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Sample records for registered nurse rn

  1. Report on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David F.; Gober, Susan L.

    Factors associated with an unusually high rate of failure on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were analyzed for nursing students at Angelo State University in San Angelo (Texas). Of the 111 nursing degree recipients who took the examination for the first time in July 1991, 18 (16.2%) failed.…

  2. Nursing Transition: An Individualized Course To Promote Mobility from the LVN to RN Role. Registered Nurse Shortage Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Marcia; Malague, Marianne

    To address a regional shortage of registered nurses (RN's), a special transition course was developed at the North Harris Montgomery Community College District in Houston, Texas, to allow licensed vocational nurses to articulate into the second year of a two-year Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Students completing the ADN program are…

  3. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  4. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  5. Registered Nursing Alumni Surveys, 1990-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA. Office of Institutional Development.

    Since 1990, California's College of the Canyons (CoC) has conducted annual surveys of graduates from its Registered Nursing (RN) program. Between 1990 and 1994, surveys were sent to 193 RN graduates, with completed questionnaires received from 124 alumni. An analysis of responses for each year revealed the following: (1) 91.7% of the respondents…

  6. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  7. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  8. The Impact of Differentiated Instructional Techniques on Non-Traditional, Adult Student Engagement in a Baccalaureate Nursing Completion Program for Registered Nurses (RN-BSN) Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the impact of differentiated instructional techniques on non-traditional, adult student engagement in an RN-BSN completion program course. Differentiated instructional techniques have been a staple method of teaching in K-12 education for a number of years. Differentiated instruction (DI) is a…

  9. Predictors for Success on the NCLEX-RN for Associate Degree Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage is a national issue that has ignited an increasing demand to address the importance of preparing students to be successful on the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN). Nursing programs are charged by the Board of Nursing to prepare graduates to be successful on the initial…

  10. Predictors of Success on the NCLEX-RN among Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Thomas W., Jr.; Dufour, Charles A.; Rhodes, Rosemary S.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 81 bachelor of science in nursing students found a strong correlation between performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN)and achievement on standardized National League for Nursing Achievement Tests. There was a significant relationship between NCLEX scores and grades in nursing courses.…

  11. Perceptions of Registered Nurses after Completing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Diane Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Background. The demands of the current health-care system support the need for more nurses to be prepared at the bachelor's level (American Association of the Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). However, only 28% of the registered nurse (RN) population in Florida holds a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), which may be the result of increased…

  12. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  13. Registered Nurses Return to College: Lessons Learned from Hindsight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    The recent impetus to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses comes from within and outside the profession, prompting increased numbers of registered nurses (RN-BSN) to return to college. Yet little is known about what these adult, non-traditional students do to prepare for the challenges ahead. Therefore, the purpose of this…

  14. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  15. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  16. United States registered nurse workforce report card and shortage forecast.

    PubMed

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ranganathan, Vinoth; Lin, Vernon W

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a critical role in health care delivery. With an aging US population, health care demand is growing at an unprecedented pace. Using projected changes in population size and age, the authors developed demand and supply models to forecast the RN job shortage in each of the 50 states. Letter grades were assigned based on projected RN job shortage ratios. The number of states receiving a grade of "D" or "F" for their RN shortage ratio will increase from 5 in 2009 to 30 by 2030, for a total national deficit of 918 232 (725,619 - 1,112,112) RN jobs. There will be significant RN workforce shortages throughout the country in 2030; the western region will have the largest shortage ratio of 389 RN jobs per 100,000. Increased efforts to understand shortage dynamics are warranted.

  17. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  18. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  19. Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Care, Wm. Dean

    A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

  20. The Influence of Nursing Unit Characteristics on RN Vacancies in Specialized Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C; Mixer, Sandra J; Cozad, Melanie J

    2016-07-01

    The nursing shortage is projected to intensify in the United States. Organizations providing specialized hospice and palliative care will be particularly hard hit. The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of the nursing unit on registered nurse (RN) vacancies and test the moderating role of recruitment strategies in perinatal hospices. We estimated the association between the nursing unit and RN vacancies and tested the interaction effects of recruitment strategies (signing bonus and recruitment bonus). Our findings showed that increasing RN unit size and nursing leadership directly affected vacancies and that recruitment bonuses had stronger influence on reducing vacancies than signing bonuses. The findings offer critical insights for hospice administrators in attracting nurses among specialized hospice and palliative care providers.

  1. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs.

  2. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program’s main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military. PMID:26648733

  3. An investigation of predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes among nursing content standardized tests.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Yei-Jin

    2013-12-01

    In order to meet increased demands for qualified registered nurses and prevent negative effects from graduates' failure on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse, it is important to promote students' success in the exam. The purpose of this study was to investigate effective predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes on the first attempt among nursing content standardized tests (adult medical-surgical, fundamentals for nursing, pharmacology, maternal-newborn, nursing care of children, mental health, community health, and leadership and management) conducted throughout the nursing program. NCLEX-RN outcomes and individual adjusted scores on the standardized tests of 151 graduates from the traditional baccalaureate nursing program of a public university located in the Midwest from May 2010 to December 2011 were analyzed by a t-test and logistic regression. The participants included 118 graduates who passed and 33 graduates who failed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. Significant statistical differences were found between the two groups with NCLEX-RN success and failure in the individual adjusted scores on all of the standardized tests except the fundamental for nursing (p=.62) and nursing care of children (p=.759) standardized tests. In addition, logistic regression indicated that the overall regression models were significant in predicting both NCLEX-RN success and failure. Adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were central to the prediction of both NCLEX-RN success and failure; however, a much lower percentage of NCLEX-RN failure than success was classified. It can be concluded that the adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were effective in predicting NCLEX-RN success and not effective in predicting NCLEX-RN failure on the first attempt. The NCLEX-RN success predictors can be utilized to identify students at risk and provide early remediation. After early remediation is

  4. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  5. Labor market trends among registered nurses: 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alan

    2012-11-01

    This study uses recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and Registered Nurses (RNs) licensing exam to examine the recession's effect on the RN labor market. It then reports results of a survey of 518 hospital nursing officers conducted in 2008 and 2010 matched with institutional data from the American Hospital Association (AHA). These unique data show how the recession led hospitals to slow hiring despite accelerating attrition of retirement-age nurses; shift away from H1-B, agency, and, overtime work; and reduce training, and other benefits for new hires. More broadly, results show how nurse-staffing practices adapt to market conditions. Results also suggest reduced hospital support for nursing education may strain the supply of managerial and specialty nurses as baby-boom nurses retire.

  6. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  7. A Study of Civilian Registered Nurse Recruitment at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    127 H. A MARKETING MIX FOR CIVILIAN REGISTERED NURSE *RECRUITMENT AT MADIGAN ARMY MEDICAL CENTER ... ... 131 SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY...employement should be promoted to this market. RN Recruitment Marketing Mix for Madigan The major finding in the market analysis of civilian RN...should be targeted; all gain their impetus from MAMC nursing management. A sumimary of the marketing mix is tabulated at Appendix H. This brief listing of

  8. Success-Failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses by Nurse Candidates from an Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Nine years of data from first-time nurse candidates taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were examined to identify predictors of successful performance and determine probabilities of success. Variables placing nurse candidates at risk included first-semester grade point average, sex, and whether they…

  9. The fast track back to registered nurses employment.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Burns, Helen K; Hoffmann, Rosemary; Dailey, Joseph; Hornyak, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The registered nurse (RN) workforce continues to decline. One method to attract experienced RNs into the workforce is through RN refresher courses. To determine if our RN refresher program is successful in returning RNs to the workforce, we sought to measure the: characteristics of RNs who participate in our program; relationship among participants' employment and demographics; effect of high fidelity human simulation (HFHS) on participants' learning, and; program's ability to meet participants' preparation for employment. Seventy-three participants were surveyed to measure their demographics and employment; they ranked the HFHS experience and program experience on their learning and employment. Thirty-four (47%) surveys were returned. Thirty-three participants (97%) were female (mean age=50.44 years, SD=6.2). Their mean years of RN licensure was 24.93 years (SD=8.8), and their mean time out of nursing practice was 13.30 years (SD=8.0). Twenty-six (76.5%) were employed, with 20 (60.6%) employed as RNs at acute care facilities. Employed participants were licensed for less years than non-employed participants (p=0.047). Employed participants ranked their HFHS experience highly (p=0.04) and the program highly (p=0.04) on benefiting their current employment. Our refresher program appears to be successful in helping RNs re-enter the nursing workforce.

  10. Predictors of NCLEX-RN success in a baccalaureate nursing program as a foundation for remediation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Linda K; Kirkpatrick, Bonnie L; Frazier, Susan K; Chung, Misook L; Moser, Debra K

    2003-09-01

    This study evaluated students' demographic and nursing program variables and standardized test scores to determine whether significant differences existed between students who successfully completed the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and those who were unsuccessful. In addition, the predictive accuracy of two standardized examinations, the Mosby AssessTest and the Health Education Systems, Incorporated (HESI) Exit Examination were compared. Two cohorts of graduating senior nursing students were studied (1999 cohort N = 121; 2000 cohort N = 103). Demographic and nursing program variables were obtained from student records. The Undergraduate Studies Committee provided standardized test scores (Mosby AssessTest in 1999; HESI Exit Examination in 2000). Only two program variables were consistently associated with success on the NCLEX-RN--final course grade for a didactic, senior-level medical-surgical nursing course and cumulative program grade point average. Scores on both standardized tests were significantly different in students who were successful on the NCLEX-RN and those who were not. The HESI Exit Examination demonstrated greater sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and test efficiency, compared with the Mosby AssessTest. Use of program variables and students' standardized test scores may allow faculty to identify students at risk for failing the NCLEX-RN and to provide structured remediation so these students may be successful on the licensing examination and begin their nursing careers.

  11. Professional Nursing in State Service: Needs and Recommendations. A Skills Inventory of Registered Nurses Employed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Barbara

    This study analyzed factors in attracting and recruiting professional nurses into Massachusetts state service. Although Massachusetts had relatively many registered nurses (RN), 45% were inactive. Resulting shortages were great, especially in state hospitals. All agencies had high turnover, with impending staffing crises in some agencies because…

  12. The Determination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement in Nursing Courses and Success on the Registered Nurse Licensure Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Julie E.

