Science.gov

Sample records for registered nurse rn

  1. Nursing Transition: An Individualized Course To Promote Mobility from the LVN to RN Role. Registered Nurse Shortage Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Marcia; Malague, Marianne

    To address a regional shortage of registered nurses (RN's), a special transition course was developed at the North Harris Montgomery Community College District in Houston, Texas, to allow licensed vocational nurses to articulate into the second year of a two-year Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Students completing the ADN program are…

  2. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  3. Hospital RN job satisfaction and nurse unions.

    PubMed

    Seago, Jean Ann; Spetz, Joanne; Ash, Michael; Herrera, Carolina-Nicole; Keane, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to examine whether unionization is associated with job satisfaction among RNs in the United States using nationally representative surveys of RNs. Factors that predict job satisfaction for RNs in healthcare continue to be of great concern to nurse administrators and managers because job satisfaction remains an important aspect of nurse retention. In addition, the notion of having unions for RNs has also gained prominence on the national stage. The relationship between RN job satisfaction and having an RN union has rarely been studied, but in 2 studies, a paradox was found; hospitals with RN unions had higher job dissatisfaction but greater retention. This study will test the relationship between having an RN union and job satisfaction with data that are both more recent and nationally representative. We analyze the public-use data from the 2004 and 2008 National Sample Surveys of Registered Nurses. In both 2004 and 2008, union representation was negatively associated with job satisfaction, although this relationship was not statistically significant in 2008. Some nurse administrators and executives would not be surprised by this finding. However, although union nurses may express more dissatisfaction, they may also be more vocal and less fearful about voicing concerns. If managers can harness this ability of the nurses to be articulate and outspoken, working with unions and union nurses can be productive and satisfying.

  4. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  5. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses for jobs in health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Some RNs ... workers was $36,200. Recommend this page using: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn tools Areas at a Glance Industries ...

  6. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  7. Baccalaureate Education for Registered Nurses: A New Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Coll., Providence. Dept. of Nursing.

    Rhode Island College's innovative program of baccalaureate education for registered nurses is described, and guidelines and materials used in the program are included. The federally funded project was designed to: identify the competencies the registered nurse (RN) applicant brings to the program and place the student accordingly; develop a…

  8. Perceptions of Registered Nurses after Completing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Diane Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Background. The demands of the current health-care system support the need for more nurses to be prepared at the bachelor's level (American Association of the Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). However, only 28% of the registered nurse (RN) population in Florida holds a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), which may be the result of…

  9. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  10. Predictors for Success on the NCLEX-RN for Associate Degree Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage is a national issue that has ignited an increasing demand to address the importance of preparing students to be successful on the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN). Nursing programs are charged by the Board of Nursing to prepare graduates to be successful on the initial…

  11. RN jurisdiction over nursing care systems in nursing homes: application of latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corazzini, Kirsten N.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Mueller, Christine; Thorpe, Joshua M.; McConnell, Eleanor S.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of declining registered nurse (RN) staffing levels in nursing homes, professional nursing jurisdiction over nursing care systems may erode. Objectives The purpose of this study is to develop a typology of professional nursing jurisdiction in nursing homes in relation to characteristics of RN staffing, drawing upon Abbott's (1988) tasks and jurisdictions framework. Method The study was a cross-sectional, observational study using the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (N=1,120 nursing homes). Latent class analysis tested whether RN staffing indicators differentiated facilities in a typology of RN jurisdiction, and compared classes on key organizational environment characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis related the emergent classes to presence or absence of specialty care programs in 8 clinical areas. Results Three classes of capacity for jurisdiction were identified, including ‘low capacity’ (41% of homes) with low probabilities of having any indicators of RN jurisdiction, ‘mixed capacity’ (26% of homes) with moderate to high probabilities of having higher RN education and staffing levels, and ‘high capacity’ (32% of homes) with moderate to high probabilities of having almost all indicators of RN jurisdiction. ‘High capacity’ homes were more likely to have specialty care programs relative to ‘low capacity’ homes; such homes were less likely to be chain-owned, and more likely to be larger, provide higher technical levels of patient care, have unionized nursing assistants, have a lower ratio of LPNs to RNs, and a higher education level of the administrator. Discussion Findings provide preliminary support for the theoretical framework as a starting point to move beyond extensive reliance on staffing levels and mix as indicators of quality. Further, findings indicate the importance of RN specialty certification. PMID:22166907

  12. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  13. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  14. Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Care, Wm. Dean

    A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

  15. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program’s main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military. PMID:26648733

  16. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University's Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program's main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military. PMID:26648733

  17. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs. PMID:27055308

  18. Relationships between registered nurse staffing, processes of nursing care, and nurse-reported patient outcomes in chronic hemodialysis units.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Clarke, Sean P

    2008-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the effects of registered nurse (RN) staffing and processes of nursing care on patient outcomes in hemodialysis units. This research examined the effects of patient-to-RN ratios and necessary tasks left undone by RNs on the likelihood of nurse-reported frequent occurrences of adverse patient events in chronic hemodialysis units. Study findings revealed that high patient-to-RN ratios and increased numbers of tasks left undone by RNs were associated with an increased likelihood of frequent occurrences of dialysis hypotension, skipped dialysis treatments, shortened dialysis treatments, and patient complaints in hemodialysis units. These findings indicate that federal, state, and dialysis organization policies must foster staffing structures and processes of care in dialysis units that effectively utilize the invaluable skills and services of professional, registered nurses.

  19. Historical data indicates a wage premium for black registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Coomer, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    The average observed wage of Black registered nurses (RNs) is higher than that of White RNs in the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses over 2 decades from 1984 to 2004. In this study, wages of Black and White RNs were analyzed controlling for factors likely to affect wages in addition to race. Results indicate racial inequality in wages of RNs: Black RN wages exceeded White RNs wages over 2 decades from 1984-2004. This significant difference remained after controlling for factors likely to affect wages in addition to race such as experience, education, employer type, and specialty among other factors. PMID:24294652

  20. Historical data indicates a wage premium for black registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Coomer, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    The average observed wage of Black registered nurses (RNs) is higher than that of White RNs in the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses over 2 decades from 1984 to 2004. In this study, wages of Black and White RNs were analyzed controlling for factors likely to affect wages in addition to race. Results indicate racial inequality in wages of RNs: Black RN wages exceeded White RNs wages over 2 decades from 1984-2004. This significant difference remained after controlling for factors likely to affect wages in addition to race such as experience, education, employer type, and specialty among other factors.

  1. An investigation of predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes among nursing content standardized tests.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Yei-Jin

    2013-12-01

    In order to meet increased demands for qualified registered nurses and prevent negative effects from graduates' failure on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse, it is important to promote students' success in the exam. The purpose of this study was to investigate effective predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes on the first attempt among nursing content standardized tests (adult medical-surgical, fundamentals for nursing, pharmacology, maternal-newborn, nursing care of children, mental health, community health, and leadership and management) conducted throughout the nursing program. NCLEX-RN outcomes and individual adjusted scores on the standardized tests of 151 graduates from the traditional baccalaureate nursing program of a public university located in the Midwest from May 2010 to December 2011 were analyzed by a t-test and logistic regression. The participants included 118 graduates who passed and 33 graduates who failed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. Significant statistical differences were found between the two groups with NCLEX-RN success and failure in the individual adjusted scores on all of the standardized tests except the fundamental for nursing (p=.62) and nursing care of children (p=.759) standardized tests. In addition, logistic regression indicated that the overall regression models were significant in predicting both NCLEX-RN success and failure. Adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were central to the prediction of both NCLEX-RN success and failure; however, a much lower percentage of NCLEX-RN failure than success was classified. It can be concluded that the adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were effective in predicting NCLEX-RN success and not effective in predicting NCLEX-RN failure on the first attempt. The NCLEX-RN success predictors can be utilized to identify students at risk and provide early remediation. After early remediation is

  2. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  3. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  4. The Determination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement in Nursing Courses and Success on the Registered Nurse Licensure Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Julie E.

    The objective of a study was to determine if academic achievement in nursing courses could be used to predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). It investigated the relationship between NCLEX outcomes and academic achievement in theory and clinical courses and the relationship between NCLEX…

  5. The Relationship Between Registered Nurses and Nursing Home Quality: An Integrative Review (2008-2014).

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Castle, Nickolas G; McGilton, Katherine S; Spilsbury, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home care is expensive; second only to acute hospital care for inpatient Medicare costs. The increased focus on costs of care accrued by Medicare beneficiaries in nursing homes presents a valuable opportunity for registered nurses (RNs) to further demonstrate quantitatively the value they add to the capacity of the nursing home nursing skill mix to provide cost-effective and efficient quality care. Most of the studies included in this review consistently reported that higher RN staffing and higher ratios of RNs in the nursing skill mix are related to better NH quality. Concerns about the costs of employing more highly skilled RNs and directors of nursing that have the potential to positively influence members of the nursing skill mix will continue to influence nursing home industry hiring practices. For both the advancement of nursing as an applied science and the benefit of society at large, nursing researchers are challenged to better demonstrate how the increased presence of a RN on each shift has the potential to enhance the cost effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of nursing homes.

  6. Registered Nurse Persistence in Baccalaureate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krov, Kathleen Nadler

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared registered nurses to safely meet the complex healthcare needs of citizens of the United States. Since there is no research on the characteristics of registered nurse students persisting in baccalaureate education, this quantitative descriptive case study was designed to identify the…

  7. Monitoring entry-level practice: keeping the national council licensure examination for registered nurses current.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Kenny, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    The National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses assesses whether a candidate has the ability to provide safe and effective nursing care upon entry into practice. It is essential that this assessment be current and relevant to nursing practice. The authors discuss methods that are used to provide evidence to support the 2007 NCLEX-RN Test Plan and to maintain the currency of the examination. PMID:17496823

  8. Transitioning RN to BSN students from acute care to hospice care nursing.

    PubMed

    Mizell, Deborah; Washington-Brown, Linda J; Russell, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Today, most medical professionals focus on a cure. However, hospice care provides a quality of life for those persons nearing the end of life or persons experiencing a life-limiting illness. The distressing reality is that most nurses are not taught the full scope of end of life care (EOL) in schools of nursing. Because of this educational deficit, a variance in care is created that may adversely affect the dying patient and family's wishes. In our RN to BSN program, we established a partnership with a national hospice organization to provide (1) leadership in end-of-life course development, (2) lecturers experienced in hospice and palliative care, (3) field placement for students with hospice nurses, and (4) nursing scholarships to complete the bachelor's degree. The end result of this partnership is to educate registered nurses about hospice and palliative care, as well as to increase the nursing workforce in this area. PMID:25612396

  9. Competency profile for registered nurses: NIC in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNs provide both direct care and leadership in geriatric-care facilities. In this specialized area of care, the contributions of the RN are not well recognized. In this issue, we focus on gerontological nursing and how NIC can be used to describe and communicate this highly specialized role.

  10. Relationship of Academic Variables to National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurse Performance of Graduates in a Selected Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naron, Rosarica G.; Widlak, Frederic

    This report addresses the unstable and unsatisfactory performance of Chicago, Illinois' Olive-Harvey College's (OHC) associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). An ex post facto correlation study was designed to determine the worthiness of pre-nursing admission course…

  11. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Diane K.; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. Methods We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. Results The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = −.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Discussion Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations. PMID:26049719

  12. How healthy are our nurses? New and registered nurses compared.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sumaira; Blake, Holly; Batt, Mark

    This study examined the health behaviour of nursing staff, comparing registered and pre-registered nurses in terms of their self-reported health and lifestyle behaviour. In total, 325 pre-registered nurses and 551 registered nurses, based at the same university teaching hospital and located within an acute NHS trust, completed a self-administered health and lifestyle questionnaire survey. With the exception of smoking behaviour, registered nurses generally had a healthier lifestyle compared with pre-registered nurses. However, when examining the overall health profile of the sample, the study reveals that there is room for improvement in the health and lifestyle behaviour exhibited by both registered and pre-registered nurses. Almost half of the sample failed to meet public health recommendations for levels of physical activity, almost two-thirds did not consume five portions of fruit or vegetables daily and almost half ate foods that were high in fat and sugar content on a daily basis. These findings are alarming given the current government emphasis on the health of NHS staff and the important role that nurses play in influencing lifestyle choices among their patients. There is an urgent need to target education and support services to improve the diet and exercise habits of nursing professionals.

  13. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research. PMID:20026454

  14. The Initiative to Move Toward a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce: Findings from the Kansas Registered Nurse Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of registered nurses (RNs) with a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) to 80% by 2020. Kansas lacks a central mechanism to collect current data on the RN workforce; therefore, detailed information about the RN workforce, including current educational level, is unknown. The purposes of the survey were to (a) describe the Kansas RN workforce, (b) examine the relationship between nursing education and employment, (c) compare and contrast the workforce to other states and national data and (d) discuss implications of strategic planning and policy making for nursing education. The on-line Kansas RN Workforce Survey link was sent to 44,568 RNs by e-mail, and the response rate was 15.6% (n = 6,948). The survey consisted of 34 questions on demographics, education, licensing, and employment. Kansas RNs were predominately women (92%) and Caucasian with an average age of 47.7 years. Approximately 46.3% of RNs obtained a BSN as their initial education. Analysis of highest level of nursing education showed that 60.5% of Kansas RNs were at least baccalaureate prepared, with 14.9% obtaining a master's degree or higher. More than 50% of RNs worked in hospitals as staff nurses. RNs with advanced education were more likely to be employed, tended to work in academic settings or ambulatory clinics, and were more likely to be faculty or in management/leadership positions. Overall, the Kansas RN workforce is closer to reaching the 80% baccalaureate-prepared goal recommended by the Future of Nursing report than has been reported. Educational level was closely related to RNs' choices of work settings and positions. Additional work such as promoting academic progression needs to continue to build a more highly educated RN workforce. PMID:26653039

  15. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  16. Occupational factors contributing to low self-esteem in registered nurses and licensed practical nurses: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Imai, K

    2001-03-01

    The present study examines job-related factors leading to low self-esteem in nurses. The lowering of self-esteem suggests that such nurses had difficulty in fully accepting themselves and their circumstances. Subjects were registered nurses (RN) and licensed practical nurses (LPN) at hospitals, and unemployed registered nurses (UEN) seeking employment. Questionnaires were provided at 53 hospitals and a Nurse Bank in Kanagawa Prefecture. The responses of 552 RN, 146 LPN and 433 UEN were analyzed. Questions were asked about personal life, past or present nursing experience, working conditions, nursing skills, satisfaction with work performance and self-esteem. Factors giving rise to low self-esteem were determined using logistic regression analysis and logistic discriminant analysis. Employment status and qualifications were determined to be the most important factors determining the self-esteem of nurses. The next most important factors were 'a limited number of years of experience (less than five years)' and 'dissatisfaction with discretion and responsibility as a nurse' (P < 0.01). Adjusted odds ratio for a reduction in self-esteem for LPN was 4.07 times higher than for UEN, and 2.2 times higher than for RN by logistic regression analysis. LPN are treated as unskilled workers, and thus significant differences were apparent in their performance of certain job tasks. These differences were analyzed using discriminant analysis, and were referred to as follows, 1: Advanced assessment skills, 2: Advanced technical skills, 3: Advanced communication skills, and 4: Nursing plan and documentation (positive discrimination rate was 70.8%). Job dissatisfaction is closely associated with the level of professional training. Continuous education and a feedback system for various levels of nurses are needed. PMID:11279837

  17. Application of Guided Imagery to Facilitate the Transition of New Graduate Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Laura B.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the new graduate registered nurse (RN) transition has included a didactic and skills-based orientation accompanied by a period of preceptored practice. However, these methods do not ensure that new RNs are in a state of reduced anxiety to fully interact with their new environment. Transition to practice may cause anxiety, and the new graduate RN may perceive moderate to severe stress. One method of stress reduction is the use of guided imagery, which has shown strong potential with a variety of populations undergoing stressful events. Today, new graduate RNs expect institutions to facilitate orientation to their new employment settings and assist in the transition to their role as a professional nurse. This article proposes a model that incorporates guided imagery for refining the new graduate RN transition process. The model can be adapted for use in the context of orienting other adult learners to unfamiliar practice situations. PMID:23330588

  18. Predicting success on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse: another piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Foti, I; DeYoung, S

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective correlational study was conducted at a state-supported bachelor's degree nursing program to determine variables that predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN). Data were collected from 1985 through 1988 on a sample of 298 students. The independent variables studied were: grade point average (GPA) overall, GPA in the major, GPA in science, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) verbal and quantitative scores, National League for Nursing (NLN) Comprehensive Baccalaureate Achievement Test scores, and Mosby Assess Test scores. The outcome variable was the NCLEX-RN. Pearson correlations indicated the Mosby Assess Test, overall GPA and GPA in the major, NLN Achievement Test, and SAT verbal to be of moderate predictive value. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the most useful combination of predictors was the Mosby Assess Test, SAT verbal, and overall GPA. The results support the value of a program at this school designed to increase students' verbal abilities.

  19. Retooling the RN workforce in long-term care: nursing certification as a pathway to quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; High, Robin; Culross, Beth; Conley, Deborah Marks; Nayar, Preethy; Nguyen, Anh T; Ojha, Diptee

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a project to improve nursing care quality in long-term care (LTC) by retooling registered nurses' (RN) geriatric clinical competence. A continuing education course was developed to prepare LTC RNs (N = 84) for national board certification and improve technological competence. The certification pass-rate was 98.5%. The study used a mixed methods design with retrospective pretests administered to RN participants. Multivariate analysis examined the impact of RN certification on empowerment, job satisfaction, intent to turnover, and clinical competence. Results showed certification significantly improved empowerment, satisfaction, and competence. A fixed effects analysis showed intent to turnover was a function of changes in empowerment, job dissatisfaction, and competency (F = 79.2; p < 0.001). Changes in empowerment (t = 1.63, p = 0.11) and competency (t = -0.04, p = 0.97) did not affect changes in job satisfaction. Findings suggest RN certification can reduce persistently high RN turnover rates that negatively impact patient safety and LTC quality.

  20. Creation of a registered nurse-administered nitrous oxide sedation program for radiology and beyond.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Mary Kay; Drake, Gloria J; Rucker, Denise; Finkelstein, Marsha; Zier, Judith L

    2008-01-01

    Children undergoing urethral catheterization for urologic imaging under existing sedation practices were identified as an underserved patient population. Using a multidisciplinary approach, a registered nurse (RN)-administered nitrous oxide sedation program was developed to meet the needs of these children. Program development required delineation of RN scope of practice, evaluation of equipment, formulation of an educational program, and compliance with occupational safety standards. The program was implemented in 2004 using standard "dental" nitrous oxide equipment coupled with distraction and imagery to enhance the efficacy of the sedation experience. Initial assessment via telephone questionnaire indicated fewer adverse effects and more rapid return to baseline than oral midazolam, the sedative previously used for these procedures. Ongoing evaluation continues to confirm patient and environmental safety. The nitrous oxide program has expanded to provide sedation for additional tests in radiology as well as in other hospital departments. By implementing an RN-administered nitrous oxide program, children's access to this sedative/analgesic agent is increased.

  1. Career ladder program for registered nurses in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Joan; Sassaman, Becky; Phillips, Alison

    2008-01-01

    RN ladder programs are designed to inspire and reward clinical excellence. Kaiser Permanente Colorado's (KPCO) career ladder program emerged as a result of a labor-management partnership. Career ladder point assignments are reflective of the organization's priorities and values. KPCO's career ladder point tool awards RNs for formal and continuing education, professional presentations, organizational experience and experience as an RN, certifications and active professional memberships, leadership activities, research and publications, and nursing-related volunteer work. Participation in the RN career ladder requires that the nurse achieve a self-determined, manager-approved, measurable goal that will improve patient care. Career ladder nurses at KPCO were significantly more involved in leadership and interdisciplinary activities, quality improvement projects, and preceptorship. PMID:19330975

  2. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  3. The Registered Nurse Population, March 2000. Findings from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratley, Ernell; Johnson, Ayah; Sochalski, Julie; Fritz, Marshall; Spencer, William

    The characteristics, education, employment patterns, salaries, job satisfaction, and other characteristics of registered nurses (RNs) across the United States were examined in a national survey. Of the initial sample of approximately 54,000 of the nation's more than 3,066,000 licensed RNs, 35,579 RNs (72%) submitted usable responses. From 1980 to…

  4. Multistate Approach to Preparing Registered Nurses: How 3 Nurse Executives Shaped a New Nursing Education Model.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan; Burnes Bolton, Linda; Swanson, Jane; Hassmiller, Susan; Chow, Marilyn

    2015-09-01

    A new model for educating baccalaureate nurses emerged from the needs of employers and came to fruition through a unique partnership resulting in the development of the 1st competency-based, asynchronous single-curriculum prelicensure program in the United States. Three nurse executives championed the design and implementation of the multistate approach to preparing RNs (MAP RN) program. The nationally accredited program has been initiated in 5 states. PMID:26301553

  5. Multistate Approach to Preparing Registered Nurses: How 3 Nurse Executives Shaped a New Nursing Education Model.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan; Burnes Bolton, Linda; Swanson, Jane; Hassmiller, Susan; Chow, Marilyn

    2015-09-01

    A new model for educating baccalaureate nurses emerged from the needs of employers and came to fruition through a unique partnership resulting in the development of the 1st competency-based, asynchronous single-curriculum prelicensure program in the United States. Three nurse executives championed the design and implementation of the multistate approach to preparing RNs (MAP RN) program. The nationally accredited program has been initiated in 5 states.

  6. Professional nurse information day: a recruitment strategy for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, M A

    1991-02-01

    The shortage of and demand for professional registered nurses is growing at an ever-increasing rate. Military facilities must consider alternative strategies for recruiting these professionals into their staffs even in the midst of worsening budget and personnel constraints. One idea is reported here that proved successful for a medical center overseas with no money expenditure. Recommendations for repetitions of a similar program are included. PMID:1900589

  7. Professional nurse information day: a recruitment strategy for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, M A

    1991-02-01

    The shortage of and demand for professional registered nurses is growing at an ever-increasing rate. Military facilities must consider alternative strategies for recruiting these professionals into their staffs even in the midst of worsening budget and personnel constraints. One idea is reported here that proved successful for a medical center overseas with no money expenditure. Recommendations for repetitions of a similar program are included.

  8. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students. PMID:25960063

  9. Cognitive apprenticeship: laying the groundwork for mentoring registered nurses in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nickle, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Professional nursing practice within the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the registered nurse (RN) to demonstrate evidence of critical thought for the various treatments provided. A sound theoretical knowledge base, coupled with sensitivity to the socio-cultural influences within this often emotionally charged atmosphere is foundational to the provision of excellent patient care. Mentorship is one educational strategy that attempts to integrate skill development with the socialization of a novice ICU RN. However, vagueness surrounding what encompasses the mentor-mentee relationship may prevent employees from entering into these unions. In this article, I present an original mentorship model based on the concept of cognitive apprenticeship, as described by Collins, Brown, and Holum (1991). I identify the learning theories that inform this approach to professional development and conclude with select recommendations for implementation of a mentorship program within the ICU.

  10. State funding for higher education and RN replacement rates by state: a case for nursing by the numbers in state legislatures.

    PubMed

    Bargagliotti, L Antoinette

    2009-01-01

    Amid an enduring nursing shortage and state budget shortfalls, discerning how the percentage of state funding to higher education and other registered nurse (RN) workforce variables may be related to the RN replacement rates (RNRR) in states has important policy implications. Regionally, the age of RNs was inversely related to RNRR. State funding in 2000 significantly predicted the 2004 RNRR, with the percentage of LPNs in 2004 adding to the model. The stability of the model using 2000 and 2004 funding data suggests that state funding creates a climate for RNRR. PMID:19789005

  11. Essential factors for a healthy RN educational mobility program.

    PubMed

    Messmer, P R; Miller, E; Spruck, M

    1994-01-01

    There is little research concerning which factors registered nurse (RN) students perceive as constituting a healthy educational mobility program. Because of this, a study was undertaken to identify the factors that RN students perceive as contributing to a healthy educational mobility RN/BSN/MSN program. Findings indicated that the RN students value flexibility, ease in planning, and convenience of course offerings as most important to their program selection. Registered nurse students emphasized the critical factors of faculty sensitivity to students' diverse opinions, faculty respect for students, and faculty expertise as important. These findings highlight the importance of sensitizing faculty members and nurse administrators to the needs of RN students. PMID:7854637

  12. Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Florin, Jan; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Bååth, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs) about preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). PU prevention behaviours in the clinical practice of RNs and ANs were also explored. A descriptive, comparative multicentre study was performed. Hospital wards and universities from four Swedish county councils participated. In total, 415 participants (RN, AN and SN) completed the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool. The mean knowledge score for the sample was 58·9%. The highest scores were found in the themes 'nutrition' (83·1%) and 'risk assessment' (75·7%). The lowest scores were found in the themes 'reduction in the amount of pressure and shear' (47·5%) and 'classification and observation' (55·5%). RNs and SNs had higher scores than ANs on 'aetiology and causes'. SNs had higher scores than RNs and ANs on 'nutrition'. It has been concluded that there is a knowledge deficit in PU prevention among nursing staff in Sweden. A major educational campaign needs to be undertaken both in hospital settings and in nursing education.

  13. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  14. Taking Part: Registered Nurses and the Labour Market in 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, I.; Smith, G.

    The labor market participation, pay, job satisfaction, employment patterns, and turnover of registered nurses in the United Kingdom were examined through an analysis of data from the 1997 Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Survey. Of the random sample of 5,984 nurses from the RCN membership records surveyed, 4,288 (72%) returned usable questionnaires.…

  15. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  16. Ethical conflicts reported by registered nurse/certified diabetes educators: a replication.

    PubMed

    Redman, B K; Fry, S T

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify types of ethical conflicts reported by certified diabetes educators who are also registered nurses (RN/CDEs) and to examine their relationship with demographic, educational and practice setting variables. This study is a replication of an earlier pilot study. Ethical conflicts expressed by RN/CDEs in active practice in New York and Pennsylvania were analysed according to four themes. Disagreement with medical practice was by far the most dominant clinical context for the conflicts (61%), as it had been in the pilot study (75%). Participants believed that 32% of the ethical conflicts were resolved. Ethics committees and consultants were very rarely used. Of the relationships between the kinds of conflicts and their resolution, and demographic, educational and practice setting variables of the participants, only kind of position was significantly (P < 0.005) related to practice context of the ethical conflict. PMID:9888378

  17. A Survey of Former Nursing (RN and LVN) Students. Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glyer, Culver-Betty

    In fall 2001 staff of the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former nursing (RN and LVN) students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former nursing students who earned…

  18. The orientation period: essential for new registered nurses' adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore adaptation in new registered nurses using the Roy adaptation model as the guiding conceptual framework. This quantitative study employed a random sampling of new nurses in the state of North Carolina. Personal attributes of the new registered nurses and characteristics of their work setting were modeled with four measures considered suitable proxies for adaptation. Being in a formal orientation period significantly supported the new nurses' overall adaptation. This may represent the benefit of social support, including education, which seems to facilitate adaptation.

  19. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  20. Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success of Associate Degree Graduates: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Bonny J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students not passing the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN) can adversely affect schools of nursing. This failure also adversely affects the national nursing shortage. The declining national pass rates on the NCLEX-RN for ADN graduates and the increasing…

  1. The effectiveness of problem-based learning and concept mapping among Taiwanese registered nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Chou, Fan-Hao; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Ko, Hsun-Kuei; Jian, Shu-Yuan; Weng, Wei-Che

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of adopting problem-based learning (PBL) and concept mapping (CM) in the educational programs for Taiwanese registered nursing (RN) students. We used a quasi-experimental design with experimental and control groups to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL-CM in three time schedules: before the course began (pre-test), at the end of the course (post-test), and six months after the end of the course (follow-up test). A convenience sample of 120 RN students participated, 51in the experimental group and 69 in the control group. Finding showed that the experimental group had higher scores than the control group for the Critical-Thinking Scale, Self-Directed Learning Scale, and Students' Performance in PBL Tutorial Sessions Questionnaire at the post-test and follow-up test stages. The PBL-CM increased students' critical-thinking skills and personal accountability for self-directed learning, and it would enhance the skills of independent study, reasoning, group interaction and active participation. This study offers guidelines for new nurse-training programs and continuing nursing education in clinical practice.

  2. The professional development needs of registered nurses in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Sharyn; McMillan, Margaret; Conway, Jane

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports on research which used a multiple-case study approach to investigate the responses of aged care nurses to changes in Australian health care policy following the introduction of the Aged Care Act 1997. Significant fiscal, social and environmental issues for Residential Aged Care (RAC) are the: need to respond to policy changes emphasizing efficiency in RAC facilities, nature of the needs of residents with increasing acuity, impact of decreasing numbers of Registered Nurses (RNs) working in the RAC environment, changing composition of the care team and RAC RN functions. The study explored the phenomenon of the contemporary practice of (RNs) within six RAC settings, focusing on changes in the practice of RNs. As a result of the research a number of issues pertinent to staff and role development of RNs were identified. PMID:17679262

  3. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  4. They Are Called Nursing Homes for a Reason: RN Staffing in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Harden, J Taylor; Burger, Sarah Greene

    2015-12-01

    According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Consolidated Medicare and Medicaid regulations have not been systematically reviewed and updated since 1991. Existing regulations require that, with certain exceptions, an RN provide services in a facility for 8 consecutive hours per day, 7 days per week; licensed practical nurses (LPNs) 24 hours per day; and sufficient staff to meet residents' needs. The requirements to determine "sufficient" staff remain undefined by CMS. Several national organizations support RN staffing 24 hours per day each day of the week (24/7). These organizations provided evidence refuting CMS' position that it does not have sufficient information at this time to require a specific number of staff or hours of nursing care per resident. Consideration should be given to the Institute of Medicine recommendation affrming the need for and requiring the presence of at least one RN within every nursing home facility at all times. Currently, there is a bill in the House of Representatives that supports 24/7 RN coverage in nursing homes, which must become both bipartisan and bicameral to be passed. PMID:26594951

  5. A Hospital School of Nursing's Approach to Continuing Education for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollok, Clementine S.; Poteet, Gaye W.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the planning and implementation of a continuing education program for registered nurses at the Petersburg, Virginia, General Hospital School of Nursing. The success of a series of refresher courses for nurses returning to active practice encouraged curriculum extension. Responses to an evaluative follow up questionnaire completed by all…

  6. The Storied Experiences of Registered Nurses' Transition from Paper to Electronic Nursing Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative inquiry was designed to bring to life the storied experiences of registered nurses who have transitioned from paper to electronic nursing documentation and to provide a foundation for others who may be preparing to implement electronic documentation and wish to consider the significance of these nurses' stories of change in their…

  7. Attitudes toward Older People among Nursing Students and Registered Nurses in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderhamn, Olle; Lindencrona, Catharina; Gustavsson, Siw Merit

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 151 undergraduate nursing students and 41 registered nurses in Sweden found that those who were under 25, male, or had limited prior experience caring for older people had less favorable attitudes toward the elderly. First-year students were more negative than third-year students. No differences among nurses in different practice…

  8. Organisation turnover among registered nurses: an exploratory model.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Flatt, S

    1988-11-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, turnover among hospital nurses has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that organisation of hospital work is a determinant of voluntary turnover among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualised at the organisational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 310 community hospitals. Results suggest the importance of administrative work structures and the professionalisation of the workforce as contributors to higher turnover.

  9. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  10. Barriers to Research Utilization by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    At present, no documentation pertaining to the factors influencing utilization of research into clinical practice by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) exists. An investigation was undertaken to determine perceptions of CRNAs regarding factors within the context of the work setting, which may serve to influence their utilization of…

  11. Future distinguishing competencies of baccalaureate-educated registered nurses in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2015-01-01

    In view of the likelihood that the complexity of care required by those admitted to nursing homes will continue to increase, an expert consensus study was conducted to reach consensus on the competencies which distinguish baccalaureate-educated registered nurses from other nursing staff working in nursing homes. Thirty-one international experts, identified through literature and our professional network, participated in a two-round web-based survey and an expert meeting. Experts reached consensus on 16 desirable competencies, including some not traditionally associated with nursing expertise e.g. being a team leader, role model and coach within the nursing team. These findings suggest that revision of current nursing curricula, nurse training programs and nursing home job profiles might be needed to meet the medically and psychologically complex needs of nursing home residents. PMID:26283584

  12. What makes nursing satisfying: a comparison of college students' and registered nurses' views.

    PubMed

    Dodds, A E; Lawrence, J A; Wearing, A J

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports a study of nurses' perceptions of the positive and negative features of the work environment and their contribution to satisfaction with nursing. The concept of a 'work space' was developed to describe nurses' mental images of the features of their work environment. Eighty-four final-year student nurses and 75 registered nurses rated questionnaire items designed to examine perceptions of opportunities for professional development, sources of satisfaction, difficulties, time constraints and problematic interactions with other hospital personnel. There was general agreement among nurses about the aspects of their work that they found satisfying, but student nurses were more pessimistic than registered nurses that nursing would give them opportunities for recognition of their worth. Students returning from practica in critical care wards reported more stressful interactions with other personnel than students returning from general ward practica. Structural equation modelling of the causal relations between sources of satisfaction with nursing revealed that recognition and self-perceptions of work as a nurse were the strongest predictors of overall satisfaction with nursing. Caring for patients contributed only indirectly through its influence on nurses' feelings about themselves. The data indicate the significance of personal and social implications of nursing careers.

  13. In the Balance: Registered Nurse Supply and Demand, 1996. IES Report 315.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, I.; Smith, G.

    A survey of 6,000 registered nurses in membership in the Royal College of Nursing across the United Kingdom examined some key factors that determined the supply of nurses. A study of the UK nursing labor market indicated that the number of registered nurses has remained more or less static since the late 1980s. Rising demand appeared to be met by…

  14. Working postures and physical activity among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard

    2016-05-01

    Nurses report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort, particularly of the low back and neck/shoulder. This study characterized the full-shift upper arm and trunk postures and movement velocities of registered nurses using inertial measurement units (IMUs). Intensity of occupational physical activity (PA) was also ascertained using a waist-worn PA monitor and using the raw acceleration data from each IMU. Results indicated that nurses spent a relatively small proportion of their work time with the arms or trunk in extreme postures, but had few opportunities for rest and recovery in comparison to several other occupational groups. Comparisons between nurses in different PA groups suggested that using a combination of accelerometers secured to several body locations may provide more representative estimates of physical demands than a single, waist-worn PA monitor. The findings indicate a need for continued field-based research with larger sample sizes to facilitate the development of maximally effective intervention strategies. PMID:26851483

  15. How New Mexico licensed registered nurses gained cultural self-efficacy and their stories.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Lynda Wilson

    2007-01-01

    The cultural self-efficacy of licensed registered nurses in New Mexico has been reported by this author in two previous articles (Hagman, 2004 & 2006). The Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) developed by Bernal and Froman (1987) was used to quantify New Mexico RN's knowledge of cultural concepts, skills and life patterns of five ethnic groups (White-non Hispanic, Hispanic, African American, Asian American and Native American). Methods used included quantitative survey results and written responses to two open-ended questions yielding both quantitative and qualitative data. This article provides details of the qualitative data which revealed how the RNs in that study gained their reported level of self-efficacy and the stories they shared. Data analysis revealed four major themes; experience, education, travel, and military service. Examples are provided for each theme. Participants also shared cultural stories/anecdotes

  16. Perioperative registered nurse excellence. Raising the bar at the point of care--star performance.

    PubMed

    Shewchuk, Muriel

    2014-06-01

    As described, the responsibilities of the Perioperative RN are extensive, complex, time-sensitive, can impact a large number of patients and multi-professionals. In a time of tremendous pressures in health care, with patient safety as a focus, there is an expectation of practice excellence throughout. Registered Nurses need to determine if they can, or are willing to, achieve excellence of practice in the OR. Our reason for being is "THE PATIENT". Strategize how you will achieve the bar of excellence and in the words of Wayne Gretzky--"skate to where the puck will be." Shower your environment with positive sprinklings of star performance--the return professional profits are immeasurable.

