafted at different stages of development to recipients on different concentrations of lead. Lead treatment (1%) caused a significant and pronounced delay of growth of the substantia nigra area during the second and third week postgrafting, approximately corresponding to the first 2 weeks after birth. Grafts of the hippocampal formation showed a slight impairment of growth following lead treatment while there were no detectable effects on size of cerebellar grafts. Grafts of the developing parietal cerebral cortex were inhibited in their growth in host animals given 2% lead while there was a small but significant increase in size following 1% lead. These results demonstrate the applicability of the grafting technique for studies of chronic low level lead intoxication. The method has revealed highly significant effects of lead on growth of certain selected brain areas and will be used for further histological, biochemical, and electrophysiological analysis of chronic lead effects on development of defined brain areas.

  12. High regional genetic diversity and lack of host-specificity in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) as revealed by mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Piwczyński, M; Pabijan, M; Grzywacz, A; Glinkowski, W; Bereś, P K; Buszko, J

    2016-08-01

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) infests a wide array of host plants and is considered one of the most serious pests of maize in Europe. Recent studies suggest that individuals feeding on maize in Europe should be referred to O. nubilalis (sensu nov.), while those infesting dicots as Ostrinia scapulalis (sensu nov.). We test if the clear genetic distinctiveness among individuals of O. nubilalis living on maize vs. dicots is tracked by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used fragments of COI and COII genes of 32 individuals traditionally recognized as O. nubilalis collected on three host plants, maize, mugwort and hop, growing in different parts of Poland. In addition, we reconstructed the mtDNA phylogeny of Ostrinia species based on our data and sequences retrieved from GenBank to assess host and/or biogeographic patterns. We also compared haplotype variation found in Poland (east-central Europe) with other regions (Anatolia, Eastern Europe, Balkans, Far East, North America). Our study showed high mtDNA diversity of O. nubilalis in Poland in comparison with other regions and revealed rare haplotypes likely of Asian origin. We did not find distinct mtDNA haplotypes in larvae feeding on maize vs. dicotyledonous plants. Phylogenetic analyses showed an apparent lack of mtDNA divergence among putatively distinct lineages belonging to the O. nubilalis group as identical haplotypes are shared by Asian and European individuals. We argue that human-mediated dispersal, hybridization and sporadic host jumps are likely responsible for the lack of a geographic pattern in mtDNA variation. PMID:27019346

  13. FISH-Based Analysis of Clonally Derived CHO Cell Populations Reveals High Probability for Transgene Integration in a Terminal Region of Chromosome 1 (1q13)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwei; Gao, Xiaoping; Peng, Rui; Zhang, Sheng; Fu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A basic goal in the development of recombinant proteins is the generation of cell lines that express the desired protein stably over many generations. Here, we constructed engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO-S) with a pCHO-hVR1 vector that carried an extracellular domain of a VEGF receptor (VR) fusion gene. Forty-five clones with high hVR1 expression were selected for karyotype analysis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and G-banding, we found that pCHO-hVR1 was integrated into three chromosomes, including chromosomes 1, Z3 and Z4. Four clones were selected to evaluate their productivity under non-fed, non-optimized shake flask conditions. The results showed that clones 1 and 2 with integration sites on chromosome 1 revealed high levels of hVR1 products (shake flask of approximately 800 mg/L), whereas clones 3 and 4 with integration sites on chromosomes Z3 or Z4 had lower levels of hVR1 products. Furthermore, clones 1 and 2 maintained their productivity stabilities over a continuous period of 80 generations, and clones 3 and 4 showed significant declines in their productivities in the presence of selection pressure. Finally, pCHO-hVR1 localized to the same region at chromosome 1q13, the telomere region of normal chromosome 1. In this study, these results demonstrate that the integration of exogenous hVR1 gene on chromosome 1, band q13, may create a high protein-producing CHO-S cell line, suggesting that chromosome 1q13 may contain a useful target site for the high expression of exogenous protein. This study shows that the integration into the target site of chromosome 1q13 may avoid the problems of random integration that cause gene silencing or also overcome position effects, facilitating exogenous gene expression in CHO-S cells. PMID:27684722

  14. Somatic Embryogenesis in Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) Kuntze (Araucariaceae).

    PubMed

    Guerra, Miguel P; Steiner, Neusa; Farias-Soares, Francine L; Vieira, Leila do N; Fraga, Hugo P F; Rogge-Renner, Gladys D; Maldonado, Sara B

    2016-01-01

    This chapter deals with the features of somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Araucaria angustifolia, an endangered and native conifer from south Brazil. In this species SE includes the induction and proliferation of embryogenic cultures composed of pro-embryogenic masses (PEMs), which precede somatic embryos development. A. angustifolia SE model encompasses induction, proliferation, pre-maturation, and maturation steps. Double-staining with acetocarmine and Evan's blue is useful to evaluate the embryonic somatic structures. In this chapter we describe A. angustifolia SE protocols and analyzes morphological features in the different SE developmental stages.

  15. Nature of the boundary between open and closed magnetic field line regions at the Sun revealed by composition data and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, Arik; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Fisk, Lennard A.; Gloeckler, George; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2001-08-01

    Recently, Fisk et al. [1999] have presented a theory that describes a number of features of the large-scale coronal and heliospheric magnetic field. This theory predicts large-scale transport of magnetic flux across the boundaries of the polar coronal holes, which leads to reconnection processes of open field lines with preliminary closed magnetic structures. Reconnection processes reveal themselves in solar wind composition data: Plasma released out of previously closed magnetic field structures exhibits hotter charge state distributions and has a tendency to be enriched by elements with low first ionization potentials. The idea of reconnection at the boundaries of coronal holes is not new. For example, Wang and Sheeley [1993] and Luhmann et al. [1999] found evidence for that mechanism by comparison of observations of the rotation and evolution of coronal holes with potential field models of the solar corona. We use Ulysses Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer composition measurements and sophisticated numerical models [Linker et al., 1999; Riley et al., 1999] to accurately map these observations back to the solar surface. We then constrain the thickness of the stream interface at the Sun and compare the location of the source region with SOHO observations of the low corona. The results are discussed in the context of the global structure of the heliospheric magnetic field.

