Science.gov

Sample records for regional radiocarbon disparities

  1. Radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Willard Libby's invention of the radiocarbon dating method revolutionized the fields of archeology and Quaternary geology because it brought into being a means to correlate events that occurred during the past 3.5×104 years on a planet-wide scale (Libby et al., 1949). This contribution was recognized with the award of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. In addition, radiocarbon measurements have been a boon to the quantification of many processes taking place in the environment, to name a few: the rate of "ventilation" of the deep ocean, the turnover time of humus in soils, the rate of growth of cave deposits, the source of carbon-bearing atmospheric particulates, the rates of gas exchange between the atmosphere and water bodies, the replacement time of carbon atoms in human tissue, and depths of bioturbation in marine sediment. Some of these applications have been greatly aided by the creation of excess 14C atoms as the result of nuclear tests conducted in the atmosphere. Since the 1960s, this so-called bomb radiocarbon has made its way into all of the Earth's active carbon reservoirs. To date, tens of thousands of radiocarbon measurements have been made in laboratories throughout the world.

  2. Child poverty and regional disparities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eryurt, Mehmet Ali; Koç, Ismet

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) defines child poverty as the inability of the child to realize their existing potential due to their inability to access resources across different dimensions of life (income, health, nutrition, education, environment, etc.). On the basis of this definition, an attempt has been made in this study to put forth the disadvantaged positions children have in different dimensions of their lives, specifically by taking regional disparities into account. As the data source, the Turkey Demographic and Health Survey 2008 is used, a survey that consists of detailed information about the different dimensions of child poverty. In this study, in order to measure poverty in four different dimensions (education and work, health and nutrition, family environment, and domestic environment), a total of 25 variables were used and descriptive and multivariate analyses were made in order to highlight the regional disparities in child poverty. Principle components analysis conducted through the use of a deficit approach reveals that the variables closely related with education and health and nutrition were the critical dimensions behind child poverty in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that 22.4% of children in Turkey are poor when various dimensions of life are taken into account; the region with the highest child poverty is Central East Anatolia, at 34.9%, while the region with the lowest rate is East Marmara, at 15.6%.

  3. Regional Disparities in Educational Development: A Controversial Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carron, Gabriel, Ed.; Chau, Ta Ngoc, Ed.

    To complement a volume of case studies, these four papers and an introduction discuss the problem of regional disparities in educational development from several different perspectives. Varying points of view are presented on the relationship between regional educational disparities and socioeconomic, political, and cultural development; the…

  4. Investigating the influence of regional climate and oceanography on marine radiocarbon reservoir ages in southwest New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Jessica L.; Moy, Christopher M.; Prior, Christine A.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Wilson, Gary S.

    2015-12-01

    The New Zealand fjords are located at a latitude where distinct oceanic and atmospheric fronts separate carbon reservoirs of varying residence time. The marine radiocarbon reservoir age in this region is likely to deviate from the global average reservoir age over space and time as frontal boundaries migrate north and south. Here we present new estimates of modern radiocarbon reservoir age using the radiocarbon content of bivalve shells collected live before 1950. Multiple measurements from hydrographically distinct sites support the use of a ΔR, defined as the regional offset between measured and modeled marine radiocarbon reservoir age, of 59 ± 35 years for the New Zealand fjords. We also assess the radiocarbon content of bulk surface sediments throughout the fjord region. Sediment with a higher proportion of marine organic carbon has relatively less radiocarbon than more terrestrial sediment, suggesting a short residence time of organic carbon on land before deposition in the fjords. Additionally, we constrain reservoir age variability throughout the Holocene using coeval terrestrial and marine macrofossils. Although our modern results suggest spatial consistency in ΔR throughout the fjords, large deviations from the global average marine radiocarbon reservoir age exist in the paleo record. We find four ancient ΔR values, extending back to ˜10.2 cal kyr BP, to be negative or near zero. A likely cause of younger radiocarbon reservoir ages at select intervals throughout the Holocene is the increased influence of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds, which cause extreme precipitation in the region that delivers terrestrial carbon, enriched in radiocarbon, to fjord basins. However, bivalve depth habitat may also influence radiocarbon content due to a stratified water column containing distinct carbon pools. This work highlights the need for thorough assessment of local radiocarbon cycling in similar regions of dynamic ocean/atmosphere frontal zones

  5. Economic Disparities and Life Satisfaction in European Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittau, M. Grazia; Zelli, Roberto; Gelman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of economic variables in predicting regional disparities in reported life satisfaction of European Union (EU) citizens. European subnational units (regions) are defined according to the first-level EU nomenclature of territorial units. We use multilevel modeling to explicitly account for the hierarchical nature of…

  6. Epidemiology, trends, and disparities in regional anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cozowicz, C; Poeran, J; Memtsoudis, S G

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have linked the use of regional anaesthesia to improved outcomes. Epidemiological research on utilization, trends, and disparities in this field is sparse; however, large nationally representative database constructs containing anaesthesia-related data, demographic information, and multiyear files are now available. Together with advances in research methodology and technology, these databases provide the foundation for epidemiological research in anaesthesia. We present an overview of selected studies that provide epidemiological data and describe current anaesthetic practice, trends, and disparities in orthopaedic surgery in particular. This literature suggests that that even among orthopaedic surgical procedures, which are highly amenable to regional anaesthetic techniques, neuraxial anaesthetics and peripheral nerve blocks are used in only a minority of procedures. Trend analyses show that peripheral nerve blocks are gaining in popularity, whereas use of neuraxial anaesthetics is remaining relatively unchanged or even declining over time. Finally, significant disparities and variability in anaesthetic care seem to exist based on demographic and health-care-related factors. With anaesthesia playing an increasingly important part in population-based health-care delivery and evidence indicating improved outcome with use of regional anaesthesia, more research in this area is needed. Furthermore, prevalent disparities and variabilities in anaesthesia practice need to be specified further and addressed in the future.

  7. Radiocarbon-based impact assessment of open biomass burning on regional carbonaceous aerosols in North China.

    PubMed

    Zong, Zheng; Chen, Yingjun; Tian, Chongguo; Fang, Yin; Wang, Xiaoping; Huang, Guopei; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2015-06-15

    Samples of total suspended particulates (TSPs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were collected from 29th May to 1st July, 2013 at a regional background site in Bohai Rim, North China. Mass concentrations of particulate matter and carbonaceous species showed a total of 50% and 97% of the measured TSP and PM2.5 levels exceeded the first grade national standard of China, respectively. Daily concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were detected 7.3 and 2.5 μg m(-3) in TSP and 5.2 and 2.0 μg m(-3) in PM2.5, which accounted 5.8% and 2.0% of TSP while 5.6% and 2.2% for PM2.5, respectively. The concentrations of OC, EC, TSP and PM2.5 were observed higher in the day time than those in the night time. The observations were associated with the emission variations from anthropogenic activities. Two merged samples representing from south and north source areas were selected for radiocarbon analysis. The radiocarbon measurements showed 74% of water-insoluble OC (WINSOC) and 59% of EC in PM2.5 derived from biomass burning and biogenic sources when the air masses were from south region, and 63% and 48% for the air masses from north, respectively. Combined with backward trajectories and daily burned area, open burning of agricultural wastes was found to be predominating, which was confirmed by the potential source contribution function (PSCF).

  8. Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  9. Simulation of bombe radiocarbon transient in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Mouchet, Anne; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Houma-Bachari, Fouzia; Louanchi, Ferial; jean-baptiste, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The radiocarbon isotope of carbon "14C", which a half-life of 5730 years, is continually formed naturally in the atmosphere by the neutron bombardment of 14N atoms. However, in the 1950s and early1960s, the atmospheric testing of thermonuclear weapons added a large amount of 14C into the atmosphere. The gradual infusion and spread of this "bomb" 14C through the oceans has provided a unique opportunity to gain insight into the specific rates characterizing the carbon cycle and ocean ventilations on such timescales. This numerical study provides, for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, a simulation of the anthropogenic 14C invasion covers a 70-years period spanning the entire 14C generated by the bomb test, by using a high resolution regional model NEMO-MED12 (1/12° of horizontal resolution). This distribution and evolution of Δ14C of model is compared with recent high resolution 14C measurements obtained from surface water corals (Tisnérat-Laborde et al, 2013). In addition to providing constraints on the air-sea transfer of 14C, our work provides information on the thermohaline circulation and the ventilation of the deep waters to constrain the degree to which the NEMO-MED12 can reproduce correctly the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation and its variations estimated from corals 14C time series measurements. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of fossil mollusk shells in the Yucca Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R.; Quade, J.

    1995-12-01

    Fossil mollusk shells from late Quaternary deposits in Southern Nevada were radiocarbon dated to determine the age of paleogroundwater discharge events and to establish minimum {sup 14}C ages of paleogroundwater. Shells of the terrestrial taxa Vallonia sp. and Succineidae returned {sup 14}C dates consistent with those on organic material in the same stratigraphic position. The aquatic taxa Gyraulus parvus and Gyraulus circumstratus returned the oldest dates within each unit samples. These results show that (1) fossil Vallonia and Succineidae are useful in dating deposits in which no other radiocarbon-datable material is available, and (2) Gyraulus sp. select micro habitats with the most {sup 14}C deficient water, providing minimum ages of groundwater in the area during the last glacial period.

  11. Map showing locations of samples dated by radiocarbon methods in the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Robert H.

    1971-01-01

    The potential value of a radiocarbon date is diminished, however, if adequate site data are not taken with the sample and do not accompany the date in publication.  At a minimum, published dates should include an accurate location for the dated sample, type of material dated and method of dating, nature of the site, depth below surface (or other accurately defined datum) of date sample, stratigraphy of material overlying date sample, and the significance of the data in the study.

  12. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed.

  13. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed. PMID:27573138

  14. Long-term regional precipitation disparity in northwestern China and its driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. F.; Pei, Q.; Zhang, D. D.; Choi, K. P. K.

    2014-08-01

    Subject to the unique physical setting of northwestern China (NW China), precipitation in the region is characterized by salient regional differences. Yet, the long-term regional precipitation disparity in NW China still remains insufficiently-explored. In the present study, we base on historical documentation to reconstruct the precipitation indices of two macro regions in NW China between AD580-1979 to address the following issues: (1) determine the multi-decadal to centennial regional precipitation disparity in NW China, a topic which has not been systematically examined in previous paleo-climate/paleo-environment studies; and (2) find the major driving forces behind it. Wavelet analysis, which is ideal for analyzing non-stationary systems, is applied. Our results show that there is significant regional discrepancy of precipitation change in NW China over extended period. Although there is significant association between the regional precipitation disparity in NW China and various modes of atmospheric circulation, the association is characterized by a regime shift during the transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age. Most importantly, the low-frequency cycle of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation is found to be the most prominent pacemaker of regional precipitation disparity in NW China at the multi-decadal to centennial timescales. Our findings help to demonstrate which atmospheric circulation is primarily responsible for the long-term regional precipitation disparity in NW China, which may have important implications for water resource management in NW China in the near future.

  15. Disparities in child health in the Arab region during the 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Marwan; Dawns, Jesse; Meyerson-Knox, Sonya; Yamout, Rouham

    2008-01-01

    Background While Arab countries showed an impressive decline in child mortality rates during the past few decades, gaps in mortality by gender and socioeconomic status persisted. However, large socioeconomic disparities in child health were evident in almost every country in the region. Methods Using available tabulations and reliable micro data from national household surveys, data for 18 Arab countries were available for analysis. In addition to infant and child mortality, child health was measured by nutritional status, vaccination, and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI). Within-country disparities in child health by gender, residence (urban/rural) and maternal educational level were described. Child health was also analyzed by macro measures of development, including per capita GDP (PPP), female literacy rates, urban population and doctors per 100,000 people. Results Gender disparities in child health using the above indicators were less evident, with most showing clear female advantage. With the exception of infant and child survival, gender disparities demonstrated a female advantage, as well as a large urban advantage and an overall advantage for mothers with secondary education. Surprisingly, the countries' rankings with respect to disparities were not associated with various macro measures of development. Conclusion The tenacity of pervasive intra-country socioeconomic disparities in child health calls for attention by policy makers and health practitioners. PMID:19021903

  16. Regional Disparities and Public Policy in Tunisian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marie T.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how Tunisia's national educational program is implemented unevenly in different regions with resulting disadvantages for rural populations, especially rural girls and women. Specifies ways the politics and public policy appear to influence regional differences in educational outcomes. Examines educational, economic, and political…

  17. Assessing needs and assets for building a regional network infrastructure to reduce cancer related health disparities.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kristen J; Lima, Diana S; Meade, Cathy D; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Scarinci, Isabel; McGuire, Allison; Gwede, Clement K; Pledger, W Jack; Partridge, Edward; Lipscomb, Joseph; Matthews, Roland; Matta, Jaime; Flores, Idhaliz; Weiner, Roy; Turner, Timothy; Miele, Lucio; Wiese, Thomas E; Fouad, Mona; Moreno, Carlos S; Lacey, Michelle; Christie, Debra W; Price-Haywood, Eboni G; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Coppola, Domenico; Sodeke, Stephen O; Green, B Lee; Lichtveld, Maureen Y

    2014-06-01

    Significant cancer health disparities exist in the United States and Puerto Rico. While numerous initiatives have been implemented to reduce cancer disparities, regional coordination of these efforts between institutions is often limited. To address cancer health disparities nation-wide, a series of regional transdisciplinary networks through the Geographic Management Program (GMaP) and the Minority Biospecimen/Biobanking Geographic Management Program (BMaP) were established in six regions across the country. This paper describes the development of the Region 3 GMaP/BMaP network composed of over 100 investigators from nine institutions in five Southeastern states and Puerto Rico to develop a state-of-the-art network for cancer health disparities research and training. We describe a series of partnership activities that led to the formation of the infrastructure for this network, recount the participatory processes utilized to develop and implement a needs and assets assessment and implementation plan, and describe our approach to data collection. Completion, by all nine institutions, of the needs and assets assessment resulted in several beneficial outcomes for Region 3 GMaP/BMaP. This network entails ongoing commitment from the institutions and institutional leaders, continuous participatory and engagement activities, and effective coordination and communication centered on team science goals.

  18. Regional patterns of radiocarbon and fossil fuel-derived CO2 in surface air across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Diana Y.; Krakauer, Nir Y.; Randerson, James T.; Xu, Xiaomei; Trumbore, Susan E.; Southon, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Radiocarbon levels in annual plants provide a means to map out regional and continental-scale fossil fuel plumes in surface air. We collected corn (Zea mays) across North America during the summer of 2004. Plants from mountain regions of western North America showed the smallest influence of fossil fuel-derived CO2 with a mean Δ14C of 66.3‰ +/-1.7‰. Plants from eastern North America and from the Ohio-Maryland region showed a larger fossil fuel influence with a mean Δ14C of 58.8‰ +/- 3.9‰ and 55.2‰ +/- 2.3‰, respectively, corresponding to 2.7 ppm +/- 1.5 ppm and 4.3 ppm +/- 1.0 ppm of added fossil fuel CO2 relative to the mountain west. A model-data comparison suggests that surveys of annual plant Δ14C can provide a useful test of atmospheric mixing in transport models that are used to estimate the spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks.

  19. Regional disparities in prenatal care services in rural China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Shen, Jay J; Chen, Gang; Moseley, Charles B; Sun, Mei; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ying; Mao, Yuming; Hao, Mo

    2011-09-01

    The study compared the prenatal care programs in the Central-East, Northwest, and Southwest regions of China. Data were collected on 14 indicators of the quality of the prenatal care process, as well as the percentage of women with high-risk pregnancies who were screened. The average number of prenatal examinations for those women who received prenatal care was 5.01, and 62.6% of pregnant women had their first examination within 12 weeks of their pregnancy. About 35% of these pregnant women had at least 1 high-risk screening, and 20.8% had 3 high-risk screenings. Among the 3 regions, the Central-East region had the best overall quality prenatal services, and the Northwest area had the poorest quality. The quality of prenatal health care in poor, rural China is in need of improvement.

  20. Regional Disparities in Primary School Participation in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    Education for All has focused international attention on the goals of universal primary education and improved education quality. However, national indicators related to these goals often mask significant differences among demographic and social groups, as well as among geographical regions within countries. This paper, based on a study…

  1. Radiocarbon Dating the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, M. A.; Gajewski, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Anthropocene has no agreed start date since current suggestions for its beginning range from Pre-Industrial times to the Industrial Revolution, and from the mid-twentieth century to the future. To set the boundary of the Anthropocene in geological time, we must first understand when, how and to what extent humans began altering the Earth system. One aspect of this involves reconstructing the effects of prehistoric human activity on the physical landscape. However, for global reconstructions of land use and land cover change to be more accurately interpreted in the context of human interaction with the landscape, large-scale spatio-temporal demographic changes in prehistoric populations must be known. Estimates of the relative number of prehistoric humans in different regions of the world and at different moments in time are needed. To this end, we analyze a dataset of radiocarbon dates from the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), the Palaeolithic Database of Europe and the AustArch Database of Australia, as well as published dates from South America. This is the first time such a large quantity of dates (approximately 60,000) has been mapped and studied at a global scale. Initial results from the analysis of temporal frequency distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates, assumed to be proportional to population density, will be discussed. The utility of radiocarbon dates in studies of the Anthropocene will be evaluated and potential links between population density and changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, climate, migration patterning and fire frequency coincidence will be considered.

  2. A revisit to prevailing care and challenges of managing diabetes in India: Focus on regional disparities

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Pathak, Ankit; Kalra, Sanjay; Das, Ashok K.; Zargar, Abdul H.; Bajaj, Sarita; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Sahay, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    An unprecedented rise in diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence in India is the outcome of lifestyle changes in the background of genetic predisposition. Moreover, there are substantial regional variations in diabetes prevalence and management. The highest prevalence of DM was observed in southern region (Ernakulum, Kerala) and lowest prevalence was observed in North Eastern region (Manipur). Similarly large variations have been evident in overall awareness and diabetes care across the geographies within India. The regional challenges are largely affected by poor disease awareness, socioeconomic disparity and underutilization of the public health-care services. Though government has taken initiatives to address this issue, overall situation demands a collaborative effort from patients, health care professionals and the state. An exhaustive literature search was performed for articles and studies published on electronic databases. Present article assesses the regional disparity of diabetes epidemiology, current management practices and government policies for T2DM in India, identifies policy and research gaps, and suggests corrective measures to address the lacunae in diabetes care. PMID:24944916

  3. Disparities in the Use of Radiation Therapy in Patients With Local-Regionally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Steve R.; Beal, Shannon H.; Chen, Steven L.; Canter, Robert J.; Khatri, Vijay P.; Chen, Allen; Bold, Richard J.

    2010-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy (RT) is indicated for the treatment of local-regionally advanced breast cancer (BCa). Hypothesis: We hypothesized that black and Hispanic patients with local-regionally advanced BCa would receive lower rates of RT than their white counterparts. Methods: The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database was used to identify white, black, Hispanic, and Asian patients with invasive BCa and {>=}10 metastatic lymph nodes diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression evaluated the relationship of race/ethnicity with use of RT. Multivariate models stratified for those undergoing mastectomy or lumpectomy. Results: Entry criteria were met by 12,653 patients. Approximately half of the patients did not receive RT. Most patients were white (72%); the remainder were Hispanic (10.4%), black (10.3%), and Asian (7.3%). On univariate analysis, Hispanics (odd ratio [OR] 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.00) and blacks (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70-0.89) were less likely to receive RT than whites. On multivariate analysis, blacks (OR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67-0.86) and Hispanics (OR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70-0.90) were less likely than whites to receive RT. Disparities persisted for blacks (OR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.85) and Hispanics (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89) who received mastectomy, but not for those who received lumpectomy. Conclusions: Many patients with local-regionally advanced BCa do not receive RT. Blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to receive RT. This disparity was noted predominately in patients who received mastectomy. Future efforts at improving rates of RT are warranted. Efforts at eliminating racial/ethnic disparities should focus on black and Hispanic candidates for postmastectomy RT.

  4. Integrating disparate lidar datasets for a regional storm tide inundation analysis of hurricane katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, J.M.; Tyler, D.J.; Turnipseed, D.P.; Van Wilson, Jr.; Oimoen, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the largest natural disasters in U.S. history. Due to the sheer size of the affected areas, an unprecedented regional analysis at very high resolution and accuracy was needed to properly quantify and understand the effects of the hurricane and the storm tide. Many disparate sources of lidar data were acquired and processed for varying environmental reasons by pre- and post-Katrina projects. The datasets were in several formats and projections and were processed to varying phases of completion, and as a result the task of producing a seamless digital elevation dataset required a high level of coordination, research, and revision. To create a seamless digital elevation dataset, many technical issues had to be resolved before producing the desired 1/9-arc-second (3meter) grid needed as the map base for projecting the Katrina peak storm tide throughout the affected coastal region. This report presents the methodology that was developed to construct seamless digital elevation datasets from multipurpose, multi-use, and disparate lidar datasets, and describes an easily accessible Web application for viewing the maximum storm tide caused by Hurricane Katrina in southeastern Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. ?? 2009 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  5. Regional Disparities in Obesity Prevalence in the United States: A Spatial Regime Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Candice A.; Slack, Tim; Martin, Corby K.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Heymsfield, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Significant clusters of high and low obesity counties have been demonstrated across the United States (U.S.). This study examined regional disparities in obesity prevalence and differences in the related structural characteristics across regions of the U.S. Design and Methods Drawing on model-based estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, regional differences in county-level adult obesity prevalence (percent of the adult population [≥ 20 years] that was obese [BMI≥30kg/m2] within a county, 2009) were assessed with a LISA (Local Indicators of Spatial Association) analysis to identify geographic concentrations of high and low obesity levels. We utilized regional regime analysis to identify factors that were differentially associated with obesity prevalence between regions of the U.S. Results High and low obesity county clusters and the effect of a number of county-level characteristics on obesity prevalence differed significantly by region. These included the positive effect of African American populations in the South, the negative effect of Hispanic populations in the Northeast, and the positive effect of unemployed workers in the Midwest and West. Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for public health policies and interventions that account for different regional characteristics underlying obesity prevalence variation across the U.S. PMID:25521074

  6. Reducing asthma disparities by addressing environmental inequities: a case study of regional asthma management and prevention's advocacy efforts.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Anne Kelsey; Ervice, Joel; Lorenzen, Kathryn; Prentice, Bob; White, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Regional Asthma Management and Prevention describes its collaborative approach to address a social determinant of health--air quality--and the associated inequities that have led to asthma disparities impacting African American and Latino communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. The strategies, aimed at decreasing diesel pollution in disproportionately impacted communities, span the levels of the socioecological model, with an emphasis on policy outcomes. Regional Asthma Management and Prevention describes how this work fits within a larger comprehensive approach to address asthma disparities encompassing several components, ranging from clinical management to environmental protection. PMID:21160331

  7. Regional Disparities in Sedentary Behaviors and Meal Frequency in Iranian Adolescents: The CASPIAN-III Study

    PubMed Central

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Heshmat, Ramin; Kelishadi, Roya; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmail; Ardalan, Gelayol; Asayesh, Hamid; Larijani, Bagher; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity is increasing among Iranian youngsters like other developing countries. Objectives: This study was conducted to assess regional disparities in sedentary behaviors and meal frequency in Iranian adolescents. Patients and Methods: In this national survey, 5682 students aged 10 - 18 years from urban and rural districts of 27 provinces of Iran were selected via stratified multi-stage sampling method. The country was classified into four sub-national regions, based on criteria of the combination of geography and socioeconomic status (SES). Mean of meal frequency and physical activity levels as well as prevalence of omitting meals and sedentary behavior were compared across regions with different SES after stratifying with sex and age group. Results: Meal frequency in lower socio-economic regions was significantly higher than two other regions in 10 - 13 and 10 - 18 years old groups (P trend < 0.001). However, the mean of working hours with computer was linearly increased with increasing the SES in studied regions (P trend < 0.001), whereas the corresponding figure was not significant for the mean of watching TV (P trend > 0.05). Frequency of adolescents omitting their meals was higher in higher SES regions especially in West Iran (P < 0.001) in 10 - 13 years old age group. Having personal computer and working with it more than two hours per day mainly was observed in central Iran which ranked as the highest SES group. Conclusions: Efforts to ensure Iranian youth meet healthy food habits and screen time guidelines include limiting access to screen technologies and encouraging parents to monitor their own screen time is required. PMID:26195993

  8. Pulmonary Embolism Mortality in Brazil from 1989 to 2010: Gender and Regional Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Casqueiro, Juliana Borges; Ciuffo, Luisa Allen; Santos, Jessica Mendes; Magalhães, Iuri Resedá; Latado, Adriana Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background A significant variation in pulmonary embolism (PE) mortality trends have been documented around the world. We investigated the trends in mortality rate from PE in Brazil over a period of 21 years and its regional and gender differences. Methods Using a nationwide database of death certificate information we searched for all cases with PE as the underlying cause of death between 1989 and 2010. Population data were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). We calculated age-, gender- and region-specific mortality rates for each year, using the 2000 Brazilian population for direct standardization. Results Over 21 years the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) fell 31% from 3.04/100,000 to 2.09/100,000. In every year between 1989 and 2010, the ASMR was higher in women than in men, but both showed a significant declining trend, from 3.10/100,000 to 2.36/100,000 and from 2.94/100,000 to 1.80/100,000, respectively. Although all country regions showed a decline in their ASMR, the largest fall in death rates was concentrated in the highest income regions of the South and Southeast Brazil. The North and Northeast regions, the lowest income areas, showed a less marked fall in death rates and no distinct change in the PE mortality rate in women. Conclusions Our study showed a reduction in the PE mortality rate over two decades in Brazil. However, significant variation in this trend was observed amongst the five country regions and between genders, pointing to possible disparities in health care access and quality in these groups. PMID:26559854

  9. Health Insurance Instability Among Older Immigrants: Region of Origin Disparities in Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We provide a detailed analysis of how the dynamics of health insurance coverage (HIC) at older ages differs among Latino, Asian, and European immigrants in the United States. Method. Using Survey of Income and Program Participation data from the 2004 and 2008 panels, we estimate discrete-time event history models to examine first and second transitions into and out of HIC, highlighting substantial differences in hazard rates among immigrants aged 50–64 from Asia, Latin America, and Europe. Results. We find that the likelihood of having HIC at first observation and the rates of gaining and losing coverage within a relatively short time frame are least favorable for older Latino immigrants, although immigrants from all three regions are at a disadvantage relative to native-born non-Hispanic Whites. This disparity among immigrant groups persists even when lower rates of citizenship, greater difficulty with English, and low-skill job placements are taken into account. Discussion. Factors that have contributed to the lower rates and shorter durations of HIC among older immigrants, particularly those from Latin America, may not be easily resolved by the Affordable Care Act. The importance of region of origin and assimilation characteristics for the risk of being uninsured in later life argues that immigration and health care policy should be jointly addressed. PMID:25637934

  10. Regional disparities in the beneficial effects of rising CO2 concentrations on crop water productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Folberth, Christian; Müller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Conway, Declan; Ruane, Alex C.; Gerten, Dieter; Jones, James W.; Khabarov, Nikolay; Olin, Stefan; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Schmid, Erwin; Yang, Hong; Rosenzweig, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) are expected to enhance photosynthesis and reduce crop water use. However, there is high uncertainty about the global implications of these effects for future crop production and agricultural water requirements under climate change. Here we combine results from networks of field experiments and global crop models to present a spatially explicit global perspective on crop water productivity (CWP, the ratio of crop yield to evapotranspiration) for wheat, maize, rice and soybean under elevated [CO2] and associated climate change projected for a high-end greenhouse gas emissions scenario. We find CO2 effects increase global CWP by 10[047]%-27[737]% (median[interquartile range] across the model ensemble) by the 2080s depending on crop types, with particularly large increases in arid regions (by up to 48[25;56]% for rainfed wheat). If realized in the fields, the effects of elevated [CO2] could considerably mitigate global yield losses whilst reducing agricultural consumptive water use (4-17%). We identify regional disparities driven by differences in growing conditions across agro-ecosystems that could have implications for increasing food production without compromising water security. Finally, our results demonstrate the need to expand field experiments and encourage greater consistency in modelling the effects of rising [CO2] across crop and hydrological modelling communities.

  11. Regional Disparities in the Beneficial Effects of Rising CO2 Emissions on Crop Water Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Folberth, Christian; Meuller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Conway, Declan; Ruane, Alex C.; Gerten, Dieter; Jones, James W.; Khabarov, Nikolay; Olin, Stefan; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Schmid, Erwin; Yang, Hong; Rosenzweig, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are expected to enhance photosynthesis and reduce crop water use. However, there is high uncertainty about the global implications of these effects for future crop production and agricultural water requirements under climate change. Here we combine results from networks of field experiments and global crop models to present a spatially explicit global perspective on crop water productivity (CWP, the ratio of crop yield to evapotranspiration) for wheat, maize, rice and soybean under elevated carbon dioxide and associated climate change projected for a high-end greenhouse gas emissions scenario. We find carbon dioxide effects increase global CWP by 10[0;47]%-27[7;37]% (median[interquartile range] across the model ensemble) by the 2080s depending on crop types, with particularly large increases in arid regions (by up to 48[25;56]% for rain fed wheat). If realized in the fields, the effects of elevated carbon dioxide could considerably mitigate global yield losses whilst reducing agricultural consumptive water use (4-17%). We identify regional disparities driven by differences in growing conditions across agro-ecosystems that could have implications for increasing food production without compromising water security. Finally, our results demonstrate the need to expand field experiments and encourage greater consistency in modeling the effects of rising carbon dioxide across crop and hydrological modeling communities.

  12. Regional benthic δ18O stacks with radiocarbon age models show Termination I onset differences of up to 4,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J.; Lisiecki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The assumption of globally synchronous benthic foraminiferal δ18O changes is central to the development of global stacks (averages) and many other types of paleoclimate studies. However, a few well-dated individual benthic δ18O records have suggested the possibility of regional differences in the timing of Termination I (e.g., Skinner and Shackleton, 2005; Waelbroeck et al., 2011). These previous studies often used single core locations to describe vast areas of the ocean, so it has remained unclear whether the observed diachroneities are truly regional in scale or merely local. Here, we bridge the gap between global benthic δ18O stacks and individual records by presenting eight regional benthic δ18O stacks from 252 cores with age models based on a total of 776 planktonic foraminiferal radiocarbon dates from 61 of those cores. The earliest termination onset (beginning of deglacial benthic δ18O decrease) occurs in the intermediate South Atlantic stack at 18.5 kyr BP, shortly after the initial deglacial melting of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. The latest termination onset occurs in the deep Indian stack at 14.5 kyr BP, coeval with the Bølling-Allerød warming. We find synchronous termination onsets at 17.5 kyr BP in the intermediate North Atlantic, deep North Atlantic, and deep South Atlantic, contrary to Waelbroeck et al. (2011). The deglacial benthic δ18O decrease in the deep Pacific lagged that of the deep Atlantic by an average of 1000 yr, with a maximum lag of ~1700 yr during the middle of the termination. The intermediate Pacific termination onset at 16.5 kyr BP happens 1000 yr after the deep Pacific termination onset at 17.5 kyr BP. The stacks extend beyond Termination I to ~40 kyr BP, allowing us to clarify and update certain aspects of millennial-scale benthic δ18O chronostratigraphy surrounding Heinrich events 2-3 and the transition into the Last Glacial Maximum. Our radiocarbon-dated regional benthic δ18O stacks demonstrate some of the

  13. The electrification of Nova Scotia, 1884--1973: Technological modernization as a response to regional disparity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lionel Bradley

    This dissertation investigates local attempts to use technology as a force for regional rehabilitation in the economically-depressed Maritime region of Canada. At the time of Confederation in 1867, the Maritime province of Nova Scotia was prosperous, progressive, and cultured. By the end of the 1910s, the province had entered a long period of economic and social decline. Recent historiography has shown that, far from passively accepting their fate, Nova Scotians and other Maritimers, actively resisted marginalization with political, cultural, or social action. The thesis expands upon that literature by exploring technology-based strategies of provincial rehabilitation using Thomas P. Hughes's systems perspective and David E. Nye's semiotic approach. In doing so, it applies methods from the social constructivist school of the history of technology to the larger concerns of Maritime Canadian historiography. In large part, the North American culture of technology determined the ways in which Nova Scotians applied technological solutions to provincial concerns. Technology has long been central to the Western idea of progress. As the "high technology" of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, electricity reinforced that view: its ephemeral nature and silent efficiency led people to endow it with transformative, even mystical, powers. As a result, Nova Scotians, adopted a program of electrical modernization in the late 1910s as a remedy for regional disparity. The Nova Scotia government's first step was the creation of an Ontario-style hydroelectric commission designed to bring order to the province's fragmented and inefficient electrical network. Over the next few decades, the Nova Scotia Power Commission implemented rural electrification, home modernization, and regional system-building models that had already proven successful in Ontario and the United States. The system-building philosophies behind these programs were adapted to local conditions and

  14. The radiocarbon hydroxyl technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Malcolm J.; Sheppard, John C.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiocarbon Technique depends upon measuring the rate of oxidation of CO in an essentially unperturbed sample of air. The airborne technique is slightly different. Hydroxyl concentrations can be calculated directly; peroxyl concentrations can be obtained by NO doping.

  15. Mapping Regional Patterns of Fossils Fuel CO2 in the Planetary Boundary Layer Across North America Using Radiocarbon in Annual Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, D. Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Southon, J. R.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    Radiocarbon levels in annual plants provide a means to map out regional and continental-scale patterns of fossil fuel emissions and biosphere-atmosphere exchange. The imprint of the local atmosphere is recorded within the leaves of these annual plants and represents a time-integral of atmospheric levels over a period of several months, complementing both flask and aircraft sampling techniques. Working with colleagues, we collected corn (Zea mays) from approximately 70 sites across North America. We designed a sampling protocol that captured regional and continental scale patterns of fossil fuel CO2 levels; we specifically avoided areas directly influenced by point sources such as major roads or cities. We then analyzed the leaves in the W.M. Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometer at the University of California, Irvine. In areas where the corn plants were exposed to sustained and elevated levels of CO2 from fossil fuel emissions, such as the Ohio Valley, the 14C/12C ratio of the corn leaves was reduced. We found that there was a drop of approximately 15 per mil between the western U.S. (Alberta, Idaho, Colorado and New Mexico) and the Northeastern U.S. (Ohio, Maryland and Pennsylvania). This corresponds to approximately 5 ppm increase in fossil fuel CO2 levels, as air moves from west to east across the continent. These data provide a means to test our understanding of the coupling of biosphere atmosphere exchange, planetary boundary layer mixing, atmospheric transport, and fossil fuel emissions in mesoscale and global models that are used to estimate the spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks.

  16. Source apportionment of PM2.5 at a regional background site in North China using PMF linked with radiocarbon analysis: insight into the contribution of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zheng; Wang, Xiaoping; Tian, Chongguo; Chen, Yingjun; Qu, Lin; Ji, Ling; Zhi, Guorui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    Source apportionment of fine particles (PM2.5) at a background site in North China in the winter of 2014 was done using statistical analysis, radiocarbon (14C) measurement and positive matrix factorization (PMF) modeling. Results showed that the concentration of PM2.5 was 77.6 ± 59.3 µg m-3, of which sulfate (SO42-) concentration was the highest, followed by nitrate (NO3-), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and ammonium (NH4+). As demonstrated by backward trajectory, more than half of the air masses during the sampling period were from the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region, followed by Mongolia and the Shandong Peninsula. Cluster analysis of chemical species suggested an obvious signal of biomass burning in the PM2.5 from the Shandong Peninsula, while the PM2.5 from the BTH region showed a vehicle emission pattern. This finding was further confirmed by the 14C measurement of OC and EC in two merged samples. The 14C result indicated that biogenic and biomass burning emission contributed 59 ± 4 and 52 ± 2 % to OC and EC concentrations, respectively, when air masses originated from the Shandong Peninsula, while the contributions fell to 46 ± 4 and 38 ± 1 %, respectively, when the prevailing wind changed and came from the BTH region. The minimum deviation between source apportionment results from PMF and 14C measurement was adopted as the optimal choice of the model exercises. Here, two minor overestimates with the same range (3 %) implied that the PMF result provided a reasonable source apportionment of the regional PM2.5 in this study. Based on the PMF modeling, eight sources were identified; of these, coal combustion, biomass burning and vehicle emission were the main contributors of PM2.5, accounting for 29.6, 19.3 and 15.9 %, respectively. Compared with overall source apportionment, the contributions of vehicle emission, mineral dust, coal combustion and biomass burning increased when air masses came from the BTH region, Mongolia and the Shandong

  17. Radiocarbon Dating: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortine, Suellen

    This selective annotated bibliography covers various sources of information on the radiocarbon dating method, including journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, reflecting the most important and useful sources of the last 25 years. The bibliography is divided into five parts--general background on radiocarbon, radiocarbon dating,…

  18. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  19. Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  20. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic and geologic gradients from time-series and fraction-specific radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; Zell, Claudia; McIntyre, Cameron; Eglinton, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between soil organic matter (SOM) and climatic, geologic and ecological factors is essential for the understanding of potential susceptibility and vulnerability to climate and land use change. Radiocarbon constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling SOM dynamics and is increasingly used in studies of carbon turnover. The complex and inherently heterogeneous nature of SOM renders it challenging to assess the processes that govern SOM stability by solely looking at the bulk signature on a plot-scale level. This project combines bulk radiocarbon measurements on a regional-scale spanning wide climatic and geologic gradients with a more in-depth approach for a subset of locations. For this subset, time-series and carbon pool-specific radiocarbon data has been acquired for both topsoil and deeper soils. These well-studied sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). Statistical analysis was performed to examine relationships of radiocarbon signatures with variables such as temperature, precipitation and elevation. Bomb-curve modeling was applied determine carbon turnover using time-series data. Results indicate that (1) there is no significant correlation between Δ14C signature and environmental conditions except a weak positive correlation with mean annual temperature, (2) vertical gradients in Δ14C signatures in surface and deeper soils are highly similar despite covering disparate soil-types and climatic systems, and (3) radiocarbon signatures vary significantly between time-series samples and carbon pools. Overall, this study provides a uniquely comprehensive dataset that allows for a better understanding of links between carbon dynamics and environmental settings, as well as for pool-specific and long-term trends in carbon (de)stabilization.

  1. Geographic disparities in heart disease and stroke mortality among black and white populations in the Appalachian region.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Joel A; Barnett, Elizabeth; Casper, Michele

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we examine geographic and racial/ethnic differences in heart disease and stroke mortality in the Appalachian region. Initial comparisons are made between national rates for heart disease and stroke mortality and those for the Appalachian region. County-level analyses were performed to examine the relative mortality experience of populations in Appalachian counties compared to other counties in the United States and to assess the degree of geographic disparity in mortality from heart disease and stroke among these race/ethnic and gender groups within Appalachia. The Appalachian region exhibits higher rates of both heart disease and stroke mortality for all race/ethnic, gender, and age groups examined. We found that many counties in the Appalachian region endure a considerable burden of the national excess in both heart disease and stroke mortality, and these counties tend to be aggregated in particular areas as opposed to being dispersed regionwide. Finally, we compare 2 groups of counties in Appalachia based on the designation as an "economically distressed county," defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission. As a group, distressed counties in Appalachia exhibit higher rates of both heart disease and stroke mortality than the rest of Appalachia.

  2. Age, Race and Regional Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates in Georgia between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; De, Subhendu; Wilkins, Thad; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates and mortality have been decreasing in the United States. Currently, states in the South have the smallest reduction in CRC mortality. The trends of CRC incidence rates in Georgia in comparison to the United States have not been investigated. We analyzed age-adjusted incidence rates of CRC in Georgia and the United States from 2000 to 2012 using data from SEER 18 registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were calculated as cases per 100,000 to the 2000 US Standard population. CRC incidence rates were calculated for groupings based on age at time of diagnosis, race, sex, and geographic location within Georgia. Incidence rates were higher in males compared to females in Georgia. In Georgians age 50–64, incidence rates were higher compared to the US, while those ages 65+ displayed lower incidence rates. Black Georgians age 50–64 generally exhibited higher incidence rates of CRC and lower rates of decrease in incidence compared to other races in Georgia. Asian/Pacific Islander females age 50–64 in Georgia exhibited an increasing trend in incidence rate. Whites and blacks Georgians age 50–64 displayed higher incidence rates compared to the US, while Asian/Pacific Islanders displayed lower incidence rates. Greater incidence rates of CRC in rural and Greater Georgia were seen across all races when compared to overall rates in Georgia. Efforts should be made to address disparities in Georgia based on race and geographic location. Increased screening by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, reduction of risk factors and promotion of healthy lifestyles can reduce CRC incidence rates. PMID:27042701

  3. Vulcanism and Radiocarbon Dates

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, L. M.; Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    We consider whether the long term perturbation of radiocarbon dates, which is known to be approximately a sin function of period about 8000 years and amplitude of about 8% peak-to-peak, could have been caused in any major part by vulcanism. We conclude that this is not the case. On the contrary, present day volcanoes are a far less important source of inert CO{sub 2} (about 100 fold less) than is man's burning of fossil fuels which has caused the Suess dilution of about 2%. (auth)

  4. Breast cancer screening disparities among immigrant women by world region of origin: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Mandana; Lofters, Aisha; Kumar, Matthew; Glazier, Richard H

    2016-07-01

    Rates of mammography screening for breast cancer are disproportionately low in certain subgroups including low-income and immigrant women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in rates of appropriate breast cancer screening (i.e., screening mammography every 2 years) among Ontario immigrant women by world region of origin and explore the association between appropriate breast cancer screening among these women groups and individual and structural factors. A cohort of 183,332 screening-eligible immigrant women living in Ontario between 2010 and 2012 was created from linked databases and classified into eight world regions of origin. Appropriate screening rates were calculated for each region by age group and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and healthcare-related characteristics. The association between appropriate screening across the eight regions of origin and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and health-related characteristics was explored using multivariate Poisson regression. Screening varied by region of origin, with South Asian women (48.5%) having the lowest and Caribbean and Latin American women (63.7%) the highest cancer screening rates. Factors significantly associated with lower screening across the world regions of origin included living in the lowest income neighborhoods, having a refugee status, being a new immigrant, not having a regular physical examination, not being enrolled in a primary care patient enrollment model, having a male physician, and having an internationally trained physician. Multiple interventions entailing cross-sector collaboration, promotion of patient enrollment models, community engagement, comprehensive and intensive outreach to women, and knowledge translation and transfer to physicians should be considered to address screening disparities among immigrant population. Consideration should be given to design and delivery of culturally appropriate and easily accessible cancer screening programs

  5. Evidence of economic regularities and disparities of Italian regions from aggregated tax income size data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueti, Roy; Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    This paper discusses the size distribution-in economic terms-of the Italian municipalities over the period 2007-2011. Yearly data are rather well fitted by a modified Lavalette law, while Zipf-Mandelbrot-Pareto law seems to fail in this doing. The analysis is performed either at a national as well as at a local (regional and provincial) level. Deviations are discussed as originating in so called king and vice-roy effects. Results confirm that Italy is shared among very different regional realities. The case of Lazio is puzzling.

  6. Back to the Basics: Socio-Economic, Gender, and Regional Disparities in Canada's Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgerton, Jason D.; Peter, Tracey; Roberts, Lance W.

    2008-01-01

    This study reassessed the extent to which socio-economic background, gender, and region endure as sources of educational inequality in Canada. The analysis utilized the 28,000 student Canadian sample from the data set of the OECD's 2003 "Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA)". Results, consistent with previous findings, highlight…

  7. Radiocarbon Dating, Memories, and Hopes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    The history of radiocarbon dating from 1939 to the present is reviewed. The basic principles of radiocarbon dating are that cosmic rays make living things radioactive with {sup 14}C to a certain level fixed by the environment and that at death the intake of food stops so no replenishment of the {sup 14}C steadily lost by the immutable decay occurs. Therefore measurement of the degree of decay gives the time lapse since death, i.e., the radiocarbon age. The equipment developed and experiments performed to measure the specific activity of specimens to be dated are described. The results obtained by world-wide experimenters are discussed. These showed that on simultaneity radiocarbon dating is apparently reliable but that absolute dates may be incorrect by as much as 600 to 700 y. The value of radiocarbon dating to archaeologists, geologists, climatologists, and historians is stressed. (LCL)

  8. Regional Disparities in Mortality after Ischemic Heart Disease in a Brazilian State from 2006 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Luciano; Zanini, Vanessa; Batilana, Adelia Portero; de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Nihei, Oscar Kenji; de Barros Carvalho, Maria Dalva

    2013-01-01

    Background High technology in the field of interventional cardiology applied in tertiary hospitals has brought enormous benefits in the treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, IHD mortality rates remain high. We analyzed the relationship between IHD mortality rate and the socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic conditions in 399 cities in Parana state, Brazil, from 2006 to 2010. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System and the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and evaluated through Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis. GeoDa™ was used to analyze 29.351 deaths across 399 cities. We found a positive spatial autocorrelation regarding IHD mortality (I = 0.5913, p = 0.001). There was a significant positive association between each of three socioeconomic and demographic indicators and IHD mortality rate: Population Elderly Index (I = 0.3436), Illiteracy Rate (I = 0.1873) and City Development Index (I = 0.0900). In addition, two indicators presented significant negative association with IHD mortality rate: Adjusted Population Size (I = −0.1216) and Gross Domestic Product (I = −0.0864). We also found a positive association between IHD mortality rates and the geographic distances between patients’ city of residence and their corresponding regional referral centers in interventional cardiology (I = 0.3368). Cities located within Regional Health Units with Reference Interventional Cardiology Center presented a significantly lower average specific mortality rate by IHD. The high mortality rate by IHD within the Regional Health Units was not restricted to socioeconomic and demographic variables, but dependent on the distance between each city and their reference interventional cardiology center. Conclusions We conclude that geographic factors play a significant role in IHD mortality within cities. These findings have important policy implications regarding the geographic

  9. Regional health accounts for Pakistan--expenditure disparities on provincial and district level.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Christian; Khalid, Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    Since May 2009 the first National Health Accounts (NHA) for Pakistan have been finalised and published by Federal Bureau of Statistics (FBS) in cooperation with German Technical Cooperation (GTZ). This paper goes one step ahead of the report and analyses in more detail the regional differences in health expenditure structures in Pakistan. The further analyses can be divided into four parts: health expenditures in provinces (Provincial Health Accounts, PHA), Punjab provincial and district governments health expenditures and its comparison with ADB figures, all districts of Pakistan and comparison between total district government and provincial government expenditure for each province; the latter calculation is applied as indication for the degree of fiscal autonomy of the districts in each province. Consequently, first the provincial health expenditures by Financial Agents is analysed and compared between the provinces which leads to very heterogeneous results (section 2); the per capita health expenditures differ from 16 to 23 USD. Secondly, NHA results on Punjab district government are compared with available ADB results and differences in methods as possible reasons for different results are presented (section 3). Third, district data of all district governments in all four Pakistani provinces are analysed on the level of detailed function codes in section 4; the aim is to discover regional differences between districts of the same as well as of different provinces. Fourth, in section 5 the degree of fiscal autonomy on health of the districts in each province is analysed; therefore the ordinance description is reviewed and total district government with total provincial government expenditures are compared per province. Finally recommendations for future rounds of NHA in Pakistan are given regarding formats and necessities of detailed health expenditure data collection to ensure evidence based decision making not only on federal, but also on provincial and

  10. Radiocarbon Ages from Two Submerged Strandline Features in the Western Gulf of Maine and a Sea-Level Curve for the Northeastern Massachusetts Coastal Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.; Colman, Steven M.; Jones, Glenn A.

    1993-01-01

    New radiocarbon dates provide ages for two submerged strandline features on the Massachusetts inner shelf. These ages provide limited control on a relative sea-level (RSL) curve for the late Wisconsinan and Holocene. The curve indicates a late Wisconsinan high stand of RSL of +33 m about 14,000 yr ago and a very short-lived relative low stand of about -43 m at about 12,000 yr ago followed by a rise to present sea level. Rapid changes of RSL around 12,000 yr ago may be related to changes in global glacial meltwater discharge and eustatic sea-level change shown by dated corals off Barbados. Variations in the magnitude and timing of RSL change from south to north along the coast of the western Gulf of Maine are due to greater crustal depression and later deglaciation to the north.

  11. Factors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Government of Kenya alike identify a well-performing health workforce as key to attaining better health. Nevertheless, the motivation and retention of health care workers (HCWs) persist as challenges. This study investigated factors influencing motivation and retention of HCWs at primary health care facilities in three different settings in Kenya - the remote area of Turkana, the relatively accessible region of Machakos, and the disadvantaged informal urban settlement of Kibera in Nairobi. Methods A cross-sectional cluster sample design was used to select 59 health facilities that yielded interviews with 404 health care workers, grouped into 10 different types of service providers. Data were collected in November 2011 using structured questionnaires and a Focus Group Discussion guide. Findings were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate methods of the associations and determinants of health worker motivation and retention. Results The levels of education and gender factors were lowest in Turkana with female HCWs representing only 30% of the workers against a national average of 53%. A smaller proportion of HCWs in Turkana feel that they have adequate training for their jobs. Overall, 13% of the HCWs indicated that they had changed their job in the last 12 months and 20% indicated that they could leave their current job within the next two years. In terms of work environment, inadequate access to electricity, equipment, transport, housing, and the physical state of the health facility were cited as most critical, particularly in Turkana. The working environment is rated as better in private facilities. Adequate training, job security, salary, supervisor support, and manageable workload were identified as critical satisfaction factors. Family health care, salary, and terminal benefits were rated as important compensatory factors. Conclusions There are distinct motivational and retention factors that affect

  12. Mississippi communities for healthy living: implementing a nutrition intervention effectiveness study in a rural health disparate region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intervention research in rural, health disparate communities presents unique challenges for study design, implementation, and evaluation. Challenges include: 1) culturally appropriate intervention components; 2) participant recruitment and retention; 3) treatment cross-contamination; 4) intervention...

  13. Disparity in regional and systemic circulatory capacities: do they affect the regulation of the circulation?

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, J. A. L.; Joyner, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this review we integrate ideas about regional and systemic circulatory capacities and the balance between skeletal muscle blood flow and cardiac output during heavy exercise in humans. In the first part of the review we discuss issues related to the pumping capacity of the heart and the vasodilator capacity of skeletal muscle. The issue is that skeletal muscle has a vast capacity to vasodilate during exercise [~300 mL (100 g)−1 min−1], but the pumping capacity of the human heart is limited to 20–25 L min−1 in untrained subjects and ~35 L min−1 in elite endurance athletes. This means that when more than 7–10 kg of muscle is active during heavy exercise, perfusion of the contracting muscles must be limited or mean arterial pressure will fall. In the second part of the review we emphasize that there is an interplay between sympathetic vasoconstriction and metabolic vasodilation that limits blood flow to contracting muscles to maintain mean arterial pressure. Vasoconstriction in larger vessels continues while constriction in smaller vessels is blunted permitting total muscle blood flow to be limited but distributed more optimally. This interplay between sympathetic constriction and metabolic dilation during heavy whole-body exercise is likely responsible for the very high levels of oxygen extraction seen in contracting skeletal muscle. It also explains why infusing vasodilators in the contracting muscles does not increase oxygen uptake in the muscle. Finally, when ~80% of cardiac output is directed towards contracting skeletal muscle modest vasoconstriction in the active muscles can evoke marked changes in arterial pressure. PMID:20345408

  14. Disparity in regional and systemic circulatory capacities: do they affect the regulation of the circulation?

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; Joyner, M J

    2010-08-01

    In this review we integrate ideas about regional and systemic circulatory capacities and the balance between skeletal muscle blood flow and cardiac output during heavy exercise in humans. In the first part of the review we discuss issues related to the pumping capacity of the heart and the vasodilator capacity of skeletal muscle. The issue is that skeletal muscle has a vast capacity to vasodilate during exercise [approximately 300 mL (100 g)(-1) min(-1)], but the pumping capacity of the human heart is limited to 20-25 L min(-1) in untrained subjects and approximately 35 L min(-1) in elite endurance athletes. This means that when more than 7-10 kg of muscle is active during heavy exercise, perfusion of the contracting muscles must be limited or mean arterial pressure will fall. In the second part of the review we emphasize that there is an interplay between sympathetic vasoconstriction and metabolic vasodilation that limits blood flow to contracting muscles to maintain mean arterial pressure. Vasoconstriction in larger vessels continues while constriction in smaller vessels is blunted permitting total muscle blood flow to be limited but distributed more optimally. This interplay between sympathetic constriction and metabolic dilation during heavy whole-body exercise is likely responsible for the very high levels of oxygen extraction seen in contracting skeletal muscle. It also explains why infusing vasodilators in the contracting muscles does not increase oxygen uptake in the muscle. Finally, when approximately 80% of cardiac output is directed towards contracting skeletal muscle modest vasoconstriction in the active muscles can evoke marked changes in arterial pressure.

  15. New biomedical applications of radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.

    1990-12-01

    The potential of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and radiocarbon in biomedical applications is being investigated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A measurement of the dose-response curve for DNA damage caused by a carcinogen in mouse liver cells was an initial experiment. This demonstrated the sensitivity and utility of AMS for detecting radiocarbon tags and led to numerous follow-on experiments. The initial experiment and follow-on experiments are discussed in this report. 12 refs., 4 figs. (SM)

  16. Racial and Regional Disparities in the Effect of the Affordable Care Act’s Dependent Coverage Provision on Young Adult Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W; Salim, Ali; Sommers, Benjamin D; Tsai, Thomas C; Scott, Kirstin W; Song, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Background Disparities in trauma outcomes based on insurance and race are especially pronounced among young adults who have relatively high uninsured rates and incur a disproportionate share of trauma in the population. The 2010 dependent coverage provision (DCP) of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed young adults to remain on their parent’s health insurance plans until age 26, leading to over 3 million young adults gaining insurance. We investigated the impact of the DCP on racial disparities in coverage expansion among trauma patients. Study Design Using the 2007–2012 National Trauma Databank, we compared changes in coverage among 529,844 19–25 year-olds to 484,974 controls aged 27–34 not affected by the DCP. Subgroup analyses were conducted by race and ethnicity and by census region. Results The pre-DCP uninsured rates among young adults were highest among black patients (48.1%) and Hispanic patients (44.3%), and significantly lower among Non-Hispanic white patients (28.9%). However, Non-Hispanic white young adults experienced a significantly greater absolute reduction in the uninsured rate (−4.9 percentage points) than black (−2.9, p=0.01) and Hispanic (−1.7, p<0.001) young adults. These absolute reductions correspond to a 17.0% relative reduction in the uninsured rate for white patients, 6.1% for black patients, and 3.7% for Hispanic patients. Racial disparities in the provision’s impact on coverage among trauma patients were largest in the South and West census regions (p<0.01). Conclusions While the DCP increased insurance coverage for young adult trauma patients of all races, both absolute and relative racial disparities in insurance coverage widened. The extent of these racial disparities also differed by geographic region. Though this policy produced overall progress towards greater coverage among young adults, its heterogeneous impact by race has important implications for future disparities research in trauma. PMID:26141468

  17. Radiocarbon Variability in the Tropical Pacific During the Last Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Cobb, K. M.; Druffel, E. R.; Griffin, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    The strength of upwelling in the tropical Pacific strongly influences global climate, as demonstrated during El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) extremes. Understanding the causes of past variability in tropical Pacific upwelling will help to predict how future climate may evolve under radiative forcing caused by the increase in greenhouse gases. We measured radiocarbon (14C) records in corals collected from Palmyra (6°°N, 162°°W) and Christmas (2°°N, 157°°W) Islands, located in the central tropical Pacific, to reconstruct high-resolution variations in tropical Pacific upwelling over the last millennium. Corals incorporate 14C/12C ratios equal to those in the dissolved inorganic carbon of surrounding seawater, and thus provide monthly-resolved records of surface ocean radiocarbon concentrations back through time. Surface ocean waters are more enriched with radiocarbon than deep waters, owing to the atmospheric source for radiocarbon. Upwelled waters are depleted in radiocarbon because significant radioactive decay has occurred during their isolation in the deeper ocean. Previous work with central tropical Pacific corals has determined that upwelled waters are approximately -55‰° to -65‰° in this region, while currents flowing from the west Pacific to the east Pacific carry waters with a higher 14C signature, roughly -38‰, and waters from the east have a value of -72‰° (Konishi et. al, 1981, Druffel, 1981). Therefore, variations in 14C in the Palmyra and Christmas corals reflect the mixing of the cool, radiocarbon-depleted, waters associated with equatorial upwelling and the warm, radiocarbon-enriched waters advected from the western tropical Pacific. Oxygen isotopic (δ18O) analyses of the Palmyra and Christmas fossil corals reveal a rich climatic history of interannual to centennial variability (Cobb et al., 2003). Our approach targets specific time intervals associated with strong interannual to centennial δ18O anomalies for high

  18. Simultaneous detection of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia duodenalis and cryptosporidia by immunochromatographic assay in stool samples from patients living in the Greater Cairo Region, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Banisch, Dagmar M; El-Badry, Ayman; Klinnert, Jorge V; Ignatius, Ralf; El-Dib, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal infection due to intestinal parasites is an enormous health problem in developing countries and its reliable diagnosis is demanding. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating a commercially available immunochromatographic assay (ICA) for the detection of cryptosporidia, Giardia duodenalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar for its usefulness in the Greater Cairo Region, Egypt. Stool samples of 104 patients who presented between October 2012 and March 2013 with gastrointestinal symptoms or for the exclusion of parasites at Kasr-Al-Ainy University Medical School were examined by light microscopy of wet mounts and the triple ICA. Microscopy revealed in 20% of the patients [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.5-29.0%] parasites with Hymenolepis nana, E. histolytica/dispar and Blastocystis hominis being the most frequent ones, but was not able to detect G. duodenalis and cryptosporidia, whereas ICA was positive in 21% (95% CI, 14.3-30.0%) and detected E. histolytica/dispar in 12.5% (95% CI, 7.3-20.4%), cryptosporidia in 6.7% (95% CI, 3.1-13.5%) and G. duodenalis in 15.4% (95% CI, 9.6-23.6%) of the patients. Detection of one or more pathogens was associated with access to water retrieved from a well or pump (p = 0.01). Patients between 20 and 29 years of age (p = 0.08) and patients with symptoms of 5 days or longer (p = 0.07) tended to have a higher risk to be infected than patients of other age groups or with shorter-lasting symptoms. In conclusion, the ICA was easy to perform and timesaving. Importantly, it enabled the detection of cryptosporidia, which cannot be found microscopically in unstained smears, demonstrated a higher sensitivity for the detection of G. duodenalis than microscopy, and was more specific for distinguishing E. histolytica/dispar from apathogenic amoeba.