  17. Preparing underemployed Latino U.S. nurses through the Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Josefina; Little, Kermit

    2010-12-01

    The critical nursing shortage in U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border is compounded by the need for nurses who are linguistically and culturally concordant with the growing number of Latinos in these communities. The innovative 16-week Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program responds to this need by helping underemployed Latino nurses, who were educated in Mexico and live in the United States, adapt linguistically and culturally to multiple-choice testing. Ten of the program students have taken the NCLEX-RN with a 50% pass rate, which is twice as high as the internationally educated candidate passing average. This demonstrates potential for the program to build the human capacity of U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border by infusing linguistically and culturally concordant nurses into the workforce and materializing the dream of underemployed Latino nurses to implement their hard-earned and urgently needed nursing skills. Lessons learned from the program are discussed. PMID:20954572

  18. Preparing underemployed Latino U.S. nurses through the Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Josefina; Little, Kermit

    2010-12-01

    The critical nursing shortage in U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border is compounded by the need for nurses who are linguistically and culturally concordant with the growing number of Latinos in these communities. The innovative 16-week Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program responds to this need by helping underemployed Latino nurses, who were educated in Mexico and live in the United States, adapt linguistically and culturally to multiple-choice testing. Ten of the program students have taken the NCLEX-RN with a 50% pass rate, which is twice as high as the internationally educated candidate passing average. This demonstrates potential for the program to build the human capacity of U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border by infusing linguistically and culturally concordant nurses into the workforce and materializing the dream of underemployed Latino nurses to implement their hard-earned and urgently needed nursing skills. Lessons learned from the program are discussed.

  19. Understanding new registered nurses' intent to stay at their jobs.

    PubMed

    Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Greene, William; Fairchild, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Nursing turnover is costly for health care organizations. Newly licensed registered nurses work behavior is a complex process, influenced by their attitudes toward their work, personal characteristics, job opportunities, and workplace attributes. Several characteristics are significant in predicting satisfaction (ethnicity, gender) and organizational commitment (patient load, mandatory overtime, shift, and unit type) and intent to stay (income, age) over and above work attitudes. Among the most important implications are how the findings can inform management and policy. Findings from this study provide information that may be useful for those organizations that want to decrease their turnover rates. PMID:19492772

  20. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered.

  1. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  2. Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Registered Nurses: Evidence from the Thai Nurse Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thinkhamrop, W; Laohasiriwong, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Health, safety, and well being have been known to be influenced by occupational characteristics. Nurses constantly encounter musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) from work demands worldwide. Nevertheless, there is insufficient of knowledge regarding causes of musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Thailand. Objective To investigate factors associated with musculoskeletal disorder among registered nurses in Thailand. Method This study is part of the 2009 Thai Nurse Cohort Study which consisted of 18,756 nationally representative sample of registered nurses. Data collection was performed via postal self-administered questionnaires. Manifesting musculoskeletal disorders was self-reported by registered nurses, 1,070 nurses were excluded since they were unemployed during previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. Result Of 17,686 registered nurses, the overall 12 months prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 47.8%. It was found that workplace violence was the strongest factor which statistically significant associated with musculoskeletal disorders (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.42 to 2.83; P < 0.001), anxiety/depression (OR = 1.96: 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.15; P < 0.001), perceiving job required a lot of physical effort (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.52 to 1.87; P < 0.001), every 10 years increased of age (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62; P < 0.001), overweight (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.52; P = 0.015). Conclusion Registered nurses were most vulnerable of musculoskeletal disorders especially those who experienced workplace violence, anxiety/depression, strenuous work, older age, and overweight. Consequently, recommending safety practices to nurses should be considered for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) prevention by ergonomics and workplace design. PMID:27180371

  3. Perceptions of Community of Associate Degree Nurse Learners in an RN-to-BSN Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Cherie R.

    2010-01-01

    Registered Nurses (RNs), when educated in an Associate Degree (AD) program, learn in a face-to-face environment. Today's preferred standard of education for RNs is to achieve a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. For convenience while they continue working, numerous AD-prepared nurses seek online education to complete their Bachelor of Science in…

  4. Academic and nursing aptitude and the NCLEX-RN in baccalaureate programs.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mary Ann; Harris, Debra; Tracz, Susan M

    2014-03-01

    Accurately predicting NCLEX-RN® success has a positive impact on all nursing education stakeholders. This study focused on the ability to predict NCLEX-RN pass rates on the basis of prenursing academic aptitude variables and the Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) nursing aptitude program. The ATI predictors were the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) and fi ve ATI subject tests: Fundamentals, Medical Surgical, Nursing Care of Children, Mental Health, and Maternal Newborn. The prenursing variables comprised the prenursing grade point average, a prerequisite communication course, and the ATI TEAS composite subscores of TEAS Reading, TEAS Math, TEAS Science, and TEAS English. This study included participants from four baccalaureate nursing programs in the California State University system. Results of canonical correlation, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression revealed a significant correlation among prenursing, ATI scores, and NCLEXRN fi rst-try pass rates. Prediction of NCLEX-RN success rate using standardized testing data was supported, with the strongest predictors being the ATI Medical Surgical and ATI Mental Health tests.

  5. RN-BSN programs: associate degree and diploma nurses' perceptions of the benefits and barriers to returning to school.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Colleen; Piscopo, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The nursing profession is facing a serious shortage in all areas including BSN completion programs. The purpose of this study was to explore associate degree and diploma nurses' perceptions of the benefits and barriers to RN-BSN programs. In addition, factors that would facilitate degree completion in academia and work environments were examined.

  6. Predictors of Success and Failure for ADN Students on the NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) analyze the relationship of preprogram and nursing program variables on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) success and failure, and 2) develop a model to predict success and failure on the NCLEX-RN. The convenience sample was comprised of 245 spring, summer, and fall midterm…

  7. Comparisons of the educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: the educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Similar to the U.S.A., New Zealand and Singapore, Australia registers two levels of nurse, the degree or postgraduate entry prepared registered nurse and diploma or certificate-prepared enrolled nurse. Over the past decade, significant changes have occurred in educational preparation of enrolled nurses. This has resulted in enrolled nurses undertaking many roles and responsibilities previously undertaken only by registered nurses. An exploratory qualitative research study using interviews with educators of both registered and enrolled nurses was undertaken to investigate differences in educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia. This paper describes perceptions around how participants viewed educational approaches and different cohorts, types and levels of students. Similarities included topics covered and the majority skills taught, although high acuity skills remain a difference between the levels of nurse. Differences were also found in type of student, educational background and teaching methods.

  8. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions. PMID:23678781

  9. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

  10. Ethical conflicts reported by certified registered rehabilitation nurses.

    PubMed

    Redman, B K; Fry, S T

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the types of ethical conflict reported by certified registered rehabilitation nurses (CRRNs) and their relationship to demographic, educational, and practice-setting variables. Ethical conflicts expressed by CRRNs in active practice in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia were analyzed according to four themes. Disagreements about medical or institutional practice, patients' rights, and payment issues were the most frequent practice contexts for ethical conflicts, reflecting these nurses' considerable underlying concerns about resource allocation in rehabilitation practice. Participants believed that 60% of the ethical conflicts were resolved, frequently through discussions with other team members and patients' family members. Ethics committees and consultants were used infrequently. There were no statistically significant relationships between the kinds of conflicts or their resolution and the participants' demographic, educational, and practice-setting variables. PMID:9832915

  11. Newly licensed registered nurse job turnover and turnover intent.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Through survey data, this study examines job leaving behaviors of newly licensed registered nurses and identifies educational and managerial issues that need to be addressed to retain them. Within 1.5-2.5 years of graduating, one third of all respondents had left their first job, most for work-related reasons. Predictors of job leaving or intentions to leave included not having had a good orientation, information issues, having difficulties doing a good job, not being rewarded fairly, and low job satisfaction. PMID:25237913

  12. The Future of Neonatal Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Practice: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Staebler, Suzanne; Meier, Susan R; Bagwell, Gail; Conway-Orgel, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses and the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners have been monitoring aspects of neonatal advanced practice nursing and providing leadership and advocacy to address concerns related to workforce, education, competency, fatigue, safety, and scope of practice. This white paper discusses current barriers within neonatal advanced practice registered nurse practice as well as strategies to promote the longevity of the neonatal advanced practice registered nurse roles. PMID:26742097

  13. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  14. Educators' expectations of roles, employability and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, like other countries, two levels of nurse are registered for entry to practice. Educational changes for second level nurses in Australia have led to questions regarding roles and career options. This paper reports on interviews with nursing course coordinators to examine educator expectations of roles and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses. Coordinators of eight degree (registered) and diploma (enrolled) nursing programs were interviewed to determine their opinions on roles and careers that students were prepared for. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Educators reported similar graduate roles, although high acuity care was primarily the role of registered nurses. Career expectations differed with enrolled nurses having limited advancement opportunity, and registered nurses greater career options. Health organisations were unprepared to accommodate increased practice scope of enrolled nurses and limited work practice through policies stipulating who could perform procedures. Organisational health policies need to accommodate increased enrolled nurse skill base. Education of practising nurses is necessary regarding increased scope of enrolled nurse practice to ensure they are used to their full potential. Increasing patient acuity requires more registered nurses, as enrolled nurses are unprepared to care for complex or deteriorating patients.

  15. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting. PMID:26938183

  16. Learning Styles Relevant to Identified Personality Types of Selected Nursing Students and Selected Successful Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Harriette B.

    A study was conducted to determine the Jungian personality types of selected groups of student and registered nurses, to identify their preferred learning styles, to ascertain the relationship between personality type and preferred learning style, and to identify the most productive learning styles for given personality types. Subjects'…

  17. AN ENQUIRY INTO THE NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLAHERTY, M. JOSEPHINE

    A RANDOM SAMPLE OF FEMALE REGISTERED NURSES ON THE ROLL OF THE COLLEGE OF NURSES OF ONTARIO IN APRIL 1965 WERE SURVEYED TO DETERMINE THEIR NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. NURSES PREFERRED TO STUDY NURSING SUBJECTS, ON A CREDIT BASIS, IN A SHORT COURSE. AGE, MARITAL AND EMPLOYMENT STATUS, LEVEL OF EDUCATION, OCCUPATIONAL GOAL, TYPE OF POSITION, AND…

  18. Independent Learning Projects of Registered Nurses in a Mandatory Continuing Education State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Susan K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A descriptive study using a survey design was implemented to investigate the scope of independent learning projects related to nursing initiated and completed by Kansas Registered Nurses. Findings indicate that nurses' involvement in independent learning projects was substantial and perceived by nurses as successful. (Author/CH)

  19. Early Indicators of NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Schooley, Angela; Kuhn, Jonathan Richard Dixon

    2013-09-01

    Health Education Systems Incorporated (HESI(™)) test results, course grades, and National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN(®)) outcomes of students in an associate degree nursing program at a midwestern public university were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed that introductory Fundamentals HESI test scores, more than either comprehensive HESI Exit Exam scores or other specialty HESI test scores, significantly predicted NCLEX-RN outcomes in this study (p < 0.05), while controlling for grade point average and high school percentile rank. In addition, of the general education courses and the nursing courses in the associate nursing program examined, Pediatric Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing, and Maternity Nursing course grades were found most statistically significantly influential of all the HESI test scores (p < 0.01).

  20. Educational Experiences and the Professional Reintegration of Registered Nurses Returning for Baccalaureate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einhellig, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to understand the experiences of RN to BSN graduates within their educational experience and their subsequent reintegration into professional practice. The goal of the study was to elucidate the experiences of nurses as they returned for a baccalaureate degree in order to more fully…

  1. Stories of Exemplary Hospital Registered Nurses: A Narrative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Donna Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Today the multidimensional global shortage of nurses is negatively impacting the work environment of hospital nurses and causing, in a cyclical fashion, decreasing work satisfaction, increasing nurse turnover, and decreasing patient outcomes. While strategies aimed at causation of the nursing shortage must be addressed, to support nursing until…

  2. Nursing dependency in registered nursing homes and long term care geriatric wards in Edinburgh.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, A E; Primrose, W R; MacIntyre, C

    1986-01-01

    There has been growing interest and public investment in registered nursing homes, apparently based on the assumption that these homes are the private equivalent of hospital long term care. We have tested this hypothesis in a survey comparing 400 patients in 18 registered nursing homes with 217 patients in 11 geriatric long term care wards in Edinburgh. The nursing home patients formed a distinct and separate group: 362 (92%) were women, 392 (98%) were single or widowed, and 358 (90%) were self financing, whereas in the geriatric long term care group 148 (68%) were women and 35 (16%) were still married. Patients in nursing homes were also far less dependent than those in geriatric long term care wards (p less than 0.005). This study suggests that there may be large differences between the patients in these two types of institution, particularly with regard to nursing dependency. This finding has important implications in the future planning of long term places for the dependent elderly. PMID:3089370

  3. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gillian; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behnam; Gohar, Basem; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2015-01-01

    Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs) was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace. PMID:25830063

  4. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  5. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  6. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  7. Exploring Preferences of Mentoring Activities among Generational Groups of Registered Nurses in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey-Goodwin, Patricia Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore differences in perceptions of mentoring activities from four generations of registered nurses in Florida, using the Alleman Mentoring Activities Questionnaire ® (AMAQ ®). Statistical procedures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to explore differences among 65 registered nurses in Florida from…

  8. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  9. Critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students in associate, baccalaureate, and RN-to-BSN programs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungrim; Jung, Duk Yoo; Shin, Sujin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2006-06-01

    This study investigated the critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students. Study participants were students enrolled in associate (n = 137), baccalaureate (n = 102), and RN-to-BSN (n = 66) programs accredited by the Korean Ministry of Education. The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used. A comparison of the CCTDI scores revealed a statistically significant difference between the students enrolled in different programs (F = 4.159, p = 0.017), as did a comparison of the CCTST scores (F = 24.205, p < 0.0001). Within the total sample (n = 305), the relationship between CCTDI and CCTST scores was significant (r = 0.305, p = 0.000). Developments in medical technology, the growing number of older adults and patients with chronic illnesses, and the demand for high-quality nursing care have led to various, increasingly complex, professional, legal, and educational issues within the nursing workplace. Therefore, nurses need creativity and critical thinking skills to make the decisions required of them in their nursing practice. In line with this, when conducting a survey of the effectiveness of nursing education, the necessity of critical thinking skills cannot be overlooked. In fact, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) (1999) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) (1998) require the concept of critical thinking be included as one of the core elements of curricula and that it be measured as an outcome when evaluating nursing education. In 1998, during the evaluation of colleges of nursing conducted by the South Korean Council for University Education, several universities presented the fostering of critical thinking as one of the terminal learning goals of nursing education based on the idea that critical thinking is important not only in the nursing workplace, but also in nursing education. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  10. Critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students in associate, baccalaureate, and RN-to-BSN programs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungrim; Jung, Duk Yoo; Shin, Sujin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2006-06-01

    This study investigated the critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students. Study participants were students enrolled in associate (n = 137), baccalaureate (n = 102), and RN-to-BSN (n = 66) programs accredited by the Korean Ministry of Education. The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used. A comparison of the CCTDI scores revealed a statistically significant difference between the students enrolled in different programs (F = 4.159, p = 0.017), as did a comparison of the CCTST scores (F = 24.205, p < 0.0001). Within the total sample (n = 305), the relationship between CCTDI and CCTST scores was significant (r = 0.305, p = 0.000). Developments in medical technology, the growing number of older adults and patients with chronic illnesses, and the demand for high-quality nursing care have led to various, increasingly complex, professional, legal, and educational issues within the nursing workplace. Therefore, nurses need creativity and critical thinking skills to make the decisions required of them in their nursing practice. In line with this, when conducting a survey of the effectiveness of nursing education, the necessity of critical thinking skills cannot be overlooked. In fact, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) (1999) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) (1998) require the concept of critical thinking be included as one of the core elements of curricula and that it be measured as an outcome when evaluating nursing education. In 1998, during the evaluation of colleges of nursing conducted by the South Korean Council for University Education, several universities presented the fostering of critical thinking as one of the terminal learning goals of nursing education based on the idea that critical thinking is important not only in the nursing workplace, but also in nursing education. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  11. Changing Times: A Survey of Registered Nurses in 1998. IES Report 351.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, G.; Seccombe, I.

    A national survey of registered nurses and analysis of official statistics provided an overview of the dimensions and dynamics of the labor market for nurses in the United Kingdom. Findings indicated the following: enrollment in preregistration nurse training courses decreased by 27 percent over the 1990s; initial entries to the UK Central Council…

  12. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...) is entitled to have a portion of these nursing student loans canceled as follows: 15 percent of...

  13. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...) is entitled to have a portion of these nursing student loans canceled as follows: 15 percent of...

  14. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...) is entitled to have a portion of these nursing student loans canceled as follows: 15 percent of...

  15. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...) is entitled to have a portion of these nursing student loans canceled as follows: 15 percent of...

  16. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...) is entitled to have a portion of these nursing student loans canceled as follows: 15 percent of...

  17. A Learning Partnership: Exploring Preceptorship through Interviews with Registered and Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockerby, Cherene M.; Newton, Jennifer M.; Cross, Wendy M.; Jolly, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Novice nurses encounter numerous factors that impact on their learning in the complex healthcare workplace. Registered nurses often work one-on-one with novices as preceptors to facilitate the development of novices' clinical skills and socialisation into the profession. This paper explores the concept of preceptorship from novice nurses' and…

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Demographic and Academic Characteristics and NCLEX-RN Passing among Urban and Rural Campus Students in a Midwest Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacos-Burds, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study was initiated to determine: (1) the predictive relationship between demographic and academic variables and NCLEX-RN success; and (2) if there were significant differences between urban and rural nursing students that could account for an increased percentage of rural NCLEX-RN failures. A convenience sample was comprised of…

  19. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  20. [Career guidance for registered nurse in the UK].

    PubMed

    Simón Melchor, Lucía; Simón Melchor, Alba

    2014-04-01

    Cuts in temporary contracts has had big consequences for newly qualified nurses with regards to finding employment. This cut in contracts has resulted in a doubling in the rate of unemployment in this profession. In the past nurses emigrated to other countries for purposes like knowledge of the language or to extend their training and experience, however today the emigration has become the only way out for many professional nurses. The reputation of nurses in Spain is recognised internationally, with the UK being one of the countries with the largest demand for Spanish nurses. Due to the great amount of job opportunities that are emerging in the UK, nurses need help and guidance in their careers, and also nurses need training in areas such as Professional Body, developing a curriculum, facing an interview etc...

  1. Reclaiming the essence of nursing: the meaning of an immersion experience in Honduras for RN to bachelor of science students.

    PubMed

    Adamshick, Pamela; August-Brady, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Cultural immersion experiences incorporated in baccalaureate nursing programs have yielded positive short- and long-term effects on the personal and professional lives of the participants. Despite this evidence, little is known about how immersion experiences affect the RN student returning to school. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to uncover the meaning of a week-long immersion in Honduras for RN students (N = 8) and its impact on their professional practice upon return from Honduras. Data were analyzed through reflective journals and two focus groups conducted postimmersion experience. Transcripts were analyzed, and four themes emerged: from the outside looking in, struggling with dissonance, searching for meaning, and from the inside looking out. These themes combined to form the essence of the meaning of the experience: reclaiming the essence of nursing. Implications for practice, education, and research are addressed.

  2. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program. PMID:26021133

  3. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  4. Reaching for the stars: career advancement and the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kim

    2005-08-01

    Clinical nursing has long struggled to secure the place of primacy it deserves in the profession's hierarchy of importance and worth. It is ironic that, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a clinical nurse is generally not as well-recognized, rewarded or remunerated as a colleague working in nursing management, education or research. Until the profession recognizes and takes serious action to remedy this situation, the crisis of recruitment and retention in nursing currently ravaging the globe is likely to continue. In this paper, I present a discursive account of an exciting initiative by a leading private, acute-care hospital which addresses this very problem. A new ladder for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) introduces a rigorous and systematic approach to the appointment of three classifications of CNS, each requiring evidence of successively higher levels of competency, and which are accompanied by fiscal reward and stronger peer recognition. PMID:15985097

  5. The value of Master's degrees for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Clark, Liz; Casey, Debbie; Morris, Sunita

    The value of graduates in the nursing workforce has been recognised in the move to all-graduate preparation of pre-registration nurses in England ( Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2010 ). Increasingly, after registration continuing professional development programmes for nurses are being offered at Master's level. However, there is limited evidence of the relationship between postgraduate study and improved patient outcomes. Evidence that does exist suggests that nurses who engage in postgraduate study are more likely to have improved critical thinking and decision-making skills, demonstrate leadership qualities to empower them to challenge poor practice, and have the skills needed for advanced clinical practice roles. This article explores these issues and makes recommendations for further work in this area.

  6. Evaluation of a Six Week Professional Education Curriculum Designed To Retrain Registered Psychiatric Nurses into the Field of Psychiatric Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safian-Rush, Donna

    During the past few years, there has been a drastic shortage of registered nurses in the field of psychiatric mental health. An evaluation conducted on an internship curriculum designed to facilitate effective nursing care in the treatment of clients who exhibit emotional problems is presented with details on a study to attract and retain nurses…

  7. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  8. From their own voices: the lived experience of African American registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah W

    2007-04-01

    This phenomenological study described the lived experience of African American registered nurses providing nursing care to individuals, families, and communities in southeast Louisiana. Data were collected from 13 African American registered nurses using semistructured interviews and a focus group. Analysis of the phenomenological data revealed two essential themes, (a) connecting with the patient and (b) proving yourself; and four incidental themes, (a) a fulfilling dream, (b) being invisible and voiceless, (c) surviving and persevering, and (d) mentoring and role modeling. The findings revealed that the general perception among participants was that they were not fully accepted as equal professionals by their Caucasian nurse colleagues, other health care providers, and sometimes patients. The findings of the study indicate the immediate need to address and resolve the issues of diversity within the nursing profession. Nursing will also have to reform its system and practices to embrace and support diversity. PMID:17416716

  9. Ratings of the Performances of Practicing Internists by Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Marjorie D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In a survey, 1,851 registered nurses evaluated 232 internists' humanistic qualities, communication skills, and selected aspects of their clinical skills. Their ratings corresponded moderately with peer physician evaluations and had a common structure but were lower for several humanistic qualities. A reliable assessment required 11-15 nurses'…

  10. Identifying Students at Risk for Failure on the Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Susan J.; Orr, Scott P.

    A method was developed for identifying students who may be at high risk for failing the State Board Licensing Examination (SBE) for registered nurses. The subjects used in developing prediction equations included 50 students who graduated from the nursing program at Saint Joseph's College (SJC) in North Windham (Maine) during the years 1983-84.…

  11. An Analysis of Barriers to Online Learning as Perceived by Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eddie D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States faces a substantial nursing shortage that is expected to increase over the next decade and beyond. Understaffing and erratic work schedules result in minimal opportunities to participate in continuing education courses, which are required for registered nurses (RNs) to maintaining proficiency and licensure. Online learning is…

  12. New registered nurses' personal responses to professional practice: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study employed a qualitative description design to inquire into new registered nurses' (RNs') personal responses to being a "new nurse." Six new RNs participated in semistructured interviews. The findings of this pilot study can be used to guide educational activities for nurse leaders and others who work with new RNs. Several strategies are discussed, which may ease new RNs' transition into professional practice.

  13. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  14. The Relationship between Post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) Failure Remediation and NCLEX-RN Success of Graduates of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Patricia Gale

    2009-01-01

    An ex post facto study was conducted to determine whether any relationship exists between remediation post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) failure and NCLEX-RN success of graduates of baccalaureate nursing programs. Data was gathered from responses to the seventh annual validity study (V7S) offered to deans and directors of nursing programs by…

  15. The Challenges of Online Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Passmore, Denise; Faught, Timber

    2009-01-01

    To meet the current critical need for qualified nurses, many colleges have initiated online programs, primarily aimed towards registered nurse (RN) to BS students. Despite the growing number of online nursing programs, there is little research on instructor views of online learning. This study used interviews to investigate nursing instructor…

  16. Debriefing as a Supportive Component for Registered Nurses in Transition.

    PubMed

    Shinners, Jean; Africa, Larissa; Hawkes, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Debriefing is considered a positive approach used to evaluate learning, support communication, and explore emotions following simulation or a clinical experience. This article discusses the use of debriefing as an evolving strategy for new graduate nurses and focuses on the importance of structured clinical debriefing as a component to relieve stress while providing periods of reflection and cohesion. PMID:27434321

  17. Functional redundancy and the process of professionalization: the case of registered nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Levi, M

    1980-01-01

    Registered nurses have been attempting to achieve professional status for nearly a century. Historical investigation of their efforts in the United States and a case study of the 1976 Seattle Nurses' strike indicate major obstacles to the professionalizing project. The most important of these are the inability of the nurses to control the labor supply, and their failure to define or monopolize a distinct set of tasks. One result is functional redundancy: there is no job nurses perform that is not also performed by some other occupation.

  18. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  19. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  20. Curriculum Development for Part-Time Programs for Certified Nurse Assistant to Licensed Vocational Nurse; and Licensed Vocational Nurse to Associate Degree Nurse Program (CNA-VN-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Ellen; And Others

    This report describes the Imperial Valley College nursing program, a program developed to provide for the nursing needs of Imperial County, California. The program provides part-time education to help train nursing assistants and to allow nursing assistants to upgrade their skills to vocational nurse level and vocational nurses to become…

  1. Predicting NCLEX-RN success in a diverse student population.

    PubMed

    Alameida, Marshall D; Prive, Alice; Davis, Harvey C; Landry, Lynette; Renwanz-Boyle, Andrea; Dunham, Michelle

    2011-05-01

    Many schools of nursing have implemented standardized testing using platforms such as those developed by Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) to better prepare students for success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses® (NCLEX-RN). This study extends and replicates the research on standardized testing to predict first-time pass success in a diverse student population and across two prelicensure program types. The final sample consisted of 589 students who graduated between 2003 and 2009. Demographic data, as well as academic performance and scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor, were analyzed. The findings in this study indicate that scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor were positively, significantly associated with first-time pass success. Students in jeopardy of failing the NCLEX-RN on their first attempt can be identified prior to graduation and remediation efforts can be strengthened to improve their success.

  2. Registered nurses' perceptions of health and safety related to their intention to leave.

    PubMed

    Val Palumbo, Mary; Rambur, Betty; McIntosh, Barbara; Naud, Shelly

    2010-03-01

    This study examined perceptions of general and emotional health among a statewide sample of nurses, and their assessment of employers' workplace health and safety initiatives. These variables and demographic data were then used to model predictors of intention to leave their work positions. A survey was mailed to all registered nurses in one state. Fifty-three percent responded (n = 3,955). Findings suggested marked differences in perception of emotional health by age, with younger nurses reporting less positive perceptions of their emotional health. Perceptions of employers' safety and health initiatives varied by age, setting, and work role. Predictors of intention to leave included lower perceived emotional health among younger nurses and employer safety initiatives for both age groups. This exploratory study suggests a relationship among employer health and safety practices, nurses' emotional health, and intention to leave. Implications for occupational health nurses are detailed. PMID:20210261

  3. A time-motion study of registered nurses' workflow in intensive care unit remote monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhihua; Mazabob, Janine; Weavind, Liza; Thomas, Eric; Johnson, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    Utilizing advanced information technology, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) remote monitoring allows highly trained specialists to oversee a large number of patients at multiple sites on a continuous basis. In the current research, we conducted a time-motion study of registered nurses' work in an ICU remote monitoring facility. Data were collected on seven nurses through 40 hours of observation. The results showed that nurses' essential tasks were centered on three themes: monitoring patients, maintaining patients' health records, and managing technology use. In monitoring patients, nurses spent 52% of the time assimilating information embedded in a clinical information system and 15% on monitoring live vitals. System-generated alerts frequently interrupted nurses in their task performance and redirected them to manage suddenly appearing events. These findings provide insight into nurses' workflow in a new, technology-driven critical care setting and have important implications for system design, work engineering, and personnel selection and training.

  4. The value of portfolio building and the registered nurse: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McColgan, Karen

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to explore the value of portfolio building and the registered nurse under the following themes: assessment of competence; work-based reflection; lifelong learning; creating career pathways and the contribution a portfolio makes to the professional development of the nurse. This review concludes that for portfolios to work effectively, nurses and their employers require a working partnership to see the value and the opportunities that exist through the development of a personal portfolio. The need exists for an organisational culture of learning that encourages a facilitative environment combined with nurses who support their colleagues and explore their skills through experiential learning. This work was submitted in part fulfilment for the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing at Queen's University of Belfast, School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2007 and was supported by ERFF. PMID:18368974

  5. Early-career registered nurses' participation in hospital quality improvement activities.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida K; Bernstein, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    We surveyed 2 cohorts of early-career registered nurses from 15 states in the US, 2 years apart, to compare their reported participation in hospital quality improvement (QI) activities. We anticipated differences between the 2 cohorts because of the growth of several initiatives for engaging nurses in QI. There were no differences between the 2 cohorts across 14 measured activities, except for their reported use of appropriate strategies to improve hand-washing compliance to reduce nosocomial infection rates. PMID:23192224

  6. The NCLex Examination: preparing for future nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wendt, A; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    One nursing organization that closely tracks the direction of healthcare and nursing practice is the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc. As the developer of the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN examination), maintaining currency of the examination is of primary importance to the National Council. The authors discuss recent trends in the NCLEX-RN Test Plan. PMID:16646187

  7. Social presence, satisfaction, and perceived learning of RN-to-BSN students in Web-based nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess social presence in online nursing courses and its relationship to student satisfaction and perceived learning. The Social Presence scale and the Satisfaction scale were administered via an Internet survey to students (n = 128) in an online RN-BSN program. Results indicated a strong relationship among satisfaction, social presence, and instructor performance. All subdomains of social presence correlated highly with the satisfaction subdomains, except the communication factor. A strong relationship was found between perceived learning and social presence and comfort with the online course. Overall social presence, instructor performance, and the subdomains of social presence predicted a significant amount of total variance in overall satisfaction and perceived learning. No significant relationships were found between the demographic factors and overall social presence or perceived learning. Results of this study can assist nurse educators in providing optimal online educational experiences for students.

  8. Social presence, satisfaction, and perceived learning of RN-to-BSN students in Web-based nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess social presence in online nursing courses and its relationship to student satisfaction and perceived learning. The Social Presence scale and the Satisfaction scale were administered via an Internet survey to students (n = 128) in an online RN-BSN program. Results indicated a strong relationship among satisfaction, social presence, and instructor performance. All subdomains of social presence correlated highly with the satisfaction subdomains, except the communication factor. A strong relationship was found between perceived learning and social presence and comfort with the online course. Overall social presence, instructor performance, and the subdomains of social presence predicted a significant amount of total variance in overall satisfaction and perceived learning. No significant relationships were found between the demographic factors and overall social presence or perceived learning. Results of this study can assist nurse educators in providing optimal online educational experiences for students. PMID:21667794

  9. An exploratory study of selected female registered nurses: meaning and expression of nurturance.

    PubMed

    Geissler, E M

    1990-05-01

    The words 'nurse' and 'nursing' originate in the word 'nurture' which dates back to the 14th century. 'Nurturance' appeared for the first time in the 1976 Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary and in a United States dictionary in 1983. Etymologically and semantically bound to nursing, little is known about the term nurturance. An exploratory design using phenomenological analysis was applied to understand the female registered nurses' experience of nurturing patients throughout the life-span and to uncover behaviours commonly believed nurturant. Interviews with 14 RNs practising in diverse settings revealed 39 nurturant behaviours that were intuited into four themes describing the subjects' perceived structure of nurturance as: (1) enabling maximum potential; (2) providing physical and emotional protection; (3) engaging in a supportive interaction; and (4) conveying shared humanity. Data were formulated into an exhaustive description of the phenomenon nurturance. Additionally, the results support Greenberg-Edelstein's theoretical model of the positive reciprocity of nurturance between nurse and patient. PMID:2358570

  10. An exploratory study of selected female registered nurses: meaning and expression of nurturance.

    PubMed

    Geissler, E M

    1990-05-01

    The words 'nurse' and 'nursing' originate in the word 'nurture' which dates back to the 14th century. 'Nurturance' appeared for the first time in the 1976 Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary and in a United States dictionary in 1983. Etymologically and semantically bound to nursing, little is known about the term nurturance. An exploratory design using phenomenological analysis was applied to understand the female registered nurses' experience of nurturing patients throughout the life-span and to uncover behaviours commonly believed nurturant. Interviews with 14 RNs practising in diverse settings revealed 39 nurturant behaviours that were intuited into four themes describing the subjects' perceived structure of nurturance as: (1) enabling maximum potential; (2) providing physical and emotional protection; (3) engaging in a supportive interaction; and (4) conveying shared humanity. Data were formulated into an exhaustive description of the phenomenon nurturance. Additionally, the results support Greenberg-Edelstein's theoretical model of the positive reciprocity of nurturance between nurse and patient.

  11. Using the Canadian Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses to explore ethics in palliative care research.

    PubMed

    Arraf, Kelly; Cox, Ginny; Oberle, Kathleen

    2004-11-01

    Nursing research in palliative care raises specific and challenging ethical issues. Questions have arisen about whether such research is morally justified, given the low likelihood of direct benefit to dying patients as research participants. The Canadian Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses outlines eight primary values intended to guide nursing practice. We use these values to explore the moral dimensions of research with the palliative care population. Our conclusion is that palliative care research is needed to foster excellent care for these patients and their families, but that nurses must remain constantly vigilant to ensure that participants are protected from resultant harms. Through this exploration we highlight particular considerations that nurse researchers must contemplate when accessing a vulnerable population.

  12. Decisional involvement: actual and preferred involvement in decision-making among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Bina, Jamey S; Schomburg, Maria K; Tippetts, Lindsay A; Scherb, Cindy A; Specht, Janet K; Schwichtenberg, Tamara

    2014-04-01

    Enhancing nurse involvement in decision-making is a starting point in addressing the nursing shortage, recruitment, and retention. The purpose of this descriptive comparative secondary data analysis was to describe the level of registered nurses' actual and preferred decisional involvement (DI) in two studies carried out during 2004 and 2010 and to describe the difference in the levels of actual and preferred DI between the 2004 study (N = 290) and the 2010 (N = 111) study in a Midwestern medical center after a new shared governance structure was implemented. In the 2004 and 2010 studies, there were statistically significant differences between actual and preferred levels of DI. A statistically significant decrease in means occurred in actual and preferred DI in 2010 as compared with that in 2004. A concerted effort must be made by nursing leaders to enhance DI, offer adequate resources, promote learning and growth, and recognize nursing contributions within a shared governance.