    The objective of a study was to determine if academic achievement in nursing courses could be used to predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). It investigated the relationship between NCLEX outcomes and academic achievement in theory and clinical courses and the relationship between NCLEX…

  13. The Relationship Between Registered Nurses and Nursing Home Quality: An Integrative Review (2008-2014).

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Castle, Nickolas G; McGilton, Katherine S; Spilsbury, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home care is expensive; second only to acute hospital care for inpatient Medicare costs. The increased focus on costs of care accrued by Medicare beneficiaries in nursing homes presents a valuable opportunity for registered nurses (RNs) to further demonstrate quantitatively the value they add to the capacity of the nursing home nursing skill mix to provide cost-effective and efficient quality care. Most of the studies included in this review consistently reported that higher RN staffing and higher ratios of RNs in the nursing skill mix are related to better NH quality. Concerns about the costs of employing more highly skilled RNs and directors of nursing that have the potential to positively influence members of the nursing skill mix will continue to influence nursing home industry hiring practices. For both the advancement of nursing as an applied science and the benefit of society at large, nursing researchers are challenged to better demonstrate how the increased presence of a RN on each shift has the potential to enhance the cost effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of nursing homes.

  14. Registered nurse turnover and the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C B

    1996-01-01

    Changes in health care delivery and cyclic fluctuations in the registered nurse (RN) labor market affect health care costs, access, and quality. This study provides insight into one factor central to these issues, the job-change behavior of RNs. The theory of human capital provides the foundation to guide investigation, and econometric modeling is used to explore relationships among study variables. Model results show clear differences in job change behavior of nurses employed in hospital and nonhospital settings. These differences are a reflection, not only of individual nurse preferences, but also of wages, working conditions, and opportunities associated with various health care settings. Understanding these relationships is essential to leaders in the nursing profession as they plan for and respond to changes in health care delivery.

  15. Registered Nurse Persistence in Baccalaureate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krov, Kathleen Nadler

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared registered nurses to safely meet the complex healthcare needs of citizens of the United States. Since there is no research on the characteristics of registered nurse students persisting in baccalaureate education, this quantitative descriptive case study was designed to identify the…

  16. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  17. Relationship of Academic Variables to National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurse Performance of Graduates in a Selected Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naron, Rosarica G.; Widlak, Frederic

    This report addresses the unstable and unsatisfactory performance of Chicago, Illinois' Olive-Harvey College's (OHC) associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). An ex post facto correlation study was designed to determine the worthiness of pre-nursing admission course…

  18. Competency profile for registered nurses: NIC in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNs provide both direct care and leadership in geriatric-care facilities. In this specialized area of care, the contributions of the RN are not well recognized. In this issue, we focus on gerontological nursing and how NIC can be used to describe and communicate this highly specialized role.

  19. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  20. Predictors of Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses among Transfer BSN Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative research study (N=175) examined predictors of first time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) among transfer students in a baccalaureate degree program (BSN). The predictors were chosen after an extensive literature review yielded few studies related to this population. Benner's…

  1. Political participation of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p < .001) of political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant (p < .001). Resources (time/money/civic skills) significantly contributed to political participation (p < .001). Less than half (40%) felt they could impact local decisions, and fewer (32%) felt they could impact state or national government decisions. Most respondents (80%) indicated their nursing courses lacked political content and did not prepare them for political participation. Findings showed that nurse educators and leaders of professional nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  2. Relationshp between Academic Variables and Personality Type to Progression in an Associate Degree Nursing Program and Achievement on NCLEX-RN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ione Norma

    This retrospective study was done to identify academic and personality variables that predict student progression through an associate degree nursing program and achievement on the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The study searched for evidence of a decline in academic ability in the students over the 7…

  3. The Initiative to Move Toward a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce: Findings from the Kansas Registered Nurse Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of registered nurses (RNs) with a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) to 80% by 2020. Kansas lacks a central mechanism to collect current data on the RN workforce; therefore, detailed information about the RN workforce, including current educational level, is unknown. The purposes of the survey were to (a) describe the Kansas RN workforce, (b) examine the relationship between nursing education and employment, (c) compare and contrast the workforce to other states and national data and (d) discuss implications of strategic planning and policy making for nursing education. The on-line Kansas RN Workforce Survey link was sent to 44,568 RNs by e-mail, and the response rate was 15.6% (n = 6,948). The survey consisted of 34 questions on demographics, education, licensing, and employment. Kansas RNs were predominately women (92%) and Caucasian with an average age of 47.7 years. Approximately 46.3% of RNs obtained a BSN as their initial education. Analysis of highest level of nursing education showed that 60.5% of Kansas RNs were at least baccalaureate prepared, with 14.9% obtaining a master's degree or higher. More than 50% of RNs worked in hospitals as staff nurses. RNs with advanced education were more likely to be employed, tended to work in academic settings or ambulatory clinics, and were more likely to be faculty or in management/leadership positions. Overall, the Kansas RN workforce is closer to reaching the 80% baccalaureate-prepared goal recommended by the Future of Nursing report than has been reported. Educational level was closely related to RNs' choices of work settings and positions. Additional work such as promoting academic progression needs to continue to build a more highly educated RN workforce.

  4. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  5. Quantitative research on critical thinking and predicting nursing students' NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been influential in several disciplines. Both education and nursing in general have been attempting to define, teach, and measure this concept for decades. Nurse educators realize that critical thinking is the cornerstone of the objectives and goals for nursing students. The purpose of this article is to review and analyze quantitative research findings relevant to the measurement of critical thinking abilities and skills in undergraduate nursing students and the usefulness of critical thinking as a predictor of National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) performance. The specific issues that this integrative review examined include assessment and analysis of the theoretical and operational definitions of critical thinking, theoretical frameworks used to guide the studies, instruments used to evaluate critical thinking skills and abilities, and the role of critical thinking as a predictor of NCLEX-RN outcomes. A list of key assumptions related to critical thinking was formulated. The limitations and gaps in the literature were identified, as well as the types of future research needed in this arena.

  6. Respect as experienced by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, Clara D

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to ascertain how registered nurses convey and experience respect in their day-to-day work environment with other registered nurses. Nurses generally feel respected when they are acknowledged for a job well done and for what they as individuals bring to the situation, including knowledge, skills, and experience. Findings revealed that communication was a key factor in conveying and experiencing respect, including what is communicated, how it is communicated, and what is not communicated. Experiencing respect was linked to collaboration, acknowledgment, autonomy, support, and fairness. Important findings in this study were barriers to conveying respect. Barriers were described as lack of time, lack of understanding of roles, inability to develop collegial relationships, not being shown respect, and lack of self-awareness.

  7. Application of Guided Imagery to Facilitate the Transition of New Graduate Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Laura B.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the new graduate registered nurse (RN) transition has included a didactic and skills-based orientation accompanied by a period of preceptored practice. However, these methods do not ensure that new RNs are in a state of reduced anxiety to fully interact with their new environment. Transition to practice may cause anxiety, and the new graduate RN may perceive moderate to severe stress. One method of stress reduction is the use of guided imagery, which has shown strong potential with a variety of populations undergoing stressful events. Today, new graduate RNs expect institutions to facilitate orientation to their new employment settings and assist in the transition to their role as a professional nurse. This article proposes a model that incorporates guided imagery for refining the new graduate RN transition process. The model can be adapted for use in the context of orienting other adult learners to unfamiliar practice situations. PMID:23330588

  8. Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya; McDonald, Sinead; Rainey, Debbie

    The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

  9. Retooling the RN workforce in long-term care: nursing certification as a pathway to quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; High, Robin; Culross, Beth; Conley, Deborah Marks; Nayar, Preethy; Nguyen, Anh T; Ojha, Diptee

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a project to improve nursing care quality in long-term care (LTC) by retooling registered nurses' (RN) geriatric clinical competence. A continuing education course was developed to prepare LTC RNs (N = 84) for national board certification and improve technological competence. The certification pass-rate was 98.5%. The study used a mixed methods design with retrospective pretests administered to RN participants. Multivariate analysis examined the impact of RN certification on empowerment, job satisfaction, intent to turnover, and clinical competence. Results showed certification significantly improved empowerment, satisfaction, and competence. A fixed effects analysis showed intent to turnover was a function of changes in empowerment, job dissatisfaction, and competency (F = 79.2; p < 0.001). Changes in empowerment (t = 1.63, p = 0.11) and competency (t = -0.04, p = 0.97) did not affect changes in job satisfaction. Findings suggest RN certification can reduce persistently high RN turnover rates that negatively impact patient safety and LTC quality.

  10. Toward a methodology for substate projections of registered nurse supply and demand in New York.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Sandra; Martiniano, Robert; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Even as concerns about nursing shortages continue nationwide and for individual states in the United States, there is little information on the impact of nursing shortages at substate levels, such as counties or groups of small counties. National and state level assessments can mask wide geographic variation in the distribution of registered nurses (RNs). The Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, developed a practical approach to projecting RN supply and demand at substate levels. The experimental model used in this research was adapted from a methodology utilized for the RN National Supply Model and National Demand Model developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration in the department of Health and Human Services to make RN supply and demand projections at the broader national and state levels. The Center's research highlighted the value of substate analyses in the identification of RN supply and demand gaps and found that supply and demand gaps vary greatly by region and within regions. This study also provided an in-depth understanding of the dynamics that drive substate labor markets for RNs as well as the need for substate analyses to help policymakers better allocate scarce resources to address nursing shortages.

  11. Perceptions of select registered nurses of the continuing competence program of the Saskatchewan registered nurses' association.