  19. Radiocarbon dates of late quaternary mammals in the Archangelsk Region and their contribution to reconstructions of the last glaciation in Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, D. V.; Markova, A. K.; van Kolfschoten, T.; van der Plicht, J.

    2012-06-01

    Twelve new AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dates of large Quaternary mammal remains were reported: mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius, bison ( Bison priscus), and musk ox ( Ovibos pallantis) found in the Archangelsk Region. The absolute age of the identified samples varies from 46 000 to 22 000 calibrated years ago. These data suggest that a substantial part of the Archangelsk Region was not covered by ice during the indicated time interval.

  20. Health disparities among the western, central and eastern rural regions of China after a decade of health promotion and disease prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Fan; Tian, Xiang-Yang; Cheng, Yu-Lan; Feng, Zhan-Chun; Wang, Liang; Southerland, Jodi

    2015-08-01

    Health disparities between the western, central and eastern regions of rural China, and the impact of national health improvement policies and programming were assessed. A total of 400 counties were randomly sampled. ANOVA and Logistic regression modeling were employed to estimate differences in health outcomes and determinants. Significant differences were found between the western, central and eastern rural regions in community infrastructure and health outcomes. From 2000 to 2010, health indicators in rural China were improved significantly, and the infant mortality rate (IMR), maternal mortality rate (MMR) and under 5 mortality rate (U5MR) had fallen by 62.79%, 71.74% and 61.92%, respectively. Central rural China had the greatest decrease in IMR (65.05%); whereas, western rural China had the greatest reduction in MMR (72.99%) but smallest reduction in U5MR (57.36%). Despite these improvements, Logistic regression analysis showed regional differences in key health outcome indicators (odds ratios): IMR (central: 2.13; western: 5.31), U5MR (central: 2.25; western: 5.69), MMR (central: 1.94; western: 3.31), and prevalence of infectious diseases (central: 1.62; western: 3.58). The community infrastructure and health outcomes of the western and central rural regions of China have been improved markedly during the first decade of the 21st century. However, health disparities still exist across the three regions. National efforts to increase per capita income, community empowerment and mobilization, community infrastructure, capacity of rural health facilities, and health literacy would be effective policy options to attain health equity.

  1. Health disparities among the western, central and eastern rural regions of China after a decade of health promotion and disease prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Fan; Tian, Xiang-Yang; Cheng, Yu-Lan; Feng, Zhan-Chun; Wang, Liang; Southerland, Jodi

    2015-08-01

    Health disparities between the western, central and eastern regions of rural China, and the impact of national health improvement policies and programming were assessed. A total of 400 counties were randomly sampled. ANOVA and Logistic regression modeling were employed to estimate differences in health outcomes and determinants. Significant differences were found between the western, central and eastern rural regions in community infrastructure and health outcomes. From 2000 to 2010, health indicators in rural China were improved significantly, and the infant mortality rate (IMR), maternal mortality rate (MMR) and under 5 mortality rate (U5MR) had fallen by 62.79%, 71.74% and 61.92%, respectively. Central rural China had the greatest decrease in IMR (65.05%); whereas, western rural China had the greatest reduction in MMR (72.99%) but smallest reduction in U5MR (57.36%). Despite these improvements, Logistic regression analysis showed regional differences in key health outcome indicators (odds ratios): IMR (central: 2.13; western: 5.31), U5MR (central: 2.25; western: 5.69), MMR (central: 1.94; western: 3.31), and prevalence of infectious diseases (central: 1.62; western: 3.58). The community infrastructure and health outcomes of the western and central rural regions of China have been improved markedly during the first decade of the 21st century. However, health disparities still exist across the three regions. National efforts to increase per capita income, community empowerment and mobilization, community infrastructure, capacity of rural health facilities, and health literacy would be effective policy options to attain health equity. PMID:26223935

  2. Radiocarbon in the Weddell Sea as observed in a deep-sea coral and in krill

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.L.; Druffel, E.M.

    1983-03-01

    Radiocarbon mesurements were performed on krill and coral samples collected from the Weddell Sea during IWSOE '80. These are the first radiocarbon measurements available from this area since 1973. These data reveal carbon-14 levels for Weddell surface water and southern Weddell Shelf water. These data indicate that the radiocarbon levels in surface waters in 1980 were the same or slightly lower than those present in 1973. In addition, an unusually low ..delta../sup 14/C value for shelf water (from coral) at 500 m is evidence that Warm Deep Water (WDW) may penetrate much further and more frequently onto the shelf region than had previously been expected.

  3. Microscale radiocarbon dating of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Laura; Hajdas, Irka; McIntyre, Cameron; Küffner, Markus; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Ferreira, Ester S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, radiocarbon dating of paintings using minimal sample sizes has been investigated, in an effort to address the problem of limited access to sample material in paintings. 14C analyses were conducted on signed and dated paintings from two Swiss artists of the twentieth century. The selected paintings dated from the 1930s and 1960s, provided the opportunity to evaluate the dating accuracy on paintings realized before and after 1950 AD when the 14C bomb peak was created, as a result of the nuclear tests conducted in the 1950/1960s. The work focused on the one hand on minimizing the size of the canvas sample required for accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon measurement on the gas ion source of the MICADAS and, on the other hand, on testing the possibility of dating the organic binder of the paint. Following careful characterization of the paint composition by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, paints containing no other carbon source than the natural organic binder were identified and dated.

  4. [Regional disparities in the feminization of the teaching staff of elementary schools: examples from Austria, Baden-Wurttemberg, and Hungary].

    PubMed

    Meusburger, P; Schmude, J

    1991-01-01

    Regional differences in the process of feminization of teaching staffs in Austria, Germany, and Hungary are analyzed, with particular attention given to the Austrian province of Vorarlberg. The study covers the late nineteenth century to the present. (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  5. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  6. New hydroxyproline radiocarbon dates from Sungir, Russia, confirm early Mid Upper Palaeolithic burials in Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated 'Red Lady of Paviland' human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia.

  7. New Hydroxyproline Radiocarbon Dates from Sungir, Russia, Confirm Early Mid Upper Palaeolithic Burials in Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials [1], [2], [3]. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site [4]. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated ‘Red Lady of Paviland’ human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia. PMID:24416120

  8. Lack of Healthy Food Options on Children’s Menus of Restaurants in the Health-Disparate Dan River Region of Virginia and North Carolina, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Olive, Nicole C.; Waters, Clarice N.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Interest has increased in understanding the types and healthfulness of restaurant foods for children, particularly in disadvantaged areas. The purpose of this community-based participatory research study was to describe the quality of restaurant food offered to children in a health-disparate region in Virginia and North Carolina and to determine if the availability of healthy foods differed by location (rural, urban) or by the predominant race (black, white, mixed race) of an area’s population. Methods Restaurants offering a children’s menu in the 3 counties in Virginia and North Carolina that make up the Dan River Region were identified by using state health department records. Research assistants reviewed menus using the Children’s Menu Assessment (CMA), a tool consisting of 29 scored items (possible score range, −4 to 21). Scores were calculated for each restaurant. We obtained information on the predominant race of the population at the block group level for all counties from 2010 US Census data. Results For the 137 restaurants studied, mean CMA scores were low (mean, 1.6; standard deviation [SD], 2.7), ranging from −4 to 9 of 21 possible points. Scores were lowest for restaurants in the predominantly black block groups (mean, 0.2; SD, 0.4) and significantly different from the scores for restaurants in the predominantly white (mean, 1.4; SD, 1.6) and mixed-race block groups (mean, 2.6; SD, 2.4) (F = 4.3; P < .05). Conclusion Children’s menus available in the Dan River Region lack healthy food options, particularly in predominantly black block groups. These study findings can contribute to regional efforts in policy development or environmental interventions for children’s food quality by the community-based participatory research partnership and help local stakeholders to determine possible strategies and solutions for improving local food options for children. PMID:25811495

  9. Towards a North Atlantic Marine Radiocarbon Calibration Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, William; Reimer, Paula; Blaauw, Maarten; Bryant, Charlotte; Rae, James; Burke, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Service du dejeuner! Twenty years ago, in 1995, I sailed as a post-doctoral researcher based at the University of Edinburgh (UK) on the first scientific mission of the new Marion Dufresne II. In this presentation, I will provide an update on the work that first quantified North Atlantic marine radiocarbon reservoir ages, highlighting how advances in marine tephrochronology over the last twenty years have significantly improved our understanding (and ability to test) land-ice-ocean linkages. The mechanistic link that connects marine radiocarbon reservoir ages to ocean ventilation state will also be discussed with reference to the Younger Dryas climate anomaly, where models and data have been successfully integrated. I will discuss the use of reference chronologies in the North Atlantic region and evaluate the common practice of climate synchronization between the Greenland ice cores and some of the key MD records that are now available. The exceptional quality of the MD giant piston cores and their potential to capture high-resolution last glacial sediment records from the North Atlantic provides an exciting opportunity to build new regional marine radiocarbon calibration curves. I will highlight new efforts by my co-authors and others to build such curves, setting-out a new agenda for the next twenty years of the IMAGES programme.

  10. Rate of new HIV diagnoses among Latinos living in Florida: disparities by country/region of birth.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Diana M; Trepka, Mary Jo; Fennie, Kristopher P; Maddox, Lorene M

    2015-01-01

    HIV incidence in the USA is three times higher for Latinos than for non-Latino whites. Latinos differ in educational attainment, poverty, insurance coverage, and health-care access, factors that affect HIV knowledge, risk behaviors, and testing. The purpose of this study was to identify differences in demographics, risk factors, and rate of new HIV diagnoses by birth country/region among Latinos in Florida to guide the targeting of primary and secondary prevention programs. Using Florida HIV/AIDS surveillance data from 2007 to 2011 and the American Community Survey, we compared demographic and risk factors, and calculated annual and five-year age-adjusted rates of new HIV diagnoses for 5801 Latinos by birth country/region. Compared to US-born Latinos, those born in Cuba and South America were significantly more likely to report the HIV transmission mode of MSM; those born in the Dominican Republic (DR) heterosexual transmission; and those born in Puerto Rico injection drug use. Mexican- and Central American-born Latinos were more likely to be diagnosed with AIDS within a month of HIV diagnosis. The rate of new HIV diagnoses among Latinos declined 33% from 2007 to 2011. HIV diagnoses over time decreased significantly for Latinos born in Mexico and increased nonsignificantly for those born in the DR. Although this study was limited to Latinos living in Florida, results suggest that tailoring HIV primary prevention and testing initiatives to specific Latino groups may be warranted. PMID:25397859

  11. Cancer Health Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer health disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  12. AMS Radiocarbon Dating at Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Sean

    2014-09-01

    Current development of a local radiocarbon dating method using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Notre Dame seeks to provide sensitive, reproducible, and accurate measurements for future interdisciplinary projects. While AMS has been the premier radiocarbon dating method for a few decades, repurposing Notre Dame's FN Tandem accelerator for radiocarbon dating has provided many unique challenges. Experiments have shown radiocarbon dating possible and reproducible using the FN Tandem accelerator, found optimal settings for said accelerator, and established sensitivity limits comparable to dedicated radiocarbon dating facilities. In addition, there is ongoing work to create a local chemistry lab to convert organic artifacts into graphite samples to be dated locally. Once the chemistry side has been completed, several artifacts from the IAEA's radiocarbon intercomparison have been procured. Dating these previously studied artifacts will provide an additional measure on the accuracy and repeatability of both the accelerator and chemical treatment. Provided that these IAEA artifacts are dated successfully, exciting projects will ensue, such as the authentication of artwork and dating of anthropological samples.

  13. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  14. What is binocular disparity?

    PubMed Central

    Lappin, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    What are the geometric primitives of binocular disparity? The Venetian blind effect and other converging lines of evidence indicate that stereoscopic depth perception derives from disparities of higher-order structure in images of surfaces. Image structure entails spatial variations of intensity, texture, and motion, jointly structured by observed surfaces. The spatial structure of binocular disparity corresponds to the spatial structure of surfaces. Independent spatial coordinates are not necessary for stereoscopic vision. Stereopsis is highly sensitive to structural disparities associated with local surface shape. Disparate positions on retinal anatomy are neither necessary nor sufficient for stereopsis. PMID:25161634

  15. Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon chronologies: examples from the European Late-glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockley, S. P. E.; Lowe, J. J.; Walker, M. J. C.; Asioli, A.; Trincardi, F.; Coope, G. R.; Donahue, R. E.

    2004-02-01

    Although there are many Late-glacial (ca. 15 000-11 000 cal. yr BP) proxy climate records from northwest Europe, some analysed at a very high temporal resolution (decadal to century scale), attempts to establish time-stratigraphical correlations between sequences are constrained by problems of radiocarbon dating. In an attempt to overcome some of these difficulties, we have used a Bayesian approach to the analysis of radiocarbon chronologies for two Late-glacial sites in the British Isles and one in the Adriatic Sea. The palaeoclimatic records from the three sites were then compared with that from the GRIP Greenland ice-core. Although there are some apparent differences in the timing of climatic events during the early part of the Late-glacial (pre-14 000 cal. yr BP), the results suggest that regional climatic changes appear to have been broadly comparable between Greenland, the British Isles and the Adriatic during the major part of the Late-glacial (i.e. between 14 000 and 11 000 cal. yr BP). The advantage of using the Bayesian approach is that it provides a means of testing the reliability of Late-glacial radiocarbon chronologies that is independent of regional chronostratigraphical (climatostratigraphical) frameworks. It also uses the full radiocarbon inventory available for each sequence and makes explicit any data selection applied. Potentially, therefore, it offers a more objective basis for comparing regional radiocarbon chronologies than the conventional approaches that have been used hitherto. Copyright

  16. The Potential for an Independent Source of Younger Dryas Tree-Ring Radiocarbon Data from the Lake Ontario Region, NE North America, and its Paleoenvironmental Context: a Preliminary Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, C. B.; Southon, J. R.; Kromer, B.; Hogg, A.; Peteet, D. M.; Grote, T.; Cathles, L. M.; Lorentzen, B. E.; Kocik, C.; Kachuck, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tree rings are the gold standard for the calibration of radiocarbon dates into calendar years with limited error due to their annual record of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere. Currently, the tree-ring 14C data used in the International Radiocarbon Calibration curve (IntCal13) are from multiple sources back to ~ 10 ka cal BP for the northern hemisphere. However, the source for tree-ring calibration data prior to ~10 ka cal BP, including the Younger Dryas (YD) and most of the Early Holocene (EH) chronozones, is limited to central Europe. Substantial quantities of logs found in the lowlands of Lake Ontario in North America, dating from 12.1 to 11.2 ka cal BP, have great potential for providing unique YD-EH tree-ring 14C data from a new, previously unrepresented, geographic location and for adding a new perspective to ongoing debates such as the timing of the YD/EH transition in continental North America. Preliminary fieldwork yielded over 43 logs, predominantly spruce (Picea spp.), found buried in alluvial strata over 0.2 hectares of the floodplain at Bell Creek near Fulton, NY. Dendrochronological analysis of 32 spruce logs from this collection has produced several chronologies, one 183 years in length and a second of 147 years with a possible crossdate yielding a chronology of 260 years. Ongoing survey of the site suggests that there is high preservation potential in the same stratigraphic units in an additional ~2 hectares of floodplain, and sample collection with subsequent analysis will increase the chronology's sample depth, extend its length, and potentially provide a robust, independent Younger Dryas - Early Holocene 14C record. Initial assessments of climatic, hydrological, environmental, and isostatic variations and events over time from the tree rings and their stable isotopes, as well as pollen, macrofossil, and sediment analyses and isostatic modeling indicate substantial changes in the Bell Creek Valley and surrounding lowlands both during the YD

  17. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  18. a Radiocarbon Database for Improved Understanding of Global Soil Carbon Dynamics: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Torn, M. S.; Sierra, C. A.; Smith, L. J.; Nave, L. E.; Workshop Paritipants, R.

    2011-12-01

    We report results of a workshop to initiate a global database of radiocarbon measurements in soil and other ecosystem compartments. Radiocarbon provides critical information for understanding the rate of exchange of soil carbon with the atmosphere and hydrosphere. For example, radiocarbon has been used to demonstrate the importance of short range order minerals in stabilizing organic carbon on millennial timescales in some soils. On decadal to centennial timescales, the infiltration of 'bomb' radiocarbon provides a measure of the amount and nature of soil carbon that responds on the timescale of most human impacts. The radiocarbon sigature of chemically or physically fractionated soil, or even in specific organic compounds, can yield clues as to controls on organic matter cycling on a range of timescales. Radiocarbon in microbial biomass or respiration can be a sensitive indicator of shifts in substrate use with vegetation, nutrient availability or temperature change. Taken toghether, such measurements can provide critical tests for models of soil carbon dynamics, while patterns in soil C dynamics with edaphic factors can be used to help parameterize models at spatial scales ranging from profile to landscape to global. The advent and proliferation of accelerator mass spectrometry since the early 1990s has vastly increased the number of radiocarbon analyses carried out in soils. However, these studies have usually been carried out by individual investigators within specific sites or regions, and to date the results have not been assembled, interpreted or compared at larger spatial scales. Given the expense of radiocarbon measurements, and the need for global synthesis products to evaluate and/or develop models of soil carbon response to climate and land use changes across a range of spatial scales, our goals are to: (1) bring together in one place existing radiocarbon measurements and provide a continuing common repository for new analyses; (2) supply ancillary

  19. First radiocarbon dated paleoecological data from the freshwater carbonates of the Danube-Tisza Interfluve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümegi, Pál; Molnár, Dávid; Sávai, Szilvia; Náfrádi, Katalin; Novák, Zsolt; Szelepcsényi, Zoltán; Törőcsik, Tünde

    2015-01-01

    The first radiocarbon dates available on the evolution of the freshwater carbonates of the Danube-Tisza Interfluve are presented in this work along with their possible uses to precisely date paleoecological and paleoenvironmental changes. This work also gives the basis of a comparative analysis of the Holocene radiocarbon-dated profile of Csólyospálos with other Hungarian radiocarbondated profiles of the same age (Bátorliget, the Sárrét, etc.) and the implementation of a detailed chronological and regional paleoenvironmental study. Furthermore, our findings clearly demonstrate the importance of radiocarbon analysis in the study of terminal Pleistocene and Holocene Hungarian sedimentary sequences for accurately dating and reconstructing the chronological order of paleoenvironmental changes as well as the evolution of the natural endowments plus the regional comparison of the various profiles.

  20. Ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Ofili, E

    2001-01-01

    Disparities in the cardiovascular outcomes of African-American patients is evident from national, regional, and local statistical data, as well as from the daily practice of medicine. This discussion highlights the complexity of ethnic disparities using a case-based approach with two typical cases from a cardiology practice. These cases underscore the complex interplay of the following factors in ethnic disparities. 1. Excess burden of cardiovascular risk factors in African Americans, with particular emphasis on high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and psychosocial stress. 2. Inadequate knowledge of how personal risk factors are directly linked to atherosclerosis and heart disease. 3. Cultural factors in symptom recognition and health-care seeking behavior. 4. Economic factors influencing access to health care including prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. 5. A combination of psychosocial stress, racism, and frustration leading to sub-optimal interactions with the health care system. 6. Genetics of disease and predisposition to vascular disease and atherosclerosis. We must come to terms with these fundamental factors in the causation and, therefore, the resolution of ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health. Successful strategies must include: 1) partnerships for long-term, sustainable, population-wide strategies on risk factor modification; 2) models of culturally competent health care delivery; and 3) research on the gene-environment interactions, which cause the susceptibility of ethnic minorities to cardiovascular disease.

  1. Radiocarbon Dating: Fictitious Results with Mollusk Shells.

    PubMed

    Keith, M L; Anderson, G M

    1963-08-16

    Evidence is presented to show that modern mollusk shells from rivers can have anomalous radiocarbon ages, owing mainly to incorporation of inactive (carbon-14-deficient) carbon from humus, probably through the food web, as well as by the pathway of carbon dioxide from humus decay. The resultant effect, in addition to the variable contributions of atmospheric carbon dioxide, fermentative carbon dioxide from bottom muds, and, locally, of carbonate carbon from dissolving limestones, makes the initial carbon-14-activity of ancient fresh-water shell indeterminate, but within limits. Consequent errors of shell radiocarbon dates may be as large as several thousand years for river shells.

  2. Can UK fossil fuel emissions be determined by radiocarbon measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Angelina; O'Doherty, Simon; Rigby, Matthew; Manning, Alistair; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The GAUGE project evaluates different methods to estimate UK emissions. However, estimating carbon dioxide emissions as a result of fossil fuel burning is challenging as natural fluxes in and out of the atmosphere are very large. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements offer a way to specifically measure the amount of recently added carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning. This is possible as, due to their age, all the radiocarbon in fossil fuels has decayed. Hence the amount of recently added CO2 from fossil fuel burning can be measured as a depletion of the 14C content in air. While this method has been successfully applied by several groups on a city or a regional scale, this is the first attempt at using the technique for a national emission estimate. Geographically the UK, being an island, is a good location for such an experiment. But are 14CO2 measurements the ideal solution for estimating fossil fuel emissions as they are heralded to be? Previous studies have shown that 14CO2emissions from the nuclear industry mask the 14C depletion caused by fossil fuel burning and result in an underestimation of the fossil fuel CO2. While this might not be a problem in certain regions around the world, many countries like the UK have a substantial nuclear industry. A correction for this enhancement from the nuclear industry can be applied but are invariably difficult as 14CO2emissions from nuclear power plants have a high temporal variability. We will explain how our sampling strategy was chosen to minimize the influence form the nuclear industry and why this proved to be challenging. In addition we present the results from our ground based measurements to show why trying to estimate national emissions using radiocarbon measurements was overambitious, and how practical the technique is for the UK in general.

  3. Disparity estimation and disparity-coherent watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh Faridul, Hasan; Doërr, Gwenaël.; Baudry, Séverine

    2015-03-01

    In the context of stereo video, disparity-coherent watermarking has been introduced to provide superior robustness against virtual view synthesis, as well as to improve perceived fidelity. Still, a number of practical considerations have been overlooked and in particular the role of the underlying depth estimation tool on performances. In this article, we explore the interplay between various stereo video processing primitives and highlight a few take away lessons that should be accounted for to improve performances of future disparity-coherent watermarking systems. In particular, we highlight how lost correspondences during the stereo warping process impact watermark detection, thereby calling for innovative designs.

  4. An Illustrated Guide to Measuring Radiocarbon from Archaeological Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayliss, Alex; McCormac, Gerry; van der Plicht, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been central to the construction of archaeological chronologies for over 50 years. The archaeological, scientific and (increasingly) statistical methods for interpreting radiocarbon measurements to produce these chronologies have become ever more sophisticated. The accurate measurement of the radiocarbon content of an…

  5. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Marvin W

    2009-03-01

    A technique based on cold argon and oxygen plasmas permits radiocarbon dates to be obtained on paintings that contain inorganic pigments. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry website at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/ancham.).

  6. Educational Disparities and Conflict: Evidence from Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tfaily, Rania; Diab, Hassan; Kulczycki, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the impact of Lebanon's civil war (1975-1991) on disparities in education among the country's main religious sects and across various regions. District of registration is adopted as a proxy for religious affiliation through a novel, detailed classification to assess sectarian differentials by region and regional differentials…

  7. Radiocarbon age of waters in the deep Atlantic revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Virgilio, A. ); Peng, T.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors use a simple box model to evaluate the impact of temporal changes of the atmosphere's {sup 14}C/C on ventilation fluxes for the deep Atlantic calculated from radiocarbon measurements. The conclusion is that despite the fact that over the 300 year period from 1650 to 1950 the atmosphere's radiocarbon content declined at the same rate as radiocarbon decays, this temporal change has a relatively small impact (10-15%) on radiocarbon-based estimates of the ventilation rate of the deep Atlantic. The reason is that the radiocarbon content of the source waters for deep Atlantic are reasonably well buffered against changes in atmospheric {sup 14}C/C.

  8. A complete terrestrial radiocarbon record for 11.2 to 52.8 kyr B.P.

    PubMed

    Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Staff, Richard A; Bryant, Charlotte L; Brock, Fiona; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; van der Plicht, Johannes; Schlolaut, Gordon; Marshall, Michael H; Brauer, Achim; Lamb, Henry F; Payne, Rebecca L; Tarasov, Pavel E; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Gotanda, Katsuya; Yonenobu, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Tada, Ryuji; Nakagawa, Takeshi

    2012-10-19

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) provides a way to date material that contains carbon with an age up to ~50,000 years and is also an important tracer of the global carbon cycle. However, the lack of a comprehensive record reflecting atmospheric (14)C prior to 12.5 thousand years before the present (kyr B.P.) has limited the application of radiocarbon dating of samples from the Last Glacial period. Here, we report (14)C results from Lake Suigetsu, Japan (35°35'N, 135°53'E), which provide a comprehensive record of terrestrial radiocarbon to the present limit of the (14)C method. The time scale we present in this work allows direct comparison of Lake Suigetsu paleoclimatic data with other terrestrial climatic records and gives information on the connection between global atmospheric and regional marine radiocarbon levels.

  9. Radiocarbon dating casts doubt on the late chronology of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in southern Iberia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rachel E; Barroso-Ruíz, Cecilio; Caparrós, Miguel; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F; Galván Santos, Bertila; Higham, Thomas F G

    2013-02-19

    It is commonly accepted that some of the latest dates for Neanderthal fossils and Mousterian industries are found south of the Ebro valley in Iberia at ca. 36 ka calBP (calibrated radiocarbon date ranges). In contrast, to the north of the valley the Mousterian disappears shortly before the Proto-Aurignacian appears at ca. 42 ka calBP. The latter is most likely produced by anatomically modern humans. However, two-thirds of dates from the south are radiocarbon dates, a technique that is particularly sensitive to carbon contaminants of a younger age that can be difficult to remove using routine pretreatment protocols. We have attempted to test the reliability of chronologies of 11 southern Iberian Middle and early Upper Paleolithic sites. Only two, Jarama VI and Zafarraya, were found to contain material that could be reliably dated. In both sites, Middle Paleolithic contexts were previously dated by radiocarbon to less than 42 ka calBP. Using ultrafiltration to purify faunal bone collagen before radiocarbon dating, we obtain ages at least 10 ka (14)C years older, close to or beyond the limit of the radiocarbon method for the Mousterian at Jarama VI and Neanderthal fossils at Zafarraya. Unless rigorous pretreatment protocols have been used, radiocarbon dates should be assumed to be inaccurate until proven otherwise in this region. Evidence for the late survival of Neanderthals in southern Iberia is limited to one possible site, Cueva Antón, and alternative models of human occupation of the region should be considered.

  10. Calibration of radiocarbon dates: tables based on the consensus data of the workshop on calibrating the radiocarbon time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.; Lerman, J.C.; Damon, P.E.; Ralph, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration is presented for conventional radiocarbon ages ranging from 10 to 7240 years BP and thus covering a calendric range of 8000 years from 6050 BC to AD 1950. Distinctive features of this calibration include: (1) an improved data set consisting of 1154 radiocarbon measurements on samples of known age, (2) an extended range over which radiocarbon ages may be calibrated (an additional 530 years), (3) separate 95% confidence intervals (in tubular form) for six different radiocarbon uncertainties (20, 50, 100, 150, 200, 300 years), and (4) an estimate of the non-Poisson errors related to radiocarbon determinations, including an estimate of the systematic errors between laboratories.

  11. Literacy and Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Mooney, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between literacy and health disparities, focusing on the concept of health literacy. Recommendations are provided for ways to bridge the health literacy gap for learners in adult basic education and family literacy programs.

  12. Rural Health Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes; quality; and cost, use, and access. AHRQ publishes an annual National Healthcare Disparities Report that summarizes ... is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  13. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  14. Constructing a database of terrestrial radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, Susan; Torn, Margaret; Smith, Lydia

    2011-10-01

    Terrestrial Radiocarbon Database Workshop; Berkeley, California, 20-22 July 2011 Soils play a large role in the global carbon (C) cycle, but soil C stocks and dynamics remain highly uncertain. Radiocarbon (14C) observations provide critical information on the rates of exchange of soil C with the atmosphere and hydrosphere and how those rates vary with edaphic (soil-related) factors and over a range of time scales. For example, the degree to which radio decay has affected 14C demonstrates the importance of short-range-order minerals for stabilizing organic C on millennial time scales in some soils. Time series that track the infiltration of "bomb" 14C help identify the components of soil C that cycle on decadal to centennial time scales.

  15. Radiocarbon age differences between coexisting foraminiferal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Clark, Elizabeth; Hajdas, Irka; Bonani, Georges

    1999-08-01

    Radiocarbon-age measurements on single species of foraminifera from a core on the Ceara Rise demonstrate the importance of the joint effect of bioturbation and variable rain abundance of foraminifera. The relatively high mixed layer ages for Pulleniatina obliquiloculata reflect, at least in part, an early Holocene peak in its abundance while the relatively young ages for Globorotalia menardii reflect the delay until mid Holocene of its reappearance in the Atlantic Ocean. These results clearly demonstrate that core-top sediment samples need not be representative foraminifera falling from today's surface ocean. Rather, at least on the Ceara Rise, such samples consist of a composite of changing species groupings. These results also reconfirm the pitfalls associated with attempts to reconstruct the radiocarbon age of deep ocean water on the basis of benthic-planktonic foraminiferal age differences.

  16. Engendering health disparities.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2005-01-01

    How is gender implicated in our exploration of health disparities in Canada? Set against the backdrop of federal government policy, this review paper examines the ways in which gender intersects with other health determinants to produce disparate health outcomes. An overview of salient issues including the impact of gender roles, environmental exposures, gender violence, workplace hazards, economic disparities, the costs of poverty, social marginalization and racism, aging, health conditions, interactions with health services, and health behaviours are considered. This review suggests health is detrimentally affected by gender roles and statuses as they intersect with economic disparities, cultural, sexual, physical and historical marginalization as well as the strains of domestic and paid labour. These conditions result in an unfair health burden borne in particular by women whose access to health determinants is--in various degrees--limited. While progress has certainly been made on some fronts, the persistence of health disparities among diverse populations of women and men suggests a postponement of the vision of a just society with health for all that was articulated in the Federal Plan on Gender Equality. Commitment, creativity and collaboration from stakeholders ranging from various levels of government, communities, academics, non-governmental agencies and health professionals will be required to reduce and eliminate health disparities between and among all members of our society. PMID:16078557

  17. Engendering health disparities.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2005-01-01

    How is gender implicated in our exploration of health disparities in Canada? Set against the backdrop of federal government policy, this review paper examines the ways in which gender intersects with other health determinants to produce disparate health outcomes. An overview of salient issues including the impact of gender roles, environmental exposures, gender violence, workplace hazards, economic disparities, the costs of poverty, social marginalization and racism, aging, health conditions, interactions with health services, and health behaviours are considered. This review suggests health is detrimentally affected by gender roles and statuses as they intersect with economic disparities, cultural, sexual, physical and historical marginalization as well as the strains of domestic and paid labour. These conditions result in an unfair health burden borne in particular by women whose access to health determinants is--in various degrees--limited. While progress has certainly been made on some fronts, the persistence of health disparities among diverse populations of women and men suggests a postponement of the vision of a just society with health for all that was articulated in the Federal Plan on Gender Equality. Commitment, creativity and collaboration from stakeholders ranging from various levels of government, communities, academics, non-governmental agencies and health professionals will be required to reduce and eliminate health disparities between and among all members of our society.

  18. Holocene age of the Yuha burial: Direct radiocarbon determinations by accelerator mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Thomas W.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Donahue, D.J.; Duhamel, R.C.; Brendel, K.; Haynes, C.V.; Bischoff, J.L.; Payen, L.A.; Taylor, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The view that human populations may not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere before about 12,000 radiocarbon yr BP1,2 has been challenged by claims of much greater antiquity for a small number of archaeological sites and human skeleton samples. One such site is the Homo sapiens sapiens cairn burial excavated in 1971 from the Yuha desert, Imperial County, California3-5. Radiocarbon analysis of caliche coating one of the bones of the skeleton yielded a radiocarbon age of 21,500??1,000 yr BP4, while radiocarbon and uranium series analyses of caliche coating a cairn boulder yielded ages of 22,125??400 and 19,000??3,000 yr BP, respectively5. The late Pleistocene age assignment to the Yuha burial has been challenged by comparing the cultural context of the burial with other cairn burials in the same region6, on the basis of the site's geomorphological context and from radiocarbon analyses of soil caliches. 7,8 In rebuttal, arguments in defence of the original age assignment have been presented9,10 as well as an amino acid racemization analysis on the Yuha skeleton indicating an age of 23,600??2,600 yr BP11. The tandem accelerator mass spectrometer at the University of Arizona has now been used to measure the ratio of 14C/13C in several organic and inorganic fractions of post-cranial bone from the Yuha H. sapiens sapiens skeleton. Isotope ratios from six chemical fractions all yielded radiocarbon ages for the skeleton of less than 4,000 yr BP. These results indicate that the Yuha skeleton is of Holocene age, in agreement with the cultural context of the burial, and in disagreement with the previously assigned Pleistocene age of 19,000-23,000 yr. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. A new small accelerator for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, M.; Huber, R.; Jacob, S. A. W.; Synal, H.-A.; Schroeder, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    A new small and compact radiocarbon dating facility based on a 500 kV Pelletron accelerator has been built. The novel feature is that it operates with 1{sup +} ions. The interfering molecules are destroyed by collisions in the gas stripper. The results of first test measurements demonstrate that stability, background and transmission are equal to the performance of conventional AMS systems based on larger accelerators.

  20. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1).

  1. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  2. Detection of radiocarbon in the cyclotrino

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, K.J.; Karadi, C.A.; Muller, R.A.; Paulson, G.C.

    1990-04-01

    A small low energy cyclotron (the cyclotrino''), which was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980, has now detected radiocarbon at natural abundance. This device combines the suppression of background through the use of negative ions with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-gated output. Data is presented showing resolution of radiocarbon at natural abundance. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting {sup 14}C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 10{sup 4}. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes are discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  4. Closing the global radiocarbon budget 1945-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naegler, Tobias; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-06-01

    The global radiocarbon cycle of the last 60 years was simulated with the Global Radiocarbon Exploration Model (GRACE). The total radiocarbon production by atmospheric nuclear bomb tests was determined using available stratospheric and tropospheric radiocarbon (14C) observations as constraints. To estimate the range of uncertainty in the explosive force of atmospheric nuclear bomb tests and their respective 14C yield factor, we applied different published bomb test compilations. Furthermore, to account for a possible small bias in the available stratospheric excess radiocarbon observations, we tested the different bomb test compilations with both uncorrected and corrected stratospheric 14C observations. For each of these scenarios of the total bomb 14C burden, the model simulated the distribution of excess radiocarbon among the stratosphere, troposphere, biosphere, and ocean carbon reservoirs. With a global bomb 14C production of 598-632 · 1026 atoms (99-105 kmol) 14C between 1945 and 1980, simulated excess radiocarbon inventories are in good agreement with all available stratospheric and tropospheric radiocarbon observations as well as with the latest estimates of the ocean excess radiocarbon inventories during the GEOSECS and WOCE surveys from Peacock (2004) and Key et al. (2004). For the very first time, our model is thus capable of closing the excess radiocarbon budget on the basis of our current knowledge of exchange rates and reservoir sizes in the global carbon system.

  5. Disparities in Underserved White Populations: The Case of Cancer-Related Disparities in Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Paskett, Electra D.; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Kennedy, Stephenie K.; Conn, Mary Ellen; Roberto, Karen A.; Dwyer, Sharon K.; Fickle, Darla; Dignan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    There are meaningful cancer-related disparities in the Appalachian region of the U.S. To address these disparities, the Appalachia Community Cancer Network (ACCN), a collaboration of investigators and community partners in five states (Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia), is involved in increasing cancer education and awareness, conducting community-based participatory research (CBPR), and creating mentorship and training opportunities. The primary objective of this paper is to describe cancer-related disparities in the Appalachian region of the U.S. as an example of the disparities experienced by underserved, predominantly white, rural populations, and to describe ACCN activities designed to intervene regarding these disparities. An ACCN overview/history and the diverse activities of ACCN-participating states are presented in an effort to suggest potential useful strategies for working to reduce health-related disparities in underserved white populations. Strengths that have emerged from the ACCN approach (e.g., innovative collaborations, long-standing established networks) and remaining challenges (e.g., difficulties with continually changing communities, scarce resources) are described. Important recommendations that have emerged from the ACCN are also presented, including the value of allowing communities to lead CBPR efforts. Characteristics of the community-based work of the ACCN provide a framework for reducing health-related disparities in Appalachia and in other underserved white and rural populations. PMID:21873582

  6. Dynamic neural mechanisms underlie race disparities in social cognition.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brittany S; Krendl, Anne C

    2016-05-15

    Race disparities in behavior may emerge in several ways, some of which may be independent of implicit bias. To mitigate the pernicious effects of different race disparities for racial minorities, we must understand whether they are rooted in perceptual, affective, or cognitive processing with regard to race perception. We used fMRI to disentangle dynamic neural mechanisms predictive of two separable race disparities that can be obtained from a trustworthiness ratings task. Increased coupling between regions involved in perceptual and affective processing when viewing Black versus White faces predicted less later racial trust disparity, which was related to implicit bias. In contrast, increased functional coupling between regions involved in controlled processing predicted less later disparity in the differentiation of Black versus White faces with regard to perceived trust, which was unrelated to bias. These findings reveal that distinct neural signatures underlie separable race disparities in social cognition that may or may not be related to implicit bias. PMID:26908320

  7. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for

  8. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1986-01-01

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3 percent for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  9. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, C.P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E.I.

    1986-03-10

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3% for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  10. Cardiovascular Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Andrew M.; Vinci, Lisa M.; Okwuosa, Tochi M.; Chase, Ayana R.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular health care are well documented. Promising approaches to disparity reduction are increasingly described in literature published since 1995, but reports are fragmented by risk, condition, population, and setting. The authors conducted a systematic review of clinically oriented studies in communities of color that addressed hypertension, hyperlipidemia, physical inactivity, tobacco, and two major cardiovascular conditions, coronary artery disease and heart failure. Virtually no literature specifically addressed disparity reduction. The greatest focus has been African American populations, with relatively little work in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American populations. The authors found 62 interventions, 27 addressing hypertension, 9 lipids, 18 tobacco use, 8 physical inactivity, and 7 heart failure. Only 1 study specifically addressed postmyocardial infarction care. Data supporting the value of registries, multidisciplinary teams, and community outreach were found across several conditions. Interventions addressing care transitions, using telephonic outreach, and promoting medication access and adherence merit further exploration. PMID:17881625

  11. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    PubMed

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old.

  12. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century

    PubMed Central

    Graven, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon (14C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio 14C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ14CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ14CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all 14C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ14CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ14CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas “business-as-usual” emissions will reduce Δ14CO2 to −250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial “aging” of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old. PMID:26195757

  13. Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century.

    PubMed

    Graven, Heather D

    2015-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon ((14)C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fossil fuel emissions, and CO2 cycling between atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Over this century, the ratio (14)C/C in atmospheric CO2 (Δ(14)CO2) will be determined by the amount of fossil fuel combustion, which decreases Δ(14)CO2 because fossil fuels have lost all (14)C from radioactive decay. Simulations of Δ(14)CO2 using the emission scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, the Representative Concentration Pathways, indicate that ambitious emission reductions could sustain Δ(14)CO2 near the preindustrial level of 0‰ through 2100, whereas "business-as-usual" emissions will reduce Δ(14)CO2 to -250‰, equivalent to the depletion expected from over 2,000 y of radioactive decay. Given current emissions trends, fossil fuel emission-driven artificial "aging" of the atmosphere is likely to occur much faster and with a larger magnitude than previously expected. This finding has strong and as yet unrecognized implications for many applications of radiocarbon in various fields, and it implies that radiocarbon dating may no longer provide definitive ages for samples up to 2,000 y old. PMID:26195757

  14. Radiocarbon Dates from a Tomb in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Furst, P T

    1965-02-01

    The first series of radiocarbon dates to be obtained from a deep shaft-and-chamber tomb of the type restricted in Mesoamerica to parts of Nayarit, Jalisco, and Colima in western Mexico ranges from 2230 +/- 100 years to 1710 +/- 80 years. Examination of the evidence indicates that for the present a date equivalent to A.D. 250 should be accepted for at least one phase, possibly a late phase, of the shaft tomb culture and for the hollow, polychrome figurines associated with the tombs.

  15. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  16. Radiocarbon dating and archeology in North America.

    PubMed

    Johnson, F

    1967-01-13

    The history of the development of a radiocarbon chronology shows how the establishment of the times of events and the order of them has greatly improved the understanding of prehistory in North America. This is true also of other parts of the world. Too little has been said of existing discordance between archeologically determined sequences, and interregional associations, and the radiocarbon chronology. It does appear that these will be resolved as additional dates are added and as the results become more finely calibrated so that secular variations may be accounted for. The collaborative aspect of the venture was apparent at the outset. Nevertheless no one expects an archeologist to delve into nuclear physics and geochemistry, and vice versa. There is great need, nevertheless, for the man in the laboratory to comprehend the difficulties of sample collecting and of judgement of the significance of the source of organic matter to be dated. At the same time, the archeologist must become more familiar with the importance of the various steps in the processing of the sample and with, what is most vital, interpretation of the significance of the numbers that appear on the counters.

  17. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  18. Monitoring change in health disparity.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Jeffrey N; Keppel, Kenneth G

    2008-01-01

    Agencies and programs tasked to reduce and eliminate disparity need the best available methods to assess the success of their efforts. When monitoring disparity it is vital to be aware of how absolute and relative measures of disparity, and when changes are measured, can lead to different conclusions regarding progress. Absolute and relative disparities for homicide rates between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites were calculated on an annual basis for 1989 through 2003. A joinpoint regression of rates was used to identify where significant changes occurred over the 15-year period. Absolute and relative changes in disparity were measured for each interval identified. The annualized percent changes in homicide rates for each interval were used to evaluate how relative rates of change in homicide affect disparity. Three distinct change points were found for homicide rates and changes in disparity between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites for the period 1989-2003. Intervals 2 (1991-1994) and 3 (1994-1999) had declines in both absolute and relative disparity. Only interval 3 had disparity reductions sufficient, if they had continued, to suggest any elimination of disparity within the next 5 years. Reduction in the relative difference between groups is the best evidence of progress toward eliminating disparity. The relative rate of improvement for the group with less favorable rate must be greater than that of the group with the more favorable rate. It is just as important to be aware of when disparity is being assessed in a longer overall trend.

  19. Upper-ocean-to-atmosphere radiocarbon offsets imply fast deglacial carbon dioxide release.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kathryn A; Sikes, Elisabeth L; Guilderson, Thomas P; Shane, Phil; Hill, Tessa M; Zahn, Rainer; Spero, Howard J

    2010-08-26

    Radiocarbon in the atmosphere is regulated largely by ocean circulation, which controls the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the deep sea through atmosphere-ocean carbon exchange. During the last glaciation, lower atmospheric CO(2) levels were accompanied by increased atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations that have been attributed to greater storage of CO(2) in a poorly ventilated abyssal ocean. The end of the ice age was marked by a rapid increase in atmospheric CO(2) concentrations that coincided with reduced (14)C/(12)C ratios (Delta(14)C) in the atmosphere, suggesting the release of very 'old' ((14)C-depleted) CO(2) from the deep ocean to the atmosphere. Here we present radiocarbon records of surface and intermediate-depth waters from two sediment cores in the southwest Pacific and Southern oceans. We find a steady 170 per mil decrease in Delta(14)C that precedes and roughly equals in magnitude the decrease in the atmospheric radiocarbon signal during the early stages of the glacial-interglacial climatic transition. The atmospheric decrease in the radiocarbon signal coincides with regionally intensified upwelling and marine biological productivity, suggesting that CO(2) released by means of deep water upwelling in the Southern Ocean lost most of its original depleted-(14)C imprint as a result of exchange and isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. Our data imply that the deglacial (14)C depletion previously identified in the eastern tropical North Pacific must have involved contributions from sources other than the previously suggested carbon release by way of a deep Southern Ocean pathway, and may reflect the expanded influence of the (14)C-depleted North Pacific carbon reservoir across this interval. Accordingly, shallow water masses advecting north across the South Pacific in the early deglaciation had little or no residual (14)C-depleted signals owing to degassing of CO(2) and biological uptake in the Southern Ocean.

  20. Calibration of the radiocarbon time scale at 37ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J.R.; Deino, A.L.; Orsi, G.

    1995-12-01

    Results from radiocarbon and U-Th measurements on corals have provided a radiocarbon calibration beyond the range covered by tree ring series, but the uncertainties in the measurements beyond 20ka BP are very large. We have obtained new calibration data from radiocarbon dates on material associated with the catastrophic Campanian Ignimbrite eruption from the Phlegrean Fields near Naples. The eruption has been well dated by {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar to 37ka BP. Radiocarbon measurements were carried out on charcoal from a carbonized branch exposed within the ignimbrite tuff on the wall of an active quarry. The sample was split and analyzed at both the Naples and Lawrence Livermore AMS facilities. The offset between the Ar-Ar data and the radiocarbon results (recalculated using the true 5730-year half life for {sup 14}C) is consistent with predictions from paleomagnetic data and carbon cycle modeling.

  1. Genetic Research and Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Pamela; Cho, Mildred K.; Condit, Celeste M.; Hunt, Linda M.; Koenig, Barbara; Marshall, Patricia; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin; Spicer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Alleviating health disparities in the United States is a goal with broad support. Medical research undertaken to achieve this goal typically adopts the well-established perspective that racial discrimination and poverty are the major contributors to unequal health status. However, the suggestion is increasingly made that genetic research also has a significant role to play in alleviating this problem, which likely overstates the importance of genetics as a factor in health disparities. Overemphasis on genetics as a major explanatory factor in health disparities could lead researchers to miss factors that contribute to disparities more substantially and may also reinforce racial stereotyping, which may contribute to disparities in the first place. Arguments that promote genetics research as a way to help alleviate health disparities are augmented by several factors, including research funding initiatives and the distinct demographic patterns of health disparities in the United States. PMID:15213210

  2. Disparities in Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E; Han, Jini H

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This paper describes trends in screening mammography utilization over the past decade and assesses the remaining disparities in mammography use among medically underserved women. We also describe the barriers to mammography and report effective interventions to enhance utilization. DESIGN We reviewed medline and other databases as well as relevant bibliographies. MAIN RESULTS The United States has dramatically improved its use of screening mammography over the past decade, with increased rates observed in every demographic group. Disparities in screening mammography are decreasing among medically underserved populations but still persist among racial/ethnic minorities and low-income women. Additionally, uninsured women and those with no usual care have the lowest rates of reported mammogram use. However, despite apparent increases in mammogram utilization, there is growing evidence that limitations in the national survey databases lead to overestimations of mammogram use, particularly among low-income racial and ethnic minorities. CONCLUSIONS The United States may be farther from its national goals of screening mammography, particularly among underserved women, than current data suggests. We should continue to support those interventions that increase mammography use among the medically underserved by addressing the barriers such as cost, language and acculturation limitations, deficits in knowledge and cultural beliefs, literacy and health system barriers such as insurance and having a source regular of medical care. Addressing disparities in the diagnostic and cancer treatment process should also be a priority in order to affect significant change in health outcomes among the underserved. PMID:15009798

  3. Diabetes Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Monica E.; Cargill, Algernon; Huang, Elbert S.

    2008-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities bear a disproportionate burden of the diabetes epidemic; they have higher prevalence rates, worse diabetes control, and higher rates of complications. This article reviews the effectiveness of health care interventions at improving health outcomes and/or reducing diabetes health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities with diabetes. Forty-two studies met inclusion criteria. On average, these health care interventions improved the quality of care for racial/ethnic minorities, improved health outcomes (such as diabetes control and reduced diabetes complications), and possibly reduced health disparities in quality of care. There is evidence supporting the use of interventions that target patients (primarily through culturally tailored programs), providers (especially through one-on-one feedback and education), and health systems (particularly with nurse case managers and nurse clinicians). More research is needed in the areas of racial/ethnic minorities other than African Americans and Latinos, health disparity reductions, long-term diabetes-related outcomes, and the sustainability of health care interventions over time. PMID:17881626

  4. Radiocarbon dating casts doubt on the late chronology of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in southern Iberia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Rachel E.; Barroso-Ruíz, Cecilio; Caparrós, Miguel; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F.; Galván Santos, Bertila; Higham, Thomas F. G.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that some of the latest dates for Neanderthal fossils and Mousterian industries are found south of the Ebro valley in Iberia at ca. 36 ka calBP (calibrated radiocarbon date ranges). In contrast, to the north of the valley the Mousterian disappears shortly before the Proto-Aurignacian appears at ca. 42 ka calBP. The latter is most likely produced by anatomically modern humans. However, two-thirds of dates from the south are radiocarbon dates, a technique that is particularly sensitive to carbon contaminants of a younger age that can be difficult to remove using routine pretreatment protocols. We have attempted to test the reliability of chronologies of 11 southern Iberian Middle and early Upper Paleolithic sites. Only two, Jarama VI and Zafarraya, were found to contain material that could be reliably dated. In both sites, Middle Paleolithic contexts were previously dated by radiocarbon to less than 42 ka calBP. Using ultrafiltration to purify faunal bone collagen before radiocarbon dating, we obtain ages at least 10 ka 14C years older, close to or beyond the limit of the radiocarbon method for the Mousterian at Jarama VI and Neanderthal fossils at Zafarraya. Unless rigorous pretreatment protocols have been used, radiocarbon dates should be assumed to be inaccurate until proven otherwise in this region. Evidence for the late survival of Neanderthals in southern Iberia is limited to one possible site, Cueva Antón, and alternative models of human occupation of the region should be considered. PMID:23382220

  5. Advancing the use of radiocarbon in studies of global and regional carbon cycling with high precision measurements of carbon-14 in carbon dioxide from the Scripps Carbon Dioxide Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, Heather Dawn

    Measurements of 14C in atmospheric CO2 have served as a powerful geochemical tracer since the first observation programs began over 50 years ago. As the nuclear weapons tests of the 1950s and 60s caused an enormous perturbation to natural atmospheric 14C levels, tracking the response of 14C in CO2 provided a measure of exchange rates between different regions of the atmosphere and between the troposphere and the ocean surface and terrestrial biosphere. Early measurements of 14C/12C, or Delta14 C, in tree rings provided clear evidence that rising CO2 concentrations were due to human activities by revealing the dilution of 14C in the atmosphere by the combustion of million year old fossil carbon, a process termed the "Suess Effect". This thesis aimed to continue and expand the use of Delta14 C in atmospheric CO2 for investigating carbon cycle dynamics. Since much of the excess 14C derived from nuclear weapons testing has been redistributed into oceanic and biospheric reservoirs, trends and gradients in Delta14C of CO2 have diminished to levels that are nearly commensurate with measurement precision at most laboratories. Development of improved methods for Delta14C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory advanced measurement uncertainty to 1.7‰. Application of the improved analytical procedures to an archive of CO 2 samples from the Scripps CO2 Program produced 2-15 year monthly time series of Delta14C at seven global sampling stations. The high precision observations show variability in the secular trend of Delta14C that could enable new insights to the climatic influences on CO2 exchange. Measurement of a shift in the Delta 14C gradient between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres since the 1980s also places constraints on regional fluxes of carbon, with particular relevance to Southern Ocean dynamics. The measurements presented here contribute significantly to the amount and global coverage of recent Delta14 C

  6. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    PubMed

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site. PMID:26704325

  7. Radiocarbon signal of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in nearby trees.

    PubMed

    Janovics, R; Kelemen, D I; Kern, Z; Kapitány, S; Veres, M; Jull, A J T; Molnár, M

    2016-03-01

    Tree ring series were collected from the vicinity of a Hungarian radioactive waste treatment and disposal facility and from a distant control background site, which is not influenced by the radiocarbon discharge of the disposal facility but it represents the natural regional (14)C level. The (14)C concentration of the cellulose content of tree rings was measured by AMS. Data of the tree ring series from the disposal facility was compared to the control site for each year. The results were also compared to the (14)C data of the atmospheric (14)C monitoring stations at the disposal facility and to international background measurements. On the basis of the results, the excess radiocarbon of the disposal facility can unambiguously be detected in the tree from the repository site.

  8. Challenges faced when using radiocarbon measurements to estimate fossil fuel emissions in the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Rigby, M. L.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Allen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Estimating the anthropogenic component of carbon dioxide emissions from direct atmospheric measurements is difficult, due to the large natural carbon dioxide fluxes. One way of determining the fossil fuel component of atmospheric carbon dioxide is the use of radiocarbon measurements. Whilst carbon reservoirs with a reasonably fast carbon exchange rate all have a similar radiocarbon content, fossil fuels are completely devoid of radiocarbon due to their age. Previous studies have 14CO2 (UK) this approach is compromised by the high density of 14CO2 emitting nuclear power plants. Of the 16 nuclear reactors in the UK, 14 are advanced gas cooled reactors, which have one of the highest 14CO2 emission rates of all reactor types. These radiocarbon emissions not only lead to a serious underestimation of the recently added fossil fuel CO2, by masking the depletion of 14C in CO2, but can in fact overshadow the depletion by a factor of 2 or more. While a correction for this enhancement can be applied, the emissions from the nuclear power plants are highly variable, and an accurate correction is therefore not straightforward. We present the first attempt to quantify UK fossil fuel CO2 emissions through the use of 14CO2. We employ a sampling strategy that makes use of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, in combination with nuclear industry emission estimates, to forecast "good" sampling times, in an attempt to minimize the correction due to emissions from the nuclear industry. As part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project, 14CO2measurements are performed at two measurement sites in the UK and Ireland, as well as during science flights around the UK. The measurement locations have been chosen with a focus on high emitting regions such as London and the Midlands. We discuss the unique challenges that face the determination of fossil fuel emissions through radiocarbon measurements in the UK and our sampling strategy to deal with them. In addition we

  9. Optimization of simultaneous tritium-radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicalzi, R. M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Mace, E. K.; Moran, J. J.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a natural methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium-counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta-decay interference.

  10. Radiocarbon dating of a very large African baobab.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F; Lowy, Daniel A; Alberts, Andries H; Pohlman, John W; Wittmann, Rudolf; Gerlach, Dana; Xu, Li; Mitchell, Clark S

    2007-11-01

    In late 2004, Grootboom, probably the largest known African baobab (Adansonia digitata L.), collapsed unexpectedly in northeastern Namibia. Ten wood samples collected from different areas of the trunk were processed and investigated by accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating. The radiocarbon dates of three samples were greater than 1000 years BP (radiocarbon years before present, i.e., before AD 1950). The corresponding calibrated calendar age of the oldest sample was 1275 +/- 50 years, making Grootboom the oldest known angiosperm tree with reliable dating results. Variations in radiocarbon dates among the wood samples indicated that, morphologically, Grootboom was a quintuple tree, whereas genetically, it was a single individual. Ages of extreme lateral samples revealed that, over the past 500-600 years, Grootbooom had almost ceased growing, providing information about climate changes in central southern Africa. The sudden demise of Grootboom coincided with the spread of the poorly studied baobab disease, which has become epidemic in Namibia.

  11. Poverty determinants of acute respiratory infections among Mapuche indigenous peoples in Chile's Ninth Region of Araucania, using GIS and spatial statistics to identify health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Flavio

    2007-01-01

    Background This research concerns Araucanía, often called the Ninth Region, the poorest region of Chile where inequalities are most extreme. Araucanía hasn't enjoyed the economic success Chile achieved when the country returned to democracy in 1990. The Ninth Region also has the largest ethnic Mapuche population, located in rural areas and attached to small agricultural properties. Written and oral histories of diseases have been the most frequently used methods to explore the links between an ancestral population's perception of health conditions and their deprived environments. With census data and hospital records, it is now possible to incorporate statistical data about the links between poverty and disease among ethnic communities and compare results with non-Mapuche population. Data sources Hospital discharge records from Health Services North N = 24,126 patients, year 2003, and 7 hospitals), Health Services South (N = 81,780 patients and 25 hospitals); CAS-2/Family records (N = 527,539 individuals, 439 neighborhoods, 32 Comunas). Methods Given the over-dispersion of data and the clustered nature of observations, we used the global Moran's I and General G Gettis-Ord procedures to test spatial dependence. These tests confirmed the clusters of disease and the need to use spatial regression within a General Linear Mixed Model perspective. Results Health outcomes indicate significantly higher morbidity rates for the Mapuche compared to non-Mapuche in both age groups < 5 and 15–44, respectively; for the groups 70–79 and 80 + years of age, this trend is reversed. Mortality rates, however, are higher among Mapuches than non-Mapuches for the entire Ninth Region and for all age groups. Mortality caused by respiratory infections is higher among Mapuches than non-Mapuches in all age-groups. A major finding is the link between poverty and respiratory infections. Conclusion Poverty is significantly associated with respiratory infections in the population of Chile

  12. Constraining the shallow subtropical overturning circulation with archived radiocarbon records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Swart, P. K.; Thorrold, S. R.; Roberts, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    Archived radiocarbon records in accretionary skeletons can be used to constrain the shallow overturning subtropical cells (STC's) that transport significant amounts of tropical heat poleward in the world's oceans. Radiocarbon values of DIC in the world's oceans reflect a continuum between waters residing on the surface over long periods (high Δ14C due to equilibration with "modern" atmosphere) and waters decoupled from the atmosphere in the abyss (low Δ14C due to radioisotope decay), as well as mixtures between water masses of different ages. Thus, measurements of radiocarbon have demonstrated utility in assessing convective heat tranport such as the Meridional Overturning Circulation that is central to global climate. A prominent radiocarbon gradient is also present between the subsiding subtropical surface waters and the upwelling equatorial surface waters in the world's oceans due to the presence of STC's. These convection cells transport a major proportion of tropical heat in the Pacific and a significant proportion of tropical heat in the Atlantic towards the poles. Archived radiocarbon records in surface corals and subsurface sclerosponges constrain the N. Atlantic STC's on a centennial time scale. Published short records from Cape Verde corals indicate significant changes in radiocarbon content; this is potentially related to migration of the front between upwelled tropical waters and downwelled subtropical waters. An approach is outlined to estimate the proportion of tropical to subtropical waters at Cape Verde using as endmembers high-resolution sclerosponge radiocarbon records from Bahamas subsurface waters and coral radiocarbon records from São Tome and Principe in the Gulf of Guinea. Preliminary data from Bahamas sclerosponges indicate the need for high-resolution subsampling of the skeletons. Initial novel AMS measurements from fine scale laser-decomposition of the skeletons are presented.