  13. [The registered nurse and the battle against tuberculosis in Brazil: 1961-1966].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Hercília Regina do Amaral; de Almeida Filho, Antonio José; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Lourenço, Lucia Helena Silva Corrêa

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the circumstances that promoted the implementation of the new Program for Action Against Tuberculosis in Brazil (Programa de Ação na Luta contra a Tuberculose no Brasil) and discuss the strategies used by registered nurses from the Santa Maria State Hospital, Guanabara State, to adjust nursing care to the new program against tuberculosis. This was performed through document research, interviews, and statements from nurses working at the time of the reorganization. Documents were analyzed based on the concepts of habitus, field, and symbolic power by Pierre Bourdieu, and included written and oral documents as well as secondary sources. The reorganization of the nursing service was performed under the leadership of a nurse whose symbolic capital assigned power and prestige to implement the necessary changes. It is concluded that the work of that nurse made it possible to implement the new program and contributed to establishing the position and importance of the registered nurse in providing care to individuals with tuberculosis, for prevention and cure.

  14. The experience of registered nurses nursing in the general adult intensive care unit. A phenomenological qualitative research study.

    PubMed

    Pope, E; Nel, E; Poggenpoel, M

    1998-06-01

    In this article a phenomenological qualitative research study is discussed. More attention will be given to the methodology of the research. The objectives of the study are two-fold: firstly to explore and describe the experience of registered nurses nursing in the adult intensive care unit (this is the first phase of the research) and to describe guidelines based on the information obtained in the first phase to support the nurses in the form of a support programme in the second phase. The units of research are the registered nurses in the intensive care unit. The characteristics of the unit of research led to the emergence of a qualitative phenomenological research design of an explorative, descriptive and contextual nature. In the discussion of research methodology attention will be given to phase one: data gathering (ethical considerations and informed consent; purposive selection, phenomenological interviews and field notes); data analysis (Tesch's method of data analysis, methods to ensure trustworthiness, organisation of raw data and integration of findings supported by literature. Five themes were identified through the data analysis: impaired communication with management; discrimination: white on black racism; lack of fair, competitive remuneration and disregard for professional worth; non-conducive physical environment, and stressful working environment. Phase two: Guidelines were described to support the registered nurses in the intensive care unit based on the information obtained in phase one of the research.

  15. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  16. An Exploration of Registered Nurses' Intentions to Leave the Profession: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutter, Stacy Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of female registered nurses who have intentions to leave the profession with particular attention to the influence of gender. The theoretical framework of feminist poststructuralism informed this study, which emphasizes the role of discourse and power relations in the…

  17. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  18. RN-BSN curricula: designed for transition, not repetition.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L

    2013-01-01

    Combined efforts of professional mandates, employer preferences for increased educational levels of staff registered nurses (RNs), Magnet's higher environmental ratings, the Institute of Medicine report, and Aiken's (2003, 2008, & 2011) clinical research outcomes have spawn renewed attention for RN-baccalaureate degree of science in nursing (BSN) education. Yet, nationally, only 21.6% of associate degree nurses are continuing their education (Health Resources and Services Administration, 2010). Designing programs with the student as the center, where student/faculty engagement is the goal, has enabled one school of nursing to develop a quality on-line RN-to-BSN program. Core values of the program reveal a faculty who is committed to development of education to transition the associate degree and/or diploma graduate to professional nursing practice without repetition of content and learning activities.

  19. Develop a Framework of Creative Thinking Teaching Mode for RN-BSN Students on the Basis of the Creative Process of Clinical Nurses in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kuo, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework of creative thinking teaching mode for RN-BSN students on the basis of the creative process of clinical nurses in Taiwan. Purposive samples have earned creativity awards recruited from the medical, surgical, maternity, paediatric, community and psychiatric departments in Taiwan. Semi-structured…

  20. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  1. Does increasing education increase the probability of promotion? The case of registered nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    Buhr, Karen J

    2010-03-01

    Little research has examined the effect of education on promotional opportunities for nurses. This article adds to the literature by addressing this question. This study uses data from the confidential master files from the 2001 Canadian Census on Individuals. The results of this study show that there is an increased probability of promotion to supervisory positions for registered nurses with a bachelor's degree. For both the male and female samples it was found that having a bachelor of nursing certification yields a 4% higher probability of promotion to a supervisory position compared with other educational credentials. Existing studies found that increases in education yield higher earnings, and this study also shows that increases in education can result in higher probabilities of promotion to supervisory positions. This can be viewed as another benefit of increased educational credentials for individuals in the nursing profession. PMID:20229963

  2. What implies the good work for registered nurses in municipal elderly care in Sweden?

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Karin; Aling, Jenny; Östin, Britt-Louise

    2011-08-01

    The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what the good work implies to them in municipal elderly care. A descriptive design and a structured questionnaire specifically designed for this study were used. Sixty housing units for older people and 213 nurses participated, with a response rate of 62%. The good work included the following aspects: intellectually stimulating without guilt feelings; freedom and independence with the possibility to influence; having appreciative and pleasant fellow workers and a fair and understanding manager; a good physical and risk-free environment; work security and a steady income with the possibility of improving salary through work effort; work effort should be beneficial to others; innovative thinking and initiative should be highly valued; and pride in work without compromising personal values. Employers must take this into consideration to retain those nurses already employed and recruit nurses to municipal elderly care. PMID:21460333

  3. Preparing registered nurses depends on "us and us and all of us".

    PubMed

    Spence, Deborah; Valiant, Sharon; Roud, Di; Aspinall, Cathleen

    2012-07-01

    The primary goal of undergraduate nursing education is the preparation of graduates able to function as competent beginning clinicians. Avariety of academic-service partnerships are being used to support the clinical preparation of undergraduate nurses but, in today's demanding and fiscally challenged health and education environments, debate continues about how bestto provide students with quality learning in the clinical setting. This article reports the qualitative findings of a collaborative study undertaken to monitor implementation of a new model of clinical education for undergraduate nursing students. Three partners: a District Health Board (DHB) and two universities have developed, and are refining, a clinical education model based on the inclusion of student nurses in team nursing. In response to the question "How well is the student integration model working?" the qualitative findings, from a DHB and university staff perspective, suggest that students are better integrated within the nursing team. Registered nurses from academic and clinical backgrounds are sharing reponsibility for students' learning but there is a clear need to further develop relationships, skills and processes in order to maximise the student development. The survey results, which include the student perspective, have and are being reported separately. PMID:23029783

  4. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  5. Do Associate Degree Registered Nurses Fare Differently in the Nurse Labor Market Compared to Baccalaureate-Prepared RNs?

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 40% of the nearly 3 million registered nurses (RNs) in the United States have an associate's degree (ADN) as their highest level of nursing education. Yet even before the recent Institute of Medicine report on The Future of Nursing, employers of RNs have increasingly preferred baccalaureate-prepared RNs (BSNs), at least anecdotally. Data from the American Community Survey (2003-2013) were analyzed with respect to employment setting, earnings, and employment outcomes of ADN and BSN-prepared RNs. The data reveal a divergence in employment setting: the percentage of ADN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals dropped from 65% to 60% while the percentage of BSN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals grew from 67% to 72% over this period. Many ADNs who would have otherwise been employed in hospitals seem to have shifted to long-term care settings.

  6. Do Associate Degree Registered Nurses Fare Differently in the Nurse Labor Market Compared to Baccalaureate-Prepared RNs?

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 40% of the nearly 3 million registered nurses (RNs) in the United States have an associate's degree (ADN) as their highest level of nursing education. Yet even before the recent Institute of Medicine report on The Future of Nursing, employers of RNs have increasingly preferred baccalaureate-prepared RNs (BSNs), at least anecdotally. Data from the American Community Survey (2003-2013) were analyzed with respect to employment setting, earnings, and employment outcomes of ADN and BSN-prepared RNs. The data reveal a divergence in employment setting: the percentage of ADN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals dropped from 65% to 60% while the percentage of BSN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals grew from 67% to 72% over this period. Many ADNs who would have otherwise been employed in hospitals seem to have shifted to long-term care settings. PMID:26214932

  7. Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing. PMID:24943567

  8. Predictors for Associate Degree Nursing Students' First Attempt on NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing program administrators need to identify significant predictors for associate degree nursing (ADN) students to determine characteristics of those who will most likely pass the NCLEX-RN® on the first attempt. The purpose of the quantitative study with a correlation prediction design was to determine if a relationship existed between the…

  9. Registered Nurse Care Coordination: Creating a Preferred Future for Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jean; Minaudo, Judith

    2015-09-30

    The concept of care coordination is often touted as the preferred way to streamline care for complex patients. Care coordination is even more popular with the mention of it in the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and with new Medicare payment models. The purpose of this article is to define care coordination, briefly describe trends for older adults and care coordination, and explore roles for registered nurses. We describe elder-appropriate models of care coordination useful for older adults with multimorbidity. A brief exemplar provides an example of evidence-based care coordination services provided by a nursing and social work team, a model supported by recent literature. As a result of this discussion, readers will become informed about possibilities for the future of care delivery and the future of professional nursing practice.

  10. Human Papillomavirus and Vaccination Of Males: Knowledge and Attitudes Of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    White, Leah; Waldrop, Julee; Waldrop, Cabe

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for all 11 to 12-year olds as part of the adolescent immunization platform. However, this vaccine has not been universally accepted by health care providers, parents, or the public, and has lower vaccination coverage rates than other recommended vaccines for the same age group. The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses' knowledge and attitudes about HPV and associated HPV vaccine for males. One hundred eleven (111) RNs participated in a descriptive exploratory study using a survey method. Nurses were knowledgeable about specific HPV information but were less knowledgeable about the extent of HPV infection seen in males or the availability or indications of HPV vaccine for males. This study demonstrates that nurses need more education about HPV and HPV vaccine. PMID:27019938

  11. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  12. Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Gardulf, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. PMID:26776502

  13. Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Gardulf, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

  14. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  15. Belief in the "free choice" model of homosexuality: a correlate of homophobia in registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Christopher W

    2007-01-01

    A great amount of social science research has supported the positive correlation between heterosexuals' belief in the free choice model of homosexuality and homophobia. Heterosexuals who believe gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) persons consciously choose their sexual orientation and practice a lifestyle conducive to that choice are much more likely to possess discriminatory, homophobic, homonegative, and heterosexist beliefs. In addition, these individuals are less likely to support gay rights initiatives such as nondiscrimination policies or same-sex partner benefits in the workplace or hate crime enhancement legislation inclusive of GLBT persons. Although researchers have demonstrated this phenomenon in the general population, none have specifically assessed it in the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine registered nurses' overall levels of homophobia and attitudes toward a workplace policy protective of gays and lesbians. These variables were then correlated with belief in the free choice model of homosexuality. Results indicated that belief in the free choice model of homosexuality was the strongest predictor of homophobia in nurses. Implications for nursing leadership and management, nursing education, and future research are discussed.

  16. Barriers to and Facilitators of Research Utilization: A Survey of Registered Nurses in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ping; Jiang, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Lei; Wang, Guo-Rong; Bai, Yang-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Aims This survey aims to describe the perception of barriers to and facilitators of research utilization by registered nurses in Sichuan province, China, and to explore the factors influencing the perceptions of the barriers to and facilitators of research utilization. Methods A cross sectional survey design and a double cluster sampling method were adopted. A total of 590 registered nurses from 3 tertiary level hospitals in Sichuan province, China, were recruited in a period from September 2006 to January 2007. A modified BARRUERS Scale and a Facilitators Scale were used. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, rank transformation test, and multiple linear regression. Results Barriers related to the setting subscale were more influential than barriers related to other subscales. The lack of authority was ranked as the top greatest barrier (15.7%), followed by the lack of time (13.4%) and language barrier (15.0%). Additional barriers identified were the reluctance of patients to research utilization, the lack of funding, and the lack of legal protection. The top three greatest facilitators were enhancing managerial support (36.9%), advancing education to increase knowledge base (21.1%), and increasing time for reviewing and implementing (17.5%), while cooperation of patients to research utilization, establishing a panel to evaluate researches, and funding were listed as additional facilitators. Hospital, educational background, research experience, and knowledge on evidence-based nursing were the factors influencing perceptions of the barriers and facilitators. Conclusions Nurses in China are facing a number of significant barriers in research utilization. Enhancing managerial support might be the most promising facilitator, given Chinese traditional culture and existing health care system. Hospital, educational background, research experience and knowledge on evidence-based nursing should be taken into account to promote research utilization. The BARRIERS

  17. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  18. Using problem-based learning in staff development: strategies for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Chunta, Kristy S; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2010-12-01

    Problem-based learning, described as an active teaching strategy, provides a framework for the development of self-directed learning, self-evaluation, interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and access and retrieval of information. This teaching method can be modified to fit almost any situation. Problem-based learning provides an opportunity to actively engage staff members in learning situations, making it a great asset for teaching in staff development. This article describes the use of problem-based learning for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses. It provides a scenario and facilitator guide pertaining to a real patient situation on an inpatient telemetry unit and offers general tips for implementing problem-based learning in staff education.

  19. Effect of Staff Turnover on Staffing: A Closer Look at Registered Nurses, Licensed Vocational Nurses, and Certified Nursing Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kash, Bita A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Naufal, George S.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the effects of facility and market-level characteristics on staffing levels and turnover rates for direct care staff, and we examined the effect of staff turnover on staffing levels. Design and Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,014 Texas nursing homes. Data were from the 2002 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost…

  20. Non-Work-Related Use of Personal Mobile Phones by Hospital Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. Methods In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. Results The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. Conclusions This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends. PMID:25586982

  1. The role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in the United States.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Takashi; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have been providing anesthesia care in the United States (US) for nearly 150 years. Historically, anesthesia care for surgical patients was mainly provided by trained nurses under the supervision of surgeons until the establishment of anesthesiology as a medical specialty in the US. Currently, all 50 US states utilize CRNAs to perform various kinds of anesthesia care, either under the medical supervision of anesthesiologists in most states, or independently without medical supervision in 16 states; the latter has become an on-going source of conflict between anesthesiologists and CRNAs. Understanding the history and current conditions of anesthesia practice in the US is crucial for countries in which the shortage of anesthesia care providers has become a national issue.

  2. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs. PMID:24831071

  3. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs.

  4. Stress: perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Chipas, Anthony; Cordrey, Dan; Floyd, David; Grubbs, Lindsey; Miller, Sarah; Tyre, Brooks

    2012-08-01

    Stress is a response to change from the norm. Stress affects all individuals to varying degrees and can be positive, such as eustress, or negative, such as distress. The purpose of this qualitative, cross-sectional study was to investigate the stressors of the typical student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA), with the objective of identifying trends in the perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of stress. An online (SurveyMonkey) questionnaire composed of 54 study-specific questions was developed to assess stress in the SRNA population. The questionnaire was sent to members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists via email invitation. The study yielded a sample of 1,282 SRNA participants. Analysis revealed statistically significant relationships between self-reported stress and negative outcomes, such as increased sick days, decreased health and wellness, and depression. The study demonstrated that SRNAs perceive their stress as above average, and it remains a central concern for them.

  5. The Hospital Work Environment And Job Satisfaction of Newly Licensed Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2014-01-01

    In prior studies, newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) described their job as being stressful. Little is known about how the hospital work environment affects their job satisfaction. A random sample of NLRNs were surveyed to assess the influence of hospital work environment on job satisfaction. Perceptions of greater job difficulty, job demands, and patient load were significantly related to lower job satisfaction. In contrast, being White, working 12-hour shifts, working more hours, and having more job control, greater professional tenure, and a perception of a better initial orientation were significantly related to higher job satisfaction.

  6. The impact of interprofessional collaboration on the effectiveness, significance, and future of advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Hannan, Jean; Guido-Sanz, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Interprofessional collaboration was essential for the conduct of research that demonstrated the effectiveness and significance of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in providing care, in reducing health care costs, and in developing innovative models of care for the nation's citizens. If the 2010 Affordable Care Act is to be implemented, APRNs, with their expertise and numbers, are essential to its implementation. Continued interdisciplinary collaboration is needed to expand the scope of APRN state practice regulations, to change reimbursement for APRN services, and to mute opposition to these changes by medical organizations. PMID:22579063

  7. Surgical site infection and prevention guidelines: a primer for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Valerie; Newman, Johanna

    2015-02-01

    Each year 500,000 surgical site infections occur in the US. Surgical site infections are the second most common healthcare-associated infections resulting in readmissions, prolonged hospital stays, higher medical costs, and increased morbidity and mortality. Surgical site infections are preventable in most cases by following evidence-based guidelines for hand hygiene, administration of prophylactic antibiotics, and perioperative patient temperature management. As attention to issues of healthcare quality heightens, the demands for positive surgical patient outcomes are intensifying. The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist can provide transparent high-quality care by implementing evidence-based guidelines for timely and appropriate antibiotic use, maintenance of normothermia, and hand washing.

  8. An Incentive Pay Plan for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Impact On Provider and Organizational Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Bechtle, Mavis; McNett, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) are integral to the provision of quality, cost-effective health care throughout the continuum of care. To promote job satisfaction and ultimately decrease turnover, an APRN incentive plan based on productivity and quality was formulated. Clinical productivity in the incentive plan was measured by national benchmarks for work relative value units for nonphysician providers. After the first year of implementation, APRNs were paid more for additional productivity and quality and the institution had an increase in patient visits and charges. The incentive plan is a win-win for hospitals that employ APRNs. PMID:26259336

  9. Making the Grade through the Front Door: Evaluation and Innovation in a Registered Practical Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Sue; Lindsay, Gail M.; Cochrane, Marianne; Cummings, Katherine; Macdonald, Karen; Mairs, Sandra; Sproul, Susan; Bouchard, Shelley; Lulat, Zainab; Salamat, Nadia; Bell, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Education of nurses from a diploma to a degree is a global phenomenon. However, bridging is often seen as a "backdoor" route to becoming a Registered Nurse and very little evaluation data exists to challenge this notion. Objectives: This research project was undertaken to explore student characteristics, academic performance,…

  10. Interview with Julie Viveros, RN, Director of Nursing, Charlotte Rescue Mission, Rebound men's program. Interview by Joan Kub.

    PubMed

    Viveros, Julie; Kub, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The Charlotte Rescue Mission is a 90-day residential program that serves approximately 530 men and 365 women experiencing the disease of addiction annually. It has a long rich history and has been serving the Charlotte community for over 75 years for men and almost 25 years for women. "The men's program provides a five-fold, client-centered treatment approach addressing spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational needs to battle addiction. The objective is to help individuals fighting addiction and homelessness to accomplish spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational goals and be free of addiction." "Dove's Nest, Charlotte Rescue Mission's women's recovery program, opened its doors in 1992. The program provides a structured, yet loving and stable living environment, with a dedicated staff aimed at helping women understand and deal with the core issues of addiction as a disease". (Web site: http:// charlotterescuemission.org/). I had the privilege of interviewing Julie Viveros, RN, the Director of Nursing for the Rebound men's program, about her unique role at the Rescue Mission.

  11. Registered nurses' perceptions of nurse staffing ratios and new hospital payment regulations.

    PubMed

    Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; DesRoches, Catherine; Hess, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Two regulatory initiatives weigh heavily on the nursing workforce: establishing minimum patient-to-nurse staffing ratios in hospitals and payment policy that eliminates payment to hospitals for negative consequences of care. Although the majority of RNs favor ratios, results also indicate that a good number of RNs either do not support ratios or are unsure, which suggests that while strong support for ratios exists, the support is not universal. With regard to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hospital payment regulations, while many RNs expect that this policy change will increase the emphasis on prevention and additional education and training, RNs also believe they will be blamed if adverse patient conditions occur. A clear majority think that their work will increase, and only a small percentage of RNs think the regulations will lead to added respect, more staffing, higher pay, or raise their status. Beyond affecting the clinical environment, both regulations will impact RNs' economic value in the eyes of the hospitals that employ them.

  12. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  13. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p < .001) between years 1 and 2. The increased episodes could explain previously reported reductions in hospitalizations for this group of children. Descriptive analysis of a program-specific survey showed that parents valued having a single place to call and assistance in managing their child's complex needs. The advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  14. The transition to registered nurse: the experience of a group of New Zealand degree graduates.

    PubMed

    Walker, J

    1998-07-01

    Since 1991, entry to the nursing profession in New Zealand has primarily been through a three year degree programme. The purpose of this study was to explore the issues faced by a group of degree graduates in their first year of registered nurse practice and to identify if the degree outcomes (such as critical thinking, problem solving, reflection on practice, research, independent learning and using cultural safety knowledge) had mediated this transition process. Purposive sampling was used to invite five female graduates to take part in two focus groups, one held at 4 months and the other at 9 months after starting work. Qualitative data were collected using semi-structured questions and the taped interviews were analysed for themes. Five themes were identified: accepting responsibility, accepting their level of knowledge, becoming a team member, professional standards, and workplace conditions. Graduates were using their cultural safety knowledge but they perceived their knowledge of research was linked to further academic study. Their ability to critique their own practice was evident but they found it more difficult to challenge their colleagues' practice and the wider agency culture. Implications of the study are discussed in relation to nursing education and preceptor programmes and areas for further research are indicated. PMID:10481649

  15. Positioning advanced practice registered nurses for health care reform: consensus on APRN regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M; Werner, Kathryn E; Apple, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have positioned themselves to serve an integral role in national health care reform. This article addresses both the policy and the process to develop this policy that has placed them in a strategic position. A successful transformation of the nation's health system will require utilization of all clinicians, particularly primary care providers, to the full extent of their education and scope of practice. APRNs are highly qualified clinicians who provide cost-effective, accessible, patient-centered care and have the education to provide the range of services at the heart of the reform movement, including care coordination, chronic care management, and wellness and preventive care. The APRN community faces many challenges amidst the opportunities of health reform. However, the APRN community's triumph in reaching consensus on APRN regulation signifies a cohesive approach to overcoming the obstacles. The consensus model for APRN regulation, endorsed by 44 national nursing organizations, will serve as a beacon for nursing, as well as a guidepost for consumers and policymakers, on titling, education, certification, accreditation, and licensing for all four APRN roles.

  16. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion.

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Meyer, S M

    2006-03-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba's (1981: 215-216) criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991: 217), were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps--product, price, place, and promotion) could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion) and by ensuring effective service (product) delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community's perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard.

  17. The effect of preceptor role effectiveness on newly licensed registered nurses' perceived psychological empowerment and professional autonomy.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Chanell; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    The first year turnover rate for newly licensed registered nurses is roughly 30% and increases to about 57% in the second year (Twibell et al., 2012). An effective preceptorship has been shown to better facilitate the first year transition (Hodges et al., 2008) and increase retention rates (Pine and Tart, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between newly licensed registered nurses' perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment and professional autonomy. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Sixty-nine newly licensed registered nurses were recruited and surveyed. Newly licensed registered nurses were found to have moderately high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment, and professional autonomy. Preceptor role effectiveness had significant, moderately, positive relationships with professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. There was also a significant relationship found between professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Results show that preceptor role effectiveness is linked to increased professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Therefore, effective preceptorships are necessary in easing the newly licensed registered nurse's transition to practice. Strategies to ensure effective preceptorships and enhance the NRLN's transition to practice are proposed.

  18. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion.

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Meyer, S M

    2006-03-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba's (1981: 215-216) criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991: 217), were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps--product, price, place, and promotion) could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion) and by ensuring effective service (product) delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community's perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard. PMID:16817488

  19. Predictors of Successful Nursing Education Outcomes: A Study of the North Carolina Central University's Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukpabi, Chinasa Victor

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to specify the variables that would play the greatest role in predicting success of North Carolina Central University (NCCU) nursing graduates in the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Participants for this study include a convenience sample of 39 students who…

  20. Young Registered Nurses' Intention to Leave the Profession and Professional Turnover in Early Career: A Qualitative Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Salanterä, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    In a time of global nursing shortages an alarming number of young registered nurses have expressed a willingness to leave the profession. In this qualitative case study we investigate in depth why young nurses leave nursing profession and reeducate themselves for a new career. The study is based on longitudinal interviews of three young registered nurses in Finland. These nurses were first interviewed between December 2006 and May 2007, when they were 29–32 years old and having an intention to leave the profession. The second interview took place four years later, from January 2011 to March 2011 when all of them had made the transition to a new career. Data were analyzed in two stages. In the first stage, comprehensive career story narratives were formed on the basis of the interviews. In the second stage, emerging themes in these stories were compared, contrasted, and interpreted in the context of the overall career histories. Nursing as a second career choice and demanding work content as well as poor practice environment and the inability to identify with the stereotypical images of nurses were main themes that emerged from these career stories. The results of this interpretative qualitative study reflect a shift toward insights into understanding professional turnover as a complex and long-lasting process. PMID:24027640

  1. Disrupted by disaster: shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists affected by hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Bennett, Marsha J; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Biddle, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) whose senior year of education and training was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, as well as to determine the storm's psychosocial impact on them. A convenience sample of 10 former SRNAs participated in focus groups that were audiorecorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed. Three major themes emerged from the study: Seriousness of Urgency, Managing Uncertainty, and Stability Equaled Relief. The themes represented how the SRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the SRNAs resulted mainly in temporary increased alcohol consumption and short-term anxiety. One person started smoking. The results of this study should serve as a guide to formulate policies regarding the education of SRNAs during and immediately after a disaster and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding SRNAs.

  2. Disrupted by disaster: shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists affected by hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Bennett, Marsha J; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Biddle, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) whose senior year of education and training was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, as well as to determine the storm's psychosocial impact on them. A convenience sample of 10 former SRNAs participated in focus groups that were audiorecorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed. Three major themes emerged from the study: Seriousness of Urgency, Managing Uncertainty, and Stability Equaled Relief. The themes represented how the SRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the SRNAs resulted mainly in temporary increased alcohol consumption and short-term anxiety. One person started smoking. The results of this study should serve as a guide to formulate policies regarding the education of SRNAs during and immediately after a disaster and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding SRNAs. PMID:22229961

  3. Development of a social justice gauge and its use to review the Canadian Nurses Association's Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Davison, Colleen M; Edwards, Nancy; Webber, June; Robinson, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    Betty Bekemeier and Patricia Butterfield undertook a critical review of 3 American nursing documents in relation to the concept of social justice. Their article inspired a review of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Registered Nurses, using a Social Justice Gauge developed by the Canadian Nurses Association. The article outlines the development of the gauge and its use in this review. Although some evidence of generic and outdated language is evident in the Canadian code, the text appears well aligned with social justice ideals overall. That being said however, there still remains significant possibility for enlarging the application of social justice, especially in relation to the place of nurses in healthcare institutions and in nontraditional nursing settings, in future revisions of the code. Work to further examine, adapt, and test the Canadian Nurses Association's Social Justice Gauge is encouraged.

  4. Reinforcing communication skills while registered nurses simultaneously learn course content: a response to learning needs.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, B B

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of Integrated Skills Reinforcement (ISR) in a baccalaureate nursing course entitled "Principles of Health Assessment" for 15 registered nurse students. ISR is a comprehensive teaching-learning approach that simultaneously reinforces student writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while they learn course content. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of ISR on writing skills and student satisfaction. A learner's guide and teacher's guide, created in advance by the teacher, described specific language activities and assignments that were implemented throughout the ISR course. During each class, the teacher promoted discussion, collaboration, and co-inquiry among students, using course content as the vehicle of exchange. Writing was assessed at the beginning and end of the course. The influence of ISR on the content, organization, sentence structure, tone, and strength of position of student writing was analyzed. Writing samples were scored by an independent evaluator trained in methods of holistic scoring. Ninety-three per cent (14 of 15 students) achieved writing growth from .5 to 1.5 points on a scale of 6 points. Student response to both the ISR approach and specific ISR activities was assessed by teacher-created surveys administered at the middle-end of the course. One hundred per cent of the students at the end of this project agreed that the ISR activities, specifically the writing and reading activities, helped them better understand the course content. These responses differed from evaluations written by the same students at the middle of the course. The ISR approach fostered analysis and communication through active collaboration, behaviors cited as critical for effective participation of nurses in today's complex health care environment.

  5. Integrating interprofessional collaboration skills into the advanced practice registered nurse socialization process.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kathleen; Payne, Camille; Heye, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of interprofessional collaboration and practice as a means to provide patient-centered care and to decrease the current fragmentation of health care services in the 21st century provides a clear and unique opportunity for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) to assume a key role. For APRNs and other health care providers, to participate effectively as team members requires an interprofessional mindset. Development of interprofessional skills and knowledge for the APRN has been hindered by a silo approach to APRN role socialization. The Institute of Medicine Report (IOM; 2010) states that current health care systems should focus on team collaboration to deliver accessible, high-quality, patient-centered health care that addresses wellness and prevention of illness and adverse events, management of chronic illness, and increased capacity of all providers on the team. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the need to incorporate interprofessional education (IPE) into the socialization models used in advanced practice nursing programs. IPE requires moving beyond profession-specific educational efforts to engage students of different health care professions in interactive learning. Being able to work effectively as member of a clinical team while a student is a fundamental part of that learning (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). The objective of IPE curriculum models in graduate nursing programs is to educate APRNs in the development of an interprofessional mindset. Interprofessional collaboration and coordination are needed to achieve seamless transitions for patients between providers, specialties, and health care settings (IOM, 2010). Achieving the vision requires the continuous development of interprofessional competencies by APRNs as part of the learning process, so that upon entering the workforce, APRNs are ready to practice effective teamwork and team-based care. Socialization of the professional APRN

  6. Examination of the Perceptions of Registered Nurses Regarding the Use of Healing Touch in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Ann Friesen, Mary; Fabian, Jennifer; Swengros, Diane; Herbst, Anna; Mangione, Lucrezia

    2016-06-01

    Given the current transformation of traditional health care to provide more integrative and complementary modalities, health systems are implementing new programs and services to meet consumer and provider needs. One such integrative modality, Healing Touch, with a foundation in holistic nursing, is a gentle therapy that uses touch to promote health and well-being by balancing the human energy system. This article describes the perceptions of registered nurses regarding the implementation of a Healing Touch training program at a multihospital health system. Five themes were identified: benefit to the patient, benefit to the nurse, holism beyond task orientation, integrating Healing Touch into acute care, and barriers and challenges. Nurses recognize the importance of creating caring-healing relationships and a holistic approach to care. Training in Healing Touch provides one avenue for nurses and health care providers to provide compassionate care. PMID:26130464

  7. The Designing and Development of a Program to Prepare Inactive Registered Nurses for Reentry into Practice. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The planning and design of a course for the inactive registered nurse desiring to return to active practice is reported in this practicum paper. Current literature was reviewed with emphasis on the needs in rural states, such as Vermont, and characteristics of the target group. The first three modules of the course were developed, entitled: The…

  8. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified...— Anesthesia and related care means those services that a certified registered nurse anesthetist is legally... approximately two years of specialized basic science and clinical education in anesthesia at a level that...

  9. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified...— Anesthesia and related care means those services that a certified registered nurse anesthetist is legally... approximately two years of specialized basic science and clinical education in anesthesia at a level that...

  10. Unlicensed Assistive Personnel: A Solution to Dwindling Health Care Resources or the Precursor to the Apocalypse of Registered Nursing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huston, Carol L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the increased use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in direct patient care delivery as a result of rising health care costs. Looks at advantages and disadvantages of having registered nurses supervise UAP and suggests that the model is not necessarily cost-effective. (JOW)

  11. Role and Responsibilities of the School Nurse (Registered Nurse) and the Child with Special Health Care Needs. Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board of Nursing, Baltimore.

    This set of guidelines by the Maryland Board of Nursing presents the role and responsibilities of the school nurse in relation to the child with special health care needs. The introduction identifies four basic issues including necessary level of preparation, who determines what nursing care can be delegated, under what conditions nursing care can…

  12. The Nursing Shortage and the Role of Community Colleges in Nurse Education. Executive Summary. AACC Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viterito, Arthur; Teich, Carolyn

    This is a report by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) on a the shortage of registered nurses (RN) in the United States and the role of community colleges in nurse education. Reasons for the shortage include: (1) inadequate wages; (2) heavy workloads; (3) undesirable work schedules; (4) increased administrative duties; (5) low…

  13. Lost in transition--a review of qualitative literature of newly qualified Registered Nurses' experiences in their transition to practice journey.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Yen Tjuin Eugene; Pua, Lay Hoon; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-02-01

    The failure of newly qualified Registered Nurses to be appropriately transitioned into the new practice has been mentioned in numerous nursing literatures. Along with the need to decrease turnover rates, increase satisfaction rate of nurses and improve patient outcomes, nursing educators in Singapore are interested in the experiences of these nurses in their transition to practice journey. In this paper, the author attempts to critically review qualitative research conducted in that area to identify why nurses are leaving the profession and how nursing educators in Singapore can reduce stress and uncertainty in the newly qualified Registered Nurses during their transition to practice journey. In conducting a qualitative literature review, the author aims to explore interpretation of these nurses' subjective experiences and description of their social context, ultimately paying attention to lay knowledge as human behaviour is context specific rather than being represented in the quantitative form.

  14. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration.

  15. Development of a Self-Paced Video Program To Teach Intravenous Therapy Techniques to Second Year Registered Nursing Students. Societal Factors Affecting Educations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A self-paced video program was developed for the registered nursing faculty at Long Beach City College (California) to teach intravenous therapy techniques to second-year nursing students. The content of the Intravenous Therapy Video was determined based on a review of the literature and input from the advisory panel (four nursing department…

  16. UNDERGRADUATE NURSING EDUCATION TO ADDRESS PATIENTS’ CONCERNS ABOUT SEXUAL HEALTH: THE PERCEIVED LEARNING NEEDS OF SENIOR TRADITIONAL FOUR-YEAR AND TWO-YEAR RECURRENT EDUCATION (RN-BSN) UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS IN TAIWAN

    PubMed Central

    TSAI, LI-YA; HUANG, CHENG-YI; SHIH, FEN-FEN; LI, CHI-RONG; LAI, TE-JEN

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aims of this study were to identify learning needs among traditional four-year and two-year recurrent education (RN-BSN) undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan with regard to patients’ concerns about sexual health. A 24-item instrument (Learning Needs for Addressing Patients’ Sexual Health Concerns) was used to collect data. Compared to RN-BSN undergraduate nursing students, traditional four-year undergraduate nursing students had more learning needs in the aspects of sexuality in health and illness (2.19 ± 0.66 vs. 1.80 ± 0.89, P = 0.005) and approaches to sexual health care (2.03 ± 0.72 vs. 1.76 ± 0.86, P = 0.033). After adjustment for other variables by the backward selection approach, those with experience in assessing patient’s sexual functioning had fewer learning needs in sexuality in health and illness (β = –0.375, P = 0.001), communication about patient’s intimate relationships (β = –0.242, P = 0.031), and approaches to sexual health care (β = –0.288, P = 0.013); those who agreed that sexual health care was a nursing role also expressed greater needs to learn about these 3 aspects (all P < 0.01). Content related to sexuality in health and illness and approaches to sexual health care should be strengthened in the traditional undergraduate nursing curriculum in order to support sexual health related competence, build a positive attitude regarding sexual health care as a nursing role, and strengthen the experience of assessing patient’s sexual functioning. A different, simplified program may be more suitable for those with clinical experience. PMID:25741036

  17. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  18. AACJC/Metropolitan Life Foundation Registered Nurse Shortage Project: Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, James F.