  16. Infrared Laser Spectroscopy of the n-PROPYL and i-PROPYL Radicals in Helium Droplets: Significant Bend-Stretch Coupling Revealed in the CH Stretch Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E.; Tabor, Daniel P.; Sibert, Edwin

    2016-06-01

    The n-propyl and i-propyl radicals were generated in the gas phase via pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrite (CH3(CH2)3ONO) and i-butyl nitrite (CH3CH(CH3)CH2ONO) precursors, respectively. Nascent radicals were promptly solvated by a beam of He nanodroplets, and the infrared spectra of the radicals were recorded in the C-H stretching region. In addition to three vibrations of n-propyl previously measured in an Ar matrix, we observe many unreported bands between 2800 and 3150 wn, which we attribute to propyl radicals. The C-H stretching modes observed above 2960 wn for both radicals are in excellent agreement with anharmonic frequencies computed using VPT2. Between 2800 and 2960 wn, however, the spectra of n-propyl and i-propyl radicals become quite congested and difficult to assign due to the presence of multiple anharmonic resonances. Computations employing a local mode Hamiltonian reveal the origin of the spectral congestion to be strong coupling between the high frequency C-H stretching modes and the lower frequency bending/scissoring motions. The only significant local coupling is between stretches and bends on the same CH2/CH3 group.

  17. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-10-05

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those exhibit significant differences in many traits, particularly yield components. The BnaZNF2 genetic map exhibited perfect collinearity with the physical map of B. napus, indicating its high quality. Comparative mapping revealed several genomic rearrangements between B. napus and B. rapa or B. oleracea. A total of eight and 16 QTLs were identified for pod number and seed number per pod, respectively, and of which three and five QTLs are identical to previously identified ones, whereas the other five and 11 are novel. Two new major QTL respectively for pod number and seed number per pod, qPN.A06-1 and qSN.A06-1 (R(2 )= 22.8% and 32.1%), were colocalised with opposite effects, and only qPN.A06-1 was confirmed and narrowed by regional association analysis to 180 kb including only 33 annotated genes. Conditional QTL analysis and subsequent NILs test indicated that tight linkage, rather than pleiotropy, was the genetic causation of their colocalisation. Our study demonstrates potential of this reference genetic population/map for precise QTL mapping and as a base for positional gene cloning in rapeseed.

  18. Biophysical Studies on BEX3, the p75NTR-Associated Cell Death Executor, Reveal a High-Order Oligomer with Partially Folded Regions.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Katia M S; Raymundo, Diana P; Silva, Viviane S; Sampaio, Laura A G; Johanson, Laizes; Hill, Luis Fernando; Almeida, Fabio C L; Cordeiro, Yraima; Almeida, Marcius S

    2015-01-01

    BEX3 (Brain Expressed X-linked protein 3) is a member of a mammal-specific placental protein family. Several studies have found the BEX proteins to be associated with neurodegeneration, the cell cycle and cancer. BEX3 has been predicted to be intrinsically disordered and also to represent an intracellular hub for cell signaling. The pro-apoptotic activity of BEX3 in association with a number of additional proteins has been widely supported; however, to the best of our knowledge, very limited data are available on the conformation of any of the members of the BEX family. In this study, we structurally characterized BEX3 using biophysical experimental data. Small angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that BEX3 forms a specific higher-order oligomer that is consistent with a globular molecule. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance, partial proteinase K digestion, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and fluorescence techniques that were performed on the recombinant protein indicated that the structure of BEX3 is composed of approximately 31% α-helix and 20% β-strand, contains partially folded regions near the N- and C-termini, and a core which is proteolysis-resistant around residues 55-120. The self-oligomerization of BEX3 has been previously reported in cell culture and is consistent with our in vitro data.

  19. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those exhibit significant differences in many traits, particularly yield components. The BnaZNF2 genetic map exhibited perfect collinearity with the physical map of B. napus, indicating its high quality. Comparative mapping revealed several genomic rearrangements between B. napus and B. rapa or B. oleracea. A total of eight and 16 QTLs were identified for pod number and seed number per pod, respectively, and of which three and five QTLs are identical to previously identified ones, whereas the other five and 11 are novel. Two new major QTL respectively for pod number and seed number per pod, qPN.A06-1 and qSN.A06-1 (R(2 )= 22.8% and 32.1%), were colocalised with opposite effects, and only qPN.A06-1 was confirmed and narrowed by regional association analysis to 180 kb including only 33 annotated genes. Conditional QTL analysis and subsequent NILs test indicated that tight linkage, rather than pleiotropy, was the genetic causation of their colocalisation. Our study demonstrates potential of this reference genetic population/map for precise QTL mapping and as a base for positional gene cloning in rapeseed. PMID:26434411

  20. Linkage and regional association analysis reveal two new tightly-linked major-QTLs for pod number and seed number per pod in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yang, Yuhua; Ye, Jiang; Huang, Shunmou; Li, Ruiyuan; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the pseudochromosomes assembly and gene cloning in rapeseed, we developed a reference genetic population/map (named BnaZNF2) from two sequenced cultivars, Zhongshuang11 and No.73290, those