  13. Investigating bomb radiocarbon transport in the southern Pacific Ocean with otolith radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, G. L.; Fallon, S. J.; Izzo, C.; Wood, R.; Gillanders, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    To explore the transport of carbon into water masses from the surface ocean to depths of ∼ 1000 m in the southwest Pacific Ocean, we generated time series of radiocarbon (Δ14C) from fish otoliths. Otoliths (carbonate earstones) from long-lived fish provide an indirect method to examine the "bomb pulse" of radiocarbon that originated in the 1950s and 1960s, allowing identification of changes to distributions of 14C that has entered and mixed within the ocean. We micro-sampled ocean perch (Helicolenus barathri) otoliths, collected at ∼ 400- 500 m in the Tasman Sea, to obtain measurements of Δ14C for those depths. We compared our ocean perch Δ14C series to published otolith-based marine surface water Δ14C values (Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) and nannygai (Centroberyx affinis)) and to published deep-water values (800-1000 m; orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus)) from the southwest Pacific to establish a mid-water Δ14C series. The otolith bomb 14C results from these different depths were consistent with previous water mass results in the upper 1500 m of the southwest Pacific Ocean (e.g. World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Geochemical Ocean Sections Study). A comparison between the initial Δ14C bomb pulse rise at 400-500 m suggested a ventilation lag of 5 to 10 yr, whereas a comparison of the surface and depths of 800-1000 m detailed a 10 to 20 yr lag in the time history of radiocarbon invasion at this depth. Pre-bomb reservoir ages derived from otolith 14C located in Tasman Sea thermocline waters were ∼ 530 yr, while reservoir ages estimated for Tasman Antarctic intermediate water were ∼ 730 yr.

  14. Predicted net efflux of radiocarbon from the ocean and increase in atmospheric radiocarbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Rau, Greg H.; Duffy, Philip B.

    Prior to changes introduced by man, production of radiocarbon (14C) in the stratosphere nearly balanced the flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the ocean and land biosphere, which in turn nearly balanced radioactive decay in these 14C reservoirs. This balance has been altered by land-use changes, fossil-fuel burning, and atmospheric nuclear detonations. Here, we use a model of the global carbon cycle to quantify these radiocarbon fluxes and make predictions about their magnitude in the future. Atmospheric nuclear detonations increased atmospheric 14C content by about 80% by the mid-1960's. Since that time, the 14C content of the atmosphere has been diminishing as this bomb radiocarbon has been entering the oceans and terrestrial biosphere. However, we predict that atmospheric 14C content will reach a minimum and start to increase within the next few years if fossil-fuel burning continues according to a “business-as-usual” scenario, even though fossil fuels are devoid of 14C. This will happen because fossil-fuel carbon diminishes the net flux of 14C from the atmosphere to the oceans and land biosphere, forcing 14C to accumulate in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the net flux of both bomb and natural 14C into the ocean are predicted to continue to slow and then, in the middle of the next century, to reverse, so that there will be a net flux of 14C from the ocean to the atmosphere. The predicted reversal of net 14C fluxes into the ocean is a further example of human impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  15. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  16. Air pollutants targeted by radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    Chemists at the Commerce Department's National Bureau of Standards (NBS) are answering questions about where certain atmospheric contaminants originate by refining a method best known for determining the age of archeological objects. Called radiocarbon dating, the method allows NBS scientists to examine air samples and determine whether contaminants come from naturally occurring or manmade sources-or a combination of the two. Making these distinctions is important to federal and state environmental agencies, which identify industrial sources of pollution for regulatory action. An overbalance of atmospheric carbon can cause a number of environmental problems. In methane's case, high levels are of concern to environmental agencies because of greenhouse properties. Methane also has been implicated as a possible contributor to changes in the ozone layer that protects the Earth from excessive ultraviolet light. Levels of methane have been increasing at an annual rate of about one percent over the last decade. This has caused concern in the environmental community, which hopes to determine just where the elevated levels are coming from. The NBS research is aimed at definitively pinpointing sources of methane and other atmospheric contaminants.

  17. Radiocarbon: nature's tracer for carbonaceous pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.; Klouda, G.A.; Gerlach, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Recent developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have made it feasible to determine /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratios in samples containing milligram or even microgram quantities of carbon. As a result, it has become practicable to apply these techniques to the study of trace gases and particles in the atmosphere, as a means of resolving anthropogenic from natural source components. Interpretation of /sup 14/C data is straightforward: biospheric carbon (such as vegetation) is alive with a /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratio of about 1.5 x 10 to the 12th power, whereas fossil carbon is dead. Beyond this dichotomous classification it becomes very interesting to combine the isotopic data with concurrent chemical data, as well as spatial and temporal distributions, in order to infer the strengths of specific sources of carbonaceous pollutants. A brief review will be presented of program on atmospheric gases and carbonaceous particles. For the latter, the authors have assayed individual chemical and size fractions, and samples collected in urban, rural, and remote locales. The biogenic carbon fraction -- presumably from wood-burning -- ranged from 10 to 100% for the urban samples analyzed.

  18. One country, two worlds - the health disparity in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyue; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Fei; Hoekstra, Edward J; Zhuo, Jiatong

    2012-01-01

    As result of its spectacular economic growth, millions of Chinese have been lifted out of poverty, making China a model for impoverished countries. Although, for many, economic growth has led to prosperity, ever-growing disparities exist between those who have benefited from the economic advancement and those left behind. Massive gaps in development exist between: regions, urban and rural and social groups. This contribution is to develop a detailed understanding of the health disparity in China by examining the discrepancies in major health indicators. Current efforts to reduce the disparities, and its challenges, opportunities and global implications are also assessed.

  19. High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Levy, Thomas E; Higham, Thomas; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Smith, Neil G; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Robinson, Mark; Münger, Stefan; Knabb, Kyle; Schulze, Jürgen P; Najjar, Mohammad; Tauxe, Lisa

    2008-10-28

    Recent excavations and high-precision radiocarbon dating from the largest Iron Age (IA, ca. 1200-500 BCE) copper production center in the southern Levant demonstrate major smelting activities in the region of biblical Edom (southern Jordan) during the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. Stratified radiocarbon samples and artifacts were recorded with precise digital surveying tools linked to a geographic information system developed to control on-site spatial analyses of archaeological finds and model data with innovative visualization tools. The new radiocarbon dates push back by 2 centuries the accepted IA chronology of Edom. Data from Khirbat en-Nahas, and the nearby site of Rujm Hamra Ifdan, demonstrate the centrality of industrial-scale metal production during those centuries traditionally linked closely to political events in Edom's 10th century BCE neighbor ancient Israel. Consequently, the rise of IA Edom is linked to the power vacuum created by the collapse of Late Bronze Age (LB, ca. 1300 BCE) civilizations and the disintegration of the LB Cypriot copper monopoly that dominated the eastern Mediterranean. The methodologies applied to the historical IA archaeology of the Levant have implications for other parts of the world where sacred and historical texts interface with the material record.

  20. Old radiocarbon ages in the southwest Pacific Ocean during the last glacial period and deglaciation

    PubMed

    Sikes; Samson; Guilderson; Howard

    2000-06-01

    Marine radiocarbon (14C) dates are widely used for dating oceanic events and as tracers of ocean circulation, essential components for understanding ocean-climate interactions. Past ocean ventilation rates have been determined by the difference between radiocarbon ages of deep-water and surface-water reservoirs, but the apparent age of surface waters (currently approximately 400 years in the tropics and approximately 1,200 years in Antarctic waters) might not be constant through time, as has been assumed in radiocarbon chronologies and palaeoclimate studies. Here we present independent estimates of surface-water and deep-water reservoir ages in the New Zealand region since the last glacial period, using volcanic ejecta (tephras) deposited in both marine and terrestrial sediments as stratigraphic markers. Compared to present-day values, surface-reservoir ages from 11,900 14C years ago were twice as large (800 years) and during glacial times were five times as large (2,000 years), contradicting the assumption of constant surface age. Furthermore, the ages of glacial deep-water reservoirs were much older (3,000-5,000 years). The increase in surface-to-deep water age differences in the glacial Southern Ocean suggests that there was decreased ocean ventilation during this period.

  1. High-precision radiocarbon dating and historical biblical archaeology in southern Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Thomas E.; Higham, Thomas; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Smith, Neil G.; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Robinson, Mark; Münger, Stefan; Knabb, Kyle; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Najjar, Mohammad; Tauxe, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Recent excavations and high-precision radiocarbon dating from the largest Iron Age (IA, ca. 1200–500 BCE) copper production center in the southern Levant demonstrate major smelting activities in the region of biblical Edom (southern Jordan) during the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. Stratified radiocarbon samples and artifacts were recorded with precise digital surveying tools linked to a geographic information system developed to control on-site spatial analyses of archaeological finds and model data with innovative visualization tools. The new radiocarbon dates push back by 2 centuries the accepted IA chronology of Edom. Data from Khirbat en-Nahas, and the nearby site of Rujm Hamra Ifdan, demonstrate the centrality of industrial-scale metal production during those centuries traditionally linked closely to political events in Edom's 10th century BCE neighbor ancient Israel. Consequently, the rise of IA Edom is linked to the power vacuum created by the collapse of Late Bronze Age (LB, ca. 1300 BCE) civilizations and the disintegration of the LB Cypriot copper monopoly that dominated the eastern Mediterranean. The methodologies applied to the historical IA archaeology of the Levant have implications for other parts of the world where sacred and historical texts interface with the material record. PMID:18955702

  2. A radiocarbon-dated cave sequence and the Pleistocene/Holocene transition in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sümegi, Pál; Náfrádi, Katalin

    2015-11-01

    The Petény Cave located on the Hungarian Highlands yielded one of the most well-documented vertebrate fauna of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene in Hungary. In addition to the vertebrate remains, considerable numbers of mollusc shells and charcoals were retrieved from the profile of the rock shelter. Furthermore, a pollen sequence close to the cavewas also evaluated in order to reconstruct the flora of the region. A new radiocarbon analysis of samples from the Petény Cave was used to correlate data of different methods and to correct the earlier outcomes. The cave sequence exposes layers from 15.180 cal BP to 483 cal BP. Nevertheless, based on our new radiocarbon data, the sequence is incomplete and layers corresponding to the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary are missing from the profile. The results of our radiocarbon analysis clearly support considerable amounts of thermo-mesophylous gastropod species appearing as early as 15.180 cal BP. The appearance of deciduous woodlands in the Carpathian Basin along with the concomitant mollusc elements is much earlier than previously assumed, supporting the presence of temperate woodland refugia in the study area.

  3. Sharing a disparate landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Khan, Carolyne

    2010-06-01

    Working across boundaries of power, identity, and political geography is fraught with difficulties and contradictions. In Tali Tal and Iris Alkaher's, " Collaborative environmental projects in a multicultural society: Working from within separate or mutual landscapes?" the authors describe their efforts to do this in the highly charged atmosphere of Israel. This forum article offers a response to their efforts. Writing from a framework of critical pedagogy, I use the concepts of space and time to anchor my analysis, as I examine the issue of power in this Jew/Arab collaborative environmental project. This response problematizes "sharing" in a landscape fraught with disparities. It also looks to further Tal and Alkaher's work by geographically and politically grounding it in the broader current conflict and by juxtaposing sustainability with equity.

  4. Latitude and longitude vertical disparities.

    PubMed

    Read, Jenny C A; Phillipson, Graeme P; Glennerster, Andrew

    2009-12-09

    The literature on vertical disparity is complicated by the fact that several different definitions of the term "vertical disparity" are in common use, often without a clear statement about which is intended or a widespread appreciation of the properties of the different definitions. Here, we examine two definitions of retinal vertical disparity: elevation-latitude and elevation-longitude disparities. Near the fixation point, these definitions become equivalent, but in general, they have quite different dependences on object distance and binocular eye posture, which have not previously been spelt out. We present analytical approximations for each type of vertical disparity, valid for more general conditions than previous derivations in the literature: we do not restrict ourselves to objects near the fixation point or near the plane of regard, and we allow for non-zero torsion, cyclovergence, and vertical misalignments of the eyes. We use these expressions to derive estimates of the latitude and longitude vertical disparities expected at each point in the visual field, averaged over all natural viewing. Finally, we present analytical expressions showing how binocular eye position-gaze direction, convergence, torsion, cyclovergence, and vertical misalignment-can be derived from the vertical disparity field and its derivatives at the fovea.

  5. Healthcare Disparities in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Graciela J.; Martin, Greg S.; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the current literature on racial and gender disparities in critical care and the mechanisms underlying these disparities in the course of acute critical illness. Data Sources MEDLINE search on the published literature addressing racial, ethnic, or gender disparities in acute critical illness such as sepsis, acute lung injury, pneumonia, venous thromboembolism, and cardiac arrest. Study Selection Clinical studies that evaluated general critically ill patient populations in the United States as well as specific critical care conditions were reviewed with a focus on studies evaluating factors and contributors to health disparities. Data Extraction Study findings are presented according to their association with the incidence, clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in acute critical illness. Data Synthesis This review presents potential contributors for racial and gender disparities related to genetic susceptibility, comorbidities, preventive health services, socioeconomic factors, cultural differences, and access to care. The data is organized along the course of acute critical illness. Conclusions The literature to date shows that disparities in critical care are most likely multifactorial involving individual, community, and hospital-level factors at several points in the continuum of acute critical illness. The data presented identify potential targets as interventions to reduce disparities in critical care and future avenues for research. PMID:24121467

  6. Preparation of bone samples in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory for AMS radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, N; Goslar, T

    2002-12-01

    In the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory, a system for preparation of samples for AMS dating has been built. At first it was used to produce graphite targets from plant macrofossils and sediments. In this study we extended its capabilities with the preparation of bones. We dealt with 3 methods; the first was the classical Longin method of collagen extraction, the second one included additional treatment of powdered bone in alkali solution, while in the third one carboxyl carbon was separated from amino acids obtained after hydrolysis of protein. The suitability of the methods was tested on 2 bone samples. Most of our samples gave ages > 40 kyr BP, suggesting good performance of the adapted methods, except for one sample prepared with simple Longin method. For routine preparation of bones we chose the Longin method with additional alkali treatment.

  7. Entamoeba dispar strains: analysis of polymorphism in Tunisian isolates.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Soumaya Ben; Bouratbine, Aida

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect intra-species polymorphism in Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar is an important tool for studying geographic distribution and transmission mechanisms. E. dispar and E. histolytica share the same mechanism for transmission among human hosts, and so after differentiation between these species. We studied the intra-species variation and distribution of E. dispar strains obtained from cyst passers, specifically from African students and Tunisian food handlers. We analyzed the polymorphic region of the chitinase protein gene in 13 individuals infected with E. dispar, of which 9 were from Tunisia and 4 from other African countries. We identified 7 different chitinase patterns in Tunisians while the 4 isolates from other countries each had a distinct pattern. Two of the patterns we found have been reported in studies from Mexico and India, possibly indicating worldwide spread of certain strains.

  8. Radiocarbon dating the appearance of modern humans and timing of cultural innovations in Europe: new results and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Conard, Nicholas J; Bolus, Michael

    2003-03-01

    New radiocarbon dates from the sites of Bockstein-Törle, Geissenklösterle, Hohle Fels, Hohlenstein-Stadel, Sirgenstein, and Vogelherd in the Swabian Jura of southwestern Germany indicate that the Aurignacian of the region spans the period from ca. 40-30ka BP. If the situation at Vogelherd, in which skeletal remains from modern humans underlie an entire Aurignacian sequence, is viewed as representative for the region, the dates from the Swabian Jura support the hypothesis that populations of modern humans entered the region by way of the "Danube Corridor." The lithic technology from the lower Aurignacian of Geissenklösterle III is fully developed, and classic Aurignacian forms are well represented. During the course of the Aurignacian, numerous assemblages rich in art works, jewelry, and musical instruments are documented. By no later than 29ka BP the Gravettian was well established in the region. These dates are consistent with the "Kulturpumpe" hypothesis that important cultural innovations of the Aurignacian and Gravettian in Swabia predate similar developments in other regions of Europe. The radiocarbon dates from Geissenklösterle corroborate observations from other non-archaeological data sets indicating large global fluctuations in the atmospheric concentrations of radiocarbon between 30 and 50ka calendar years ago. These fluctuations lead to complications in building reliable chronologies during this period and cause the "Middle Paleolithic Dating Anomaly" and the "Coexistence Effect," which tend to exaggerate the temporal overlap between Neanderthals and modern humans.

  9. Mediterranean Sea surface radiocarbon reservoir age changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Siani, G; Paterne, M; Michel, E; Sulpizio, R; Sbrana, A; Arnold, M; Haddad, G

    2001-11-30

    Sea surface reservoir ages must be known to establish a common chronological framework for marine, continental, and cryospheric paleoproxies, and are crucial for understanding ocean-continent climatic relationships and the paleoventilation of the ocean. Radiocarbon dates of planktonic foraminifera and tephra contemporaneously deposited over Mediterranean marine and terrestrial regions reveal that the reservoir ages were similar to the modern one (approximately 400 years) during most of the past 18,000 carbon-14 years. However, reservoir ages increased by a factor of 2 at the beginning of the last deglaciation. This is attributed to changes of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation during the massive ice discharge event Heinrich 1.

  10. Mediterranean Sea surface radiocarbon reservoir age changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Siani, G; Paterne, M; Michel, E; Sulpizio, R; Sbrana, A; Arnold, M; Haddad, G

    2001-11-30

    Sea surface reservoir ages must be known to establish a common chronological framework for marine, continental, and cryospheric paleoproxies, and are crucial for understanding ocean-continent climatic relationships and the paleoventilation of the ocean. Radiocarbon dates of planktonic foraminifera and tephra contemporaneously deposited over Mediterranean marine and terrestrial regions reveal that the reservoir ages were similar to the modern one (approximately 400 years) during most of the past 18,000 carbon-14 years. However, reservoir ages increased by a factor of 2 at the beginning of the last deglaciation. This is attributed to changes of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation during the massive ice discharge event Heinrich 1. PMID:11729315

  11. Disparities in women's cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Jean C; Pettey, Christina M; Souder, Elaine; Rhoads, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women, and disparities affect the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of CVD for women. Biology, genetics, and race contribute to these disparities. Obstetric-gynecologic health care providers routinely encounter women who are at risk for developing CVD and are uniquely positioned as a point of access to intervene to improve/prevent CVD by assessing for risks and discussing healthy lifestyle changes during routine visits.

  12. Disability disparities: a beginning model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of disability disparities. Though the concept of health disparities is discussed in the health care literature, there is no such model that explicitly addresses disparities in the disability literature. Therefore, this model begins to fill a void in the disability literature. Part of the value of such a model is that it represents an attempt to address the question of why cultural competency is important in the disability arena at this point in the 21st century. The urgency in addressing cultural competency at this time in history is supported by understanding the multiple accountability demands on rehabilitation and disability providers these days, e.g., increasing diversification of the United States population, that render providing effective services to everyone a clear mandate. The author provides a working definition of disability disparity. The disability disparity model is described in terms of its five-domain continuum as well as its macro- and micro-level aspects that are designed to both promote clarity of the concept for researchers and offer practitioners ideas on how to explore the existence of disability disparities in working with specific service recipients. Limitations and strengths of the model are discussed along with suggested next steps in model validation. PMID:19802930

  13. Entamoeba dispar: genetic diversity of Iranian isolates based on serine-rich Entamoeba dispar protein gene.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, A; Rasti, S; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, E; Kazemi, B; Bandehpour, M; Nochi, Z; Hooshyar, H; Rezaian, M

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) gene have already exhibited stable and significant polymorphism in the gene studies. Serine-rich protein is also present and polymorphic in Entamoeba dispar which called SREDP. The polymorphism of the Serine-Rich Entamoeba dispar Protein (SREDP) gene among 8 isolates obtained from Iranian cyst carriers were analyzed by a nested PCR-RFLP followed by sequencing of the PCR products. From those isolates, six distinct DNA patterns were observed after PCR-RFLP of the nested PCR, whereas sequencing showed 8 different patterns among the isolates. The results demonstrate an extensive genetic variability among Iranian E. dispar isolates. The repeat-containing region of the SREDP was found extensively polymorphic in size, number and order of repeat units. Genetic diversity of Iranian E. dispar isolates based on the SREDP was more polymorphic in comparison of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) of the E. histolytica isolates as well as were different from a few known SREDP genes.

  14. Divergent Radiocarbon Age Distributions of Carbon Pools in a Major Temperate River: Implications for Sources, Reactivity, and Land-Ocean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Guo, L.; Perkey, D. W.; Raymond, P.; Bianchi, T. S.; Grottoli, A. G.; Matsui, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers collectively transport carbon to the oceans in amounts comparable to other net global carbon fluxes. The characteristics of the carbon pools exported by major world rivers have largely been defined by studies of a single system - the Amazon - yet a significant fraction of global river water and material fluxes are driven by major temperate rivers which have received more limited study. We present new findings on the carbon pools of the Mississippi River system, which drains one of the most highly engineered drainage basins in the world. The three major pools (dissolved organic and inorganic C and particulate organic C; DOC, DIC and POC, respectively) have entirely disparate source-age characteristics, suggesting that each arises from unique reservoirs and/or processes in the Mississippi Basin. In particular, the radiocarbon (14C) contents of the organic matter pools indicate that river DOC arises from surface runoff of contemporary biomass, whereas POC originates from deeper soil horizons and/or protracted river bed erosion. Between the Upper Mississippi and the confluence of the Ohio River, concentrations of DOC and DIC along the mainstem of the river show non-conservative behavior. Downriver of the Ohio River confluence, however, DOC and DIC when corrected for tributary inputs remain essentially unchanged, suggesting the relative inertness of these pools over a significant length of the Mississippi. While a major part of the Mississippi and Ohio River watersheds is agricultural, carbon inputs from corn-dominated regions appear to be relatively limited. The export of carbon pools of highly divergent source-ages from the Mississippi and possibly other major temperate rivers indicates that terrestrial carbon losses from these systems may need to be reassessed in continent-scale and ocean carbon budgets.

  15. Southern Ocean Carbon Sink Constraints from Radiocarbon in Drake Passage Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C. M.; Lehman, S.; Miller, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the earth's largest regional net carbon sinks due to strong westerly winds, which drive surface gas exchange, deep mixing and upwelling. The strength of the sink is set by complex interactions between the physical circulation, gas exchange and biological activity in surface waters. Recent work by others has predicted that global warming may weaken the sink by strengthening the regional winds, increasing upwelling and the flux of deep, naturally carbon-rich and radiocarbon-depleted water into the surface mixed layer. The resulting decrease in the air-sea pCO2 gradient is thought to overwhelm other compensating changes, causing a weakened net sink. Here we demonstrate the use of precise measurements of radiocarbon in Drake Passage air (14CO2) to detect short-term fluctuations in the Southern Ocean gross sea-to-air C flux, and by extension, possible changes in the net carbon sink and their underlying causes. Drake Passage boundary layer air has been sampled since 2006 at roughly fortnightly intervals as part of NOAA's Cooperative Air Sampling Network, resulting in a 5-year high-resolution 14CO2 time-series with accompanying same-flask CO2 concentration measurements. Atmospheric measurements at Drake Passage are representative of zonal average exchange fluxes due to strong mixing by the westerly winds. In preliminary results, anomalously low ∆14C values are correlated with positive states of the Southern Annular Mode, a hemispheric-scale indicator of stronger westerly winds in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Simulations from the TM5 atmospheric transport model with a detailed global radiocarbon budget are used to interpret the results. These results appear to support the hypothesized link between stronger westerly winds and a weaker Southern Ocean carbon sink.

  16. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Stockhammer, Philipp W; Massy, Ken; Knipper, Corina; Friedrich, Ronny; Kromer, Bernd; Lindauer, Susanne; Radosavljević, Jelena; Wittenborn, Fabian; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2), which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2) around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria) and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz) A1 and Bronze (Bz) A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900-1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology.

  17. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating

    PubMed Central

    Knipper, Corina; Friedrich, Ronny; Kromer, Bernd; Lindauer, Susanne; Radosavljević, Jelena; Wittenborn, Fabian; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2), which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2) around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria) and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz) A1 and Bronze (Bz) A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900–1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology. PMID:26488413

  18. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Stockhammer, Philipp W; Massy, Ken; Knipper, Corina; Friedrich, Ronny; Kromer, Bernd; Lindauer, Susanne; Radosavljević, Jelena; Wittenborn, Fabian; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2), which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2) around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria) and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz) A1 and Bronze (Bz) A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900-1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology. PMID:26488413

  19. Bomb radiocarbon in metabolically inert tissues from terrestrial and marine mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Bada, J.L.; Vrolijk, C.D.; Brown, S.; Druffel, E.R.M.; Hedges, R.E.M.

    1987-10-01

    We report here radiocarbon measurements of monkey eye lens nucleus proteins and a narwhal tusk, biological tissues which have sampled the bomb radiocarbon signal in different ways. The results confirm the metabolic inertness of eye lens nucleus proteins and demonstrate the feasibility of measuring radiocarbon in small samples of biological tissue using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The narwhal tusk provides a unique record of the radiocarbon activity in Arctic Ocean waters over most of the 20th century.

  20. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication. PMID:25788477

  1. Addressing Disparities in Stroke Prevention for Atrial Fibrillation: Educational Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Rachel; Berman, Adam E; Gross, Hartmut; Hess, David C; Jauch, Edward C; Viser, Paul E; Solenski, Nina J; Wolf, Andrew M D

    2016-07-01

    Disparities in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke and mortality persist, especially racial disparities, within the US "Stroke Belt." This study identified barriers to optimal stroke prevention to develop a framework for clinician education. A comprehensive educational needs assessment was developed focusing on clinicians within the Stroke Belt. The mixed qualitative-quantitative approach included regional surveys and one-on-one clinician interviews. Identified contributors to disparities included implicit racial biases, lack of awareness of racial disparities in AF stroke risk, and lack of effective multicultural awareness and training. Additional barriers affecting disparities included patient medical mistrust and clinician-patient communication challenges. General barriers included lack of consistency in assessing stroke and anticoagulant-related bleeding risk, underuse of standardized risk assessment tools, discomfort with novel anticoagulants, and patient education deficiencies. Effective cultural competency training is one strategy to reduce disparities in AF-related stroke and mortality by improving implicit clinician bias, addressing medical mistrust, and improving clinician-patient communication.

  2. Radiocarbon dates from the Casa Grande. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This report suggests a very early Civano construction date for Casa Grande, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Arizona on the basis of C14 dates from fragments of two primary roof beams. The radiocarbon dates presented are seen as a positive contribution to an understanding of the history of Casa Grande.

  3. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements can p...

  4. VOC RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS DURING SCOS97 AND EMISSIONS INVENTORY VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. In September 1997 during SCOS97 a series of 3-h canister samples of ambient air were collected at the Azusa air monitoring station during morning and afternoon periods. ...

  5. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of 14C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1+ charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  6. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  7. Health disparities: reframing the problem.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathleen E

    2003-03-01

    Health disparities are of continuing concern to the community of public health professionals. Despite concerted efforts on a number of fronts, little progress seems to have been made towards eliminating these disparities. This is due in part to a frame of reference that focuses on race and racism. While racism plays a role, continued focus on socially constructed racial groups will not lead to solutions to the problem. Humans are biological organisms and the presence of disease indicates a maladaptation between the individual human organism and its environment. Lumping together into a 'racial' group large numbers of individuals who share little in terms of phenotype, culture, and/or behavior inhibits reaching appropriate solutions. Progress will only be made when the issue of health disparities is reframed as one of phenotype/environmental mismatch. Such a frame crosscuts current racial groups. Health disparities such as hypertension, prostate cancer, low-birth-weight (LBW) infants, infant mortality, rickets, and melanoma are affected by the interactions of degree of pigmentation, amount of exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and levels of serum vitamin D. Reframing the problem of health disparities from one of race and racism to one of phenotype/environmental mismatch permits a solution to an otherwise intractable problem.

  8. High-precision radiocarbon dating shows recent and rapid initial human colonization of East Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Hunt, Terry L.; Lipo, Carl P.; Anderson, Atholl J.

    2011-01-01

    The 15 archipelagos of East Polynesia, including New Zealand, Hawaii, and Rapa Nui, were the last habitable places on earth colonized by prehistoric humans. The timing and pattern of this colonization event has been poorly resolved, with chronologies varying by >1000 y, precluding understanding of cultural change and ecological impacts on these pristine ecosystems. In a meta-analysis of 1,434 radiocarbon dates from the region, reliable short-lived samples reveal that the colonization of East Polynesia occurred in two distinct phases: earliest in the Society Islands A.D. ∼1025–1120, four centuries later than previously assumed; then after 70–265 y, dispersal continued in one major pulse to all remaining islands A.D. ∼1190–1290. We show that previously supported longer chronologies have relied upon radiocarbon-dated materials with large sources of error, making them unsuitable for precise dating of recent events. Our empirically based and dramatically shortened chronology for the colonization of East Polynesia resolves longstanding paradoxes and offers a robust explanation for the remarkable uniformity of East Polynesian culture, human biology, and language. Models of human colonization, ecological change and historical linguistics for the region now require substantial revision. PMID:21187404

  9. High-precision radiocarbon dating shows recent and rapid initial human colonization of East Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Janet M; Hunt, Terry L; Lipo, Carl P; Anderson, Atholl J

    2011-02-01

    The 15 archipelagos of East Polynesia, including New Zealand, Hawaii, and Rapa Nui, were the last habitable places on earth colonized by prehistoric humans. The timing and pattern of this colonization event has been poorly resolved, with chronologies varying by >1000 y, precluding understanding of cultural change and ecological impacts on these pristine ecosystems. In a meta-analysis of 1,434 radiocarbon dates from the region, reliable short-lived samples reveal that the colonization of East Polynesia occurred in two distinct phases: earliest in the Society Islands A.D. ∼1025-1120, four centuries later than previously assumed; then after 70-265 y, dispersal continued in one major pulse to all remaining islands A.D. ∼1190-1290. We show that previously supported longer chronologies have relied upon radiocarbon-dated materials with large sources of error, making them unsuitable for precise dating of recent events. Our empirically based and dramatically shortened chronology for the colonization of East Polynesia resolves longstanding paradoxes and offers a robust explanation for the remarkable uniformity of East Polynesian culture, human biology, and language. Models of human colonization, ecological change and historical linguistics for the region now require substantial revision.

  10. Environmental Health Disparities in Housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The physical infrastructure and housing make human interaction possible and provide shelter. How well that infrastructure performs and which groups it serves have important implications for social equity and health. Populations in inadequate housing are more likely to have environmental diseases and injuries. Substantial disparities in housing have remained largely unchanged. Approximately 2.6 million (7.5%) non-Hispanic Blacks and 5.9 million Whites (2.8%) live in substandard housing. Segregation, lack of housing mobility, and homelessness are all associated with adverse health outcomes. Yet the experience with childhood lead poisoning in the United States has shown that housing-related disparities can be reduced. Effective interventions should be implemented to reduce environmental health disparities related to housing. PMID:21551378

  11. Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.; Krueger, Patrick M.; Denney, Justin T.

    2011-01-01

    The inverse relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) and unhealthy behaviors such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been well demonstrated empirically but encompass diverse underlying causal mechanisms. These mechanisms have special theoretical importance because disparities in health behaviors, unlike disparities in many other components of health, involve something more than the ability to use income to purchase good health. Based on a review of broad literatures in sociology, economics, and public health, we classify explanations of higher smoking, lower exercise, poorer diet, and excess weight among low-SES persons into nine broad groups that specify related but conceptually distinct mechanisms. The lack of clear support for any one explanation suggests that the literature on SES disparities in health and health behaviors can do more to design studies that better test for the importance of the varied mechanisms. PMID:21909182

  12. Widening economic & social disparities: implications for India.

    PubMed

    Kurian, N J

    2007-10-01

    India is often characterized as an emerging economic super power. The huge demographic dividend, the high quality engineering and management talent, the powerful Indian diaspora and the emerging Indian transnational--kneeling the optimism. In contrast, there is another profile of India which is rather gloomy. This is the country with the largest number of the poor, illiterates and unemployed in the world. High infant mortality, morbidity and widespread anaemia among women and children continue. India suffers from acute economic and social disparities. This article addresses four dimensions of such disparities, viz. regional, rural-urban, social, and gender. There is empirical evidence to indicate that during the last two decades all these disparities have been increasing. As a result of economic reforms, the southern and western States experienced accelerated economic and social development as compared to northern and eastern States. This has led to widening gap in income, poverty and other indicators of development between the two regions. Rural-urban divide also widened in the wake of reforms. While large and medium cities experience unprecedented economic prosperity, the rural areas experience economic stagnation. As a result, there is widespread agrarian distress which results in farmers' suicide and rural unrest. Socially backward sections, especially scheduled castes and tribes (SCs and STs) have gained little from the new prosperity which rewards disproportionately those with assets, skills and higher education. STs have often been victims of development as a result of displacement. The gender gap in social and economic status, traditionally more in India as compared to other societies; has further widened by the economic reforms and globalization. The approach paper to the Eleventh Plan stresses the importance of more inclusive economic growth. It emphasizes the need for bridging the divides discussed in this article. Unless these are achieved in a time

  13. Educating primary care clinicians about health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Chiapa, Ana L

    2007-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health disparities inarguably exist in the United States. It is important to educate primary care clinicians regarding this topic because they have the ability to have an impact in the reduction of health disparities. This article presents the evidence that disparities exist, how clinicians contribute to these disparities, and what primary care clinicians can do to reduce disparities in their practice. Clinicians are able to impact health disparities by receiving and providing cross-cultural education, communicating effectively with patients, and practicing evidence-based medicine. The changes suggested herein will have an impact on the current state of health of our nation. PMID:17371577

  14. Changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age in Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China during the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifeng; He, Yuxin; Wu, Duo; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Can; Liu, Zhonghui; Yu, Junqing

    2015-01-01

    Chronology is a necessary component of paleoclimatology. Radiocarbon dating plays a central role in determining the ages of geological samples younger than ca. 50 ka BP. However, there are many limitations for its application, including radiocarbon reservoir effects, which may cause incorrect chronology in many lakes. Here we demonstrate temporal changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age of Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China, where radiocarbon ages based on bulk organic matter have been reported in previous studies. Our new radiocarbon ages, determined from terrestrial plant macrofossils suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir age changed from 960 to 2200 years during the last 8500 cal a BP years. These changes to the reservoir effect were associated with inputs from either pre-aged organic carbon or 14C-depleted hard water in Lake Xingyun caused by hydrological change in the lake system. The radiocarbon reservoir age may in return be a good indicator for the carbon source in lake ecosystems and depositional environment.

  15. Changes in the Radiocarbon Reservoir Age in Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China during the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aifeng; He, Yuxin; Wu, Duo; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Can; Liu, Zhonghui; Yu, Junqing

    2015-01-01

    Chronology is a necessary component of paleoclimatology. Radiocarbon dating plays a central role in determining the ages of geological samples younger than ca. 50 ka BP. However, there are many limitations for its application, including radiocarbon reservoir effects, which may cause incorrect chronology in many lakes. Here we demonstrate temporal changes in the radiocarbon reservoir age of Lake Xingyun, Southwestern China, where radiocarbon ages based on bulk organic matter have been reported in previous studies. Our new radiocarbon ages, determined from terrestrial plant macrofossils suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir age changed from 960 to 2200 years during the last 8500 cal a BP years. These changes to the reservoir effect were associated with inputs from either pre-aged organic carbon or 14C-depleted hard water in Lake Xingyun caused by hydrological change in the lake system. The radiocarbon reservoir age may in return be a good indicator for the carbon source in lake ecosystems and depositional environment. PMID:25815508

  16. Short-latency ocular following in humans is dependent on absolute (rather than relative) binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Yang, D-S; Miles, F A

    2003-06-01

    A previous study showed that the initial ocular following responses elicited by sudden motion of a large random-dot pattern were only modestly attenuated when that whole pattern was shifted out of the plane of fixation by altering its horizontal binocular disparity, but the same disparity applied to a restricted region of the dots had a much more powerful effect [Vision Research 41 (2001) 3371]. Thus, if the dots were partitioned into horizontal bands, for example, and alternate bands were moved in opposite directions to the left or right then ocular following was very weak, but if the (conditioning) dots moving in one direction were all shifted out of the plane of fixation (by applying horizontal disparity to them) then strong ocular following was now seen in the direction of motion of the (test) dots in the plane of fixation, i.e., moving images became much less effective when they were given binocular disparity. We sought to determine if the greater impact of disparity with the partitioned images was because there were additional relative disparity cues. We used a similar partitioned display and found that the dependence of ocular following on the absolute disparity of the conditioning stimulus had a Gaussian form with an x-offset that was close to zero disparity and, importantly, this offset was almost unaffected by changing the absolute disparity of the test stimulus. We conclude from this that it is the absolute--rather than the relative--disparity that is important, and that ocular following has a strong preference for moving images whose absolute disparities are close to zero. This is consistent with the idea that ocular following selectively stabilizes the retinal images of objects in and around the plane of fixation and works in harmony with disparity vergence, which uses absolute disparity to bring objects of interest into the plane of fixation [Archives of Ophthalmology 55 (1956) 848].

  17. Radiocarbon dating of marine material: mollusc versus foraminifera ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, L.; Long, A. J.; Plets, R. M.; Cooper, A.; Belknap, D. F.; Edwards, R.; Jackson, D.; Kelley, J. T.; Long, D.; Milne, G. A.; Monteys, X.; Quinn, R.

    2013-12-01

    A key challenge in reconstructing Quaternary environmental change from marine archives is developing a robust chronology. During the last ~50k a-1, radiocarbon dating is the mainstay for many studies. Often investigators are restricted in the material that is available for dating, with studies relying on AMS dating of either mono-specific or mixed assemblages of foraminifera. In some instances, marine molluscs (broken or whole, articulated or disarticulated) may also be present and can provide an alternative or complementary dating target. Previous radiocarbon dating of paired foraminiferal and marine molluscan samples from the Kattegat (Denmark) revealed significant age offsets between these materials, inferred to reflect greater reworking of foraminifera compared to the marine molluscs (Heier-Nielsen et al., 1995). Here we present the results of a comparable study from the Irish Sea Basin, which forms part of a wider investigation into the evidence for the Late Glacial sea-level minima at offshore sites from around Britain and Ireland. We have collected and AMS 14C-dated twelve paired samples of foraminifera and marine shells. The results shows a systematic age offset with the monospecific foraminifera samples consistently giving older ages than their shell counterparts. This offset increases with sample age, reaching a maximum offset of 3000 years in the oldest sample (~ 13 ka cal a BP). These results are consistent with the observations of Heier-Nielsen et al. (1995), and we hypothesize that foraminifera may be more susceptible to reworking from older deposits because of their lower effective density than the shell samples. However, foraminifera size and shape may also be contributing factors. These findings are potentially significant for studies that develop chronologies based on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera alone, since the resulting dates may over-estimate sample age by several thousand years. We conclude by outlining an experimental design that seeks

  18. Measures of Disparity. A Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosthal, Richard A.

    Four measures of disparity were used to compute changes in the distribution of education dollars for each of the 50 states between 1970 and 1975. Three of the measures have been used by analysts and have known statistical properties, and the fourth is a less formal measure that has been embodied in a federal regulation. These measures include 1)…

  19. The Disparity of Principal Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, M. Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This study begins with a review of court cases that have helped shape public education in America. Following the review is an analysis of federal reform in education from 1965 to the present, paired with educational leadership literature to highlight a disparity in what federal mandates and state policies have in place for accountability measures.…

  20. Eliminating Disparities in School Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishioka, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in suspension rates for White, Black, Hispanic, and American Indian students are more often a result of inequitable disciplinary actions than differences in behavior. Exclusionary discipline undermines students' academic achievement by weakening their connection with school and removing them from the classroom. Students who…

  1. Toward Explaining Mental Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aneshensel, Carol S.

    2009-01-01

    Mental health disparities refer to the disproportionate amount of psychopathology found among persons of disadvantageous social standing, such as persons of low socioeconomic status (SES). Although social and self selection cannot entirely be ruled out as explanations for these differences, the accumulation of evidence supports a social causation…

  2. NON-DESTRUCTIVE RADIOCARBON DATING: NATURALLY MUMMIFIED INFANT BUNDLE FROM SW TEXAS

    SciTech Connect

    Steelman, K L; Rowe, M W; Turpin, S A; Guilderson, T P; Nightengale, L

    2004-09-07

    Plasma oxidation was used to obtain radiocarbon dates on six different materials from a naturally mummified baby bundle from the Lower Pecos River region of southwest Texas. This bundle was selected because it was thought to represent a single event and would illustrate the accuracy and precision of the plasma oxidation method. Five of the materials were clearly components of the original bundle with 13 dates combined to yield a weighted average of 2135 {+-} 11 B.P. Six dates from a wooden stick of Desert Ash averaged 939 {+-} 14 B.P., indicating that this artifact was not part of the original burial. Plasma oxidation is shown to be a virtually non-destructive alternative to combustion. Because only sub-milligram amounts of material are removed from an artifact over its exposed surface, no visible change in fragile materials has been observed, even under magnification. The method is best applied when natural organic contamination is unlikely and serious consideration of this issue is needed in all cases. If organic contamination is present, it will have to be removed before plasma oxidation to obtain accurate radiocarbon dates.

  3. In search of in-situ radiocarbon in Law Dome ice and firn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Levchenko, V. A.; Etheridge, D. M.; Lowe, D. C.; Hua, Q.; Trudinger, C. M.; Zoppi, U.; Elcheikh, A.

    2000-10-01

    Results of AMS radiocarbon measurements on CO and CO 2 separated from firn air directly pumped from the ice sheet, and on CO 2 separated from air extracted from ice cores by a dry grating technique, are presented. The firn air samples and ice cores used in this study were collected from the region of Law Dome, Antarctica. No evidence of in-situ 14CO 2 was found in the firn air samples or the ice core air samples from one site although a slight enhancement of 14CO above expected polar atmospheric concentrations was observed for some firn air samples. A clear in-situ 14CO 2 signal for ice pre-dating the radiocarbon bomb pulse was found, however, in air samples extracted from an ice core from a second site. We compare these results and propose an hypothesis to explain this apparent contradiction. The degree to which in-situ 14C is released from the ice crystals during trapping and bubble formation is considered and discussed. The selectivity of the dry grating technique for the extraction of trapped atmospheric gases from ice cores is also discussed and compared with other methods.

  4. Study of a metallurgical site in Tuscany (Italy) by radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartocci, A.; Fedi, M. E.; Taccetti, F.; Benvenuti, M.; Chiarantini, L.; Guideri, S.

    2007-06-01

    Tuscany represents one of the most important ancient mining districts of Italy. Metalworking activities have been present in the area since ancient times and several mining centres have been active in the region since the Etruscan period. Two of the more notable mining locations are the island of Elba and the towns of Populonia and Massa Marittima. In order to reconstruct the development of metallurgical techniques in the past, a multi-disciplinary approach is required, involving both archaeological study and archaeometric analysis of the sites of interest. One of the most complex problems is establishing the chronological history of metallurgical exploitation in ancient sites: archaeological remains are sometimes incomplete and the stratigraphy of archaeological horizons might have been deeply altered. Thus, direct dating of metallurgical slags and other remains of mining and metalworking activities using radiocarbon measurements is particularly useful for developing site chronologies. Charcoal samples from a recent excavation in Populonia were dated by AMS radiocarbon in order to reconstruct the chronological evolution of ancient metallurgical production; results reported here are consistent with archaeological observations.

  5. Test of Martin’s overkill hypothesis using radiocarbon dates on extinct megafauna

    PubMed Central

    Surovell, Todd A.; Pelton, Spencer R.; Anderson-Sprecher, Richard; Myers, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    Following Martin [Martin PS (1973) Science 179:969–974], we propose the hypothesis that the timing of human arrival to the New World can be assessed by examining the ecological impacts of a small population of people on extinct Pleistocene megafauna. To that end, we compiled lists of direct radiocarbon dates on paleontological specimens of extinct genera from North and South America with the expectation that the initial decline of extinct megafauna should correspond in time with the initial evidence for human colonization and that those declines should occur first in eastern Beringia, next in the contiguous United States, and last in South America. Analyses of spacings and frequency distributions of radiocarbon dates for each region support the idea that the extinction event first commenced in Beringia, roughly 13,300–15,000 BP. For the United States and South America, extinctions commenced considerably later but were closely spaced in time. For the contiguous United States, extinction began at ca. 12,900–13,200 BP, and at ca. 12,600–13,900 BP in South America. For areas south of Beringia, these estimates correspond well with the first significant evidence for human presence and are consistent with the predictions of the overkill hypothesis. PMID:26504205

  6. Test of Martin's overkill hypothesis using radiocarbon dates on extinct megafauna.

    PubMed

    Surovell, Todd A; Pelton, Spencer R; Anderson-Sprecher, Richard; Myers, Adam D

    2016-01-26

    Following Martin [Martin PS (1973) Science 179:969-974], we propose the hypothesis that the timing of human arrival to the New World can be assessed by examining the ecological impacts of a small population of people on extinct Pleistocene megafauna. To that end, we compiled lists of direct radiocarbon dates on paleontological specimens of extinct genera from North and South America with the expectation that the initial decline of extinct megafauna should correspond in time with the initial evidence for human colonization and that those declines should occur first in eastern Beringia, next in the contiguous United States, and last in South America. Analyses of spacings and frequency distributions of radiocarbon dates for each region support the idea that the extinction event first commenced in Beringia, roughly 13,300-15,000 BP. For the United States and South America, extinctions commenced considerably later but were closely spaced in time. For the contiguous United States, extinction began at ca. 12,900-13,200 BP, and at ca. 12,600-13,900 BP in South America. For areas south of Beringia, these estimates correspond well with the first significant evidence for human presence and are consistent with the predictions of the overkill hypothesis.

  7. Test of Martin's overkill hypothesis using radiocarbon dates on extinct megafauna.

    PubMed

    Surovell, Todd A; Pelton, Spencer R; Anderson-Sprecher, Richard; Myers, Adam D

    2016-01-26

    Following Martin [Martin PS (1973) Science 179:969-974], we propose the hypothesis that the timing of human arrival to the New World can be assessed by examining the ecological impacts of a small population of people on extinct Pleistocene megafauna. To that end, we compiled lists of direct radiocarbon dates on paleontological specimens of extinct genera from North and South America with the expectation that the initial decline of extinct megafauna should correspond in time with the initial evidence for human colonization and that those declines should occur first in eastern Beringia, next in the contiguous United States, and last in South America. Analyses of spacings and frequency distributions of radiocarbon dates for each region support the idea that the extinction event first commenced in Beringia, roughly 13,300-15,000 BP. For the United States and South America, extinctions commenced considerably later but were closely spaced in time. For the contiguous United States, extinction began at ca. 12,900-13,200 BP, and at ca. 12,600-13,900 BP in South America. For areas south of Beringia, these estimates correspond well with the first significant evidence for human presence and are consistent with the predictions of the overkill hypothesis. PMID:26504205

  8. The radiocarbon budget for Mono Lake: an unsolved mystery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broecker, W.S.; Wanninkhof, R.; Mathieu, G.; Peng, T.-H.; Stine, S.; Robinson, S.; Herczeg, A.; Stuiver, M.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1957 the 14C C ratio of the dissolved inorganic carbon in Mono Lake has risen by about 60???. The magnitude of this increase is about four times larger than that expected from the invasion of bomb-produced 14C from the atmosphere. We have eliminated the following explanations: (1) measurement error, (2) an unusually high physical exchange rate for non-reactive gases, (3) inorganic enhancement of the CO2 exchange rate, and (4) biological enhancement of the CO2 exchange rate. Clandestine disposal of waste radiocarbon remains a dark-horse explanation. In the course of our investigations we have uncovered evidence for at least one episodic input of radiocarbon-free carbon to the lake over the last 1000 years. We speculate that this injection was related to a hydrothermal event resulting from sublacustrine volcanic activity. ?? 1988.

  9. Radiocarbon age of the kohitsugire calligraphy and the kiwamefuda certificate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Kazuomi; Nakamura, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    Kohitsugire are ancient paper sheets with elegant calligraphy. They were originally leaves of ancient manuscripts written mainly from the 8th to the 15th century. Old manuscripts are rarely discovered as complete books; therefore, kohitsugire can be significant materials for historical studies if the written ages or the calligraphists or both are known. Most of kohitsugire have kiwamefuda certificates which identify the calligraphists. This is also a clue about the written age. In this study, we determined the written ages of kohitsugire from three viewpoints: radiocarbon dating, calligraphical investigation and the kiwamefuda. Comparison of radiocarbon age and the calligraphical evidence of each kohitsugire give fair agreement. The results are, however, in obvious conflict with the age of the calligraphist noted on the kiwamefuda, and showed the doubtful reliability of kiwamefuda.

  10. New radiocarbon dates on the cereals from Wadi Kubbaniya

    SciTech Connect

    Wendorf, F.; Schild, R.; Close, A.E.; Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Wieckowska, H.; Kobusiewicz, M.; Issawi, B.; el Hadidi, N.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978, three carbonized grains of barley and a carbonized grain of einkorn wheat were found in a buried hearth at a Late Paleolithic site at Wadi Kubbaniya in Egypt. In 1981, two large clusters of barley seeds, which were identified as six-row barley and thus domestic, were found at a nearby site of comparable age. Numerous grinding stones, presumed to have been used for processing the cereals, were found in these and other sites, often deeply buried, and 30 radiocarbon dates placed the occupations between 18,500 and 17,000 radiocarbon years ago. These finds led us to suggest an early origin of food production, with implications for the initial development of complex societies. Several barley seeds were analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy to determine the maximal temperature to which they had been subjected before burial. Six barley seeds and three small pieces of wood charcoal were dated directly by using a tandem accelerator mass spectrometer.

  11. Radiocarbon dating of plant macrofossils from tidal-marsh sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemp, A.C.; Nelson, Alan R.; Horton, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal-marsh sediment is an archive of Holocene environmental changes, including movements of sea and land levels, and extreme events such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Accurate and precise radiocarbon dating of environmental changes is necessary to estimate rates of change and the recurrence interval (frequency) of events. Plant macrofossils preserved in growth position (or deposited soon after death) in tidal-marsh sediment are ideal samples for dating such changes. In this chapter, we focus on the selection of plant macrofossils for radiocarbon dating and the application of ages from different types of macrofossils to varied research projects, and make recommendations for selection and preparation of tidal-marsh samples for dating.

  12. Radiocarbon concentration in modern tree rings from Valladolid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowski, Andrzej Z.; Nakamura, Toshio; Pazdur, Anna; Charro, Elena; Villanueva, Jose Luis Gutierrez; Piotrowska, Natalia

    2010-04-01

    New results of radiocarbon concentration in tree rings from the City of Valladolid (Spain) covering a growth period of 22 year have been measured using an AMS. Samples were taken using a hollow drill from a living tree, and α-cellulose was extracted from each of annual rings (early and late wood separately). The set of data shows lower radiocarbon concentration than that reported for "clean air" at the reference station, indicating a remarkable input of "dead" CO 2 of fossil fuel origin. Using data of carbon dioxide and 14C concentrations from Schauinsland, the corresponding summer and winter values of the fossil component ( cf) in carbon dioxide were calculated for the City of Valladolid. By fitting exponential and linear functions to the experimental data, the exchange time was calculated, and the expected future 14C concentration in the atmosphere was estimated.

  13. Radiocarbon dating with electrostatic accelerators: dating of milligram samples.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C L; Beukens, R P; Clover, M R; Elmore, D; Gove, H E; Kilius, L; Litherland, A E; Purser, K H

    1978-07-28

    The recently developed direct counting technique for radiocarbon atoms has been used to measure the relative numbers of such atoms in various geological samples which had earlier been dated by the beta-ray counting method. Sample weights ranged from 3.5 to 15 milligrams. The dates determined by the two methods are consistent with each other. Further experience with the new method is also reported.

  14. New radiocarbon ages from cirques in Colorado Front Range

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.T. . Dept. Natural Science); Birkeland, P.W. . Dept. Geological Science); Caine, N. . Dept. of Geography); Rodbell, D.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors recovered sediment cores 3.1 m long from Blue Lake ([approximately]37m water depth, [approximately]3,445m a.s.l., 40[degree]5 minutes 20 seconds N, 105[degree]37 minutes 08 seconds W) and 2.7m long from Lake Dorothy ([approximately]35m water depth, [approximately]3,675m a.s.l., 40[degree]00 minutes 46 seconds N, 105[degree]41 minutes 11 seconds W). A light-weight percussion coring system suspended from perlon ropes was used because of sediment thicknesses, water depths, and ski-backpacking requirements. Lake ice provided a stable coring platform. One purpose of the project is provision of a high-resolution record of environmental change in the subalpine/alpine ecotone during the Holocene, under the auspices of the Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research program. The sediment cores also provide minimum-limiting radiocarbon ages for deglaciation of cirques and the deposits that impound their tarns. Here the authors report on this second purpose. The Blue Lake core bottomed in sandy, gray, inorganic sediment, presumably glacial diamict. A bulk sample from 2.8--2.9m depth yielded a conventional radiocarbon age of 12,275[+-]345 yrs BP. Thus, ice retreated from the site by 12 ka. Since 12 ka both glacial and rock-glacial sediments have been deposited upvalley; some of these events may be recognized in the core. In contrast, the Lake Dorothy core did not penetrate gray inorganic diamict and is entirely organic-rich. A bulk sample from 2.65--2.7m depth yielded a conventional radiocarbon age of 10,910 [+-] 320 yrs BP. Thus, the moraines impounding the lake are 2--3 times older than suggested by a combination of relative-age methods and one radiocarbon age from surface sediments.

  15. Year of Birth Determination Using Radiocarbon Dating of Dental Enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2009-03-10

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, {sup 14}C levels in the enamel represent {sup 14}C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  16. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists.

  17. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide. PMID:26699457

  18. Using Radiocarbon to Test Models of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbore, S.; Lin, H.; Randerson, J.

    2007-05-01

    The radiocarbon content of carbon stored in and respired by ecosystems provides a direct measure of ecosystem carbon dynamics that can be directly compared to model predictions. Because carbon cycles through ecosystems on a variety of timescales, the mean age of C in standing biomass and soil organic matter pools is older than the mean age of microbially respired carbon. In turn, each pathway for C transit through ecosystems my respond differently to edaphic conditions; for example, soil organic matter mean age is controlled by factors affecting stabilization of C on very long timescales, such as mineralogy, while a factor like litter quality that effects decomposition rates reflects vegetation and climate characteristics. We compare the radiocarbon signature of heterotrophically respired CO2 across a number of ecosystems with models predicted using the CASA ecosystem model. The major controls of microbially respired CO2 from ecosystems include the residence time of C in living plant pools (i.e. the age of C in litter inputs to soil) and factors that control decomposition rates (litter quality and climate). Major differences between model and measured values at low latitudes are related to how woody debris pools are treated differently in models and measurements. The time lag between photosynthesis and respiration is a key ecosystem property that defines its potential to store or release carbon given variations in annual net primary production. Radiocarbon provides a rare case where models can be directly compared with measurements to provide a test of this parameter.

  19. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record.

    PubMed

    Zahid, H Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L

    2016-01-26

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide.

  20. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record.

    PubMed

    Zahid, H Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L

    2016-01-26

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide. PMID:26699457

  1. Year of birth determination using radiocarbon dating of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B A; Spalding, K L

    2010-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating is typically an archaeological tool rather than a forensic one. Recently however, we have shown that the amount of radiocarbon present in tooth enamel, as a result of nuclear bomb testing during the cold war, is a remarkably accurate indicator of when a person is born. Enamel isolated from human teeth is processed to form graphite and carbon-14 ((14)C) levels are measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Since there is no turnover of enamel after it is formed, (14)C levels in the enamel represent (14)C levels in the atmosphere at the time of its formation. In this paper we describe the strategy used to determine the date of birth of an individual based on radiocarbon levels in tooth enamel, focusing on the methodology of this strategy. Year of birth information can significantly assist police investigators when the identity of a deceased individual is unknown. In such cases police will try to match particulars of the unidentified individual (which is often only gender and/or an estimate of age), with particulars from missing persons lists. PMID:20976120

  2. Wealth Inequality: Ethnic Disparities in Israeli Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semyonov, Moshe; Lewin-Epstein, Noah

    2011-01-01

    This research examines wealth distribution across ethnic groups in Israel and evaluates the role of labor market rewards and intergenerational transfers in producing ethnic disparities. Israel SHARE data from 2005-2006 are used in the analyses. The findings reveal considerable ethnic disparities in wealth. Wealth disparities are most pronounced…

  3. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  4. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  5. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  6. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  7. 29 CFR 1607.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 1607.11 Section 1607.11 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.11 Disparate treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of validation. A selection...