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges's Nurse Shortage Project was designed to alleviate the nurse shortage by helping community colleges improve recruitment, retention, and graduation in nursing programs through direct mini-grants, with a special emphasis on Tech Prep/Associate Degree initiatives between secondary schools and…

  19. A Core Course on Veterans' Health in an Online RN to BSN Program: Preparing Nurses to Work with Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keavney, Elaine C.

    2015-01-01

    The Joining Forces Initiative challenges nursing programs throughout the country to develop curriculum that addresses the unique healthcare issues facing veterans. It is imperative that Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students acquire the knowledge that will help them to care for veterans in all areas of nursing practice. This article…

  20. Nurse satisfaction and the implementation of minimum nurse staffing regulations.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne

    2008-02-01

    In 1999, California passed the first legislation in the United States to establish minimum staffing levels for licensed nurses in hospitals. Implementation of the regulation began in 2004. This article examines whether nurses who work in hospitals in California have perceived improvements in their working conditions. A statewide sample survey of registered nurses is used, and the survey data are linked with regional data to learn whether changes in satisfaction are associated with the degree to which regional employers were expected to increase nurse staffing when the ratios were implemented. Nurse satisfaction improved between 2004 and 2006, particularly with the adequacy of RN staff, time for patient education, benefits, and clerical support. There was a significant increase in overall job satisfaction between 2004 and 2006. However, improvements in satisfaction with the adequacy of RN staff were not associated with the degree to which regional hospitals were expected to increase staffing. PMID:18390479

  1. Effect of a Nontechnical Skills Intervention on First-Year Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Skills During Crisis Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Linda L

    2016-02-01

    Simulation-based education provides a safe place for student registered nurse anesthetists to practice non-technical skills before entering the clinical arena. An anesthetist's lack of nontechnical skills contributes to adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an educational intervention on nontechnical skills could improve the performance of nontechnical skills during anesthesia crisis simulation with a group of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists. Thirty-two first-year students volunteered for this quasi-experimental study. Each subject was videotaped and rated as he or she performed 6 simulated crisis scenarios: 3 scenarios before the intervention and 3 after the intervention. Findings revealed that the nontechnical skills mean posttest score was greater than pretest scores: t (df = 31) = 1.99, P = .028. The mean gain in scores for standardized nontechnical skills were significantly greater than those for standardized technical skills: t (df = 30) = 1.81, P = .04. In conclusion, a 3-hour educational intervention on nontechnical skills resulted in significant improvement. Nontechnical skills therefore are not acquired through experience, but rather through instruction. An educational intervention using the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills system is a valuable tool in the measurement of nontechnical skills assessment of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists. PMID:26939388

  2. Effect of a Nontechnical Skills Intervention on First-Year Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Skills During Crisis Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Linda L

    2016-02-01

    Simulation-based education provides a safe place for student registered nurse anesthetists to practice non-technical skills before entering the clinical arena. An anesthetist's lack of nontechnical skills contributes to adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an educational intervention on nontechnical skills could improve the performance of nontechnical skills during anesthesia crisis simulation with a group of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists. Thirty-two first-year students volunteered for this quasi-experimental study. Each subject was videotaped and rated as he or she performed 6 simulated crisis scenarios: 3 scenarios before the intervention and 3 after the intervention. Findings revealed that the nontechnical skills mean posttest score was greater than pretest scores: t (df = 31) = 1.99, P = .028. The mean gain in scores for standardized nontechnical skills were significantly greater than those for standardized technical skills: t (df = 30) = 1.81, P = .04. In conclusion, a 3-hour educational intervention on nontechnical skills resulted in significant improvement. Nontechnical skills therefore are not acquired through experience, but rather through instruction. An educational intervention using the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills system is a valuable tool in the measurement of nontechnical skills assessment of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists.

  3. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27305338

  5. Standard instruction versus simulation: Educating registered nurses in the early recognition of patient deterioration in paediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jessica; Nash, Robyn; Lewis, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and stabilising deterioration in a child with significant clinical compromise is both a challenging and necessary role of the paediatric critical care nurse. Within adult critical care research, high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been shown to positively impact learner outcomes regarding identification and management of a deteriorating patient; however, there is a paucity of evidence examining the use of HFPS in paediatric nursing education. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HFPS on nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge for recognising and managing paediatric deterioration. Further, participants' perceptions of the learning experiences specific to the identification and management of a deteriorating child were also explored. Registered nurses working in a tertiary-referral paediatric critical care unit were recruited for this quasi-experimental study. Using a pre-test/post-test control-group design, participants were assigned to one of two learning experiences: HFPS or standard instruction. Following the learning experience, nurses were also invited to participate in semi-structured interviews. 30 nurses participated in the study (control n=15, experiment n=15). Participants in the HFPS intervention were most likely to demonstrate an increase in both perceived self-efficacy (p=<0.01) and knowledge (p=<0.01). No statistically significant change was observed in control group scores. The mean difference in self-efficacy gain score between the two groups was 5.67 score units higher for the experiment group compared to the control. HFPS also yielded higher follow-up knowledge scores (p=0.01) compared to standard instruction. Ten nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of the interview data identified four themes: self-awareness, hands-on learning, teamwork, and maximising learning. The results of this study suggest that HFPS can positively influence nurses' self-efficacy and knowledge test scores

  6. [Masculinity and femininity in self-perceptions and ideals of registered nurses].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva

    2010-08-01

    Despite of intensive professionalisation efforts and changed legal frameworks the public image of nursing is still full of gender-stereotypes. This study investigates to what extend public stereotypes of "typically female" and "typically male" are reflected in the self-concept and ideals of nurses. Using a cross-sectional research design 174 female nurses were surveyed regarding their sex-role orientation and ideals (femininity and masculinity) using a standardized questionnaire (BSRI). Contrary to stereotypes the respondents indentified more with masculine traits. Masculine attributes predominated especially in ideas about the ideal nurse. No differences between nurses who work in different areas could be revealed. In all endeavors regarding autonomy and masculinity the significance of the feminine function of "caring" must not be forgotten. Teachers in healthcare and nursing play a central role in sensibilising students for gender issues.

  7. Increasing the Number of Certified Registered Nurses in an Emergency Department: A Cohort Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Neira, Paula M; Maliszewski, Barbara; Toledo, RaniMaria; Borries, Kimberly; Baptiste, Diana-Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, hospital emergency departments are met with challenges because of increasing patient demands, overcrowding, and the need to protect patient safety. It is imperative that frontline emergency department nurses are prepared to meet the complex needs of diverse patient populations by having appropriate continuing education, training, and institutional resources. Professional certification is associated with improved patient safety, higher organizational performance scores, professional growth, and credibility among nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and outcome of a nursing professional development-practitioner-led intervention to promote professional certification among nurses in an urban adult emergency department while reducing overall cost of institutional support for certification preparation. PMID:27648902

  8. Perceptions of Writing Confidence, Critical Thinking, and Writing Competence among Registered Nurse-Learners Studying Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    Historically, nursing education has recognized that writing enhances critical thinking, the basis of the clinical reasoning process. The online learning recently adopted by Nursing involves considerable writing, which may enhance critical thinking more than face-to-face courses. In the study reported here, the critical thinking and writing…

  9. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  10. Disaster competency development and integration in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Joan M

    2005-09-01

    Nurses, because of their nursing education and perspective practicing in multiple roles and settings, are uniquely qualified for mass casualty preparedness and response. Educating the current 2.7 million registered nurses and all future nursing graduates is a daunting task. Nursing education must ensure that graduates are prepared with the necessary knowledge and skills for mass casualty incidents. Four key entities are essential for education's successful implementation of disaster preparedness: education and professional organizations, accreditation and regulatory bodies, schools of nursing, and continuing education providers. This article examines the role each of these key entities plays in the development of a nursing workforce prepared for mass casualty response. In addition, the International Nursing Coalition for Mass Casualty Education (INCMCE) registered nurse (RN) competencies for mass casualty incidents and guidelines for integrating these competencies into the nursing education curricula are presented.

  11. Direct care registered nurses' and nursing leaders' review of the clinical competencies needed for the successful nurse of the future: a gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Strong, Margaret; Kane, Irene; Petras, Denise; Johnson-Joy, Cheryl; Weingarten, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Direct care nurses and nurse leaders were surveyed on their perceptions of the appropriateness, importance, and use in daily practice of 10 clinical nursing competencies needed for nurses to be successful in the future. Competencies needed in the 21st century are not based entirely on task-driven motor skills because comprehensive knowledge is essential to care for complex patients. Differences identified between direct care nurses, leaders, and educational levels provide educational opportunities for both groups.

  12. The Effect of Hardiness Education on Hardiness and Burnout on Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaye

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders need to be aware of the costly implications of staff retention, unit finances, and patient satisfaction caused by unmanaged stress and burnout as well as staff disengagement. It is vital to the organizational behavior of the health care facility for nurse managers to promote, educate, and screen for hardiness in their staff. Hardiness education can lessen the effects of stress and burnout. Nurse managers and executives can give their staff valuable tools and resources to enhance hardiness and coping abilities through hardiness education. PMID:26477118

  13. Impact of residency programs on professional socialization of newly licensed registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Maguire, Patrica; Halfer, Diana; Brewer, Barbara; Schmalenberg, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Do Nurse Residency Programs (NRPs) reflect the professional socialization process? Residency facilitators in 34 Magnet hospitals completed Residency Program Questionnaires constructed to reflect the goals, themes, components, and strategies of the professional socialization process described in the literature. NRPs in 4 hospitals exemplified the complete two-stage (role transition and role/community integration) process. In 14 hospitals, NRPs were of sufficient length and contained components that reflected the professional socialization process. In 16 hospitals, NRPs exemplified the "becoming" role transition stage. What components are most effective in the professional socialization of new graduate nurses? A total of 907 new and experienced nurses, nurse managers, and educators working on clinical units with confirmed healthy work environments in 20 Magnet hospitals with additional "excellence designations" were interviewed. Components identified as most instrumental were precepted experience, reflective seminars, skill acquisition, reflective practice sessions, evidence-based management projects, and clinical coaching-mentoring sessions. Suggestions for improvement of NRPs are offered.

  14. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... its “home page” or “electronic bulletin board,” provided that the nurses have, as a practical matter... practical computer access, a hard copy must be posted in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section and...

  15. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  16. Comparison of Online and Traditional Basic Life Support Renewal Training Methods for Registered Professional Nurses.

    PubMed

    Serwetnyk, Tara M; Filmore, Kristi; VonBacho, Stephanie; Cole, Robert; Miterko, Cindy; Smith, Caitlin; Smith, Charlene M

    2015-01-01

    Basic Life Support certification for nursing staff is achieved through various training methods. This study compared three American Heart Association training methods for nurses seeking Basic Life Support renewal: a traditional classroom approach and two online options. Findings indicate that online methods for Basic Life Support renewal deliver cost and time savings, while maintaining positive learning outcomes, satisfaction, and confidence level of participants. PMID:26580468

  17. A survey of threats and violent behaviour by patients against registered nurses in their first year of practice.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian G; Poole, Suzette J; Smith, Naumai A; Coverdale, John H; Gale, Chris K

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aggressive behaviours by patients against nurses in the first year of practice, and to determine the psychological impact of this behaviour. An anonymous survey was sent to registered nurses in their first year of practice. From the 1169 survey instruments that were distributed, 551 were returned completed (a response rate of 47%). The most common inappropriate behaviour by patients involved verbal threats (n = 192, 35%), verbal sexual harassment (n = 167, 30%) and physical intimidation (n = 161, 29%). There were 22 incidents of assault requiring medical intervention and 21 incidents of participants being stalked by patients. Male graduates and younger nurses were especially vulnerable. Mental health was the service area most at risk. A most distressing incident was described by 123 (22%) of respondents. The level of distress caused by the incident was rated by 68 of the 123 respondents (55%) as moderate or severe. Only half of those who described a most distressing event indicated they had some undergraduate training in protecting against assault or in managing potentially violent incidents (n = 63 of 123; 51%). After registration, 45 (37%) indicated they had had such training. The findings of this study indicate priorities for effective prevention programmes. The issues highlighted need to be addressed in undergraduate nursing curricula and in the development of orientation programmes supporting new graduates.

  18. Fostering RN-to-BSN students' confidence in searching online for scholarly information on evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    McCulley, Carol; Jones, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Graduates of bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs are increasingly expected to take an active role in assessing and improving nursing practice, and nurse educators are expected to prepare BSN students for this expanding role. Information literacy, the ability to search for, find, get, and use scholarly information to inform nursing practice, should be a critical component of nursing education. This article focuses on five strategies for teaching information literacy to registered nurse (RN)-to-BSN students in an online continuing education environment. These strategies include the addition of an embedded librarian to the online courses, collaboration between the librarian and nursing faculty, a subject guide with access to resources and tutorials at the point of need, student-centered learning with authentic assignments, and reflection on the learning process. Student reflections suggest that these strategies result in increased confidence in searching for and finding the evidence-based scholarship that they need.

  19. Mortality among female registered nurses and school teachers in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    King, A S; Threlfall, W J; Band, P R; Gallagher, R P

    1994-07-01

    The mortality profile of female nurses and teachers in British Columbia (BC) was examined using age-standardized proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) calculated for the period 1950-1984. Lowered overall mortality among nurses was seen for degenerative heart disease and for cerebrovascular accidents. Significantly elevated PMR values were observed for cancer of the breast and ovary in nurses of age 20-65 years. PMRs were significantly elevated for cancer of the pancreas and leukemia among those age 20 years and older. Elevated values were also observed for motor vehicle accidents and suicide among nurses in both age groups. Lower than expected mortality from degenerative heart disease and cerebrovascular accidents was seen in working age teachers (age 20-65 years). However, elevated PMRs were detected for carcinoma of the colon, breast, endometrium, brain, and melanoma. Among those 20 years and over, significantly elevated PMRs were also observed for cancers of the ovary and other digestive organs. Elevated PMRs were found for motor vehicle and aircraft accidents. Mortality from cirrhosis of the liver was lower than anticipated in both teachers and nurses. A number of significant PMRs declined when deaths of "homemakers" were withdrawn from the comparison group used to generate PMR values, suggesting that risk of death from various causes among women working outside the home differ from those seen in women who are predominantly in the home. PMID:8074120

  20. Insights into Registered Nurses' professional values through the eyes of graduating students.

    PubMed

    Lyneham, Joy; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2016-03-01

    Professional values are integrated into undergraduate nursing curricula and taught in various ways. A significant influence on students' developing values and their definition of a 'good nurse' are the nurses they interact with in practice. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from a study that explored the professional values that graduating students viewed as important and how these values were illustrated in the behaviours of the nurses whose clinical practice they admired and wished to emulate. Fourteen students from one Australian university were interviewed on the last day of their final clinical placement. An interpretive qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews framed the study. Data were audio recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The participants' descriptions illustrated a range of professional values and behaviours. Four main professional values were identified, these included: being person-centred; kindness and caring; being in control; and commitment to learning. Findings demonstrated that the participants understood the meaning and relevance of professional nursing values, from a theoretical, moral and practical stance. Their responses also illustrated an appreciation of how these values influence patient care and the organisational culture as a whole. PMID:26682771

  1. Current Assessments of Quality and Safety Competencies in Registered Professional Nurses: An Examination of Nurse Leader Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elaine Lois

    2012-01-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare is a national concern. It has been proposed that nurses and other clinicians need to develop a new set of competencies in order to make significant improvements in the quality and safety of patient care. These new competencies include: patient-centered care; teamwork and collaboration; evidence-based practice;…

  2. The student perspective on RN-Plus-10 legislation: a survey of associate degree and diploma nursing program students.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Teeter, Marilyn M

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of associate degree and diploma nursing students in Pennsylvania designed to elicit their future educational goals and opinions regarding proposed educational advancement legislation. Results indicated the majority of respondents (86.3 percent) planned to pursue the bachelor's degree in nursing; most (94.8 percent) hoped to be enrolled in a BSN program within four years of graduation. The majority (78.9 percent) indicated that even if they were mandated to complete the bachelor's degree in nursing within 10 years, they would still enroll in their current associate degree or diploma program. Asked if 10 years is a reasonable amount of time to complete the BSN, 79.4 percent agreed it is. If money were not an obstacle, 95.8 percent of participants indicated they would pursue a BSN or higher. The results of this survey suggest that the vast majority of associate degree and diploma nursing students value and hope to pursue higher education in nursing.

  3. Registered nurses as permanent members of medical evacuation crews: the critical link.

    PubMed

    Wissemann, Michael W; Vanfosson, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Medical evacuation has changed form the experiences of the past decade of combat operations. Much of the focus of the medical support in the combat zone is now critical care during evacuation, which is, and will continue to be, a very successful, life-saving asset. The assignment of Army critical care or trauma nurses to medical evacuation units is consistent with the recognition that the medical evacuation system is a truly vital asset in the success of today's American military. Our NATO allies, and our sister services, rely heavily on the availability, reliability, and especially continuity of care of the Arm medical evacuation system. It is time to upgrade the system of evacuation and provide our Warriors with the greatest possibilities of survival. Army nurses trained in critical care and trauma nursing are best suited to provide that continuity of care. PMID:23007941

  4. Work-Family Conflict Among Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: A Structural Equation Model of Antecedents and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Raffenaud, Amanda; Fottler, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Conflict between work and family is a human resource management issue that is particularly relevant for nurses. Nursing is a demanding profession, and a high proportion of nurses are women, who tend to have greater family responsibilities than men. Little is known regarding work-family conflict among nurses, and even less is known about how this affects newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs), who can be stressed from their new jobs and careers. This study empirically tests a model of antecedents and outcomes of work-family and family-work conflict among a sample of NLRNs. We developed a model of the relationships between personal and work environment characteristics, work-family and family-work conflicts, job satisfaction, and intent to leave the job and profession. We used structural equation modeling (Amos, IBM SPSS) to test the model with data from.a survey of NLRNs. We examined a number of latent variables, as well as direct and mediating relationships. The measurement models for all latent variables were validated. The final model indicated that age, health, and family responsibilities are antecedents of family-work conflict; job demands lead to work-family conflict; family-work conflict contributes to job difficulties, which lowers job satisfaction, which, in turn, increases the intent to leave the job and profession; and work-family conflict increases the intent to leave the job and profession (but does not directly affect job satisfaction). Policies to help NLRNs with family responsibilities could reduce family-work conflict, which might reduce job difficulties and improve satisfaction and retention. In addition, policies to reduce job demands could reduce work-family conflict and improve retention.

  5. Association between registered nurse staffing and management outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes within primary care: a cross-sectional linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Lukewich, Julia; Edge, Dana S.; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Williamson, Tyler; Tranmer, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the organization of primary care continues to evolve toward more interdisciplinary team structures, demonstrating effectiveness of care delivery is becoming important, particularly for nonphysician providers. Nurses are the most common nonphysician provider within primary care. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between primary care delivery models that incorporate registered nurses and clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Patient data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network were matched with survey data from 15 Family Health Team practices in southeastern Ontario. Included patients were adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had at least 1 primary care encounter at a Family Health Team practice that completed the organizational survey between Apr. 1, 2013, and Mar. 31, 2014. The clinical outcomes explored included hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and urine albumin:creatinine ratio. Results: Of the 15 practices, 13 (86.7%) had at least 1 registered nurse. The presence of 1 or more registered nurses in the practice was associated with increased odds of patients' having their hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values meet recommended targets. Practices with the lowest ratios of patients with diabetes to registered nurse had a significantly greater proportion of patients with hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose values on target than did practices with the highest ratios of patients to registered nurse (p < 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Interpretation: The findings suggest that registered nurse staffing within primary care practice teams contributes to better diabetic care, as measured by diabetes management indicators. This study sets the groundwork for further exploration of nursing and organizational contributions to patient care in the primary care setting

  6. Factors associated with hospital retention of RNs in the New York City Metropolitan Area: an analysis of the 1996, 2000, and 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Peri; Adams, Richard E

    2008-08-01

    The nursing shortage is well documented, and government estimates indicate that shortfalls will worsen in the future. As the largest employer of registered nurses (RNs), hospitals are the most seriously affected by shortages, as they compete with other employment settings for limited nursing resources. Recruitment remains the primary avenue for ensuring staffing levels, but retention is increasingly important as applicant pools shrink because of demographic and employment trends. Effective retention strategies must address the factors that contribute to exodus of RNs from hospitals, as well as isolating the factors that enable RNs to remain in hospital employment. This secondary analysis of the 1996, 2000, and 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses examines the demographic, employment, and educational factors associated with working in hospitals, having full-time status, and holding patient care positions. The findings suggest that hospitals must address nonwork issues to retain nursing personnel. Relevant policy issues are examined and strategies for effective retention are offered. PMID:18509198

  7. Reinforcing Communication Skills While Registered Nurses Simultaneously Learn Course Content: A Response to Learning Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Simone, Barbara B.

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen nursing students participated in Integrated Skills Reinforcement, an approach that reinforces writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while students learn course content. Pre-/postassessment of writing showed that 93% achieved writing improvement. All students agreed that the approach improved understanding of course content, a…

  8. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  9. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... easily read the notices on their way to or from their duties. Appropriate locations for posting hard copy..., the facility may use electronic means it ordinarily uses to communicate with its nurses about job... satisfied by electronic means if an individual e-mail message, with the Attestation as an attachment,...

  10. Seven Years On: Distance Learning Courses for First Level Registered Nurses and Midwives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogerson, Elizabeth C. B.; Harden, Ronald M.

    1999-01-01

    At the University of Dundee (Scotland), distance learning is used to provide inservice opportunities for nurses and midwives. The modular courses feature problem-based and work-based learning, text-based study guides, and strategies to provide continuous learner support. (SK)

  11. Costs of Hospital-Sponsored Orientation & Inservice Education for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kase, Suzanne H.; Swenson, Betty

    A nationwide survey sought to analyze hospital orientation and inservice education programs to determine their nature and costs with focus on differences in orientation costs for new nurses with three different types of preparation (diploma, associate degree (AD), and baccalaureate) and for cost differences in hospitals of varying sizes.…

  12. The Relationship between Barcode Medication Administration Satisfaction and the Use of Workarounds among Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sally F.

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug events, resulting in preventable patient harm or death, are of great concern. To keep patients safe, hospitals have implemented barcode medication administration (BCMA) technology for RNs who have accepted this technology with varying levels of satisfaction. When nurses are dissatisfied with a BCMA system, they may find alternative…

  13. Meeting the Needs of the Health System: A Refresher Course for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Margaret J.; Czekanski, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    A refresher course to facilitate the return of inactive nurses to the work force included a weighted admission system, didactic content, simulated laboratory experiences, and precepted clinical experiences. Recommendations for future course implementation included a systematic evaluation of each participant's knowledge base at the beginning of the…

  14. Professional Development Needs of Registered Nurses Practicing at a Military Community Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibb, Sandra C.; Malebranche, Mark; Crowell, Debra; Altman, Colleen; Lyon, Sylvia; Carlson, Ariel; Miller, Steven; Miller, Teresa; Rybarczyk, Jeanine

    2003-01-01

    Six focus groups with 21 nurses in military hospitals identified five professional development themes: (1) critical topics; (2) appropriate continuing education methods; (3) evaluation of effectiveness and efficiency of continuing education; (4) barriers to professional development; and (5) staff retention issues. Recommendations for mentoring,…

  15. RN-BSN Students' Perceptions of the Differences in Practice of the ADN- and BSN-Prepared RN.

    PubMed

    Matthias, April D; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study explored RN-BSN students' perceptions of practice differences between nurses prepared with an ADN and BSN. Five themes were identified in 20 students' discussion posts: "a nurse is a nurse" at the bedside, beyond the bedside, BSN wanted, digging deeper, and appraisal. Results illustrate the need for educators to assist nurses in translating the differentiated educational competencies to the practice role of the bedside RN.

  16. An exploratory study of the correlates of intent to quit among certified registered nurse anesthetists in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E; Largent, R N; Eberhardt, B J

    1990-07-01

    Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) provide the majority of anesthesia services in rural hospitals. Some services provided by CRNAs are routine, while others are for emergency conditions. The effect of the current nurse shortage on the potential pool of nurse anesthetists becomes a critical concern when considering the nature of CRNA services in rural areas. This study investigated the potential factors that relate to the desire of CRNAs to continue practicing in rural hospitals of North Dakota. All CRNAs licensed in North Dakota (n = 125) were mailed survey questionnaires. Approximately five weeks later responses were received from 54 respondents for an overall return rate of 43 percent. Correlational analyses were used to examine responses of the subjects. A moderate degree of relationship was found among the work-related variables. The average interscale correlation, calculated using an r to z transformation, for the seven work-related variables was 0.47. Overall, pay and promotion satisfaction exhibited strong (r greater than 0.60) correlations with turnover intentions. Supervisory satisfaction was only moderately (r = -0.33) related to intention to quit. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the management of CRNAs in rural hospitals. Revised salary schedules, clinical ladders for promotions, supervisory training, and the identification of potential performance constraints are suggested as areas in which rural hospitals should focus attention in an attempt to manage turnover in CRNAs. PMID:10105942

  17. Occupational injuries for consecutive and cumulative shifts among hospital registered nurses and patient care associates: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hopcia, Karen; Dennerlein, Jack Tigh; Hashimoto, Dean; Orechia, Terry; Sorensen, Glorian

    2012-10-01

    Nontraditional work shifts for hospital registered nurses and patient care associates and associated injuries were examined through a case-control study. Inpatient care requires that many staff work nontraditional shifts, including nights and 12-hour shifts, but some characteristics remain unexplored, especially consecutive shifts. A total of 502 cases (injured workers) were matched to single controls based on their hospital, unit type, job type, gender, and age (± 5 years). Conditional logistic regression was used for the analysis, controlling for weekly hours scheduled. For both, consecutive shifts of 2 or more days and some various cumulative shifts over a week and month period, especially night shifts, were associated with increased odds of injury. More investigations on the phenomenon of consecutive shifts are recommended. Additionally, the assessment of shift policy and subsequent injury outcomes is necessary before implementing intervention strategies.

  18. Implementing a standardized testing program: preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Phyllis; Koehn, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The undergraduate nursing faculty of a large Midwestern university initiated a program of standardized computerized testing for two purposes: to provide students experience with standardized computerized testing prior to taking the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to increase the students' NCLEX-RN passing rate. This article chronicles the process of implementing a comprehensive testing program developed by the Assessment Technologies Institute (Overland Park, KS). Although the first class of students to have taken the entire testing package has just graduated, midprogram results have demonstrated potential as key indicators for identifying at-risk students. The trends in scores on standardized computerized tests, grades in prerequisite science courses, and grades in medical-surgical courses are used to identify students who are at risk for failure in the program and on the NCLEX-RN. Faculty advisors meet with these students to develop individual plans of study and to provide additional resources. The testing process is going on smoothly, and faculty members are learning to use the extensive information on students' test scores to further assist them in passing the NCLEX-RN.

  19. Call-shift fatigue and use of countermeasures and avoidance strategies by certified registered nurse anesthetists: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Domen, Ramona; Connelly, Cynthia D; Spence, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    This study surveyed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) on their frequency of call-shift fatigue, fatigue symptoms, medical errors associated with fatigue, and use of fatigue countermeasures and avoidance strategies. A secondary aim was to identify predictors of call-shift fatigue. An invitation to complete an anonymous electronic survey was sent to 2,500 randomly selected AANA members. Data were collected on CRNAs' fatigue experience, call-shift length and frequency, errors in patient care, and use of fatigue countermeasures and avoidance strategies. Analysis included descriptive and inferential statistics. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of call-shift fatigue. Of 325 CRNAs who provided data, 82% reported experiencing call-shift fatigue, 87% used fatigue countermeasures, 77% used fatigue-avoidance strategies, and 28% reported committing a medical error because of fatigue. Predictors included hours to recovery from a call shift (odds ratio [OR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.12), working 5 to 6 calls per month (OR = 3.78, CI = 1.17-12.23), working 7 or more calls per month (OR = 4.87, CI = 1.93-12.33), use of fatigue countermeasures (OR = 5.44, CI = 2.15-13.77), and fatigue symptoms (OR = 2.19, CI = 1.03-4.67). Call-shift fatigue is a common problem among CRNAs and is associated with medical errors and negative health consequences.

  20. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses 1

    PubMed Central

    Cónsul-Giribet, María; Medina-Moya, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups. METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class) with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups. RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life. PMID:25493666

  1. Use of Standardized Mastery Content Assessments Given during the First Year of a Baccalaureate Nursing Program for Predicting NCLEX-RN Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory, DeAnna Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between standardized content specific mastery assessments and NCLEX-RN outcomes. Three content-specific standardized assessments testing Fundamentals, Pharmacology and Mental Health concepts were used to explain the dichotomous NCLEX-RN outcome of pass or fail. The three assessments were…

  2. Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse's experiences. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anne-Marie; Connor-Fenelon, Maureen O'; Lyons, Rosemary

    2012-06-01

    This is the second of two articles presenting the findings of a qualitative study which explored the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. While Part 1 outlined the study background, context and methodology along with the overarching, multi-dimensional category of 'familiarity/knowing the person', the current article critically discusses the themes and subthemes encapsulated in this category. Each theme is considered in the light of current policies, strategies and philosophies shaping the provision of services to people with an intellectual disability in Ireland. The results suggest that the RNID is ideally located and key to supporting the implementation of these policies and strategies due to their highly developed and proficient skill set as well as experience of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. PMID:22433478

  3. NCLEX-RN success: evidence-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marie H; Baker, Susan Scott

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing requires that students think reflectively and use clinical inquiry to develop clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Likewise, nursing students need a strategy to be successful in passing the NCLEX-RN. The authors identify strategies based on nursing research to facilitate student success. While learning the evidence-based nursing process, the student must begin to think like a nurse while answering clinical practice questions. Using the skills taught for evidence-based nursing can be a powerful tool to approach the NCLEX-RN and succeed. PMID:22024676

  4. Meeting The Future of Nursing Report Recommendations: A Successful Practice-Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Stout, Cindy; Short Nancy; Aldrich, Kelly; Cintron, R Jacob; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2015-01-01

    In collaboration with the University of Texas at El Paso, nurse leadership at Del Sol Medical Center implemented an internship program for nursing students in the final semester of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program. The medical center experienced an increase in the proportion of BSN-prepared nurses, decreased orientation full-time equivalents (FTE), and lowered operating costs. The university experienced highly satisfied and competent new graduate nurses. The nurse interns averaged a 91.9% in-hospital registered nurse (RN) competency completion rate during the internship. All interns accepted a RN position at the medical center. Total savings for salaries, benefits, and recruitment fees at the medical center were $599,040 with a total FTE savings of 23.4 FTEs per week, over 10 weeks. PMID:26259340

  5. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  6. Quality and Cost Analysis of Nurse Staffing, Discharge Preparation, and Postdischarge Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Marianne E; Yakusheva, Olga; Bobay, Kathleen L

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact of unit-level nurse staffing on quality of discharge teaching, patient perception of discharge readiness, and postdischarge readmission and emergency department (ED) visits, and cost-benefit of adjustments to unit nurse staffing. Data Sources Patient questionnaires, electronic medical records, and administrative data for 1,892 medical–surgical patients from 16 nursing units within four acute care hospitals between January and July 2008. Design Nested panel data with hospital and unit-level fixed effects and patient and unit-level control variables. Data Collection/Extraction Registered nurse (RN) staffing was recorded monthly in hours-per-patient-day. Patient questionnaires were completed before discharge. Thirty-day readmission and ED use with reimbursement data were obtained by cross-hospital electronic searches. Principal Findings Higher RN nonovertime staffing decreased odds of readmission (OR = 0.56); higher RN overtime staffing increased odds of ED visit (OR = 1.70). RN nonovertime staffing reduced ED visits indirectly, via a sequential path through discharge teaching quality and discharge readiness. Cost analysis projected total savings from 1 SD increase in RN nonovertime staffing and decrease in RN overtime of U.S.$11.64 million and U.S.$544,000 annually for the 16 study units. Conclusions Postdischarge utilization costs could potentially be reduced by investment in nursing care hours to better prepare patients before hospital discharge. PMID:21517836

  7. Texas Nurse Staffing Trends Before and After Mandated Nurse Staffing Committees.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry; Heui Bae, Sung; Murry, Nicole; Hamilton, Patti

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the evolution of mandated nurse staffing committees in Texas from 2002 to 2009 and presents a study that analyzed nurse staffing trends in Texas using a secondary analysis of hospital staffing data (N = 313 hospitals) from 2000 to 2012 obtained from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Nurse staffing patterns based on three staffing variables for registered nurses (RNs), licensed vocational nurses (LVNs), and total licensed nurses were identified: full-time equivalents per 1,000 adjusted patient days, productive hours per adjusted patient day, and RN skill mix. Similar to national trends between 2000 and 2012, most Texas hospitals experienced an increase in RN and total nurse staffing, decrease in LVN staffing, and an increase in RN skill mix. The magnitude of total nurse staffing changes in Texas (5% increase) was smaller than national trends (13.6% increase). Texas's small, rural, government hospitals and those with the highest preregulation staffing levels experienced the least change in staffing between 2000 and 2012: median change of 0 to .13 full-time equivalents per 1,000 adjusted patient days and median change in productive hours per patient day of 0 to .23. The varying effects of staffing committees in different organizational contexts should be considered in future staffing legislative proposals and other policy initiatives.

  8. Registered nurses' thoughts on blended learning in a postgraduate course in cancer care--content analyses of web surveys and a focus group interview.

    PubMed

    Arving, Cecilia; Wadensten, Barbro; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-06-01

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  9. Demand for temporary agency nurses and nursing shortages.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sukyong; Spetz, Joanne

    2013-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons for the growth of temporary employment of registered nurses (RNs). Some argue that efficiency incentives to increase flexibility and reduce labor costs are the principal cause, while others point to shortages of RNs as the stronger determinant. Using hospital-level data from California's Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, we find a significant trend of increasing demand for agency nurses during the years of RN shortage. Demand rose with inpatient days, patient demand fluctuation, and the level of fringe benefits. Competition between hospitals and unionization, however, did not affect hospitals' demand for temporary RNs.