    PubMed

    Bassendowski, Sandra; Petrucka, Pammla

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is a self-regulating profession, and most professional nursing jurisdictions across Canada have undertaken the creation of Continuing Competence Programs (CCPs), with the goals of promoting good nursing practice, encouraging continuous learning, contributing to the quality of nursing practice, and optimizing client outcomes. Most CCPs call for a professional portfolio to collect, synthesize, and analyze professional experiences, including documentation of peer feedback and preparation of a learning plan. In the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, there is a self-reflective tool that enables registered nurses to self-rate their achievement of a set of foundational competencies. This article explores the perceptions that select registered nurses have about the CCP in Saskatchewan and how their view of the degree of professional control (as assessed through locus of control) that they have affects their perspective about the outcomes of the program. The study was designed to assess how perceived locus of control was related to how registered nurses view the implementation of the CCP in Saskatchewan.

  12. Registered nurse scope of practice in Australia: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Davis, Jenny; Smithson, John; Cant, Robyn

    2016-10-01

    The nursing profession comprises Australia's largest regulated health workforce yet its practice boundaries are poorly understood. The ambiguity surrounding the practice scope of nurses limits the profession's ability to fully respond to Australia's current and emerging health system challenges. The aim of this review is to explore the concept of scope of practice of registered nurses (RN) in Australia, as reflected in contemporary literature. An integrative review of literature relating to the scope of practice of the Australian registered nurse published between 2007 and 2014 was conducted. Twenty primary papers and nine secondary source papers were included in the review. Themes that arose from the analysis are: Scope of practice - an elusive concept; Scope of practice and context; Scope of practice and boundaries; and Scope of practice and advanced practice. Discussion of these themes includes consideration of the professional, legal and ethical significance of scope of practice for the RN, as well as the legislative, professional and contextual influences on, and challenges to, defining scope of practice at both a professional and individual level. For the Australian registered nursing workforce to continue to be a significant and influential contributor to Australia(')s dynamic healthcare context, a clearly articulated scope of practice is both necessary and overdue.

  13. The Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Fusilero, Jane; Lini, Linda; Prohaska, Priscilla; Szweda, Christine; Carney, Katie; Mion, Lorraine C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse administrators focus on factors that influence nurses' levels of satisfaction to reduce turnover and improve retention. One important determinant of nurses' satisfaction is the opportunity for professional development. On the basis of feedback from the nurses, a professional development program, Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence, was instituted. The authors describe one approach to create opportunities to improve professional nurse development and the necessity for ongoing assessment of its impact on nurses' job satisfaction.

  14. Work force policy perspectives: registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Friss, L O

    1981-01-01

    If the decline in full-time labor force participation by registered nurses in hospitals is to be reversed, the issue of equal pay for comparable work must be addressed. Under pressure for cost containment, policies tend to focus on labor force economics rather than on limitations of services. While the two are interrelated, wage policies must be considered independently. This article describes the network which determines how nurse salaries are set: the relationship between the private sector, the general schedule and the Veteran's Administration. The effects of this system are documented, using testimony from a case in the tenth circuit, as well as comparisons with other reference groups: policemen, teachers, laborers, and VA career fields. The evidence suggests that there is a need for policy intervention. Prime areas for action are the comparability practices by governments, particularly in the areas of classification standards and pay setting. Hospital personnel practices which continue past effects of occupational segregation also should be changed.

  15. Education and Practice Barriers for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Malina, Debra P; Izlar, Janice J

    2014-05-31

    Of the recognized advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) specialties, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have historically experienced the most vigorous and organized resistance from outside entities regarding rights to practice to the full scope of their education and experience. Opposition to nurse anesthetists practicing to the full scope of their education and training is present in the clinical arena and educational milieu.

  16. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  17. State funding for higher education and RN replacement rates by state: a case for nursing by the numbers in state legislatures.

    PubMed

    Bargagliotti, L Antoinette

    2009-01-01

    Amid an enduring nursing shortage and state budget shortfalls, discerning how the percentage of state funding to higher education and other registered nurse (RN) workforce variables may be related to the RN replacement rates (RNRR) in states has important policy implications. Regionally, the age of RNs was inversely related to RNRR. State funding in 2000 significantly predicted the 2004 RNRR, with the percentage of LPNs in 2004 adding to the model. The stability of the model using 2000 and 2004 funding data suggests that state funding creates a climate for RNRR.

  18. The costs of NCLEX-RN failure.

    PubMed

    Roa, Michelle; Shipman, Debra; Hooten, Jack; Carter, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Nursing programs across the country are challenged with producing qualified competent graduates who can successfully pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for Registered Nurses (RN) on the first attempt. The challenge has been prompted by the largest aging population striking the nation who will need nursing care and organizations who are demanding increasing numbers of competent nurses. However, graduates from nursing programs are failing the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. The impact of NCLEX-RN failure is felt not only by the graduate student and their nursing program, but by healthcare organizations as well. Even though the impact is multi-faceted, a common theme of cost emerges.

  19. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students.

  20. Cognitive apprenticeship: laying the groundwork for mentoring registered nurses in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nickle, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Professional nursing practice within the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the registered nurse (RN) to demonstrate evidence of critical thought for the various treatments provided. A sound theoretical knowledge base, coupled with sensitivity to the socio-cultural influences within this often emotionally charged atmosphere is foundational to the provision of excellent patient care. Mentorship is one educational strategy that attempts to integrate skill development with the socialization of a novice ICU RN. However, vagueness surrounding what encompasses the mentor-mentee relationship may prevent employees from entering into these unions. In this article, I present an original mentorship model based on the concept of cognitive apprenticeship, as described by Collins, Brown, and Holum (1991). I identify the learning theories that inform this approach to professional development and conclude with select recommendations for implementation of a mentorship program within the ICU.

  1. Multistate Approach to Preparing Registered Nurses: How 3 Nurse Executives Shaped a New Nursing Education Model.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan; Burnes Bolton, Linda; Swanson, Jane; Hassmiller, Susan; Chow, Marilyn

    2015-09-01

    A new model for educating baccalaureate nurses emerged from the needs of employers and came to fruition through a unique partnership resulting in the development of the 1st competency-based, asynchronous single-curriculum prelicensure program in the United States. Three nurse executives championed the design and implementation of the multistate approach to preparing RNs (MAP RN) program. The nationally accredited program has been initiated in 5 states.

  2. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  3. Organizational determinants of work outcomes and quality care ratings among Army Medical Department registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Patrician, Patricia A; Shang, Jingjing; Lake, Eileen T

    2010-04-01

    The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and several single-item measures were administered to registered nurses (RNs) working within 23 U.S.-based Army Medical Department (AMEDD) hospitals. Data were analyzed with logistic regression for nested data. Unfavorable nursing practice environments had a substantial association with job dissatisfaction (OR 13.75, p < .01), emotional exhaustion (OR 12.70, p < .01), intent to leave (OR 3.03, p < .01), and fair to poor quality of care (OR 10.66, p < .01). This study provides the first system-wide analyses of nursing practice environments in AMEDD hospitals in the U.S. Similar to findings in civilian samples, poor quality work environments are associated with less favorable RN work outcomes and quality of care ratings.

  4. Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses in the South, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Projections of supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) through the 1980's are presented with specific reference to the 14 southern states. The importance of manpower projections and studies for registered nurses is emphasized in light of figures that show the number of graduates from entry-level programs in the southern states has doubled…

  5. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  6. Registered nurses are delaying retirement, a shift that has contributed to recent growth in the nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2014-08-01

    The size of the registered nurse (RN) workforce has surpassed forecasts from a decade ago, growing to 2.7 million in 2012 instead of peaking at 2.2 million. Much of the difference is the result of a surge in new nursing graduates. However, the size of the RN workforce is particularly sensitive to changes in retirement age, given the large number of baby-boomer RNs now in the workforce. We found that in the period 1969-90, for a given number of RNs working at age fifty, 47 percent were still working at age sixty-two and 9 percent were working at age sixty-nine. In contrast, in the period 1991-2012 the proportions were 74 percent at age sixty-two and 24 percent at age sixty-nine. This trend, which largely predates the recent recession, extended nursing careers by 2.5 years after age fifty and increased the 2012 RN workforce by 136,000 people. Because many RNs tend to shift out of hospital settings as they age, employers seeking RNs for nonhospital roles may welcome (and seek to capitalize on) the growing numbers of experienced RNs potentially able to fill these positions.

  7. Understanding the supply and distribution of registered nurses: where are the data and what can they tell us?

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Robert; Mcginnis, Sandra; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Health workforce researchers routinely conduct studies to determine whether a profession is currently in short supply and whether future shortages are likely. This is particularly important for registered nursing since the profession has experienced periodic shortages over the past three decades. Registered nurse (RN) forecast studies can be valuable in quantifying supply and demand gaps and identifying the most appropriate strategies to avert future shortages. In order to quantify RN supply/demand gaps, it is important to have accurate data on RNs, including the number of active RNs as well as their demographic, education, and practice characteristics, and work location(s). A lack of relevant and timely data on the nursing workforce is a significant barrier to identifying where nursing shortages exist, where they are most severe, and determining the factors that contribute to them. This lack of understanding impedes the development of effective health workforce programs and policies to mitigate shortages and the ability to evaluate these programs and policies for effectiveness. This study describes the national data sources available to nursing researchers to study the supply and distribution of the RN workforce and assesses the sources' strengths and limitations. This study also explores the potential for using state-level data for nursing workforce research.

  8. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    As advanced practice nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) have a responsibility to engage in patient education about health...Categories and themes include; engaging in perioperative patient education , focusing on explanations about anesthesia and surgery, prior nursing...experiences make patient education easier, documenting patient education is important and uncertainty about where to document it. Common topics and themes

  9. Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success of Associate Degree Graduates: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Bonny J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students not passing the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN) can adversely affect schools of nursing. This failure also adversely affects the national nursing shortage. The declining national pass rates on the NCLEX-RN for ADN graduates and the increasing…

  10. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  11. The orientation period: essential for new registered nurses' adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore adaptation in new registered nurses using the Roy adaptation model as the guiding conceptual framework. This quantitative study employed a random sampling of new nurses in the state of North Carolina. Personal attributes of the new registered nurses and characteristics of their work setting were modeled with four measures considered suitable proxies for adaptation. Being in a formal orientation period significantly supported the new nurses' overall adaptation. This may represent the benefit of social support, including education, which seems to facilitate adaptation.