  8. PAH fluxes to Siskiwit revisted: trends in fluxes and sources of pyrogenic PAH and perylene constrained via radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Slater, G F; Benson, A A; Marvin, C; Muir, D

    2013-05-21

    Trends in concentrations and radiocarbon content of pyrogenic PAHs and perylene were determined 20 years after a previous study by Mcveety and Hites (1988). Pyrogenic PAH fluxes to sediments were observed to continue to decrease over the period from 1980 to 2000 at this remote site in contrast to observations in more urban areas. Radiocarbon analysis of pyrogenic PAHs showed a 50% decrease in the proportion of pyrogenic PAH derived from fossil fuel combustion over the past 50 years, consistent with decreasing emissions from regional coal-fired power-generating plants. Fluxes of pyrogenic PAHs related to biomass burning were consistent over this same period and found to exceed fossil fuel sources in the most recent samples. Fluxes of biomass-derived pyrogenic PAHs were similar in magnitude to total pyrogenic PAH fluxes in early 1900, suggesting that these fluxes may represent wildfire inputs. Not only did perylene concentrations in these sediments increase with depth as previously observed but also concentrations from the same sedimentary layers analyzed 20 years previously showed large increases in perylene concentrations. Radiocarbon analysis of perylene indicated that 70-85% of perylene observed in the deeper sediments could be explained by production from total organic carbon. PMID:23582045

  9. Late Glacial to Holocene radiocarbon constraints on North Pacific Intermediate Water ventilation and deglacial atmospheric CO2 sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies-Walczak, Maureen; Mix, A. C.; Stoner, J. S.; Southon, J. R.; Cheseby, M.; Xuan, C.

    2014-07-01

    Radiocarbon reconstructions of past ocean ventilation rates constrain oceanic sources and sinks of CO2 and mechanisms of subsurface hypoxia. Here, 14C in coexisting benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sediment core 682 m deep off Southeast Alaska documents paleoventilation over the past ∼17,000 years. A chronology based on calibrated planktonic foraminiferal dates, consistent with independent terrestrial dates for regional glacial retreat, yields deglacial projection ages moderately greater than those of the Holocene, suggesting comparatively limited ventilation. The observed Holocene increase of apparent ventilation at intermediate depths tracks inundation of the Bering Strait between ∼11,800 and 13,200 years ago, suggesting that flooding of continental shelves and export of low-salinity surface waters to the Arctic enhanced intermediate water formation in the North Pacific. An abrupt increase in the benthic-planktonic radiocarbon age gradient, implying homogenization of abyssal radiocarbon in deep and intermediate waters, aligns with the younger of two episodes of rapid rise of atmospheric CO2 and depletion of atmospheric ΔC14 during deglaciation (∼11,500-13,000 years ago), suggesting the North Pacific as a possible pathway for venting of oceanic CO2 to the atmosphere during the second half of the deglacial transition.

  10. Decomposing racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Hasebe, Takuya; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2015-06-12

    While persistent racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination have been reported among the elderly, characteristics contributing to disparities are poorly understood. This study aimed to assess characteristics associated with racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination using a nonlinear Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method. We performed cross-sectional multivariable logistic regression analyses for which the dependent variable was self-reported receipt of influenza vaccine during the 2010-2011 season among community dwelling non-Hispanic African-American (AA), non-Hispanic White (W), English-speaking Hispanic (EH) and Spanish-speaking Hispanic (SH) elderly, enrolled in the 2011 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) (un-weighted/weighted N=6,095/19.2 million). Using the nonlinear Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method, we assessed the relative contribution of seventeen covariates - including socio-demographic characteristics, health status, insurance, access, preference regarding healthcare, and geographic regions - to disparities in influenza vaccination. Unadjusted racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination were 14.1 percentage points (pp) (W-AA disparity, p<0.001), 25.7 pp (W-SH disparity, p<0.001) and 0.6 pp (W-EH disparity, p>.8). The Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method estimated that the unadjusted W-AA and W-SH disparities in vaccination could be reduced by only 45% even if AA and SH groups become equivalent to Whites in all covariates in multivariable regression models. The remaining 55% of disparities were attributed to (a) racial/ethnic differences in the estimated coefficients (e.g., odds ratios) in the regression models and (b) characteristics not included in the regression models. Our analysis found that only about 45% of racial/ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination among the elderly could be reduced by equalizing recognized characteristics among racial/ethnic groups. Future studies are needed to identify additional

  11. Food Systems and Public Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Roni A.; Palmer, Anne M.; Mckenzie, Shawn E.; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The United States has set a national goal to eliminate health disparities. This article emphasizes the importance of food systems in generating and exacerbating health disparities in the United States and suggests avenues for reducing them. It presents a conceptual model showing how broad food system conditions interplay with community food environments—and how these relationships are filtered and refracted through prisms of social disparities to generate and exacerbate health disparities. Interactions with demand factors in the social environment are described. The article also highlights the separate food systems pathway to health disparities via environmental and occupational health effects of agriculture. PMID:23173027

  12. A micro-architecture for binocular disparity and ocular dominance in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kara, Prakash; Boyd, Jamie D

    2009-04-01

    In invertebrate predators such as the praying mantis and vertebrate predators such as wild cats the ability to detect small differences in inter-ocular retinal disparities is a critical means for accurately determining the depth of moving objects such as prey. In mammals, the first neurons along the visual pathway that encode binocular disparities are found in the visual cortex. However, a precise functional architecture for binocular disparity has never been demonstrated in any species, and coarse maps for disparity have been found in only one primate species. Moreover, the dominant approach for assaying the developmental plasticity of binocular cortical neurons used monocular tests of ocular dominance to infer binocular function. The few studies that examined the relationship between ocular dominance and binocular disparity of individual cells used single-unit recordings and have provided conflicting results regarding whether ocular dominance can predict the selectivity or sensitivity to binocular disparity. We used two-photon calcium imaging to sample the response to monocular and binocular visual stimuli from nearly every adjacent neuron in a small region of the cat visual cortex, area 18. Here we show that local circuits for ocular dominance always have smooth and graded transitions from one apparently monocular functional domain to an adjacent binocular region. Most unexpectedly, we discovered a new map in the cat visual cortex that had a precise functional micro-architecture for binocular disparity selectivity. At the level of single cells, ocular dominance was unrelated to binocular disparity selectivity or sensitivity. When the local maps for ocular dominance and binocular disparity both had measurable gradients at a given cortical site, the two gradient directions were orthogonal to each other. Together, these results indicate that, from the perspective of the spiking activity of individual neurons, ocular dominance cannot predict binocular disparity

  13. The moral problem of health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cynthia M

    2010-04-01

    Health disparities exist along lines of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic class in US society. I argue that we should work to eliminate these health disparities because their existence is a moral wrong that needs to be addressed. Health disparities are morally wrong because they exemplify historical injustices. Contractarian ethics, Kantian ethics, and utilitarian ethics all provide theoretical justification for viewing health disparities as a moral wrong, as do several ethical principles of primary importance in bioethics. The moral consequences of health disparities are also troubling and further support the claim that these disparities are a moral wrong. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides additional support that health disparities are a moral wrong, as does an analogy with the generally accepted duty to provide equal access to education. In this article, I also consider and respond to 3 objections to my thesis. PMID:20147677

  14. Allometric disparity in rodent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, allometric trajectories for 51 rodent species, comprising equal representatives from each of the major clades (Ctenohystrica, Muroidea, Sciuridae), are compared in a multivariate morphospace (=allometric space) to quantify magnitudes of disparity in cranial growth. Variability in allometric trajectory patterns was compared to measures of adult disparity in each clade, and dietary habit among the examined species, which together encapsulated an ecomorphological breadth. Results indicate that the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents is characterized by different features in sciurids compared with muroids and Ctenohystrica. Sciuridae was found to have a reduced magnitude of inter-trajectory change and growth patterns with less variation in allometric coefficient values among members. In contrast, a greater magnitude of difference between trajectories and an increased variation in allometric coefficient values was evident for both Ctenohystrica and muroids. Ctenohystrica and muroids achieved considerably higher adult disparities than sciurids, suggesting that conservatism in allometric trajectory modification may constrain morphological diversity in rodents. The results provide support for a role of ecology (dietary habit) in the evolution of allometric trajectories in rodents. PMID:23610638

  15. Large variations in the Holocene marine radiocarbon reservoir effect reflect ocean circulation and climatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Quan; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Nothdurft, Luke D.; Lybolt, Matthew; Price, Gilbert J.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate radiocarbon dating of marine samples requires knowledge of the marine radiocarbon reservoir effect. This effect for a particular site/region is generally assumed constant through time when calibrating marine 14C ages. However, recent studies have shown large temporal variations of several hundred to a couple of thousand years in this effect for a number of regions during the late Quaternary and Holocene. Here we report marine radiocarbon reservoir correction (ΔR) for Heron Reef and Moreton Bay in southwestern (SW) Pacific for the last 8 ka derived from 14C analysis of 230Th-dated corals. Most of our ΔR for the last ∼5.4 ka agree well with their modern value, but large ΔR variability of ∼410 yr (from trough to peak) with possible decadal/centennial fluctuations is evident for the period ∼5.4-8 ka. The latter time interval also has significant variations with similar features in previously published ΔR values for other sites in the Pacific, including southern Peru-northern Chile in southeastern (SE) Pacific, the South China Sea, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea, with the largest magnitude of ∼920 yr from SE Pacific. The mechanisms for these large ΔR variations across the Pacific during the mid-Holocene are complex processes involving (1) changes in the quantity and 14C content of upwelled waters in tropical east Pacific (TEP) (frequency and intensity of ocean upwelling in the TEP, and contribution of Subantarctic Mode Water to the upwelled waters, which is influenced by the intensity and position of southern westerly winds), and (2) variations in ocean circulation associated with climate change (La Niña/El Niño conditions, intensity of easterly trade winds, positions of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the South Pacific Convergence Zone), which control the spreading of the older upwelled surface waters in the TEP to the western sites. Our results imply the need for employing temporal changes in ΔR values, instead of constant (modern) values

  16. Geomorphic and paleoclimatic implications of latest Pleistocene radiocarbon dates from colluvium-mantled hollows, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; Dietrich, W.E.; Dorn, R.I.; Berger, C.R.; Rubin, M.

    1986-08-01

    Radiocarbon analyses of charcoal from basal colluvium in 11 California hollows show a clustering of dates between 9000 and 15,000 B.P., an indication that changes in the storage and discharge of colluvium from hillslopes accompanied the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. Hollows are sites of topographically induced convergence and deposition of colluvial debris, and evacuation of this debris was apparently more thorough and possibly more frequent in the latest Pleistocene, perhaps due to a combination of changes in vegetation and rainfall characteristics. One hypothesis is that greater storm intensities occurred in the latest Pleistocene and induced a higher frequency of landslides in hollows and a regional extension of channel heads upslope relative to the Holocene. During the last Pleistocene, California hollows apparently contained smaller volumes of colluvium in storage. The increased storage of debris during the Holocene may have resulted in a diminished supply of sediment to stream channels.

  17. Stereo transparency and the disparity gradient limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Several studies (Vision Research 15 (1975) 583; Perception 9 (1980) 671) have shown that binocular fusion is limited by the disparity gradient (disparity/distance) separating image points, rather than by their absolute disparity values. Points separated by a gradient >1 appear diplopic. These results are sometimes interpreted as a constraint on human stereo matching, rather than a constraint on fusion. Here we have used psychophysical measurements on stereo transparency to show that human stereo matching is not constrained by a gradient of 1. We created transparent surfaces composed of many pairs of dots, in which each member of a pair was assigned a disparity equal and opposite to the disparity of the other member. For example, each pair could be composed of one dot with a crossed disparity of 6' and the other with uncrossed disparity of 6', vertically separated by a parametrically varied distance. When the vertical separation between the paired dots was small, the disparity gradient for each pair was very steep. Nevertheless, these opponent-disparity dot pairs produced a striking appearance of two transparent surfaces for disparity gradients ranging between 0.5 and 3. The apparent depth separating the two transparent planes was correctly matched to an equivalent disparity defined by two opaque surfaces. A test target presented between the two transparent planes was easily detected, indicating robust segregation of the disparities associated with the paired dots into two transparent surfaces with few mismatches in the target plane. Our simulations using the Tsai-Victor model show that the response profiles produced by scaled disparity-energy mechanisms can account for many of our results on the transparency generated by steep gradients.

  18. On the radiocarbon record in banded corals: exchange parameters and net transport of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ between atmosphere and surface ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Druffel, E.M.; Suess, H.E.

    1983-02-20

    We have made radiocarbon measurements of banded hermatypic corals from Florida, Belize, and the Galapagos Islands. Interpretation is presented here of these previously reported results. These measurements represent the /sup 14/C//sup 12/C ratios in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIOC) in the surface ocean waters of the Gulf Stream and the Peru Current at the time of coral ring formation. A depletion in radiocarbon concentration was observed incoral rings that grew from A.D. 1900--1952. It was caused by dilution of existing /sup 14/C levels with dead CO/sub 2/ from fossil fuel burning (the Suess effect, or S/sub e/). A similar trend was observed in the distribution of bomb-produced /sup 14/C in corals that had grown during the years following A.D. 1952. The concentration of bomb-produced radiocarbon was much higher in corals from temperate regions (Florida, Belize, Hawaiian Islands) than in corals from tropical regions (Galapagos Islands and Canton Island). The apparent radiocarbon ages of the surface waters in temperate and tropical oceans during the preanthropogenic period range from about 280 to 520 years B.P. (-40 to -69%). At all investigated locations, it is likely that waters at subsurface depths have the same apparent radiocarbon age of about 670 years B.P. From the change of oceanic ..delta../sup 14/C in the surface during post-bomb times, the approximate annual rate of net input of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to the ocean waters is calculated to be about 8% of the prevailing /sup 14/C difference between atmosphere and ocean. From this input and from preanthropogenic ..delta../sup 14/C values found at each location, it can be seen that vertical mixing of water in the Peru Current is about 3 times greater than that in the Gulf Stream.

  19. Radiocarbon dating and wood density chronologies of mangrove trees in arid Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Santini, Nadia S; Hua, Quan; Schmitz, Nele; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    Mangrove trees tend to be larger and mangrove communities more diverse in tropical latitudes, particularly where there is high rainfall. Variation in the structure, growth and productivity of mangrove forests over climatic gradients suggests they are sensitive to variations in climate, but evidence of changes in the structure and growth of mangrove trees in response to climatic variation is scarce. Bomb-pulse radiocarbon dating provides accurate dates of recent wood formation and tree age of tropical and subtropical tree species. Here, we used radiocarbon techniques combined with X-ray densitometry to develop a wood density chronology for the mangrove Avicennia marina in the Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia (WA). We tested whether wood density chronologies of A. marina were sensitive to variation in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index, which reflects temperature fluctuations in the Pacific Ocean and is linked to the instrumental rainfall record in north WA. We also determined growth rates in mangrove trees from the Exmouth Gulf, WA. We found that seaward fringing A. marina trees (~10 cm diameter) were 48 ± 1 to 89 ± 23 years old (mean ± 1 σ) and that their growth rates ranged from 4.08 ± 2.36 to 5.30 ± 3.33 mm/yr (mean ± 1 σ). The wood density of our studied mangrove trees decreased with increases in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index. Future predicted drying of the region will likely lead to further reductions in wood density and their associated growth rates in mangrove forests in the region.

  20. Developing inorganic carbon-based radiocarbon chronologies for Holocene lake sediments in arid NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawu; Ma, Xueyang; Qiang, Mingrui; Huang, Xiaozhong; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Henderson, Andrew C. G.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic carbonates are often used to establish radiocarbon (14C) chronologies for lake sediments when terrestrial plant remains (TPR) are rare or when bulk organic matter is insufficient for dating, a problem that is common for many lakes in arid regions. However, the reservoir effect (RE), as well as old carbon contributed from the lakes catchment make it difficult to establish reliable chronologies. Here we present a systematic study of inorganic 14C ages of two lake-sediment sequences, one from a small-enclosed saline lake - Lake Gahai in Qaidam Basin, and the other from a large freshwater lake - Lake Bosten in Xinjiang. Modern dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of the lakes, paleo-lake sediments exposed in the catchment, and mollusk shells in core sediments from Lake Gahai were dated to assess the RE and the contribution of pre-aged carbon to the old ages in the cores. We propose a statistical regression to assess more than one RE for the 14C carbonate ages within our sedimentary sequences. Old radiocarbon ages contributed by detrital carbonates were assessed by comparing the ages of mollusk shells with those of carbonates at the same sediment depths. We established the RE of the authigenic component and assessed detrital old carbon contributions to our two sites, and this was used to correct the 14C ages. Based on this approach, we developed age models for both cores, and tested them using 210Pb ages in both cores and TPR-based 14C-ages recovered from Lake Bosten. We further tested our age models by comparing carbonate-based oxygen isotope (δ18O) records from both lakes to an independently-dated regional speleothem δ18O record. Our results suggest if sedimentary sequences are densely dated and the RE and the contribution of old carbon from detrital carbonates can be ascertained, robust chronological frameworks based on carbonate-based 14C determinations can be established.

  1. Radiocarbon Dating and Wood Density Chronologies of Mangrove Trees in Arid Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Nadia S.; Hua, Quan; Schmitz, Nele; Lovelock, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Mangrove trees tend to be larger and mangrove communities more diverse in tropical latitudes, particularly where there is high rainfall. Variation in the structure, growth and productivity of mangrove forests over climatic gradients suggests they are sensitive to variations in climate, but evidence of changes in the structure and growth of mangrove trees in response to climatic variation is scarce. Bomb-pulse radiocarbon dating provides accurate dates of recent wood formation and tree age of tropical and subtropical tree species. Here, we used radiocarbon techniques combined with X-ray densitometry to develop a wood density chronology for the mangrove Avicennia marina in the Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia (WA). We tested whether wood density chronologies of A. marina were sensitive to variation in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index, which reflects temperature fluctuations in the Pacific Ocean and is linked to the instrumental rainfall record in north WA. We also determined growth rates in mangrove trees from the Exmouth Gulf, WA. We found that seaward fringing A. marina trees (∼10 cm diameter) were 48±1 to 89±23 years old (mean ± 1σ) and that their growth rates ranged from 4.08±2.36 to 5.30±3.33 mm/yr (mean ±1σ). The wood density of our studied mangrove trees decreased with increases in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation Index. Future predicted drying of the region will likely lead to further reductions in wood density and their associated growth rates in mangrove forests in the region. PMID:24265797

  2. Radiocarbon: analysis of inorganic carbon of fossil bone and enamel.

    PubMed

    Haynes, V

    1968-08-16

    Carbon dioxide from calcium carbonate in fossil bone can be selectively separated from carbon dioxide in bone apatite by hydrolyzing the sample first in acetic acid and then in hydrochloric acid. Radiocarbon analyses of the inorganic carbon dioxide in three samples of known age clearly show calcium carbonate in fossil bone to be secondary and the carbonate of bone apatite to be indigenous and suitable for dating in some cases. Agreement between dates on collagen-bone apatite pairs increases the level of confidence.

  3. Recent documents dating: an approach using radiocarbon techniques.

    PubMed

    Zavattaro, D; Quarta, G; D'Elia, M; Calcagnile, L

    2007-04-11

    The possibility to develop an absolute technique, independent from the paper conservation conditions, to date recent paper documents (i.e. less than 50 years old) for forensics purposes is discussed. We suggest the possibility to use the curve representing the strong increase in the atmospheric radiocarbon concentration induced in the last 50 years by nuclear weapons tests as reference to date paper documents, with a resolution down to a few months. The results obtained in the analysis of two known age documents are presented together with a first order mathematical model developed in order to take into account the contributions of the different tree rings employed in the paper production.

  4. Racial disparities in reaching the renal transplant waitlist: is geography as important as race?

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Milda R.; Lee, Haena; Alexander, G. Caleb; Tak, Hyo Jung; Thistlethwaite, J. Richard; Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, African Americans and whites differ in access to the deceased donor renal transplant waitlist. The extent to which racial disparities in waitlisting differ between United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) regions is understudied. Methods The US Renal Data System (USRDS) was linked with US census data to examine time from dialysis initiation to waitlisting for whites (n = 188 410) and African Americans (n = 144 335) using Cox proportional hazards across 11 UNOS regions, adjusting for potentially confounding individual, neighborhood, and state characteristics. Results Likelihood of waitlisting varies significantly by UNOS region, overall and by race. Additionally, African Americans face significantly lower likelihood of waitlisting compared to whites in all but two regions (1 and 6). Overall, 39% of African Americans with ESRD reside in Regions 3 and 4 – regions with a large racial disparity and where African Americans comprise a large proportion of the ESRD population. In these regions, the African American–white disparity is an important contributor to their overall regional disparity. Conclusions Race remains an important factor in time to transplant waitlist in the United States. Race contributes to overall regional disparities; however, the importance of race varies by UNOS region. PMID:25818547

  5. The persistence of American Indian health disparities.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S

    2006-12-01

    Disparities in health status between American Indians and other groups in the United States have persisted throughout the 500 years since Europeans arrived in the Americas. Colonists, traders, missionaries, soldiers, physicians, and government officials have struggled to explain these disparities, invoking a wide range of possible causes. American Indians joined these debates, often suggesting different explanations. Europeans and Americans also struggled to respond to the disparities, sometimes working to relieve them, sometimes taking advantage of the ill health of American Indians. Economic and political interests have always affected both explanations of health disparities and responses to them, influencing which explanations were emphasized and which interventions were pursued. Tensions also appear in ongoing debates about the contributions of genetic and socioeconomic forces to the pervasive health disparities. Understanding how these economic and political forces have operated historically can explain both the persistence of the health disparities and the controversies that surround them.

  6. Anomalous radiocarbon ages from a Holocene detrital organic lens in Alaska and their implications for radiocarbon dating and paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.E.; Carter, L.D.; Robinson, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven radiocarbon age determinations clearly show that a lens of Holocene fluvial organic debris on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain contains mostly pre-Holocene organic material. Radio-carbon ages of identified plant macrofossils indicate the material was deposited about 9000 to 9500 yr B.P. Radiocarbon analyses of bulk samples from this deposit, however, range from 13,300 to 30,300 yr B.P. Most of the old organic matter seems to be in the smaller size fractions in the deposit, particularly in the fraction between 0.25 and 0.5 mm, but all size fractions are contaminated. Particular caution must be exercised in submitting bulk samples for radiocarbon dating from areas where conditions favor redeposition of isotopically "dead" carbon. ?? 1988.

  7. Marine radiocarbon reservoir age simulations for the past 50000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzin, Martin; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    We present simulations of marine radiocarbon reservoir ages using the ocean general circulation model LSG-HAMOCC2s, and evaluate the results with Marine13 raw data records. Our model considers various climatic background states. Radiocarbon cycle boundary conditions are atmospheric Δ14C values according to IntCal13, a recent atmospheric CO2 reconstruction, and spatially variable concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon derived from marine carbon cycle simulations. Our model reasonably agrees with glacial marine Δ14C records but indicates reservoir ages varying with time, different to the invariant reservoir age corrections applied to the observations and to Marine13. Modelled global-mean reservoir ages are in the range 400-800 years compared to the invariant Marine13 value of 405 years. Self-consistent simulations involving the Cariaco Basin record (which is the most continuous marine record contributing to IntCal13 for periods prior to about 30 kyears) amplify the temporal reservoir age variability with global-mean values of about 350-850 years, and improve the agreement with Δ14C observations in some areas.

  8. The radiocarbon signature of microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean.

    PubMed

    Hansman, Roberta L; Griffin, Sheila; Watson, Jordan T; Druffel, Ellen R M; Ingalls, Anitra E; Pearson, Ann; Aluwihare, Lihini I

    2009-04-21

    Several lines of evidence indicate that microorganisms in the meso- and bathypelagic ocean are metabolically active and respiring carbon. In addition, growing evidence suggests that archaea are fixing inorganic carbon in this environment. However, direct quantification of the contribution from deep ocean carbon sources to community production in the dark ocean remains a challenge. In this study, carbon flow through the microbial community at 2 depths in the mesopelagic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was examined by exploiting the unique radiocarbon signatures (Delta(14)C) of the 3 major carbon sources in this environment. The radiocarbon content of nucleic acids, a biomarker for viable cells, isolated from size-fractionated particles (0.2-0.5 microm and >0.5 microm) showed the direct incorporation of carbon delivered by rapidly sinking particles. Most significantly, at the 2 mesopelagic depths examined (670 m and 915 m), carbon derived from in situ autotrophic fixation supported a significant fraction of the free-living microbial community (0.2-0.5 microm size fraction), but the contribution of chemoautotrophy varied markedly between the 2 depths. Results further showed that utilization of the ocean's largest reduced carbon reservoir, (14)C-depleted, dissolved organic carbon, was negligible in this environment. This isotopic portrait of carbon assimilation by the in situ, free-living microbial community, integrated over >50,000 L of seawater, implies that recent, photosynthetic carbon is not always the major carbon source supporting microbial community production in the mesopelagic realm.

  9. Growth rate determinations from radiocarbon in bamboo corals (genus Keratoisis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hönisch, Bärbel

    2015-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements are an important tool for determining growth rates of bamboo corals, a cosmopolitan group of calcitic deep-sea corals. Published growth rate estimates for bamboo corals are highly variable, with potential environmental or ecological drivers of this variability poorly constrained. Here we systematically investigate the application of 14C for growth rate determinations in bamboo corals using 55 14C dates on the calcite and organic fractions of six bamboo corals (identified as Keratoisis sp.) from the western North Atlantic Ocean. Calcite 14C measurements on the distal surface of these corals and five previously published bamboo corals exhibit a strong one-to-one relationship with the 14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DI14C) in ambient seawater (r2=0.98), confirming the use of Keratoisis sp. calcite 14C as a proxy for seawater 14C activity. Radial growth rates determined from 14C age-depth regressions, 14C plateau tuning and bomb 14C reference chronologies range from 12 to 78 μm y-1, in general agreement with previously published radiometric growth rates. We document potential biases to 14C growth rate determinations resulting from water mass variability, bomb radiocarbon, secondary infilling (ontogeny), and growth rate nonlinearity. Radial growth rates for Keratoisis sp. specimens do not correlate with ambient temperature, suggesting that additional biological and/or environmental factors may influence bamboo coral growth rates.

  10. AMS radiocarbon dating of very large Grandidier's baobabs (Adansonia grandidieri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Margineanu, Dragos

    2015-10-01

    The article reports the AMS radiocarbon investigation of the two largest known Adansonia grandidieri specimens. The two baobabs, which are named Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab, are located in Southwestern Madagascar, near Andombiro. A third specimen from this area, the House baobab, was also investigated. According to measurements, Tsitakakoike is the biggest individual above ground level of all Adansonia species. The House baobab was selected for its exposed structure, which is identical to the closed ring-shaped structure with false cavities identified by us in large and old Adansonia digitata specimens. According to our research, Tsitakakoike and the Pregnant baobab have multi-stemmed cylindrical trunks which are mainly hollow; the two very large baobabs also possess a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon dates of the oldest wood samples collected from the large trunks were 1274 ± 20 BP for Tsitakakoike and 930 ± 20 BP for the Pregnant baobab. According to their original positions and to the architectures of the two A. grandidieri, the ages of Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab would be between 1300 and 1500 years. Therefore, A. grandidieri becomes the third Adansonia species with individuals that can live over 1000 years, according to accurate dating results.

  11. Vertebral Bomb Radiocarbon Suggests Extreme Longevity in White Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Hamady, Li Ling; Natanson, Lisa J.; Skomal, Gregory B.; Thorrold, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation and management efforts for white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) remain hampered by a lack of basic demographic information including age and growth rates. Sharks are typically aged by counting growth bands sequentially deposited in their vertebrae, but the assumption of annual deposition of these band pairs requires testing. We compared radiocarbon (Δ14C) values in vertebrae from four female and four male white sharks from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) with reference chronologies documenting the marine uptake of 14C produced by atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices to generate the first radiocarbon age estimates for adult white sharks. Age estimates were up to 40 years old for the largest female (fork length [FL]: 526 cm) and 73 years old for the largest male (FL: 493 cm). Our results dramatically extend the maximum age and longevity of white sharks compared to earlier studies, hint at possible sexual dimorphism in growth rates, and raise concerns that white shark populations are considerably more sensitive to human-induced mortality than previously thought. PMID:24416189

  12. Measurements and modeling of contemporary radiocarbon in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanu, A. M.; Comfort, L. L.; Guilderson, T. P.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bergmann, D. J.; Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Boering, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the 14C content of carbon dioxide in air collected by high-altitude balloon flights in 2003-2005 reveal the contemporary radiocarbon distribution in the northern midlatitude stratosphere, four decades after the Limited Test Ban Treaty restricted atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Comparisons with results from a 3-D chemical-transport model show that the 14CO2 distribution is now largely governed by the altitude/latitude dependence of the natural cosmogenic production rate, stratospheric transport, and propagation into the stratosphere of the decreasing radiocarbon trend in tropospheric CO2 due to fossil fuel combustion. From the observed correlation of 14CO2 with N2O mixing ratios, an annual global mean net flux of 14CO2 to the troposphere of 1.6(±0.4) × 1017‰ mol CO2 yr-1 and a global production rate of 2.2(±0.6) × 1026 atoms 14C yr-1 are empirically derived. The results also indicate that contemporary 14CO2 observations provide highly sensitive diagnostics for stratospheric transport and residence times in models.

  13. Soil organic radiocarbon and mineralogy at two coastal California sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, C. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Harden, J. W.; Torn, M. S.; Southon, J.

    2001-12-01

    As the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration rises it becomes increasingly important to understand the mechanisms that control carbon sequestration in carbon pools such as soils and ocean sediments. Mineralogy and soil grain size have both been hypothesized to regulate soil carbon storage. On volcanic soils, carbon storage correlates best with a mineralogical property, amorphous mineral content. However, volcanic soils are relatively uncommon and weather to unusually high concentrations of amorphous minerals. Two chronosequences of soil terraces occurring along the coast of California provide the opportunity to study the relationship between a range of mineral types, soil carbon content, soil radiocarbon age, and grain size on more common Alfisol soils. One site is located close to the mouth of the Mattole River, near Eureka, CA, and the second site is located close to Santa Cruz, CA. Both series of chronosequences formed on similar parent material, although the Mattole site receives approximately twice the rainfall of the Santa Cruz site. Through analysis of relationships between soil mineralogical properties, organic matter content, and soil radiocarbon age, we examine potential controls on soil carbon turnover.

  14. The role of inter-comparisons in radiocarbon quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Marian; Cook, Gordon; Naysmith, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating is used widely in many geochronology projects as a basis for the creation and testing of chronological constructs. Radiocarbon measurements are by their nature complex and the degree of sample pre-treatment varies considerably depending on the material. Within the UK and Europe, there are a number of well-established laboratories and increasingly, scientists are not just commissioning new dates, but also using statistical modelling of assemblages of dates, perhaps measured in different laboratories, to provide formal date estimates for their investigations. The issue of comparability of measurements (and thus bias, accuracy and precision of measurement) from the diverse laboratories is one which has been the focus of some attention both within the 14C community and the wider user communities for some time. As a result of this but also as part of laboratory benchmarking and quality assurance, the 14C community has undertaken a wide-scale, far-reaching and evolving programme of inter-comparisons, to the benefit of laboratories and users alike. This paper presents the results from the most recent exercise SIRI. The objectives of SIRI included, through choice of material, to contribute to the discussion concerning laboratory offsets and error multipliers in the context of IntCal (the International Calibration Programme) and to gain a better understanding of differences in background derived from a range of infinite age material types.

  15. Discrete Gabor Filters For Binocular Disparity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1995-01-01

    Discrete Gabor filters proposed for use in determining binocular disparity - difference between positions of same feature or object depicted in stereoscopic images produced by two side-by-side cameras aimed in parallel. Magnitude of binocular disparity used to estimate distance from cameras to feature or object. In one potential application, cameras charge-coupled-device video cameras in robotic vision system, and binocular disparities and distance estimates used as control inputs - for example, to control approaches to objects manipulated or to maintain safe distances from obstacles. Binocular disparities determined from phases of discretized Gabor transforms.

  16. Methodological Issues in Measuring Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, Kenneth; Pamuk, Elsie; Lynch, John; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Kim, Insun; Mays, Vickie; Pearcy, Jeffrey; Schoenbach, Victor; Weissman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This report discusses six issues that affect the measurement of disparities in health between groups in a population: Selecting a reference point from which to measure disparityMeasuring disparity in absolute or in relative termsMeasuring in terms of favorable or adverse eventsMeasuring in pair-wise or in summary fashionChoosing whether to weight groups according to group sizeDeciding whether to consider any inherent ordering of the groups. These issues represent choices that are made when disparities are measured. Methods Examples are used to highlight how these choices affect specific measures of disparity. Results These choices can affect the size and direction of disparities measured at a point in time and conclusions about the size and direction of changes in disparity over time. Eleven guidelines for measuring disparities are presented. Conclusions Choices concerning the measurement of disparity should be made deliberately, recognizing that each choice will affect the results. When results are presented, the choices on which the measurements are based should be described clearly and justified appropriately. PMID:16032956

  17. The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cottereau, Benoit R.; Ales, Justin M.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    We used fMRI-informed EEG source-imaging in humans to characterize the dynamics of cortical responses during a disparity-discrimination task. After the onset of a disparity-defined target, decision-related activity was found within an extended cortical network that included several occipital regions of interest (ROIs): V4, V3A, hMT+ and the Lateral Occipital Complex (LOC). By using a response-locked analysis, we were able to determine the timing relationships in this network of ROIs relative to the subject's behavioral response. Choice-related activity appeared first in the V4 ROI almost 200 ms before the button press and then subsequently in the V3A ROI. Modeling of the responses in the V4 ROI suggests that this area provides an early contribution to disparity discrimination. Choice-related responses were also found after the button-press in ROIs V4, V3A, LOC and hMT+. Outside the visual cortex, choice-related activity was found in the frontal and temporal pole before the button-press. By combining the spatial resolution of fMRI-informed EEG source imaging with the ability to sort out neural activity occurring before, during and after the behavioral manifestation of the decision, our study is the first to assign distinct functional roles to the extra-striate ROIs involved in perceptual decisions based on disparity, the primary cue for depth. PMID:24513152

  18. Prioritizing health disparities in medical education to improve care.

    PubMed

    Awosogba, Temitope; Betancourt, Joseph R; Conyers, F Garrett; Estapé, Estela S; Francois, Fritz; Gard, Sabrina J; Kaufman, Arthur; Lunn, Mitchell R; Nivet, Marc A; Oppenheim, Joel D; Pomeroy, Claire; Yeung, Howa

    2013-05-01

    Despite yearly advances in life-saving and preventive medicine, as well as strategic approaches by governmental and social agencies and groups, significant disparities remain in health, health quality, and access to health care within the United States. The determinants of these disparities include baseline health status, race and ethnicity, culture, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, region or geography, sexual orientation, and age. In order to renew the commitment of the medical community to address health disparities, particularly at the medical school level, we must remind ourselves of the roles of doctors and medical schools as the gatekeepers and the value setters for medicine. Within those roles are responsibilities toward the social mission of working to eliminate health disparities. This effort will require partnerships with communities as well as with academic centers to actively develop and to implement diversity and inclusion strategies. Besides improving the diversity of trainees in the pipeline, access to health care can be improved, and awareness can be raised regarding population-based health inequalities. PMID:23659676

  19. Prioritizing health disparities in medical education to improve care

    PubMed Central

    Awosogba, Temitope; Betancourt, Joseph R.; Conyers, F. Garrett; Estapé, Estela S.; Francois, Fritz; Gard, Sabrina J.; Kaufman, Arthur; Lunn, Mitchell R.; Nivet, Marc A.; Oppenheim, Joel D.; Pomeroy, Claire; Yeung, Howa

    2015-01-01

    Despite yearly advances in life-saving and preventive medicine, as well as strategic approaches by governmental and social agencies and groups, significant disparities remain in health, health quality, and access to health care within the United States. The determinants of these disparities include baseline health status, race and ethnicity, culture, gender identity and expression, socioeconomic status, region or geography, sexual orientation, and age. In order to renew the commitment of the medical community to address health disparities, particularly at the medical school level, we must remind ourselves of the roles of doctors and medical schools as the gatekeepers and the value setters for medicine. Within those roles are responsibilities toward the social mission of working to eliminate health disparities. This effort will require partnerships with communities as well as with academic centers to actively develop and to implement diversity and inclusion strategies. Besides improving the diversity of trainees in the pipeline, access to health care can be improved, and awareness can be raised regarding population-based health inequalities. PMID:23659676

  20. Radiocarbon dating of petroleum-impregnated bone from tar pits at Rancho La Brea, California.

    PubMed

    Ho, T Y; Marcus, L F; Berger, R

    1969-05-30

    A liquid-chromatography method has been developed for the separation of amino acids with the same specific activity in radiocarbon from bones impregnated with isotopically dead petroleum compounds found in the La Brea tar pits. This technique permits the application of radiocarbon dating to such bone assemblages.

  1. A new radiocarbon revolution and the dispersal of modern humans in Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Mellars, Paul

    2006-02-23

    Radiocarbon dating has been fundamental to the study of human cultural and biological development over the past 50,000 yr. Two recent developments in the methodology of radiocarbon dating show that the speed of colonization of Europe by modern human populations was more rapid than previously believed, and that their period of coexistence with the preceding Neanderthal was shorter.

  2. A new radiocarbon revolution and the dispersal of modern humans in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellars, Paul

    2006-02-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been fundamental to the study of human cultural and biological development over the past 50,000yr. Two recent developments in the methodology of radiocarbon dating show that the speed of colonization of Europe by modern human populations was more rapid than previously believed, and that their period of coexistence with the preceding Neanderthal was shorter.

  3. Radiocarbon Analysis Source Apportionment of Fossil and Modern Atmospheric Carbon from DISCOVER-AQ Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, S. M.; Yoon, S.; Barrett, T. E.; Usenko, S.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a sampling campaign aimed to monitor regional atmospheric pollutants within a collection of cities across the United States. In September 2013, ground-based air samplers were placed selectively to represent the city of Houston: Moody Tower (downtown; urban) and Manvel Croix (southern; suburb), Conroe (far north; suburb) and La Porte (east; urban industrial), with the goal of understanding particulate matter sources and composition and exposure in urban communities. Radiocarbon analysis was conducted on TSP (total suspended particulate matter) and PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) from ground-based samplers. Radiocarbon is used to determine the contributions of contemporary and fossil sources to carbonaceous aerosol in Houston. Contemporary sources of atmospheric carbon in TSP and PM2.5 include primary biogenic emissions, biomass combustion and SOA produced in the atmosphere from biogenic- and biomass combustion-derived volatile organic carbon. Fossil sources of atmospheric carbon in PM2.5 and TSP include all types of primary fossil fuel combustion and SOA produced in the atmosphere from fossil-derived volatile organic carbon. Results from the last week of the campaign, September 21-28th, displayed a PM2.5 contemporary carbon fraction of 48-78% for Moody Tower, 59-86% for Manvel Croix, 66-89% for Conroe. Ambient TSP had contemporary carbon fractions of 51-65% for Moody Tower and 51-83% for La Porte.

  4. Empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler: a tool for incorporating radiocarbon-date and calibration error into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Molak, Martyna; Suchard, Marc A.; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Beilman, David W.; Shapiro, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA from ancient samples provide a valuable opportunity to gain insight into past evolutionary and demographic processes. Bayesian phylogenetic methods can estimate evolutionary rates and timescales from ancient DNA sequences, with the ages of the samples acting as calibrations for the molecular clock. Sample ages are often estimated using radiocarbon dating, but the associated measurement error is rarely taken into account. In addition, the total uncertainty quantified by converting radiocarbon dates to calendar dates is typically ignored. Here we present a tool for incorporating both of these sources of uncertainty into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA. This empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler (ECRS) integrates the age uncertainty for each ancient sequence over the calibrated probability density function estimated for its radiocarbon date and associated error. We use the ECRS to analyse three ancient DNA data sets. Accounting for radiocarbon-dating and calibration error appeared to have little impact on estimates of evolutionary rates and related parameters for these data sets. However, analyses of other data sets, particularly those with few or only very old radiocarbon dates, might be more sensitive to using artificially precise sample ages and should benefit from use of the ECRS. PMID:24964386

  5. Empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler: a tool for incorporating radiocarbon-date and calibration error into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Molak, Martyna; Suchard, Marc A; Ho, Simon Y W; Beilman, David W; Shapiro, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Studies of DNA from ancient samples provide a valuable opportunity to gain insight into past evolutionary and demographic processes. Bayesian phylogenetic methods can estimate evolutionary rates and timescales from ancient DNA sequences, with the ages of the samples acting as calibrations for the molecular clock. Sample ages are often estimated using radiocarbon dating, but the associated measurement error is rarely taken into account. In addition, the total uncertainty quantified by converting radiocarbon dates to calendar dates is typically ignored. Here, we present a tool for incorporating both of these sources of uncertainty into Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of ancient DNA. This empirical calibrated radiocarbon sampler (ECRS) integrates the age uncertainty for each ancient sequence over the calibrated probability density function estimated for its radiocarbon date and associated error. We use the ECRS to analyse three ancient DNA data sets. Accounting for radiocarbon-dating and calibration error appeared to have little impact on estimates of evolutionary rates and related parameters for these data sets. However, analyses of other data sets, particularly those with few or only very old radiocarbon dates, might be more sensitive to using artificially precise sample ages and should benefit from use of the ECRS.

  6. A coupled model for carbon and radiocarbon evolution during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Véronique; Paillard, Didier; Bopp, Laurent; Roche, Didier M.; Bouttes, Nathaëlle

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the ventilation of the Southern Ocean are thought to play an important role on deglacial carbon and radiocarbon evolution but have not been tested within a coupled climate-carbon model. Here we present such a simulation based on a simple scenario of transient deglacial sinking of brines—sea ice salt rejections—around Antarctica, which modulates Southern Ocean ventilation. This experiment is able to reproduce deglacial atmospheric changes in carbon and radiocarbon and also ocean radiocarbon records measured in the Atlantic, Southern, and Pacific Oceans. Simulated for the first time in a fully coupled climate-carbon model of intermediate complexity including radiocarbon, our modeling results suggest that the deglacial changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and radiocarbon were achieved by means of a breakdown in the glacial brine-induced stratification of the Southern Ocean.

  7. Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Education: Psychology's Role in Understanding and Reducing Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintana, Stephen M.; Mahgoub, Lana

    2016-01-01

    We review the scope and sources of ethnic and racial disparities in education with a focus on the the implications of psychological theory and research for understanding and redressing these disparities. We identify 3 sources of ethnic and racial disparities including (a) social class differences, (b) differential treatment based on ethnic and…

  8. Disparity and Convergence: Chinese Provincial Government Health Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jay; Wang, Peng; Qin, Xuezheng; Zhang, Shufang

    2013-01-01

    The huge regional disparity in government health expenditures (GHE) is a major policy concern in China. This paper addresses whether provincial GHE converges in China from 1997 to 2009 using the economic convergence framework based on neoclassical economic growth theory. Our empirical investigation provides compelling evidence of long-term convergence in provincial GHE within China, but not in short-term. Policy implications of these empirical results are discussed. PMID:23977049

  9. Radiocarbon dating of VIRI bone samples using ultrafiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Yamazaki, Kana; Omori, Takayuki; Nakamura, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafiltration can effectively remove low-molecular-weight (LMW) contaminants from bone gelatin to extract high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins that are derived from original bone collagen, though it cannot remove HMW collagen crosslinked with humic acids. Therefore, ultrafiltration is often used to obtain more accurate 14C dates of bones. However, ultrafiltration may introduce new contaminants to bone gelatins, mainly from ultrafilters used. To study the effects of ultrafiltration on 14C age, we analyzed the C/N ratio, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values, and 14C ages of acid-soluble bone collagen obtained by decalcification, gelatin extracted from acid-insoluble bone collagen, and the HMW gelatin and LMW fractions produced during ultrafiltration of the extracted gelatin. Bone samples from the Fifth International Radiocarbon Intercomparison (VIRI) were used: VIRI-E (mammoth), -F (horse), -G (human), and -I (whale). In this study, carbon and nitrogen content and gelatin yields were used to evaluate collagen preservation in the VIRI bone samples. Radiocarbon ages, δ13CPDB and δ15NAIR values of unfiltered and HMW gelatins were obtained and compared with the published consensus values. The LMW fraction was found to exhibit different values from those of the other fractions, indicating the possible presence of extraneous contamination. The Vivaspin™ 6 ultrafilters used in this study were analyzed and radiocarbon dated both before and after cleaning. We present evidence to suggest that LMW fraction contaminants could be derived from the ultrafilters rather than humic substances. Excessively long ultrafiltration time was suspected to have contaminated the bone samples with material from the ultrafilter, because those samples exhibited older 14C ages than did those filtered for shorter durations. The results in this study indicate that 14C ages of unfiltered gelatin extracted from well-preserved bones can be sufficiently accurate, and that care should be taken not to

  10. Amoebic liver abscess production by Entamoeba dispar.

    PubMed

    Dolabella, Silvio S; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Navarro-García, Fernando; Cerritos, René; Ximénez, Cecilia; Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Silva, Edward F; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2012-01-01

    Although Entamoeba dispar displays a similar morphology to Entamoeba histolytica, cellular and molecular studies have revealed significant differences between these two amoebae, including the former being characterized as non-pathogenic and the later as pathogenic. However, recent in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that E. dispar strains of different origin are capable of causing liver damage and destroying cell culture lines in the presence of common intestinal bacteria. These results suggested that E. dispar may present pathogenic behavior according to the specific E. dispar strain, culture and environmental conditions. To investigate this possibility, we carried out in vivo and in vitro studies using a xenic strain E. dispar (ICB-ADO) isolated from a symptomatic non-dysenteric Brazilian patient. This strain was able to induce liver necrosis in a hamster model that was more severe than that produced by E. histolytica. The ICB-ADO isolate also caused significantly more destruction of cultured MDCK cells and increased loss of transepithelial resistance than did the E. histolytica. Xenic E. dispar exhibited high proteolytic activity, which was partially inhibited by the addition of cysteine-protease inhibitors. Based on our biochemical and molecular characterization of E. dispar (ICB-ADO) xenic culture and its ability to produce liver abscesses, we conclude that this specific strain can indeed produce tissue damage, distinct from the frequently used non- pathogenic E. dispar SAW 760 strain.

  11. Racial Disparity in Minnesota's Child Protection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik P.; Clark, Sonja; Donald, Matthew; Pedersen, Rachel; Pichotta, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Minnesota has been recognized by several studies as a state with a significant amount of racial disparity in its child protection system. This study, using 2001 data from Minnesota's Social Services Information Service, was conducted to determine at which of the six decision points in Minnesota's child welfare system racial disparities are…

  12. Health Disparities and Gaps in School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal…

  13. What limits the morphological disparity of clades?

    PubMed

    Oyston, Jack W; Hughes, Martin; Wagner, Peter J; Gerber, Sylvain; Wills, Matthew A

    2015-12-01

    The morphological disparity of species within major clades shows a variety of trajectory patterns through evolutionary time. However, there is a significant tendency for groups to reach their maximum disparity relatively early in their histories, even while their species richness or diversity is comparatively low. This pattern of early high-disparity suggests that there are internal constraints (e.g. developmental pleiotropy) or external restrictions (e.g. ecological competition) upon the variety of morphologies that can subsequently evolve. It has also been demonstrated that the rate of evolution of new character states decreases in most clades through time (character saturation), as does the rate of origination of novel bodyplans and higher taxa. Here, we tested whether there was a simple relationship between the level or rate of character state exhaustion and the shape of a clade's disparity profile: specifically, its centre of gravity (CG). In a sample of 93 extinct major clades, most showed some degree of exhaustion, but all continued to evolve new states up until their extinction. Projection of states/steps curves suggested that clades realized an average of 60% of their inferred maximum numbers of states. Despite a weak but significant correlation between overall levels of homoplasy and the CG of clade disparity profiles, there were no significant relationships between any of our indices of exhaustion curve shape and the clade disparity CG. Clades showing early high-disparity were no more likely to have early character saturation than those with maximum disparity late in their evolution. PMID:26640649

  14. Role of genomics in eliminating health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Meghana V; Nolan, Michael; Sprouse, Marc; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Cross, Deanna; Roby, Rhonda; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2015-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education, and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2014 Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts in research, patient care, and community outreach on the “Role of Genomics in Eliminating Health Disparities.” Rapid advances in genomics and pharmacogenomics are leading the field of medicine to use genetics and genetic risk to build personalized or individualized medicine strategies. We are at a critical juncture of ensuring such rapid advances benefit diverse populations. Relatively few forums have been organized around the theme of the role of genomics in eliminating health disparities. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Gene-Environment Interactions and Health Disparities,” “Personalized Medicine and Elimination of Health Disparities,” and “Ethics and Public Policy in the Genomic Era.” This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates, and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:26435701

  15. Rural/Urban Disparities in Science Achievement in Post-Socialist Countries: The Evolving Influence of Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryst, Erica L.; Kotok, Stephen; Bodovski, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Disparities in educational outcomes exist between students in rural areas as compared to students in urban settings. While there is some evidence that these rural disparities are present in eastern Europe, little is known about young peoples' lives in the rural areas of this region. This paper presents an analysis of science achievement by…

  16. Depth spreading through empty space induced by sparse disparity cues.

    PubMed

    Li, Xintong; Huang, Abigail E; Altschuler, Eric L; Tyler, Christopher W

    2013-01-01

    A key goal of visual processing is to develop an understanding of the three-dimensional layout of the objects in our immediate vicinity from the variety of incomplete and noisy depth cues available to the eyes. Binocular disparity is one of the dominant depth cues, but it is often sparse, being definable only at the edges of uniform surface regions, and visually resolvable only where the edges have a horizontal disparity component. To understand the full 3D structure of visual objects, our visual system has to perform substantial surface interpolation across unstructured visual space. This interpolation process was studied in an eight-spoke depth spreading configuration corresponding to that used in the neon color spreading effect, which generates a strong percept of a sharp contour extending through empty space from the disparity edges within the spokes. Four hypotheses were developed for the form of the depth surface induced by disparity in the spokes defining an incomplete disk in depth: low-level local (isotropic) depth propagation, mid-level linear (anisotropic) depth-contour interpolation or extrapolation, and high-level (anisotropic) figural depth propagation of a disk figure in depth. Data for both perceived depth and position of the perceived contour clearly rejected the first three hypotheses and were consistent with the high-level figural hypothesis in both uniform disparity and slanted disk configurations. We conclude that depth spreading through empty visual space is an accurately quantifiable perceptual process that propagates depth contours anisotropically along their length and is governed by high-level figural properties of 3D object structure. PMID:23946433

  17. Gender disparity in organ donation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Judith L

    2006-12-01

    Organ donation is affected by legal, cultural, religious, and racial factors, as well as by health considerations. Although organs in and of themselves are gender neutral and can be exchanged between the sexes, women account for up to two thirds of all organ donations. There are no clear reasons why women are more willing to undergo the risks of surgery than are men, nor is this gender disparity mirrored in the demand for donated organs. More men than women are recipients, and women are less likely to complete the necessary steps to receive donated organs. Internationally, ethical concern has been focused on possible human rights violations in the harvesting of organs from prisoners and, in poor countries, on the trafficking of organs from girls and women who are expected to financially help their families by selling their organs.

  18. Racial Disparity in Police Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Crutchfield, Robert D.; Haggerty, Kevin P.; McGlynn, Anne; Catalano, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Criminologists agree the race disparity in arrests cannot be fully explained by differences in criminal behavior. We examine social environment factors that may lead to racial differences in police contact in early adolescence, including family, peers, school, and community. Data are from 331 8th-grade students. Blacks were almost twice as likely as Whites to report a police contact. Blacks reported more property crime but not more violent crime than Whites. Police contacts were increased by having a parent who had been arrested, a sibling involved in criminal activity, higher observed reward for negative behavior, having school disciplinary actions, and knowing adults who engaged in substance abuse or criminal behavior. Race differences in police contacts were partially attributable to more school discipline. PMID:24363956

  19. Health Disparities and Discrimination: Three Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Krieger, Janice R.; Warren, Jennifer R.; Hecht, Michael L.; Okuyemi, Kola

    2010-01-01

    This article presents three perspectives on health discrimination and disparities, organized around different conceptualizations of the way “space” perpetuates health disparities. The first two perspectives are grounded in conceptualizing space in a physical sense by exploring the manifestation of discrimination as a problem both among and within nations. The third perspective juxtaposes geographical space with cyberspace. The internet, with its ability to blur sense of place, social demarcations, and behavior is often considered a panacea that can eliminate the health disparities. The internet, however, may not be fulfilling its promise as an equal source of health information for all and disparities related to international and rural geography remain problematic. Solutions are proposed for reducing health disparities based on The Principle of Cultural Grounding (Hecht & Krieger, 2006; Hecht & Miller-Day, in press). PMID:20694161

  20. Health Disparities and Discrimination: Three Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; Krieger, Janice R; Warren, Jennifer R; Hecht, Michael L; Okuyemi, Kola

    2008-10-01

    This article presents three perspectives on health discrimination and disparities, organized around different conceptualizations of the way "space" perpetuates health disparities. The first two perspectives are grounded in conceptualizing space in a physical sense by exploring the manifestation of discrimination as a problem both among and within nations. The third perspective juxtaposes geographical space with cyberspace. The internet, with its ability to blur sense of place, social demarcations, and behavior is often considered a panacea that can eliminate the health disparities. The internet, however, may not be fulfilling its promise as an equal source of health information for all and disparities related to international and rural geography remain problematic. Solutions are proposed for reducing health disparities based on The Principle of Cultural Grounding (Hecht & Krieger, 2006; Hecht & Miller-Day, in press). PMID:20694161

  1. Quantifying Access Disparities in Response Plans

    PubMed Central

    Indrakanti, Saratchandra; Mikler, Armin R.; O’Neill, Martin; Tiwari, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Effective response planning and preparedness are critical to the health and well-being of communities in the face of biological emergencies. Response plans involving mass prophylaxis may seem feasible when considering the choice of dispensing points within a region, overall population density, and estimated traffic demands. However, the plan may fail to serve particular vulnerable subpopulations, resulting in access disparities during emergency response. For a response plan to be effective, sufficient mitigation resources must be made accessible to target populations within short, federally-mandated time frames. A major challenge in response plan design is to establish a balance between the allocation of available resources and the provision of equal access to PODs for all individuals in a given geographic region. Limitations on the availability, granularity, and currency of data to identify vulnerable populations further complicate the planning process. To address these challenges and limitations, data driven methods to quantify vulnerabilities in the context of response plans have been developed and are explored in this article. PMID:26771551

  2. Progress reported on curbing disparities. One type of program doesn't fit all.

    PubMed

    2002-11-01

    As researchers examined the issue of racial disparity in HIV care and treatment, they found that some clinics and states have made progress in reducing disparity through a variety of programs and measures. Through studying various HIV programs in four states, researchers have found that the chief obstacles and solutions vary by region and minority culture, so there probably will never be one model for care that would work for all states and programs.

  3. Single amino acid radiocarbon dating of Upper Paleolithic modern humans.

    PubMed

    Marom, Anat; McCullagh, James S O; Higham, Thomas F G; Sinitsyn, Andrey A; Hedges, Robert E M

    2012-05-01

    Archaeological bones are usually dated by radiocarbon measurement of extracted collagen. However, low collagen content, contamination from the burial environment, or museum conservation work, such as addition of glues, preservatives, and fumigants to "protect" archaeological materials, have previously led to inaccurate dates. These inaccuracies in turn frustrate the development of archaeological chronologies and, in the Paleolithic, blur the dating of such key events as the dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Here we describe a method to date hydroxyproline found in collagen (~10% of collagen carbon) as a bone-specific biomarker that removes impurities, thereby improving dating accuracy and confidence. This method is applied to two important sites in Russia and allows us to report the earliest direct ages for the presence of anatomically modern humans on the Russian Plain. These dates contribute considerably to our understanding of the emergence of the Mid-Upper Paleolithic and the complex suite of burial behaviors that begin to appear during this period.

  4. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conard, N.; Asch, D.L.; Asch, N.B.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.; Rubin, M.; Brown, J.A.; Wiant, M.D.; Farnsworth, K.B.; Cook, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of direct detection radiocarbon dating, which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer, it is now possible to determine the age of milligram samples of organic materials1-5. One application of accelerator dating is in evaluating scanty, sometimes controversial evidence for early horticulture throughout the world. We have now used the technique to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North America with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (???2,000 BP) is questionable. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Atmosphere-ocean gas exchange based on radiocarbon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byalko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    In recent decades, the intensity of global atmospheric convection has accelerated faster than climate warming; it is possible to judge this process from indirect data. Increasing ocean salinity contrasts provide evidence that evaporation has intensified [1]; sea surface wind velocities and wave heights have increased [2]. The CO2 gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean must also simultaneously increase. Monthly measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration have been published since 1958 [3], but directly measuring its fluxes from the atmosphere to the ocean and back is hardly possible. We show they can be reconstructed from 14C isotope concentration data. In the past century, two processes influenced the atmospheric 14C concentration in opposite directions: burning fossil fuels and testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. We compare the gas exchange theory with measurements of radiocarbon content in the atmosphere [4—6], which allows assessing the gas exchange quantitatively for the ocean to atmosphere and atmosphere to ocean fluxes separately for period 1960—2010 [7]. References 1. Durack P. J. and Wijffels S. E., J. Climate 23, 4342 (2010). 2. Young I. R., Sieger S., and Babanin A.V., Science 332, 451 (2011). 3. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Data: ftp://ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccg/co2/trends/co2_mm_mlo.txt. 4. Nydal R., Lövseth K. // J. Geophys. Res. 1983. V. 88. P. 3579. 5. Levin I., Kromer B. // Radiocarbon. 1997. V. 39. P. 205. 6. Miller J.B., Lehman S.J., Montzka S.A., et al. // J. Geophys. Res. 2012. V. 117. D08302. 7. Byalko A.V. Doklady Physics, 2013. V. 58, 267-271.

  6. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  7. The radiocarbon signature of microorganisms in the mesopelagic ocean

    PubMed Central

    Hansman, Roberta L.; Griffin, Sheila; Watson, Jordan T.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Pearson, Ann; Aluwihare, Lihini I.