  10. Demand for temporary agency nurses and nursing shortages.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sukyong; Spetz, Joanne

    2013-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the reasons for the growth of temporary employment of registered nurses (RNs). Some argue that efficiency incentives to increase flexibility and reduce labor costs are the principal cause, while others point to shortages of RNs as the stronger determinant. Using hospital-level data from California's Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, we find a significant trend of increasing demand for agency nurses during the years of RN shortage. Demand rose with inpatient days, patient demand fluctuation, and the level of fringe benefits. Competition between hospitals and unionization, however, did not affect hospitals' demand for temporary RNs. PMID:25117086

  11. Meeting the Needs of Children with Medical Complexity Using a Telehealth Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Care Coordination Model

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Mary; Lunos, Scott; Finkelstein, Stanley M.; Looman, Wendy; Celebreeze, Margaret; Garwick, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Effective care coordination is a key quality and safety strategy for populations with chronic conditions, including children with medical complexity (CMC). However, gaps remain in parent report of the need for care coordination help and receipt of care coordination help. New models must close this gap while maintaining family-centered focus. A three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in an established medical home utilized an advanced practice registered nurse intervention based on Presler’s model of clinic-based care coordination. The model supported families of CMC across settings using telephone only or telephone and video telehealth care coordination. Effectiveness was evaluated from many perspectives and this paper reports on a subset of outcomes that includes family-centered care (FCC), need for care coordination help and adequacy of care coordination help received. FCC at baseline and end of study showed no significant difference between groups. Median FCC scores of 18.0–20.0 across all groups indicated high FCC within the medical home. No significant differences were found in the need for care coordination help within or between groups and over time. No significant difference was found in the adequacy of help received between groups at baseline. However, this indicator increased significantly over time for both intervention groups. These findings suggest that in an established medical home with high levels of FCC, families of CMC have unmet needs for care coordination help that are addressed by the APRN telehealth care coordination model. PMID:25424455

  12. Does Moral Distress Differ Between California Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Independent Versus Medically Supervised Practice: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Dumouchel, Michael; Boytim, Michael; Gorman, Nicholas; Weismuller, Penny

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if moral distress levels differed between certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) working in medically supervised versus independent practice in California. A 63-question survey was administered to 1,190 California CRNAs. Moral distress was measured by the included Ethics Stress Scale. The response rate was 14.7%, yielding demographic and Ethics Stress scores for 175 respondents. Sixty-five participants answered an open-ended question about moral distress yielding qualitative data. Medically supervised CRNAs had a lower mean moral distress scores (176.8) versus independent practice CRNAs (187.8) (p = .002). Lower scores on the ESS indicate higher moral distress. Qualitative data demonstrated that CRNAs experienced moral distress in the following situations: when pressured to give anesthesia to unoptimized patients, when differences of opinion regarding anesthetic plans occurred, in dealing with end-of-life issues, when working with incompetent providers, and during interprofessional struggles between CRNAs and anesthesiologists. In order to reduce moral distress among CRNAs, implications for practice include increased administrative support, increased communication and reciprocated collegial respect between anesthesiologists and CRNAs, and CRNA representation on ethics committees.

  13. Meeting the needs of children with medical complexity using a telehealth advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda G; Erickson, Mary; Lunos, Scott; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy; Celebreeze, Margaret; Garwick, Ann

    2015-07-01

    Effective care coordination is a key quality and safety strategy for populations with chronic conditions, including children with medical complexity (CMC). However, gaps remain in parent report of the need for care coordination help and receipt of care coordination help. New models must close this gap while maintaining family-centered focus. A three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in an established medical home utilized an advanced practice registered nurse intervention based on Presler's model of clinic-based care coordination. The model supported families of CMC across settings using telephone only or telephone and video telehealth care coordination. Effectiveness was evaluated from many perspectives and this paper reports on a subset of outcomes that includes family-centered care (FCC), need for care coordination help and adequacy of care coordination help received. FCC at baseline and end of study showed no significant difference between groups. Median FCC scores of 18.0-20.0 across all groups indicated high FCC within the medical home. No significant differences were found in the need for care coordination help within or between groups and over time. No significant difference was found in the adequacy of help received between groups at baseline. However, this indicator increased significantly over time for both intervention groups. These findings suggest that in an established medical home with high levels of FCC, families of CMC have unmet needs for care coordination help that are addressed by the APRN telehealth care coordination model.

  14. Taking action: An exploration of the actions of exemplary oncology nurses when there is a sense of hopelessness and futility perceived by registered nurses at diagnosis, during treatment, and in palliative situations.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Katherine J; Perry, Beth

    2015-01-01

    "There is nothing more that can be done" is a phrase that may occasionally cross the minds of oncology nurses. This paper reports on the actions of exemplary oncology nurses who were faced with such situations where their colleagues gave up or turned away. The research question, "What actions do exemplary clinical oncology nurses (RNs) undertake in patient-care situations where further nursing interventions seem futile?" prefaced data collection via a secure website where 14 Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs) provided narratives documenting their actions. Thematic analysis utilized QRS NVivo 10 software and hand coding. Four themes were generated from data analysis: advocacy, not giving up, genuine presence, and moral courage. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  15. Factors affecting incident reporting by registered nurses: the relationship of perceptions of the environment for reporting errors, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographics on intent to report errors.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Terry; Etchegaray, Jason

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety has assumed an international focus. In the past, the focus on detecting and preventing errors was up to the individual clinician, often the registered nurse. With impetus from the Institute of Medicine and other national agencies, a shift to emphasis on systems and processes and near miss and error reporting has occurred. Information from caregiver reporting has taken on new importance. This study was conducted to explore nurses' willingness to report errors of varying degrees of severity and the factors that impacted that intent. Registered nurses were selected randomly from the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners' roster and surveyed regarding perceptions of the environment for reporting, perceptions of reasons for not reporting, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographic variables. A majority of nurses were willing to report all levels of errors. Primary position, reasons for not reporting, and years since initial licensure were predictors of intent to report incidents with no injury and those with minimal injury. All but four nurses (99%) indicated that they would report incidents resulting in moderate to severe injury or death.

  16. Nurse Workforce Characteristics and Infection Risk in VA Community Living Centers: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida-Nakakoji, Mayuko; Stone, Patricia W.; Schmitt, Susan K.; Phibbs, Ciaran S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine effects of workforce characteristics on resident infections in Veterans Affairs (VA) Community Living Centers (CLCs). Data Sources A six-year panel of monthly, unit-specific data included workforce characteristics (from the VA Decision Support System and Payroll data) and characteristics of residents and outcome measures (from the Minimum Data Set). Study Design A resident infection composite was the dependent variable. Workforce characteristics of registered nurses (RN), licensed practical nurses (LPN), nurse aides (NA), and contract nurses included: staffing levels, skill mix and tenure. Descriptive statistics and unit-level fixed effects regressions were conducted. Robustness checks varying workforce and outcome parameters were examined. Principal Findings Average nursing hours per resident day was 4.59 hours (sd = 1.21). RN tenure averaged 4.7 years (sd = 1.64) and 4.2 years for both LPN (sd= 1.84) and NA (sd= 1.72). In multivariate analyses RN and LPN tenure were associated with decreased infections by 3.8% (IRR= 0.962 p<0.01) and 2% (IRR=0.98 p<0.01) respectively. Robustness checks consistently found RN and LPN tenure to be associated with decreased infections. Conclusions Increasing RN and LPN tenure are likely to reduce CLC resident infections. Administrators and policymakers need to focus on recruiting and retaining a skilled nursing workforce. PMID:25634087

  17. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the clinical experience of newly graduated registered nurses from their pre-registration paid employment: A narrative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Law, Yee-Shui Bernice; Chan, E Angela

    2016-09-01

    Paid employment within clinical setting, such as externships for undergraduate student, are used locally and globally to better prepare and retain new graduates for actual practice and facilitate their transition into becoming registered nurses. However, the influence of paid employment on the post-registration experience of such nurses remains unclear. Through the use of narrative inquiry, this study explores how the experience of pre-registration paid employment shapes the post-registration experience of newly graduated registered nurses. Repeated individual interviews were conducted with 18 new graduates, and focus group interviews were conducted with 11 preceptors and 10 stakeholders recruited from 8 public hospitals in Hong Kong. The data were subjected to narrative and paradigmatic analyses. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the knowledge and performance of graduates who worked in the same unit for their undergraduate paid work experience were uncovered. These assumptions affected the quantity and quality of support and time that other senior nurses provided to these graduates for their further development into competent nurses and patient advocates, which could have implications for patient safety. It is our hope that this narrative inquiry will heighten awareness of taken-for-granted assumptions, so as to help graduates transition to their new role and provide quality patient care. PMID:27428797

  18. Factors associated with evidence-based practice among registered nurses in Sweden: a national cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practice (EBP) is emphasized to increase the quality of care and patient safety. EBP is often described as a process consisting of distinct activities including, formulating questions, searching for information, compiling the appraised information, implementing evidence, and evaluating the resulting practice. To increase registered nurses’ (RNs’) practice of EBP, variables associated with such activities need to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine individual and organizational factors associated with EBP activities among RNs 2 years post graduation. Methods A cross-sectional design based on a national sample of RNs was used. Data were collected in 2007 from a cohort of RNs, included in the Swedish Longitudinal Analyses of Nursing Education/Employment study. The sample consisted of 1256 RNs (response rate 76%). Of these 987 RNs worked in healthcare at the time of the data collection. Data was self-reported and collected through annual postal surveys. EBP activities were measured using six single items along with instruments measuring individual and work-related variables. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results Associated factors were identified for all six EBP activities. Capability beliefs regarding EBP was a significant factor for all six activities (OR = 2.6 - 7.3). Working in the care of older people was associated with a high extent of practicing four activities (OR = 1.7 - 2.2). Supportive leadership and high collective efficacy were associated with practicing three activities (OR = 1.4 - 2.0). Conclusions To be successful in enhancing EBP among newly graduated RNs, strategies need to incorporate both individually and organizationally directed factors. PMID:23642173

  19. Exploring direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction for early-career registered nurses employed in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida; Greene, William H

    2014-08-01

    We explored direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction in a nationally representative sample of 1,141 early-career registered nurses. In the fully specified model, physical work environment had a non-significant direct effect on job satisfaction. The path analysis used to test multiple indirect effects showed that physical work environment had a positive indirect effect (p < .05) on job satisfaction through ten variables: negative affectivity, variety, workgroup cohesion, nurse-physician relations, quantitative workload, organizational constraints, distributive justice, promotional opportunity, local and non-local job opportunities. The findings make important contributions to the understanding of the relationship between physical work environment and job satisfaction. The results can inform health care leaders' insight about how physical work environment influences nurses' job satisfaction. PMID:24985551

  20. Exploring direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction for early-career registered nurses employed in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida; Greene, William H

    2014-08-01

    We explored direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction in a nationally representative sample of 1,141 early-career registered nurses. In the fully specified model, physical work environment had a non-significant direct effect on job satisfaction. The path analysis used to test multiple indirect effects showed that physical work environment had a positive indirect effect (p < .05) on job satisfaction through ten variables: negative affectivity, variety, workgroup cohesion, nurse-physician relations, quantitative workload, organizational constraints, distributive justice, promotional opportunity, local and non-local job opportunities. The findings make important contributions to the understanding of the relationship between physical work environment and job satisfaction. The results can inform health care leaders' insight about how physical work environment influences nurses' job satisfaction.

  1. A community college model to support nursing workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    Colville, Janet; Cottom, Sherry; Robinette, Teresa; Wald, Holly; Waters, Tomi

    2015-02-01

    Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC), Allegheny Campus, is situated on the North Side of Pittsburgh. The neighborhood is 60% African American. At the time of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) application, approximately one third of the students admitted to the program were African American, less than one third of whom successfully completed it. With the aid of HRSA funding, CCAC developed a model that significantly improved the success rate of disadvantaged students. Through the formation of a viable cohort, the nursing faculty nurtured success among the most at-risk students. The cohort was supported by a social worker, case managers who were nursing faculty, and tutors. Students formed study groups, actively participated in community activities, and developed leadership skills through participation in the Student Nurse Association of Pennsylvania. This article provides the rationale for the Registered Nurse (RN) Achievement Model, describes the components of RN Achievement, and discusses the outcomes of the initiative.

  2. Enrolled nurses and the professionalisation of nursing: a comparison of nurse education and skill-mix in Australia and the UK.

    PubMed

    Francis, B; Humphreys, J

    1999-04-01

    In the UK prior to 1989 two levels of nurse were trained: first level, or 'Registered Nurses' (RNs), and second Level, or 'Enrolled Nurses' (ENs). In 1989 changes to nurse education driven by 'Project 2000' marked the end of EN training: nurse education moved into the higher education sector and a single type of RN education replaced the original split-level training. Yet in Australia, where RN training has followed a similar path into higher education, the split level training of ENs and RNs has been maintained. The reasons for this difference in approach to ENs are investigated and discussed. The paper goes on to explore the implications and possible outcomes of the two different approaches in terms of the professionalisation of nursing and skill-mix in the health care workforce. Now that some UK nursing bodies are pressing for a degree-led profession, it is suggested that the Australian model may have an advantage, as concerns are being raised that English nurses may 'price themselves out of the market', with the nursing role being encroached upon by non-nurse Health Care Assistants.

  3. RN to FNP: a qualitative study of role transition.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Laura J; Steiner, Susan H; Burman, Mary E

    2004-09-01

    Registered nurses who return to school in a nurse practitioner program undergo role transition throughout the educational process and into the postgraduate period. This study examined the role transition that occurs in family nurse practitioner (FNP) students. A descriptive, qualitative design was used with in-depth telephone interviews of 9 female FNPs who had recently graduated. A conceptual model was generated that described the role transition from RN to FNP. Two phases of role transition occurred and were depicted by the central categories that emerged: extrinsic obstacles, intrinsic obstacles, turbulence, positive extrinsic forces, positive intrinsic forces, and role development. Although the central categories were found to be the same in Phase I and Phase II, the defining characteristics differed. This study has implications for FNPs, students, and educators regarding role transition. It presents new findings not identified in prior research: personal commitments and sacrifices were identified as specific obstacles encountered during the educational process, and differences were found between inexperienced and experienced RNs in relation to the FNP role transition during the educational period.

  4. Guidance Counselors' Ratings of Important Attributes for Registered Nurses and Prospective Nursing Students: A Comparison of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Career Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Leslie K.; Hoke, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of counselors from Hispanic serving high schools regarding professional nursing as a career have received limited study. A cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenience sample of 55 guidance counselors from Hispanic serving institutions identified the number of requests/referrals to nursing programs and perceptions of prospective…

  5. Australian rural remote registered nurses' experiences of learning to provide antenatal services in general practice: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane; Birks, Melanie; Francis, Karen; Miles, Maureen; Jones, Jan

    2010-08-01

    This article reports on a pilot vocational study programme for provision of antenatal services in the general practice environment. The concurrent evaluation study assessed practice nurses' experiences of undertaking the pilot programme, the level and applicability of the content, and the mode of delivery. General practitioners' understanding of the role of the nurse in providing antenatal services, and the actual and potential impact of this new role on models of service delivery and care were also investigated. Women receiving care from practice nurses within this new model of service delivery and care were also of interest in this study. Findings showed that the current role of the general practice nurse in caring for pregnant women is restricted to assisting the general practitioner to complete their assessment of clients. Organizing clinical placement with a midwife was a major barrier to completing the pilot programme.

  6. Towards a values-based person specification for recruitment of compassionate nursing and midwifery candidates: a study of registered and student nurses' and midwives' perceptions of prerequisite attributes and key skills.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Anne; Smith, Dave; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Gray, Morag

    2014-09-01

    Selection and retention of preregistration nursing and midwifery students are issues that exercise educators, universities and commissioning bodies both nationally and internationally. It has recently become an expectation that a values-based approach is used within recruitment and selection activities in the UK. The desirability of a person specification to support transparent recruitment and selection is well recognised. An online survey of registered and student nurses and midwives found consensus around the desirability of several personal attributes and key skills. There was consensus in the top seven ranked attributes which were honesty and trustworthiness, communication skills, being a good listener, patience and tactfulness, sensitivity and compassion, the ability to seek and act on guidance and being a good team worker; this was between registered and unregistered nurses and midwives and also between participants representing all fields of nursing and midwifery practice. Some of the responses from Practice Education Facilitators (PEFs) (n=5) and senior managers (n=15) differed from those of other registrants surveyed. The attribute 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' was considered more important by PEFs and 'Observant and able to act on your own initiative within your level of responsibility' and 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' were ranked more highly by senior managers.

  7. Development and Validation of a Web-Based Survey on the Use of Personal Communication Devices by Hospital Registered Nurses: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. Objective No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. Methods A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. Results The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation

  8. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  9. Influence of stress resiliency on RN job satisfaction and intent to stay.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, June H; Wu, Ying; Persily, Cynthia A; Simoni, Patricia S; Johnston, Patricia A; Marcischak, Terri L; Mott, Christine L; Gladden, Stephanie D

    2010-02-01

    Registered nurse (RN) job satisfaction is a major predictor of intent to stay and job turnover, serious concerns to health care leaders. Predictors of job satisfaction include autonomy, control over daily practice, nurse-physician collaboration, transformational leadership, group cohesion, job stress, structural empowerment, and psychological empowerment. In the model of psychological empowerment, stress resiliency is the product of persons' interpretive styles and influences psychological empowerment. This study has evaluated the influence of stress resiliency on job stress, psychological empowerment, job satisfaction, and intent to stay using causal modeling. Participants are 464 RNs employed in five acute care hospitals in West Virginia. The final model has provided a very good fit to the data. Stress resiliency is a predictor of psychological empowerment, situational stress, and job satisfaction. This study provides the first evidence of the influence of stress resiliency on job stress, psychological empowerment, job satisfaction, and intent to stay in a sample of RNs.

  10. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  11. Evaluation of a pilot training program in alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for nurses in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Lauren M; Gordon, Adam J; Rodriguez, Keri L; Hanusa, Barbara H; Kengor, Caroline; Kraemer, Kevin L

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a set of clinical strategies for reducing the burden of alcohol-related injury, disease, and disability. SBIRT is typically considered a physician responsibility but calls for interdisciplinary involvement requiring basic SBIRT knowledge and skills training for all healthcare disciplines. The purpose of this pilot study was to design, implement, and evaluate a theory-driven SBIRT training program for nurses in inpatient settings (RN-SBIRT) that was developed through an interdisciplinary collaboration of nursing, medical, and public health professionals and tailored for registered nurses in the inpatient setting. In this three-phase study, we evaluated (1) RN-SBIRT's effectiveness for changing nurses' alcohol-related knowledge, clinical practice, and attitudes and (2) the feasibility of implementing the inpatient curriculum. In a quasi-experimental design, two general medical units at our facility were randomized to receive RN-SBIRT or a self-directed Web site on alcohol-related care. We performed a formative evaluation of RN-SBIRT, guided by the RE-AIM implementation framework. After training, nurses in the experimental condition had significant increases in Role Adequacy for working with drinkers and reported increased performance and increased competence for a greater number of SBIRT care tasks. Despite some scheduling challenges for the nurses to attend RN-SBIRT, nurse stakeholders were highly satisfied with RN-SBIRT. Results suggest that with adequate training and ongoing role support, nurses in inpatient settings could play active roles in interdisciplinary initiatives to address unhealthy alcohol use among hospitalized patients.

  12. Nurses' working tasks and MSDs back symptoms: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Serranheira, Florentino; Cotrim, Teresa; Rodrigues, Victor; Nunes, Carla; Sousa-Uva, António

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare workers, namely registered nurses (RN), are frequently exposed to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) risk factors. Identifying the symptoms of these disorders is one of the first epidemiological steps to managing them. This study aims to identify WRMSDs prevalence symptoms in Portuguese RN. During 8 months (2010-2011) the National Public Health School and the Portuguese Registered Nurses Board made a call to all RN to answer an online WRMSDs questionnaire. Respondents (n=2140) are mostly females (77.4%) and work mainly in hospitals (n=1396) and in primary healthcare centers (n=421). Results show high symptoms prevalence (last 12 months) in the lower back (60.6%), the upper back (44.5%), and the neck (48.6%). Nurses' activity, especially patient hygiene in bed, is a strong contributor (p>0.05) to pain in the upper back (OR=1.39 [1.09-1.80]) and lower back (OR=1.4 [1.08-1.84]). Patient holdup without mechanical support has the highest relationship (p>0.05) between work tasks and symptoms in the last 12 months in the upper back (OR=1.50 [1.19-1.90]). Prevalence rates of WRMSDs symptoms in Portuguese nurses are no different from other studies with Swedish, Italian and Greek nurses. Maybe changes in healthcare systems didn't change the way care is delivered and we must rethink how to prevent nurses WRMSDs. PMID:22317085

  13. Nursing education at Western Governors University: a modern, disruptive approach.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Over 1 million working registered nurses (RNs) currently do not have a bachelor's degree in nursing and comprise the critical group needing to return to school in order to achieve the Institute of Medicine's goal of 80% bachelors of science in nursing (BSNs) by 2020. Western Governors University (WGU) has developed a transformative educational model, incorporating 4 operational pillars (competency-based learning, technology, disaggregated faculty roles, and a student-centric management system), to revolutionize RN-BSN education. This article describes a successful contemporary model, disrupting most all of the traditional aspects of university education for professional nursing practice. The program design is of particular value to working adults and addresses the flexibility they need to accommodate academic advancement. The WGU nursing program currently serves over 5,000 students seeking BSN and Master of Science in Nursing degrees in all 50 states. PMID:24720946

  14. Nursing education at Western Governors University: a modern, disruptive approach.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Over 1 million working registered nurses (RNs) currently do not have a bachelor's degree in nursing and comprise the critical group needing to return to school in order to achieve the Institute of Medicine's goal of 80% bachelors of science in nursing (BSNs) by 2020. Western Governors University (WGU) has developed a transformative educational model, incorporating 4 operational pillars (competency-based learning, technology, disaggregated faculty roles, and a student-centric management system), to revolutionize RN-BSN education. This article describes a successful contemporary model, disrupting most all of the traditional aspects of university education for professional nursing practice. The program design is of particular value to working adults and addresses the flexibility they need to accommodate academic advancement. The WGU nursing program currently serves over 5,000 students seeking BSN and Master of Science in Nursing degrees in all 50 states.

  15. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified... anesthesia at a level that builds on a premedical undergraduate science background. Anesthetist includes both... respect to non-physician anesthetists; (3) Has graduated from a nurse anesthesia educational program...

  16. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified... anesthesia at a level that builds on a premedical undergraduate science background. Anesthetist includes both... respect to non-physician anesthetists; (3) Has graduated from a nurse anesthesia educational program...

  17. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified... anesthesia at a level that builds on a premedical undergraduate science background. Anesthetist includes both... respect to non-physician anesthetists; (3) Has graduated from a nurse anesthesia educational program...

  18. Standardized mastery content assessments for predicting NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Emory, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators need predictors of failure for early intervention. This study investigated the predictability of fundamentals, mental health, and pharmacology standardized assessment scores to identify the risk of baccalaureate students' failure on the NCLEX-RN. Using logistic regression the pharmacology assessment score was predictive with 73.7% accuracy. Use of the pharmacology assessment can assist in early identification of at-risk students in efforts to better prepare for the NCLEX-RN examination.

  19. Reverse Engineering: Strategy to Teach Evidence-Based Practice to Online RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Gary, Jodie C; Hudson, Cindy E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative approach to introducing RN-to-BSN students to nursing research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Reverse engineering updates an existing EBP project to better emphasize the role of research and evidence to practicing RNs enrolled in an RN-to-BSN program. Reverse engineering of a nursing practice guideline offers a method for teaching an appreciation of research and supporting nursing practice with best evidence.

  20. Informing pre-registration nurse education: a proposal outline on the value, methods and ethical considerations of involving children in doctoral research.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya

    2014-12-01

    As pre-registration nurse education programmes evolve within the United Kingdom, it is imperative to involve patient/client groups within the research process, as the outcome may invoke a change in the care delivery of the registered nurse (RN). This paper focuses upon children and how children might hypothetically contribute to informing a generic nursing programme in their capacity as a rights holder and expert in their own lives. Even though their contribution and value has been debated around their capacity as research advisor, research participant and co researcher, this paper explores how the child's view of their experience of hospital and of the good nurse could be best captured. Research is a powerful vehicle that can enable their voice to equally inform UK nurse educators and policy makers so that the child's health care needs are effectively met in hospital by RN's who complete a generic programme.

  1. The Role of Organizational Culture in Retaining Nursing Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G.; Lin, Michael K.; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Design and Methods: Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Results: Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Implications: Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. PMID:24218146

  2. The shortage tsunami and high school guidance counselors' perspectives on future nurse recruitment.

    PubMed

    Rudel, Rebecca J; Moulton, Patricia; Arneson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    The current recession has eased the shortage of registered nurses (RNs), but this must be viewed only as a transient, temporary lull. The nurse shortage predictions still are greatly concerning. This article extends the most current RN shortage forecasts, an overview of this shortage "tsunami", and recent/current workforce recruitment strategies across the United States. A related explanatory study of high school counselors is presented, designed to improve understanding of decision-making influences on today's youth and to explore the extent of awareness counselors have about nursing.

  3. Meaningful Use of Data in Care Coordination by the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse: The TeleFamilies Project

    PubMed Central

    Looman, Wendy S.; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann W.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne; Pettey, Carrie; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful use of electronic health records to coordinate care requires skillful synthesis and integration of subjective and objective data by practitioners to provide context for information. This is particularly relevant in the coordination of care for children with complex special health care needs. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and example of meaningful use within an innovative telenursing intervention to coordinate care for children with complex special health care needs. The TeleFamilies intervention engages an advanced practice nurse in a full-time care coordinator role within an existing hospital-based medical home for children with complex special health care needs. Care coordination is facilitated by the synthesis and integration of internal and external data using an enhanced electronic health record and telehealth encounters via telephone and videoconferencing between the advanced practice nurse and the family at home. The advanced practice nurse’s ability to maintain an updated plan of care that is shared across providers and systems and build a relationship over time with the patient and family supports meaningful use of these data. PMID:22948406

  4. Smoking cessation strategies by nurses in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saovarot K

    2008-01-01

    Smoking Cessation Strategies by Nurses in an Acute Care Setting is a pilot educational project for registered nurses (RNs) at a teaching community hospital in the Southeast. The purpose of this project is to provide an inservice education session using the recommendation of the National Guideline Clearinghouse in Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence and the Guideline from the U.S. Public Health Service. A convenience sample of 49 RNs completed a 10-question pretest and 10-question posttest on perceptions about smoking cessation assessment, strategies, and documentation. After the inservice education, the result showed a significant improvement of RN perception in smoking cessation assessment, strategies, and documentation.

  5. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  6. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  7. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  8. An investigation of the impact of a continuing nursing education program on a small Catholic liberal arts college.

    PubMed

    Fay, P A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the impact of the nursing continuing education (CE) program at a small Catholic liberal arts college on the college itself as identified by CE participants. Data that validated the CE program did more than provide education to registered nurses were gathered. In fact, the data showed that after first coming to the college for a CE offering, participants engaged in several college-related activities, such as registering for the RN-BSN program, sending family members to the college, and recommending the college to family and friends.

  9. Strategies to promote success on the NCLEX-RN for students with English as a second language.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Helene; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R; Towle, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Faced with an increasingly diverse population and a shortage of nurses, US schools of nursing need to educate nurses from diverse backgrounds. These students may use English as a second language (ESL), leading to challenges that can place them at risk for not passing the NCLEX-RN. The authors present several challenges for ESL students preparing for the NCLEX-RN and successful strategies to coach them. These preparation issues and strategies may also help foreign-educated nurses prepare for the NCLEX-RN.

  10. Registered Nurses’ Perceptions about the Situation of Family Caregivers to Patients with Heart Failure - A Focus Group Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure is a growing public health problem associated with poor quality of life and significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of heart failure care is provided by family caregivers, and is associated with caregiver burden and reduced quality of life. Research emphasizes that future nursing interventions should recognize the importance of involving family caregivers to achieve optimal outcomes. Aims The aims of this study are to explore registered nurses’ perceptions about the situation of family caregivers to patients with heart failure, and registered nurses’ interventions, in order to improve family caregivers’ situation. Methods The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Six focus group interviews were held with 23 registered nurses in three hospitals and three primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Two content areas were identified by the a priori study aims. Four categories and nine sub-categories emerged in the analysis process. The content area “Family caregivers' situation” includes two categories: “To be unburdened” and “To comprehend the heart failure condition and its consequences”. The content area “Interventions to improve family caregivers' situation” includes two categories: “Individualized support and information” and “Bridging contact”. Conclusions Registered nurses perceive family caregivers' situation as burdensome, characterized by worry and uncertainty. In the PHCCs, the continuity and security of an RN as a permanent health care contact was considered an important and sustainable intervention to better care for family caregivers' worry and uncertainty. In the nurse-led heart failure clinics in hospitals, registered nurses can provide family caregivers with the opportunity of involvement in their relative's health care and address congruence and relationship quality within the family through the use of "Shared care

  11. Toward a model for effectiveness. What Alberta occupational health nurses think.

    PubMed

    Skillen, D Lynn; Anderson, Marjorie C; Seglie, JoAnne; Gilbert, Julie

    2002-02-01

    Effectiveness is difficult to define or measure, but is frequently associated with cost. A two phase study conducted with occupational health nurses in Alberta, Canada resulted in a beginning model for effectiveness. In 1997, Phase One of an exploratory descriptive study focused on physical assessment by occupational health nurses (N = 137) and perceptions of effectiveness in practice (n = 104). In 2001, Phase Two used focus groups (n = 7) to determine occupational health nurses' reactions to the preliminary analysis of questionnaire responses on effectiveness. The focus groups confirmed and expanded categories, and reconfigured the developing model. The model makes explicit the foundations, functions, relationships, and goals for effectiveness in occupational health nursing practice. The foundation includes registered nurse (RN) experience and baseline competence comprising occupational health nursing education, RN and occupational health nurse experience, and multidisciplinary knowledge. Ten specific functions and nine relationships describe the occupational health nursing specialty practice and promote achievement of five goals: balance, communication, continuing competence, leadership, and trust. The goal of balance needs articulation in the nursing literature.

  12. 'We did the best we could'--the United States Army nurses of Ie Shima.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Francie

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, Army Nurses of the 156th Army Evacuation Hospital delivered care while under attack, demonstrated incredible bravery, endured extreme hardships, and unknowingly defined advanced nursing practice as we know it today. First Lieutenant Edythe (Goldstein) Pallin, BS, RN, was a 23-year old registered nurse who served in the Pacific and was stationed near the front lines on the remote island of Ie Shima in the Ryukyu Island Chain near Okinawa. This article, as told to Edythe's daughter, draws heavily on her memories and her military photo album stored in the attic of her home for over 50 years. Edythe only acknowledges her military experience by saying, "We did the best we could." Yes, these nurses not only did the best they could, they also changed nursing from a subservient position to an independent practice long before nurses even understood their professional possibilities. Edythe passed away October 26, 2012. PMID:23734553

  13. Resonant leadership, workplace empowerment, and "spirit at work": impact on RN job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joan I J; Warren, Sharon; Cummings, Greta; Smith, Donna L; Olson, Joanne K

    2013-12-01

    Canadian researchers have developed the Spirit At Work (SAW) tool for identifying the experiences of individuals who are passionate about and energized by their work. This article describes (a) what registered nurses perceive as contributing to their personal SAW; and (b) the relationships among resonant leadership, structural empowerment concepts, psychological empowerment concepts, SAW concepts, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and the demographic variables of experience, education, and rank in the RN workplace. The theoretical model was tested using LISREL 8.80 and survey data from 147 randomly selected RNs. Engaging work was found to account for 63% of the explained variance in the model's endogenous variables. Spiritual connection had a causal effect on organizational commitment, while resonant leadership and individual empowerment had significant causal influence on SAW, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. These results strengthen those of previous studies reporting workplace structures/processes/contributions leading to superior care environments. Future studies will clarify the role of SAW in the workplace.

  14. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fen; Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong; Liu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = -2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = -2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP.

  15. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = −2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = −2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  16. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fen; Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong; Liu, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = -2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = -2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  17. Precursory Subsurface 222Rn and 220Rn Degassing Signatures of the 2004 Seismic Crisis at Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Padrón, Eleazar; Melián, Gladys; Marrero, Rayco; Padilla, Germán; Barrancos, José; Nolasco, Dácil

    2007-12-01

    Precursory geochemical signatures of radon degassing in the subsurface of the Tenerife Island were observed several months prior to the recent 2004 seismic-volcanic crisis. These premonitory signatures were detected by means of a continuous monitoring of 222Rn and 220Rn activity from a bubbling CO2-rich gas spot located at 2.850 m depth inside a horizontal gallery for groundwater exploitation at Tenerife. Multivariate Regression Analysis (MRA) on time series of the radon activity was applied to eliminate the radon activity fluctuation due to external variables such as barometric pressure, temperature and relative humidity as well as power supply. Material Failure Forecast Method (FFM) was successfully applied to forecast the anomalous seismicity registered in Tenerife Island in 2004. The changes in the 222Rn/220Rn ratio observed after the period of anomalous seismicity might suggest a higher gas flow rate and/or changes in the vertical permeability induced by seismic activity.

  18. Continuing Education for Mentors and a Mentoring Program for RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Rita E; Walsh Dotson, Jo Ann; Ogilvie, LeAnn A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring programs have been used effectively with graduate and undergraduate nursing students and newly licensed nurses. There are few publications about mentoring for the RN enrolled in a bachelor of science in nursing (RN-to-BSN) program. To address low graduation rates in the public RN-to-BSN nursing programs, the Montana Center to Advance Health Through Nursing designed a mentoring program to help these nurses achieve their BSN. This voluntary program was initiated at an RN-to-BSN program in a 4-year college with six RN students who were paired with a mentor. An interactive, continuing education workshop on mentoring also was developed to prepare experienced nurses for their role as a mentor. This workshop was held nine times across Montana, with a total of 156 attendees. Workshop evaluations were consistently positive. Participants identified time and personality issues as barriers to successful mentoring and recommended expansion of the workshop to a distance-learning format so more nurses could attend. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(6):272-277.

  19. Continuing Education for Mentors and a Mentoring Program for RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Rita E; Walsh Dotson, Jo Ann; Ogilvie, LeAnn A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring programs have been used effectively with graduate and undergraduate nursing students and newly licensed nurses. There are few publications about mentoring for the RN enrolled in a bachelor of science in nursing (RN-to-BSN) program. To address low graduation rates in the public RN-to-BSN nursing programs, the Montana Center to Advance Health Through Nursing designed a mentoring program to help these nurses achieve their BSN. This voluntary program was initiated at an RN-to-BSN program in a 4-year college with six RN students who were paired with a mentor. An interactive, continuing education workshop on mentoring also was developed to prepare experienced nurses for their role as a mentor. This workshop was held nine times across Montana, with a total of 156 attendees. Workshop evaluations were consistently positive. Participants identified time and personality issues as barriers to successful mentoring and recommended expansion of the workshop to a distance-learning format so more nurses could attend. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(6):272-277. PMID:27232226

  20. Implementing a writing course in an online RN-BSN program.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carol J; D'Angelo, Barbara; Rennell, Nathalie; Muzyka, Diann; Pannabecker, Virginia; Maid, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly writing is an essential skill for nurses to communicate new research and evidence. Written communication directly relates to patient safety and quality of care. However, few online RN-BSN programs integrate writing instruction into their curricula. Nurses traditionally learn how to write from instructor feedback and often not until midway into their baccalaureate education. Innovative strategies are needed to help nurses apply critical thinking skills to writing. The authors discuss a collaborative project between nursing faculty and technical communication faculty to develop and implement a writing course that is 1 of the 1st courses the students take in the online RN-BSN program.