  12. Use of aptitude to understand bachelor of science in nursing student attrition and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E; Moore, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Attrition is a serious issue among Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students with attrition rates around 50% nationwide. To help minimize BSN student attrition, many nursing programs use commercially available standardized nursing aptitude tests as adjuncts to scholastic aptitude data, usually operationalized as pre-nursing grade point average, to select students for admission. Little is known regarding the usefulness of scholastic and nursing aptitude data for predicting long-term retention in a BSN program and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among scholastic aptitude, nursing aptitude, BSN student attrition prior to the final semester of the curriculum, and BSN student readiness for the NCLEX-RN. This study's findings, along with other findings in the literature, suggest the need for a parsimonious explanatory model of BSN student attrition that can be used to guide admission and progression policies, and ensure that students ready for the NCLEX-RN are the ones graduating from BSN programs.

  13. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  14. HESI admission assessment (A(2)) examination scores, program progression, and NCLEX-RN success in baccalaureate nursing: an exploratory study of dependable academic indicators of success.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Katherine A; DiBartolo, Mary C; Walsh, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to meet the demand for well-educated, high-quality nurses, schools of nursing seek to admit those candidates most likely to have both timely progression and first-time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Finding the right combination of academic indicators, which are most predictive of success, continues to be an ongoing challenge for entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs across the United States. This pilot study explored the relationship of a standardized admission examination, the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Admission Assessment (A(2)) Examination to preadmission grade point average (GPA), science GPA, and nursing GPA using a retrospective descriptive design. In addition, the predictive ability of the A(2) Examination, preadmission GPA, and science GPA related to timely progression and NCLEX-RN success were explored. In a sample of 89 students, no relationship was found between the A(2) Examination and preadmission GPA or science GPA. The A(2) Examination was correlated with nursing GPA and NCLEX-RN success but not with timely progression. Further studies are needed to explore the utility and predictive ability of standardized examinations such as the A(2) Examination and the contribution of such examinations to evidence-based admission decision making.

  15. A Survey of Registered Nurses in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Postsecondary Research and Information Systems.

    As part of the 1989 triennial registration of registered nurses (RNs) in New York State, a survey of professional, personal, and practice characteristics of nurses was conducted. Basic information from this survey is enhanced by information from earlier surveys to illustrate significant trends. Usable survey questionnaires were received from…

  16. [The prescribing rights of registered nurses in Canada].

    PubMed

    Roussel, Josette

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of the healthcare system in Canada, registered nurses have been given the right to prescribe. The Canadian Nurses Association played a central role in the implementation of this change by developing a national reference framework, now available to Canadian provinces and territories.

  17. Present and Future Supply of Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Stuart H.

    During the 1960's, nursing education shifted dramatically away from hospital-operated diploma schools toward associate degree and baccalaureate programs. This report examines the nature of this shift in training and its anticipated impact on future supply. Other important factors affecting the future supply of nurses are analyzed, including the…

  18. A comparison of two nursing program exit exams that predict first-time NCLEX-RN outcome.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Lisa D; Mills, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective descriptive correlational study compared the predictive accuracy of the Health Education Systems, Inc, Exit Exam (Elsevier) and Assessment Technologies Institute's RN Comprehensive Predictor, both of which were administered to nursing students in an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program during their final semester of study. Using logistic regression analyses, it was determined that the two examinations were statistically significant but weak predictors of success on the RN licensure examination. The RN Comprehensive Predictor had a slightly better odds ratio; however, both examinations had similar sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy. Because the RN Comprehensive Predictor was included in the Assessment Technologies Institute's Comprehensive Assessment and Review Program already being used by the BSN program, based on the results of this study, the nursing faculty decided to use only the RN Comprehensive Predictor during its NCLEX-RN preparation course.

  19. Caring for adolescent females with anorexia nervosa: registered nurses' perspective.

    PubMed

    King, S J; de Sales Turner

    2000-07-01

    This phenomenological study was undertaken to explore in depth the experiences of registered nurses caring for adolescent anorexic females within paediatric wards of general hospitals in Victoria, Australia. A qualitative design underpinned by the philosophy of Edmund Husserl was employed for this study. Audio taped in-depth interviews with five registered nurses working within the public health care system were conducted. Using Colaizzi's procedural steps of analysis, six themes of meaning were explicated. They were: (a) personal core values of nurses; (b) core values challenged; (c) emotional turmoil; (d) frustration; (e) turning points; and (f) resolution. These themes, when taken together, described the essence of the journey undertaken by registered nurses who cared for adolescent anorexic females. The findings of this study indicated that there is a need for extensive registered nurse preparation, on-going support, and development of education programmes to enable registered nurses to care for these patients with greater understanding. Further, the participants identified the need for new care regimes and protocols to be developed that incorporated new ways of thinking. They also expressed a desire to be have greater involvement in the planned care of their patients.

  20. Emotional intelligence levels in baccalaureate-prepared early career registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Reemts, Glenda S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The increasing complexity of the healthcare environment calls for increasing emotional intelligence (EI) competence in nurses. This study assessed the EI competence of 164 baccalaureate nursing alumni who graduated during the years 2007-2010 from three Benedictine institutions located in the Midwestern United States to see if there was growth of EI with experience as a registered nurse (RN), and to determine if age, gender, grade point average (GPA), and years of total healthcare work experience prior to graduation predicted EI. Methods: Participants completed the web-based Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and a demographic survey. Results: Findings indicated 79.4% of participants were competent or higher on the MSCEIT total EI score. Percentages of nurses scoring in the competent or higher range on each of the four branch scores of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions were 80.6%, 72.7%, 84.2%, and 84.9% respectively. There were no significant differences on EI scores between graduates with 1-2 years compared to 3-5 years of experience as a RN. Results of a linear stepwise regression indicated being female was a significant predictor on the MSCEIT total EI score (P = 0.015) and using emotions branch (P = 0.047). Findings also indicated GPA (P < 0.001) and being female (P = 0.023) were significant predictors of EI on the understanding emotions branch. Conclusions: The findings indicate there is work to be done to improve the EI competence of nursing graduates. Continued research on the topic of EI and nursing is needed to build the knowledge base on how to promote positive patient outcomes. PMID:27981097

  1. The NCLEX-RN examination: charting the course of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The author describes the changes in the 2004 NCLEX-RN(R) Test Plan and provides information about the alternate item formats that are being developed for the NCLEX examination. Nursing educators will learn details about the new test plan and review sample alternate items. Information from this article can be used for curriculum review and to prepare students to take the NCLEX examination.

  2. [Important role of a nurse parctitioner-like specialized registered nurse in a cardiac surgery team].

    PubMed

    Izutani, Hironori

    2012-11-01

    Team medical practice by physician, nurse, and other co-medical staffs has been performed and it provides numerous values to the patients. Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare reported that a registered nurse was a key person of medicine. The importance of nurse's role expansion and involving medical cure by a registered nurse was emphasized in the report. Japanese nurse practitioner for a new profession is going to start in near future. In our institute, a specialized registered nurse has joined a cardiac surgery team. She plays an important role of assisting and consulting cardiac physicians for patient cure and care as a member of the surgery team. Cardiac surgery team including specialized registered nurse gives quality surgical results and patient satisfaction.

  3. The NCLEX-RN experience: qualitative interviews with graduates of a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Linda L; Epeneter, Beverly J

    2002-06-01

    It is important for nursing faculty to pay attention to individual as well as institutional results on the National Council Licensure Examination for RNs (NCLEX-RN). This study was designed to identify themes to help faculty understand the NCLEX-RN experience from students' perspectives and help future students pass the examination at the first sitting. A sample of 1998 graduates of a baccalaureate program was selected, which included 10 students who were successful and 9 who were unsuccessful on the first testing attempt. Participants were interviewed about the testing experience and the relationship between nursing education and the NCLEX-RN. Findings indicate that participants who passed on the first attempt accepted responsibility for learning, were proactive in test preparation, took the examination when they felt ready, and used stress management techniques to cope with this challenge. The unsuccessful participants tended to perceive their lack of success on the NCLEX-RN was the responsibility of others, seemed less able to manage stress, and took the examination when they did not feel ready. Both successful and unsuccessful participants felt unprepared to answer NCLEX-RN-type questions and believed nothing had prepared them for this experience.

  4. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  5. Valuing teamwork: Insights from newly-registered nurses working in specialist mental health services.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Mannix, Judy; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-12-01

    In this qualitative study, the experiences of a small cohort of registered nurses (RN) during the first 2 years of mental health employment were documented. A total of 13 semistructured interviews were completed from within a specialist mental health setting. Eleven issues were identified: (i) teamwork; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) self-development; (iv) confidence; (v) listening; (vi) rapport; (vii) keen observation; (viii) patience; (ix) empathy; (x) learning from colleagues; and (xi) maintaining a positive approach towards patients. The nurses focused on the here-and-now circumstances, rather than on future plans, or past preparation, and were able to elucidate the qualities and skills that they brought to their clinical work. Participants were most proud of achievements that bridged the personal and professional, such as self-development, working closely with patients to develop rapport, experiential learning, and teamwork. Findings highlight the importance of teamwork to newly-graduated RN entering the mental health environment. It is known that teamwork can convey a sense of belonging and help create an environment in which applied experiential clinical learning can occur. Therefore, it is important that efforts are made to facilitate team building and opportunities for teamwork when new graduates are transitioning into the mental health clinical practice environment.

  6. Supply and distribution of primary healthcare registered nurses in british columbia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E; Young, Ella; Mooney, Dawn

    2009-11-01

    WHAT DID WE DO?: This study uses an existing data source to (a) describe the population and geographic distribution of registered nurses (RNs) working in primary healthcare (PHC) in British Columbia, (b) compare this workforce to PHC physicians and (c) assess the distribution of PHC-RNs relative to population health status. WHAT DID WE LEARN?: Of the 27,570 practising RNs in British Columbia in 2000, there were 3,179 (12%) in the PHC workforce. This translates into 147 people per practising RN and 1,277 people per PHC-RN. In 2000, there were 990 people per PHC physician. PHC-RNs represented 43% of the combined PHC workforce of physicians and RNs. A large proportion (47%) of PHC-RNs worked in community health centres, whereas less than 2% worked in physicians' offices. Geographic distribution of PHC-RNs is similar to the distribution of PHC physicians and is not associated with population health status. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?: There seem to be sufficient PHC-RNs to implement policy objectives in support of interdisciplinary PHC teams, but physicians and nurses will increasingly need to practice in the same location or have access to electronic information systems to support coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of PHC. The PHC workforce could be better deployed to align with population health status.