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that microorganisms in the meso- and bathypelagic ocean are metabolically active and respiring carbon. In addition, growing evidence suggests that archaea are fixing inorganic carbon in this environment. However, direct quantification of the contribution from deep ocean carbon sources to community production in the dark ocean remains a challenge. In this study, carbon flow through the microbial community at 2 depths in the mesopelagic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was examined by exploiting the unique radiocarbon signatures (Δ14C) of the 3 major carbon sources in this environment. The radiocarbon content of nucleic acids, a biomarker for viable cells, isolated from size-fractionated particles (0.2–0.5 μm and >0.5 μm) showed the direct incorporation of carbon delivered by rapidly sinking particles. Most significantly, at the 2 mesopelagic depths examined (670 m and 915 m), carbon derived from in situ autotrophic fixation supported a significant fraction of the free-living microbial community (0.2–0.5 μm size fraction), but the contribution of chemoautotrophy varied markedly between the 2 depths. Results further showed that utilization of the ocean's largest reduced carbon reservoir, 14C-depleted, dissolved organic carbon, was negligible in this environment. This isotopic portrait of carbon assimilation by the in situ, free-living microbial community, integrated over >50,000 L of seawater, implies that recent, photosynthetic carbon is not always the major carbon source supporting microbial community production in the mesopelagic realm. PMID:19366673

  8. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-06-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ⩾2). 14N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (Cn+ → C-) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14C in enriched samples of CO2 gas with 14C/12C isotopic ratio down to the 10-9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development.

  9. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Minami, M.; Onbe, S.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakamura, T.; Imamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric 14C and the Lake Biwa freshwater 14C is larger for this period because the atmospheric 14C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the 14C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric 14C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330-450 14C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 14C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3-6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  10. View synthesis from wide-baseline views using occlusion aware estimation of large disparities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliethy, Ahmed S.; Aly, Hussein A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-03-01

    Accurate disparity estimation is a key ingredient required when generating a high fidelity novel view from a set of input views. In this paper, a high quality disparity estimation method is proposed for view synthesis from multiple input images with large disparities and occlusions. The method optimally selects one out of three image pairs to estimate the disparity map for different regions of the novel view. The novel view is then formed using this disparity map. We introduce two novel elements: a) an enhanced visibility map that is able to segment the scene accurately near object boundaries and b) a backward unilateral and bilateral disparity estimation procedure using the Gabor transform on an expandable search window to tackle large disparities. The quality of the interpolated virtual views produced by the proposed method is assessed and compared against two of the prominent previously-reported methods. The proposed method offers a significant improvement both in terms of visual quality of the interpolated views as well as the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structured similarity image index (SSIM) metrics.

  11. Intracavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy not suitable for ambient level radiocarbon detection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro A J

    2015-09-01

    IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy as a radiocarbon detection technique was first reported by the Murnick group at Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, in 2008. This technique for radiocarbon detection was presented with tremendous potentials for applications in various fields of research. Significantly cheaper, this technique was portrayed as a possible complementary technique to the more expensive and complex accelerator mass spectrometry. Several groups around the world started developing this technique for various radiocarbon related applications. The IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at the University of Groningen was constructed in 2012 in close collaboration with the Murnick group for exploring possible applications in the fields of radiocarbon dating and atmospheric monitoring. In this paper we describe a systematic evaluation of the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup at Groningen for radiocarbon detection. Since the IntraCavity OptoGalvanic Spectroscopy setup was strictly planned for dating and atmospheric monitoring purposes, all the initial experiments were performed with CO2 samples containing contemporary levels and highly depleted levels of radiocarbon. Because of recurring failures in differentiating the two CO2 samples, with the radiocarbon concentration 3 orders of magnitude apart, CO2 samples containing elevated levels of radiocarbon were prepared in-house and experimented with. All results obtained thus far at Groningen are in sharp contrast to the results published by the Murnick group and rather support the results put forward by the Salehpour group at Uppsala University. From our extensive test work, we must conclude that the method is unsuited for ambient level radiocarbon measurements, and even highly enriched CO2 samples yield insignificant signal.

  12. Economic disparities in treatment costs among ambulatory Medicaid cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, C. Daniel; Snyder, Stephen E.; Wang, Junling; Cooke, Jesse L.; Baquet, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and a major contributor to healthcare expenditure. There are few studies examining disparities in treatment costs. Studies that do exist are dominated by the cost of hospital care. METHODS: Utilizing Maryland Medicaid administrative claims data, a retrospective cohort, design was employed to examine disparities in ambulatory treatment costs of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer treatment by region, race and gender. We report mean and median results by each demographic category and test for the statistical significance of each. Lorenz curves are plotted and Gini coefficients calculated for each type of cancer. RESULTS: We do not find a consistent trend in ambulatory costs across the three cancers by traditional demographic variables. Lorenz curves indicate highly unequal distributions of costs. Gini coefficients are 0.687 for breast cancer, 0.757 for colorectal cancer and 0.774 for prostate cancer. CONCLUSION: Significant variation in nonhospital-based expenditures exists for breast, colorectal and prostate cancers in a population of homogeneous socioeconomic status and uniform insurance entitlement. Observed individual-level disparities are not consistent across cancers by region, race or gender, but the majority of this low-income population receives very little ambulatory care. Images Figure 2 PMID:15622686

  13. Holocene radiocarbon-dated sites in northeastern Siberia: issues of temporal frequency, reservoir age, and human-nature interaction.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Yaroslav V

    2010-01-01

    The existing corpus of data on radiocarbon dates for Holocene sites in Northeastern Siberia was used as proxy to reconstruct the chronology of human occupation of the region. The problem of reservoir age correction in the Bering Sea region complicated this task and this issue needs to be solved in order to obtain more reliable age determinations for coastal archaeological sites. Using a chronology built after excluding the questionable dates from the database, the major patterns of human population dynamics and their possible correlation with climatic fluctuations were examined. No direct relationship appears to exist between these two processes. Additional archaeological and paleo environmental work needs to be carried out in this region of the North.

  14. Black women's awareness of breast cancer disparity and perceptions of the causes of disparity.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Karen; Cameron, Kenzie A; Curry, Gina; Stolley, Melinda

    2013-08-01

    Black women face the greatest breast cancer mortality burden of any racial or ethnic group in the United States. Breast cancer disparity is particularly pronounced in Chicago, where Black women were 62 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than their White counterparts in 2007. No work to date has examined views of disparity among a population living in the context of a large, well-documented, and grave health disparity. We examined (1) awareness of breast cancer disparities among Black women in Chicago; and (2) Black women's perceptions of the causes of breast cancer disparity. Four focus groups with Black women were held in Chicago. Participants completed a brief survey about their views of breast cancer prior to the group discussion. In response to the survey question, "In your opinion, who is more likely to die from breast cancer?" 51 % of participants believed all women have the same chance of dying from breast cancer. In focus group discussions, participants placed responsibility for disparity on individual behaviors and community culture. Participants believed that disparity resulted from Black women's lack of awareness of cancer screening and their failure to be screened or treated for breast cancer. The majority of participants were unaware of breast cancer mortality disparities. Moreover, while health researchers and professionals believe disparity in Chicago results from healthcare system inequalities, Black women largely viewed breast cancer disparity as a consequence of individual behaviors, knowledge and attitudes.

  15. Radiocarbon and stable isotope investigations at the Central Rhineland sites of Gönnersdorf and Andernach-Martinsberg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rhiannon E; O'Connell, Tamsin C; Hedges, Robert E M; Street, Martin

    2009-08-01

    of the two sites not detectable at the level of precision of current radiocarbon dating techniques. No spatial trends in the faunal isotope signatures were observed within each site. In the case of samples with both radiocarbon and isotope data, no chronological pattern was observed for the isotope results. The Magdalenian faunal isotope signatures at the two sites resembled each other, suggesting comparable climatic and environmental conditions. The faunal delta(13)C signatures at Gönnersdorf and Andernach-Martinsberg were similar to those at contemporary European sites. While the faunal delta(15)N values were similar to those at contemporary sites in Germany, the UK, and Belgium, they were lower than those from the South of France. This difference in delta(15)N values is thought to relate to regional differences in the timing of changes in soil and plant nitrogen cycling in response to ameliorating climatic conditions.

  16. Gender Disparity in Late-life Cognitive Functioning in India: Findings From the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Regina; Feeney, Kevin; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To examine gender disparities in cognitive functioning in India and the extent to which education explains this disparity in later life. Methods. This study uses baseline interviews of a prospective cohort study of 1,451 community-residing adults 45 years of age or older in four geographically diverse states of India (Karnataka, Kerala, Punjab, Rajasthan). Data collected during home visits includes cognitive performance tests, and rich sociodemographic, health, and psychosocial variables. The cognitive performance tests include episodic memory, numeracy, and a modified version of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Results. We find gender disparity in cognitive function in India, and this disparity is greater in the north than the south. We also find that gender disparities in educational attainment, health, and social and economic activity explain the female cognitive disadvantage in later life. Discussion. We report significant gender disparities in cognitive functioning among older Indian adults, which differ from gender disparities in cognition encountered in developed countries. Our models controlling for education, health status, and social and economic activity explain the disparity in southern India but not the region-specific disparity in the northern India. North Indian women may face additional sources of stress associated with discrimination against women that contribute to persistent disadvantages in cognitive functioning at older ages. PMID:24622150

  17. Late Quaternary sedimentological and climate changes at Lake Bosumtwi Ghana: new constraints from laminae analysis and radiocarbon age modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanahan, Timothy M.; Beck, J. Warren; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; McKay, Nicholas P.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Peck, John A.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Heil, Clifford W.; King, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Bosumtwi sediment record represents one of the longest and highest-resolution terrestrial records of paleoclimate change available from sub-Saharan Africa. Here we report a new sediment age model framework for the last ~ 45 cal kyr of sedimentation using a combination of high-resolution radiocarbon dating, Bayesian age-depth modeling and lamination counting. Our results highlight the practical limits of these methods for reducing age model uncertainties and suggest that even with very high sampling densities, radiocarbon uncertainties of at least a few hundred years are unavoidable. Age model uncertainties are smallest during the Holocene (205 yr) and the glacial (360 yr) but are large at the base of the record (1660 yr), due to a combination of decreasing sample density, larger calibration uncertainties and increases in radiocarbon age scatter. For portions of the chronology older than ~ 35 cal kyr, additional considerations, such as the use of a low-blank graphitization system and more rigorous sample pretreatment were necessary to generate a reliable age depth model because of the incorporation of small amounts of younger carbon. A comparison of radiocarbon age model results and lamination counts over the time interval ~ 15–30 cal kyr agree with an overall discrepancy of ~ 10% and display similar changes in sedimentation rate, supporting the annual nature of sediment laminations in the early part of the record. Changes in sedimentation rates reconstructed from the age-depth model indicate that intervals of enhanced sediment delivery occurred at 16–19, 24 and 29–31 cal kyr, broadly synchronous with reconstructed drought episodes elsewhere in northern West Africa and potentially, with changes in Atlantic meridional heat transport during North Atlantic Heinrich events. These data suggest that millennial-scale drought events in the West African monsoon region were latitudinally extensive, reaching within several hundred kilometers of the Guinea coast

  18. Global health disparities: crisis in the diaspora.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Raymond L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States spends more than the rest of the world on healthcare. In 2000, the U.S. health bill was 1.3 trillion dollars, 14.5% of its gross domestic product. Yet, according to the WHO World Health Report 2000, the United States ranked 37th of 191 member nations in overall health system performance. Racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes are the most obvious examples of an unbalanced healthcare system. This presentation will examine health disparities in the United States and reveal how health disparities among and within countries affect the health and well-being of the African Diaspora. PMID:15101675

  19. Fast Radiometry Guided Fusion of Disparity Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stephan; Fritsch, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Previous work on disparity map fusion has mostly focused on geometric or statistical properties of disparity maps. Since failure of stereo algorithms is often consistent in many frames of a scene, it cannot be detected by such methods. Instead, we propose to use radiometric information from the original camera images together with externally supplied camera pose information to detect mismatches. As radiometric information is local information, the computations in the proposed algorithm for disparity fusion can be decoupled and parallelized to a very large degree, which allows us to easily achieve real-time performance.

  20. Conquering racial disparities in perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Earnestine; McManus, Patricia; Magallanes, Norma; Johnson, Sheri; Majnik, Amber

    2014-12-01

    Infant mortality rate (IMR) is a reference indicator for societal health status. Trend analysis of IMR highlights 2 challenges to overcome in the United States: (1) US IMR is higher than most industrialized countries and (2) there are persistent racial/ethnic disparities in birth outcomes, especially for blacks. Racial/ethnic infant mortality disparities result from the complex interplay of adverse social, economic, and environmental exposures. In this article, racial/ethnic disparities are discussed, highlighting trends, the role of epigenetics in understanding mechanisms, key domains of community action planning, and programs and policies addressing the racial gaps in adverse birth outcomes. PMID:25459778

  1. Conquering racial disparities in perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Earnestine; McManus, Patricia; Magallanes, Norma; Johnson, Sheri; Majnik, Amber

    2014-12-01

    Infant mortality rate (IMR) is a reference indicator for societal health status. Trend analysis of IMR highlights 2 challenges to overcome in the United States: (1) US IMR is higher than most industrialized countries and (2) there are persistent racial/ethnic disparities in birth outcomes, especially for blacks. Racial/ethnic infant mortality disparities result from the complex interplay of adverse social, economic, and environmental exposures. In this article, racial/ethnic disparities are discussed, highlighting trends, the role of epigenetics in understanding mechanisms, key domains of community action planning, and programs and policies addressing the racial gaps in adverse birth outcomes.

  2. Racial disparities in pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Lodish, Maya B

    2013-09-01

    The question of whether or not children, particularly girls, are entering puberty earlier than they did in the past has been a concern in both the medical community and the general population. A secular trend analysis of the current data on pubertal timing in boys and girls is limited by variations in the study design, the population assessed, and the methods used to determine pubertal development. These differences present a challenge when interpreting the available data, especially when comparing multiple studies. The influence of race on pubertal timing and development had not been assessed before the 1970s. The purpose of this article is to review the reported variations in pubertal timing among different racial/ethnic groups. Data suggest African American girls enter puberty earlier and reach menarche earlier than Caucasian and Hispanic girls. In addition, the trend toward earlier timing of puberty seems to be occurring faster in African American girls compared with Caucasian girls over the past 25 years. While the mechanism and understanding of the cause of racial disparities in pubertal development remain to be discerned, genetic and/or environmental factors may play a role and require further investigation.

  3. Social disparity and oral health.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima; Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Bresciani, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    There is a clear reported association between social disparity and oral health, for example, between dental caries and malnutrition in children. This fact is detected in several studies, and also found amongst the Brazilian population. However, several efforts have been made to improve the quality of life of the population and to achieve the 2015 Millennium Development Goals. Oral health is a branch to be improved among these goals. The Brazilian experience has been drawing the attention of authorities, insofar as there have been direct improvements in oral health through state oral health programs, and also indirect results by improving the quality of life of the population. Included within the Brazilian oral health programs are the Family Health Program and Smiling Brazil Program. The former is a global healthcare program which involves primary oral healthcare, while the latter is a specialized oral care program. Among the social programs that would indirectly improve oral health are Family Stipend and the Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute of Neuroscience of Natal (ELS-IINN). In conclusion, although oral health problems are related to socioeconomic factors, the implementation of primary oral health programs and programs to improve the population's quality of life may directly or indirectly improve the oral health scenario. This fact is being observed in Brazil, where the oral health policies have changed, and social programs have been implemented.

  4. Disparities in renal care in Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Renoirte-Lopez, Karina; Marquez-Magaña, Isela

    2010-01-01

    End-stage renal disease represents a serious public health problem in Mexico. Close to 9% of the Mexican population has chronic kidney disease (CKD) and 40,000 patients are on dialysis. However, the fragmentation of our health care system has resulted in unequal access to renal replacement therapy. In addition, poor patients in Jalisco with kidney failure have very advanced disease at the time of dialysis initiation, suggesting lack of access to predialysis care. To address these issues, a number of strategies have been implemented. Among them a renal replacement therapy program for which the cost of treatment is shared by government, patients, industry, and charitable organizations; the implementation of a state-funded hemodialysis program that provides free dialysis for the poor; the establishment of a university-sponsored residency program in nephrology and a postgraduate training in nephrology nursing; and a screening program for early detection and control of CKD. In conclusion, access to renal care is unequal. The extension of the Seguro Popular to cover end-stage renal disease treatment nationwide and the implementation of community screening programs for the detection and control of CKD offers an opportunity to correct the existing disparities in renal care in Jalisco and perhaps in other regions of Mexico.

  5. Black-white disparities in blunt trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Rodriguez, A.; Dunham, C. M.; Shankar, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    To uncover causes of increased mortality rates in black accident victims, patterns of injury and access to trauma care were compared between black and white patients. Over a 41-month period (February 1985 to June 1988), 2120 white and 468 black patients, each with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 14 as a result of blunt trauma, were admitted to a Level I regional trauma center, part of a statewide trauma system. Blacks were significantly older and more of them had premorbid illnesses. Although vehicular crashes accounted for the majority of injuries in both groups, blacks had significantly more injuries resulting from falls, pedestrian accidents, and assaults. Whereas 70.6% of whites were transported from the scene and 73% were transported by helicopter, 52.7% of blacks were transported from the scene and 44% by helicopter. Blacks made up 18% of the study group and accounted for 20% of deaths (mortality rate 17.3% for blacks and 14.9% for whites). Mortality was significantly increased for black patients admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score > or = 13. Private medical insurance, available for 46.3% of black patients, accounted for 78% of payments for all trauma admissions. Increased mortality of black trauma patients may be related to risk factors (age, premorbid illness), increased rates of pedestrian accidents and falls, and disparities in access to Level I trauma centers. PMID:8371282

  6. Prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar in the city of Campina Grande, in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Teresa Nascimento; Santana, José Valfrido; Bragagnoli, Gérson; Marinho, Alexandre Magno da Nóbrega; Malagueño, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear need to perform epidemiological studies to find the true prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica around the world. The evaluation of this prevalence has been hindered by the existence of two different species which are morphologically identical, but genetically different, namely E. histolytica, which causes amebiasis, and E. dispar, which is non-pathogenic. In Brazil, the E. dispar has been detected in communities in the Southeastern (SE) and Northeastern (NE) regions with poor sanitation. However, individuals infected with E. histolytica have been identified in other regions. There is an absence of reports on the prevalence of these parasites in the state of Paraíba, which also has areas with poor sanitary conditions where a high prevalence of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex has been detected in children from urban slums. The present study evaluated the prevalence of E. histolytica and E. dispar in 1,195 asymptomatic children between two and 10 years of age, living in a sprawling urban slum in Campina Grande, in the state of Paraíba, in Northeastern Brazil. These children were examined and their feces samples were analyzed microscopically. A total of 553 children tested positive for the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex, and 456 of the positive samples were tested with the E. histolytica II® ELISA kit. All 456 samples were negative for the presence of the adhesin E. histolytica specific antigen. The evidence suggests that in this community E. histolytica is absent and E. dispar is the dominant species.

  7. BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide a means to quantify the ...

  8. EGRP-Supported Health Disparities Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute has targeted the reduction of cancer-related health disparities, differences in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, and burden of cancer and related adverse health conditions, as an important challenge.

  9. Racial and ethnic disparities in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Churak, Joanne M

    2005-02-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in renal transplantation. The causes are multifactorial and include but are not limited to racism, socioeconomic status and class, unfavorable geographical location, lack of organ donation by minority groups, and differences in social networks, health beliefs culture and HLA typing. These disparities affect blacks, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Alaskan natiives and Asians. Elimination of these disparities is difficult, since many of the causes are intertwined, and it is difficult todiscern attributable disparity risk associated with the various factors. The possible solutions and recommendations are numerous. Since it is difficult to identify which may be successsful, thorough evaluation is required to determine which should be implemented. Some recommendations may not be easily implemented. Those selected for implementation must be continuously monitored for the expected results and effects.

  10. Cancer Health Disparities | Did You Know?

    Cancer.gov

    How does cancer affect people from different populations and groups? Cancer health disparities happen when there are higher rates of new diagnoses and cancer death rates among certain races, ethnicities, or other population groups.

  11. Healthcare Quality and Disparities in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Report (NHDR) focuses on “prevailing disparities in health care delivery as it relates to racial factors and socioeconomic factors in priority populations.” Priority populations include racial ...

  12. Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature you selected is no longer available. In 10 seconds you will be automatically redirected to the CDC. ...

  13. Age validation of quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) using bomb radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, L A; Andrews, A H; Munk, K; Coale, K H; Frantz, B R; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A

    2005-01-05

    Rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) support one of the most economically important fisheries of the Pacific Northwest and it is essential for sustainable management that age estimation procedures be validated for these species. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices during the 1950s and 1960s created a global radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) signal in the ocean environment that scientists have identified as a useful tracer and chronological marker in natural systems. In this study, we first demonstrated that fewer samples are necessary for age validation using the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal by emphasizing the utility of the time-specific marker created by the initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C. Second, the bomb-generated {sup 14}C signal retained in fish otoliths was used to validate the age and age estimation methodology of the quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger) in the waters of southeast Alaska. Radiocarbon values from the first year's growth of quillback rockfish otoliths were plotted against estimated birth year producing a {sup 14}C time series spanning 1950 to 1985. The initial rise of bomb-{sup 14}C from pre-bomb levels ({approx} -90 {per_thousand}) occurred in 1959 {+-} 1 year and {sup 14}C levels rose relatively rapidly to peak {Delta}{sup 14}C values in 1967 (+105.4 {per_thousand}), with a subsequent declining trend through the end of the record in 1985 (+15.4 {per_thousand}). The agreement between the year of initial rise of {sup 14}C levels from the quillback rockfish record and the chronometer determined for the waters of southeast Alaska from yelloweye rockfish (S. ruberrimus) otoliths validated the ageing methodology for the quillback rockfish. The concordance of the entire quillback rockfish {sup 14}C record with the yelloweye rockfish time series demonstrated the effectiveness of this age validation technique, confirmed the longevity of the quillback rockfish up to a minimum of 43 years, and strongly supports higher age estimates of up to 90 years.

  14. Solar activity around AD 775 from aurorae and radiocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2015-04-01

    A large variation in 14C around AD 775 has been considered to be caused by one or more solar super-flares within one year. We critically review all known aurora reports from Europe as well as the Near, Middle, and Far East from AD 731 to 825 and find 39 likely true aurorae plus four more potential aurorae and 24 other reports about halos, meteors, thunderstorms etc., which were previously misinterpreted as aurorae or misdated; we assign probabilities for all events according to five aurora criteria. We find very likely true aurorae in AD 743, 745, 762, 765, 772, 773, 793, 796, 807, and 817. There were two aurorae in the early 770s observed near Amida (now Diyarbak\\i r in Turkey near the Turkish-Syrian border), which were not only red, but also green-yellow - being at a relatively low geomagnetic latitude, they indicate a relatively strong solar storm. However, it cannot be argued that those aurorae (geomagnetic latitude 43 to 50°, considering five different reconstructions of the geomagnetic pole) could be connected to one or more solar super-flares causing the 14C increase around AD 775: There are several reports about low- to mid-latitude aurorae at 32 to 44° geomagnetic latitude in China and Iraq; some of them were likely observed (quasi-)simultaneously in two of three areas (Europe, Byzantium/Arabia, East Asia), one lasted several nights, and some indicate a particularly strong geomagnetic storm (red colour and dynamics), namely in AD 745, 762, 793, 807, and 817 - always without 14C peaks. We use 39 likely true aurorae as well as historic reports about sunspots together with the radiocarbon content from tree rings to reconstruct the solar activity: From AD {˜ 733} to {˜ 823}, we see at least nine Schwabe cycles; instead of one of those cycles, there could be two short, weak cycles - reflecting the rapid increase to a high 14C level since AD 775, which lies at the end of a strong cycle. In order to show the end of the dearth of naked-eye sunspots, we

  15. New radiocarbon measurement methods in the Hertelendi Laboratory, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovics, Róbert; Major, István; Rinyu, László; Veres, Mihály; Molnár, Mihály

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present two very different and novel methods for C-14 measurement from dissolved inorganic carbonate (DIC) of water samples. A new LSC sample preparation method for liquid scintillation C-14 measurements was implemented in the ATOMKI. The first method uses direct absorption into a special absorbent (Carbosorb E®) and a following liquid scintillation measurement. Typical sample size is 20-40 litre of water. The developed CO2 absorption method is fast, and simple. The C-14 activities is measured by an ultra low background LSC (TRI-CARB 3170 TR/SL, Perkin Elmer) including quenching parameter (tSIE).The corresponding limit of C-14 dating is 31200 year. Several tests were executed with old borehole CO2 gas without significant content of C-14 and also performed on samples of known C-14 activities between 29 and 7000 pMC, previously measured by GPC. The combined uncertainty of the described determination is about 2 % in the case of recent carbon. It is a very cost-effective and easy to use method based on a novel and simple static absorption process for the CO2 extracted from groundwater. The other very sensitive method is based on accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) using gas ion source. This method does not require graphite generation and a small volume of water sample (1-20mL) is enough for the radiocarbon measurement. The procedure is very similar to pre-treatment of carbonate contained sample preparation for stable isotope measurement with gasbench technique. We applied a MICADAS type accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with gas ion source for C-14 analysis. The radiocarbon content of water was sat free with phosphoric acid and then the headspace gas was rinsed vials. The whole measurement needs only 20 min of each sample. The precision of measurement is better than 1% for modern samples. The preparation is vastly reduced compared to the other AMS methods and principally allows fully automated measurements of groundwater samples with an auto

  16. Radiocarbon-depleted CO2 evidence for fuel biodegradation at the Naval Air Station North Island (USA) fuel farm site.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Thomas J; Pound, Michael J; Lohr, Daniel; Coffin, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved CO(2) radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope ratios were measured in groundwater from a fuel contaminated site at the North Island Naval Air Station in San Diego, CA (USA). A background groundwater sampling well and 16 wells in the underground fuel contamination zone were evaluated. For each sample, a two end-member isotopic mixing model was used to determine the fraction of CO(2) derived from fossil fuel. The CO(2) fraction from fossil sources ranged from 8 to 93% at the fuel contaminated site, while stable carbon isotope values ranged from -14 to +5‰VPDB. Wells associated with highest historical and contemporary fuel contamination showed the highest fraction of CO(2) derived from petroleum (fossil) sources. Stable carbon isotope ratios indicated sub-regions on-site with recycled CO(2) (δ(13)CO(2) as high as +5‰VPDB) - most likely resulting from methanogenesis. Ancillary measurements (pH and cations) were used to determine that no fossil CaCO(3), for instance limestone, biased the analytical conclusions. Radiocarbon analysis is verified as a viable and definitive technique for confirming fossil hydrocarbon conversion to CO(2) (complete oxidation) at hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater sites. The technique should also be very useful for assessing the efficacy of engineered remediation efforts and by using CO(2) production rates, contaminant mass conversion over time and per unit volume.

  17. Characterizing the export of fossil carbon from permafrost soils of Spitsbergen using compound-specific radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, G.; Kusch, S.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    Permafrost soils in the circumpolar Arctic regions contain vast amounts of carbon stored as organic matter, which could potentially be mobilized during the climate warming expected to be particularly severe in these regions. Deeper thawing of permafrost soils may result in degradation and erosion of previously freeze-locked organic matter, followed by transport to the ocean and respiration to CO2. We studied a small catchment area covered by permafrost soils on the island of Spitsbergen at approximately 78°N, Svalbard archipelago. Total organic carbon (TOC) in a soil profile of the annually thawed active layer exhibits increasing radiocarbon ages with depth of 5800 conventional radiocarbon years (14C yrs BP) in 0 to 30 cm depth to 26000 14C yrs BP at 60-85 cm. However, in this region known for its occurrence of carboniferous and tertiary coals, these ages are likely biased by variable relative contributions of fossil coal particles. Compound-specific radiocarbon ages of short-chain (C16) and long-chain (C26 and C28) fatty acids, which are derived mainly from bacteria and recent tundra vegetation, respectively, aree substantially younger than TOC, but still reach values between 2280 14C yrs BP for C16 in the uppermost 0-30 cm and 8350 14C yrs BP for C26 fatty acids in the 30-60 cm soil depth interval. Obviously, several different carbon pools contribute to TOC in the soil profile, and carbon turnover is slow. Radiocarbon dating of long-chain (C26-C28) fatty acids recovered from core-top sediments of the Bayelva river draining the catchment and from shallow water fjord sediments directly off the river mouth yields 14C ages of 10800 and 7900 yrs BP, respectively. As the C16 fatty acids in marine sediments are primarily attributed to marine phytoplankton, its modern in the marine sediment age clearly identifies it as a recent sediment, in which old terrestrial plant material is deposited. Apparently, this terrigenous material is buried near shore, as 14C ages of long

  18. Application of compound-specific radiocarbon dating for Antarctic margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkouchi, N.; Koizumi, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Miura, H.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Radiocarbon dating has been extensively applied for the development of chronologies of Antarctic margin sediments deposited during the late Quaternary. However, the problems are 1) the DIC reservoir age in the surface mixed layer is much older than that of the other oceans, 2) Antarctic margin sediments generally lack calcareous foraminifera conventionally used for radiocarbon dating and as stratigraphic tool, and 3) the sediments are subjected to significant "contamination" of relict organic matter eroded from the Antarctic continent, leading to substantially older radiocarbon ages of bulk sedimentary organic matter. Ohkouchi et al. (2003) first applied compound-specific radiocarbon dating to the surface sediments collected from Ross Sea, Antarctica for resolving the problem. They reported that the radiocarbon ages of solvent-extractable, short-chain (C14, C16, and C18) fatty acids are consistent with the modern DIC reservoir age (Pre-bomb: 14C -150, Post-bomb: 14C -100). Furthermore, the radiocarbon ages of these fatty acids at five down-core intervals progressively increase with the core depth. These results clearly show a utility of the compound- specific radiocarbon dating for developing sediment chronologies in Antarctic margin sediments. We also determined radiocarbon ages of the fatty acids from a core recovered in the NW Ross Sea to reconstruct sediment chronologies. Furthermore, we determined hydrogen isotopic compositions of sedimentary biomarkers in the core. Around 6.8, 5.7, 4.1, 2.5, and 1.5 kyr ago, the reconstructed D values of paleo- seawater were -200 or lower, suggesting a large amount of meltwater influx to the Ross Sea. Currently, we are applying the method to more sediment samples collected from wider area of Ross Sea to investigate the timing and pattern of retreat of West Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Holocene. I will present the up-dated results in my talk.

  19. Healthcare disparities and models for change.

    PubMed

    Baquet, Claudia R; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Bengen-Seltzer, Barbara

    2004-09-01

    With Healthy People 2010 making the goal of eliminating health disparities a national priority, policymakers, researchers, medical centers, managed care organizations (MCOs), and advocacy organizations have been called on to move beyond the historic documentation of health disparities and proceed with an agenda to translate policy recommendations into practice. Working models that have successfully reduced health disparities in managed care settings were presented at the National Managed Health Care Congress Inaugural Forum on Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care on March 10-11, 2003, in Washington, DC. These models are being used by federal, state, and municipal governments, as well as private, commercial, and Medicaid MCOs. Successful models and programs at all levels reduce health disparities by forming partnerships based on common goals to provide care, to educate, and to rebuild healthcare systems. Municipal models work in collaboration with state and federal agencies to integrate patient care with technology. Several basic elements of MCOs help to reduce disparities through emphasis on preventive care, community and member health education, case management and disease management tracking, centralized data collection, and use of sophisticated technology to analyze data and coordinate services. At the community level, there are leveraged funds from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Bureau of Primary Health Care. Well-designed models provide seamless monitoring of patient care and outcomes by integrating human and information system resources.

  20. Socioeconomic Dynamics of Gender Disparity in Childhood Immunization in India, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Ranjan Kumar; Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicated that gender disparity in child health is minimal and narrowed over time in India. However, considering the geographical and socio-cultural diversity in India, the gender gap may persist across disaggregated socioeconomic context which may be masked by average level. This study examines the dynamics of gender disparity in childhood immunization across regions, residence, wealth, caste and religion in India during 1992–2006. Method We used multi-waves of the cross-sectional data of National Family Health Survey conducted in India between 1992–93 and 2005–06. Gender disparity ratio was used to measure the gender gap in childhood immunization across the selected socioeconomic characteristics. Multinomial regression analysis was used to examine the gender gap after accounting for other covariates. Result Results indicate that, at aggregate level, gender disparity in full immunization is minimal and has stagnated during the study period. However, gender disparity – disfavouring female children – becomes apparent across the regions, poor households, and religion - particularly among Muslims. Adjusted gender disparity ratio indicates that, full immunization is lower among female than male children of the western region, poor household and among Muslims. Between 1992–93 and 2005–06, the disparity in full immunization had narrowed in the northern region whereas it had, astonishingly, increased in some of the western and southern states of the country. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the need to integrate gender issues in the ongoing immunization programme in India, with particular attention to urban areas, developed states, and to the Muslim community. PMID:25127396

  1. Estimates of upwelling rates in the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean based on bomb radiocarbon.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, R; Dutta, K; Somayajulu, B L K

    2008-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements were made in the water column of the Arabian Sea and the equatorial Indian Ocean during 1994, 1995 and 1997 to assess the temporal variations in bomb 14C distribution and its inventory in the region with respect to GEOSECS measurements made during 1977-1978. Four GEOSECS stations were reoccupied (three in the Arabian Sea and one in the equatorial Indian Ocean) during this study, with all of them showing increased penetration of bomb 14C along with decrease in its surface water activity. The upwelling rates derived by model simulation of bomb 14C depth profile using the calculated exchange rates ranged from 3 to 9 m a(-1). The western region of the Arabian Sea experiencing high wind-induced upwelling has higher estimated upwelling rates. However, lower upwelling rates obtained for the stations occupied during this study could be due to reduced 14C gradient compared to that during GEOSECS.

  2. Improving estimates of surface water radiocarbon reservoir ages in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenop, Rosanna; Burke, Andrea; Rae, James; Austin, William; Reimer, Paula; Blaauw, Maarten; Crocker, Anya; Chalk, Thomas; Barker, Stephen; Knutz, Paul; Hall, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon measurements from foraminifera in marine sediment cores are widely used to constrain age models and the timing of paleoceanographic events, as well as past changes in ocean circulation and carbon cycling. However, the use of radiocarbon for both dating and palaeoceanographic applications is limited in sediment cores by a lack of knowledge about the surface ocean radiocarbon reservoir age and how it varies in both space and time. Typically, to convert a planktic radiocarbon age into a calendar age, an assumed constant reservoir age is applied. However, there is mounting evidence to suggest that this assumption of constant reservoir age through time is an oversimplification, particularly for the high latitude oceans during the cold climates of the last glacial and deglacial periods. Here we present new high-resolution radiocarbon records together with tephra tie points and 230-thorium (230Th) constrained sedimentation rates to improve estimates of radiocarbon reservoir age in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. In addition we will explore the impact of the new reservoir ages for both the age models of the cores studied, as well as the palaeoceanographic implications of these reservoir age changes during intervals of rapid climate change over the past 40,000 years.

  3. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.F.; Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Steadman, D.W.; Olson, S.L.; Martin, P.S.; Jull, A.J.; McCoy, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The /sup 14/C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  4. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    PubMed

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  5. Radiocarbon analyses along the EDML ice core in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wal, R. S. W.; Meijer, H. A. J.; de Rooij, M.; van der Veen, C.

    2007-02-01

    Samples, 17 in total, from the EDML core drilled at Kohnen station Antarctica are analysed for 14CO and 14CO2 with a dry-extraction technique in combination with accelerator mass spectrometry. Results of the in situ produced 14CO fraction show a very low concentration of in situ produced 14CO. Despite these low levels in carbon monoxide, a significant in situ production is observed in the carbon dioxide fraction. For the first time we found background values for the ice samples which are equal to line blanks. The data set is used to test a model for the production of 14C in the ice matrix, in combination with a degassing as 14CO2 and possibly as 14CO into the air bubbles. Application of the model, for which no independent validation is yet possible, offers the opportunity to use radiocarbon analysis as dating technique for the air bubbles in the ice. Assigning an arbitrary error of 25% to the calculation of the in situ production leads to age estimates, after correction for the in situ production, which are in agreement with age estimates based on a volcanic layer match of EDML to the Dome C timescale in combination with a correction for firn diffusion.

  6. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    PubMed

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications. PMID:27366605

  7. Radiocarbon test of earthquake magnitude at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.; Stuiver, M.; Yamaguchi, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, which extends along the northern Pacific coast of North America, might produce earthquakes of magnitude 8 or 9 ('great' earthquakes) even though it has not done so during the past 200 years of European observation 1-7. Much of the evidence for past Cascadia earthquakes comes from former meadows and forests that became tidal mudflats owing to abrupt tectonic subsidence in the past 5,000 years2,3,6,7. If due to a great earthquake, such subsidence should have extended along more than 100 km of the coast2. Here we investigate the extent of coastal subsidence that might have been caused by a single earthquake, through high-precision radiocarbon dating of coastal trees that abruptly subsided into the intertidal zone. The ages leave the great-earthquake hypothesis intact by limiting to a few decades the discordance, if any, in the most recent subsidence of two areas 55 km apart along the Washington coast. This subsidence probably occurred about 300 years ago.

  8. Mortar radiocarbon dating: preliminary accuracy evaluation of a novel methodology.

    PubMed

    Marzaioli, Fabio; Lubritto, Carmine; Nonni, Sara; Passariello, Isabella; Capano, Manuela; Terrasi, Filippo

    2011-03-15

    Mortars represent a class of building and art materials that are widespread at archeological sites from the Neolithic period on. After about 50 years of experimentation, the possibility to evaluate their absolute chronology by means of radiocarbon ((14)C) remains still uncertain. With the use of a simplified mortar production process in the laboratory environment, this study shows the overall feasibility of a novel physical pretreatment for the isolation of the atmospheric (14)CO(2) (i.e., binder) signal absorbed by the mortars during their setting. This methodology is based on the assumption that an ultrasonic attack in liquid phase isolates a suspension of binder carbonates from bulk mortars. Isotopic ((13)C and (14)C), % C, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed to characterize the proposed methodology. The applied protocol allows suppression of the fossil carbon (C) contamination originating from the incomplete burning of the limestone during the quick lime production, providing unbiased dating for "laboratory" mortars produced operating at historically adopted burning temperatures.

  9. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II].

    PubMed

    Currie, Lloyd A

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought (14)C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for "molecular dating" at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the "bomb effect," that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural (14)C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications.

  10. The Remarkable Metrological History of Radiocarbon Dating [II

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Lloyd A.

    2004-01-01

    This article traces the metrological history of radiocarbon, from the initial breakthrough devised by Libby, to minor (evolutionary) and major (revolutionary) advances that have brought 14C measurement from a crude, bulk [8 g carbon] dating tool, to a refined probe for dating tiny amounts of precious artifacts, and for “molecular dating” at the 10 µg to 100 µg level. The metrological advances led to opportunities and surprises, such as the non-monotonic dendrochronological calibration curve and the “bomb effect,” that gave rise to new multidisciplinary areas of application, ranging from archaeology and anthropology to cosmic ray physics to oceanography to apportionment of anthropogenic pollutants to the reconstruction of environmental history. Beyond the specific topic of natural 14C, it is hoped that this account may serve as a metaphor for young scientists, illustrating that just when a scientific discipline may appear to be approaching maturity, unanticipated metrological advances in their own chosen fields, and unanticipated anthropogenic or natural chemical events in the environment, can spawn new areas of research having exciting theoretical and practical implications. PMID:27366605

  11. Single amino acid radiocarbon dating of Upper Paleolithic modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Anat; McCullagh, James S. O.; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Sinitsyn, Andrey A.; Hedges, Robert E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Archaeological bones are usually dated by radiocarbon measurement of extracted collagen. However, low collagen content, contamination from the burial environment, or museum conservation work, such as addition of glues, preservatives, and fumigants to “protect” archaeological materials, have previously led to inaccurate dates. These inaccuracies in turn frustrate the development of archaeological chronologies and, in the Paleolithic, blur the dating of such key events as the dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Here we describe a method to date hydroxyproline found in collagen (∼10% of collagen carbon) as a bone-specific biomarker that removes impurities, thereby improving dating accuracy and confidence. This method is applied to two important sites in Russia and allows us to report the earliest direct ages for the presence of anatomically modern humans on the Russian Plain. These dates contribute considerably to our understanding of the emergence of the Mid-Upper Paleolithic and the complex suite of burial behaviors that begin to appear during this period. PMID:22517758

  12. Biological Removal of Radiocarbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Molokwane, P.E.; Chirwa, E.M.N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the preliminary study on the bioseparation of radiocarbon-14 (C-14) using a mixed-culture of microorganisms. The bioseparation principle is critically analyzed and is benchmarked against existing C-14 separation methods using physical chemical processes. The preliminary study indicated probable bio-separate of C-14 from solution prepared from a nuclear graphite mixture, even though the findings need to be verified. The current experiment consisted of a growth vessel and a bio-filter operated in a closed loop. The bio-filter was not installed for the purpose of treatment but rather as a method of isolation of microorganisms for further processing. Significant amounts of C-14 were detected in the trapped cells in the bio-filter, significantly higher than in controls taken before adding carbon sources containing C-14. The microorganisms were grown under micro-aerobic conditions with graphite carbon and commercially purchased powdered carbon as the predominant supplied carbon sources. Small amounts of sucrose (500 mg/L) were added at 48 hour intervals to maintain culture balance. A proof of concept study is underway to determine the C-14 mass balance, characterize the microorganisms in the reactor, and establish the presence or absence of processes that might have affected the preliminary observations. This research represents an exploration into a new field using a new philosophy for treatment of C-14 in low-level waste. (authors)

  13. Anomalous elevated radiocarbon measurements of PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Zermeño, Paula; Bench, Graham; Schichtel, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    Two-component models are often used to determine the contributions made by fossil fuel and natural sources of carbon in airborne particulate matter (PM). The models reduce thousands of actual sources to two end members based on isotopic signature. Combustion of fossil fuels produces PM free of carbon-14 (14C). Wood or charcoal smoke, restaurant fryer emissions, and natural emissions from plants produce PM with the contemporary concentration of 14C approximately 1.2 × 10-1214C/C. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading and radiocarbon analysis is becoming a popular source apportionment method. Emissions from incinerators combusting medical or biological wastes containing tracer 14C can skew the 14C/C ratio of PM, however, so critical analysis of sampling sites for possible sources of elevated PM needs to be completed prior to embarking on sampling campaigns. Results are presented for two ambient monitoring sites in different areas of the United States where 14C contamination is apparent. Our experience suggests that such contamination is uncommon but is also not rare (∼10%) for PM sampling sites.

  14. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    PubMed Central

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-01-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania. Images PMID:3470800

  15. Construction of reliable radiocarbon-based chronologies for speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleitner, Franziska; Fohlmeister, Jens; McIntyre, Cameron; Baldini, Lisa M.; Jamieson, Robert A.; Hercman, Helena; Gasiorowski, Michal; Pawlak, Jacek; Stefaniak, Krzysztof; Socha, Pawel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Baldini, James U. L.

    2016-04-01

    Speleothems have become one of the most widely applied archives for paleoclimate research. One of their key advantages is their amenability for U-series dating, often producing excellent high precision chronologies. However, stalagmites with high detrital Th or very low U concentrations are problematic to date using U-series, and sometimes need to be discarded from further paleoclimate analysis. Radiocarbon chronologies could present an alternative for stalagmites that cannot be dated using U-series, if offsets from the "dead carbon fraction" (DCF) can be resolved. The DCF is a variable reservoir effect introduced by the addition of 14C-dead carbon from host rock dissolution and soil organic matter. We present a novel age modeling technique that provides accurate 14C-based chronologies for stalagmites. As this technique focuses on the long-term decay pattern of 14C, it is only applicable on stalagmites that show no secular variability in their 14C-depth profiles, but is independent of short-term DCF variations. In order to determine whether a stalagmite is suitable for this method without direct knowledge of long-term trends in the DCF, we highlight how other geochemical proxies (δ13C, Mg/Ca) can provide additional information on changes in karst hydrology, soil conditions, and climate that would affect DCF. We apply our model on a previously published U-Th dated stalagmite 14C dataset from Heshang Cave, China with excellent results, followed by a previously 'undateable' stalagmite from southern Poland.

  16. Measuring healthcare disparities and racial segregation in Missouri nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yishih J; Siegel, Bruce; Wilkerson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Measuring and, ultimately, addressing disparities in long-term care quality continue to be a challenge. Although literature suggests that disparities in healthcare quality exist and nursing homes remain relatively segregated, healthcare professionals and policymakers stand to benefit from improvements in measuring both racial segregation and healthcare disparities. This paper quantifies the relationships between healthcare disparities and racial segregation using the disparities quality index and dissimilarity index. Results suggested that the more segregated the nursing homes, the greater the observed disparities. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the proportion of Black residents in nursing homes is the variable that best predicts disparities.

  17. Measuring healthcare disparities and racial segregation in Missouri nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yishih J; Siegel, Bruce; Wilkerson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Measuring and, ultimately, addressing disparities in long-term care quality continue to be a challenge. Although literature suggests that disparities in healthcare quality exist and nursing homes remain relatively segregated, healthcare professionals and policymakers stand to benefit from improvements in measuring both racial segregation and healthcare disparities. This paper quantifies the relationships between healthcare disparities and racial segregation using the disparities quality index and dissimilarity index. Results suggested that the more segregated the nursing homes, the greater the observed disparities. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the proportion of Black residents in nursing homes is the variable that best predicts disparities. PMID:22059384

  18. Infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity for depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Kaneko, Hirohiko; Kanazawa, So; Otsuka, Yumiko; Shirai, Nobu; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2013-05-01

    Both horizontal and vertical binocular disparities produce depth perception in adults. In developmental studies, infants aged around 4 to 6 months were shown to perceive depth from horizontal disparity. However, infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity has not been shown clearly. To examine the sensitivity in infants, this study measured preferential looking behavior of infants aged 20 to 27 weeks. Results showed a significant preference for the stimulus with vertical disparity, providing the first evidence of infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity. The infants in the same age group did not show preference for stimulus with horizontal disparity when the stimulus were comparable to the stimulus with vertical disparity, while their sensitivity to horizontal disparity was confirmed with the stimuli used in a previous study. Our results would suggest that properties in processing horizontal and vertical disparities are different in infancy, and that the sensitivity to horizontal disparity are still premature in 27 weeks after birth.

  19. Radiocarbon chronology and environment of woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius Blum.) in northern Asia: results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.; Orlova, Lyobov A.

    2004-12-01

    This paper reviews the history of the woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius Blum.) in Siberia and adjacent northern Asia. The particular emphases are the chronology and environment of mammoth existence and extinction, based on about 530 radiocarbon dates from about 230 localities with mammoth remains and palaeoenvironmental records of the last 50,000 years. Until ca. 12,000 radiocarbon years ago (BP), mammoths inhabited all of northern Asia, from the High Arctic to southern Siberia and northeastern China. Since ca. 12,000 BP, mammoth disappeared from major parts of Siberia and adjacent northern Asia, and survived mainly in the Arctic regions of Siberia, north of 69° northern latitude. However, recently, it was found that some mammoth populations continued to exist in central and southern Western Siberia until ca. 11,100-10,200 BP. 'Normal' size mammoths became extinct in mainland Siberia at the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary, ca. 9700 BP. On Wrangel Island in the High Arctic, small-sized mammoths survived into the Middle-Late Holocene, ca. 7700-3700 BP. Compared with previous studies, it is now possible to reveal the complex nature of the process of final mammoth extinction in Siberia, with some small populations surviving outside of the Arctic until ca. 10,000 BP. The extinction of mammoth was most probably caused by a combination of factors, such as global warming in the Late Glacial (since ca. 15,000 BP) and the disintegration of landscapes suitable for mammoths throughout the Upper Pleistocene, such as light forests with vast open spaces occupied by meadows and forest tundra. The expansion of forest vegetation after the Last Glacial Maximum in Siberia, including its northeastern part, created unsuitable habitats for herbivorous megafauna, especially for mammoths. However, the Holocene environment of Wrangel Island was not of 'glacial' type and this requires further studies. The relationship between mammoths and Upper Palaeolithic humans is also considered. The

  20. Late Pleistocene Holocene stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of La Malinche volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Govea, Renato; Siebe, Claus

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies of La Malinche identified and radiocarbon dated several volcanic layers, the youngest of which yielded an age of ca. 7.5 ka. An additional ash fallout layer that crops out at high altitudes was considered the most recent deposit, with an estimated age of 6 ka. In the present work 38 new radiocarbon ages are presented. From these, several date the young ash fallout layer and lie around 3.1 ka. With the aid of these dates a new and comprehensive stratigraphy documenting the Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive history of La Malinche is presented. The stratigraphy indicates two main stages of volcanic activity: Pre-Malinche and Malinche. The first undoubtedly comprises the major part of the eruptive history, but its deposits are largely covered by the products of the latter stage, on which this study is focused. The Malinche stage was subdivided into three eruptive periods. Period 1 started with the emplacement of the Huamantla Pumice more than 45 ka ago. This deposit consists of a thick pumice fallout overlain by pyroclastic flow deposits. Subsequently, several episodes of construction and collapse of summit domes occurred. The oldest dome was dated at ca. 45 ka. Period 2 started 21.5 ka ago with the Malinche Pumice I, a widespread pumice fallout covering the entire slopes of the volcano. Pyroclastic flows and lahars related to this eruption were channeled along deep barrancas and reached considerable distances. Deposits produced by partial sector collapse and dated at ca. 20.9 ka, and a pumice-and-ash flow deposit dated at 15.9 ka were also generated during this period. The last period started with the eruption of the Malinche Pumice II, a distinctive fallout deposit overlain by ash flow deposits on the NE slope of the volcano. The age of this pumice layer is estimated between 12 and 9 ka. Formation of block-and-ash flows, lahars and pumice-and-ash flows followed during this period, and peaked in a most intensive episode that was dated at 7.5 ka

  1. New Radiocarbon Dates on Upper Mid-West Proboscideans: Determining Date Robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, G.; Widga, C.; Lengyel, S. N.; Saunders, J.; Walker, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    With the objective of refining the picture of Megafaunal extinction patterns in the upper Midwest in the terminal Pleistocene, we have assembled for radiocarbon dating specimens from more than 80 distinct Mammut and Mammuthus remains from potentially late sites. So far, we have measurements for 65 bones, tusks and teeth, nearly double the extant number of published dates . These new specimens were all from museums rather than excavation sites, and 60% were known to be coated with a consolidant. The predominant consolidant was Butvar B-76, however shellac, Elmer's Glue, Glyptol were also noted in the conservation records, or deduced from knowledge of a particular museum's practices. Given the objective of the project is to identify extinction patterns, coupled with the wide prevalence of consolidants amongst the specimen set, it was imperative that testing be carried out to confirm that radiocarbon laboratory protocols removed the consolidants, so that ultimately the dates can be considered robust. To this end, key specimens were dated three times using different sample preparation protocols. These were 1) a solvent extraction followed by a modified Longin-plus -Base continuous flow collagen extraction method used in the NSF-Arizona AMS facility, 2) the solvent/modified Longin method plus ultrafiltration, and 3) solvent/modified Longin method plus hydroxyproline single amino acid dating. Among the specimens subjected to triplicate testing were some of the youngest late Wisconsin proboscidean specimens from the Upper Midwest Region. The data reveal general agreement between the different protocols, and suggested either limited penetration of consolidants into the specimens, or that the standard laboratory cleaning protocols were sufficient to remove traces from deep within bone, tooth or tusk tissue. The preservation of each specimen, recorded in terms of collagen content, C/N ratio and stable isotope values, indicated that most were actually well preserved, implying

  2. Distributions of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, James E.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.; Wolgast, David M.; Griffin, Sheila; Masiello, Caroline A.

    Temporal variations in the natural radiocarbon ( 14C) signatures of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively) in seawater have been studied previously (Druffel, E.R.M., Bauer, J.E., Williams, P.M., Griffin, S., Wolgast, D.M., 1996. Seasonal variability of radiocarbon in particulate organic carbon in the northeast Pacific. J. Geophys. Res. 101, 20 543-20 552; Bauer, J.E., Druffel, E.R.M., Williams, P.M., Wolgast, D.M., Griffin, S., 1998. Temporal variability in dissolved organic carbon and radiocarbon in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 2867-2882) at a long-term time-series station (Sta. M: 32°N, 123W) in the eastern North Pacific located at the eastern edge of the North Pacific abyssal plain. In June 1995 a transect was made from Sta. M inshore to approximately 500 m depth in order to evaluate the distributions of 14C in DOC and DIC from the abyssal plain to the upper continental slope. Concentrations and Δ 14C values of DOC in mixed layer waters (25 and 85 m) decreased toward the upper slope. In deeper waters, concentrations and Δ 14C values were in general similar at all three sites. Differences in DOC concentrations and Δ 14C-DOC between Sta. M and the rise and upper slope sites were explained in part by the mixing of DOC and Δ 14C along constant density ( σt) surfaces. However, specific deviations from conservative behavior due to mixing were observed for Δ 14C-DOC at mesopelagic (˜700 m) and near-bottom (˜3600- 3900 m) depths of the continental rise. Comparable findings are reported for DIC, where σt-normalized concentrations and Δ 14C values in Sta. M, rise and upper slope waters were similar, with the exception of slight increases in concentrations and Δ 14C values in near-bottom waters of the rise. These observations indicate that both DOC and DIC in continental rise and slope surface waters of the eastern North Pacific Ocean margin are comprised of a component of actively upwelled material derived

  3. Optical and radiocarbon dating at Jinmium rock shelter in northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Richard; Bird, Michael; Olley, Jon; Galbraith, Rex; Lawson, Ewan; Laslett, Geoff; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Jones, Rhys; Fullagar, Richard; Jacobsen, Geraldine; Hua, Quan

    1998-05-01

    The Jinmium rock shelter is located in the Kimberley region of northern Australia. Claims for ancient rock art and an early human presence at this site were based on thermoluminescence ages of 50-75 thousand years (kyr) for quartz sands associated with buried circular engravings (pecked cupules) and on thermoluminescence ages of 116-176kyr for the underlying artefact-bearing deposits. Here we report substantially younger optical ages for quartz sand, and ages based on measurements of radioactive carbon in charcoal fragments, from the occupation deposit. Using conventional (multiple-grain) optical dating methods, we estimate that the base of the deposit is 22kyr. However, dating of individual grains shows that some have been buried more recently. The single-grain optical ages indicate that the Jinmium deposit is younger than 10kyr. This result is in agreement with the late-Holocene ages obtained for the upper two-thirds of the deposit from radiocarbon measurements. We suggest that some grains have older optical ages because they receivedinsufficient exposure to sunlight before burial. The presence of such grains in a sample will cause age overestimates using multiple-grain methods, whether using thermoluminescence or optical dating.

  4. Morphotype disparity in the Precambrian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Rachael; Reitner, Joachim; Braiser, Martin; Donoghue, Phil; Schirrmeister, Bettina

    2015-04-01

    Prokaryotes have dominated life on Earth for over 2 billion years. Throughout the Precambrian, prokaryotes acted as the major biological impetus for both large and small scale environmental changes. Yet, very little is known about the composition, diversity and evolution of ancient microbial communities due to poor preservation during the Precambrian period. Previous studies of fossils that date to this period relied mainly on light microscopy to identify microfossil morphology and abundance, with limited success. Here we present novel analyses of the microbial remains found in Precambrian stromatolites using Synchrotron Radiation x-Ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM). Microfossils found in samples of three Precambrian deposits, 3.45 Ga Strelley Pool, Australia, 2.1 Ga Gunflint Chert, Canada, and 650 Ma Rasthof Cap Carbonate, Namibia, have been reconstructed in 3D. Based on four scans from each sample, we estimated size and abundance of spheroidal microfossils within those deposits. Our findings show that while cell abundance decreased towards the end of the Precambrian, the biovolume of microfossils within the host rock remained relatively constant. Additionally, both size and disparity increase through time. Constant biovolumes and yet different sizes for these three deposits, point towards a negative correlation of large cell size and cell abundance. This negative correlation indicates that the systems in which these prokaryotes lived may have been biolimited. Both, gas exchange and nutrient uptake in prokaryotes function via diffusion. Therefore, one would expect bacteria to evolve towards an increasing surface to volume ratio. Increased cell sizes, and hence decreased overall surface to volume ratio observed in our data, suggest the influence of other selective factors. Decreased abundance and increased cell size could potentially be associated to changes in nutrient availability and the occurrence of predation. As cells increased in size, more nutrients would

  5. What Can Radiocarbon Depth Profiles Tell Us About The LGM Circulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Stewart, A.; Adkins, J. F.; Ferrari, R. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Jansen, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Published reconstructions of radiocarbon in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean indicate that there is a mid-depth maximum in radiocarbon age during the last glacial maximum (LGM). This is in contrast to the modern ocean where intense mixing between water masses along shared density surfaces (isopycnals) results in a relatively homogenous radiocarbon profile. A recent study (Ferrari et al. 2014) suggested that the extended Antarctic sea ice cover during the LGM necessitated a shallower boundary between the upper and lower branches of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). This shoaled boundary lay above major topographic features and their associated strong diapycnal mixing, which isolated dense southern-sourced water in the lower branch of the overturning circulation. This isolation would have allowed radiocarbon to decay, and thus provides a possible explanation for the mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge. We test this hypothesis using an idealized, 2D, residual-mean dynamical model of the global overturning circulation. Concentration distributions of a decaying tracer that is advected by the simulated overturning are compared to published radiocarbon data. We test the sensitivity of the mid-depth radiocarbon age to changes in sea ice extent, wind strength, and isopycnal and diapycnal diffusion. The mid-depth radiocarbon age bulge is most likely caused by the different circulation geometry, associated with increased sea ice extent. In particular, with an LGM-like sea ice extent the upper and lower branches of the MOC no longer share isopycnals, so radiocarbon-rich northern-sourced water is no longer mixed rapidly into the southern-sourced water. However, this process alone cannot explain the magnitude of the glacial radiocarbon anomalies; additional isolation (e.g. from reduced air-sea gas exchange associated with the increased sea ice) is required. Ferrari, R., M. F. Jansen, J. F. Adkins, A. Burke, A. L. Stewart, and A. F. Thompson (2014), Antarctic sea

  6. Morphological and biomechanical disparity of crocodile-line archosaurs following the end-Triassic extinction.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Thomas L; Pierce, Stephanie E; Rayfield, Emily J; Anderson, Philip S L

    2013-11-01

    Mesozoic crurotarsans exhibited diverse morphologies and feeding modes, representing considerable ecological diversity, yet macroevolutionary patterns remain unexplored. Here, we use a unique combination of morphological and biomechanical disparity metrics to quantify the ecological diversity and trophic radiations of Mesozoic crurotarsans, using the mandible as a morpho-functional proxy. We recover three major trends. First, the diverse assemblage of Late Triassic crurotarsans was morphologically and biomechanically disparate, implying high levels of ecological variation; but, following the end-Triassic extinction, disparity declined. Second, the Jurassic radiation of marine thalattosuchians resulted in very low morphological disparity but moderate variation in jaw biomechanics, highlighting a hydrodynamic constraint on mandibular form. Third, during the Cretaceous terrestrial radiations of neosuchians and notosuchians, mandibular morphological variation increased considerably. By the Late Cretaceous, crocodylomorphs evolved a range of morphologies equalling Late Triassic crurotarsans. By contrast, biomechanical disparity in the Cretaceous did not increase, essentially decoupling from morphology. This enigmatic result could be attributed to biomechanical evolution in other anatomical regions (e.g. cranium, dentition or postcranium), possibly releasing the mandible from selective pressures. Overall, our analyses reveal a complex relationship between morphological and biomechanical disparity in Mesozoic crurotarsans that culminated in specialized feeding ecologies and associated lifestyles.