  1. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described. PMID:26712302

  2. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described.

  3. Wage Inequity: Within-Market Comparative Analysis of Salary for Public Health Nurses and Hospital Nurses.

    PubMed

    Issel, L Michele; Lurie, Christine Fitzpatrick; Bekemeier, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The labor market perspective focuses on supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) as employees. This perspective contrasts with beliefs in the public health sector that RNs working in local health departments (LHD) as public health nurses (PHNs) accept lower wages because of factors other than market demand. This study sought to describe the extent to which hourly wages of RNs working in LHDs are competitive with hospital RN wages within the same county market. A repeated measures survey design was used in collecting 2010 and 2014 data. The unit of analysis was the county, as an RN labor market for LHDs and hospitals. Survey questions captured factors common in human resources benefits and wage packages, such as differential pay, hourly rate pay based on years of experience, components of benefit packages (eg, sick and vacation leave), and reimbursement for education. Within each county, the LHD and all hospitals constituted a "market," yielding a potential 12 markets in our study sample. Human resources representatives from each of the 12 LHDs and from all hospitals within those 12 counties were invited to participate. We conducted comparisons with survey data using t test of mean differences on mean RN wages across years of experience. On average, LHDs paid significantly less than hospitals in their markets, at all levels of RN experience, and this gap increased with RN experience in the sample markets. Salary compression was evident in 2010 and worsened for PHNs in 2014, when compared with hospital RNs. In 2014, 100% of the sample LHDs offered reimbursements for continuing education for PHNs compared with 89% of hospitals providing this benefit. This study contributes to our understanding of the human resources challenges faced by LHDs and provides evidence elucidating resources issues that need to be addressed in order to improve recruitment and retention of PHNs. PMID:27682725

  4. Wage Inequity: Within-Market Comparative Analysis of Salary for Public Health Nurses and Hospital Nurses.

    PubMed

    Issel, L Michele; Lurie, Christine Fitzpatrick; Bekemeier, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The labor market perspective focuses on supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) as employees. This perspective contrasts with beliefs in the public health sector that RNs working in local health departments (LHD) as public health nurses (PHNs) accept lower wages because of factors other than market demand. This study sought to describe the extent to which hourly wages of RNs working in LHDs are competitive with hospital RN wages within the same county market. A repeated measures survey design was used in collecting 2010 and 2014 data. The unit of analysis was the county, as an RN labor market for LHDs and hospitals. Survey questions captured factors common in human resources benefits and wage packages, such as differential pay, hourly rate pay based on years of experience, components of benefit packages (eg, sick and vacation leave), and reimbursement for education. Within each county, the LHD and all hospitals constituted a "market," yielding a potential 12 markets in our study sample. Human resources representatives from each of the 12 LHDs and from all hospitals within those 12 counties were invited to participate. We conducted comparisons with survey data using t test of mean differences on mean RN wages across years of experience. On average, LHDs paid significantly less than hospitals in their markets, at all levels of RN experience, and this gap increased with RN experience in the sample markets. Salary compression was evident in 2010 and worsened for PHNs in 2014, when compared with hospital RNs. In 2014, 100% of the sample LHDs offered reimbursements for continuing education for PHNs compared with 89% of hospitals providing this benefit. This study contributes to our understanding of the human resources challenges faced by LHDs and provides evidence elucidating resources issues that need to be addressed in order to improve recruitment and retention of PHNs.

  5. Post-graduation factors predicting NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Pamela Butler; Waterhouse, Julie Keith

    2003-01-01

    The academic and nonacademic factors that influence nursing students' success on the licensure exam have been widely reported. However, many questions remain as to why certain candidates fail the exam. This pilot study explores postgraduation influences on the NCLEX-RN.(R) Factors such as length and type of study, work hours, review course participation, sleep, and stress were recorded using the newly developed NCLEX Preparation Survey. Results suggest both expected and unexpected relationships between these factors and NCLEX-RN mastery. PMID:14624123

  6. Das sprachliche Register (Speech Registers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess-Luttich, Ernest W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The linguistic behavior of a given individual varies; he will on different occasions speak (or write) differently according to what may be roughly described as different social situations: he will use a number of different registers. The application of such registers both in the field of text analysis and in the preparation of teaching materials…

  7. Influence of perceptions on school nurse practices to prevent childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Quelly, Susan B

    2014-08-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida registered nurse (RN) school nurses (n = 171) anonymously completed online or paper questionnaires. Linear regression analyses identified a model of self-efficacy with perceived benefits and barriers that explained 12% and 9.1% (p < .001) of variance in child-level and school-level COP practices, respectively. Self-efficacy explained the most variance in both models (p < .001). Mediation testing identified perceived barriers as a partial mediator of the influence of self-efficacy on child-level practices. These findings support interventions and policy changes to increase self-efficacy and reduce perceived barriers to promote school nurse involvement in preventing childhood obesity. PMID:24128859

  8. Early Identification of At-Risk LPN-to-RN Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    Nurse education programs are implementing standardized assessments without evaluating their effectiveness. Graduates of associate degree nursing programs continue to be unsuccessful with licensure examinations, despite standardized testing and stronger admission criteria. This problem is also prevalent for LPN-to-RN education programs due to a…

  9. Using linear programming to minimize the cost of nurse personnel.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Charles H

    2005-01-01

    Nursing personnel costs make up a major portion of most hospital budgets. This report evaluates and optimizes the utility of the nurse personnel at the Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Linear programming (LP) was employed to determine the effective combination of nurses that would allow for all weekly clinic tasks to be covered while providing the lowest possible cost to the department. Linear programming is a standard application of standard spreadsheet software that allows the operator to establish the variables to be optimized and then requires the operator to enter a series of constraints that will each have an impact on the ultimate outcome. The application is therefore able to quantify and stratify the nurses necessary to execute the tasks. With the report, a specific sensitivity analysis can be performed to assess just how sensitive the outcome is to the stress of adding or deleting a nurse to or from the payroll. The nurse employee cost structure in this study consisted of five certified nurse assistants (CNA), three licensed practicing nurses (LPN), and five registered nurses (RN). The LP revealed that the outpatient clinic should staff four RNs, three LPNs, and four CNAs with 95 percent confidence of covering nurse demand on the floor. This combination of nurses would enable the clinic to: 1. Reduce annual staffing costs by 16 percent; 2. Force each level of nurse to be optimally productive by focusing on tasks specific to their expertise; 3. Assign accountability more efficiently as the nurses adhere to their specific duties; and 4. Ultimately provide a competitive advantage to the clinic as it relates to nurse employee and patient satisfaction. Linear programming can be used to solve capacity problems for just about any staffing situation, provided the model is indeed linear. PMID:18972976

  10. Motivators and barriers to returning to school: RN to BSN.

    PubMed

    Romp, Celeste R; Kiehl, Ermalynn M; Bickett, Anette; Bledsoe, Sarah F; Brown, Debbie S; Eitel, Stephanie B; Wall, Mary Patricia

    2014-01-01

    With national emphasis on increasing baccalaureate-prepared nurses, the role of the staff development educator of promoting lifelong learning is ideal for advising and mentoring non-bachelor's-prepared nurses to return to school. However, an understanding of the motivators and barriers for nurses to return to school is essential for success. A descriptive correlational research study was completed to determine the motivators and barriers of returning to school for registered nurses without a bachelor's degree. PMID:24658040

  11. Work environment issues and intention-to-leave in Portuguese nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Bruyneel, Luk; Anderson, Janet E; Murrells, Trevor; Dussault, Gilles; Henriques de Jesus, Élvio; Sermeus, Walter; Aiken, Linda; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    This study extends the Registered Nurses Forecasting (RN4CAST) study evidence base with newly collected data from Portuguese nurses working in acute care hospitals, in which the measurement of the quality of work environment, workload and its association with intention-to-leave emerge as of key importance. Data included surveys of 2235 nurses in 144 nursing units in 31 hospitals via stratified random sampling. Multilevel multivariate regression analysis shows that intention-to-leave is higher among nurses with a specialty degree, nurses aged 35-39, and in nursing units where nurses are less satisfied with opportunities for career advancement, staffing levels and participation in hospital affairs. Analysis with moderation effects showed the observed effect of age and of having a specialty degree on intention-to-leave during the regression analysis is reduced in nursing units where nurses are more satisfied with opportunities for career advancement. The most important finding from the study suggests that promoting retention strategies that increase satisfaction with opportunities for career advancement among Portuguese nurses has the potential to override individual characteristics associated with increased turnover intentions. PMID:26474746

  12. Work environment issues and intention-to-leave in Portuguese nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Bruyneel, Luk; Anderson, Janet E; Murrells, Trevor; Dussault, Gilles; Henriques de Jesus, Élvio; Sermeus, Walter; Aiken, Linda; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    This study extends the Registered Nurses Forecasting (RN4CAST) study evidence base with newly collected data from Portuguese nurses working in acute care hospitals, in which the measurement of the quality of work environment, workload and its association with intention-to-leave emerge as of key importance. Data included surveys of 2235 nurses in 144 nursing units in 31 hospitals via stratified random sampling. Multilevel multivariate regression analysis shows that intention-to-leave is higher among nurses with a specialty degree, nurses aged 35-39, and in nursing units where nurses are less satisfied with opportunities for career advancement, staffing levels and participation in hospital affairs. Analysis with moderation effects showed the observed effect of age and of having a specialty degree on intention-to-leave during the regression analysis is reduced in nursing units where nurses are more satisfied with opportunities for career advancement. The most important finding from the study suggests that promoting retention strategies that increase satisfaction with opportunities for career advancement among Portuguese nurses has the potential to override individual characteristics associated with increased turnover intentions.

  13. Identification of Anticipated Job Stressors of Registered Nurse Refresher Students as They Prepare to Reenter the Work Force Following a Career Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial reasons have produced a growing nursing shortage. One possible group that could reverse this shortage is inactive nurses. Many stakeholders wonder about allocating scarce resources to identify, locate, educate, and redeploy this group into active practice. The purpose of this one-phase embedded validating quantitative mixed…

  14. Nursing Alumni Surveys: 2002 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA.

    This document reports on outcomes of the College of the Canyons, California, 2002 survey of nursing alumni. Surveys of RN, LVN, and LVN-RN graduates and their employers aimed to assess graduates' satisfaction with the preparation and training they received. Surveys also collected information intended to assess the current position in which the…

  15. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  16. The effectiveness of Tai Chi, yoga, meditation, and Reiki healing sessions in promoting health and enhancing problem solving abilities of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Raingruber, Bonnie; Robinson, Carol

    2007-10-01

    Given the current necessity of retaining qualified nurses, a self-care program consisting of Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation classes, and Reiki healing sessions was designed for a university-based hospital. The effectiveness of these interventions was evaluated using self-care journals and analyzed using a Heideggerian phenomenological approach. Outcomes of the self-care classes described by nurses included: (a) noticing sensations of warmth, tingling, and pulsation which were relaxing, (b) becoming aware of an enhanced problem solving ability, and (c) noticing an increased ability to focus on patient needs. Hospitals willing to invest in self-care options for nurses can anticipate patient and work related benefits.

  17. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students.

  18. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students. PMID:11868719

  19. The nursing crisis.

    PubMed

    McVEAGH, T C

    1949-06-01

    Three concrete proposals are made for the improvement of the present nursing situation:1. Make nursing education more easily available by holding the prerequisites to a minimum and concentrating upon the real essentials of nursing, granting the student the R.N. degree when she has completed this basic and essential training.2. Utilize more fully the principles of group nursing as applied to "specialing" whether in the home or in the hospital.3. Completely avoid the use of sub-standard nurses, while furnishing to the nurse such non-technical service (through the use of maid assistants or others) as shall make practicable the complete utilization of her skill and training.

  20. Impact of a standardized test package on exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Homard, Catherine M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this ex post facto correlational study was to compare exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN(®) pass rates of baccalaureate nursing students who differed in level of participation in a standardized test package. Three cohort groups emerged as a standardized test package was introduced: (a) students who did not participate in a standardized test package; (b) students with two semesters of a standardized test package; and (c) students with four semesters of a standardized test package. Benner's novice-to-expert theory framed the study in the belief that students best acquire knowledge and skills through practice and reflection. Students participating in four semesters of a standardized test package demonstrated higher exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN pass rates compared with students who did not participate in this package. This study's results could inform nurse educators about strategies to facilitate nursing student success on exit examinations and the NCLEX-RN.

  1. A writing intensive introductory course for RN to BSN students.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Anita S; Hyde, Yolanda M; Kautz, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    This article describes learning strategies used with RN to BSN students in their 1st nursing course to successfully learn how to write formal papers using the American Psychological Association (APA) format. This 1st nursing course, a writing intensive, requires 4 short papers with self, peer, and teacher critiques and opportunities to rewrite. Students learn the style of professional nursing discourse, mastery of APA format, and development of additional skills in following directions and in critiquing their own work. An additional benefit is to enhance learning about professional nursing topics. By mastering writing skills in this initial course, students are able to successfully complete writing assignments in future courses and, in some cases, move on to publication.

  2. A writing intensive introductory course for RN to BSN students.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Anita S; Hyde, Yolanda M; Kautz, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    This article describes learning strategies used with RN to BSN students in their 1st nursing course to successfully learn how to write formal papers using the American Psychological Association (APA) format. This 1st nursing course, a writing intensive, requires 4 short papers with self, peer, and teacher critiques and opportunities to rewrite. Students learn the style of professional nursing discourse, mastery of APA format, and development of additional skills in following directions and in critiquing their own work. An additional benefit is to enhance learning about professional nursing topics. By mastering writing skills in this initial course, students are able to successfully complete writing assignments in future courses and, in some cases, move on to publication. PMID:24300250

  3. Nursing in Switzerland: struggling to maintain quality and ideals.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Teodora; Baumann, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    After an edited transcript of an interview with a nurse leader, Teodora Duarte, RN; MA, on nursing in Switzerland, the author further discusses the challenges and opportunities facing nursing in that country from a global perspective. Also discussed are some of the advantages and problems of international nursing, in particular nurses who migrate to work in other countries or commute across national borders.

  4. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    PubMed

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The Mediating Effects of Basic Psychological Needs at Work on the Relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and Organizational Commitment in Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Bonni Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mediating effects of the Basic Psychological Needs at Work, comprised of competence, autonomy and relatedness, on the relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and affective and normative organizational commitment in the United States nursing population. The study incorporated…

  6. A DESCRIPTIVE AND CORRELATIONAL STUDY OF VARIABLES RELATED TO SUCCESS IN THE SAN BERNARDINO VALLEY COLLEGE TWO-YEAR REGISTERED NURSE PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARLSON, DALE C.

    THE PRIME CRITERION OF SUCCESS OF A NURSING PROGRAM IS OCCUPATIONAL PERFORMANCE OF GRADUATES. AS AN INTERMEDIATE STEP, THE AUTHOR INVESTIGATED THE RELATIONSHIP OF CERTAIN PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS (AGE, SEX, MARITAL STATUS, NUMBER OF CHILDREN, NUMBER OF BROTHERS AND SISTERS, FATHER'S AND MOTHER'S EDUCATION, AND SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ABILITY TEST…

  7. Program and Student Characteristics Related to the Performance of New York State Associate Degree Graduates on the Registered Nurse Licensing Examination. Research Publication No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muncrief, Martha

    Characteristics of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs in New York State which relate to the achievement of their graduates on the State Board Test Pool Examination (SBTPE) were identified. A questionnaire was designed and mailed to all two-year colleges in the states offering the ADN. A total of 32 questionnaires were returned (91 percent).…

  8. Spectroscopy of 215Rn86

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M. E.; Davidson, M.; Davidson, J.; Hojman, D.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Lenzi, S.; Napoli, D.

    2007-02-12

    The yrast level structure of 215,216Rn has been studied using in beam spectroscopy {alpha} - {gamma} - {gamma} coincidence techniques mainly through the 207Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) and 208Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) reactions in the 91-93 MeV energy range, using the 8{pi} GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. The obtained low lying level scheme of 215Rn does not exhibit the alternating parity structure observed in their heavier known isotones 216Fr, 217Ra and 218Ac. The level scheme of 216Rn resulting from this study shows >From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence for reflection asymmetry is 216Fr defining one lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N{>=}129 and Z{>=}87.

  9. Joint Venture Arrangement for RN to BSN: A Model of Synergy between Academia and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargagliotti, L. Antoinette; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Joint venture among educational and practice institutions is well on its way toward becoming the norm in nursing education and practice. Kaiser Permanente and the University of San Francisco School of Nursing offer a venture that allows registered nurses to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing degree. (JOW)

  10. Optimizing All Licensed Staff: Magnet Standards Require an All-BSN/RN Staff in Hospital Settings by 2020: Truth or Myth?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Linda

    2015-05-01

    This column, presented by the executive vice president and chief officer of the American Nurses Credentialing Center, Linda Lewis, MSA, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, discusses a topic of interest to nurse executives as they develop plans for the nursing workforce. Ms Lewis addresses the direction of the Magnet Recognition Program® with regard to requirements for staffing mix.

  11. Cost savings associated with increased RN staffing in acute care hospitals: simulation exercise.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Mueller, Christine; Duval, Sue; Wilt, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Increasing nurse-to-patient staffing has been recommended as a means to improve patient safety. In this study, researchers analyzed the savings-cost ratio of increased RN-to-patient ratios for patients in ICUs and patients in surgical and medical units based on a meta-analysis of published observational studies. Increased RN staffing was associated with lower hospital-related mortality and adverse patient events and generates societal net savings from avoided patient adverse events. This finding appears to hold in ICUs and, to some extent, in surgical units, but not in medical units. Hospitals do not experience sufficient monetary benefit from reduced length of stay corresponding to an increased RN staffing. Policy decisions about RN staffing should include cost-utility analyses. PMID:19927445

  12. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  13. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  14. NCLEX-RN Examination Performance by BSN Graduates of Four Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesney, Anita M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative multiple-case study research explored and described differences as well as NCLEX-RN preparation strategies used by Historically Black College and University (HBCU) baccalaureate nursing programs with consistent NCLEX pass rates versus those with inconsistent pass rates. Two of the four selected programs had a history of consistent…

  15. Using Adobe Connect to Deliver Online Library Instruction to the RN to BSN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes a look at how one academic health sciences librarian brought mediated literature searching to the distance RN to BSN nursing students. It takes a look at why Adobe Connect was the webinar software that was selected to deliver online instruction to the students. The article explains how students participated in a pre-class survey…

  16. Worker productivity and ventilation rate in a call center: Analyses of time-series data for a group of registered nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Price, Phillip; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas; Dibartolomeo, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the relationship of ventilation rates with the performance of advice nurses working in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated; temperatures, humidities, and CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored; and worker performance data, with 30-minute resolution, were collected. Multivariate linear regression was used to investigate the association of worker performance with indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration (which increases with decreasing ventilation rate per worker) and with building ventilation rate. Results suggest that the effect of ventilation rate on worker performance in this call center was very small (probably less than 1%) or nil, over most of the range of ventilation rate (roughly 12 L s{sup -1} to 48 L s{sup -1} per person). However, there is some evidence of worker performance improvements of 2% or more when the indoor CO{sub 2} concentration exceeded the outdoor concentration by less than 75 ppm.

  17. Attitudes towards collaboration and servant leadership among nurses, physicians and residents.

    PubMed

    Garber, Jeannie Scruggs; Madigan, Elizabeth A; Click, Elizabeth R; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2009-07-01

    A descriptive, comparative study was conducted to examine the attitudes of nurses, physicians and residents towards collaboration and to assess their self-perception of servant leadership characteristics. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration and the Barbuto-Wheeler Servant Leadership Questionnaire were utilized for data collection. Registered nurses (RNs) (n = 2,660), physicians (n = 447) and residents (n = 171) in a Southeastern United States health system were surveyed via the intranet; there were 497 responses for analysis. The response rate should be considered and generalizations made with caution regarding the study results. RN scores were higher for both total scores and subscales as compared to physician/resident groups for collaboration and servant leadership. There was a weak positive correlation between collaboration and servant leadership in the RN group and no significant correlation between the variables in the physician/resident group. Findings from this study have implications for nursing and physician education and practice and may serve as a framework for future studies. Representative samples are needed to gain further insight and to guide future research.

  18. Meanings Over Time of Working as a Nurse in Elderly Care

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Karin; James, Inger; Kihlgren, Annica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although registered nurses (RNs) play a central role in the care of older persons, their work in elderly care has historically been described as “low status” in nursing. This is especially problematic due to the global issue of RN turnover, but there is still little evidence of how to change this trend. Better understanding is needed of the reasons why RNs work in elderly care, as well as knowledge of whether these reasons have changed over time. Aim: The aim was to explore the meaning of working in elderly care, over time, from the perspective of RNs. Method: We interviewed thirteen RNs working in nursing homes, six of them in 2000 and the remaining seven in 2012, and analysed the resulting data using Interpretive Description. Results: The results show similarities and differences over time in the RNs’ reasoning about the meaning of their work with older persons, from a focus on obstacles to a view of opportunities. Conclusion: An RN’s intention to continue working in elderly care might be based on their beliefs; their view of older people, and their experiences of being able to influence the care. Managing this knowledge could be an essential factor in reversing the historical trend of RN work in elderly care being seen as low status, and the increasing turnover in such nurses. Our results could stimulate reflection on daily care and beliefs about caring for older persons. PMID:24044032

  19. Nephrology Nursing and Education.

    PubMed

    Richards, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Professional nephrology nurses are responsible for their ongoing education and competency in their area of practice. ANNA has an additional opportunity for education for nephrology nurses at the 47th National Symposium to be held May 1-4, 2016, in Louisville, Kentucky. The Janel Parker Memorial Opening Session keynote speaker for the meeting will be Suzanne Miyamoto, PhD, RN, Senior Director of Government Affairs and Health Policy with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Her topic will be "Are We Practicing to the Fullest Extent? Licensure, Certification, and Education?" This session will help address educational competence in nephrology nursing.

  20. (220)Rn/(222)Rn isotope pair as a natural proxy for soil gas transport.

    PubMed

    Huxol, Stephan; Brennwald, Matthias S; Henneberger, Ruth; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-12-17

    Radon (Rn) is a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, which is ubiquitous in soil gas. Especially, its long-lived isotope (222)Rn (half-life: 3.82 d) gained widespread acceptance as a tracer for gas transport in soils, while the short-lived (220)Rn (half-life: 55.6 s) found less interest in environmental studies. However, in some cases, the application of (222)Rn as a tracer in soil gas is complex as its concentrations can be influenced by changes of the transport conditions or of the (222)Rn production of the soil material. Due to the different half-lives of (220)Rn and (222)Rn, the distances that can be traveled by the respective isotopes before decay differ significantly, with (220)Rn migrating over much shorter distances than (222)Rn. Therefore, the soil gas concentrations of (220)Rn and (222)Rn are influenced by processes on different length scales. In laboratory experiments in a sandbox, we studied the different transport behaviors of (220)Rn and (222)Rn resulting from changing the boundary conditions for diffusive transport and from inducing advective gas movements. From the results gained in the laboratory experiments, we propose the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn to determine gas transport processes in soils. In a field study on soil gases in the cover soil of a capped landfill we applied the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn in soil gas for the first time and showed the feasibility of this approach to characterize soil gas transport processes.

  1. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  2. An evidence-based approach to nurses week celebrations.

    PubMed

    Hensinger, Barbara; Parry, Juanita; Calarco, Margaret M; Fuhrmann, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    It is time to examine nurses week investments. With expenses increasingly scrutinized, healthcare leaders require data-driven decisions. Managing by instinct and intuition is both inadequate and reckless. This survey of 727 registered nurses identifies celebratory options for nurses week that nurses find meaningful. Knowing what registered nurses value will guide approaches to an effective nurses week activity planning. PMID:18403990

  3. Retirement financial planning and the RN: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2013-11-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  4. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  5. Soil radon ( 222 Rn) monitoring at Furnas Volcano (São Miguel, Azores): Applications and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Ferreira, T.; Viveiros, F.; Allard, P.

    2015-05-01

    A soil 222Rn continuous monitoring test was performed in three sampling points inside Furnas Volcano caldera and 222Rn concentration varied between 0 and 153000 Bq/m3. Multivariate regression and spectral analyses were applied to the time series registered in order to understand and filter the influence of external factors on soil 222Rn concentration and to recognise anomalies correlated with deep processes. The regression models show that barometric pressure, soil water content, soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed are the statistical meaningful variables explaining between 15.8% and 73.6% of 222Rn variations. Spectral analysis allowed to identify seasonal variations and daily variations associated with one cycle per day on winter months only in one of the monitored sites. This diurnal variation is correlated with air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed cycles. The change in the location of the sampling points was caused by both artificial and natural constrains. On the three monitoring sites, after a period of continuous register, a sudden drop on the 222Rn concentration values was observed and the cause is still under debate. The work performed can be applied for seismovolcanic monitoring and for public health risk assessment.

  6. KATTS: a framework for maximizing NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Betsy M

    2008-04-01

    A key indicator of the quality of a nursing education program is the performance of its graduates as first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN. As a result, nursing schools are open to strategies that strengthen the performance of their graduates on the examination. The Knowledge base, Anxiety control, Test-Taking Skills (KATTS) framework focuses on the three components of achieving a maximum score on an examination. In KATTS, all three components must be present and in proper balance to maximize a test taker's score. By strengthening not just one but all of these components, graduates can improve their overall test scores significantly. Suggested strategies for strengthening each component of KATTS are provided. This framework has been used successfully in designing remedial tutoring programs and in assisting first-time NCLEX test takers in preparing for the licensing examination. PMID:18468296

  7. Role transition during RN-to-FNP education.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Susan H; McLaughlin, Diana G; Hyde, Roberta S; Brown, Rosemary H; Burman, Mary E

    2008-10-01

    This study examines the role transition that occurs during RN-to-family nurse practitioner (FNP) education, described in an earlier qualitative study that identified a role transition framework of influential positive forces and obstacles. The purposes of the study were to validate the educational phase of the original framework and explore other role transition issues. The study used a descriptive correlational design by asking all FNPs in two rural western states to participate by answering a questionnaire. Findings evidenced a stronger level of agreement with the positive forces than with the obstacles. In addition, two significant relationships were found between the positive forces and obstacles and personal life circumstances. These included personal support systems, which were significant for those who had to travel to class, and personal sacrifices, which were significant for those who had children at home. Further research will focus on testing across nurse practitioner specialties nationally.

  8. Study groups: are they effective in preparing students for NCLEX-RN?

    PubMed

    Ashley, J; O'Neil, J

    1994-10-01

    The effectiveness of faculty-directed study groups as an intervention to prepare nurse candidates for NCLEX-RN was evaluated. The NCLEX-RN performance of a baccalaureate class who had participated in study groups was compared to the performance of a prior class who had not participated in study groups. Academic subgroups within the classes were compared to determine if study groups were equally effective across levels of academic achievement. The possible reasons for the significant difference in the NCLEX-RN passing rate between "at-risk" students who participated in study groups and at-risk students who did not participate in study groups are discussed. Discussion also considers possible factors influencing the generally better performance of study group participants at all academic levels. Suggestions for future intervention research direct attention to time intensity of interventions and research control through random assignments to treatment groups.

  9. Measurements of 220Rn emanation from rocks.

    PubMed

    Howard, A J; Simsarian, J E; Strange, W P

    1995-12-01

    Alpha-particle and gamma-ray measurements are employed to determine the individual emanation and production rates associated with the thorium radioactive series for thirty-seven rock specimens of approximately 200 cm3 individual volume representing igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic types. These results are combined to establish 220Rn emanating powers for each of these specimens, and a wide range of values is observed. The generally large 220Rn emanation observed for these specimens strongly indicates that non-tortuous diffusion paths are commonly present in the associated structures, which gives more evidence for the existence of well-connected pore networks at the nanometer level in many of the specimens studied. While the results are qualitatively explainable, they are not predictable in terms of the current macroscopic observables. Since 220Rn and 222Rn emanation rates from rock specimens have previously been found to be comparable in magnitude, the relatively fast determination of 220Rn emanation rates described herein (measurements involving 1-h duration) is in reasonable probability indicative of a comparable 222Rn emanation rate: The employment of 220Rn as a convenient screening tool for potentially high 222Rn emanation sources is indicated. PMID:7493809

  10. Measurements of 220Rn emanation from rocks.

    PubMed

    Howard, A J; Simsarian, J E; Strange, W P

    1995-12-01

    Alpha-particle and gamma-ray measurements are employed to determine the individual emanation and production rates associated with the thorium radioactive series for thirty-seven rock specimens of approximately 200 cm3 individual volume representing igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic types. These results are combined to establish 220Rn emanating powers for each of these specimens, and a wide range of values is observed. The generally large 220Rn emanation observed for these specimens strongly indicates that non-tortuous diffusion paths are commonly present in the associated structures, which gives more evidence for the existence of well-connected pore networks at the nanometer level in many of the specimens studied. While the results are qualitatively explainable, they are not predictable in terms of the current macroscopic observables. Since 220Rn and 222Rn emanation rates from rock specimens have previously been found to be comparable in magnitude, the relatively fast determination of 220Rn emanation rates described herein (measurements involving 1-h duration) is in reasonable probability indicative of a comparable 222Rn emanation rate: The employment of 220Rn as a convenient screening tool for potentially high 222Rn emanation sources is indicated.

  11. Dissolved gas 222Rn, 220Rn and 220Rn/222Rn in the Ground Water System of Las Cañadas, Tenerife, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, L.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Perez, N.; Lopez, D.

    2001-12-01

    Tenerife (2,034 Km2) could be considered as an unique natural-scale laboratory for hydrological studies at oceanic volcanic islands. Thousands of well and galleries have been drilled (1,650 Km) reaching the island volcanic aquifer at different depth and elevations. Cañadas' aquifer is located in the central part of Tenerife and is affected by Teide volcanic-hydrothermal system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the concentration levels of dissolved gas 222Rn and 220Rn as well as their spatial distribution at Cañadas' aquifer. Dissolved gas 222Rn and 220Rn were measured at 13 observation sites "galleries" on July and August, 2001. Concentration of these dissolved gases were performed by means of a gas-water exchange membrane and an electrostatic-type alfa detector SARAD RTM2010-2 during 24 hours, allowing to measure alfa particles from its radioactive progeny, 214Po, 216Po and 218Po in hourly basis. Dissolved gas 222Rn concentrations ranged from 0.12 to 67.3 BqL-1, and 220Rn content ranged from 0.06 to 24.5 BqL-1. Median values for dissolved gas 222Rn and 220Rn are 1.7 and 0.64 BqL-1, respectively. Most of the ground waters showed dissolved gas 222Rn concentrations lower than 10 BqL-1, and relatively high levels up to 67.3 y 24.7 BqL-1 where observed at two galleries on the eastern side of Cañadas' aquifer. 220Rn/222Rn ratio ranged from 0.1 to 0.6. A wide range of 222Rn and 220Rn/222Rn ratios were just detected at the recharge zone of Cañadas' aquifer and a more limited range was observed at lower elevations. Teide volcanic-hydrothermal system might be playing a role on this spatial distribution. These results could be useful for hydrological modelling of Cañadas' aquifer and the geochemical monitoring for the seismic-volcanic surveillance of Tenerife.

  12. Development and calibration of a portable radon sampling system for groundwater 222Rn activity concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Fabio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Igor José Chaves; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha

    2009-10-01

    The assembling of a system for field sampling and activity concentration measurement of radon dissolved in groundwater is described. Special attention is given in presenting the calibration procedure to obtain the radon activity concentration in groundwater from the raw counting rate registered in a portable scintillation detector and in establishing the precision of the activity concentration measurements. A field procedure was established and the system tested during one year of monthly observations of (222)Rn activity concentration in groundwater drawn from two wells drilled on metamorphic rocks exposed at Eastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The observed mean (222)Rn activity concentrations are 374Bq/dm(3) in one well and about 1275Bq/dm(3) in the other one. In both wells the (222)Rn activity concentrations showed a seasonal variation similar to variations previously reported in the literature for the same region.

  13. Men in Nursing: Their Influence in a Female Dominated Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett-Landau, Susan; Henle, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    An analysis performed by Staiger, Auerback, and Buerhaus (2012) on the RN workforce model suggests that between 2010 and 2015 there will be a decrease in the RN's employment as the economy improves and the baby boomer population retires. This article centers on the road blocks men face in nursing education, clinical experiences, job preferences in…

  14. Interrelationship between core interventions and core competencies of forensic psychiatric nursing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Tenkanen, Helena; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kinnunen, Juha

    2011-03-01

    The importance of core competencies (CC) and their relationship to core interventions in clinical practice guidelines on schizophrenia (CPGS), and the abilities to master these competencies were studied among registered nurses (RN) and practical mental nurses (PMN) in a forensic psychiatric setting. Data were collected from RNs, PMNs, and managers of all five forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland. The research material was obtained by using a 360-degree feedback method. The response rate was 68% (N = 428). The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the importance of and ability to master the following CCs: (1) pharmacotherapy, (2) knowledge in forensic psychiatry and violent behavior, (3) the treatment of violent patients, (4) processing patient's and own emotion, and (5) need-adapted treatment of the patient. Overall, RNs exceeded PMNs in mastering the CCs, however the principles of the CPGS were not achieved within the current resources in Finland. In summary, RNs, rather than PMNs, should be recruited for work in forensic psychiatric nursing, although a considerable amount of specific training would still be required to achieve competence. Implications of our research indicate that all nurses working in this area need to receive further education in forensic psychiatry and in forensic psychiatric nursing.

  15. An instrument for continuous measurement of 220Rn (and 222Rn) using delayed coincidences between 220Rn and 216Po

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigu, J.; Elliott, J.