  7. Mastering the professional role as a newly graduated registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Pennbrant, Sandra; Nilsson, Maria Skyvell; Öhlén, Joakim; Rudman, Ann

    2013-07-01

    Professional development is a process starting during undergraduate education and continuing throughout working life. A new nurse's transition from school to work has been described as difficult. This study aims to develop a model describing the professional development of new nurses during their first years of work. To develop this model, constant comparative analyses were performed. The method was a qualitative study of survey data on 330 registered nurses. The results showed that mastering the professional role was the result of an ongoing process building on the nurse's experiences and interactions with the surrounding environment. The professional developmental process involves the following interrelated sub-processes: evaluating and re-evaluating educational experiences, developing professional self-efficacy and developing clinical competence. These sub-processes are influenced by the following factors: social values and norms, healthcare organization, management of new nurses, co-workers, patients and significant others and the nurse's own family and friends. These factors affect professional development directly, indirectly or as mediating influences and can lead to possible outcomes, as new nurses choose to remain in or leave the profession. The results underscore the importance of developing a professional nursing role within the new working context. To facilitate this professional development, new nurses need support from their nursing-school educators and their healthcare employers. The model described here will be the subject of further measurement and testing.

  8. The Storied Experiences of Registered Nurses' Transition from Paper to Electronic Nursing Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative inquiry was designed to bring to life the storied experiences of registered nurses who have transitioned from paper to electronic nursing documentation and to provide a foundation for others who may be preparing to implement electronic documentation and wish to consider the significance of these nurses' stories of change in their…

  9. Assistants-at-surgery: recognition of the role of the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, C A

    1992-01-01

    In the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA '89), Congress directed the Physician Payment Review Commission (PPRC or "the Commission") to make recommendations on payment policies for assistants-at-surgery, including physicians, physician assistants (PAs) and registered nurses (RNs). The National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON), via the Government Relations Committee and Executive Board, participated in the public hearing on this issue and submitted testimony on the role of the RN first assistant during orthopaedic surgery. In its 1991 report to Congress, the Commission recommended that inappropriate utilization of assistants-at-surgery could be reduced by implementing "profiling"--a variety of techniques to examine the use of assistants. PPRC failed to comment on policies related to non-physician providers, determining that this was a coverage issue, not a payment issue and thus outside the scope of their jurisdiction. However, as global surgical payment policy is further defined by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and Congress, consideration will again be given to incorporating payment for assistants-at-surgery into a comprehensive fee schedule. Recognition of the registered nurse as an assistant-at-surgery will continue to be a primary goal of NAON.

  10. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  11. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  12. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  13. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  14. Registered nurses select multiple factors associated with their errors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mary Beth

    2010-06-01

    Errors in health care are a leading cause of death and injury, requiring new methods for evaluating the efficacy of health care services. A board of nursing staff member conducted a study to examine perceptions of registered nurses who had been sanctioned for practice errors to ascertain the level of patient harm, and individual, health care team, patient, and system factors that contributed to the error or patient harm. Gaining the perspective of nurses who have been involved in a practice error can contribute to a better understanding of the factors involved in error commission.

  15. Esther McCready, RN: Nursing Advocate for Civil Rights

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Phoebe A

    2016-02-15

    More than a decade before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as an African American teenager from Baltimore, Maryland, Esther McCready challenged the discriminatory admissions policies of the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON). The article explores nurse advocacy and how Esther McCready advocated for herself and greater racial equity in nursing education during a time of civil rights turmoil. Her actions eventually resulted in the formation of numerous schools of nursing for African Americans across the south. This article recounts McCready’s early life experiences and the powerful impact her actions had on creating educational options for nurses during a time when they were severely limited for African American women, including discussion of her student days at UMSON and her journey after nursing school. A review of pertinent legal cases and policies related to segregation and integration of higher education in the mid-twentieth century is presented, along with details of McCready’s continued education and advocacy.

  16. Barriers to Research Utilization by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    At present, no documentation pertaining to the factors influencing utilization of research into clinical practice by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) exists. An investigation was undertaken to determine perceptions of CRNAs regarding factors within the context of the work setting, which may serve to influence their utilization of…

  17. Preparing underemployed Latino U.S. nurses through the Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Josefina; Little, Kermit

    2010-12-01

    The critical nursing shortage in U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border is compounded by the need for nurses who are linguistically and culturally concordant with the growing number of Latinos in these communities. The innovative 16-week Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program responds to this need by helping underemployed Latino nurses, who were educated in Mexico and live in the United States, adapt linguistically and culturally to multiple-choice testing. Ten of the program students have taken the NCLEX-RN with a 50% pass rate, which is twice as high as the internationally educated candidate passing average. This demonstrates potential for the program to build the human capacity of U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border by infusing linguistically and culturally concordant nurses into the workforce and materializing the dream of underemployed Latino nurses to implement their hard-earned and urgently needed nursing skills. Lessons learned from the program are discussed.

  18. In the Balance: Registered Nurse Supply and Demand, 1996. IES Report 315.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, I.; Smith, G.

    A survey of 6,000 registered nurses in membership in the Royal College of Nursing across the United Kingdom examined some key factors that determined the supply of nurses. A study of the UK nursing labor market indicated that the number of registered nurses has remained more or less static since the late 1980s. Rising demand appeared to be met by…

  19. Compassion fatigue among registered nurses: connecting theory and research.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kate

    2015-02-01

    Unresolved compassion fatigue often causes physical and emotional exhaustion, and can significantly impair job performance. It is also known to cause increased absenteeism and even turnover among health care providers such as registered nurses. Often those experiencing compassion fatigue attempt to self-medicate in order to numb the intense emotions, and distance themselves from patients, colleagues, friends, and even family. This article describes the challenges of applying one widely used conceptual model to research among nurses who are at risk for experiencing this important and debilitating phenomenon. Through two qualitative studies that explored compassion fatigue among registered nurses, symptoms were identified that fit within the conceptual model. Several additional elements were not adequately captured by the conceptual model, and the term was perceived as being stigmatizing.

  20. Future distinguishing competencies of baccalaureate-educated registered nurses in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2015-01-01

    In view of the likelihood that the complexity of care required by those admitted to nursing homes will continue to increase, an expert consensus study was conducted to reach consensus on the competencies which distinguish baccalaureate-educated registered nurses from other nursing staff working in nursing homes. Thirty-one international experts, identified through literature and our professional network, participated in a two-round web-based survey and an expert meeting. Experts reached consensus on 16 desirable competencies, including some not traditionally associated with nursing expertise e.g. being a team leader, role model and coach within the nursing team. These findings suggest that revision of current nursing curricula, nurse training programs and nursing home job profiles might be needed to meet the medically and psychologically complex needs of nursing home residents.

  1. Accelerated second-degree nursing students: predictors of graduation and NCLEX-RN first-time pass rates.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara B; Harris, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand and identify factors that affect students' academic performance before entry into a nursing program and as they progress through the program. The authors discuss a study, and its outcomes, that assessed accelerated second-degree nursing students' prenursing and core nursing grades that served to predict their success at completing the nursing program and passing NCLEX-RN on first attempt. Strategies were identified to help at-risk students to be successful in the program and with first-time passage of NCLEX-RN.

  2. Working postures and physical activity among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard

    2016-05-01

    Nurses report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort, particularly of the low back and neck/shoulder. This study characterized the full-shift upper arm and trunk postures and movement velocities of registered nurses using inertial measurement units (IMUs). Intensity of occupational physical activity (PA) was also ascertained using a waist-worn PA monitor and using the raw acceleration data from each IMU. Results indicated that nurses spent a relatively small proportion of their work time with the arms or trunk in extreme postures, but had few opportunities for rest and recovery in comparison to several other occupational groups. Comparisons between nurses in different PA groups suggested that using a combination of accelerometers secured to several body locations may provide more representative estimates of physical demands than a single, waist-worn PA monitor. The findings indicate a need for continued field-based research with larger sample sizes to facilitate the development of maximally effective intervention strategies.

  3. Perceptions of Community of Associate Degree Nurse Learners in an RN-to-BSN Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Cherie R.

    2010-01-01

    Registered Nurses (RNs), when educated in an Associate Degree (AD) program, learn in a face-to-face environment. Today's preferred standard of education for RNs is to achieve a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. For convenience while they continue working, numerous AD-prepared nurses seek online education to complete their Bachelor of Science in…

  4. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Inga E; Sahlsten, Monika J M

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  5. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect. PMID:28044103

  6. An interview with Peter I. Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN: on hopes and threats for nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison P; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2007-01-01

    Peter I. Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN, reflects on several recently published studies examining workforce and nurse survey data and reveals more findings. Dr. Buerhaus identifies several policy and research priorities to accelerate progress and secure a more stable future for nursing. Dr. Buerhaus will be the recipient of the 2007 Nursing Economics/Margaret D. Sovie Writer's Award, for his collective works on nursing workforce issues in the journal, during the Nurse Faculty/Nurse Executive Summit, sponsored by Nursing Economics, in Scottsdale, AZ, November 29-December 1.

  7. Nurse forecasting in Europe (RN4CAST): Rationale, design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. Methods/Design A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences. This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of changing

  8. An evaluation of the drug calculation skills of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Sandra; Brady, Anne-Marie; Malone, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical skill and proficiency underpin a number of nursing activities, with the most common application being in relation to drug dosage calculation and administration. Medication errors have been identified as the most common type of error affecting patient safety and the most common single preventable cause of adverse events and they can occur as a result of mathematical calculation error and or conceptual error. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the drug calculation skills of registered nurses (n = 124) on commencement of employment. The findings of this study indicate that there are inconsistencies in the amount of pharmacology content and drug calculation skills delivered within nursing curricula. The most frequent type of drug calculation errors are attributed to conceptual errors and participants identified ward based education on drug calculation as a pathway for improving the drug calculation skills of registered nurses. The study recommends that medication education, encompassing mathematical and conceptual drug calculation skills should be identified as a distinct competency in nursing curricula and continuing education programme.