  7. Racial Healthcare Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Louis A.; Hagiwara, Nao; Eggly, Susan; Gaertner, Samuel L.; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Dovidio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Around the world, members of racial/ethnic minority groups typically experience poorer health than members of racial/ethnic majority groups. The core premise of this article is that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to race and ethnicity play a critical role in healthcare disparities. Social psychological theories of the origins and consequences of these thoughts, feelings, and behaviors offer critical insights into the processes responsible for these disparities and suggest interventions to address them. We present a multilevel model that explains how societal, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors can influence ethnic/racial health disparities. We focus our literature review, including our own research, and conceptual analysis at the intrapersonal (the race-related thoughts and feelings of minority patients and non-minority physicians) and interpersonal levels (intergroup processes that affect medical interactions between minority patients and non-minority physicians). At both levels of analysis, we use theories of social categorization, social identity, contemporary forms of racial bias, stereotype activation, stigma, and other social psychological processes to identify and understand potential causes and processes of health and healthcare disparities. In the final section, we identify theory-based interventions that might reduce ethnic/racial disparities in health and healthcare. PMID:25197206

  8. Health policy, disparities, and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy W

    2015-01-01

    Kidney care and public policy have been linked for 40 years, with various consequences to outcomes. The 1972 Social Security Amendment, Section 2991, expanded Medicare coverage for all modalities of dialysis and transplant services and non-kidney-related care to those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of age. This first and only disease-specific entitlement program was a step toward decreasing disparities in access to care. Despite this, disparities in kidney disease outcomes continue as they are based on many factors. Over the last 4 decades, policies have been enacted to understand and improve the delivery of ESRD care. More recent policies include novel shared-risk payment models to ensure quality and decrease costs. This article discusses the impact or potential impact of selected policies on health disparities in advanced chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Although it is too early to know the consequences of newer policies (Affordable Care Act, ESRD Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program, Accountable Care Organizations), their goal of improving access to timely patient-centered appropriate affordable and quality care should lessen the disparity gap. The Nephrology community must leverage this dynamic state of care-delivery model redesign to decrease kidney-related health disparities. PMID:25573513

  9. Racial Healthcare Disparities: A Social Psychological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Penner, Louis A; Hagiwara, Nao; Eggly, Susan; Gaertner, Samuel L; Albrecht, Terrance L; Dovidio, John F

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, members of racial/ethnic minority groups typically experience poorer health than members of racial/ethnic majority groups. The core premise of this article is that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to race and ethnicity play a critical role in healthcare disparities. Social psychological theories of the origins and consequences of these thoughts, feelings, and behaviors offer critical insights into the processes responsible for these disparities and suggest interventions to address them. We present a multilevel model that explains how societal, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors can influence ethnic/racial health disparities. We focus our literature review, including our own research, and conceptual analysis at the intrapersonal (the race-related thoughts and feelings of minority patients and non-minority physicians) and interpersonal levels (intergroup processes that affect medical interactions between minority patients and non-minority physicians). At both levels of analysis, we use theories of social categorization, social identity, contemporary forms of racial bias, stereotype activation, stigma, and other social psychological processes to identify and understand potential causes and processes of health and healthcare disparities. In the final section, we identify theory-based interventions that might reduce ethnic/racial disparities in health and healthcare. PMID:25197206

  10. Health policy, disparities, and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy W

    2015-01-01

    Kidney care and public policy have been linked for 40 years, with various consequences to outcomes. The 1972 Social Security Amendment, Section 2991, expanded Medicare coverage for all modalities of dialysis and transplant services and non-kidney-related care to those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of age. This first and only disease-specific entitlement program was a step toward decreasing disparities in access to care. Despite this, disparities in kidney disease outcomes continue as they are based on many factors. Over the last 4 decades, policies have been enacted to understand and improve the delivery of ESRD care. More recent policies include novel shared-risk payment models to ensure quality and decrease costs. This article discusses the impact or potential impact of selected policies on health disparities in advanced chronic kidney disease and ESRD. Although it is too early to know the consequences of newer policies (Affordable Care Act, ESRD Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program, Accountable Care Organizations), their goal of improving access to timely patient-centered appropriate affordable and quality care should lessen the disparity gap. The Nephrology community must leverage this dynamic state of care-delivery model redesign to decrease kidney-related health disparities.

  11. The racial disparity in breast cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Steven; Ansell, David; Orsi, Jennifer; Francois, Teena

    2011-08-01

    Black women die of breast cancer at a much higher rate than white women. Recent studies have suggested that this racial disparity might be even greater in Chicago than the country as a whole. When data describing this racial disparity are presented they are sometimes attributed in part to racial differences in tumor biology. Vital records data were employed to calculate age-adjusted breast cancer mortality rates for women in Chicago, New York City and the United States from 1980-2005. Race-specific rate ratios were used to measure the disparity in breast cancer mortality. Breast cancer mortality rates by race are the main outcome. In all three geographies the rate ratios were approximately equal in 1980 and stayed that way until the early 1990s, when the white rates started to decline while the black rates remained rather constant. By 2005 the black:white rate ratio was 1.36 in NYC, 1.38 in the US, and 1.98 in Chicago. In any number of ways these data are inconsistent with the notion that the disparity in black:white breast cancer mortality rates is a function of differential biology. Three societal hypotheses are posited that may explain this disparity. All three are actionable, beginning today.

  12. What is the true age uncertainty of radiocarbon dated Holocene records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sze Ling; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Refeld, Kira; Mollenhauer, Gesine; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Nürnberg, Dirk; Laepple, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon-based age-depth models are the backbone of the chronology of Holocene sediment records. The uncertainty of such age-depth models is often estimated from the uncertainty of the calibrated radiocarbon samples. A necessary assumption hereby is that the age of the samples is representative for the proxies in the same sediment layer they originate from. Here we generate radiocarbon and multiple temperature proxy data in three Holocene sediment cores from the same multi-corer employed in the Southwest Pacific. Surprisingly, whilst radiocarbon ages at the same sediment depth strongly differ between the tubes, multiple independent proxy time-series measured in each of the sediment cores suggest stratified sediments at the site. This is based on the finding that proxy time-series correlate significantly better between sediment cores when analyzed over depth, rather than against core-specific age-depth models based on the radiocarbon dates. If our site is not a pathological special case - an argument which we have no evidence for - our finding has important implications for age-depth modeling and the interpretations of paleoclimate time-series. It suggests that the true age uncertainty of a sediment layer can be much higher than the uncertainty obtained from the radiocarbon dates. An alternative but less likely hypothesis is that the proxy values are modified post-deposition in the sediments, resulting in more consistent stratification than the original climate signal time-series. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of replication of the proxy time series and radiocarbon dates in the quest for chronologic precision and proxy reliability, which are crucial for a more quantitative understanding of Holocene climate evolution.

  13. Determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, obtained through AirCore sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), with carbon dioxide as the most prominent example, has been and still is increasing, predominantly due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion. CO2 is also the most important component of the global carbon cycle. Among other tracers, radiocarbon (Carbon-14) is a unique and an important atmospheric tracer used in the understanding of the global carbon cycle. Radiocarbon is a naturally occurring isotope (radioactive, t 1/2 = 5730 ± 40 years) of carbon produced through the interaction of thermalized neutrons and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere. Generally, for performing atmospheric radiocarbon measurements in the higher atmosphere, large samples (few liters of air) were collected using aircrafts and balloons. However, collecting stratospheric samples on a regular basis for radiocarbon analysis is extremely expensive. Here we describe the determination of radiocarbon concentrations in stratospheric CO2, collected using AirCore sampling. AirCore is an innovative sampling technique for obtaining vertical atmospheric profiles and, in Europe, is done on a regular basis at Sodankylä, Finland for CO2, CH4 and CO. The stratospheric parts of two such AirCore profiles were used in this study as a proof-of-principle. CO2 from the stratospheric air samples were extracted and converted to elemental carbon, which were then measured at the Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) facility of the Centre for Isotope Research (CIO) at the University of Groningen. The stratospheric part of the AirCore profile was divided into six sections, each contained approximately 10 μg C. A detailed description of the extraction, graphitization, AMS analysis and the derivation of the stratospheric radiocarbon profile will be the main focus. Through our results, we will show that AirCore is a viable sampling method for performing high-precision radiocarbon measurements of stratospheric CO2 with reasonably good spatial resolution on a regular basis

  14. Intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy: Is there any evidence of a radiocarbon signal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Anders; Salehpour, Mehran

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the first report of an ultrasensitive method for ro-vibrational spectrometry of radiocarbon dioxide was published. The method, called intracavity optogalvanic spectroscopy (ICOGS), claimed a sensitivity and limit-of-detection comparable to accelerator mass spectroscopy. ICOGS was claimed to utilize the isotope-dependent ro-vibrational absorption lines of carbon dioxide in the infrared spectrum. In order to facilitate unambiguous detection of radiocarbon, the sample was placed inside the cavity of a radiocarbon dioxide laser. This intracavity approach was claimed to increase the sensitivity by seven orders of magnitude compared with traditional optogalvanic methods. However, despite the methodical and thorough efforts of several research groups worldwide, these claims have not been possible to reproduce. Instead, we have previously reported serious deviations from the original results, where we found that ICOGS suffers from considerable problems with the stability and reproducibility of the optogalvanic signal, and that misinterpretations of these uncertainties likely are the explanation for the claimed sensitivity in the first reports. Having identified the stability and reproducibility of the detection as major concerns, we decided to improve the setup by with state-of-the-art plasma source technology. Deploying a custom-made stripline split-ring resonator optogalvanic detector, we have now investigated the applicability of ICOGS to radiocarbon detection even further. Measurements have been made with a wide range of parameters including different gas mixtures at various pressures and wavelengths. We have also conducted measurements with gas flowing through the sample cell to investigate the effect of plasma induced decomposition of the sample. Still, we have seen no indications of a significant radiocarbon signal in a concentration range between 0.29 Modern and 9.7 Modern, i.e., the range of interest to the radiocarbon community. Hence, our conclusions

  15. Intermediate Water Radiocarbon Anomalies During the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, S. P.; Lehman, S. J.; Marchitto, T. M.; Ninnemann, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent reconstructions of intermediate water radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) have revealed intervals of very low Δ14C during the last deglaciation [Bryan et al., 2010; Marchitto et al., 2007; Thornalley et al., 2011]. Anomalously low Δ14C values coincided with increases in atmospheric CO2 and decreases in atmospheric Δ14C. As such, these Δ14C anomalies have been interpreted as the transfer of 14C-depleted carbon from the deep ocean to the upper ocean and atmosphere. An important component of this interpretation is the transport of low-Δ14C waters from the Southern Ocean, where they presumably upwelled from the deep ocean, northward to the core sites via intermediate waters. However, contrary to expectations, anomalously low Δ14C values have not been found at intermediate water sites closer to the Southern Ocean [e.g., De Pol-Holz et al., 2009; Rose et al., 2010]. In this talk, we will present new intermediate water Δ14C measurements from ~53°S along the Chile Margin, reconstructed using sediment core MD07-3128. Consistent with other intermediate water records from the Southern Hemisphere, these measurements do not show anomalously low Δ14C during the deglaciation. Instead, these results indicate lower Δ14C values during the Last Glacial Maximum and a rapid increase in Δ14C at the start of the deglaciation. We interpret this change as a shift in the boundary between Circumpolar Deep Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water. These results along with the previously published records provide strong evidence that low-Δ14C waters were not transported by an intermediate water mass analogous to modern Antarctic Intermediate Water. We synthesize the currently available deglacial intermediate water Δ14C records and discuss possible changes to Southern Ocean intermediate water formation, which could reconcile the available data.

  16. Radiocarbon in the Northern Indian Ocean two decades after GEOSECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Koushik; Bhushan, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    The 14C measurements in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the late 1990s offer a way to assess the temporal changes in the inventories of bomb-14C and its penetration into the ocean, in two decades since GEOSECS expeditions (1977-1978). The mean penetration depth of bomb radiocarbon during GEOSECS (1977-1978) was 270 m, which increased by ˜40% to 381 m in 1994-1998. The small changes in bomb-14C inventories, significant increase in the mean penetration depths and lowering of the surface Δ14C values in the northern Indian Ocean indicate the temporal variation of bomb-14C in two decades is mainly through downward transfer through mixing with deeper waters. The observed bomb-14C inventory in the northern Indian Ocean agrees with numerical model simulated values, except at the equatorial Indian Ocean. The high bomb-14C inventory at the equator can be attributed to lateral advection of 14C-enriched waters from the Pacific Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago. The air-sea CO2exchange rates in the northern Indian Ocean calculated from the bomb-14C inventories range from ˜7 mol m-2 yr-1 (in the northern Bay of Bengal) to 20 mol m-2 yr-1(in the equatorial Indian Ocean). Net sea-air flux of CO2 estimated for the northern Indian Ocean between 0° and 25°N is ˜104 ± 30 TgC yr-1. The Bay of Bengal is a net sink of atmospheric CO2 (˜-1 ± 0.4 TgC yr-1), while the Arabian Sea is a source of CO2 (˜69 ± 21 TgC yr-1).

  17. Radiocarbon measurements at LAC-UFF: Recent performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, Roberto; Macario, Kita D.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Carvalho, Carla; dos Santos, Hellen C.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Castro, Maikel D.; Oliveira, Fabiana M.; Alves, Eduardo Q.

    2015-10-01

    In 2012 a single stage accelerator mass spectrometer from NEC was installed at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of Universidade Federal Fluminense (LAC-UFF), Niterói, Brazil. Here, we present a status report of our facility. We discuss some modifications applied to our combustion protocol in an attempt to reduce our procedural blank, mostly to processed organic samples. Measurements of reference materials indicate low precision and accuracy that are partially related to beam optics through the acceleration tube. We observed that once the beam current intensity increases the measured 13C+/12C+ becomes erratic. Therefore, in order to maintain the AMS-δ13C values within reasonable values, so that fractionation corrections using the spectrometer 13C+/12C+ values does not affect the final 14C results, we are forced to limit the 12C- beam intensity to ⩽30 μA. This requirement was confirmed during our accuracy tests, when measuring selected annual tree-rings wood samples from a Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia) between 1927 and 1997 previously measured at the Keck Carbon Cycle AMS Facility (KCCAMS), at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). At the LAC-UFF tree-ring wood samples were processed and measured in 4 different batches during a period of about 5 months. The 14C results were later compared to the high-precision data obtained at KCCAMS/UCI and reached a good agreement. Recently a problem associated with graphitization yield were finally identified and new measurements with secondary standards are promising.

  18. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  19. Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in Incarcerated Populations.

    PubMed

    Borysova, Meghan E; Mitchell, Ojmarrh; Sultan, Dawood H; Williams, Arthur R

    2012-01-01

    Alarming disparities in population health and wellness in the United States have led to multidisciplinary research efforts to create health equity. Identifying disparities, elucidating the etiological bases of disparities, and implementing solutions to eliminate disparities are part of the U.S. national health agenda. Racial and ethnic disparities have been identified throughout the cancer control continuum, in cardiovascular disease, diabetes and a multitude of other conditions. The causes of disparities are complex, condition specific, and conjectured to result from combinations of biological and socio-behavioral factors. Racial and ethnic health disparities within the vast incarcerated communities have been excluded from most studies, yet are of significant ethical and fiscal concern to inmates, governing bodies, and non-incarcerated communities into which inmates return. Importantly, research on racial and ethnic disparities in this unique population may shed light on the relative etiologies of health disparities and solutions for creating health equity throughout the general population in the United States.

  20. Social Determinants of Racial Disparities in CKD.

    PubMed

    Norton, Jenna M; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Eggers, Paul W; Narva, Andrew S; Star, Robert A; Kimmel, Paul L; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2016-09-01

    Significant disparities in CKD rates and outcomes exist between black and white Americans. Health disparities are defined as health differences that adversely affect disadvantaged populations, on the basis of one or more health outcomes. CKD is the complex result of genetic and environmental factors, reflecting the balance of nature and nurture. Social determinants of health have an important role as environmental components, especially for black populations, who are disproportionately disadvantaged. Understanding the social determinants of health and appreciating the underlying differences associated with meaningful clinical outcomes may help nephrologists treat all their patients with CKD in an optimal manner. Altering the social determinants of health, although difficult, may embody important policy and research efforts, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes for patients with kidney diseases, and minimizing the disparities between groups. PMID:27178804

  1. Changing corporate practices to reduce cancer disparities.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Nicholas; Galea, Sandro; Fahs, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    While reducing racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in cancer mortality has been identified as a national goal, current policies are unlikely to achieve it. In order to advance the development of policies for the primary prevention of cancer and cancer disparities, we propose that the practices of the tobacco, alcohol, and food industries be considered as modifiable social determinants of health. We review evidence that the practices of these industries in product design, marketing, retail distribution, and pricing contribute to cancer risk behavior, incidence, and disparities, then examine public health strategies designed to reduce health-damaging practices of these industries and encourage healthier alternatives. We conclude with recommendations for research, practice, and policy that could contribute to the development of less carcinogenic corporate practices.

  2. Treatment Disparities in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dahodwala, Nabila; Xie, Ming; Noll, Elizabeth; Siderowf, Andrew; Mandell, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We sought to identify racial disparities in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We identified 307 incident PD cases using Pennsylvania State Medicaid claims, and extracted claims for medications, physical therapy, and healthcare visits for the 6 months after diagnosis. After controlling for age, sex, and geography, African-Americans were four times less likely than whites to receive any PD treatment (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 – 0.64), especially indicated medications. In a group with the same healthcare insurance, disparities in PD treatment exist. Physician and community awareness of these racial differences in PD treatment is the first step in addressing healthcare disparities. PMID:19743462

  3. Pyrrolidonyl and pyridyl alkaloids in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Deml, Reinhold

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence and metabolism of nicotine and related N-containing compounds in body fluids of the gipsy moth were addressed. Thin layer chromatographic studies clearly showed the simultaneous presence of GABA and 2-pyrrolidone but not of GABamide in the larval haemolymph and osmeterial secretion of Lymantria dispar as well as in the corresponding body fluids of the saturniids, Saturnia pavonia and Attacus atlas. Furthermore, feeding and injection experiments using alkylated precursors and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence of the transformation of 2-pyrrolidone to nicotine and of nicotinic acid to nicotinamide in caterpillars of L. dispar. Based on these results, on the earlier described variation of the secondary-compound patterns of L. dispar during its development, and on literature data, metabolic pathways for the hitherto detected pyridyl and pyrrolidonyl alkaloids in Lymantriidae (and possibly Saturniidae) are proposed.

  4. Racial and ethnic disparities in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malek, Sayeed K; Keys, Brandon J; Kumar, Sanjaya; Milford, Edgar; Tullius, Stefan G

    2011-05-01

    Success of renal transplantation, as a viable alternative to dialysis, has been tempered by long-standing racial disparities. Ethnic minorities have less access to transplantation, are less likely to be listed for transplantation, and experience a higher rate of graft failure. Reasons for the existing racial disparities at various stages of the transplantation process are complex and multi-factorial. They include a combination of behavioral, social, environmental, and occupational factors, as well as potential intended or unintended discrimination within the healthcare system. Immunologic factors such as human leukocyte antigen matching, composition of the organ donor pool, and patient immune response, all of which affect post-transplantation graft rejection rates and patient survival, also contribute to health disparities between ethnic groups.

  5. Disparities in Primary Care EHR Adoption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Dominic; Zhang, Shun; Douglas, Megan; Sow, Charles; Strothers, Harry; Rust, George

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates electronic health record (EHR) adoption by primary care providers in Georgia to assess adoption disparities according to practice size and type, payer mix, and community characteristics. Frequency variances of EHR “Go Live” status were estimated. Odds ratios were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Large practices and community health centers (CHCs) were more likely to Go Live (>80% EHR adoption) than rural health clinics and other underserved settings (53%). A significantly lower proportion (68.9%) of Medicaid predominant providers had achieved Go Live status and had a 47% higher risk of not achieving Go Live status than private insurance predominant practices. Disparities in EHR adoption rates may exacerbate existing disparities in health outcomes of patients served by these practices. Targeted support such as that provided to CHCs would level the playing field for practices now at a disadvantage. PMID:27587942

  6. Beyond Individual Neighborhoods: A Geography of Opportunity Perspective for Understanding Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Osypuk, Theresa L.; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    There has been insufficient attention to how and why place and neighborhood context contribute to racial/ethnic health disparities, as well as to policies that can eliminate racial/ethnic health disparities. This article uses a geography of opportunity framework to highlight methodological issues specific for quantitative research examining neighborhoods and racial/ethnic health disparities, including study design, measurement, causation, interpretation, and implications for policy. We argue that failure to consider regional, racialized housing market processes given high US racial residential segregation may introduce bias, restrict generalizability, and/or limit the policy relevance of study findings. We conclude that policies must address the larger geography of opportunity within the region in addition to improving deprived neighborhoods. PMID:20705500

  7. Enhancing scene structure in prosthetic vision using iso-disparity contour perturbance maps.

    PubMed

    Feng, David; McCarthy, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach for enhancing structurally significant features in a scene to facilitate safe mobility with prosthetic vision. Previous approaches rely on visually salient features (e.g., intensity gradients, size, texture), or surface fitting (e.g., ground plane extraction), to determine and convey regions of structural change in the scene. Such approaches can be costly to compute, and/or are not guaranteed to detect all features relevant to the needs of safe mobility (e.g., small, low-contrast trip hazards). Assuming a dense disparity image, we propose a novel feature using iso-disparity contours. Regions of significant structural change are detected via a cost function based on local comparisons of iso-disparity contour orientations. Through this, structurally interesting features such as surface boundaries and general clutter are extracted and emphasised in the output visual representation. Our approach is real-time, and requires no surface fitting. Experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively validate our approach.

  8. Effectiveness of disease management programs on improving diabetes care for individuals in health-disparate areas.

    PubMed

    Coberley, Carter R; Puckrein, Gary A; Dobbs, Angela C; McGinnis, Matthew A; Coberley, Sadie S; Shurney, Dexter W

    2007-06-01

    In addition to race and ethnicity, specific geographic regions are associated with poorer outcomes of care. Individuals with diabetes experiencing health disparities typically have worse long-term outcomes, such as increased diabetes complications and mortality. Zip code mapping, or geocoding, was utilized in this study to identify regions of the United States with high diabetes prevalence rates and to identify areas with high densities of minority populations. Use of this methodology to examine the effect of disease management on a large, diverse diabetes population revealed greater improvement in clinical testing rates in health disparity zones compared with members living outside of these areas. In particular, significant improvement was achieved by members living in minority zip codes and by members aged 65 years or older. These findings demonstrate that members living in areas of health disparity obtain even greater benefit from diabetes disease management program participation, helping to reduce gaps in care.

  9. Trends in Longevity in the Americas: Disparities in Life Expectancy in Women and Men, 1965-2010

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, Ian R.; Howitt, Christina; Jeyaseelan, Selvi; Murphy, Madhuvanti M.; Hennis, Anselm J; Wilks, Rainford; Harris, E. Nigel; MacLeish, Marlene; Sullivan, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective We describe trends in life expectancy at birth (LE) and between-country LE disparities since 1965, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Methods & Findings LE trends since 1965 are described for three geographical sub-regions: the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. LE disparities are explored using a suite of absolute and relative disparity metrics, with measurement consensus providing confidence to observed differences. LE has increased throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Compared to the Caribbean, LE has increased by an additional 6.6 years in Central America and 4.1 years in South America. Since 1965, average reductions in between-country LE disparities were 14% (absolute disparity) and 23% (relative disparity) in the Caribbean, 55% and 51% in Central America, 55% and 52% in South America. Conclusions LE in Latin America and the Caribbean is exceeding ‘minimum standard’ international targets, and is improving relative to the world region with the highest human longevity. The Caribbean, which had the highest LE and the lowest between-country LE disparities in Latin America and the Caribbean in 1965-70, had the lowest LE and the highest LE disparities by 2005-10. Caribbean Governments have championed a collaborative solution to the growing burden of non-communicable disease, with 15 territories signing on to the Declaration of Port of Spain, signalling regional commitment to a coordinated public-health response. The persistent LE inequity between Caribbean countries suggests that public health interventions should be tailored to individual countries to be most effective. Between- and within-country disparity monitoring for a range of health metrics should be a priority, first to guide country-level policy initiatives, then to contribute to the assessment of policy success. PMID:26091090

  10. Gender Disparities in Ocular Inflammatory Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Hatice Nida; Davis, Janet; Ucar, Didar; Fox, Austin; Chan, Chi Chao; Goldstein, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular inflammatory disorders disproportionately affect women, and the majority of affected women are of childbearing age. The role of sex or reproductive hormones has been proposed in many other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and findings from non-ocular autoimmune diseases suggest a complex interaction between sex hormones, genetic factors and the immune system. However, despite the age and sex bias, factors that influence this disparity are complicated and unclear. This review aims to evaluate the gender disparities in prevalence, incidence and severity of the most common infectious and non-infectious ocular inflammatory disorders. PMID:24987987

  11. Is there an imbalance in the global budget of bomb-produced radiocarbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Atul K.; Kheshgi, Haroon S.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    Several recent studies of the global inventory of radiocarbon produced by above ground nuclear weapons testing have brought into question our understanding of the global cycle of bomb-produced radiocarbon. Radiocarbon produced from these explosions has provided a unique test for global carbon cycle models used in the analysis of emission scenarios for carbon dioxide. We employ a globally aggregated model for the global cycles of carbon and its isotopes (13C and 14C) to examine these studies, and find several modeling approximations or assumptions which could be responsible for the differences between analyses. In light of the considerable uncertainty in both model-based and data-based estimates of global inventories, we conclude that the global budget of bomb-produced radiocarbon cannot be shown to be out of balance. Uncertainties limit the utility of 14C as a tracer for determining the flow of carbon dioxide within the atmosphere-ocean-terrestrial-biosphere system of carbon cycle. Our model-based analyses suggest that improved analysis of past nuclear tests and their production of radiocarbon, as well as additional measurements of 14C in the biosphere and oceans, could reduce uncertainties in model studies of the evolution of 14C in the carbon cycle system.

  12. Radiocarbon Generation By Cosmic Rays and Elements Transport, Mixing and Exchange On The Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.

    We considere general equations and its solutions determined the space-time varia- tions of cosmogenic nuclides production by cosmic rays (CR) and its contents in the space, inside astrophysical bodies, in atmospheres of stares and planets by the method of coupling functions which was developed before for CR variations research. Then we introduce and calculate the local and polar radiocarbon coupling functions for the Earth's atmosphere with taking into account vertical mixing of elements. Then we introduce and calculate the global radiocarbon coupling function with taking into ac- count the global elements transport, mixing and influence of geomagnetic field on CR planetary distribution. For the contents of radiocarbon in the atmosphere and in dated samples are very important exchange processes between several reservoirs on the Earth. As the first approximation we consider two-reservoir model and then the model of five-reservoir elements exchange. By comparison with experimental data on radiocarbon contents we estimate the exchange constants. On the basis of devel- oped methods and obtained solutions of equations determined the time evolution of radiocarbon production rate and contents in the Earth's atmosphere we consider data of atomic bomb tests in the atmosphere, on CR time variations in the past caused by changes of geomagnetic field, by solar activity cycles, and by possible local supernova explosions

  13. Accurate radiocarbon age estimation using "early" measurements: a new approach to reconstructing the Paleolithic absolute chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Takayuki; Sano, Katsuhiro; Yoneda, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents new correction approaches for "early" radiocarbon ages to reconstruct the Paleolithic absolute chronology. In order to discuss time-space distribution about the replacement of archaic humans, including Neanderthals in Europe, by the modern humans, a massive data, which covers a wide-area, would be needed. Today, some radiocarbon databases focused on the Paleolithic have been published and used for chronological studies. From a viewpoint of current analytical technology, however, the any database have unreliable results that make interpretation of radiocarbon dates difficult. Most of these unreliable ages had been published in the early days of radiocarbon analysis. In recent years, new analytical methods to determine highly-accurate dates have been developed. Ultrafiltration and ABOx-SC methods, as new sample pretreatments for bone and charcoal respectively, have attracted attention because they could remove imperceptible contaminates and derive reliable accurately ages. In order to evaluate the reliability of "early" data, we investigated the differences and variabilities of radiocarbon ages on different pretreatments, and attempted to develop correction functions for the assessment of the reliability. It can be expected that reliability of the corrected age is increased and the age applied to chronological research together with recent ages. Here, we introduce the methodological frameworks and archaeological applications.

  14. Bridging the gap: global disparity processing in the human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Suzanne P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The human stereoscopic system is remarkable in its ability to utilize widely separated features as references to support fine depth discrimination. In a search for possible neural substrates of this ability, we recorded high-density EEG and used a distributed inverse technique to estimate population-level disparity responses in five regions of interest (ROIs): V1, V3A, hMT+, V4, and lateral occipital complex (LOC). The stimulus was a central modulating disk surrounded by a correlated “reference” annulus presented in the fixation plane. We varied a gap separating the disk from the annulus parametrically from 0 to 5.5° as a test of long-range disparity integration. In the V1, LOC, and hMT+ ROIs, the responses with gaps >0.5° were equal to those obtained in a control condition where the surround was composed of uncorrelated noise (no reference). By contrast, in the V4 and V3A ROIs, responses with gaps as large as 5.5° were still significantly higher than the control. As a test of the spatial distribution of the disparity reference information, we manipulated the properties of the stimulus by placing noise between the center and the surround or throughout the surround. The V3A ROI was particularly sensitive to disparity noise between the center and annulus regions, suggesting an important contribution of disparity edge detectors in this ROI. PMID:22323636

  15. Widening Geographical Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in the United States, 1969-2011

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gopal K.; Azuine, Romuladus E.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Williams, Shanita D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined trends in geographical disparities in cardiovascular-disease (CVD) mortality in the United States between 1969 and 2011. Methods: National vital statistics data and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study were used to estimate regional, state, and county-level disparities in CVD mortality over time. Log-linear, weighted least squares, and Cox regression were used to analyze mortality trends and differentials. Results: During 1969-2011, CVD mortality rates declined fastest in New England and Mid-Atlantic regions and slowest in the Southeast and Southwestern regions. In 1969, the mortality rate was 9% higher in the Southeast than in New England, but the differential increased to 48% in 2011. In 2011, Southeastern states, Mississippi and Alabama, had the highest CVD mortality rates, nearly twice the rates for Minnesota and Hawaii. Controlling for individual-level covariates reduced state differentials. State- and county-level differentials in CVD mortality rates widened over time as geographical disparity in CVD mortality increased by 50% between 1969 and 2011. Area deprivation, smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes prevalence, urbanization, lack of health insurance, and lower access to primary medical care were all significant predictors of county-level CVD mortality rates and accounted for 52.7% of the county variance. Conclusions and Global Health Implications: Although CVD mortality has declined for all geographical areas in the United States, geographical disparity has widened over time as certain regions and states, particularly those in the South, have lagged behind in mortality reduction. Geographical disparities in CVD mortality reflect inequalities in socioeconomic conditions and behavioral risk factors. With the global CVD burden on the rise, monitoring geographical disparities, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, could indicate the extent to which reductions in CVD mortality are achievable and may

  16. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Rech, J.A.; Nekola, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Fossil shells of small terrestrial gastropods are commonly preserved in wetland, alluvial, loess, and glacial deposits, as well as in sediments at many archeological sites. These shells are composed largely of aragonite (CaCO3) and potentially could be used for radiocarbon dating, but they must meet two criteria before their 14C ages can be considered to be reliable: (1) when gastropods are alive, the 14C activity of their shells must be in equilibrium with the 14C activity of the atmosphere, and (2) after burial, their shells must behave as closed systems with respect to carbon. To evaluate the first criterion, we conducted a comprehensive examination of the 14C content of the most common small terrestrial gastropods in North America, including 247 AMS measurements of modern shell material (3749 individual shells) from 46 different species. The modern gastropods that we analyzed were all collected from habitats on carbonate terrain and, therefore, the data presented here represent worst-case scenarios. In sum, ~78% of the shell aliquots that we analyzed did not contain dead carbon from limestone or other carbonate rocks even though it was readily available at all sites, 12% of the aliquots contained between 5 and 10% dead carbon, and a few (3% of the total) contained more than 10%. These results are significantly lower than the 20-30% dead carbon that has been reported previously for larger taxa living in carbonate terrain. For the second criterion, we report a case study from the American Midwest in which we analyzed fossil shells of small terrestrial gastropods (7 taxa; 18 AMS measurements; 173 individual shells) recovered from late-Pleistocene sediments. The fossil shells yielded 14C ages that were statistically indistinguishable from 14C ages of well-preserved plant macrofossils from the same stratum. Although just one site, these results suggest that small terrestrial gastropod shells may behave as closed systems with respect to carbon over geologic

  17. High-resolution deep Northeast Pacific radiocarbon record shows little change in ventilation rate during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, D. C.; Mix, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the last deglaciation is thought to be driven by release of carbon sequestered in the abyssal ocean. This mechanism requires a poorly ventilated deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and enhanced ventilation during the deglaciation. Here we evaluate the plausibility of this scenario using planktonic and benthic foraminiferal radiocarbon data from a high-sedimentation rate core (~25 cm/kyr) collected in the deep (2700 m) Northeast Pacific. We estimate that the mean benthic-planktonic (B-P) age was 1620±190 years during the LGM (n=10 pairs). This value is indistinguishable from the mean B-P difference for the deglaciation (1500±230; n=20 pairs) and the difference between surface and deep water 14C ages today (1560±70 years). Furthermore, our time series of benthic Δ14C parallels atmospheric Δ14C with an offset of 300±50‰ from 22 to 10 kyr BP. These data suggest the ventilation rate of the deep NE Pacific remained nearly constant during the deglaciation, consistent with lower resolution data from this region (Okazaki et al., 2010). Between 22 and 16 kyr BP, Δ14C in the deep NE Pacific varied between 0 and 100‰, well above the -200‰ values estimated at intermediate depths off of Baja California during the Mystery Interval (Marchitto et al., 2007). The deep NE Pacific apparently did not contain water of adequate age to source deglacial Δ14C anomalies shallower in the water column. Given that Antarctic Intermediate Water is also an unlikely source (de Pol-Holz et al., 2010; Rose et al., 2010), an alternative explanation is necessary for the extreme 14C depletions in the eastern tropical Pacific. De Pol-Holz, R. D., et al. 2010. No signature of abyssal carbon in intermediate waters off Chile during deglaciation. Nature Geoscience 3, 192-195. Marchitto, T., Lehman, S., Ortiz, J., Fluckiger, J. & van Geen, A. 2007. Marine radiocarbon evidence for the mechanism of deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise. Science

  18. Concordance of collagen-based radiocarbon and aspartic-acid racemization ages.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Schroeder, R A; Protsch, R; Berger, R

    1974-03-01

    By determining the extent of racemization of aspartic acid in a well-dated bone, it is possible to calculate the in situ first-order rate constant for the interconversion of the L and D enantiomers of aspartic acid. Collagen-based radiocarbon-dated bones are shown to be suitable samples for use in "calibrating" the racemization reaction. Once the aspartic-acid racemization reaction has been "calibrated" for a site, the reaction can be used to date other bones from the deposit. Ages deduced by this method are in good agreement with radiocarbon ages. These results provide evidence that the aspartic-acid racemization reaction is an important chronological tool for dating bones either too old or too small for radiocarbon dating. As an example of the potential application of the technique for dating fossil man, a piece of Rhodesian Man from Broken Hill, Zambia, was analyzed and tentatively assigned an age of about 110,000 years.

  19. The impact of age at death on the lag time of radiocarbon values in human bone.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Thomas, Christian; Olson, Jacqueline E

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of modern bomb-pulse radiocarbon in human bone offers data needed to interpret the post-mortem interval in skeletonized human remains recovered from forensic contexts. Radiocarbon analysis of different tissues with distinct rates of remodeling allows proper placement of the values on the modern bomb-curve. However, the lag time between the date of intercept on the curve and the actual death date is largely affected by the age at death. Published data on radiocarbon analysis of individuals of known age at death and death dates indicate that this lag time increases with age until about 60 years. The lag time documented for each decade of life can be used to compensate for this age-related factor and increase the accuracy of interpretation of the death date. While this method could be greatly improved by original research with a larger sample size, this study provides an adequate point from which to launch further investigations into the subject.

  20. Molecular gas sensing below parts per trillion: radiocarbon-dioxide optical detection.

    PubMed

    Galli, I; Bartalini, S; Borri, S; Cancio, P; Mazzotti, D; De Natale, P; Giusfredi, G

    2011-12-30

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) concentrations at a 43 parts-per-quadrillion level are measured by using saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy by exciting radiocarbon-dioxide ((14)C(16)O(2)) molecules at the 4.5 μm wavelength. The ultimate sensitivity limits of molecular trace gas sensing are pushed down to attobar pressures using a comb-assisted absorption spectroscopy setup. Such a result represents the lowest pressure ever detected for a gas of simple molecules. The unique sensitivity, the wide dynamic range, the compactness, and the relatively low cost of this table-top setup open new perspectives for ^{14}C-tracing applications, such as radiocarbon dating, biomedicine, or environmental and earth sciences. The detection of other very rare molecules can be pursued as well thanks to the wide and continuous mid-IR spectral coverage of the described setup.

  1. Microflora distributions in paleosols: a method for calculating the validity of radiocarbon-dated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, W.C.; Boyer, M.G.

    1986-08-01

    Microflora (bacteria and fungi) distributions in several paleosols from Mount Kenya, East Africa, provide important information about contamination of buried soil horizons dated by radiocarbon. High counts of bacteria and fungi in buried soils provide evidence for contamination by plant root effects or ground water movement. Profiles with decreasing counts versus depth appear to produce internally consistent and accurate radiocarbon dates. Profiles with disjunct or bimodal distributions of microflora at various depths produce internally inconsistent chronological sequences of radiocarbon-dated buried surfaces. Preliminary results suggest that numbers up to 5 x 10/sup 2/ g/sup -1/ for bacteria in buried A horizons do not appear to affect the validity of /sup 14/C dates. Beyond this threshold value, contamination appears to produce younger dates, the difference between true age and /sup 14/C age increasing with the amount of microflora contamination.

  2. The absolute age of events in Earth and human history on the basis of radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazdur, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Radiocarbon chronometry holds a special place among the many discoveries made in the field of applied nuclear research. Few discoveries in fact, even among those being honored with the Nobel Prize, have had such a powerful and lasting impact on the further development of science. This method, as well as many other complex research methods, which appear to constitute an independent scientific discipline, arose as a result of many years of work by a team of several scientists. However, the actual founder of radiocarbon chronometry was one man, Willard Frank Libby, honored for his contribution with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1960. In Poland, the creative activity in this area was begun in the late 1940s by Włodzimierz Mościcki, who continued it in the last 10 years of his life in the Silesian University of Technology in Gliwice, where he founded the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory.

  3. A graphical method to evaluate predominant geochemical processes occurring in groundwater systems for radiocarbon dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Liang-Feng; Plummer, L. Niel; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method is described for identifying geochemical reactions needed in the interpretation of radiocarbon age in groundwater systems. Graphs are constructed by plotting the measured 14C, δ13C, and concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and are interpreted according to specific criteria to recognize water samples that are consistent with a wide range of processes, including geochemical reactions, carbon isotopic exchange, 14C decay, and mixing of waters. The graphs are used to provide a qualitative estimate of radiocarbon age, to deduce the hydrochemical complexity of a groundwater system, and to compare samples from different groundwater systems. Graphs of chemical and isotopic data from a series of previously-published groundwater studies are used to demonstrate the utility of the approach. Ultimately, the information derived from the graphs is used to improve geochemical models for adjustment of radiocarbon ages in groundwater systems.

  4. Youngest radiocarbon age for Jefferson's ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii (Xenarthra, Megalonychidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory McDonald, H.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Gnidovec, Dale M.

    2015-03-01

    A partial skeleton of the extinct ground sloth, Megalonyx jeffersonii, recovered from a farm near Millersburg, Ohio in 1890, was radiocarbon dated for the first time. The ungual dated is part of a skeleton mounted for exhibit at the Orton Geological Museum at Ohio State University and was the first mounted skeleton of this animal. From its initial discovery the bones were treated with multiple organic compounds that had the potential to compromise the radiocarbon age and the specimen required special treatments in order to obtain a valid radiocarbon age. The 14C measurement on the ungual from this skeleton (11,235 ± 40 14C yr BP = 13,180-13,034 cal yr BP) is the youngest 14C age presently determined for M. jeffersonii.

  5. Gender Disparity in Turkish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findik, Leyla Yilmaz

    2016-01-01

    Turkey has been concerned about gender inequality in education for many years and has implemented various policy instruments. However, gender disparity still seems to prevail today. This study seeks to provide an insight to the gender differences in terms of enrollment rates, level of education, fields of education and number of graduates in…

  6. Income disparities shape medical student specialty choice.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Venis; Dodoo, Martey S; Phillips, Robert L; Teevan, Bridget; Bazemore, Andrew W; Petterson, Stephen M; Xierali, Imam

    2010-09-15

    Currently, a gap of more than $135,000 separates the median annual subspecialist income from that of a primary care physician, yielding a $3.5 million difference in expected income over a lifetime. These income disparities dissuade medical students from selecting primary care and should be addressed to ensure sufficient patient access to primary care. PMID:20842986

  7. Friction and the Intuition-Outcome Disparity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter; Makarova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Humans have evolved to follow their intuition, but as any high school physics teacher knows, relying on intuition often leads students to predict outcomes that are at odds with evidence. Over the years, we have attempted to make this intuition-outcome disparity a central theme running throughout our physics classes, with limited success. Part of…

  8. Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Dan A.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Sanders, Seth G.; Taylor, Lowell J.

    2008-01-01

    We examine gender wage disparities for four groups of college-educated women--black, Hispanic, Asian, and non-Hispanic white--using the National Survey of College Graduates. Raw log wage gaps, relative to non-Hispanic white male counterparts, generally exceed -0.30. Estimated gaps decline to between -0.08 and -0.19 in nonparametric analyses that…

  9. Gout and African Americans: Reducing disparities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharat; Lenert, Petar

    2016-09-01

    African Americans are more likely to suffer from gout and are less likely to receive optimal treatment for it. Physicians should be aware of risk factors for gout and professional guidelines for treating acute attacks and high uric acid levels, and should help develop strategies to reduce disparities in healthcare delivery. PMID:27618355

  10. Teachers' Voices 2: Teaching Disparate Learner Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Anne, Ed.; Hood, Susan, Ed.

    The collection of papers was written by teacher researchers from an adult migrant English program, and consists of reports and discussions of action research on teaching heterogeneous learner groups. Papers include: "Disparate Groups: Exploring Diversity in Practice through Collaborative Action Research" (Anne Burns, Susan Hood); "A Profile of…

  11. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  12. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  13. Analysis of artificial radiocarbon in different skeletal and dental tissue types to evaluate date of death.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Buchholz, Bruce A; Stewart, John E B

    2006-05-01

    Radiocarbon dating, with special reference to the modern bomb-curve, can provide useful information to elucidate the date of death of skeletonized human remains. Interpretation can be enhanced with analysis of different types of tissues within a single skeleton because of the known variability of formation times and remodeling rates. Analysis of radiocarbon content of teeth, especially the enamel in tooth crowns, provides information about the date of formation in the childhood years and in consideration of the known timing of tooth formation can be used to estimate the birth date after 1950 ad. Radiocarbon analysis of modern cortical and trabecular bone samples from the same skeleton may allow proper placement on the pre-1963 or post-1963 sides of the bomb-curve as most trabecular bone generally undergoes more rapid remodeling than does most cortical bone. Pre-1963 bone formation would produce higher radiocarbon values for most trabecular bone than for most cortical bone. This relationship is reversed for formation after 1963. Radiocarbon analysis was conducted in this study on dental, cortical, and trabecular bone samples from two adult individuals of known birth (1925 and 1926) and death dates (1995 and 1959). As expected, the dental results correspond to prebomb-curve values reflecting conditions during the childhoods of the individuals. The radiocarbon content of most bone samples reflected the higher modern bomb-curve values. Within the bone sample analyses, the values of the trabecular bone were higher than those of cortical bone and supported the known placement on the pre-1963 side of the bomb-curve.

  14. Analysis of Artificial Radiocarbon in Different Skeletal and Dental Tissue Types to Evaluate Date of Death

    SciTech Connect

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A; Stewart, J

    2005-07-19

    Radiocarbon dating, with special reference to the modern bomb-curve, can provide useful information to elucidate the date of death of skeletonized human remains. Interpretation can be enhanced with analysis of different types of tissues within a single skeleton because of the known variability of formation times and remodeling rates. Analysis of radiocarbon content of teeth, especially the enamel in tooth crowns provides information about the date of formation in the childhood years and in consideration of the known timing of tooth formation can be used to estimate the birth date after 1950 A.D. Radiocarbon analysis of modern cortical and trabecular bone samples from the same skeleton may allow proper placement on the pre-1963 or post-1963 sides of the bomb-curve since most trabecular bone generally undergoes more rapid remodeling than does most cortical bone. Pre-1963 bone formation would produce higher radiocarbon values for most trabecular bone than for most cortical bone. This relationship is reversed for formation after 1963. Radiocarbon analysis was conducted in this study on dental, cortical and trabecular bone samples from two adult individuals of known birth (1925 and 1926) and death dates (1995 and 1959). As expected, the dental results correspond to pre-bomb bomb-curve values reflecting conditions during the childhoods of the individuals. The curve radiocarbon content of most bone samples reflected the higher modern bomb-curve values. Within the bone sample analyses, the values of the trabecular bone were higher than those of cortical bone and supported the known placement on the pre-1963 side of the bomb-curve.

  15. Age estimation in forensic sciences: application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Buchholz, Bruce A; Ohtani, Susumu; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Druid, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-01

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster because the age at death, birth date, and year of death as well as gender can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization, has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this study, we analyzed teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that aboveground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ((14)C), which has been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel, and 10 of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R(2) = 0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 1.0 +/- 0.6 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 +/- 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification. PMID:19965905

  16. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--U.S. 2013

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Community Health Tribal Support Women's Health CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report (CHDIR) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Sheets 2011 Report More Information CDC Releases Second Health Disparities & Inequalities Report - United States, 2013 CDC and its partners ...

  17. The horizontal disparity direction vs. the stimulus disparity direction in the perception of the depth of two-dimensional patterns.

    PubMed

    Farell, Bart; Chai, Yu-Chin; Fernandez, Julian M

    2010-04-29

    Horizontal binocular disparity has long been the conventional predictor of stereo depth. Surprisingly, an alternative predictor fairs just as well. This alternative predicts the relative depth of two stimuli from the relation between their disparity vectors, without regard to horizontal disparities. These predictions can differ; horizontal disparities accurately predict the perceived depth of a grating and a plaid only when the grating is vertical, while the vector calculation accurately predicts it at all except near-horizontal grating orientations. For spatially two-dimensional stimulus pairs, such as plaids, dots, and textures, the predictions cannot be distinguished when the stimuli have the same disparity direction or when the disparity direction of one of the stimuli is horizontal or has a magnitude of zero. These are the conditions that have prevailed in earlier studies. We tested whether the perceived depth of two-dimensional stimuli depends on relative horizontal disparity magnitudes or on relative disparity magnitudes along a disparity axis. On both measures tested-depth matches and depth-interval matches-the perceived depth of plaids varied with their horizontal disparities and not with disparity direction differences as observed for grating-plaid pairs. Differences in disparity directions as great as 120 degrees did not affect depth judgments. This result, though opposite the grating-plaid data, is consistent with them and provides a view into the construction of orientation-invariant disparity representations.

  18. Radiocarbon dating of extinct fauna in the Americas recovered from tar pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Iturralde-Vinent, M.; O'Malley, J. M.; MacPhee, R. D. E.; McDonald, H. G.; Martin, P. S.; Moody, J.; Rincón, A.

    2004-08-01

    We have obtained radiocarbon dates by accelerator mass spectrometry on bones of extinct large mammals from tar pits. Results on some samples of Glyptodon and Holmesina (extinct large mammals similar to armadillos) yielded ages of >25 and >21 ka, respectively. We also studied the radiocarbon ages of three different samples of bones from the extinct Cuban ground sloth, Parocnus bownii, which yielded dates ranging from 4960 ± 280 to 11 880 ± 420 yr BP. In order to remove the tar component pretreat the samples sufficiently to obtain reliable dates, we cleaned the samples by Soxhlet extraction in benzene. Resulting samples of collagenous material were often small.

  19. [Radiocarbon dating of pollen and spores in wedge ice from Iamal and Kolyma].

    PubMed

    Vasil'chuk, A K

    2004-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of pollen concentrate from late Pleistocene syngenetic wedge ice was carried out using acceleration mass spectrometry (AMS) in Seyakha and Bizon sections. Comparison of the obtained dating with palynological analysis and AMS radiocarbon dating previously obtained for other organic fractions of the same samples allowed us to evaluate accuracy of dating of different fractions. Quantitative tests for data evaluation were considered in terms of possible autochthonous or allochthonous accumulation of the material on the basis of pre-Pleistocene pollen content in these samples. Paleoecological information content of pollen spectra from late Pleistocene syngenetic wedge ice was evaluated.

  20. Radiocarbon Content of Intermediate Waters off West Sumatra During the Last 45,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as a likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Late Glacial depleted radiocarbon water masses have been found at intermediate depths off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos, the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the required mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. A common approach to search for the old water reservoir is the radiocarbon difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera or 'apparent ventilation age'. Caveats of this approach are due to the fact that it relies strongly on the knowledge of the surface water reservoir age. In this study, we present a high-resolution radiocarbon difference between surface and intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to elucidate a possible route of the old water from its hypothetical source in the high latitudes near Antarctica on its way to the lower latitude sites where it has been observed. Samples come from core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m), a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years. Radiocarbon determinations were made at centennial time resolution on both planktonic and benthic species. Calibration of the planktonic radiocarbon as age control points allowed us to infer the Δ14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content of intermediate depths in the area remained with an almost constant age difference with the contemporaneous atmosphere. Unless we have grossly underestimated the local planktonic reservoir age, our results discard this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. In light of recent evidence from the

  1. Radiocarbon analysis of the Torah scrolls from the National Museum of Brazil collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Fabiana M.; Araujo, Carlos A. R.; Macario, Kita D.; Cid, Alberto S.

    2015-10-01

    This radiocarbon study aims to physically verify the critical analysis of the Torah scrolls from the National Museum of Brazil collection. Although the manuscript was formerly believed to be as old as the 10th century, the paleographic and stylistic study of the books of Genesis and Deuteronomy revealed features that could be associated to the year 1560 AD. Radiocarbon analysis was performed and a phase model limited by a Historical boundary was applied. The results are in agreement with the critical analysis of the manuscript that it is not older than the 16th century.

  2. Cation-ratio and accelerator radiocarbon dating of rock varnish on mojave artifacts and landforms.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Bamforth, D B; Cahill, T A; Dohrenwend, J C; Turrin, B D; Donahue, D J; Jull, A J; Long, A; Macko, M E; Weil, E B; Whitley, D S; Zabel, T H

    1986-02-21

    The first accelerator radiocarbon dates of rock varnishes are reported along with potassium/argon ages of lava flows and conventional radiocarbon dates of pluvial lake shorelines, in an empirical calibration of rock varnish K(+) + Ca(2+)/Ti(4+) ratios with age in the Mojave Desert, eastern California. This calibration was used to determine the cation-ratio dates of 167 artifacts. Although cation-ratio dating is an experimental method, some dates suggest human occupation of the Mojave Desert in the late Pleistocene. PMID:17774077

  3. Cation-ratio and accelerator radiocarbon dating of rock varnish on Mojave artifacts and landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorn, R.I.; Bamforth, D.B.; Cahill, T.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Turrin, B.D.; Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T.; Long, A.; Macko, M.E.; Weil, E.B.; Whitley, D.S.; Zabel, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    The first accelerator radiocarbon dates of rock varnishes are reported along with potassium/argon ages of lava flows and conventional radiocarbon dates of pluvial lake shorelines, in an empirical calibration of rock varnish K + + Ca2+/Ti4+ ratios with age in the Mojave Desert, eastern California. This calibration was used to determine the cation-ratio dates of 167 artifacts. Although cation-ratio dating is an experimental method, some dates suggest human occupation of the Mojave Desert in the late Pleistocene.

  4. Cation-ratio and accelerator radiocarbon dating of rock varnish on Mojave artifacts and landforms

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.I.; Bamforth, D.B.; Cahill, T.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Turrin, B.D.; Donahue, D.J.; Jull, A.J.T.; Long, A.; Macko, M.E.; Weil, E.B.; Whitley, D.S.

    1986-02-21

    The first accelerator radiocarbon dates of rock varnishes are reported along with potassium/argon ages of lava flows and conventional radiocarbon dates of pluvial lake shorelines, in an empirical calibration of rock varnish K/sup +/ + Ca/sup 2 +//Ti/sup 4 +/ ratios with age in the Mojave Desert, eastern California. This calibration was used to determine the cation-ratio dates of 167 artifacts. Although cation-ratio dating is an experimental method, some dates suggest human occupation of the Mojave Desert in the late Pleistocene. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Cation-ratio and accelerator radiocarbon dating of rock varnish on mojave artifacts and landforms.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Bamforth, D B; Cahill, T A; Dohrenwend, J C; Turrin, B D; Donahue, D J; Jull, A J; Long, A; Macko, M E; Weil, E B; Whitley, D S; Zabel, T H

    1986-02-21

    The first accelerator radiocarbon dates of rock varnishes are reported along with potassium/argon ages of lava flows and conventional radiocarbon dates of pluvial lake shorelines, in an empirical calibration of rock varnish K(+) + Ca(2+)/Ti(4+) ratios with age in the Mojave Desert, eastern California. This calibration was used to determine the cation-ratio dates of 167 artifacts. Although cation-ratio dating is an experimental method, some dates suggest human occupation of the Mojave Desert in the late Pleistocene.

  6. Kidney transplantation in Brazil and its geographic disparity.

    PubMed

    Medina-Pestana, José O; Galante, Nelson Zocoler; Tedesco-Silva, Hélio; Harada, Kelly Miyuki; Garcia, Valter Duro; Abbud-Filho, Mário; Campos, Henry de Holanda; Sabbaga, Emil

    2011-12-01

    The Brazilian National Transplantation System coordinates and regulates perhaps the largest public transplantation program worldwide. Since its implementation in 1997, the number of kidney transplantations increased from 920 (5.8 pmp) in 1998, to 4,630 (24.1 pmp) in 2010. This growth was primarily due to the increased number of effective donors (from 1.8 pmp in 1998 to 9.3 pmp in 2010), with a corresponding increased number of kidneys transplanted from deceased donors (3.8 pmp in 1999 versus 9.9 pmp in 2010).The number of kidney transplantations from living donors has not increased significantly, from 1,065 (6.7 pmp) in 1998 to 1,641 (8.6 pmp) in 2010, either as a consequence of the observed increase in the deceased donor program or perhaps because of strict government regulations allowing only transplantations from related donors. From 2000 to 2009, the mean age of living donors increased from 40 to 45 years, while it increased from 33 to 41 years for deceased donors, of whom roughly 50% die of stroke. There are clear regional disparities in transplantation performance across the national regions. While the state of São Paulo is ranked first in organ donation and recovery (22.5 pmp), some states of the Northern region have much poorer performances. These disparities are directly related to different regional population densities, gross domestic product distribution, and number of trained transplantation physicians. The initial evaluation of the centers with robust outcomes indicates no clear differences in graft survival in comparison with centers in the USA and Europe. Ethnicity and time on dialysis, but not the type of immunosuppressive regimen, decisively influence the measured outcomes. Since the implementation of national clinical research regulations in 1996, Brazilian centers have participated in a number of national and international collaborative trials for the development of immunosuppressive regimens. Besides the challenge of reducing the regional

  7. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOGENIC CONTRIBUTION TO SUMMERTIME PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL IN NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements performed on PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, TN from June 21 to July 13, 1999, showed high levels of modern carbon, ranging from 56 to 80% of the total carbon in the samples. Radiocarbon measurements performed on dichloromethane extracts of...

  8. Radiocarbon content in the annual tree rings during last 150 years and time variation of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Metskvarishvili, R. Y.; Tsereteli, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the high accuracy measurements of radiocarbon abundance in precisely dated tree rings in the interval 1800 to 1950 yrs are discussed. Radiocarbon content caused by solar activity is established. The temporal dependence of cosmic rays is constructed, by use of radio abundance data.