    1994-05-01

    An instrument has been developed for continuous monitoring of 220Rn. The method of data analysis is based on delayed coincidences between 220Rn and 216Po. The instrument basically consists of a scaler equipped with a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to which a scintillation cell (SC) of the flow through type is optically coupled. The scaler is equipped with a pulse output (P/O) port which provides a TTL pulse, +5 V in amplitude and 5 to 10 μs duration for each nuclear event recorded by the SC and its associated electronic circuitry. The P/O port is connected to a 32 bit counter/timer unit operating at 1 MHz which records and stores the time of arrival of pulses. For laboratory use, the counter/timer is connected to the serial port of a laptop PC. However, for field applications, where space and weight pose severe practical limitations, the PC is substituted by an expanded counter/timer unit which incorporates a muprocessor for data analysis, a LCD for data display, and a keypad to key in function instructions. Furthermore, some additional hardware permits the measurement of 220Rn flux density, J( 220Rn) , from soils and other materials. Because total α-particle count, as well as delayed (α - α) coincidence rates are recorded in two separate channels, the method permits the measurement of 222Rn in addition to 220Rn. The method is particularly useful for low concentration levels. The sensitivity of the method primarily depends on the volume of the SC. For a low volume SC (˜0.16 l), a sensitivity of 0.2 h -1/Bq m -3 for 220Rn and 1.4 h -1/Bq m -3 for 222Rn are readily attainable. For a large volume (1.5 l) SC (external PMT used), the sensitivity for 220Rn is ≥ 1.5 h -1/Bq m -3, depending on the SC design and the operating sampling flowrate. (Note: h -1 stands for counts per hour). The above instrument has been used extensively at the National Radon/Thoron Test Facility (NRTTF) of the Elliot Lake Laboratory for routine monitoring of 220Rn levels since 1992. It has

  16. D 1 , 2 (RN) versus C (RN) local minimizer and a Hopf-type maximum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Siegfried; Costa, David G.; Tehrani, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    We consider functionals of the form Φ (u) =1/2∫RN | ∇u|2 -∫RN b (x) G (u) on D 1 , 2 (RN), N ≥ 3, whose critical points are the weak solutions of a corresponding elliptic equation in the whole RN. We present a Brezis-Nirenberg type result and a Hopf-type maximum principle in the context of the space D 1 , 2 (RN). More precisely, we prove that a local minimizer of Φ in the topology of the subspace V must be a local minimizer of Φ in the D 1 , 2 (RN)-topology, where V is given by V : = { v ∈D 1 , 2 (RN) : v ∈ C (RN)withsupx∈RN ⁡ (1 + | x| N - 2) | v (x) | < ∞ }. It is well-known that the Brezis-Nirenberg result has been proved a strong tool in the study of multiple solutions for elliptic boundary value problems in bounded domains. We believe that the result obtained in this paper may play a similar role for elliptic problems in RN.

  17. Nursing in Switzerland: struggling to maintain quality and ideals.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Teodora; Baumann, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    After an edited transcript of an interview with a nurse leader, Teodora Duarte, RN; MA, on nursing in Switzerland, the author further discusses the challenges and opportunities facing nursing in that country from a global perspective. Also discussed are some of the advantages and problems of international nursing, in particular nurses who migrate to work in other countries or commute across national borders. PMID:25520468

  18. Geriatric Training Academy: innovative education for certified nurse aides and charge nurses.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Barbara; Marshall-Gray, Paula; Laurence, Ann; Green, Alexia; Valadez, Ana; Scott-Tilley, Donna; Merritt, Pearl

    2007-03-01

    Quality care for the rapidly growing number of older Americans is a major challenge facing the health care industry today. With the baby-boom generation "coming of age"--older age-the need for quality long-term care workers is on the rise. It is estimated that the number of persons needing assisted or alternative living arrangements will increase from 15 million in 2000 to 27 million in 2050 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHS], 2003). In response to the rising demand for quality long-term care workers, the Geriatric Education and Training Academy (the Academy) was created at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) to provide advanced geriatric education and training for certified nurse aides (CNA), licensed vocational nurses (LVN) and registered nurses (RN) who work in long-term care facilities. This article describes how the Academy is addressing the need for the recruitment, education, and retention of long-term care workers for the expanding geriatric population in West Texas. PMID:17378190

  19. Charting the course for nurses' achievement of higher education levels.

    PubMed

    Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol; Katigbak, Carina; Djukic, Maja; Fatehi, Farida

    2012-01-01

    To improve patient outcomes and meet the challenges of the U.S. health care system, the Institute of Medicine recommends higher educational attainment for the nursing workforce. Characteristics of registered nurses (RNs) who pursue additional education are poorly understood, and this information is critical to planning long-term strategies for U.S. nursing education. To identify factors predicting enrollment and completion of an additional degree among those with an associate or bachelor's as their pre-RN licensure degree, we performed logistic regression analysis on data from an ongoing nationally representative panel study following the career trajectories of newly licensed RNs. For associate degree RNs, predictors of obtaining a bachelor's degree are the following: being Black, living in a rural area, nonnursing work experience, higher positive affectivity, higher work motivation, working in the intensive care unit, and working the day shift. For bachelor's RNs, predictors of completing a master's degree are the following: being Black, nonnursing work experience, holding more than one job, working the day shift, working voluntary overtime, lower intent to stay at current employer, and higher work motivation. Mobilizing the nurse workforce toward higher education requires integrated efforts from policy makers, philanthropists, employers, and educators to mitigate the barriers to continuing education.

  20. Charting the course for nurses' achievement of higher education levels.

    PubMed

    Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol; Katigbak, Carina; Djukic, Maja; Fatehi, Farida

    2012-01-01

    To improve patient outcomes and meet the challenges of the U.S. health care system, the Institute of Medicine recommends higher educational attainment for the nursing workforce. Characteristics of registered nurses (RNs) who pursue additional education are poorly understood, and this information is critical to planning long-term strategies for U.S. nursing education. To identify factors predicting enrollment and completion of an additional degree among those with an associate or bachelor's as their pre-RN licensure degree, we performed logistic regression analysis on data from an ongoing nationally representative panel study following the career trajectories of newly licensed RNs. For associate degree RNs, predictors of obtaining a bachelor's degree are the following: being Black, living in a rural area, nonnursing work experience, higher positive affectivity, higher work motivation, working in the intensive care unit, and working the day shift. For bachelor's RNs, predictors of completing a master's degree are the following: being Black, nonnursing work experience, holding more than one job, working the day shift, working voluntary overtime, lower intent to stay at current employer, and higher work motivation. Mobilizing the nurse workforce toward higher education requires integrated efforts from policy makers, philanthropists, employers, and educators to mitigate the barriers to continuing education. PMID:23158196

  1. Musculoskeletal outcomes in multiple body regions and work effects among nurses: the effects of stressful and stimulating working conditions.

    PubMed

    Daraiseh, N; Genaidy, A M; Karwowski, W; Davis, L S; Stambough, J; Huston, R I

    2003-10-10

    This study investigated the various stressors encountered by the nursing profession. In particular, the following hypotheses were tested: (1) working conditions of nurses significantly affect perceived risk of injury and illness, work dissatisfaction, work satisfaction, energy state at the end of workday, the effort exerted by the registered nurse (RN), psychosomatic outcomes, and musculoskeletal symptoms (in multiple body regions); (2) both intermediate work effects (i.e., effort, perceived risk of injury/illness, work satisfaction/dissatisfaction, energy state at end of workday) and psychosomatic outcomes significantly affect musculoskeletal outcomes (in multiple body regions); (3) both working conditions and effects significantly affect musculoskeletal outcomes. In a preliminary study conducted on 34 registered nurses, results show that: (1) stressful working conditions affect musculoskeletal outcomes in multiple body regions, and (2) physical maladies such as lower back problems are not only associated with physical factors but also with a complex interaction of working conditions. Further research is warranted to obtain a better understanding of the complex interaction and the synergistic effects of the various nursing working conditions. PMID:12933079

  2. A literature review of mentoring for RN-to-FNP transition.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2012-11-01

    Making the transition from RN to family nurse practitioner (FNP) can be challenging and stressful. The transition may begin during graduate school. As FNP students struggle to balance the multitude of academic, personal, and professional demands, they may also struggle with how to make the transition in role and practice. Nurse faculty may aid FNP students by mentoring them. However, information is limited regarding successful mentoring programs and faculty mentoring of FNP students. A literature review of mentoring was conducted, and findings are presented and discussed in this article, including recommendations for additional research. This information may assist faculty, students, and academic institutions seeking to better facilitate the RN-to-FNP transition during graduate school.

  3. Radiological risk of actinon (/sup 219/Rn)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.J.

    1981-12-01

    The research reported was designed to provide information on the following subjects: (1) development of the functional relations between exposure to the /sup 219/Rn decay chain and pertinent health effects; (2) specification of the circumstances under which a significant concentration of the decay chain may occur; (3) recommendation of an exposure standard which will provide protection of the public from significant elevation of health effects; and (4) an assessment of the impact of /sup 219/Rn on determinations of the concentration of the /sup 222/Rn decay chain and/or its precursors.

  4. An Analysis of the Need for Registered Nurses in New Jersey: A Case Study of the Uses of Manpower Planning in the Development of State Level Higher Education Policy. ASHE Annual Meeting 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbo, Phyllis

    The value of linking manpower analyses and educational policy formation is illustrated by the experience of the New Jersey Department of Higher Education in planning programs for professional nurses. After reviewing the history of manpower planning for nurses in New Jersey, the results of a 1980 nursing study and projections of the future need for…

  5. Empowering nurses through an innovative scheduling model.

    PubMed

    Maxson-Cooper, Pamela A

    2011-03-01

    In 1980, Froedtert Hospital opened its doors using an innovative registered nurse scheduling model. The hospital has grown to 500 beds, with over 1,600 registered nurses, and continues to use the 7/70 staffing pattern as a core scheduling model. Registered nurses work a straight seven, 10-hour days, and then have 1 week off, or 26 weeks off a year. For professional registered nurses in acute care, the schedule is predictable and consistent for years. This scheduling pattern has resulted in excellent registered nurse satisfaction, increased retention, and consistency in care delivery teams since 1980.

  6. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  7. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  8. From healthcare support worker to registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Driffield, Amanda

    2016-09-01

    Workforce planning, education and training are essential for achieving an appropriate mix of skilled and motivated staff, but the NHS's financial challenges mean new ways of providing safe staffing levels and balancing the books are required. This article describes the development of an education programme for band 1 to band 4 unregistered support workers that led to the introduction of an assistant practitioner (AP) role. It also explains how the programme evolved from a one-year certificate in higher education to a foundation degree in health care, and has since produced over 100 APs in a range of clinical areas who deliver high quality, competent and patient-centred care in a cost-effective, sustainable way. PMID:27581913

  9. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute

  10. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a…

  11. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  12. A Regional Collaboration for Educational and Career Mobility: The Nursing Education Mobility Action Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolince, Patricia; Giesser, Nancy; Greig, Judith; Knittel, Kathleen; Mahowald, Jane F.; McAloney-Madden, Lisa; Schloss, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative group of 25 Northeast Ohio nursing deans/directors has developed an access model to provide new education and career mobility pathways into nursing. Model components describe the routes of licensed practical nurse to registered nurse and registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing. Cost effectiveness and equity are…

  13. Nurses working outside of nursing: societal trend or workplace crisis?

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2008-08-01

    The phenomenon of career inactivity in professional nursing has been historically portrayed in the literature as a major cause of disequilibrium in the registered nurse labor market. However, there remains a general lack of understanding of the diverse forces that shape the inactive nurse pool and the likelihood that this population will return to nursing. The purpose of this study was to examine the population of registered nurses who are active in the labor market but work in nonnursing employment. Specifically, this study sought to determine the relative importance of nonworkplace- and workplace-related reasons for working outside of nursing. The results demonstrate that dissatisfaction with the nursing workplace is the key reason cited by actively licensed nurses for working outside of nursing employment. These findings suggest that policy and employer remedies are needed to improve the nursing workplace.

  14. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-12 and RN-19, Reykjanes, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-07-24

    Results for fluid rare earth elment analyses from Reykjanes wells RN-12 and RN-19. The data have not been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcetrated using chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using and Element magnetic sctor ICP-MS.

  15. Criminal liability research in vaccine administration by public health nurse: a case study of the Nantou vaccine administration case.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jui-Chu; Wang, Triumph

    2008-03-01

    Immunization is recognized as a powerful public health tool in disease control and eradication. Registered nurses (RNs) are the principal health professionals responsible for administering vaccines, not only in terms of childhood immunization but also increasingly in administering travel vaccines and annual influenza vaccinations. The RN often provides leadership in developing and maintaining a high quality program. The legal position of nurses when administering a vaccine conflicts with their role as care providers, and nurses must be aware of their legal position when administering a vaccine that has not been individually prescribed by a doctor. A recent case involving a baby who died after receiving a vaccine administered by a public health nurse without a doctor's prescription resulted in the prosecutor initiating a prosecution against the nurse and chief of Health Bureau for a violation of Article 28 of the Physician's Act and the criminal law. Although the nurse and Bureau Chief were judged not guilty, the first trial court pointed out that the behavior of this nurse still violated Article 28. This reflects the conflict that exists between empirical practice and legal regulations. In order to guarantee that prophylactic inoculation is implemented properly under legitimate and effective conditions (specially in remote districts), in May 23, 2006, Legislative Yuan passed an amendment to Article 4 of the Communicable Disease Control Act, which specified that no public health nurse can be prosecuted for violations of Article 28 of the Physician's Act as a result of vaccine administration. In the future, nurses in clinics located in remote districts may conduct prophylactic inoculation work without fear of the terms of Article 28 and focus on implementing public prophylactic inoculation responsibilities. However, a public health nurse can still be liable for the malpractice in criminal law during the vaccination. Therefore, following procedure is still necessary

  16. Nursing Educator Retention: The Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Intent to Stay among Nursing Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an increasingly worsening shortage of registered nurses, due, in part, to the nursing educator shortage. Further, nursing programs nationwide are turning away qualified applicants because of a lack of nursing educators. Unfortunately, the nursing educator shortage is not a problem that will be easily fixed. As…

  17. On Vocal Registers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollien, Harry

    A vocal register is a series or range of consecutive frequencies that can be produced with nearly identical voice quality. On the basis of research three fundamental registers can be defined and described: pulse, a low range of phonation; modal, a middle or "normal" range; and loft, a high range, described by some as falsetto. These three…

  18. Adult student satisfaction in an accelerated RN-to-BSN program: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Mary T; Jackson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This mixed-method study revealed accelerated RN-to-BSN (bachelor of science in nursing) students' levels of satisfaction with a wide range of college services in a small university. Building on seminal research on the topic [Boylston, M. T., Peters, M. A., & Lacey, M. (2004). Adult student satisfaction in traditional and accelerated RN-to-BSN programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20, 23-32.], the Noel-Levitz Adult Student Priorities Survey (ASPS) and qualitative interview data revealed primary factors involved in nontraditional (adult) accelerated RN-to-BSN student satisfaction. The ASPS assesses both satisfaction with and importance of the following factors: academic advising effectiveness, academic services, admissions and financial aid effectiveness, campus climate, instructional effectiveness, registration effectiveness, safety and security, and service excellence. Of these factors, participants considered instructional effectiveness and academic advising effectiveness as most important and concomitantly gave high satisfaction ratings to each. In contrast, convenience of the bookstore, counseling services, vending machines, and computer laboratories were given low importance ratings. The participants cited convenience as a strong marketing factor. Loss of financial aid or family crisis was given as a reason for withdrawal and, for most students, would be the only reason for not completing the BSN program. Outcomes of this investigation may guide faculty, staff, and administrators in proactively creating an educational environment in which a nontraditional student can succeed. PMID:18804082

  19. Inverse modeling of Asian (222)Rn flux using surface air (222)Rn concentration.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2010-11-01

    When used with an atmospheric transport model, the (222)Rn flux distribution estimated in our previous study using soil transport theory caused underestimation of atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations as compared with measurements in East Asia. In this study, we applied a Bayesian synthesis inverse method to produce revised estimates of the annual (222)Rn flux density in Asia by using atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at seven sites in East Asia. The Bayesian synthesis inverse method requires a prior estimate of the flux distribution and its uncertainties. The atmospheric transport model MM5/HIRAT and our previous estimate of the (222)Rn flux distribution as the prior value were used to generate new flux estimates for the eastern half of the Eurasian continent dividing into 10 regions. The (222)Rn flux densities estimated using the Bayesian inversion technique were generally higher than the prior flux densities. The area-weighted average (222)Rn flux density for Asia was estimated to be 33.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1), which is substantially higher than the prior value (16.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). The estimated (222)Rn flux densities decrease with increasing latitude as follows: Southeast Asia (36.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)); East Asia (28.6 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) including China, Korean Peninsula and Japan; and Siberia (14.1 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). Increase of the newly estimated fluxes in Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia from the prior ones contributed most significantly to improved agreement of the model-calculated concentrations with the atmospheric measurements. The sensitivity analysis of prior flux errors and effects of locally exhaled (222)Rn showed that the estimated fluxes in Northern and Central China, Korea, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia were robust, but that in Central Asia had a large uncertainty.

  20. Nurse Anesthetists: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... governors to opt out of this facility reimbursement requirement (which applies to hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers) ... states have opted out of the federal supervision requirement, most recently Kentucky (April 2012). Additional states do ...

  1. Transforming Associate Degree Nursing Education with Internet Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremel, Maureen D.

    2004-01-01

    In light of today's dynamic health care delivery system, nursing education cannot be passive and still produce competent and effective registered nurses. Registered nurses must be able to communicate confidently in order to advocate for their patients and themselves. The nursing faculty at Seminole Community College have accepted the challenge to…

  2. A pilot study of RN-BSN completion students' preferred instructor online classroom caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mann, Judith C

    2014-01-01

    Definitions of caring include the global concept of showing concern and empathy of others. This may be especially true in the online classroom in the absence of face to face interactions. This quantitative study focused on RN-BSN completion students' preferred online instructor caring behaviors. Online RN-BSN students (N = 100) were invited to participate in the study. The research question was: What are historically black colleges universities nursing students' preferred instructor caring behaviors in the online classroom? All of the respondents (N = 48) agreed that an instructor can create a caring online learning environment, while the vast majority agreed that the presence of a caring environment influenced their success in the course. As ranked by the respondents the three most important items in creating a caring online learning environment were instructors': 1) attention to detail in organization and clarity, 2) prompt and detailed feedback to assignments, and 3) prompt response to students' questions.

  3. Janet Quinn, RN, PhD. Therapeutic touch and a healing way. Interview by Bonnie Horrigan.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J

    1996-07-01

    Janet Quinn, RN, PhD, is an associate professor and senior scholar at the Center for Human Caring at the School of Nursing, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, in Denver, Colo. In addition to teaching she conducts research, lectures, writes, and maintains a private practice in Boulder, Colo. She received her PhD in nursing research and theory development from New York University in 1982. Quinn is a member of Sigma Theta Tau, and is active in a diverse group of professional organizations including the American Nurses Association, American Holistic Nurses Association, Association for Holotropic Breathwork International, Association for Transpersonal Psychology, International Society for the Study of Subtle Energy and Energy Medicine, Hakomi Therapy Association, and the Institute of Noetic Sciences. During her career she has received many awards including the Healers Award from the Nurse Healers and Professional Associates (1995); the Edgar S Wilson, MD, Fellowship Award from the International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine (1994); and the Holistic Nurse of the Year award from the American Holistic Nurses Association. Alternative Therapies interviewed Dr Quinn at her office in Boulder, Colo. PMID:8795925

  4. Moderating Effects of Learning Climate on the Impact of RN Staffing on Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, YunKyung; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite increasing recognition of the significance of learning from errors, little is known about how learning climate contributes to error reduction. Objectives To investigate whether learning climate moderates the relationship between error-producing conditions and medication errors. Method A cross-sectional descriptive study was done using data from 279 nursing units in 146 randomly selected hospitals in the United States. Error-producing conditions included work environment factors (work dynamics and nurse mix), team factors (communication with physicians and nurses’ expertise), personal factors (nurses’ education and experience), patient factors (age, health status, and previous hospitalization), and medication-related support services. Poisson models with random effects were used with the nursing unit as the unit of analysis. Results A significant negative relationship was found between learning climate and medication errors. It also moderated the relationship between nurse mix and medication errors: When learning climate was negative, having more registered nurses was associated with fewer medication errors, and this relationship trended towards significance. However, no relationship was found between nurse mix and medication errors at either positive or average levels of learning climate. Learning climate did not moderate the relationship between work dynamics and medication errors. Discussion The way nurse mix affects medication errors depends on the level of learning climate. Nursing units with fewer registered nurses and frequent medication errors should examine their learning climate. Future research should be focused on the role of learning climate as related to the relationships between nurse mix and medication errors. PMID:21127452

  5. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  6. 25 CFR 36.85 - Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings? 36... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Staffing § 36.85 Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings? No, a program is not required to make a nurse (LPN or RN) available in the evenings. However, this is...

  7. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS... Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2014, AENT support for part-time... practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  8. 25 CFR 36.85 - Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings? 36... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Staffing § 36.85 Is a nurse required to be available in the evenings? No, a program is not required to make a nurse (LPN or RN) available in the evenings. However, this is...

  9. A descriptive study of Korean nurses' perception of pain and skin tearing at dressing change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Yoon; Kim, Na Kyung; Lee, Yun Jin

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate Korean nurses' level of awareness of pain and skin tearing in wound bed and/or peri-wound skin at dressing change. A descriptive study was performed. Convenience sampling was employed and registered nurses were recruited from attendees of continuing education program. A total of 399 participants (RN) completed questionnaire. Data was collected from September to November 2014. Many of them perceived skin tearing and wound related pain associated with dressing changing, but most of them did not assess and record pain and skin tearing at dressing change. More than half of respondents reported that they did not provide nursing intervention to prevent pain and skin tearing. Many of them reported that a systematic educational program for preventing pain and skin tearing at dressing change was needed. In conclusion, many of respondents were aware of pain and skin tearing at dressing change, but did not take any further necessary measures, including nursing intervention, for the most appropriate, systematic pain and skin tearing management. Therefore, this study suggested that a systematic and comprehensive educational program for Korean healthcare professions needs to be developed and implemented in Korea's hospital settings. PMID:26847938

  10. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  11. Nursing Students' Empowerment in Distance Education: Testing Kanter's Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Elizabeth; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Iwasiw, Carroll

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative, explanatory study examined Post-RN baccalaureate nursing students' experiences of empowerment with distance education and computer conferencing (CC) for fit with the constructs of Kanter's (1977, 1993) Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Seven post-RNs from Canadian distance education nursing programs were interviewed.…

  12. Nurses' self-relation--becoming theoretically competent: the SAUC model for confirming nursing.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Barbro; Willman, Ania M

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to acquire an understanding of how nurses' self-relation (view of themselves as nurses) was influenced in connection with implementation of a nursing theory, the sympathy-acceptance-understanding-competence model for confirming nursing. This model was developed by Gustafsson and Pörn. Twenty-two nurses' written statements evaluating mentoring during the six-month implementation process in elder care, were analyzed hermeneutically with the hypothetic-deductive method. An action-theoretic and confirmatory approach was used for facilitating theoretically specified hypotheses. The nurses increased their ability to describe nursing theoretically and gained a foundation of common nursing values. The results provided an understanding of how nurses' self-relation was strengthened by becoming theoretically competent. PMID:12876885

  13. New graduate nurses, new graduate nurse transition programs, and clinical leadership skill: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Kathy B; Richards, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review evaluated the relationship between new graduate nurses and clinical leadership skill, and between new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs have been cited as one strategy to improve clinical leadership skill, but to our knowledge, no one has synthesized the evidence on new graduate nurse transition programs and clinical leadership skill. Results of this review showed that new graduate nurse transition programs that were at least 24 weeks in length had a positive impact on clinical leadership skill. New graduate nurse transition programs using the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing Nurse Residency curriculum had the greatest impact, followed by curriculum developed by the Versant New Graduate RN Residency, an important finding for nursing professional development specialists.

  14. Nurses' self-relation--becoming theoretically competent: the SAUC model for confirming nursing.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Barbro; Willman, Ania M

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to acquire an understanding of how nurses' self-relation (view of themselves as nurses) was influenced in connection with implementation of a nursing theory, the sympathy-acceptance-understanding-competence model for confirming nursing. This model was developed by Gustafsson and Pörn. Twenty-two nurses' written statements evaluating mentoring during the six-month implementation process in elder care, were analyzed hermeneutically with the hypothetic-deductive method. An action-theoretic and confirmatory approach was used for facilitating theoretically specified hypotheses. The nurses increased their ability to describe nursing theoretically and gained a foundation of common nursing values. The results provided an understanding of how nurses' self-relation was strengthened by becoming theoretically competent.

  15. Enhancing Student Learning: RN CAT Advisement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Susan K.

    This document describes a community college advisement program that was implemented to improve the student pass rate for the national nursing licensure examination. The nursing faculty at Manatee Community College (Florida) recently instituted an advisement system during the final semester of the two-year nursing program. First, students were…

  16. Improving the Credibility of Child Sexual Assault Victims in Court: The Impact of a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner.

    PubMed

    Golding, Jonathan M; Wasarhaley, Nesa E; Lynch, Kellie R; Lippert, Anne; Magyarics, Casey L

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the influence of a sexual assault nurse examiner's (SANE's) testimony on mock juror perceptions of a child or adolescent victim of child sexual assault. Community members (N = 252, 156 females) read a fictional criminal trial summary of a child sexual assault case in which the victim was 6 or 15 years old and the prosecution presented medical testimony from a SANE or a traditional registered nurse (RN), or did not present medical testimony. Mock jurors were more likely to render guilty verdicts when a SANE testified compared with the other two testimony conditions. In addition, pro-victim judgments (e.g., sympathy toward the victim) and negative defendant judgments (e.g., anger toward the defendant) mediated this relation. Finally, cognitive network representations of the case demonstrated that the RN and no-medical-testimony groups were similar and the SANE group was distinct from the other two conditions. We discuss these results in terms of the implications of SANE testimony in child sexual assault court cases.

  17. Community Health Workers Versus Nurses as Counselors or Case Managers in a Self-Help Diabetes Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kim B.; Kim, Miyong T.; Lee, Hochang B.; Nguyen, Tam; Bone, Lee R.; Levine, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To confirm the effectiveness of community health workers’ involvement as counselors or case managers in a self-help diabetes management program in 2009 to 2014. Methods Our open-label, randomized controlled trial determined the effectiveness of a self-help intervention among Korean Americans aged 35 to 80 years in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. We measured and analyzed physiological and psychobehavioral health outcomes of the community health worker–counseled (n = 54) and registered nurse (RN)–counseled (n = 51) intervention groups in comparison with the control group (n = 104). Results The community health workers’ performance was comparable to that of the RNs for both psychobehavioral outcomes (e.g., self-efficacy, quality of life) and physiological outcomes. The community health worker–counseled group showed hemoglobin A1C reductions from baseline (−1.2%, −1.5%, −1.3%, and −1.6%, at months 3, 6, 9, and 12, respectively), all of which were greater than reductions in the RN-counseled (−0.7%, −0.9%, −0.9%, and −1.0%) or the control (−0.5%, −0.5%, −0.6%, and −0.7%) groups. Conclusions Community health workers performed as well as or better than nurses as counselors or case managers in a self-help diabetes management program in a Korean American community. PMID:26985607

  18. INDUSTRIAL TRAINING RESEARCH REGISTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, London (England).

    IN THIS CLASSIFIED REGISTER OF CURRENT AND RECENTLY COMPLETED STUDIES OF INDUSTRIAL TRAINING IN GREAT BRITAIN, INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS ARE ARRANGED BY THE ITEM NUMBER JUDGED MOST IMPORTANT, AND THE NUMBERS OF OTHER RELEVANT INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH PROJECTS ARE INSERTED AT THE END OF EACH SECTION TO PROVIDE CROSS REFERENCES. DESCRIPTIONS INCLUDE THE TITLE…

  19. Hello! Are You Registered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Political/Legal Education, Sewell, NJ.

    Organizational procedures and appropriate forms for high school students to conduct a community survey of non-registered voters are provided. Duties for student coordinator, field staff, and clerical staff are described and a flow chart depicts the relationship of personnel to one another and to the community. Students are instructed to notify…

  20. Attached, unattached fraction of progeny concentrations and equilibrium factor for dose assessments from (222)Rn and (220)Rn.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parminder; Saini, Komal; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, measurements of indoor radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) were carried out in 96 dwellings from 22 different villages situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, by using LR-115 type II-based pinhole twin cup dosimeters and deposition-based progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). The annual average indoor (222)Rn and (220)Rn concentrations observed in these dwellings were 63.82 and 89.59 Bq/m(3), respectively, while the average EEC (attached + unattached) for (222)Rn and (220)Rn was 29.28 and 2.74 Bq/m(3). For (222)Rn (f Rn) and (220)Rn (f Tn), the average values of unattached fraction were 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. The equilibrium factors for radon (F Rn) and thoron (F Tn) varied from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average of 0.50, and from 0.01 to 0.34 with an average of 0.05, respectively. The annual inhalation dose due to mouth and nasal breathing was calculated using dose conversion factors and unattached fractions. The indoor annual effective doses for (222)Rn (AEDR) and (220)Rn (AEDT) were found to be 1.92 and 0.83 mSv a(-1), respectively. The values of (222)Rn/(220)Rn concentrations and annual effective doses obtained in the present study are within the safe limits as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for indoor dwelling exposure conditions. PMID:27289385

  1. Attached, unattached fraction of progeny concentrations and equilibrium factor for dose assessments from (222)Rn and (220)Rn.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parminder; Saini, Komal; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, measurements of indoor radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) were carried out in 96 dwellings from 22 different villages situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, by using LR-115 type II-based pinhole twin cup dosimeters and deposition-based progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). The annual average indoor (222)Rn and (220)Rn concentrations observed in these dwellings were 63.82 and 89.59 Bq/m(3), respectively, while the average EEC (attached + unattached) for (222)Rn and (220)Rn was 29.28 and 2.74 Bq/m(3). For (222)Rn (f Rn) and (220)Rn (f Tn), the average values of unattached fraction were 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. The equilibrium factors for radon (F Rn) and thoron (F Tn) varied from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average of 0.50, and from 0.01 to 0.34 with an average of 0.05, respectively. The annual inhalation dose due to mouth and nasal breathing was calculated using dose conversion factors and unattached fractions. The indoor annual effective doses for (222)Rn (AEDR) and (220)Rn (AEDT) were found to be 1.92 and 0.83 mSv a(-1), respectively. The values of (222)Rn/(220)Rn concentrations and annual effective doses obtained in the present study are within the safe limits as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for indoor dwelling exposure conditions.

  2. Relationships between 222Rn dissolved in ground water supplies and indoor 222Rn concentrations in some Colorado front range houses.

    PubMed

    Folger, P F; Nyberg, P; Wanty, R B; Poeter, E

    1994-09-01

    Indoor 222Rn concentrations were measured in 37 houses with alpha track detectors placed in water-use rooms near water sources (bathrooms, laundry rooms, and kitchens) and in non-water-use living rooms, dining rooms, and bedrooms away from water sources. Results show that relative contributions of 222Rn to indoor air from water use are insignificant when soil-gas concentrations are high but become increasingly important as the ratio of 222Rn-in-water: 222Rn-in-soil gas increases. High soil-gas 222Rn concentrations may mask 222Rn contributions from water even when waterborne 222Rn concentrations are as high as 750 kBq m-3. Ground water in Precambrian Pikes Peak granite averages 340 kBq m-3 222Rn, vs. 170 kBq m-3 in Precambrian migmatite, but average 222Rn concentrations in soil gas are also lower in migmatite. Because the ratio of 222Rn-in-water: 222Rn-in-soil gas may be consistently higher for houses in migmatite than in Pikes Peak granite, indoor air in houses built on migmatite may have a greater relative contribution from water use even though average 222Rn concentrations in the water are lower. Continuous monitoring of 222Rn concentrations in air on 15-min intervals also indicates that additions to indoor concentrations from water use are significant and measurable only when soil-gas concentrations are low and concentrations in water are high. When soil-gas concentrations were mitigated to less than 150 Bq m-3 in one house, water contributes 20-40% of the annual indoor 222Rn concentration in the laundry room (222Rn concentration in water of 670 kBq m-3). Conversely, when the mitigation system is inactive, diurnal fluctuations and other variations in the soil-gas 222Rn contribution swamp the variability due to water use in the house. Measurable variations in indoor concentrations from water use were not detected in one house despite a low soil-gas contribution of approximately 150 Bq m-3 because waterborne 222Rn concentrations also are low (80 kBq m-3). This

  3. A partnership to enhance community health education for RN to BSN students.

    PubMed

    Abell, Cathy H; Alexander, Lori Jaggers; Bragg-Underwood, Tonya

    2014-01-01

    This article shares a unique model of collaboration between a school of nursing and a community business to offer an on-site occupational health clinical experience for RN to BSN students. This activity could be easily replicated by others to provide a learning opportunity for nursing students. Hospitals remain the primary site of employment for nurses. However, with health care reform nurses are exploring many new opportunities including many settings in the community (Black, 2014). Incorporating community health into nursing curriculum is a necessity; however, providing meaningful clinical experiences can be a challenge for faculty. To meet students' learning needs, faculty must be open to developing innovative clinical opportunities (Ellenbecker, 2002). This article describes a unique partnership between faculty in a RN to BSN completion program and employees of a local UPS. The partnership provided an opportunity for students to have a real on-site experience in health education for community members in a nontraditional clinical site. Faculty and employees of the UPS center's health and safety committee worked together to plan a health fair for employees that took place at the workplace setting. One of the goals in the 2014-2018 strategic plan of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is to "Advance the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of the American People" (HHS, n.d. p. 3). Strategies to promote prevention and wellness across the lifespan include educating individuals to adopt healthy lifestyles (HHS, n.d). This activity is just one example of how this can be accomplished.

  4. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  5. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Lively, R S; Krafthefer, B C

    1995-04-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4-h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature-induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  6. Nutrition Knowledge of Nurses in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crogan, Neva L.; Shultz, Jill A.; Massey, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    The average score of 44 nursing-home nurses on a nutrition knowledge questionnaire was 65%. Scores of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses were significantly different. Nutritional assessment activity correlated with nutritional knowledge. The need for further training regarding nutritional concerns of nursing-home residents was…

  7. Credentials, Curriculum, and Access: The Debate Over Nurse Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Jacobs, James; Hughes, Katherine L.