  9. Predictors of Success and Failure for ADN Students on the NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) analyze the relationship of preprogram and nursing program variables on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) success and failure, and 2) develop a model to predict success and failure on the NCLEX-RN. The convenience sample was comprised of 245 spring, summer, and fall midterm…

  10. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered.

  11. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  12. 78 FR 69539 - Removal of Attestation Process for Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor... governing health care facilities using nonimmigrant foreign workers as registered nurses under the H-1A visa... exclusively for the temporary admission and employment of registered nurses, which permitted employers...

  13. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  14. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  15. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  16. Academic and nursing aptitude and the NCLEX-RN in baccalaureate programs.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mary Ann; Harris, Debra; Tracz, Susan M

    2014-03-01

    Accurately predicting NCLEX-RN® success has a positive impact on all nursing education stakeholders. This study focused on the ability to predict NCLEX-RN pass rates on the basis of prenursing academic aptitude variables and the Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) nursing aptitude program. The ATI predictors were the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) and fi ve ATI subject tests: Fundamentals, Medical Surgical, Nursing Care of Children, Mental Health, and Maternal Newborn. The prenursing variables comprised the prenursing grade point average, a prerequisite communication course, and the ATI TEAS composite subscores of TEAS Reading, TEAS Math, TEAS Science, and TEAS English. This study included participants from four baccalaureate nursing programs in the California State University system. Results of canonical correlation, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression revealed a significant correlation among prenursing, ATI scores, and NCLEXRN fi rst-try pass rates. Prediction of NCLEX-RN success rate using standardized testing data was supported, with the strongest predictors being the ATI Medical Surgical and ATI Mental Health tests.

  17. Career Motivation in Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: What Makes Them Remain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Zarata Mann; Bailey, Jessica H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite vast research on newly licensed registered nurses (RNs), we don't know why some newly licensed registered nurses remain in their current jobs and others leave the nursing profession early in their career. Job satisfaction, the most significant factor emerging from the literature, plays a significant role in nurses' decisions to remain in…

  18. Introducing the New American Nurses Association President: Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Pamela F

    2014-11-01

    This month in the Magnet® Perspectives column, Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAAN, new President of the American Nurses Association, discusses her priorities for the future and partnerships that are being forged to support nursing.

  19. Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Registered Nurses: Evidence from the Thai Nurse Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thinkhamrop, W; Laohasiriwong, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Health, safety, and well being have been known to be influenced by occupational characteristics. Nurses constantly encounter musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) from work demands worldwide. Nevertheless, there is insufficient of knowledge regarding causes of musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Thailand. Objective To investigate factors associated with musculoskeletal disorder among registered nurses in Thailand. Method This study is part of the 2009 Thai Nurse Cohort Study which consisted of 18,756 nationally representative sample of registered nurses. Data collection was performed via postal self-administered questionnaires. Manifesting musculoskeletal disorders was self-reported by registered nurses, 1,070 nurses were excluded since they were unemployed during previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. Result Of 17,686 registered nurses, the overall 12 months prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 47.8%. It was found that workplace violence was the strongest factor which statistically significant associated with musculoskeletal disorders (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.42 to 2.83; P < 0.001), anxiety/depression (OR = 1.96: 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.15; P < 0.001), perceiving job required a lot of physical effort (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.52 to 1.87; P < 0.001), every 10 years increased of age (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62; P < 0.001), overweight (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.52; P = 0.015). Conclusion Registered nurses were most vulnerable of musculoskeletal disorders especially those who experienced workplace violence, anxiety/depression, strenuous work, older age, and overweight. Consequently, recommending safety practices to nurses should be considered for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) prevention by ergonomics and workplace design.

  20. Psychological Distress and Workplace Bullying Among Registered Nurses

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy Ann; Gillespie, Gordon L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Gormley, Denise; Haynes, Jared T

    2016-08-10

    Workplace bullying (WPB) behaviors are pervasive in some healthcare organizations leading to difficult work environments for registered nurses. We conducted an exploratory quantitative dominant (QUANT/qual) mixed method design study to determine the differences in respondents in three Midwestern states on psychological distress symptoms using WPB exposure levels and select nurse characteristics. This article discusses background information and WPB consequences. We report on the study purpose, methods, and Phase I qualitative results, including significant differences with perceived stress, anxiety, and posttraumatic symptoms reported by persons with frequent to daily WPB behavior exposure. The discussion section considers significant differences found between respondents related to age and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Narrative analysis on strategies used after bullying also illuminates the discussion. Finally, we examine implications for nurse leaders and empowerment of their direct reports to resolve minor interpersonal conflicts and move swiftly to resolve escalating bullying.

  1. Clinical education experiences: perceptions of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Elisha, Sass; Rutledge, Dana N

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) related to clinical instruction. This descriptive study used a cross-sectional survey method with a regionally stratified randomly selected sample of SRNA members from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists data bank. A total of 2,673 SRNAs were invited by email to respond to an online, 54-item questionnaire; 696 SRNAs participated. Verbal abuse was reported by almost 70% of SRNA participants, but fewer experienced sexual harassment (13%), physical abuse (14%), or racial discrimination (72%). However, SRNAs reported that their Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) preceptors most often served as positive role models. These SRNAs found CRNA preceptors, unique cases, reading, and clinical lectures more helpful to their clinical learning compared with grand rounds, surgeons, and anesthesiology residents. The SRNAs' perceptions of the ideal behavioral characteristics for CRNA preceptors included calmness during stressful events, use of nonthreatening communication, clear communication, and encouraging independent decision making. The educational process for nurse anesthetists is continually evolving and improving. Study findings offer insights that may assist in improvements in the clinical component of SRNA education.

  2. Moral distress in certified registered nurse anesthetists: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Radzvin, Linda Clerici

    2011-02-01

    Registered nurses are frequently confronted with ethical dilemmas in their nursing practice. As a consequence of their decisions regarding ethical challenges, nurses report experiencing moral distress. This experience is often manifested by such feelings as anger, guilt, and sadness, and has been identified as a contributing factor to burnout and turnover in nursing. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) experience moral distress in their nursing practice. A random sample of 800 CRNAs from the registry of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists was selected to participate in this study. Participating nurses were asked to complete a demographic data survey and the Ethics Stress Scale. Three hundred surveys were analyzed for this study. The data supported the assumption that CRNAs do experience moral distress in their nursing practice. Although a small number of nurse anesthetists experienced high levels of moral distress, CRNAs generally experienced moderate levels of moral distress. Moral distress was associated with situations in which anesthetists believed they were aware of the morally correct course of action but were unable to follow through with these behaviors. Also, CRNAs reported physical and psychological manifestations in relation to moral distress.

  3. A simultaneous-equation model of labor supply, fertility and earnings of married women: the case of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Link, C R; Settle, R F

    1981-01-01

    A simultaneous-equation model of labor supply, fertility, and earnings is developed and estimated for an important subset of the female population, married registered nurses (RNs). Measures of variables specific to married nurses age 21-64 are developed by aggregating observations on individual nurses or their families into Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) averages, from the 1-in-100 Public Use Sample of the 1970 Census of Population in the U.S. The sample was restricted in certain ways: the grouped observations apply only to white RNs who are married with husband present and live in SMSAs of over 250,000 population in 1970 (except Honolulu). The sample is further restricted so that each included observation (representing an SMSA average) is based upon an underlying pool of at least 15 individual nurses. This last restriction reduces the sample of SMSAs to 88 from 124. The coefficient on the nurse wage variable is positive and statistically significant with an implied wage elasticity of .40 at the means. These estimates are consistent with those observed using the analogous microcensus data on RNs. RN fertility has the predicted negative effect on nurse labor supply but is statistically insignificant, but the magnitude of the fertility coefficient is plausible. A 10% increase in nurse fertility within an SMSA (number of children ever born/1000 nurses ever married within an SMSA) is associated with a reduction in the SMSA nurse labor supply. The estimated coefficients of the husband-earnings and nonlabor-income variables are negative but only the former is statistically significant at the 90% level or above. The estimated effect of the nurse's earnings opportunities on her fertility are statistically insignificant, but the wage coefficient is negative as expected and implies an elasticity of nurse fertility with respect to the nurse wage rate of approximately -.2. The coefficient on the labor supply variable is negative and statistically significant

  4. Registered nurses' self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nemcek, Mary Ann

    2007-08-01

    Knowledge of factors that help nurses thrive, including satisfaction with life and self-nurturance, can be used to enhance retention of a healthy work force. This study determined whether nurses are happy or satisfied with their lives; how self-nurturing or "good to self" they are; and whether a relationship exists among self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction. A descriptive, correlational study of 136 registered nurses involving measures of self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction was conducted. Mean scores for life satisfaction and self-nurturance were consistent with those from studies of well adults. Self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction were positively correlated with each other; thus, improving one is expected to improve the others. Knowledge of the significant positive correlation among life satisfaction, self-nurturance, and career satisfaction may prove useful in improving the mental health and safety of nurses. Strategies consistent with Magnet hospital characteristics are suggested for the occupational health nurse.

  5. The roller coaster supply of registered nurses: lessons from the eighties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, C S

    1996-08-01

    The strong labor demand of the eighties for nurses has evaporated under reform proposals and cost constraints. In this study, the 1984 and 1988 National Sample Surveys of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) were used to examine the labor supply of nurses. Ordinary least squares and logistic regression analyses indicated that the responsiveness of registered nurses to the wage was greater than previous research has indicated. If wage growth is slow relative to other occupations due to a decreased demand for nurses, registered nurses will in turn reduce their supply of labor more than previous research has indicated. Whether the response by nurses will balance the reduction of demand by employers remains to be seen.