  9. Ocular dominance and disparity coding in cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    LeVay, S; Voigt, T

    1988-01-01

    The orientation selectivity, ocular dominance, and binocular disparity tuning of 272 cells in areas 17 and 18 of barbiturate-anesthetized, paralyzed cats were studied with automated, quantitative techniques. Disparity was varied along the axis orthogonal to each cell's best orientation. Binocular correspondence was established by means of a reference electrode positioned at the boundary of lamina A and A1 in the area centralis representation of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Measures were derived that expressed each cell's disparity sensitivity and best disparity and the shape and slope of its tuning curve. Cells were found that corresponded to categories described by previous authors ("disparity-insensitive," "tuned excitatory," "near," and "far" cells), but many others had intermediate response patterns, or patterns that were difficult to categorize. Quantitative analysis suggested that the various types belong to a continuum. No relationship could be established between a cell's best orientation and its ocular dominance or any aspect of its disparity tuning. There was no relationship between a cell's ocular dominance and its sensitivity to disparity. Ocular dominance and best disparity were related. As reported by others, cells with best disparities close to zero (the fixation plane) tended to have balanced ocularity, while cells with best disparities in the near or far range had a broad distribution of ocular dominance. Among cells with receptive fields near the vertical meridian, those preferring far disparities tended to be dominated by the contralateral eye, and those preferring near disparities by the ipsilateral eye. It is suggested that this relationship follows from the geometry of near and far images and the pattern of decussation in the visual pathway. There was a significant grouping of cells with similar best disparities along tangential electrode tracks. We believe that this grouping is due to the columnar organization for ocular dominance and the

  10. Access to Routine Immunization: A Comparative Analysis of Supply-Side Disparities between Northern and Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eboreime, Ejemai; Abimbola, Seye; Bozzani, Fiammetta

    2015-01-01

    Background The available data on routine immunization in Nigeria show a disparity in coverage between Northern and Southern Nigeria, with the former performing worse. The effect of socio-cultural differences on health-seeking behaviour has been identified in the literature as the main cause of the disparity. Our study analyses the role of supply-side determinants, particularly access to services, in causing these disparities. Methods Using routine government data, we compared supply-side determinants of access in two Northern states with two Southern states. The states were identified using criteria-based purposive selection such that the comparisons were made between a low-coverage state in the South and a low-coverage state in the North as well as between a high-coverage state in the South and a high-coverage state in the North. Results Human resources and commodities at routine immunization service delivery points were generally insufficient for service delivery in both geographical regions. While disparities were evident between individual states irrespective of regional location, compared to the South, residents in Northern Nigeria were more likely to have vaccination service delivery points located within a 5km radius of their settlements. Conclusion Our findings suggest that regional supply-side disparities are not apparent, reinforcing the earlier reported socio-cultural explanations for disparities in routine immunization service uptake between Northern and Southern Nigeria. Nonetheless, improving routine immunisation coverage services require that there are available human resources and that health facilities are equitably distributed. PMID:26692215

  11. Using natural abundance radiocarbon to trace the flux of petrocarbon to the seafloor following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Zhao, Tingting; Rosenheim, Brad E; Joye, Samantha; Bosman, Samantha; Brunner, Charlotte; Yeager, Kevin M; Diercks, Arne R; Hollander, David

    2015-01-20

    In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon accident released 4.6–6.0 × 10(11) grams or 4.1 to 4.6 million barrels of fossil petroleum derived carbon (petrocarbon) as oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Natural abundance radiocarbon measurements on surface sediment organic matter in a 2.4 × 10(10) m(2) deep-water region surrounding the spill site indicate the deposition of a fossil-carbon containing layer that included 1.6 to 2.6 × 10(10) grams of oil-derived carbon. This quantity represents between 0.5 to 9.1% of the released petrocarbon, with a best estimate of 3.0–4.9%. These values may be lower limit estimates of the fraction of the oil that was deposited on the seafloor because they focus on a limited mostly deep-water area of the Gulf, include a conservative estimate of thickness of the depositional layer, and use an average background or prespill radiocarbon value for sedimentary organic carbon that produces a conservative value. A similar approach using hopane tracer estimated that 4–31% of 2 million barrels of oil that stayed in the deep sea settled on the bottom. Converting that to a percentage of the total oil that entered into the environment (to which we normalized our estimate) converts this range to 1.8 to 14.4%. Although extrapolated over a larger area, our independent estimate produced similar values.

  12. Using natural abundance radiocarbon to trace the flux of petrocarbon to the seafloor following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Zhao, Tingting; Rosenheim, Brad E; Joye, Samantha; Bosman, Samantha; Brunner, Charlotte; Yeager, Kevin M; Diercks, Arne R; Hollander, David

    2015-01-20

    In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon accident released 4.6–6.0 × 10(11) grams or 4.1 to 4.6 million barrels of fossil petroleum derived carbon (petrocarbon) as oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Natural abundance radiocarbon measurements on surface sediment organic matter in a 2.4 × 10(10) m(2) deep-water region surrounding the spill site indicate the deposition of a fossil-carbon containing layer that included 1.6 to 2.6 × 10(10) grams of oil-derived carbon. This quantity represents between 0.5 to 9.1% of the released petrocarbon, with a best estimate of 3.0–4.9%. These values may be lower limit estimates of the fraction of the oil that was deposited on the seafloor because they focus on a limited mostly deep-water area of the Gulf, include a conservative estimate of thickness of the depositional layer, and use an average background or prespill radiocarbon value for sedimentary organic carbon that produces a conservative value. A similar approach using hopane tracer estimated that 4–31% of 2 million barrels of oil that stayed in the deep sea settled on the bottom. Converting that to a percentage of the total oil that entered into the environment (to which we normalized our estimate) converts this range to 1.8 to 14.4%. Although extrapolated over a larger area, our independent estimate produced similar values. PMID:25494527

  13. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  14. New constraints on deglacial marine radiocarbon anomalies from a depth transect near Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Colin M.; Lehman, Scott J.; Marchitto, Thomas M.; Carriquiry, José D.; Ortiz, Joseph D.

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that radiocarbon activities (Δ14C) in the low-latitude, middepth Pacific and Indian Oceans were anomalously low during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1, ~17.8-14.6 ka) and the Younger Dryas (YD, ~12.8-11.5 ka), coincident with intervals of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration and declining atmospheric Δ14C. However, a full explanation of these events remains elusive due to sparse and sometimes conflicting data. Here we present new 14C measurements on benthic and planktic foraminifera that, in combination with previously published measurements, enable us to reconstruct the Δ14C depth gradient near Baja California. Vertical profiles were similar to present during the Last Glacial Maximum and Bølling/Allerod (14.6-12.8 ka) but display a pronounced middepth (~700 m) Δ14C minimum during HS1 and the YD. The latter observation, along with a comparison to other regional reconstructions, appears to rule out intermediate waters from the north or from directly below as proximate sources of aged 14C-depleted ocean carbon during deglaciation and point instead to changes in the composition of Equatorial Pacific intermediate waters. Simple mixing constraints require Equatorial Pacific intermediate waters to be only slightly lower in Δ14C than at Baja California, in contrast with previous observations of extremely low Δ14C at Galapagos Rise. While the latter may have been influenced by localized releases of geologic (14C-dead) CO2, the smaller and more widespread deglacial Δ14C anomalies in the Arabian Sea and North Pacific seem to require a source of aged carbon in the glacial deep Southern and Pacific Oceans for which there is growing evidence.

  15. Radiocarbon evidence for mid-late Holocene changes in southwest Pacific Ocean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugabe-Dixson, Aimée. F.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Eggins, Stephen M.; Thresher, Ronald E.

    2016-07-01

    Variability in the southwest (SW) Pacific Ocean circulation is influenced by the changes in the South Pacific subtropical gyre and its western boundary current, the East Australian Current (EAC). The EAC plays a significant role in transporting warm, well-ventilated, nutrient-poor waters to more temperate higher latitudes. Recent climate changes associated with EAC intensification have led to anomalous warming in the South Tasman, with implications for marine ecosystems and environment. A clear understanding of the significance of these changes requires knowledge of past natural variability. Here we have reconstructed a 4500 year record of regional sea surface radiocarbon reservoir ages (R) and local reservoir effects (ΔR). Our results reveal the centennial-scale variability over the last 4500 years, with R ranges as large as 390 14C yr. Older R (~410 14C yr) between 1610 to 1860 A.D. in our record, corresponding to the "Little Ice Age," suggests a weaker influence of the EAC in the South Tasman. Between 4000 and 1900 cal years B.P., R and ΔR were significantly younger than the modern, with values of ~170 and -130 14C yr, respectively, indicating increased EAC transport of tropical waters into the South Tasman. We propose that the large R variability was influenced by strong and abrupt El Niño events which punctuated the muted El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) period in the mid-late Holocene and enabled increased westward flow of gyre waters into the SW Pacific. The strengthening of the EAC extension appears to have been a response to the precession-modulated ENSO-Southern Annular Mode interactions.

  16. Determination of the Prebomb Southern (Antartic) Ocean Radiocarbon in Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P

    2001-02-26

    The Southern Hemisphere is an important and unique region of the world's oceans for water-mass formation and mixing, upwelling, nutrient utilization, and carbon export. In fact, one of the primary interests of the oceanographic community is to decipher the climatic record of these processes in the source or sink terms for Southern Ocean surface waters in the CO{sub 2} balance of the atmosphere. Current coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling efforts to trace the input of CO{sub 2} into the ocean imply a strong sink of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the southern ocean. However, because of its relative inaccessibility and the difficulty in directly measuring CO{sub 2} fluxes in the Southern Ocean, these results are controversial at best. An accepted diagnostic of the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the atmosphere and ocean is the prebomb distribution of radiocarbon in the ocean and its time-history since atmospheric nuclear testing. Such histories of {sup 14}C in the surface waters of the Southern Ocean do not currently exist, primarily because there are few continuous biological archives (e.g., in corals) such as those that have been used to monitor the {sup 14}C history of the tropics and subtropics. One of the possible long-term archives is the scallop Adamussium collbecki. Although not independently confirmed, relatively crude growth rate estimates of A. collbecki indicate that it has the potential to provide continuous 100 year time-series. We are exploring the suitability of this potential archive.

  17. Compound specific radiocarbon analyses to apportion sources of combustion products in sedimentary pyrogenic carbon deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC) is a collective term for carbon-rich residues comprised of a continuum of products generated during biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. PyC is a key component of the global carbon cycle due to its slow intrinsic decomposition rate and its ubiquity in the environment. It can originate from natural or anthropogenic vegetation fires, coal mining, energy production, industry and transport. Subsequently, PyC can be transported over long distances by wind and water and can eventually be buried in sediments. Information about the origin of PyC (biomass burning vs. fossil fuel combustion) deposited in estuarine sediments is scarce. We studied the highly anoxic estuarine sediments of the Pettaquamscutt River (Rhode Island, U.S.) in high temporal resolution over 250 years and found different combustion proxies reflect local and regional sources of PyC (Hanke et al. in review; Lima et al. 2003). The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) originate from long-range atmospheric transport, whereas bulk PyC, detected as benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), mainly stems from local catchment run-off. However, to unambiguously apportion PyC sources, we need additional information, such as compound specific radiocarbon (14C) measurements. We report 14C data for individual BPCA including error analysis and for combustion-related PAH. First results indicate that biomass burning is the main source of PyC deposits, with additional minor contributions from fossil fuel combustion. References Hanke U.M., T.I. Eglinton, A.L.L. Braun, C. Reddy, D.B. Wiedemeier, M.W.I. Schmidt. Decoupled sedimentary records of combustion: causes and implications. In review. Lima, A. L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Reddy, C. M., High-resolution record of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon deposition during the 20th century. ES&T, 2003, 37 (1), 53-61.

  18. Stigma and Racial/Ethnic HIV Disparities: Moving toward Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Bogart, Laura M.; Dovidio, John F.; Williams, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research suggests that stigma plays a role in racial/ethnic health disparities. However, there is limited understanding about the mechanisms by which stigma contributes to HIV-related disparities in risk, incidence and screening, treatment, and survival and what can be done to reduce the impact of stigma on these disparities. We introduce…

  19. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Disparate treatment. 60-3... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  20. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 60... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  1. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Disparate treatment. 60-3... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  2. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disparate treatment. 60... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  3. 41 CFR 60-3.11 - Disparate treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disparate treatment. 60-3... treatment. The principles of disparate or unequal treatment must be distinguished from the concepts of..., or members have not been subjected to that standard. Disparate treatment occurs where members of...

  4. Health Disparities | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Health Disparities Health Disparities Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents Photo ... minorities—understand and care about minority health and health disparities? This is an issue of social justice. Racial ...

  5. Using Community-Based Participatory Research to Ameliorate Cancer Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlert, Sarah; Coleman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Although much attention has been paid to health disparities in the past decades, interventions to ameliorate disparities have been largely unsuccessful. One reason is that the interventions have not been culturally tailored to the disparity populations whose problems they are meant to address. Community-engaged research has been successful in…

  6. Gradients of relative disparity underlie the perceived slant of stereoscopic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Susan G; Gillam, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Perceived stereoscopic slant around a vertical axis is strongly underestimated for isolated surfaces, suggesting that neither uniocular image compression nor linear gradients of absolute disparity are very effective cues. However, slant increases to a level close to geometric prediction if gradients of relative disparity are introduced, for example by placing flanking frontal-parallel surfaces at the horizontal boundaries of the slanted surface. Here we examine the mechanisms underlying this slant enhancement by manipulating properties of the slanted surface or the flanking surfaces. Perceived slant was measured using a probe bias method. In Experiment 1, an outlined surface and a randomly textured surface showed similar slant underestimation when presented in isolation, but the enhancement in slant produced by flankers was significantly greater for the textured surface. In Experiment 2, we degraded the relative disparity gradient by (a) reducing overall texture density, (b) reducing flanker width, or (c) adding disparity noise to the flankers. Density had no effect while adding noise to the flankers, or reducing their width significantly decreased perceived slant of the central surface. These results support the view that the enhancement of slant produced by adding flanking surfaces is attributable to the presence of a relative disparity gradient and that the flanker effect can spread to regions of the surface not directly above or below the gradient. PMID:26998800

  7. Year-round Source Contributions of Fossil Fuel and Biomass Combustion to Elemental Carbon on the North Slope Alaska Utilizing Radiocarbon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, T. E.; Gustafsson, O.; Winiger, P.; Moffett, C.; Back, J.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well documented that the Arctic has undergone rapid warming at an alarming rate over the past century. Black carbon (BC) affects the radiative balance of the Arctic directly and indirectly through the absorption of incoming solar radiation and by providing a source of cloud and ice condensation nuclei. Among atmospheric aerosols, BC is the most efficient absorber of light in the visible spectrum. The solar absorbing efficiency of BC is amplified when it is internally mixed with sulfates. Furthermore, BC plumes that are fossil fuel dominated have been shown to be approximately 100% more efficient warming agents than biomass burning dominated plumes. The renewal of offshore oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, specifically in the Chukchi Sea, will introduce new BC sources to the region. This study focuses on the quantification of fossil fuel and biomass combustion sources to atmospheric elemental carbon (EC) during a year-long sampling campaign in the North Slope Alaska. Samples were collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility in Barrow, AK, USA. Particulate matter (PM10) samples collected from July 2012 to June 2013 were analyzed for EC and sulfate concentrations combined with radiocarbon (14C) analysis of the EC fraction. Radiocarbon analysis distinguishes fossil fuel and biomass burning contributions based on large differences in end members between fossil and contemporary carbon. To perform isotope analysis on EC, it must be separated from the organic carbon fraction of the sample. Separation was achieved by trapping evolved CO2 produced during EC combustion in a cryo-trap utilizing liquid nitrogen. Radiocarbon results show an average fossil contribution of 85% to atmospheric EC, with individual samples ranging from 47% to 95%. Source apportionment results will be combined with back trajectory (BT) analysis to assess geographic source region impacts on the EC burden in the western Arctic.

  8. Demography of the Early Neolithic Population in Central Balkans: Population Dynamics Reconstruction Using Summed Radiocarbon Probability Distributions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Central Balkans region is of great importance for understanding the spread of the Neolithic in Europe but the Early Neolithic population dynamics of the region is unknown. In this study we apply the method of summed calibrated probability distributions to a set of published radiocarbon dates from the Republic of Serbia in order to reconstruct population dynamics in the Early Neolithic in this part of the Central Balkans. The results indicate that there was a significant population growth after ~6200 calBC, when the Neolithic was introduced into the region, followed by a bust at the end of the Early Neolithic phase (~5400 calBC). These results are broadly consistent with the predictions of the Neolithic Demographic Transition theory and the patterns of population booms and busts detected in other regions of Europe. These results suggest that the cultural process that underlies the patterns observed in Central and Western Europe was also in operation in the Central Balkan Neolithic and that the population increase component of this process can be considered as an important factor for the spread of the Neolithic as envisioned in the demic diffusion hypothesis. PMID:27508413

  9. Demography of the Early Neolithic Population in Central Balkans: Population Dynamics Reconstruction Using Summed Radiocarbon Probability Distributions.

    PubMed

    Porčić, Marko; Blagojević, Tamara; Stefanović, Sofija

    2016-01-01

    The Central Balkans region is of great importance for understanding the spread of the Neolithic in Europe but the Early Neolithic population dynamics of the region is unknown. In this study we apply the method of summed calibrated probability distributions to a set of published radiocarbon dates from the Republic of Serbia in order to reconstruct population dynamics in the Early Neolithic in this part of the Central Balkans. The results indicate that there was a significant population growth after ~6200 calBC, when the Neolithic was introduced into the region, followed by a bust at the end of the Early Neolithic phase (~5400 calBC). These results are broadly consistent with the predictions of the Neolithic Demographic Transition theory and the patterns of population booms and busts detected in other regions of Europe. These results suggest that the cultural process that underlies the patterns observed in Central and Western Europe was also in operation in the Central Balkan Neolithic and that the population increase component of this process can be considered as an important factor for the spread of the Neolithic as envisioned in the demic diffusion hypothesis. PMID:27508413

  10. Human vergence eye movements to oblique disparity stimuli: evidence for an anisotropy favoring horizontal disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rambold, H. A.; Miles, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    Binocular disparities applied to large-field patterns elicit vergence eye movements at ultra-short latencies. We used the electromagnetic search coil technique to record the horizontal and vertical positions of both eyes while subjects briefly viewed (150 ms) large patterns that were identical at the two eyes except for a difference in position (binocular disparity) that was varied in direction from trial to trial. For accurate alignment with the stimuli, the horizontal and vertical disparity vergence responses (HDVRs, VDVRs) should vary as the sine and cosine, respectively, of the direction of the disparity stimulus vector. In a first experiment, using random dots patterns (RDs) with a binocular disparity of 0.2°, this was indeed the case. In a second experiment, using 1-D sine-wave gratings with a binocular phase difference (disparity) of 1/4-wavelength, it was not the case: HDVRs were maximal when the grating was vertical and showed little decrement until the grating was oriented more than ~65° away from vertical, whereas VDVRs were maximal when the grating was horizontal and began to decrement roughly linearly when the grating was oriented away from the horizontal. We attribute these complex directional dependencies with gratings to the aperture problem, and the HDVR data strongly resemble the stereothresholds for 1-D gratings, which are minimal when the gratings are vertical and remain constant for orientations up to ~80° away from the vertical when expressed as spatial phase disparities [Morgan & Castet (1997) The aperture problem in stereopsis. Vision Research, 37, 2737–2744]. To explain this constancy of stereothresholds, Morgan & Castet (1997) postulated detectors sensitive to the phase disparity of the gratings seen by the two eyes (rather than their linear separation along some fixed axis, such as the horizontal). However, because 1) our VDVR data with gratings did not show this constancy and 2) the available evidence strongly suggests that there

  11. PREVALENCE OF Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar IN THE CITY OF CAMPINA GRANDE, IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Teresa Nascimento; Santana, José Valfrido; Bragagnoli, Gérson; Marinho, Alexandre Magno da Nóbrega; Malagueño, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear need to perform epidemiological studies to find the true prevalence of Entamoeba histolytica around the world. The evaluation of this prevalence has been hindered by the existence of two different species which are morphologically identical, but genetically different, namely E. histolytica, which causes amebiasis, and E. dispar, which is non-pathogenic. In Brazil, the E. dispar has been detected in communities in the Southeastern (SE) and Northeastern (NE) regions with poor sanitation. However, individuals infected with E. histolytica have been identified in other regions. There is an absence of reports on the prevalence of these parasites in the state of Paraíba, which also has areas with poor sanitary conditions where a high prevalence of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex has been detected in children from urban slums. The present study evaluated the prevalence of E. histolytica and E. dispar in 1,195 asymptomatic children between two and 10 years of age, living in a sprawling urban slum in Campina Grande, in the state of Paraíba, in Northeastern Brazil. These children were examined and their feces samples were analyzed microscopically. A total of 553 children tested positive for the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex, and 456 of the positive samples were tested with the E. histolytica II® ELISA kit. All 456 samples were negative for the presence of the adhesin E. histolytica specific antigen. The evidence suggests that in this community E. histolytica is absent and E. dispar is the dominant species. PMID:25229229

  12. Confronting Health Disparities: Latin American Social Medicine in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Mantini-Briggs, Clara

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We explored the emergence and effectiveness of Venezuela's Misión Barrio Adentro, “Inside the Neighborhood Mission,” a program designed to improve access to health care among underserved residents of the country, hoping to draw lessons to apply to future attempts to address acute health disparities. Methods. We conducted our study in 3 capital-region neighborhoods, 2 small cities, and 2 rural areas, combining systematic observations with interviews of 221 residents, 41 health professionals, and 28 government officials. We surveyed 177 female and 91 male heads of household. Results. Interviews suggested that Misión Barrio Adentro emerged from creative interactions between policymakers, clinicians, community workers, and residents, adopting flexible, problem-solving strategies. In addition, data indicated that egalitarian physician–patient relationships and the direct involvement of local health committees overcame distrust and generated popular support for the program. Media and opposition antagonism complicated physicians’ lives and clinical practices but heightened the program's visibility. Conclusions. Top-down and bottom-up efforts are less effective than “horizontal” collaborations between professionals and residents in underserved communities. Direct, local involvement can generate creative and dynamic efforts to address acute health disparities in these areas. PMID:19150916

  13. Revised age of deglaciation of Lake Emma based on new radiocarbon and macrofossil analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Toolin, L.J.; Jull, A.J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous radiocarbon ages of detrital moss fragments in basal organic sediments of Lake Emma indicated that extensive deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains occurred prior to 14,900 yr B.P. (Carrara et al., 1984). Paleoecological analyses of insect and plant macrofossils from these basal sediments cast doubt on the reliability of the radiocarbon ages. Subsequent accelerator radiocarbon dates of insect fossils and wood fragments indicate an early Holocene age, rather than a late Pleistocene age, for the basal sediments of Lake Emma. These new radiocarbon ages suggest that by at least 10,000 yr B.P. deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains was complete. The insect and plant macrofossils from the basal organic sediments indicate a higher-than-present treeline during the early Holocene. The insect assemblages consisted of about 30% bark beetles, which contrasts markedly with the composition of insects from modern lake sediments and modern specimens collected in the Lake Emma cirque, in which bark beetles comprise only about 3% of the assemblages. In addition, in the fossil assemblages there were a number of flightless insect species (not subject to upslope transport by wind) indicative of coniferous forest environments. These insects were likewise absent in the modern assemblage. ?? 1991.

  14. Radiocarbon and Soil Evidence of Former Forest in the Southern Canadian Tundra.

    PubMed

    Bryson, R A; Irving, W N; Larsen, J A

    1965-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of charcoal on podzols along a transect reaching 280 kilometers north of the present tree line from Ennadai Lake indicates that former forests were burnt about 3500 years ago and again about 900 years ago. These forests probably were associated with periods of relatively mild climate.

  15. Revised age of deglaciation of Lake Emma based on new radiocarbon and macrofossil analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.; Carrara, Paul E.; Toolin, L. J.; Jull, A. J. T.

    1991-11-01

    Previous radiocarbon ages of detrital moss fragments in basal organic sediments of Lake Emma indicated that extensive deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains occurred prior to 14,900 yr B.P. (Carrara et al., 1984). Paleoecological analyses of insect and plant macrofossils from these basal sediments cast doubt on the reliability of the radiocarbon ages. Subsequent accelerator radiocarbon dates of insect fossils and wood fragments indicate an early Holocene age, rather than a late Pleistocene age, for the basal sediments of Lake Emma. These new radiocarbon ages suggest that by at least 10,000 yr B.P. deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains was complete. The insect and plant macrofossils from the basal organic sediments indicate a higher-than-present treeline during the early Holocene. The insect assemblages consisted of about 30% bark beetles, which contrasts markedly with the composition of insects from modern lake sediments and modern specimens collected in the Lake Emma cirque, in which bark beetles comprise only about 3% of the assemblages. In addition, in the fossil assemblages there were a number of flightless insect species (not subject to upslope transport by wind) indicative of coniferous forest environments. These insects were likewise absent in the modern assemblage.

  16. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL FROM NASHVILLE, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (Carbon-14) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements...

  17. Co-Development of Conceptual Understanding and Critical Attitude: Analyzing Texts on Radiocarbon Dating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Décamp, N.; Viennot, L.

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the impact of a teaching interview aimed at developing a critical attitude in students, and focused on a particular topic: radiocarbon dating. This teaching interview is designed to observe students' reaction to limited written explanations of the phenomenon under study, and their possible frustration or intellectual…

  18. High precise measurements of cosmogenic radiocarbon abundance by complex of scintillation equipments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Metskvarishvili, R. Y.; Tsereteli, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The main characteristics of scintillation equipments which enable the measurements of radiocarbon content with high accuracy of 0.2 to 0.3% were considered. The complex of scintillation devices operated very well for the last 15 years and allowed the investigation of the temporal variation of solar activity and intensity of cosmic rays for the last 300 years.

  19. The academic advantage: gender disparities in patenting.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R; Ni, Chaoqun; West, Jevin D; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed gender disparities in patenting by country, technological area, and type of assignee using the 4.6 million utility patents issued between 1976 and 2013 by the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO). Our analyses of fractionalized inventorships demonstrate that women's rate of patenting has increased from 2.7% of total patenting activity to 10.8% over the nearly 40-year period. Our results show that, in every technological area, female patenting is proportionally more likely to occur in academic institutions than in corporate or government environments. However, women's patents have a lower technological impact than that of men, and that gap is wider in the case of academic patents. We also provide evidence that patents to which women--and in particular academic women--contributed are associated with a higher number of International Patent Classification (IPC) codes and co-inventors than men. The policy implications of these disparities and academic setting advantages are discussed.

  20. Fossil and modern sources of aerosol carbon in the Netherlands - A year-long radiocarbon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Monaco, Mattia; Kappetijn, Arthur; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Szidat, Sönke; Röckmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of the radioactive carbon isotope 14C in aerosols can provide a direct estimate of the contribution of fossil fuel sources to aerosol carbon. In aerosol science, measurements of 14C/12C ratios are usually reported as fraction modern (fm). The radiocarbon signature gives a clear distinction between 'modern' carbon sources (fm around 1.1-1.2 for biomass burning and around 1.05 for biogenic secondary organic aerosol) and 'fossil' carbon sources (fm =0 for primary and secondary formation from fossil fuel combustion). Due to the high cost of 14C analyses very few long-term studies have been conducted to date. The data that will be presented offer a unique insight into the seasonal variation of source contributions to the carbonaceous aerosol in a highly industrialized region. High volume filter samples have been collected roughly twice per month from February 2011 - July 2012 at Cabauw, a rural location in the Netherlands surrounded by major urban centers and highways. This site provides a regional background aerosol contamination in the Netherlands. We report measurements of fm for total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), water insoluble OC (WIOC) and thermally refractory carbon (RC) as a proxy for elemental carbon. The fraction modern of OC lies between 0.65 - 1 and shows only a moderate seasonal variation with highest values in the spring and lowest values in the summer. Elemental carbon is generally dominated by fossil fuel emissions, but shows a distinct seasonal variation with higher contribution of modern sources from November - Mai. This contribution is attributed to wood combustion. It is low when air masses arrive from the ocean and high for air masses with European continental origin, pointing to a main source outside the Netherlands. Water soluble organic carbon is dominated by modern sources throughout the year. For TC concentrations between 1.2 and 8 μg/m3, fm(TC) increases with TC concentration. A Keeling plot implies that synoptic scale

  1. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  2. Disparity in motorcycle helmet use in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suriyawongpaisa, Paibul; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Rangpueng, Aratta; Jiwattanakulpaisarn, Piyapong; Techakamolsuk, Pimpa

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion of motorcycle related injuries and deaths might be a result of disparity in motorcycle helmet use. This study uses national roadside survey data, injury sentinel surveillance data and other national data sets in 2010 of Thailand, a country with high mortality related to motorcycle injuries, to explore the disparity in helmet use, explanatory factors of the disparity. It also assessed potential agreement and correlation between helmet use rate reported by the roadside survey and the injury sentinel surveillance. This report revealed helmet use rate of 43.7%(95% CI:43.6,43.9) nationwide with the highest rate (81.8%; 95% CI: 44.0,46.4) in Bangkok. Helmet use rate in drivers (53.3%; 95% CI: 53.2,53.8) was 2.5 times higher than that in passengers (19.3%; 95% CI:18.9,19.7). In relative terms (highest-to-lowest ratio,HLR), geographical disparity in helmet use was found to be higher in passengers (HLR = 28.5). Law enforcement activities as indicated by the conviction rate of motorcyclists were significantly associated with the helmet use rate (spline regression coefficient = 3.90, 95% CI: 0.48,7.33). Together with the finding of HLR for conviction rate of 87.24, it is suggested that more equitable improvement in helmet use could be achieved by more equitable distribution of the police force. Finally, we found poor correlation (r = 0.01; p value = 0.76) and no agreement (difference = 34.29%; 95% CI:13.48%, 55.09%) between roadside survey and injury sentinel surveillance in estimating helmet use rate. These findings should be considered a warning for employing injury surveillance to monitor policy implementation of helmet use.

  3. Disparity in motorcycle helmet use in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion of motorcycle related injuries and deaths might be a result of disparity in motorcycle helmet use. This study uses national roadside survey data, injury sentinel surveillance data and other national data sets in 2010 of Thailand, a country with high mortality related to motorcycle injuries, to explore the disparity in helmet use, explanatory factors of the disparity. It also assessed potential agreement and correlation between helmet use rate reported by the roadside survey and the injury sentinel surveillance. This report revealed helmet use rate of 43.7%(95% CI:43.6,43.9) nationwide with the highest rate (81.8%; 95% CI: 44.0,46.4) in Bangkok. Helmet use rate in drivers (53.3%; 95% CI: 53.2,53.8) was 2.5 times higher than that in passengers (19.3%; 95% CI:18.9,19.7). In relative terms (highest-to-lowest ratio,HLR), geographical disparity in helmet use was found to be higher in passengers (HLR=28.5). Law enforcement activities as indicated by the conviction rate of motorcyclists were significantly associated with the helmet use rate (spline regression coefficient = 3.90, 95% CI: 0.48,7.33). Together with the finding of HLR for conviction rate of 87.24, it is suggested that more equitable improvement in helmet use could be achieved by more equitable distribution of the police force. Finally, we found poor correlation (r=0.01; p value = 0.76) and no agreement (difference = 34.29%; 95% CI:13.48%, 55.09%) between roadside survey and injury sentinel surveillance in estimating helmet use rate. These findings should be considered a warning for employing injury surveillance to monitor policy implementation of helmet use. PMID:24119233

  4. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  5. Scalable combinatorial tools for health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Langston, Michael A; Levine, Robert S; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Rogers, Gary L; Kershenbaum, Anne D; Baktash, Suzanne H; Coughlin, Steven S; Saxton, Arnold M; Agboto, Vincent K; Hood, Darryl B; Litchveld, Maureen Y; Oyana, Tonny J; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual's genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject. PMID:25310540

  6. Genetic Contributions to Disparities in Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Anum, Emmanuel A.; Springel, Edward H.; Shriver, Mark D.; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2008-01-01

    Ethnic disparity in preterm delivery between African Americans and European Americans has existed for decades, and is likely the consequence of multiple factors, including socioeconomic status, access to care, environment, and genetics. This review summarizes existing information on genetic variation and its association with preterm birth in African Americans. Candidate gene-based association studies, in which investigators have evaluated particular genes selected primarily because of their potential roles in the process of normal and pathological parturition, provide evidence that genetic contributions from both mother and fetus account for some of the disparity in preterm births. To date, most attention has been focused on genetic variation in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes and their respective receptors. These genes, particularly the pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and their receptors, are linked to matrix metabolism since these cytokines increase expression of matrix degrading metalloproteinases. However, the role that genetic variants that are different between populations play in preterm birth cannot yet be quantified. Future studies based on genome wide association or admixture mapping may reveal other genes that contribute to disparity in prematurity. PMID:18787421

  7. Trends in kidney transplantation rates and disparities.

    PubMed Central

    Stolzmann, Kelly L.; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; McElroy, Jane A.; Becker, Bryan N.; Remington, Patrick L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the likelihood of transplantation and trends over time among persons with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Wisconsin. METHODS: We examined the influence of patient- and community-level characteristics on the rate of kidney transplantation in Wisconsin among 22,387 patients diagnosed with ESRD between January 1, 1982 and October 30, 2005. We grouped patients by the year of ESRD onset in order to model the change in transplantation rates over time. RESULTS: After multivariate adjustment, all other racial groups were significantly less likely to be transplanted compared with whites, and the racial disparity increased over calendar time. Older patients were less likely to be transplanted in all periods. Higher community income and education level and a greater distance from patients' residence to the nearest dialysis center significantly increased the likelihood of transplantation. Males also had a significantly higher rate of transplantation than females. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate a growing disparity in transplantation rates by demographic characteristics and a consistent disparity in transplantation by socioeconomic characteristics. Future studies should focus on identifying specific barriers to transplantation among different subpopulations in order to target effective interventions. PMID:17722672

  8. Scalable Combinatorial Tools for Health Disparities Research

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Michael A.; Levine, Robert S.; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Rogers, Gary L.; Kershenbaum, Anne D.; Baktash, Suzanne H.; Coughlin, Steven S.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Agboto, Vincent K.; Hood, Darryl B.; Litchveld, Maureen Y.; Oyana, Tonny J.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Juarez, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite staggering investments made in unraveling the human genome, current estimates suggest that as much as 90% of the variance in cancer and chronic diseases can be attributed to factors outside an individual’s genetic endowment, particularly to environmental exposures experienced across his or her life course. New analytical approaches are clearly required as investigators turn to complicated systems theory and ecological, place-based and life-history perspectives in order to understand more clearly the relationships between social determinants, environmental exposures and health disparities. While traditional data analysis techniques remain foundational to health disparities research, they are easily overwhelmed by the ever-increasing size and heterogeneity of available data needed to illuminate latent gene x environment interactions. This has prompted the adaptation and application of scalable combinatorial methods, many from genome science research, to the study of population health. Most of these powerful tools are algorithmically sophisticated, highly automated and mathematically abstract. Their utility motivates the main theme of this paper, which is to describe real applications of innovative transdisciplinary models and analyses in an effort to help move the research community closer toward identifying the causal mechanisms and associated environmental contexts underlying health disparities. The public health exposome is used as a contemporary focus for addressing the complex nature of this subject. PMID:25310540

  9. Biogenic contribution to PM-2.5 ambient aerosol from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C.; Klouda, G.; Ellenson, W.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources to ambient aerosol is of great interest in the formulation of strategies to achieve nationally mandated air quality standards. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide a means to quantify the biogenic fraction of any carbon-containing sample of ambient aerosol. In the absence of an impact from biomass burning (e.g., during summertime) such measurements can provide an estimate of the contribution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol, from biogenic volatile organic compound precursors. Radiocarbon results for 11.5-h PM-2.5 samples collected near Nashville, Tennessee, USA, during summer 1999 will be presented. On average the measured biogenic fraction was surprisingly large (more than half), with the average biogenic fraction for night samples being only slightly smaller than for day samples. Discussion will include (a) description of the radiocarbon methodology, (b) use of radiocarbon measurements on local vegetation and fuel samples as calibration data, (c) concurrent measurements of organic carbon and elemental carbon ambient concentrations, (d) assessment of organic aerosol sampling artifact through use of organic vapor denuders, variable face velocities, and filter extraction, and (e) comparison with published radiocarbon results obtained in Houston, Texas in a similar study. Disclaimer: This work has been funded wholly or in part by the United States Environmental Protection Agency under Interagency Agreement No. 13937923 to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Contract No. 68-D5-0049 to ManTech Environmental Tecnology, Inc. It has been subjected to Agency review and approved for publication.

  10. Marine radiocarbon reservoir age variation in Donax obesulus shells from northern Peru: late Holocene evidence for extended El Niño

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etayo-Cadavid, Miguel F.; Andrus, C. Fred T.; Jones, Kevin B.; Hodgins, Gregory W. L.; Sandweiss, Daniel H.; Uceda-Castillo, Sandiago; Quilter, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    For at least 6 m.y., El Niño events have posed the greatest environmental risk on the Peruvian coast. A better understanding of El Niño is essential for predicting future risk and growth in this tropical desert. To achieve this we analyzed archaeological and modern pre-bomb shells from the surf clam Donax for the radiocarbon reservoir effect (ΔR) to characterize late Holocene coastal upwelling conditions in northern Peru (8°14′S). Mean ΔR values from these shells suggest that modern upwelling conditions in this region were likely established between A.D. 539 and A.D. 1578. Our radiocarbon data suggest that upwelling conditions ca. A.D. 539 were less intense than those in modern times. The observed coastal water enrichment in 14C may be consequence of frequent strong El Niño events or extended El Niño–like conditions. These ΔR-inferred marine conditions are in agreement with proposed extended El Niño activity in proxy and archaeological records of ca. A.D. 475–530. Extended El Niño conditions have been linked to political destabilization, societal transformation, and collapse of the Moche civilization in northern Peru. A return to such conditions would have significant impacts on the dense population of this region today and in the near future.

  11. Health disparities and gaps in school readiness.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal health problems and health-related behaviors that affect children's behavioral and cognitive readiness for school. If a health problem is to affect the readiness gap, it must affect many children, it must be linked to academic performance or behavior problems, and it must show a racial disparity either in its prevalence or in its effects. The author focuses not only on the black-white gap in health status but also on the poor-nonpoor gap because black children tend to be poorer than white children. The health conditions Currie considers seriously impair cognitive skills and behavior in individual children. But most explain little of the overall racial gap in school readiness. Still, the cumulative effect of health differentials summed over all conditions is significant. Currie's rough calculation is that racial differences in health conditions and in maternal health and behaviors together may account for as much as a quarter of the racial gap in school readiness. Currie scrutinizes several policy steps to lessen racial and socioeconomic disparities in children's health and to begin to close the readiness gap. Increasing poor children's eligibility for Medicaid and state child health insurance is unlikely to be effective because most poor children are already eligible for public insurance. The problem is that many are not enrolled. Even increasing enrollment may not work: socioeconomic disparities in health persist in Canada and the United Kingdom despite universal public health insurance. The author finds more promise in strengthening early childhood programs with a built-in health component, like Head Start; family

  12. Τesting models for the beginnings of the Aurignacian and the advent of figurative art and music: the radiocarbon chronology of Geißenklösterle.

    PubMed

    Higham, Thomas; Basell, Laura; Jacobi, Roger; Wood, Rachel; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Conard, Nicholas J

    2012-06-01

    The German site of Geißenklösterle is crucial to debates concerning the European Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition and the origins of the Aurignacian in Europe. Previous dates from the site are central to an important hypothesis, the Kulturpumpe model, which posits that the Swabian Jura was an area where crucial behavioural developments took place and then spread to other parts of Europe. The previous chronology (critical to the model), is based mainly on radiocarbon dating, but remains poorly constrained due to the dating resolution and the variability of dates. The cause of these problems is disputed, but two principal explanations have been proposed: a) larger than expected variations in the production of atmospheric radiocarbon, and b) taphonomic influences in the site mixing the bones that were dated into different parts of the site. We reinvestigate the chronology using a new series of radiocarbon determinations obtained from the Mousterian, Aurignacian and Gravettian levels. The results strongly imply that the previous dates were affected by insufficient decontamination of the bone collagen prior to dating. Using an ultrafiltration protocol the chronometric picture becomes much clearer. Comparison of the results against other recently dated sites in other parts of Europe suggests the Early Aurignacian levels are earlier than other sites in the south of France and Italy, but not as early as recently dated sites which suggest a pre-Aurignacian dispersal of modern humans to Italy by ∼45000 cal BP. They are consistent with the importance of the Danube Corridor as a key route for the movement of people and ideas. The new dates fail to refute the Kulturpumpe model and suggest that Swabian Jura is a region that contributed significantly to the evolution of symbolic behaviour as indicated by early evidence for figurative art, music and mythical imagery. PMID:22575323

  13. Τesting models for the beginnings of the Aurignacian and the advent of figurative art and music: the radiocarbon chronology of Geißenklösterle.

    PubMed

    Higham, Thomas; Basell, Laura; Jacobi, Roger; Wood, Rachel; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Conard, Nicholas J

    2012-06-01

    The German site of Geißenklösterle is crucial to debates concerning the European Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition and the origins of the Aurignacian in Europe. Previous dates from the site are central to an important hypothesis, the Kulturpumpe model, which posits that the Swabian Jura was an area where crucial behavioural developments took place and then spread to other parts of Europe. The previous chronology (critical to the model), is based mainly on radiocarbon dating, but remains poorly constrained due to the dating resolution and the variability of dates. The cause of these problems is disputed, but two principal explanations have been proposed: a) larger than expected variations in the production of atmospheric radiocarbon, and b) taphonomic influences in the site mixing the bones that were dated into different parts of the site. We reinvestigate the chronology using a new series of radiocarbon determinations obtained from the Mousterian, Aurignacian and Gravettian levels. The results strongly imply that the previous dates were affected by insufficient decontamination of the bone collagen prior to dating. Using an ultrafiltration protocol the chronometric picture becomes much clearer. Comparison of the results against other recently dated sites in other parts of Europe suggests the Early Aurignacian levels are earlier than other sites in the south of France and Italy, but not as early as recently dated sites which suggest a pre-Aurignacian dispersal of modern humans to Italy by ∼45000 cal BP. They are consistent with the importance of the Danube Corridor as a key route for the movement of people and ideas. The new dates fail to refute the Kulturpumpe model and suggest that Swabian Jura is a region that contributed significantly to the evolution of symbolic behaviour as indicated by early evidence for figurative art, music and mythical imagery.

  14. Tephrochronology as a tool to constrain radiocarbon reservoir age in the deglacial Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, A. U.; White-Nockleby, C.; de Konkoly Thege, P. A.; Rubel, J. N.; Cook, M. S.; Mix, A. C.; Addison, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to accurately calendar date marine carbon, it is necessary to constrain surface reservoir age, the apparent 14C age difference between the atmosphere and surface ocean that results from incomplete equilibration of 14C across the air-sea interface. Surface reservoir age is generally assumed to be constant at the preindustrial value, but evidence suggests it has varied through time by up to 1000 years. In this study we use tephrochronology, a method of correlating tephras across different environments, to identify equivalent strata, as a tool to quantify reservoir age in the Bering Sea during the transition between the Oldest Dryas and Bolling-Allerod (14.7 kcal BP). With frequent volcanic eruptions that allow for possibility of high-resolution reservoir age reconstructions, the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands region is uniquely positioned to provide insight into the hypothesis that dense water formed in the North Pacific during the last deglaciation. We compare a massive tephra found in three deep-sea sediment cores from Umnak Plateau in the southeast Bering Sea (HLY02-02-55JPC, HLY-02-02-51JPC, and IODP Site U1339) to a tephra dated to 14.8 kcal BP from Deep Lake, Sanak Island in the Eastern Aleutians. For both the Umnak and Sanak tephras, volcanic glass shards are geochemically matched using major and trace elements from electron microprobe and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry. We compare 14C ages of foraminiferal species Uvigerina peregrina and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) from just above the tephra in HLY-02-02-51JPC (1467 m) to 14C age of the corresponding tephra at Sanak Island from terrestrial plant macrofossils. The surface reservoir age found (930 ± 160 14C y) is similar to the average preindustrial value in the region (790 ± 130 14C y). Benthic-atmosphere age difference (1860 ± 200 14C y) is also comparable to the preindustrial value (2030 ± 60 14C y). These results and future work on additional tephras from

  15. Disparity-Specific Spatial Interactions: Evidence from EEG Source Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cottereau, Benoit R.; McKee, Suzanne P.; Ales, Justin M.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Using cortical source estimation techniques based on high-density EEG and fMRI measurements in humans, we measured how a disparity-defined surround influenced the responses to the changing disparity of a central disk within five visual ROIs: V1, V4, lateral occipital complex (LOC), hMT+, and V3A. The responses in the V1 ROI were not consistently affected either by changes in the characteristics of the surround (correlated or uncorrelated) or by its disparity value, consistent with V1 being responsive only to absolute, not relative, disparity. Correlation in the surround increased the responses in the V4, LOC, and hMT+ ROIs over those measured with the uncorrelated surround. Thus, these extrastriate areas contain neurons that are sensitive to disparity differences. However, their evoked responses did not vary systematically with the surround disparity. Responses in the V3A ROI, in contrast, were increased by correlation in the surround and varied with its disparity. We modeled these V3A responses as attributable to a gain modulation of the absolute disparity response, where the gain amplitude is proportional to the center–surround disparity difference. An additional experiment identified a nonlinear center–surround interaction in V3A that facilitates the responses when center and surround are misaligned but suppresses it when they share the same disparity plane. PMID:22262881

  16. Short-latency disparity vergence eye movements: a response to disparity energy.

    PubMed

    Sheliga, B M; FitzGibbon, E J; Miles, F A

    2006-10-01

    Vergence eye movements were elicited in human subjects by applying disparities to square-wave gratings lacking the fundamental ("missing fundamental", mf). Using a dichoptic arrangement, subjects viewed gratings that were identical at the two eyes except for a phase difference of 1/4 wavelength so that, based on the nearest-neighbor matches, the features and the 4n+1 harmonics (5th, 9th, etc.) all had binocular disparities of one sign, whereas the 4n-1 harmonics (3rd, 7th, etc.) all had disparities of the opposite sign. Further, the amplitude of the ith harmonic was proportional to 1/i. Using the electromagnetic search coil technique to record the positions of both eyes indicated that the earliest vergence eye movements elicited by these disparity stimuli had ultra-short latencies (minimum, <65 ms) and were always in the direction of the most prominent harmonic, the 3rd, but their magnitudes fell short of those elicited when the same disparities were applied to pure sinusoids whose spatial frequency and contrast matched those of the 3rd harmonic. This shortfall was evident in both the horizontal vergence responses recorded with vertical grating stimuli and the vertical vergence responses recorded with horizontal grating stimuli. When the next most prominent harmonic, the 5th, was removed from the mf stimulus (creating the "mf-5" stimulus) the vertical vergence responses showed almost no shortfall-indicating that it had been almost entirely due to that 5th harmonic-but the horizontal vergence responses still showed a small shortfall, at least with higher contrast stimuli. This small shortfall might represent a very minor contribution from higher harmonics and/or distortion products and/or a feature-based mechanism. We conclude that the earliest disparity vergence responses-especially vertical-were strongly dependent on the major Fourier components of the binocular images, consistent with early spatial filtering of the monocular visual inputs prior to their binocular

  17. Short-latency disparity vergence eye movements: a response to disparity energy.

    PubMed

    Sheliga, B M; FitzGibbon, E J; Miles, F A

    2006-10-01

    Vergence eye movements were elicited in human subjects by applying disparities to square-wave gratings lacking the fundamental ("missing fundamental", mf). Using a dichoptic arrangement, subjects viewed gratings that were identical at the two eyes except for a phase difference of 1/4 wavelength so that, based on the nearest-neighbor matches, the features and the 4n+1 harmonics (5th, 9th, etc.) all had binocular disparities of one sign, whereas the 4n-1 harmonics (3rd, 7th, etc.) all had disparities of the opposite sign. Further, the amplitude of the ith harmonic was proportional to 1/i. Using the electromagnetic search coil technique to record the positions of both eyes indicated that the earliest vergence eye movements elicited by these disparity stimuli had ultra-short latencies (minimum, <65 ms) and were always in the direction of the most prominent harmonic, the 3rd, but their magnitudes fell short of those elicited when the same disparities were applied to pure sinusoids whose spatial frequency and contrast matched those of the 3rd harmonic. This shortfall was evident in both the horizontal vergence responses recorded with vertical grating stimuli and the vertical vergence responses recorded with horizontal grating stimuli. When the next most prominent harmonic, the 5th, was removed from the mf stimulus (creating the "mf-5" stimulus) the vertical vergence responses showed almost no shortfall-indicating that it had been almost entirely due to that 5th harmonic-but the horizontal vergence responses still showed a small shortfall, at least with higher contrast stimuli. This small shortfall might represent a very minor contribution from higher harmonics and/or distortion products and/or a feature-based mechanism. We conclude that the earliest disparity vergence responses-especially vertical-were strongly dependent on the major Fourier components of the binocular images, consistent with early spatial filtering of the monocular visual inputs prior to their binocular

  18. Radiocarbon evidence for extensive plate-boundary rupture about 300 years ago at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Atwater, B.F.; Bobrowsky, P.T.; Bradley, L.-A.; Clague, J.J.; Carver, G.A.; Darienzo, M.E.; Grant, W.C.; Krueger, H.W.; Sparks, R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stuiver, M.

    1995-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, a region of converging tectonic plates along the Pacific coast of North America, has a geological history of very large plate-boundary earthquakes1,2, but no such earthquakes have struck this region since Euro-American settlement about 150 years ago. Geophysical estimates of the moment magnitudes (Mw) of the largest such earthquakes range from 8 (ref. 3).to 91/2 (ref. 4). Radiocarbon dating of earthquake-killed vegetation can set upper bounds on earthquake size by constraining the length of plate boundary that ruptured in individual earthquakes. Such dating has shown that the most recent rupture, or series of ruptures, extended at least 55 km along the Washington coast within a period of a few decades about 300 years ago5. Here we report 85 new 14C ages, which suggest that this most recent rupture (or series) extended at least 900 km between southern British Columbia and northern California. By comparing the 14C ages with written records of the past 150 years, we conclude that a single magnitude 9 earthquake, or a series of lesser earthquakes, ruptured most of the length of the Cascadia subduction zone between the late 1600s and early 1800s, and probably in the early 1700s.

  19. RACIAL DISPARITIES IN ACCESS TO RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Arnold M.; Ayanian, John Z.; Keogh, Joseph H.; Noonan, Susan J.; Armistead, Nancy; Cleary, Paul D.; Weissman, Joel S.; David-Kasdan, Jo Ann; Carlson, Diane; Fuller, Jerry; Marsh, Douglas; Conti, Rena M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite abundant evidence of racial disparities in the use of surgical procedures, it is uncertain whether these disparities reflect racial differences in clinical appropriateness or overuse or under-use of care. Methods We performed a literature review and used an expert panel to develop criteria for determining the appropriateness of renal transplantation for patients with end-stage renal disease. Using data from five states and the District of Columbia on patients who had started to undergo dialysis in 1996 or 1997, we selected a random sample of 1518 patients (age range, 18 to 54 years), stratified according to race and sex. We classified the appropriateness of patients as candidates for transplantation and analyzed data on rates of referral to a transplantation center for evaluation, placement on a waiting list, and receipt of a transplant according to race. Results Black patients were less likely than white patients to be rated as appropriate candidates for transplantation according to appropriateness criteria based on expert opinion (71 blacks [9.0 percent] vs. 152 whites [20.9 percent]) and were more likely to have had incomplete evaluations (368 [46.5 percent] vs. 282 [38.8 percent], P<0.001 for the overall chi-square). Among patients considered to be appropriate candidates for transplantation, blacks were less likely than whites to be referred for evaluation, according to the chart review (90.1 percent vs. 98.0 percent, P=0.008), to be placed on a waiting list (71.0 percent vs. 86.7 percent, P=0.007), or to undergo transplantation (16.9 percent vs. 52.0 percent, P<0.001). Among patients classified as inappropriate candidates, whites were more likely than blacks to be referred for evaluation (57.8 percent vs. 38.4 percent), to be placed on a waiting list (30.9 percent vs. 17.4 percent), and to undergo transplantation (10.3 percent vs. 2.2 percent, P<0.001 for all three comparisons). Conclusions Racial disparities in rates of renal

  20. The AD 1300 1700 eruptive periods at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, revealed by historical narratives, stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, J.-L.; Jaya, D.; Samaniego, P.; Ramón, P.; Moreno Yánez, S.; Egred, J.; van der Plicht, J.

    2008-09-01

    Tungurahua is a frequently active and hazardous volcano of the Ecuadorian Andes that has experienced pyroclastic flow-forming eruption in 1773, 1886, 1916-18 and 2006-08. Earlier eruptions in Late Pre-Hispanic and Early Colonial times have remained poorly known and are debated in the literature. To reconstruct the eruptive chronology in that time interval we examine relevant historical narratives recently found in Sevilla, Spain, and Rome, Italy, and we combine stratigraphic field constraints with 22 new radiocarbon age determinations. Results show that pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions and tephra falls took place repeatedly since ~ 700 14C yr BP, when the Tungurahua region was already populated. Radiocarbon ages averaging around 625 yr BP reveal a period of notable eruptive activity in the 14th century (Late Integration cultural period). The associated andesitic eruptions produced ash and scoria falls of regional extent and left scoria flow deposits on the western flanks of the edifice. The fact that Tungurahua was known by the Puruhás Indians as a volcano at the time of the Spanish Conquest in 1533 perhaps refers to these eruptions. A group of ages ranging from 380 to 270 yr BP is attributed to younger periods of activity that also predates the 1773 event, and calibration results yield eruption dates from late 15th to late 17th centuries (i.e. Inca and Early Colonial Periods). The historical narratives mention an Early Colonial eruption between the Spanish Conquest and the end of the 16th century, followed by a distinct eruptive period in the 1640s. The descriptions are vague but point to destructive eruptions likely accompanied by pyroclastic flows. The dated tephras consist of andesitic scoria flow deposits and the contemporaneous fallout layers occur to the west. These findings reveal that the eruption recurrence rate at Tungurahua is at least one pyroclastic flow-forming event per century since the 13th century and the occurrence of such eruptions in 2006

  1. Disparity modifications and the emotional effects of stereoscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Takashi; Atsuta, Daiki; Tomiyama, Yuya; Kim, Sanghyun; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Reiko; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a study that focuses on disparity changes in emotional scenes of stereoscopic (3D) images, in which an examination of the effects on pleasant and arousal was carried out by adding binocular disparity to 2D images that evoke specific emotions, and applying disparity modification based on the disparity analysis of famous 3D movies. From the results of the experiment, for pleasant, a significant difference was found only for the main effect of the emotions. On the other hand, for arousal, there was a trend of increasing the evaluation values in the order 2D condition, 3D condition and 3D condition applied the disparity modification for happiness, surprise, and fear. This suggests the possibility that binocular disparity and the modification affect arousal.

  2. Opportunities and challenges of using technology to address health disparities.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Brian M; Bernhardt, Jay M; Fleisher, Linda; Green, Bernard Lee

    2014-03-01

    During a panel presentation at the American Association for Cancer Research Cancer Health Disparities Conference titled 'Opportunities and challenges of using technology to address health disparities', the latest scientific advances in the application and utilization of mobile technology and/or mobile-health (mHealth) interventions to address cancer health disparities were discussed. The session included: an examination of overall population trends in the uptake of technology and the potential of addressing health disparities through such media; an exploration of the conceptual issues and challenges in the construction of mHealth interventions to address disparate and underserved populations; and a presentation of pilot study findings on the acceptability and feasibility of using mHealth interventions to address prostate cancer disparities among African-American men.

  3. Radiocarbon measurements constrain the fossil and biological components of total CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S. J.; Tans, P. P.; Turnbull, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In a rapidly evolving environment in which binding treaties and laws at the international, national and state levels are likely to limit greenhouse gas emissions, it will be critical for society to have independent verification of emissions and their accumulation in the atmosphere. Current treaties and laws like the Kyoto Protocol and California’s AB32 rely upon “bottom-up” reporting by governments and industry from inventories and process models to assess emissions. What we propose here is that to promote accuracy and transparency, it will also be necessary to verify these “bottom-up” approaches from the “top-down” perspective of the atmosphere. In particular, total CO2, which is the bottom line for climate forcing, and fossil fuel CO2, which is the primary driver of the observed increase need to be monitored. Total CO2 is already measured at high precision and accuracy at numerous sites nationally and globally by a variety of university and government entities (see e.g., www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/globalview/). CO2 measurements in more locations and at higher frequencies are required to establish tighter constraints to emissions. For fossil fuel CO2, however, we require measurements of the rare isotopic species 14CO2. Fossil fuel emissions of CO2 are devoid of 14 (radiocarbon), because, by definition, these fuels are many millions of years old and the 14 half-life is only 5730 years. This makes 14CO2 an ideal tracer for fossil fuel emissions. Here we will present results of a nascent United States 14CO2 observation program that together with model simulations suggest a large number of 14CO2 measurements over the coterminous USA would allow for tight (~20%) regional (~105 - 106 km2) constraints on fossil fuel emissions at annual or seasonal time scales. Additionally, correlations of our 14CO2 observations with a wide suite of anthropogenic tracers suggest that “tuning” of these tracers with 14CO2 for fossil fuel detection may be possible

  4. The First Radiocarbon-Constrained Full-Vector Holocene Paleomagnetic Secular Variation Reconstruction for Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, F.; St-Onge, G.; Stoner, J.; Lajeunesse, P.