    The question of how to best prepare nurses for practice continues to be debated extensively. The crux of the debate is whether a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) should be required of all registered nurses in the United States or whether an associate degree in nursing (ADN) and diploma programs adequately prepare novice nurses for practice.…

  8. NFκB induces overexpression of bovine FcRn

    PubMed Central

    Cervenak, Judit; Doleschall, Márton; Bender, Balázs; Mayer, Balázs; Schneider, Zita; Doleschall, Zoltán; Zhao, Yaofeng; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Hammarström, Lennart; Oster, Wolfgang; Kacskovics, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Among the many functions of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, it binds to IgG-opsonized antigen complexes and propagates their traffic into lysosomes where antigen processing occurs. We previously reported that transgenic (Tg) mice and rabbits that carry multiple copies and overexpress FcRn have augmented humoral immune responses. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a critical molecule in the signaling cascade in the immune response. NFκB induces human FcRn expression and our previous in silico analysis suggested NFκB binding sites in the promoter region of the bovine (b) FcRn α-chain gene (FCGRT). Here, we report the identification of three NFκB transcription binding sites in the promoter region of this gene using luciferase reporter gene technology, electromobility shift assay and supershift analysis. Stimulation of primary bovine endothelial cells with the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mediates its effect via NFκB, resulted in rapid upregulation of the bFcRn expression and a control gene, bovine E-selectin. This rapid bFcRn gene induction was also observed in the spleen of bFcRn Tg mice treated with intraperitoneally injected LPS, analyzed by northern blot analysis. Finally, NFκB-mediated bFcRn upregulation was confirmed at the protein level in macrophages isolated from the bFcRn Tg mice using flow cytometry with a newly developed FcRn specific monoclonal antibody that does not cross-react with the mouse FcRn. We conclude that NFκB regulates bFcRn expression and thus optimizes its functions, e.g., in the professional antigen presenting cells, and contributes to the much augmented humoral immune response in the bFcRn Tg mice. PMID:24492342

  9. Register file soft error recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  10. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Values Changes in Baccalaureate Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenda, Skip

    2012-01-01

    Values education in nursing can be a highly emotional topic. Values in nursing education can be linked to general societal values at any given point in time. Values are transmitted by nursing educators and institutions not only consciously in the nursing curriculum, but also unconsciously in the hidden curriculum. Each year many registered nurses…

  11. Nurse Supply, Distribution and Requirements. 3rd Report to the Congress. Nurse Training Act of 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    This report focuses on the supply, distribution of, and requirements for nursing. The first chapter describes the supply of registered and licensed practical nurses. Characteristics of the overall nursing supply are discussed in terms of marital status, age, and employment patterns. Data are also provided on nurses newly licensed to practice,…

  12. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  13. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents. PMID:25537789

  14. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  15. The Effect of CO2 on the Measurement of 220Rn and 222Rn with Instruments Utilising Electrostatic Precipitation

    DOE PAGES

    Lane-Smith, Derek; Sims, Kenneth

    2013-06-09

    In some volcanic systems, thoron and radon activity and CO2 flux, in soil and fumaroles, show a relationship between (220Rn/222Rn) and CO2 efflux. It is theorized that deep, magmatic sources of gas are characterized by high 222Rn activity and high CO2 efflux, whereas shallow sources are indicated by high 220Rn activity and relatively low CO2 efflux. In this paper we evaluate whether the observed inverse relationship is a true geochemical signal, or potentially an analytical artifact of high CO2 concentrations. We report results from a laboratory experiment using the RAD7 radon detector, known 222Rn (radon) and 220Rn (thorn), and amore » controllable percentage of CO2 in the carrier gas. Our results show that for every percentage of CO2, the 220Rn reading should be multiplied by 1.019, the 222Rn radon should be multiplied by 1.003 and the 220Rn/222Rn ratio should be multiplied by 1.016 to correct for the presence of the CO2.« less

  16. Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Gavin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    After a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career. PMID:26645841

  17. Nurse on the Move: Lisa Gorski.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa; Gavin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    After a short hiatus, Nurses On the Move is back and better than ever! I am excited to bring you our next nurse leader, Lisa A. Gorski MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN. With more than 30 years in the field, Gorski is an expert in both home healthcare and infusion nursing. As a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Wisconsin, an editorial board member of Home Healthcare Now, an associate consultant for OASIS ANSWERS, Inc., and a published author, her knowledge of the nursing profession is truly impressive.Through our phone interview, I spoke with Gorski about why she decided to enter into home healthcare, her time as president of the Infusion Nurses Society, and what advice she has for a nurse starting their career.

  18. Understanding unassisted falls: effects of nurse staffing level and nursing staff characteristics.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Knight, Jeff E; Dunton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical Poisson modeling was used to explore hospital and nursing unit characteristics as predictors of the unassisted fall rate. Longitudinal data were collected from 1502 units in 248 US hospitals. The relation between the fall rate and total nurse staffing was positive at lower staffing levels and negative for levels around and above the median. The fall rate was negatively associated with registered nurse skill mix and average registered nurse tenure on the unit.

  19. The relationship between direct-care RN specialty certification and surgical patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Diane K; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Gatua, Mary W; Stobinski, James X

    2014-11-01

    Specialty certification enhances patient safety in health care by validating that practice is consistent with standards of excellence. The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between direct-care, specialty-certified nurses employed in perioperative units, surgical intensive care units (SICUs), and surgical units and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes in SICUs and surgical units. Lower rates of central-line-associated bloodstream infections in SICUs were significantly associated with higher rates of CPAN (certified postanesthesia nurse) (β = -0.09, P = .05) and CNOR/CRNFA (certified nurse operating room/certified RN first assistant) (β = -0.17, P = .00) certifications in perioperative units. Unexpectedly, higher rates of CNOR/CRNFA certification in perioperative units were associated with higher rates of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (β = 0.08, P = .03) and unit-acquired pressure ulcers (β = 0.13, P = .00), possibly because of a higher risk of pressure ulcers in the patient population. Additional research is needed to clarify this relationship. Our findings lend credence to perioperative, SICU, and surgical nurses participating in lifelong learning and continuous professional development, including achievement of specialty certification.

  20. Summertime elevation of sup 222 Rn levels in Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Saultz, R.J. )

    1991-02-01

    Indoor Rn concentrations and Rn in adjacent karst terrains were studied at four houses with crawlspaces in Huntsville, AL. In warm summertime weather, Rn-rich air may vent through limestone solution cavities exposed as holes at the surface of the properties. A probable interrelated-finding is that the indoor levels of {sup 222}Rn are distinctly higher in the summer than winter. The karst underlying the homes is structurally faulted and, in all probability, facilitates Rn transport from the solution cavities to the crawlspaces. Abrupt day-to-day changes in indoor Rn concentrations were recorded in addition to large seasonal changes. If the owners or residents of these particular homes had attempted to make, and interpret, short-term screening measurements for Rn during the fall season, problems, including false negatives, could have arisen because of order-of-magnitude changes in Rn concentration occurring over a few days. The best time of year to make screening measurements would be during the summer when indoor Rn concentrations are more likely to reach their maximum values.

  1. A direct correlation among indoor Rn, soil gas Rn and geology in the Reading Prong near Boyertown, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Gundersen, L.C.S.

    1989-01-01

    We feel that this study suggests a relationship among geology, soil gas Rn and the potential for indoor Rn accumulation in this portion of the Reading Prong. There are deviations from a perfect correlation but these are related to inhomogeneities in the geologic environment and perhaps variations in construction techniques of homes in the area. This study also demonstrates that several analyses in a small area may be necessary to adequately determine the Rn distribution for a particular geologic unit. That scale would be determined by the complexity of the local geology. Where no discrete source of elevated Rn supply is found for dwellings having a significant Rn accumulation, the implication is that overall gross permeability may be sufficient to supply Rn from a larger volume of soil and rock.

  2. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  3. Motivating Nursing Faculty to Use Active Learning Strategies: A Qualitative Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardell, Traci Lee

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage remains of great concern to the nursing profession and to nursing educators. With the projected need for Registered Nurses high and the attrition rate in nursing programs remaining high, a focus on retention of qualified nursing students may be needed. One way to contribute to enhanced retention is using active learning…

  4. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  5. Errors in measurements of 222Rn in methane and carbon dioxide using scintillation cells calibrated for 222Rn in air.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Phillip H; Burkhart, James F; Camley, Robert E

    2014-03-01

    Scintillation cells are used typically for measuring the concentration of (222)Rn in air and are calibrated for that purpose. However, scintillation cells are sometimes used for measuring (222)Rn in natural gas or carbon dioxide. The counting efficiencies of scintillation cells for measurements of (222)Rn in these gases should be different from those for measuring (222)Rn in air because the ranges of alpha particles emitted by (222)Rn and its progeny are greater in methane and smaller in carbon dioxide than in air. If these effects are not taken into consideration, measurements of (222)Rn in natural gas will be biased high and in carbon dioxide will be biased low. The authors previously investigated the effects of barometric pressure on measurements of (222)Rn in air using scintillation cells. A modeling technique was used in a previous study to calculate theoretical errors that would result if atmospheric pressure were not considered. In the current study, the same modeling technique was used to calculate theoretical errors that would be made for measurements of (222)Rn in methane and carbon dioxide if the calibration for (222)Rn in air were used. Results are presented for four types of scintillation cells of varying geometries and for barometric pressures representative of four elevations ranging from sea level to 1,963 m (6,440 feet). These results indicate that the errors introduced by the ranges of the alpha particles in gases different from air can be significant. Depending on the type of cell and the local pressure, a measurement of (222)Rn in methane may be biased high by 2-7%, while a measurement of (222)Rn in CO2 may be biased low by 15-20% if the calibration for (222)Rn in air is used. PMID:25208015

  6. Emergency nursing in Malta: past and present with a vision for the future.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Diane; Calleja, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Every other year, the International Council of Nurses convenes a conference. In 2011 it was held in Malta, and Diane Gurney, RN, MS, CEN, ENA Past President, attended to represent ENA. In this article Diane and Paul Calleja, MSc(Manchester) Nurs, BSc (Hons) Nurs, Dip Nurs, Malta Emergency Nurses Association (MENA) International Relationship Officer, describe this visit, the significant nursing history in Malta, emergency nursing, and MENA.

  7. District nursing in Dominica.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, P M; Luteijn, A J; Nasiiro, R S; Bruney, V; Smith, R J; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1998-10-01

    District nurses constitute the basis of the primary health care services in Dominica. All encounters of three district nurses were registered using the international classification of primary care. Information on other aspects of district nursing was collected by participating observation and the use of a questionnaire. Check-ups for hypertension, diabetes, pregnancy and immunisations constituted 40% of all reasons for encounter. The district nurses dealt with 80% of all contacts; only 20% of all patients were referred to the district medical officer. There are several discouragements to the motivation of the nurses. In addition to being a nurse, all have their family and other obligations. Postgraduate training with diversified certification and upgrading of wages could contribute to a continued high motivation and increased job satisfaction.

  8. Theoretical considerations regarding the migration of 222Rn and 220Rn from uranium- and thorium-bearing underground environments.

    PubMed

    Bigu, J

    1994-07-01

    Theoretical calculations are presented for partially enclosed uranium- and thorium-bearing subterranean environments, such as tunnels and underground uranium mines. The variables of practical interest considered here are the 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations in the wall, and the flux densities of the same radioactive gases in the wall and at the wall/air interface of these underground sites. Calculations have been conducted based on a plane, semi-infinite geometry model (commonly used to predict radiation levels in mines) and a cylindrical (i.e., tunnel) geometry model. The 220Rn flux density, J(220Rn), calculated according to the plane and cylindrical geometries agree with each other within 5% for wall media of porosity equal to or greater than about 2%, even for tunnels of small radii. However, for 222Rn the cylindrical geometry gives values for the 222Rn flux density, J(222Rn), substantially higher (by a factor of 1.4 to approximately 3) than those predicted by the plane semi-infinite geometry. A practical difficulty arises in the experimental verification of the models in underground environments. The results are relevant for predicting radioactivity levels (222Rn, 220Rn, and their progeny) in underground environments such as uranium mines. Health Phys.

  9. Outcomes and cost analysis of the impact of unit-level nurse staffing on post-discharg utilization.

    PubMed

    Bobay, Kathleen L; Yakusheva, Olga; Weiss, Marianne E

    2011-01-01

    Under a proposal from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, hospitals would no longer be reimbursed for 30-day re-admissions or emergency department (ED) visits. Increasing RN staffing to reduce post-discharge utilization is one possible solution, but one that is not financially attractive to hospitals. This study demonstrates the impact of fluctuating staffing levels on ED visits within 30 days of discharge. RN overtime and RN vacancies also affected subsequent ED visits. It is important for nurse managers, directors, and administrators to recognize the impact of RN staffing on patient outcomes. Reimbursement models will need to be realigned to benefit both hospitals and payers.

  10. National Esophageal Atresia Register.

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Rony; Michaud, Laurent; Sharma, Duyti; Richard, Florence; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    National Esophageal Atresia was created in 2008 by the National Reference Center for Esophageal Congenital Abnormalities created in 2006. Primary goal was estimation of live birth prevalence in France. A national network of surgeons and pediatricians was initiated and entire teams dealing with esophageal atresia accepted to participate in an exhaustive national register. A questionnaire was validated by a national committee and data were centralized in our center. Scientific exploitation showed that such database is useful for health authorities as for medical professionals. Live birth prevalence in France is at 1.9/10,000 births. Prenatal diagnosis is more common but its effect on prevalence is not yet fully understood. Associated congenital abnormalities are frequent and major malformations with termination of pregnancy can influence prevalence. PMID:26642387

  11. Amateur Nursing: Delegating Nursing Tasks to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Jane Pamela

    In response to the growing trend of using unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in hospitals, a study was conducted of faculty of associate degree nursing programs in New Jersey to determine which professional tasks they considered inherently safe for registered nurses to delegate to UAPs. A check-list survey was distributed to 104 faculty members…

  12. Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants and Certified Nurse Midwives in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Francisco. Center for California Health Workforce Studies.

    Surveys were mailed to all nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) registered in California, asking questions about education, labor force participation, specialty, and location and type of practice site, as well as the demographic characteristics of these professionals and their patients. Response…

  13. Good nurse, bad nurse....

    PubMed

    Alavi, C; Cattoni, J

    1995-02-01

    The construction of the nursing subject is discussed. The paper takes a historical perspective, arguing that the range of speaking positions available to the nurse is limited by gender, class and education. It evaluates the position of nursing in the university, showing how this also has propensity to limit the development of the nursing profession.

  14. RN-to-MSN students' attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min; Hatton, Diane; Robinson, Linda; Kleffel, Dorothy

    2006-08-01

    When health professionals, including RNs, have negative attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness, they create barriers to services. It is incumbent on nursing faculty to develop curricula that address homelessness and associated stereotypes, as well as to prepare students to provide safe and appropriate care to the homeless population. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the attitudes of RN-to-MSN students toward mothers living with their children in a transitional shelter. A convenience sample of 10 students enrolled in a community health nursing course at a university in southern California participated in the study. Two focus groups were conducted: one before and one after a 15-week clinical experience. Data analysis revealed that during the clinical experience, students discovered that they, or perhaps an individual like them, could become homeless. Their attitudes and views changed to include a bigger picture of homelessness, described by public health nursing researchers as "moving upstream." This article suggests strategies for integrating clinical experiences with socioeconomically vulnerable individuals into undergraduate nursing curricula.

  15. RN Students' Ratings and Opinions Related to the Importance of Certain Clinical Teacher Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viverais-Dresler, Gloria; Kutschke, Myrtle

    2001-01-01

    Registered nurses in a bachelor's degree program (n=56) rated the following as important clinical teacher behaviors: evaluation, professional competence, interpersonal relationship, and teaching ability. They valued teachers who were approachable, fair, open, and honest and who fostered mutual respect. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  16. Facilitating the career transition of second-career students into professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Felicitas A; Farr, Shirley; Klakovich, Marilyn D; Esslinger, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the approaches used by the Second Careers and Nursing (SCAN) program to socialize second-career students into professional nursing. The pre-licensure phase of the program is guided by Schlossberg's transition theory of moving in, moving through, and moving out. Moving in involves setting expectations, from the admission interview to the two-day intensive orientation. Moving through entails imparting and instilling nursing's cultural content and values through the program's formal and informal curriculum. Moving out strengthens students' feelings of pride and their commitment to becoming professional nurses during a concentrated internship, NCLEX-RN preparation, and coaching for their first RN position. The article also reports on the socialization outcomes and lessons learned during the pre-licensure phase. Outcomes provide evidence that the SCAN program has successfully transitioned non-nursing college graduates into professional nursing by socializing them into the profession's knowledge, skills, and behaviors while they internalize nursing's values and goals. PMID:23586199

  17. Facilitating the career transition of second-career students into professional nursing.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Felicitas A; Farr, Shirley; Klakovich, Marilyn D; Esslinger, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the approaches used by the Second Careers and Nursing (SCAN) program to socialize second-career students into professional nursing. The pre-licensure phase of the program is guided by Schlossberg's transition theory of moving in, moving through, and moving out. Moving in involves setting expectations, from the admission interview to the two-day intensive orientation. Moving through entails imparting and instilling nursing's cultural content and values through the program's formal and informal curriculum. Moving out strengthens students' feelings of pride and their commitment to becoming professional nurses during a concentrated internship, NCLEX-RN preparation, and coaching for their first RN position. The article also reports on the socialization outcomes and lessons learned during the pre-licensure phase. Outcomes provide evidence that the SCAN program has successfully transitioned non-nursing college graduates into professional nursing by socializing them into the profession's knowledge, skills, and behaviors while they internalize nursing's values and goals.

  18. An instrument for measuring equilibrium-equivalent 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations with etched track detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, W; Iida, T

    1999-11-01

    To simultaneously measure both 222Rn and 220Rn progeny concentrations, a new type of portable integrating monitor with allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) plastic detectors was developed. The monitor gives the average equilibrium-equivalent 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations (EEC(RN) and EEC(Tn)) during sampling intervals. The detection efficiencies of the alpha particles were calculated by Monte Carlo method. The lower limits of detection for EEC(Rn) and EEC(Tn) are estimated to be 0.57 Bq m(-3) and 0.07 Bq m(-3) for 24 h continuously sampling at a flow rate of 0.8 L min(-1). The measuring results with the new type monitors were confirmed through intercomparison experiments. In a small survey, a rather high 220Rn progeny concentration with an average of 1.73 Bq m(-3) was observed in traditional Japanese dwellings with soil/mud plastered walls. On the other hand, a very high 232Th concentration in soil was reported in China. They suggested that there is a possibility of high 220Rn progeny concentration in both Japan and China.

  19. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered.... An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  20. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered.... An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  1. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered.... An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  2. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered.... An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  3. 42 CFR 409.21 - Nursing care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.21 Nursing care. (a) Basic rule. Medicare pays for nursing care as posthospital SNF care when provided by or under the supervision of a registered.... An individual is not considered to be a private duty nurse or attendant if he or she is an...

  4. Ethical environment: reports of practicing nurses.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, C

    1998-06-01

    Reports from the development of the Ethics Environment Questionnaire identify three critical features for ethical environments in health care settings of registered nurses. They are the ability of nurses to engage in discussions about patient care, support from administrators, and the development of policies-procedures that support their practice. Implications for clinical practicing nurses are explored.

  5. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment.

  6. Technology in the Nursing Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siktberg, Linda L.; Dillard, Nancy L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes nursing education integrating the Internet at Ball State University: (1) redesign of a professional-issues course; (2) electronic conferencing and computer quizzes in a health-appraisal course; (3) Internet tools used in an introductory associate-degree course; and (4) redesign of the required registered nurse-completion course. (SK)

  7. Reducing nurse medicine administration errors.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Rose; Jarrett, Patricia

    Errors in administering medicines are common and can compromise the safety of patients. This review discusses the causes of drug administration error in hospitals by student and registered nurses, and the practical measures educators and hospitals can take to improve nurses' knowledge and skills in medicines management, and reduce drug errors.

  8. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Cheryl; Blair, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages and policy changes emerge, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. will experience a significant shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs). Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the size of nursing cohorts to respond to this imminent shortage. Notwithstanding a 2.6%…

  9. [Evaluation of nursing care systematization through the phases of nursing process performance and registration in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Reppetto, Maria Angela; de Souza, Mariana Fernandes

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study was carried out in a teaching hospital at São Paulo city and had as objective to identify the phases performance and registration of nursing care systematization and the most frequent nursing diagnoses. Data were collected retrospectively from 135 patients records of three units: Cardiology, Adult Infectious Diseases and Neurosurgery, from January to July, 2002. The phases: history, nursing diagnoses, prescription, evolution and assessment were performed and registered in the three units, however, it was verified systematization gaps performance related to nursing diagnoses registered without the realization of nursing history and nursing prescriptions without evolution. The most frequent nursing diagnosis in the three units was risk for infection.

  10. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
.

  11. Economic aspects of community-based academic-practice transition programs for unemployed new nursing graduates.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jonalyn; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; West, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Four partnerships between schools of nursing and practice sites provided grant-funded 12- to 16-week transition programs to increase confidence, competence, and employability among new RN graduates who had not yet found employment in nursing. Per capita program costs were $2,721. Eighty-four percent of participants completing a postprogram employment survey became employed within 3 months; 55% of participants became employed at their program practice site. Staff development educators may find this model a useful adjunct to in-house nurse residency programs for new RN graduates.

  12. Distance learning for the RN first assistant.

    PubMed

    Degon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The number of online, distance-learning programs has increased to accommodate the needs of today's adult learners; these include new programs that feature perioperative courses for RN first assistants (RNFAs). Whereas the advantages of these programs include flexible schedules and the ability to participate at one's own pace, the disadvantages can include the lack of immediate access to faculty members who can answer questions or clarify information, and the added difficulty of learning a technical skill without hands-on training. The RNFA training program at Rock Valley College, Rockford, Illinois, is a hybrid training program that includes three phases: an online component, a hands-on workshop, and a clinical preceptorship. PMID:20102811

  13. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  14. A Nurse Prescribing Programme Incorporating e-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Joan

    2007-01-01

    In order to become a UK Nurse Prescriber, a First Level Registered Nurse must undergo an approved University based educational programme, which consists of theory, and a period of practice supervised by doctors. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires nurses undertaking this programme to have some formal university attendance and to be…

  15. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  16. Chronic Health Conditions Managed by School Nurses. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgitan, Judith; Bushmiaer, Margo; DeSisto, Marie C.; Duff, Carolyn; Lambert, C. Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah; White, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that students with chronic health conditions have access to a full-time registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). School districts should include school nurse positions in their full-time instructional support personnel to provide health services…

  17. Portable shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M[sup 3]CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M[sup 3]CA; like the M[sup 3]CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel.

  18. School nurse intention to pursue higher education.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's degree. In many states, the bachelor's degree is required for all school nurses, and many school nurses are prepared at the masters' and doctoral levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the intention of Louisiana school nurses to pursue higher education in nursing. A survey was distributed to all members of the Louisiana School Nurses Organization, and results indicated that 65% of the participants were motivated to return to school. Incentives and barriers to pursuing higher education were identified, and strategies for overcoming these barriers were proposed.

  19. Educational silos in nursing education: a critical review of practical nurse education in Canada.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Changes to practical nurse education (with expanded scopes of practice) align with the increasing need for nurses and assistive personnel in global acute care contexts. A case in point is this critical exploration of Canadian practical nursing literature, undertaken to reveal predominating discourses and relationships to nursing disciplinary knowledge. The objectives of this poststructural critical review were to identify dominant discourses in practical nurse education literature and to analyze these discourses to uncover underlying beliefs, constructed truths, assumptions, ambiguities and sources of knowledge within the discursive landscape. Predominant themes in the discourses surrounding practical nurse education included conversations about the nurse shortage, expanded roles, collaboration, evidence-based practice, role confusion, cost/efficiency, the history of practical nurse education and employer interests. The complex relationships between practical nursing and the disciplinary landscape of nursing are revealed in the analysis of discourses related to the purpose(s) of practical nurse education, curricula/educational programming, relationships between RN and PN education and the role of nursing knowledge. Power dynamics related to employer needs and interests, as well as educational silos and the nature of women's work, are also revealed within the intersection of various discourses.

  20. Educational silos in nursing education: a critical review of practical nurse education in Canada.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Changes to practical nurse education (with expanded scopes of practice) align with the increasing need for nurses and assistive personnel in global acute care contexts. A case in point is this critical exploration of Canadian practical nursing literature, undertaken to reveal predominating discourses and relationships to nursing disciplinary knowledge. The objectives of this poststructural critical review were to identify dominant discourses in practical nurse education literature and to analyze these discourses to uncover underlying beliefs, constructed truths, assumptions, ambiguities and sources of knowledge within the discursive landscape. Predominant themes in the discourses surrounding practical nurse education included conversations about the nurse shortage, expanded roles, collaboration, evidence-based practice, role confusion, cost/efficiency, the history of practical nurse education and employer interests. The complex relationships between practical nursing and the disciplinary landscape of nursing are revealed in the analysis of discourses related to the purpose(s) of practical nurse education, curricula/educational programming, relationships between RN and PN education and the role of nursing knowledge. Power dynamics related to employer needs and interests, as well as educational silos and the nature of women's work, are also revealed within the intersection of various discourses. PMID:25514985

  1. Factors Associated with Nurses' Intention to Report Child Abuse: A National Survey of Taiwanese Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, J.Y.; Levine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The objectives were to determine the experiences of Taiwanese nurses with a new child abuse reporting law and to assess attitudinal correlates of nurses' intention to report. Method: A stratified quota sampling technique was used to select registered nurses working in pediatric, psychiatric and emergency care units in Taiwan. A total of…

  2. Transition from Associate's Degree in Nursing to Bachelor's of Science in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allar, Deborah T.

    2014-01-01

    Areas throughout the United States lack baccalaureate-prepared registered nurses to meet the health care needs of individuals, forcing health care providers to rely on associate degree nurses (ADN). In an effort to increase the numbers of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students, technical colleges and state and private universities have…

  3. Determination of waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations using AC canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, C.; Giannelli, G.

    1995-09-01

    A method for measuring {sup 222}Rn concentration in water using charcoal canisters is presented. {sup 222}Rn is transferred within a few minutes from water contained in a 0.720 L bottle to a charcoal canister using a portable degassing unit. In the laboratory, gamma counting is performed at least 10 h after sampling to determine waterborne {sup 222}Rn concentration. The results obtained with charcoal canisters are compared to measurements made with Marinelli beakers calibrated in a comparison with liquid scintillation counting. The efficiency of transferring dissolved {sup 222}Rn in water to activated charcoal is 99% based on measurements made using Marinelli beakers. The lower limit of detection at the 95% confidence level is approximately 1 kBq m{sup -3} for a 15 min gamma count. the system was used to measure radon concentration in mineral groundwater near Rome. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. On the Agenda: Changing Nurses' Careers in 1999. IES Report 360.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Dilys; Buchan, James; Hayday, Sue

    A survey of a random sample of 6,000 registered nurses who were members of the Royal College of Nursing explored views on issues related to working as a nurse and having a career in nursing. Recent policy documents highlighted the high value the government placed on the role of nurses. Results indicated there were clear gender differences with…

  5. Short-lived Rn-222 daughters in cryogenic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pelczar, Krzysztof; Frodyma, Nikodem; Wójcik, Marcin

    2013-08-08

    In this paper a detection method of α emitters from {sup 222}Rn decay chain, present in cryogenic liquids, using bare Si-PIN diodes immersed in the liquids is presented. Properties of ionized {sup 222}Rn daughters deduced from conducted measurements are outlined. Life-time of positive ions was found to be of the order of 10 s, and nonzero content of electronegative ions was observed.

  6. Short-lived Rn-222 daughters in cryogenic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelczar, Krzysztof; Frodyma, Nikodem; Wójcik, Marcin

    2013-08-01

    In this paper a detection method of α emitters from 222Rn decay chain, present in cryogenic liquids, using bare Si-PIN diodes immersed in the liquids is presented. Properties of ionized 222Rn daughters deduced from conducted measurements are outlined. Life-time of positive ions was found to be of the order of 10 s, and nonzero content of electronegative ions was observed.

  7. Two-filter monitor for atmospheric 222Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schery, S. D.; Gaeddert, D. H.; Wilkening, M. H.

    1980-03-01

    A two-filter, continuous monitor has been developed for atmospheric 222Rn. Features include a sensitivity of better than 0.01 pCi/l, a high specificity for 222Rn, and immediate start up capability. The monitor has been computer modeled to facilitate calibration and selection of operating parameters. The filters are stationary and require no moving parts for control. Field trials indicate high reliability and maintenance-free operation for periods of a week and longer.

  8. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    PubMed

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  9. Registering Researchers in Authority Files

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Yoshimura, Karen; Altman, Micah; Conlon, Michael; Cristán, Ana Lupe; Dawson, Laura; Dunham, Joanne; Hickey, Thom; Hook, Daniel; Horstmann, Wolfram; MacEwan, Andrew; Schreur, Philip; Smart, Laura; Wacker, Melanie; Woutersen, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Written by OCLC Research Program Officer Karen Smith-Yoshimura and the 13 members of the Registering Researchers in Authority Files Task Group comprised of specialists from the US, UK, and the Netherlands, this report summarizes their research into approaches to providing authoritative researcher identifiers. Registering researchers in some type…

  10. Nursing Supplies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  11. AIDS and homophobia among nurses.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Y K; Wu, Y W; Haughey, B P

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study nurses' attitudes toward homosexuality and caring for homosexual patients. The results reported in this article are a component of a larger study of nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward caring for patients with AIDS. The sample comprised 581 Registered Nurses residing in Erie County, New York. Data were gathered by mailed questionnaires. Results of the study indicate that issues concerning the care of patients with AIDS may be complicated by the fact that many of these individuals are homosexuals. The results of this research provide data for developing intervention strategies to help nurses cope with their concerns about caring for homosexual patients with AIDS.

  12. NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

    PubMed

    McClure, Margaret L; Batcheller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The following two articles relate to Nursing's past and future, described through a series of predictions made by one of Nursing's great leaders Margaret L. McClure (Maggie McClure). It is reprinted from NAQ Fall 2000, Volume 25, Issue 1. The second article, by another great leader, Joyce Batcheller, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is a follow up on those predictions, reflecting on Nursing today and tommorow. PMID:27584886

  13. NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

    PubMed

    McClure, Margaret L; Batcheller, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    The following two articles relate to Nursing's past and future, described through a series of predictions made by one of Nursing's great leaders Margaret L. McClure (Maggie McClure). It is reprinted from NAQ Fall 2000, Volume 25, Issue 1. The second article, by another great leader, Joyce Batcheller, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is a follow up on those predictions, reflecting on Nursing today and tommorow.

  14. Seasonal Variation of Unattached fraction and Equilibrium factor of 222Rn and 220Rn using DRPS/DTPS and Pin -hole cup dosimeters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangotra, P.; Mehra, R.; Jakhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    222Rn (Radon), 220Rn (Thoron) and their progenies are naturally occurring radionuclides in environment and responsible for the radiological dose to population. The 222Rn, 220Rn concentration and their separate attached and unattached progeny concentration (season-wise) in units of EEC have been measured in the dwellings of Muktsar and Mansa districts of Punjab (India), using Pin- hole cup dosimeters and deposition based progeny sensors (DTPS/DRPS). The indoor 222Rn concentration was maximum in the rainy season (60 Bqm-3) while 220Rn concentration was maximum in winter season (57 Bqm-3). However EEC of 222Rn and 220Rn has distinct seasonal demeanour than their parent nuclides. The unattached EEC for both 222Rn and 220Rn (EERCU and EETCU) were higher in summer and rainy season as compared to winter season. The equilibrium factor ( for 222Rn and for 220Rn) and unattached fraction ( for 222Rn and for 220Rn) has been calculated separately. The (0.44 ± 0.04) in the studied area was similar to 0.4 that proposed by UNSCEAR and for (0.05 ± 0.01) it was greater than specified value 0.02 by UNSCEAR. The was higher in summer season as compared to rainy and winter season. Due to very smaller value of , a proper relation has not been observed seasonally. The unattached fraction in environment may increase the risk of radiological exposure and absorbed at faster rate into blood then the attached 222Rn and 220Rn progeny. The overall arithmetic mean (rainy, winter and summer seasons) of and were 0.09 ± 0.02 and 0.10 ± 0.03 respectively. The and were lower in winter season as compared to rainy and summer seasons due to higher value of attached EEC present in winter season. A positive and significant correlation (0.56) has been observed between the and aerosol concentration (Z (cm-3)).

  15. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce.

  16. Measurements of Rn-222, Rn-220 and their decay products in the environmental air of the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Morishima, H; Shen, T; Koga, T; Wei, L; Sugahara, T

    2000-10-01

    For the renewal of dose estimation from internal irradiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang, the measurements of radon, thoron and their decay products in the environmental air were conducted, including: (1) integrating measurements of Rn-222 and Rn-220 concentrations; (2) eqilibrium factor F for Rn-222 and alpha-potential energy value of Rn-220; (3) external gamma radiation in places where radon measurements were undertaken; (4) cumulative exposure to indoor radon for each family in a case-control study on lung cancer. The Rn-Tn cup monitor method was used for the integrating measurement of Rn-222 and Rn-220 concentration. An alpha track detector was used for the integration measurement of Rn-222 concentration in the case-control study on lung cancer. The results of measurements show that although the investigated areas are located between the Equator and the Tropic of Cancer, and that people live in well-ventilated dwellings, the concentrations of radon, especially of Rn-220 are significantly higher in the indoor air of HBRA than those in the control area. The value of equilibrium factors for Rn-222, the alpha potential energy of decay products from Rn-222 and Rn-220 are determined.

  17. Contribution of 222Rn in domestic water supplies to 222Rn in indoor air in Colorado homes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, E.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Nyberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of 222Rn from domestic water wells to indoor air was investigated in a study of 28 houses near Conifer, CO. Air concentrations determined by alpha-track detectors (ATDs) and continuous radon monitors were compared with the predictions of a single-cell model. In many of the houses, the water supply was shown to contribute significantly to levels of indoor 222Rn. The data from the ATD study were augmented with a continuous monitoring study of a house near Lyons, CO. The well water in that house has the highest known concentration of 222Rn in water yet reported (93 MBq m-3). The temporal pattern in the indoor 222Rn concentration corresponds to water-use records. In general, it is difficult to quantify the proportion of indoor radon attributable to water use. Several lines of evidence suggest that the single-cell model underestimates this proportion. Continuous- monitoring data, although useful, are impractical due to the cost of the equipment. We propose a protocol for 222Rn measurement based on three simultaneous integrating radon detectors that may help estimate the proportion of indoor 222Rn derived from the water supply.

  18. Determination of (222)Rn absorption properties of polycarbonate foils by liquid scintillation counting. Application to (222)Rn measurements.

    PubMed

    Mitev, K; Cassette, P; Georgiev, S; Dimitrova, I; Sabot, B; Boshkova, T; Tartès, I; Pressyanov, D

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrates that a Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC) technique using a Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio counter with extending dead-time is very appropriate for the accurate measurement of (222)Rn activity absorbed in thin polycarbonate foils. It is demonstrated that using a toluene-based LS cocktail, which dissolves polycarbonates, the (222)Rn activity absorbed in thin Makrofol N foil can be determined with a relative standard uncertainty of about 0.7%. A LSC-based application of the methodology for determination of the diffusion length of (222)Rn in thin polycarbonate foils is proposed and the diffusion length of (222)Rn in Makrofol N (38.9±1.3µm) and the partition coefficient of (222)Rn in Makrofol N from air (112±12, at 20°C) and from water (272±17, at 21°C) are determined. Calibration of commercial LS spectrometers for (222)Rn measurements by LSC of thin polycarbonate foils is performed and the minimum detectable activities by this technique are estimated.

  19. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. In addition, many doctors share office space ...

  20. Nurses' experiences working with nursing students in a hospital: a phenomenological enquiry

    PubMed Central

    Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda Raquel; Cibanal-Juan, Luis; Orts-Cortés, Mª Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Mª Loreto; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this paper explores the experiences of registered nurses working with Spanish nursing students within the hospital. Methods: a qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Purposeful sampling was employed. Twenty-one registered nurses, from a public hospital located in Spain, were included in the study. Data were collected by means of unstructured and semi-structured interviews and were analysed using Giorgi's proposal. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research were followed. Results: three main themes described the experience of registered nurses: "The nurse's relationship with nursing students"; most nurses emphasized the importance of the first contact with students and they considered students' attitude to be key. "Defining the role of the student in clinical practice"; it is necessary to unify the nurse's role and interventions to avoid misleading students and establish priorities in clinical practice. "Building bridges between clinical settings and the University"; the need to establish a common ground and connection between the university and hospital clinical settings was emphasized. Nurses felt that the training program should also be designed by the clinical settings themselves. Conclusions: understanding the meaning of nursing students with registered nurses might gain a deeper insight into their expectations. PMID:27463112