  6. Comparisons of the educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: the educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Similar to the U.S.A., New Zealand and Singapore, Australia registers two levels of nurse, the degree or postgraduate entry prepared registered nurse and diploma or certificate-prepared enrolled nurse. Over the past decade, significant changes have occurred in educational preparation of enrolled nurses. This has resulted in enrolled nurses undertaking many roles and responsibilities previously undertaken only by registered nurses. An exploratory qualitative research study using interviews with educators of both registered and enrolled nurses was undertaken to investigate differences in educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia. This paper describes perceptions around how participants viewed educational approaches and different cohorts, types and levels of students. Similarities included topics covered and the majority skills taught, although high acuity skills remain a difference between the levels of nurse. Differences were also found in type of student, educational background and teaching methods.

  7. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulations to permit full practice authority of three roles of VA advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) when they are acting within the scope of their VA employment. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) will not be included in VA's full practice authority under this final rule, but comment is requested on whether there are access issues or other unconsidered circumstances that might warrant their inclusion in a future rulemaking. The final rulemaking establishes the professional qualifications an individual must possess to be appointed as an APRN within VA, establishes the criteria under which VA may grant full practice authority to an APRN, and defines the scope of full practice authority for each of the three roles of APRN. The services provided by an APRN under full practice authority in VA are consistent with the nursing profession's standards of practice for such roles. This rulemaking increases veterans' access to VA health care by expanding the pool of qualified health care professionals who are authorized to provide primary health care and other related health care services to the full extent of their education, training, and certification, without the clinical supervision of physicians, and it permits VA to use its health care resources more effectively and in a manner that is consistent with the role of APRNs in the non-VA health care sector, while maintaining the patient-centered, safe, high-quality health care that veterans receive from VA.

  8. Predicting academic progression for student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sharon M

    2011-06-01

    In order to foster academic progression and improve retention in nurse anesthesia programs, admission selection criteria require attention. With the escalating cost of graduate education coupled with the current economic crisis, efforts by educational leaders to minimize attrition remain pivotal. Selecting potential candidates who are most likely to succeed, aligned with data-driven evidence, offers the greatest potential for academic success for student registered nurse anesthetists. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if a relationship existed between admission criteria (grade point average [GPA], science grade point average [SGPA], Graduate Record Examination scores, and critical care experience) and academic progression (current academic status and GPA). Key findings revealed that statistically significant relationships exist between the admission selection criteria and academic progression. Findings also indicated that a combination of the independent variables, specifically the GPA and SGPA, predict academic progression. Further research that includes examination of cognitive and noncognitive admission criteria may offer greater evidence predicting academic performance by student registered nurse anesthetists.

  9. The Relationship between Selected Variables and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of Pass/Fail Performance for Traditional and Second-Degree Baccalaureate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englert, Nadine Cozzo

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between selected variables and performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Data were collected from one hundred twenty graduates of a baccalaureate program; graduates completed either the traditional four-year track or an accelerated…

  10. A comprehensive approach to NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Nancy C

    2007-01-01

    Nurse educators face many challenges in their efforts to prepare graduates for success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). A proactive, coordinated, and comprehensive effort to prepare graduates for NCLEX-RN success developed as an essential element in curriculum planning and delivery by a university-based associate degree program is described. The plan incorporates interventions in each semester of the curriculum and uses a commercially available standardized assessment and remediation package.

  11. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

  12. Newly licensed registered nurse job turnover and turnover intent.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Through survey data, this study examines job leaving behaviors of newly licensed registered nurses and identifies educational and managerial issues that need to be addressed to retain them. Within 1.5-2.5 years of graduating, one third of all respondents had left their first job, most for work-related reasons. Predictors of job leaving or intentions to leave included not having had a good orientation, information issues, having difficulties doing a good job, not being rewarded fairly, and low job satisfaction.

  13. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  14. Early Indicators of NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Schooley, Angela; Kuhn, Jonathan Richard Dixon

    2013-09-01

    Health Education Systems Incorporated (HESI(™)) test results, course grades, and National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN(®)) outcomes of students in an associate degree nursing program at a midwestern public university were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed that introductory Fundamentals HESI test scores, more than either comprehensive HESI Exit Exam scores or other specialty HESI test scores, significantly predicted NCLEX-RN outcomes in this study (p < 0.05), while controlling for grade point average and high school percentile rank. In addition, of the general education courses and the nursing courses in the associate nursing program examined, Pediatric Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing, and Maternity Nursing course grades were found most statistically significantly influential of all the HESI test scores (p < 0.01).

  15. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who: (1... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of...

  16. Survey of Registered Nurses Licensed by New York State Education Department, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Higher and Professional Education.

    A survey of professional nurses registered by the New York State Education Department was conducted in 1983, updating 1961, 1973, and 1977 surveys. Usable responses were completed by 171,109 registered nurses (RNs) licensed by the state and 137,116 in-state RNs (82% response rate). In-state RNs who were employed in nursing in New York numbered…

  17. Educators' expectations of roles, employability and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, like other countries, two levels of nurse are registered for entry to practice. Educational changes for second level nurses in Australia have led to questions regarding roles and career options. This paper reports on interviews with nursing course coordinators to examine educator expectations of roles and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses. Coordinators of eight degree (registered) and diploma (enrolled) nursing programs were interviewed to determine their opinions on roles and careers that students were prepared for. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Educators reported similar graduate roles, although high acuity care was primarily the role of registered nurses. Career expectations differed with enrolled nurses having limited advancement opportunity, and registered nurses greater career options. Health organisations were unprepared to accommodate increased practice scope of enrolled nurses and limited work practice through policies stipulating who could perform procedures. Organisational health policies need to accommodate increased enrolled nurse skill base. Education of practising nurses is necessary regarding increased scope of enrolled nurse practice to ensure they are used to their full potential. Increasing patient acuity requires more registered nurses, as enrolled nurses are unprepared to care for complex or deteriorating patients.

  18. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  19. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  20. Job satisfaction among psychiatric registered nurses in New England.

    PubMed

    Sharp, T P

    2008-06-01

    This research used Herzberg et al.'s two-factor theory as a framework with which to examine job satisfaction in a sample of 161 registered psychiatric nurses in the states of Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Weiss et al.'s Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short form was used to measure possible relationships between ability utilization, compensation, co-workers, achievement and job satisfaction. Findings support Herzberg et al.'s theory, showing moderate correlations among nurses' ability utilization, achievement and job satisfaction. Mean general satisfaction of respondents was closer to satisfied than neutral; respondents indicated greatest satisfaction with ability utilization (86%) and achievement (83%); 67% were satisfied with co-workers, and 52% with compensation. Respondents were least satisfied with compensation, with 14% indicating that they were very dissatisfied. Although compensation was an issue, it is possible that other factors, such as safety, management conflict, and balancing the needs of job and family, if addressed, may help increase job satisfaction and retention of psychiatric nursing staff.

  1. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  2. Through the Looking Glass: The Labor Market for Registered Nurses in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Carol S.

    1997-01-01

    Demand for registered nurses is changing in a managed care environment and wages are likely to decrease. These trends will affect nursing school enrollments, and schools will need to monitor market conditions and adjust policies accordingly. (SK)

  3. AN ENQUIRY INTO THE NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLAHERTY, M. JOSEPHINE

    A RANDOM SAMPLE OF FEMALE REGISTERED NURSES ON THE ROLL OF THE COLLEGE OF NURSES OF ONTARIO IN APRIL 1965 WERE SURVEYED TO DETERMINE THEIR NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. NURSES PREFERRED TO STUDY NURSING SUBJECTS, ON A CREDIT BASIS, IN A SHORT COURSE. AGE, MARITAL AND EMPLOYMENT STATUS, LEVEL OF EDUCATION, OCCUPATIONAL GOAL, TYPE OF POSITION, AND…

  4. Exploring the experience of Canadian registered psychiatric nurses: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J; Morrissette, P J

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a phenomenological study that was conducted in 2012 and investigated the experiences of registered psychiatric nurses working in the province of Manitoba. Ten registered psychiatric nurses participated in semistructured, audio-recorded interviews, during which they described their experiences, yielding written protocols that were thematically analysed. Results from this study revealed six predominant themes that included (1) perception of psychiatric nursing; (2) patient aggression; (3) patient family involvement; (4) nurse-doctor relationship; (5) responsibility and worry; and (6) shift in practice and educational standards. The results of this study can assist in better understanding registered psychiatric nursing practice, inform educational programmes, and spawn future research.

  5. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  6. Teaching nursing students and newly registered nurses strategies to deal with violent behaviors in the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cynthia M

    2010-07-01

    Direct and indirect violent behaviors toward nursing students and newly registered nurses must be eliminated. Nursing students and newly registered nurses are particularly vulnerable to acts of violence. The article discusses the effect of violence on students and newly registered nurses, the role of the continuing education nurse in eliminating violence, examples of aggressive situations, and strategies to educate and support students and new nurses and empower them to eliminate violence directed toward them. Strategies include confrontation tips, implementation of violence-free contracts, participation in role-play activities, adoption of a professional communication technique, reflection journaling and cognitive recognition, promotion of carefronting, introduction of dialogue through the World Café, and use of nurse preceptors, practice partnerships, residency programs.

  7. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gillian; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behnam; Gohar, Basem; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2015-01-01

    Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs) was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace. PMID:25830063

  8. Characteristics of Registered Nurses in Rural versus Urban Areas: Implications for Strategies to Alleviate Nursing Shortages in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skillman, Susan M.; Palazzo, Lorella; Keepnews, David; Hart, L. Gary

    2006-01-01

    Methods: This study compares characteristics of rural and urban registered nurses (RNs) in the United States using data from the 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. RNs in 3 types of rural areas are examined using the rural-urban commuting area taxonomy. Findings: Rural and urban RNs are similar in age and sex; nonwhites and…

  9. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Perceptions of Factors Impacting Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Susan P; Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Shirey, Maria R

    Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) provide more than 40 million anesthetics each year in the United States. This article describes a study that investigates relationships among CRNA organizational structures (CRNA practice models, work setting, workload, level of education, work experience), CRNA ratings of patient safety culture, and CRNA adverse anesthesia-related event (ARE) reporting. This is a cross-sectional survey study of 336 CRNAs randomly selected from American Association of Nurse Anesthetists database. Workload was measured using NASA Task-Load Index and the Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale and Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Patient Safety Grade Scale were utilized to measure safety culture. Dependent variables (ARE) included difficult intubation/extubation, inadequate ventilation/oxygenation, and pulmonary aspiration. The Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale workload was significantly associated with ARE. Years' experience and Patient Safety Grade Scale were inversely associated with ARE. Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale was significantly and inversely associated with ARE. Practice model, education, and work setting were not associated with ARE. Based on findings, CRNA workload, years' experience, and patient safety culture may be important markers for ARE. Administrative interventions designed to upgrade patient safety culture and ensure manageable CRNA workload may foster quality patient care.