    2009-05-01

    Here we present the first high-resolution Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) master curve and relative paleointensity stack constrained by radiocarbon dates for Eastern Canada. This reconstruction is based on seven sedimentary sequences collected from the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf from the head to the mouth of the Laurentian Channel. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM), the anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) were measured on u-channel samples at the Paleomagnetism Laboratory of ISMER using a 2G Enterprises cryogenic magnetometer. Magnetic mineralogy was additionally assessed using a recently installed alternative gradient force magnetometer (AGM). The magnetic mineralogy of the Holocene postglacial sediments is mainly carried by low-coercivity ferrimagnetic minerals (most likely magnetite) in the pseudo-single domain size range. The characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM), assessed by principal component analysis, reveals the presence of a stable and well-defined magnetization characterized by maximum angular deviation (MAD) values generally lower than 5°. Furthermore, ChRM inclinations fluctuate around the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) magnetic inclination for the latitude of the coring sites (from 63° to 66°). The similarity of these records on their own independent timescales implies that all of the individual sedimentary sequences record a reliable Holocene PSV record for Eastern Canada. Relative paleointensity (RPI) was estimated by normalizing the NRM by the ARM which provided the best coercivity match. Lastly, the paleomagnetic directional and RPI records were stacked on a common time scale spanning the last ~10 000 cal BP. The smoothed PSV stack reveal centennial- to millennial-scale geomagnetic features concordant with the CALS7K.2 time-varying spherical harmonic model, as well as with the US eastern stack (King and Peck, 2001). Comparisons further a field with the

  5. Pollen-based biome reconstructions for Latin America at 0, 6000 and 18 000 radiocarbon years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marchant, R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Markgraf, Vera; Van Boxel, J. H.; Ager, T.; Almeida, L.; Anderson, R.; Baied, C.; Behling, H.; Berrio, J.C.; Burbridge, R.; Bjorck, S.; Byrne, R.; Bush, M.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Flenley, J.R.; De Oliveira, P.; Van Geel, B.; Graf, K.J.; Gosling, W.D.; Harbele, S.; Van Der Hammen, T.; Hansen, B.C.S.; Horn, S.P.; Islebe, G.A.; Kuhry, P.; Ledru, M.

    2009-01-01

    The biomisation method is used to reconstruct Latin American vegetation at 6000±500 and 18 000±1000 radiocarbon years before present (14C yr BP) from pollen data. Tests using modern pollen data from 381 samples derived from 287 locations broadly reproduce potential natural vegetation. The strong temperature gradient associated with the Andes is recorded by a transition from high altitude cool grass/shrubland and cool mixed forest to mid-altitude cool temperate rain forest, to tropical dry, seasonal and rain forest at low altitudes. Reconstructed biomes from a number of sites do not match the potential vegetation due to local factors such as human impact, methodological artefacts and mechanisms of pollen representivity of the parent vegetation. At 6000±500 14C yr BP 255 samples are analysed from 127 sites. Differences between the modern and the 6000±500 14C yr BP reconstruction are comparatively small. Patterns of change relative to the modern reconstruction are mainly to biomes characteristic of drier climate in the north of the region with a slight more mesic shift in the south. Cool temperate rain forest remains dominant in western South America. In northwestern South America a number of sites record transitions from tropical seasonal forest to tropical dry forest and tropical rain forest to tropical seasonal forest. Sites in Central America also show a change in biome assignment to more mesic vegetation, indicative of greater plant available moisture, e.g. on the Yucat??n peninsula sites record warm evergreen forest, replacing tropical dry forest and warm mixed forest presently recorded. At 18 000±1000 14C yr BP 61 samples from 34 sites record vegetation that reflects a generally cool and dry environment. Cool grass/shrubland prevalent in southeast Brazil, Amazonian sites record tropical dry forest, warm temperate rain forest and tropical seasonal forest. Southernmost South America is dominated by cool grass/shrubland, a single site retains cool temperate

  6. Pollen-based biome reconstructions for Latin America at 0, 6000 and 18 000 radiocarbon years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marchant, R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Markgraf, Vera; Van Boxel, J. H.; Ager, T.; Almeida, L.; Anderson, R.; Baied, C.; Behling, H.; Berrio, J.C.; Burbridge, R.; Bjorck, S.; Byrne, R.; Bush, M.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Flenley, J.R.; De Oliveira, P.; Van Geel, B.; Graf, K.J.; Gosling, W.D.; Harbele, S.; Van Der Hammen, T.; Hansen, B.C.S.; Horn, S.P.; Islebe, G.A.; Kuhry, P.; Ledru, M.-P.; Mayle, F.E.; Leyden, B.W.; Lozano-Garcia, S.; Melief, A.B.M.; Moreno, P.; Moar, N.T.; Prieto, A.; Van Reenen, G. B.; Salgado-Labouriau, M. L.; Schasignbitz, F.; Schreve-Brinkman, E. J.; Wille, M.

    2009-01-01

    The biomisation method is used to reconstruct Latin American vegetation at 6000±500 and 18 000±1000 radiocarbon years before present (14C yr BP) from pollen data. Tests using modern pollen data from 381 samples derived from 287 locations broadly reproduce potential natural vegetation. The strong temperature gradient associated with the Andes is recorded by a transition from high altitude cool grass/shrubland and cool mixed forest to mid-altitude cool temperate rain forest, to tropical dry, seasonal and rain forest at low altitudes. Reconstructed biomes from a number of sites do not match the potential vegetation due to local factors such as human impact, methodological artefacts and mechanisms of pollen representivity of the parent vegetation.

    At 6000±500 14C yr BP 255 samples are analysed from 127 sites. Differences between the modern and the 6000±500 14C yr BP reconstruction are comparatively small. Patterns of change relative to the modern reconstruction are mainly to biomes characteristic of drier climate in the north of the region with a slight more mesic shift in the south. Cool temperate rain forest remains dominant in western South America. In northwestern South America a number of sites record transitions from tropical seasonal forest to tropical dry forest and tropical rain forest to tropical seasonal forest. Sites in Central America also show a change in biome assignment to more mesic vegetation, indicative of greater plant available moisture, e.g. on the Yucat??n peninsula sites record warm evergreen forest, replacing tropical dry forest and warm mixed forest presently recorded.

    At 18 000±1000 14C yr BP 61 samples from 34 sites record vegetation that reflects a generally cool and dry environment. Cool grass/shrubland prevalent in southeast Brazil, Amazonian sites record tropical dry forest, warm temperate rain forest and tropical seasonal forest. Southernmost South America is dominated by cool grass/shrubland, a single site

  7. Radiocarbon Age Offsets in Arctic Lake Sediments Describe the Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Past Climate Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaglioti, B.; Mann, D. H.; Pohlman, J.; Kunz, M. L.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M.; Wooller, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    A warming climate in the future could release permafrost carbon (C) as carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere, causing a positive feedback to climate warming. An effective approach to better understanding this problem is to observe how permafrost C dynamics responded to past warming events. Here we use the sediment record of a lake basin in northern Alaska as a long-term archive for past permafrost C release from the surrounding watershed. The age of deposition and burial for an arctic lake sediment horizon is often younger than the 14C age because of old, 14C-depleted C eroded or leached from peat, soil, and thawing permafrost in the watershed. Changes in the magnitude between the age of deposition ("true age") and the radiocarbon age of the bulk sediment from the same layer is the radiocarbon age-offset, which serves as a gauge for the relative amount of permafrost C released from the watershed. We analyzed the sediments of Lake of the Pleistocene (LOP), a partially-drained lake basin located in the northern flank of the Brooks Range that contains continuously deposited sediments spanning the last 14,500 calendar years. The LOP watershed is underlain by continuous permafrost and contains extensive, frozen peatlands. We were able to excavate a wide swath of the former lakebed and collect hundreds of willow twigs and sediment samples to construct a high-resolution age-offset chronology. We dated well-preserved willow twigs that are directly blown into the lake to obtain a "true" 14C age and the age of bulk lake-sediment organic matter from the same layer that records the age of both primary productivity from within the lake and of the old dissolved and particulate organic carbon reworked from the watershed. Today, the radiocarbon age of the surface sediments of LOP is 2,000 calendar years old, which is roughly the same as the age offset during the Younger Dryas cold interval. During the warmer than present Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM; ~11,700-9,000 calendar

  8. Complexities in the Use of Bomb-Curve Radiocarbon to Determine Time Since Death of Human Skeletal Remains

    SciTech Connect

    Ubelaker, D H; Buchholz, B A

    2005-04-26

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the level of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the atmosphere. From the peak in 1963, the level of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} has decreased exponentially with a mean life of about 16 years, not due to radioactive decay, but due to mixing with large marine and terrestrial carbon reservoirs. Since radiocarbon is incorporated into all living things, the bomb-pulse is an isotopic chronometer of the past half century. The absence of bomb radiocarbon in skeletonized human remains generally indicates a date of death before 1950. Comparison of the radiocarbon values with the post 1950 bomb-curve may also help elucidate when in the post 1950 era, the individual was still alive. Such interpretation however, must consider the age at death of the individual and the type of tissue sampled.

  9. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages

  10. Radiocarbon dates from the Grotte du Renne and Saint-Césaire support a Neandertal origin for the Châtelperronian.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Talamo, Sahra; Julien, Michèle; David, Francine; Connet, Nelly; Bodu, Pierre; Vandermeersch, Bernard; Richards, Michael P

    2012-11-13

    The transition from the Middle Paleolithic (MP) to Upper Paleolithic (UP) is marked by the replacement of late Neandertals by modern humans in Europe between 50,000 and 40,000 y ago. Châtelperronian (CP) artifact assemblages found in central France and northern Spain date to this time period. So far, it is the only such assemblage type that has yielded Neandertal remains directly associated with UP style artifacts. CP assemblages also include body ornaments, otherwise virtually unknown in the Neandertal world. However, it has been argued that instead of the CP being manufactured by Neandertals, site formation processes and layer admixture resulted in the chance association of Neanderthal remains, CP assemblages, and body ornaments. Here, we report a series of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ultrafiltered bone collagen extracted from 40 well-preserved bone fragments from the late Mousterian, CP, and Protoaurignacian layers at the Grotte du Renne site (at Arcy-sur-Cure, France). Our radiocarbon results are inconsistent with the admixture hypothesis. Further, we report a direct date on the Neandertal CP skeleton from Saint-Césaire (France). This date corroborates the assignment of CP assemblages to the latest Neandertals of western Europe. Importantly, our results establish that the production of body ornaments in the CP postdates the arrival of modern humans in neighboring regions of Europe. This new behavior could therefore have been the result of cultural diffusion from modern to Neandertal groups.

  11. Radiocarbon dates from the Grotte du Renne and Saint-Césaire support a Neandertal origin for the Châtelperronian

    PubMed Central

    Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Talamo, Sahra; Julien, Michèle; David, Francine; Connet, Nelly; Bodu, Pierre; Vandermeersch, Bernard; Richards, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The transition from the Middle Paleolithic (MP) to Upper Paleolithic (UP) is marked by the replacement of late Neandertals by modern humans in Europe between 50,000 and 40,000 y ago. Châtelperronian (CP) artifact assemblages found in central France and northern Spain date to this time period. So far, it is the only such assemblage type that has yielded Neandertal remains directly associated with UP style artifacts. CP assemblages also include body ornaments, otherwise virtually unknown in the Neandertal world. However, it has been argued that instead of the CP being manufactured by Neandertals, site formation processes and layer admixture resulted in the chance association of Neanderthal remains, CP assemblages, and body ornaments. Here, we report a series of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates on ultrafiltered bone collagen extracted from 40 well-preserved bone fragments from the late Mousterian, CP, and Protoaurignacian layers at the Grotte du Renne site (at Arcy-sur-Cure, France). Our radiocarbon results are inconsistent with the admixture hypothesis. Further, we report a direct date on the Neandertal CP skeleton from Saint-Césaire (France). This date corroborates the assignment of CP assemblages to the latest Neandertals of western Europe. Importantly, our results establish that the production of body ornaments in the CP postdates the arrival of modern humans in neighboring regions of Europe. This new behavior could therefore have been the result of cultural diffusion from modern to Neandertal groups. PMID:23112183

  12. Radiocarbon version of 11-year variations in the interplanetary magnetic field since 1250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, D. M.; Makarenko, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which is controlled by solar activity, modulates the flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). Because GCRs are the only source of the 14C isotope in the atmosphere before the era of atmospheric nuclear tests, the formation rate of this isotope in the atmosphere is one of the few reliable sources of information on solar activity before the initiation of regular telescopic observations. In this study, we solve the inverse problem for the equation of radiocarbon diffusion from the atmosphere into the ocean by calibrating the radiocarbon content in tree rings from 1510 to 1950. We obtain an approximation of 11-year IMF cycles represented by the IDV index from 1872 to 1950. The model extrapolation to the calibration curve for the Korean Peninsula over the time period from 1250 to 1650 makes it possible to calculate the sequence of minima of quasi-11-year cycles since 1250.

  13. Radiocarbon dating of interstratified Neanderthal and early modern human occupations at the Chatelperronian type-site.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Brad; Mellars, Paul; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk

    2005-11-01

    The question of the coexistence and potential interaction between the last Neanderthal and the earliest intrusive populations of anatomically modern humans in Europe has recently emerged as a topic of lively debate in the archaeological and anthropological literature. Here we report the results of radiocarbon accelerator dating for what has been reported as an interstratified sequence of late Neanderthal and early anatomically modern occupations at the French type-site of the Chatelperronian, the Grotte des Fées de Châtelperron, in east-central France. The radiocarbon measurements seem to provide the earliest secure dates for the presence of Aurignacian technology--and from this, we infer the presence of anatomically modern human populations--in France.

  14. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R E

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  15. Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus).

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Julius; Hedeholm, Rasmus B; Heinemeier, Jan; Bushnell, Peter G; Christiansen, Jørgen S; Olsen, Jesper; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brill, Richard W; Simon, Malene; Steffensen, Kirstine F; Steffensen, John F

    2016-08-12

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation.

  16. Accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon dating of Pleistocene lake sediments in the Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.S.; Toolin, L.J.; Forester, R.M.; Spencer, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Pleistocene lake sediments in the Great Basin typically contain little organic carbon, and thus are difficult to date reliably by conventional radioccarbon methods. Paleoenvironmental data are abundant in these sediments, but are of limited value without adequate age controls. With the advent of accelerator-mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon dating, it is now possible to date these paleolacustrine sediments. AMS dates were obtained on sediment cores from the Bonneville, Franklin, and Lahontan Basins. In the Bonneville Basin, the AMS-based chronology compares well with other chronologies constructed from dated shore-zone features. In the Bonneville and Franklin basins, AMS dates delimit unconformities not apparent by other means. We found that dispersed organic carbon from sediments deposited during relatively freshwater intervals provided apparently reliable AMS radiocarbon dates. Carbonate microfossils from the Lahontan Basin also produced results that appear reasonable, while bulk carbonate yielded erroneous results. ?? 1990.

  17. Eye lens radiocarbon reveals centuries of longevity in the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus).

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Julius; Hedeholm, Rasmus B; Heinemeier, Jan; Bushnell, Peter G; Christiansen, Jørgen S; Olsen, Jesper; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brill, Richard W; Simon, Malene; Steffensen, Kirstine F; Steffensen, John F

    2016-08-12

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), an iconic species of the Arctic Seas, grows slowly and reaches >500 centimeters (cm) in total length, suggesting a life span well beyond those of other vertebrates. Radiocarbon dating of eye lens nuclei from 28 female Greenland sharks (81 to 502 cm in total length) revealed a life span of at least 272 years. Only the smallest sharks (220 cm or less) showed signs of the radiocarbon bomb pulse, a time marker of the early 1960s. The age ranges of prebomb sharks (reported as midpoint and extent of the 95.4% probability range) revealed the age at sexual maturity to be at least 156 ± 22 years, and the largest animal (502 cm) to be 392 ± 120 years old. Our results show that the Greenland shark is the longest-lived vertebrate known, and they raise concerns about species conservation. PMID:27516602

  18. Optimal integration of shading and binocular disparity for depth perception.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Paul G; Bloj, Marina; Harris, Julie M

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relative utility of shape from shading and binocular disparity for depth perception. Ray-traced images either featured a smooth surface illuminated from above (shading-only) or were defined by small dots (disparity-only). Observers judged which of a pair of smoothly curved convex objects had most depth. The shading cue was around half as reliable as the rich disparity information for depth discrimination. Shading- and disparity-defined cues where combined by placing dots in the stimulus image, superimposed upon the shaded surface, resulting in veridical shading and binocular disparity. Independently varying the depth delivered by each channel allowed creation of conflicting disparity-defined and shading-defined depth. We manipulated the reliability of the disparity information by adding disparity noise. As noise levels in the disparity channel were increased, perceived depths and variances shifted toward those of the now more reliable shading cue. Several different models of cue combination were applied to the data. Perceived depths and variances were well predicted by a classic maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) model of cue integration, for all but one observer. We discuss the extent to which MLE is the most parsimonious model to account for observer performance.

  19. Reducing and eliminating health disparities: a targeted approach.

    PubMed Central

    Green, B. Lee; Lewis, Rhonda K.; Bediako, Shawn M.

    2005-01-01

    Health disparities have dominated recent discourse among public health and medical researchers. Ever since the United States began to compile health statistics, differences in health status have been noted between majority and non-majority populations. Myriad approaches have been undertaken in an attempt to reduce or eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health. However, the disparities continue to persist. We are at a point in our history where innovative strategies must be explored that will be more effective in addressing racial and ethnic disparities in health. In large part, health disparities exist as a result of inequitable distribution of goods, resources, services and power in America. We have learned that improvements in health cannot come about solely through primary and secondary interventions but rather through an examination of the availability of resources that would allow individuals to improve their health. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the contextual factors that affect health disparities, to integrate theory to address disparities and to provide recommendations to encourage systematic changes to eliminate health disparities. It is hoped that this paper will bring about a national discussion relating to addressing the real issues we face in reducing and ultimately eliminating health disparities. PMID:15719868

  20. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  1. Coral Radiocarbon Record of Interannual Variability in Wind-induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N. S.; Abram, N. J.; Beck, J. W.; Dunbar, R. B.; Gagan, M. K.

    2002-12-01

    Radiocarbon measurements from annually banded corals have been shown to track radiocarbon levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the surrounding surface water. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, production of excess radiocarbon has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean carbon-14 concentrations. The temporal evolution of this gradient in radiocarbon is preserved in a coral record from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0S, 98E), in the eastern Indian Ocean. During the southeast monsoon, alongshore winds generate Ekman upwelling along the Java-Sumatra coasts, which transports 14C-depleted thermocline water toward the surface-dwelling Mentawai corals. The strength of upwelling in the Mentawai Islands, which is characterized by lower sea surface temperatures, a shallower thermocline and lower sea surface height, reflects variability in the monsoon winds and is modulated by interannual atmosphere-ocean teleconnections. Bimonthly AMS-14C measurements on the Mentawai coral show that the seasonal radiocarbon signal is relatively weak, while the interannual signal is clearly marked by episodic depletions in radiocarbon levels. These events are most likely responding to a relaxation of the westerly trades and subsequent strengthening of the easterlies. Easterly anomalies are linked to a large scale adjustment of the sea surface height along the equator and a shallower eastern thermocline. Our results suggest that interannual climate variability is the dominant forcing mechanism with seasonal variability secondary. Together, bimonthly coral oxygen isotope and radiocarbon records capture variability in upwelling, and hence the strength of the southeast monsoon. Comparison with a coral radiocarbon record from the western Indian Ocean provides insights into oceanic processes across the Indian Ocean basin and the question of the existence of an Indian Ocean Dipole.

  2. Reducing Disparities by way of a Cancer Disparities Research Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Lee S.; Akintobi, Tabia H.; Gordon, Tandeca King; Zellner, Tiffany; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background For minority populations, there is a continuing disparity in the burden of death and illness from cancer. Research to address this disparity should be conducted by investigators who can best understand and address the needs of culturally diverse communities. However, minorities are under-represented in health-related research. The goal of this project was to develop and evaluate an approach to motivating and preparing master’s degree students for careers dedicated to cancer disparities research. Method A Cancer Disparities Research Training Program (CDRTP) was initiated in 2010. The program consists of coursework, practicum experiences, and research opportunities. Assessment of the curriculum is based on monitoring achievement of evaluation indicators and included a mixed-method approach with included both quantitative and qualitative approach. Results In its first three years, the program graduated 20 trainees, all of whom were minorities (18 African Americans and two Asians). When asked about career goals, two-thirds of the trainees indicated interest in pursuing careers in research in cancer prevention and control. The trainees expressed high satisfaction with the courses, instructor, materials, and curriculum. Although trainees had suggestions about course details, evaluations overall were positive. Across focus groups, three recurrent themes emerged regarding activities to enhance the trainee experience: having a wider variety of topics, more guest speakers, and field trips. Conclusion The CDRTP was intended to recruit students – primarily African Americans – into research on prevention and control of cancer disparities. Although final evaluation of the program’s overall outcome will not be available for several years, this preliminary evaluation indicates early program success. PMID:27722034

  3. Health Disparities in the Latino Population

    PubMed Central

    Vega, William A.; Rodriguez, Michael A.; Gruskin, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide an approach to the study of health disparities in the US Latino population and evaluate the evidence, using mortality rates for discrete medical conditions and the total US population as a standard for comparison. They examine the demographic structure of the Latino population and how nativity, age, income, and education are related to observed patterns of health and mortality. A key issue discussed is how to interpret the superior mortality indices of Latino immigrants and the subsequent declining health status of later generations. Explanations for differences in mortality include selection, reverse selection, death record inconsistencies, inequalities in health status, transnational migration, social marginality, and adaptation to environmental conditions in the United States. The utility of the public health social inequality framework and the status syndrome for explaining Latino disparities is discussed. The authors examine excess mortality from 8 causes: diabetes, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, liver disease, homicide, and work-related injuries. The impact of intergenerational changes in health behavior within the Latino population and the contributory role of suboptimal health care are interpreted in the context of implications for future research, public health programs, and policies. PMID:19713270

  4. Measurement Issues in Health Disparities Research

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Mildred; Ford, Marvella E; Stewart, Anita L; A Teresi, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    Background Racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care have been documented; the elimination of such disparities is currently part of a national agenda. In order to meet this national objective, it is necessary that measures identify accurately the true prevalence of the construct of interest across diverse groups. Measurement error might lead to biased results, e.g., estimates of prevalence, magnitude of risks, and differences in mean scores. Addressing measurement issues in the assessment of health status may contribute to a better understanding of health issues in cross-cultural research. Objective To provide a brief overview of issues regarding measurement in diverse populations. Findings Approaches used to assess the magnitude and nature of bias in measures when applied to diverse groups include qualitative analyses, classic psychometric studies, as well as more modern psychometric methods. These approaches should be applied sequentially, and/or iteratively during the development of measures. Conclusions Investigators performing comparative studies face the challenge of addressing measurement equivalence, crucial for obtaining accurate results in cross-cultural comparisons. PMID:16179000

  5. Health disparities in the Latino population.

    PubMed

    Vega, William A; Rodriguez, Michael A; Gruskin, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this review, the authors provide an approach to the study of health disparities in the US Latino population and evaluate the evidence, using mortality rates for discrete medical conditions and the total US population as a standard for comparison. They examine the demographic structure of the Latino population and how nativity, age, income, and education are related to observed patterns of health and mortality. A key issue discussed is how to interpret the superior mortality indices of Latino immigrants and the subsequent declining health status of later generations. Explanations for differences in mortality include selection, reverse selection, death record inconsistencies, inequalities in health status, transnational migration, social marginality, and adaptation to environmental conditions in the United States. The utility of the public health social inequality framework and the status syndrome for explaining Latino disparities is discussed. The authors examine excess mortality from 8 causes: diabetes, stomach cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, liver disease, homicide, and work-related injuries. The impact of intergenerational changes in health behavior within the Latino population and the contributory role of suboptimal health care are interpreted in the context of implications for future research, public health programs, and policies.

  6. The Academic Advantage: Gender Disparities in Patenting

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R.; Ni, Chaoqun; West, Jevin D.; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed gender disparities in patenting by country, technological area, and type of assignee using the 4.6 million utility patents issued between 1976 and 2013 by the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO). Our analyses of fractionalized inventorships demonstrate that women’s rate of patenting has increased from 2.7% of total patenting activity to 10.8% over the nearly 40-year period. Our results show that, in every technological area, female patenting is proportionally more likely to occur in academic institutions than in corporate or government environments. However, women’s patents have a lower technological impact than that of men, and that gap is wider in the case of academic patents. We also provide evidence that patents to which women—and in particular academic women—contributed are associated with a higher number of International Patent Classification (IPC) codes and co-inventors than men. The policy implications of these disparities and academic setting advantages are discussed. PMID:26017626

  7. Addressing Health Disparities in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I.-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-01-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran’s I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD. PMID:25514144

  8. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katherine M.; Queenan, John T.; Schulkin, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article's aim is to review the literature on racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding rates and practices, address barriers to breastfeeding among minority women, conduct a systematic review of breastfeeding interventions, and provide obstetrician-gynecologists with recommendations on how they can help increase rates among minority women. In order to do so, the literature of racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding rates and barriers among minority women was reviewed, and a systematic review of breastfeeding interventions among minority women on PubMed and MEDLINE was conducted. Racial and ethnic minority women continue to have lower breastfeeding rates than white women and are not close to meeting the Healthy People 2020 goals. Minority women report many barriers to breastfeeding. Major efforts are still needed to improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates among minority women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists have a unique opportunity to promote and support breastfeeding through their clinical practices and public policy, and their efforts can have a meaningful impact on the future health of the mother and child. PMID:25831234

  9. Addressing health disparities in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I -Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-12-01

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008–2012.However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database.The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran's I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD.

  10. Addressing health disparities in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Fan, I-Chun; Liu, Michael Shi-Yung; Su, Ming-Daw; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2014-12-11

    According to the official health statistics, Taiwan has the highest prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Each year, around 60,000 ESRD patients in Taiwan consume 6% of the national insurance budget for dialysis treatment. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been climbing during 2008-2012. However, the spatial disparities and clustering of CKD at the public health level have rarely been discussed. The aims of this study are to explore the possible population level risk factors and identify any clusters of CKD, using the national health insurance database. The results show that the ESRD prevalence in females is higher than that in males. ESRD medical expenditure constitutes 87% of total CKD medical expenditure. Pre-CKD and pre-ESRD disease management might slow the progression from CKD to ESRD. After applying ordinary least-squares regression, the percentages of high education status and the elderly in the townships are positively correlated with CKD prevalence. Geographically weighted regression and Local Moran's I are used for identifying the clusters in southern Taiwan. The findings can be important evidence for earlier and targeted community interventions and reducing the health disparities of CKD.

  11. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis.

  12. A Rapid Radiocarbon Method for Age Surveys of Southern Ocean Deep-sea Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A.; Robinson, L. F.; Gerlach, D. S.; Jenkins, W. J.; McNichol, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Deep-sea corals provide a unique archive of past ocean radiocarbon because they are sessile and can be dated independently using U-series nuclides. One difficulty, however, is that using current techniques it is impractical to date large numbers of corals in order to determine which specimens have the appropriate ages for radiocarbon reconstructions. Here we present results from a quick method of making graphite for radiocarbon dating that reduces the amount of sample preparation time, thus allowing us to date a greater number of corals. In addition, these rapid age surveys provide important information on coral age populations, allowing us to examine coral distributions through time. The corals used in this study come from a sample set of about 6,000 specimens of Flabellum, Balanophyllia and Desmophyllum spp. collected from the Drake Passage area (50S -70S, 120 m-1700 m depth). Replicate samples from a single coral yielded a standard deviation of 81 years (n=9). Variations in sample mass (3 to 85 mg) have no clear effect on the Fm and furthermore, a simple cleaning using methanol yields the same results as a more involved cleaning procedure that includes an oxidizing solution and perchloric acid rinse. To improve the efficiency of the method, we assumed a delta13C = 0 per mil. This assumption is likely our largest source of uncertainty, resulting in offsets of up to 200 radiocarbon years over a reasonable range of delta13C. This level of uncertainty is sufficiently low to allow distinction between corals from different time periods over the past 35 ky (e.g. Last Glacial Maximum, Younger Dryas, etc.). To date, we have found corals from Burdwood Bank dating from the modern to the Younger Dryas and corals from the Drake Passage dating from the modern to Heinrich Event 1, which will be used in future paleo-climatic reconstructions in this important part of the ocean.

  13. The radiocarbon age of calcite dissolving at the sea floor: Estimates from pore water data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, W.R.; McNichol, A.P.; McCorkle, D.C.

    2000-04-01

    The authors measured the radiocarbon content and stable isotopic composition of pore water and bottom water {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, sedimentary organic carbon, and CaCO{sub 3} at two sites on the Ceara Rise, one underlying bottom water that is supersaturated with respect to calcite (Site B), the other underlying under saturated bottom water (Site G). The results were combined with pore water O{sub 2}, {Sigma}CO{sub 2}, and Ca{sup 2+} profiles (Martin and Sayles, 1996) to estimate the radiocarbon content of the CaCO{sub 3} that is dissolving in the sediment mixed layer. At Site G, the CaCO{sub 3} that is dissolving in the upper 2 cm of the sediments is clearly younger (richer in {sup 14}C) than the bulk sedimentary CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that nonhomogeneous CaCO{sub 3} dissolution occurs there. The case for nonhomogeneous dissolution is much weaker at the site underlying supersaturated bottom water. The results indicate that nonhomogeneous dissolution occurs in sediments underlying under saturated bottom water, that the dissolution is rapid relative to the rate of homogenization of the CaCO{sub 3} in the mixed layer by bioturbation, and that the dissolution rate of CaCO{sub 3} decreases as it ages in the sediment mixed layer. The results support the hypothesis, based on solid phase analyses, that the preferential dissolution of young (i.e., radiocarbon-rich) CaCO{sub 3} leads to a pattern of increasing radiocarbon age of mixed-layer CaCO{sub 3} as the degree of under saturation of bottom water increases (Keir, 1984; Broecker et al., 1991).

  14. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Virginia L.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Chamberlain, Andrew T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six 14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated 14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 14C analysis. PMID:26938469

  15. Matanchen complex: new radiocarbon dates on early coastal adaptation in west Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mountjoy, J B; Taylor, R E; Feldman, L H

    1972-03-17

    Samples of marine shell from archeological context on the coast of Nayarit, Mexico, have given radiocarbon determinations of 1810 +/- 80 B.C., 2000 +/- 100 B.C., and 2100 +/- 100 B.C. Even with maximum correction for upwelling these are the earliest dates for coastal occupation in West Mexico north of Acapulco, Guerrero. Analysis of the midden contents has provided new insights regarding early coastal adaptation.

  16. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis. PMID:26938469

  17. Misreporting and misclassification: implications for socioeconomic disparities in body-mass index and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ljungvall, Åsa; Gerdtham, Ulf G; Lindblad, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Body-mass index (BMI) has become the standard proxy for obesity in social science research. This study deals with the potential problems related to, first, relying on self-reported weight and height to calculate BMI (misreporting), and, second, the concern that BMI is a deficient measure of body fat (misclassification). Using a regional Swedish sample, we analyze whether socioeconomic disparities in BMI are biased because of misreporting, and whether socioeconomic disparities in the risk of obesity are sensitive to whether BMI or waist circumference is used to define obesity. Education and income are used as socioeconomic indicators. The overall conclusion is that misreporting and misclassification may indeed matter for estimated educational and income disparities in BMI and obesity. In the misreporting part we find that women with higher education misreport less than those with lower education, leading to underestimation of the education disparity when using self-reported information. In the misclassification part we find that the probability of being misclassified decreases with income, for both men and women. Among women, the consequence is a steeper income gradient when obesity is defined using waist circumference instead of BMI. Among men the income gradient is statistically insignificant irrespective of how obesity is defined, but when estimating the probability of obesity defined by waist circumference, an educational gradient, which is not present when classifying men using BMI, arises.

  18. M pathway and areas 44 and 45 are involved in stereoscopic recognition based on binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Negawa, Tsuneo; Mizuno, Shinji; Hahashi, Tomoya; Kuwata, Hiromi; Tomida, Mihoko; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Era, Seiichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2002-04-01

    We characterized the visual pathways involved in the stereoscopic recognition of the random dot stereogram based on the binocular disparity employing a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The V2, V3, V4, V5, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and the superior temporal sulcus (STS) were significantly activated during the binocular stereopsis, but the inferotemporal gyrus (ITG) was not activated. Thus a human M pathway may be part of a network involved in the stereoscopic processing based on the binocular disparity. It is intriguing that areas 44 (Broca's area) and 45 in the left hemisphere were also active during the binocular stereopsis. However, it was reported that these regions were inactive during the monocular stereopsis. To separate the specific responses directly caused by the stereoscopic recognition process from the nonspecific ones caused by the memory load or the intention, we designed a novel frequency labeled tasks (FLT) sequence. The functional MRI using the FLT indicated that the activation of areas 44 and 45 is correlated with the stereoscopic recognition based on the binocular disparity but not with the intention artifacts, suggesting that areas 44 and 45 play an essential role in the binocular disparity. PMID:12139777

  19. M pathway and areas 44 and 45 are involved in stereoscopic recognition based on binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Negawa, Tsuneo; Mizuno, Shinji; Hahashi, Tomoya; Kuwata, Hiromi; Tomida, Mihoko; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Era, Seiichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2002-04-01

    We characterized the visual pathways involved in the stereoscopic recognition of the random dot stereogram based on the binocular disparity employing a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The V2, V3, V4, V5, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and the superior temporal sulcus (STS) were significantly activated during the binocular stereopsis, but the inferotemporal gyrus (ITG) was not activated. Thus a human M pathway may be part of a network involved in the stereoscopic processing based on the binocular disparity. It is intriguing that areas 44 (Broca's area) and 45 in the left hemisphere were also active during the binocular stereopsis. However, it was reported that these regions were inactive during the monocular stereopsis. To separate the specific responses directly caused by the stereoscopic recognition process from the nonspecific ones caused by the memory load or the intention, we designed a novel frequency labeled tasks (FLT) sequence. The functional MRI using the FLT indicated that the activation of areas 44 and 45 is correlated with the stereoscopic recognition based on the binocular disparity but not with the intention artifacts, suggesting that areas 44 and 45 play an essential role in the binocular disparity.

  20. Radiocarbon-Based Source Apportionment of the Water-Soluble Organic Carbon (wsoc) of Atmospheric Aerosols in South and East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Sheesley, R. J.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, K.; Rao, P. S.; Kang, E.; Han, J.; Lee, M.

    2011-12-01

    The air quality and regional climate in South and East Asia are considerably affected by atmospheric aerosols produced by anthropogenic activities. Recent studies have investigated the sources of the black carbon aerosol component in these regions. This study seeks to make progress in apportioning the sources of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) component, which makes up 20-65% of the carbonaceous aerosol mass in these areas. WSOC is important as it enhances the ability of particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and, therefore, has an impact on regional climate and radiative forcing. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fifteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCOH) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). WSOC is a large fraction of organic aerosols and its annual average contribution to TOC during 2008 is 26% at MCOH and 40% at SIN. There is a distinct seasonal variability in WSOC concentrations at both sites with high concentrations during the winter season (0.92±0.49μg m-3 at MCOH and 3.5±2.0μg m-3 at SIN) and very low concentrations during the summer monsoon season (0.08±0.04μg m-3 at MCOH and 0.27±0.20μg m-3 at SIN). The radiocarbon source apportionment of WSOC in winter dry season was similar at MCOH and SIN with 80-85% from biogenic/biomass combustion and the rest from fossil fuel precursors. For the rest of the year, the biogenic/biomass contribution to WSOC is higher at the Indian Ocean site (86-93%) compared to the Indian site (74-83%). In March 2011 the GoPoEx2011 intensive sampling campaign at the Gosan ABC Superstation, Jeju Island, South Korea was dedicated to study atmospheric

  1. Radiocarbon evidence of mid-Holocene mammoths stranded on an Alaskan Bering Sea island.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, R Dale

    2004-06-17

    Island colonization and subsequent dwarfing of Pleistocene proboscideans is one of the more dramatic evolutionary and ecological occurrences, especially in situations where island populations survived end-Pleistocene extinctions whereas those on the nearby mainland did not. For example, Holocene mammoths have been dated from Wrangel Island in northern Russia. In most of these cases, few details are available about the dynamics of how island colonization and extinction occurred. As part of a large radiocarbon dating project of Alaskan mammoth fossils, I addressed this question by including mammoth specimens from Bering Sea islands known to have formed during the end-Pleistocene sea transgression. One date of 7,908 +/- 100 yr bp (radiocarbon years before present) established the presence of Holocene mammoths on St Paul Island, a first Holocene island record for the Americas. Four lines of evidence--265 accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) radiocarbon dates from Alaskan mainland mammoths, 13 new dates from Alaskan island mammoths, recent reconstructions of bathymetric plots and sea transgression rates from the Bering Sea--made it possible to reconstruct how mammoths became stranded in the Pribilofs and why this apparently did not happen on other Alaskan Bering Sea islands.

  2. Extracting growth rates from the non-laminated coralline sponge Astrosclera willeyana using "bomb" radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, S; Guilderson, T

    2004-06-30

    Coralline sponges have the potential to fill in gaps in our understanding of subsurface oceanographic variability. However, one disadvantage they have compared to hermatypic reef building coral proxies is that they do not have annual density bands and need to be radiometrically dated for an age determination. To elucidate growth rate variability we have measured radiocarbon in 1 mm increments from Astrosclera willeyana sponges collected off the Central and Northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and from Truk in the Caroline Islands and compared these radiocarbon profiles to independently dated coral radiocarbon records. Growth rates of the GBR sponges average 1.2 {+-} 0.3 and 1.0 {+-} 0.3 mm yr{sup -1}, north and central respectively but can vary by a factor of two. The growth rate of the Truk sponge averages 1.2 {+-} 0.1 mm yr{sup -1}. These growth rates are significantly faster to those measured for other GBR Astrosclera willeyana sponges (0.2 mm yr{sup -1}) by Calcein staining (Woerheide 1988).

  3. Radiocarbon source apportionment of urban and wildfire black and organic carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil and non-fossil sources of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified unambiguously by radiocarbon (14C) measurements. However, accurate 14C-based source apportionment requires a clear and reproducible physical separation of OC and BC, as well as minimal sample contaminations with non-sample carbon. To achieve a clear separation, we used a thermo-optical aerosol analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc, USA) with a newly established protocol (Swiss_4S protocol, Zhang et al., 2012), specifically optimized to completely separate the OC and BC fractions with minimal charring and maximum BC recovery. A simple and efficient vacuum line was coupled to the analyzer to trap produced CO2 with high yields and low carbon blanks. Upon trapping, CO2 samples sealed into glass ampoules were converted to graphite and measured for their radiocarbon content at the Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the University of California, Irvine. Here, we present the results from the radiocarbon analysis of a set of 14C reference materials, blanks and inter-comparison samples for both OC and BC with sample sizes as small as 5 μg C. We will also present initial results from a set of urban aerosol samples from Salt Lake City, collected throughout 2012 and 2013, and from interior Alaska, collected during the summer of 2013 near the Stuart Creek 2 wildfire.

  4. Influence of matrix diffusion and exchange reactions on radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Maloszewski, P. ); Zuber, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The parallel fissure model coupled with the equation of diffusion into the matrix and with exchange reaction equations has been used to derive a simple formula for estimating the influence of matrix porosity and reaction parameters on the determination of radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate rocks. Examples of evidently too great radiocarbon ages in carbonate formations, which are not explainable by models for the initial {sup 14}C corrections, can easily be explained by this formula. Parameters obtained for a chalk formation from a known multitracer experiment combined with a pumping test suggest a possibility of {sup 14}C ages more than three orders of magnitude greater than the ages which would be observed if the radiocarbon transport took place only in the mobile water in the fissures. It is shown that contrary to the solute movement on a small scale and with a variable input, the large-scale movement, characteristic for the {sup 14}C dating, does not necessarily require the knowledge of kinetic parameters, because they may be replaced by the distribution coefficient. Discordant tritium and {sup 14}C concentrations are commonly interpreted as a proof of mixing either in the aquifer or at the discharge site. For fissured carbonate formations, however, an alternative explanation is given by the derived model showing a considerable delay of {sup 14}C with respect to nonsorbable tracers.

  5. Gas chromatographic isolation of individual compounds from complex matrices for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Eglinton, T.I.; Aluwihare, L.I.; McNichol, A.P.; Bauer, J.E.; Druffel, E.R.M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the application of a novel, practical approach for isolation of individual compounds from complex organic matrices for natural abundance radiocarbon measurement. This is achieved through the use of automated pereparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC) to separate and recover sufficient quantities of individual target compounds for {sup 14}C analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We developed and tested this approach using a suite of samples (plant lipids, petroleums) whose ages spanned the {sup 14}C time scale and which contained a variety of compound types (fatty acids, sterols, hydrocarbons). Comparison of individual compound and bulk radiocarbon signatures for the isotopically homogeneous samples studied revealed that {Delta}{sup 14}C values generally agreed well ({+-}10%). Background contamination was assessed at each stage of the isolation procedure, and incomplete solvent removal prior to combustion was the only significant source of additional carbon. Isotope fractionation was addressed through compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analyses. Fractionation of isotopes during isolation of individual compounds was minimal (<5% for {delta}{sup 13}C), provided the entire peak was collected during PCGC. Trapping of partially coeluting peaks did cause errors, and these results highlight the importance of conducting stable carbon isotopic measurements of each trapped compound in concert with AMS for reliable radiocarbon measurements. 29 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. African baobabs with false inner cavities: the radiocarbon investigation of the Lebombo Eco Trail baobab.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; Woodborne, Stephan; von Reden, Karl F; Hall, Grant; Hofmeyr, Michele; Lowy, Daniel A; Patrut, Roxana T

    2015-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation results of the Lebombo Eco Trail tree, a representative African baobab from Mozambique. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part of the tree were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating. According to dating results, the age values of all samples increase from the sampling point with the distance into the wood. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the increase of age values with the distance into the wood (up to a point of maximum age) represents a major anomaly. The only realistic explanation for this anomaly is that such inner cavities are, in fact, natural empty spaces between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. We named them false cavities. Several important differences between normal cavities and false cavities are presented. Eventually, we dated other African baobabs with false inner cavities. We found that this new architecture enables baobabs to reach large sizes and old ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 1425 ± 24 BP, which corresponds to a calibrated age of 1355 ± 15 yr. The dating results also show that the Lebombo baobab consists of five fused stems, with ages between 900 and 1400 years; these five stems build the complete ring. The ring and the false cavity closed 800-900 years ago. The results also indicate that the stems stopped growing toward the false cavity over the past 500 years.

  7. Radiocarbon dating of fluvial organic matter reveals land-use impacts in boreal peatlands.

    PubMed

    Hulatt, Chris J; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Oinonen, Markku; Sonninen, Eloni; Stedmon, Colin A; Thomas, David N

    2014-11-01

    This study measured the effects of land use on organic matter released to surface waters in a boreal peat catchment using radiocarbon dating of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC), DOC concentration, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition, and optical measurements. Undisturbed sites invariably released modern DOC and POC (<20 years old), and seasonal forcing had little impact on the age distribution. Release of pre-1950 carbon was detected at peat extraction, agricultural and drained sites, and was consistently observed at agricultural and peat extraction areas throughout the seasons. Conventional mean DOC ages reached 3,100 (±122) years before collection. On average, DOC concentrations were up to 38% higher at impacted sites compared to natural areas, but there was no significant effect of land use on surface water DOC concentrations. The study indicates that the true extent of land use impacts is not necessarily detectible through changes in DOC concentration alone: Radiocarbon dating was essential to show that leaching of old soil organic matter at modified sites had replaced, rather than supplemented, the modern DOM that is usually released from pristine peatlands. Relationships between the specific fluorescence intensity of DOM and its radiocarbon age were identified, indicating that optical techniques may provide a method for the detection of changes in DOM age.

  8. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A; von Reden, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old.

  9. Brief communication: preliminary radiocarbon dates from Florida crania in Hrdlička's gulf states catalog.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Johnson, Kent M

    2011-05-01

    Aleš Hrdlička produced a tremendous amount of data in his career, much of which was published in a series of catalogs by the US National Museum. The Gulf States catalog, for example, contains raw craniometric data for over 700 individuals from the state of Florida alone. However, many of these skeletons are poorly sourced by Hrdlička, thus limiting their utility in modern bioarchaeological analyses where context is critical. In particular, the age of the skeletal material is often based solely on associated material culture and information on the sites themselves is not presented by Hrdlička. To address this impasse we attempted radiocarbon dates for 10 of the largest Florida sites published in the Gulf States catalog. In addition, archival data in the form of unpublished field notes and personal correspondence were accessed to better contextualize the radiocarbon dates and to provide some guidance on the degree of temporal variability at the sites. Eight AMS radiocarbon dates were successful. Archival data was of variable quality per site. In some cases very little is known about the provenience of the specimens. In other cases, however, individual burials could be allocated to specific strata within specific mounds. The relevance of using published raw data is discussed with respect to the Howells and Boas Immigrant datasets and the impact the dissemination of these resources has had on the discipline.

  10. Radiocarbon geochronology of the sediments of the São Paulo Bight (southern Brazilian upper margin).

    PubMed

    Mahiques, Michel M; Sousa, Silvia H M; Burone, Leticia; Nagai, Renata H; Silveira, Ilson C A; Figueira, Rubens C L; Soutelino, Rafael G; Ponsoni, Leandro; Klein, Daniel A

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this work was to generate an inventory of the data on radiocarbon datings obtained from sediments of the São Paulo Bight (southern Brazilian upper margin) and to analyze the data in terms of Late Quaternary sedimentary processes and sedimentation rates. A total of 238 radiocarbon datings from materials collected using differents ampling procedures was considered for this work. The sedimentation rates varied from less than 2 to 68 cm.kyr(-1). The highest sedimentation rate values were found in a low-energy (ría type) coastal system as well as in the upwelling zones of Santa Catarina and Cabo Frio. The lowest rates were found on the outer shelf and upper slopes. Our results confirm the strong dependency of the shelf currents, with an emphasis to the terrigenous input from the Río de La Plata outflow which is transported via the Brazilian Coastal Current, as well as of the coupled Brazil Current - Intermediate Western Boundary Current (BC-IWBC) dynamics on the sedimentary processes. At least three indicators of the paleo sea level were found at 12200 yr BP (conventional radiocarbon age) (103 meters below sea level - mbsl), 8300-8800 cal yr BP (13 mbsl) and 7700-8100 cal yr BP (6 mbsl).

  11. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A.; von Reden, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old. PMID:26760300

  12. Radiocarbon dating of fluvial organic matter reveals land-use impacts in boreal peatlands.

    PubMed

    Hulatt, Chris J; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Oinonen, Markku; Sonninen, Eloni; Stedmon, Colin A; Thomas, David N

    2014-11-01

    This study measured the effects of land use on organic matter released to surface waters in a boreal peat catchment using radiocarbon dating of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC), DOC concentration, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition, and optical measurements. Undisturbed sites invariably released modern DOC and POC (<20 years old), and seasonal forcing had little impact on the age distribution. Release of pre-1950 carbon was detected at peat extraction, agricultural and drained sites, and was consistently observed at agricultural and peat extraction areas throughout the seasons. Conventional mean DOC ages reached 3,100 (±122) years before collection. On average, DOC concentrations were up to 38% higher at impacted sites compared to natural areas, but there was no significant effect of land use on surface water DOC concentrations. The study indicates that the true extent of land use impacts is not necessarily detectible through changes in DOC concentration alone: Radiocarbon dating was essential to show that leaching of old soil organic matter at modified sites had replaced, rather than supplemented, the modern DOM that is usually released from pristine peatlands. Relationships between the specific fluorescence intensity of DOM and its radiocarbon age were identified, indicating that optical techniques may provide a method for the detection of changes in DOM age. PMID:25260159

  13. Radiocarbon dioxide detection based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Genoud, G; Vainio, M; Phillips, H; Dean, J; Merimaa, M

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of radiocarbon (C14) in carbon dioxide is demonstrated using mid-infrared spectroscopy and a quantum cascade laser. The measurement is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and a high sensitivity is achieved with a simple setup. The instrument was tested using a standardized sample containing elevated levels of radiocarbon. Radiocarbon dioxide could be detected from samples with an isotopic ratio C14/C as low as 50 parts-per-trillion, corresponding to an activity of 5  kBq/m(3) in pure CO(2), or 2  Bq/m(3) in air after extraction of the CO(2) from an air sample. The instrument is simple, compact, and robust, making it the ideal tool for on-site measurements. It is aimed for monitoring radioactive gaseous emissions in a nuclear power environment, during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Its high sensitivity also makes it the ideal tool for the detection of leaks in radioactive waste repositories. PMID:25831328

  14. Performance report for the low energy compact radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometer at Uppsala University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, M.; Håkansson, K.; Possnert, G.; Wacker, L.; Synal, H.-A.

    2016-03-01

    A range of ion beam analysis activities are ongoing at Uppsala University, including Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Various isotopes are used for AMS but the isotope with the widest variety of applications is radiocarbon. Up until recently, only the 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator had been used at our site for radiocarbon AMS, ordinarily using 12 MeV 14,13,12C3+ ions. Recently a new radiocarbon AMS system, the Green-MICADAS, developed at the ion physics group at ETH Zurich, was installed. The system has a number of outstanding features which will be described. The system operates at a terminal voltage of 175 kV and uses helium stripper gas, extracting singly charged carbon ions. The low- and high energy mass spectrometers in the system are stigmatic dipole permanent magnets (0.42 and 0.97 T) requiring no electrical power nor cooling water. The system measures both the 14C/12C and the 13C/12C ratios on-line. Performance of the system is presented for both standard mg samples as well as μg-sized samples.

  15. Brief communication: preliminary radiocarbon dates from Florida crania in Hrdlička's gulf states catalog.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Johnson, Kent M

    2011-05-01

    Aleš Hrdlička produced a tremendous amount of data in his career, much of which was published in a series of catalogs by the US National Museum. The Gulf States catalog, for example, contains raw craniometric data for over 700 individuals from the state of Florida alone. However, many of these skeletons are poorly sourced by Hrdlička, thus limiting their utility in modern bioarchaeological analyses where context is critical. In particular, the age of the skeletal material is often based solely on associated material culture and information on the sites themselves is not presented by Hrdlička. To address this impasse we attempted radiocarbon dates for 10 of the largest Florida sites published in the Gulf States catalog. In addition, archival data in the form of unpublished field notes and personal correspondence were accessed to better contextualize the radiocarbon dates and to provide some guidance on the degree of temporal variability at the sites. Eight AMS radiocarbon dates were successful. Archival data was of variable quality per site. In some cases very little is known about the provenience of the specimens. In other cases, however, individual burials could be allocated to specific strata within specific mounds. The relevance of using published raw data is discussed with respect to the Howells and Boas Immigrant datasets and the impact the dissemination of these resources has had on the discipline. PMID:21484762

  16. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of Large Za Baobabs (Adansonia za) of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Patrut, Adrian; Patrut, Roxana T; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Lowy, Daniel A; von Reden, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The article reports the radiocarbon investigation of Anzapalivoro, the largest za baobab (Adansonia za) specimen of Madagascar and of another za, namely the Big cistern baobab. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part/exterior of the tree were investigated by AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) radiocarbon dating. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the age values increase with the distance into the wood up to a point of maximum age, after which the values decrease toward the outer part. This anomaly of age sequences indicates that the inner cavity of Anzapalivoro is a false cavity, practically an empty space between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 780 ± 30 bp, which corresponds to a calibrated age of around 735 yr. Dating results indicate that Anzapalivoro has a closed ring-shaped structure, which consists of 5 fused stems that close a false cavity. The oldest part of the biggest za baobab has a calculated age of 900 years. We also disclose results of the investigation of a second za baobab, the Big cistern baobab, which was hollowed out for water storage. This specimen, which consists of 4 fused stems, was found to be around 260 years old. PMID:26760300

  17. How visual attention is modified by disparities and textures changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaustova, Dar'ya; Fournier, Jérome; Wyckens, Emmanuel; Le Meur, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    The 3D image/video quality of experience is a multidimensional concept that depends on 2D image quality, depth quantity and visual comfort. The relationship between these parameters is not yet clearly defined. From this perspective, we aim to understand how texture complexity, depth quantity and visual comfort influence the way people observe 3D content in comparison with 2D. Six scenes with different structural parameters were generated using Blender software. For these six scenes, the following parameters were modified: texture complexity and the amount of depth changing the camera baseline and the convergence distance at the shooting side. Our study was conducted using an eye-tracker and a 3DTV display. During the eye-tracking experiment, each observer freely examined images with different depth levels and texture complexities. To avoid memory bias, we ensured that each observer had only seen scene content once. Collected fixation data were used to build saliency maps and to analyze differences between 2D and 3D conditions. Our results show that the introduction of disparity shortened saccade length; however fixation durations remained unaffected. An analysis of the saliency maps did not reveal any differences between 2D and 3D conditions for the viewing duration of 20 s. When the whole period was divided into smaller intervals, we found that for the first 4 s the introduced disparity was conducive to the section of saliency regions. However, this contribution is quite minimal if the correlation between saliency maps is analyzed. Nevertheless, we did not find that discomfort (comfort) had any influence on visual attention. We believe that existing metrics and methods are depth insensitive and do not reveal such differences. Based on the analysis of heat maps and paired t-tests of inter-observer visual congruency values we deduced that the selected areas of interest depend on texture complexities.

  18. Year-round probing of soot carbon and secondary organic carbon contributions and sources to the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud using radiocarbon (14C) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Elena; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Andersson, August; Krusâ, Martin; Safai, P. D.; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Rao, P. S. P.; Praveen, P. S.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    South Asia is one region of vital importance for assessing human impact on radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. Previous research in the region has indicated that black carbon is a significant component of the regional aerosol load. In contrast, there is more ambiguous information regarding the contribution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) to the total carbonaceous (TC) aerosol composition. Here we primarily address the SOA component of the South Asian Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) by a combination of measurements of SOA concentrations and the 14C signature of TC. Atmospheric particulate matter was collected during fourteen-month continuous sampling campaigns Jan 2008 - March 2009 at both the Maldives Climate Observatory at Hannimaadho (MCO-H) and at the Sinhagad hilltop sampling site of the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (SIN) in central-western India. The radiocarbon method is an ideal approach to identify fossil sources (14C "dead") compared to biogenic and biomass combustion products (with a contemporary 14C signal). The radiocarbon source apportionment of TC revealed very similar contribution from biogenic/biomass combustion (60-70%) for Indian SIN site and the MCOH receptor regions for much of the year. However, during the summer monsoon season biomass contribution to TC at the Indian Ocean site increases to 70-80%, while it decreases to 40-50% at the Indian site. Source apportionment of a soot carbon (SC) isolate (CTO-375 method; a tracer of black carbon) shows a similar trend. According to preliminary data in summer biomass contribution is higher at the MCOH receptor site (70%) compared to the SIN background site (45%). These unique year-round 14C data will be interpreted in view of the SOA concentration and the varying origin of the air masses.

  19. Radiocarbon dates and late-Quaternary stratigraphy from Mamontova Gora, unglaciated central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pewe, T.L.; Journaux, A.; Stuckenrath, R.

    1977-01-01

    A fine exposure of perennially frozen ice-rich silt and associated flora and vertebrate fauna of late-Quaternary age exists at Mamontova Gora along the Aldan River in central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R. The silt deposit caps a 50-m-high terrace and consists of three units. An upper layer 1-2 m thick overlies a 10-15-m-thick brownish to black silt layer. The lower silt layer is greenish to gray and about 15 m thick. All the silt is well sorted with 60% of the particles falling between 0.005 and 0.5 mm in diameter and is generally chemically and mineralogically homogeneous. The middle unit contains may extinct vertebrate mammal remains and ice wedges. The lower unit contains little vegetation and no ice wedges. The silt is widespread and exists as a loamy blanket on terraces at various elevations on both sides of the lower Aldan River. The origin of the silt blanket of late-Quaternary age in central Yakutia has long been controversial. Various hypotheses have been suggested, including lacustrine and alluvial, as well as frost-action origins. It is sometimes referred to as loess-like loam. Pe??we?? believes the silt at Mamontova Gora is loess, some of which has been retransported very short distances by water. The silt probably was blown from wide, braided, unvegetated flood plains of rivers draining nearby glaciers. The silt deposits are late Quaternary in age and probably associated with the Maximum glaciation (Samarov) and Sartan and Syryan glaciations of Wisconsinan age. On the basis of biostratigraphy, 10 radiocarbon dates, and their relation to the nearby glacial record, it is felt that the upper unit at Mamontova Gora is Holocene and the middle unit is Wisconsinan. The youngest date available from the middle unit at this particular location is 26,000 years. Dates greater than 56,000 years were obtained in the lower part of the middle unit. The lower unit is definitely beyond the range of radiocarbon dating and probably is older than the last interglacial. The

  20. Fluted Projectile Points: Their Age and Dispersion: Stratigraphically controlled radiocarbon dating provides new evidence on peopling of the New World.

    PubMed

    Haynes, C V

    1964-09-25

    The stratigraphic record shows Clovis projectile points to be restricted to sediments between 11,000 and 11,500 years old. Underlying deposits dating back 11,600 to 13,000 years are without evidence of human occupation. In the High Plains, overlying deposits dating back 10,000 to 11,000 years contain Folsom and Hell Gap artifacts and are without mammoth remains. The glacial history of Alaska, Canada, and the Great Lakes region indicates that, for the first time in at least 15,000 years, an ice-free, trans-Canadian corridor opened up approximately 12,000 years ago. Since Clovis points are distributed from coast to coast south of the Valders ice border, the abrupt appearance of Clovis artifacts in the stratigraphic record of the High Plains some 700 years later suggests that Clovis progenitors passed through Canada during Two Creeks time. If eastern fluted points (for example, Enterline) are older than Clovis points, the difference may be on the order of only a hundred or so years, not thousands. The change from Clovis points to Folsom points in the High Plains may be related to a marked decline in the mammoth population after 11,000 years ago, but whether or not man was a prime factor in the extinction of Pleistocene megafauna is a moot question. On the basis of new data and critical geological evaluation of dates obtained by the radiocarbon method a hypothesis has been offered to explain (i) the abrupt appearance of Clovis points in the stratigraphic record of the United States around 11,500 years ago, and (ii) the lack of a cultural continuum in the United States leading to fluted projectile points. Llano hunters, like the game they pursued, may have persisted longer in some areas of the continent (for example, Bull Brook) than in others, but if a Clovis site can be found for which good stratigraphic evidence supports a date earlier than the Two Creeks interstade, then correlation of this event to the opening of the trans-Canadian ice-free corridor is incorrect