  10. Assisting at-risk students in preparing for NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Siktberg, L L; Dillard, N L

    2001-01-01

    The graduate who fails the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt is psychologically, socially, and financially devastated. It is humiliating for the graduate to inform family, friends, and potential employers of the failure. It is also devastating for the graduate to have to wait until the 91st day following the NCLEX-RN failure to retake the computer adapted test (CAT). This length of time between examinations may increase the graduate's risk for failing the NCLEX-RN a subsequent time, because the graduate is not authorized to function as a graduate nurse in the clinical setting; there is no ongoing reinforcement of nursing knowledge, nursing process, critical thinking, or clinical performance skills. The graduate's NCLEX-RN performance also impacts the school of nursing's annual NCLEX-RN pass rate.

  11. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  12. Recent RN graduate perceptions of educational preparation.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Bowles, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Nursing education programs strive to deliver curricula that prepare and transition graduates not just to survive but to truly thrive in any workplace environment. It is therefore important to reach out to those who have recently entered the nursing workforce to understand their views on educational preparation for practice. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to examine the perceptions of recent nurse graduates with regard to how well their educational programs prepared them for practice in their first jobs as registered nurses. Three hundred fifty-two nurses registered in the state of Nevada who graduated from a basic nursing program within the past five years completed the Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation. Respondents perceived they were inadequately prepared in pharmacology, clinical practice, leadership/management, and the use of patient electronic medical records. In addition, respondents felt their programs prepared them more for success on the NCLEX-RN than for practice. Recommendations for addressing these issues are offered.

  13. Critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students in associate, baccalaureate, and RN-to-BSN programs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungrim; Jung, Duk Yoo; Shin, Sujin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2006-06-01

    This study investigated the critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students. Study participants were students enrolled in associate (n = 137), baccalaureate (n = 102), and RN-to-BSN (n = 66) programs accredited by the Korean Ministry of Education. The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used. A comparison of the CCTDI scores revealed a statistically significant difference between the students enrolled in different programs (F = 4.159, p = 0.017), as did a comparison of the CCTST scores (F = 24.205, p < 0.0001). Within the total sample (n = 305), the relationship between CCTDI and CCTST scores was significant (r = 0.305, p = 0.000). Developments in medical technology, the growing number of older adults and patients with chronic illnesses, and the demand for high-quality nursing care have led to various, increasingly complex, professional, legal, and educational issues within the nursing workplace. Therefore, nurses need creativity and critical thinking skills to make the decisions required of them in their nursing practice. In line with this, when conducting a survey of the effectiveness of nursing education, the necessity of critical thinking skills cannot be overlooked. In fact, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) (1999) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) (1998) require the concept of critical thinking be included as one of the core elements of curricula and that it be measured as an outcome when evaluating nursing education. In 1998, during the evaluation of colleges of nursing conducted by the South Korean Council for University Education, several universities presented the fostering of critical thinking as one of the terminal learning goals of nursing education based on the idea that critical thinking is important not only in the nursing workplace, but also in nursing education. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  14. Educational Experiences and the Professional Reintegration of Registered Nurses Returning for Baccalaureate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einhellig, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to understand the experiences of RN to BSN graduates within their educational experience and their subsequent reintegration into professional practice. The goal of the study was to elucidate the experiences of nurses as they returned for a baccalaureate degree in order to more fully…

  15. Exploring Preferences of Mentoring Activities among Generational Groups of Registered Nurses in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey-Goodwin, Patricia Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore differences in perceptions of mentoring activities from four generations of registered nurses in Florida, using the Alleman Mentoring Activities Questionnaire ® (AMAQ ®). Statistical procedures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to explore differences among 65 registered nurses in Florida from…

  16. Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses, 2000-2020.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Center for Health Workforce Analysis.

    The supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses (RNs) were projected and analyzed for 2000-2020. According to the analysis, the national supply of full-time-equivalent registered nurses in 2000 was estimated at 1.89 million versus an estimated demand of 2 million, leaving a shortage of 110,000 (6%). The shortage is expected to grow…

  17. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  18. Stories of Exemplary Hospital Registered Nurses: A Narrative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Donna Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Today the multidimensional global shortage of nurses is negatively impacting the work environment of hospital nurses and causing, in a cyclical fashion, decreasing work satisfaction, increasing nurse turnover, and decreasing patient outcomes. While strategies aimed at causation of the nursing shortage must be addressed, to support nursing until…

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Demographic and Academic Characteristics and NCLEX-RN Passing among Urban and Rural Campus Students in a Midwest Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacos-Burds, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study was initiated to determine: (1) the predictive relationship between demographic and academic variables and NCLEX-RN success; and (2) if there were significant differences between urban and rural nursing students that could account for an increased percentage of rural NCLEX-RN failures. A convenience sample was comprised of…

  20. Changing Times: A Survey of Registered Nurses in 1998. IES Report 351.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, G.; Seccombe, I.

    A national survey of registered nurses and analysis of official statistics provided an overview of the dimensions and dynamics of the labor market for nurses in the United Kingdom. Findings indicated the following: enrollment in preregistration nurse training courses decreased by 27 percent over the 1990s; initial entries to the UK Central Council…

  1. United States registered nurses' self-report of access to the Web.

    PubMed

    Kleib, Manal; Sales, Anne E; Andrea Baylon, Melba; Beaith, Amy; Lima, Isac

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the proportion and characteristics of Registered Nurses who reported having had an access to the Web in the year 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. We conducted a secondary data analysis using more than 25 000 respondents to the year 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. Using bivariate and logistic regression, we examined the association of reporting access to the Web with demographic, educational, and other characteristics of Registered Nurse respondents to the survey. We found that several factors were associated with the increased likelihood of Registered Nurses' reporting having had an access to the Web in the year 2000. These included race/ethnicity, marital and family status, highest level of nursing education, current enrollment in a nursing education program, annual household income, and continuing education in informatics. The likelihood of reporting having had access decreased with sex, age, experience since first nursing degree, and primary job responsibility. The results of this study indicate that having access to the Web enhances Registered Nurses' participation in professional development and continuing education opportunities.

  2. The effect of work environment on intent to leave the nursing profession: a case study of bedside registered nurses in rural Florida.

    PubMed

    Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall H; Unruh, Lynn; Fottler, Myron D

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the effect work environment has on the intent to leave the profession for rural hospital bedside registered nurses (RNs). Subscales of autonomy, control over the practice setting, nurse-physician relationship and organizational support were incorporated into the analysis to determine which aspects of work environment directly affect the intent to leave the profession. An explanatory cross-sectional survey was distributed to 259 direct care bedside RNs employed at a rural system-affiliated hospital in Central Florida between February 2007 and June 2007. Anonymity was assured. A questionnaire containing demographic questions, the Nursing Work Index-Revised and Blau's intent to leave scale was distributed to all direct care nurses. A 32.8% response rate was achieved for a total of 85 complete and usable surveys. Data analysis shows that the work environment in general is negatively related to intent to leave. In addition, each of the four subscales was also negatively related to the intent to leave the profession. The results of this study support several recommendations for practice and education, including the promotion of professional practice environments, fostering inter-departmental relationships, and increasing the managerial training of RN managers.

  3. Contemplative Practices, Self-efficacy, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Elizabeth

    2016-10-04

    Despite program completion, not all graduates are successful on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Contemplative practices such as meditation and guided imagery were added to an NCLEX-RN preparatory course. The difference between self-efficacy scores at the beginning and end of the course was statistically significant. Students reported that the contemplative activities were beneficial, and they would use these activities again in the future.

  4. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  5. Creating tomorrow's leaders and innovators through an RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing consortium curricular model.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Susan M; Phillips, Janet M; Narwold, Lynda; Laux, Marcia; Rouse, Susan; Dulemba, Ladonna; Makielski, Marta; Halstead, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    The critical need to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared RNs to improve the safety and quality of patient care in today's complex health care system is a pressing issue in health care. One part of the solution lies in the attainment of higher education of RNs prepared at the associate and diploma levels who make up the majority of the nursing workforce in the United States today. The Indiana University Schools of Nursing located throughout the state of Indiana collaborated to create a statewide RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing curriculum that is flexible, innovative, and meaningful. The plan focuses on the strengths and unique learning needs of returning RN students. Specifically, this curriculum offers year-round online courses in 7-week terms, which allows students to enter and exit the program within 1 year, and a curriculum with more choices and fewer constraints than is typical for baccalaureate nursing degrees. This learner-centered plan fully incorporates the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials for Baccalaureate Education (2009) throughout the curriculum. It is conveniently delivered online, takes into account and gives credit for students' previous learning and work experience, and allows the students to pursue nursing specialty knowledge for college credit. Working together as a consortium to achieve these goals across an entire state with 8 regional campuses required focused attention on the concerns and strengths of all the stakeholders and successful implementation of effective communication strategies.

  6. Implementing a collaborative framework for academic support for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Debra; Ugboma, Debra; Knight, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the collaboration between a national health service acute hospital trust and a higher education institution, to implement a framework for academic support for registered nurses undertaking learning beyond registration. A small percentage of the educational budget was utilised to fund two academic staff (0.6 whole time equivalent) to work within the trusts' own learning and development department. The initial aim of the project was to maximise the utilisation of the funding available for learning beyond registration study. The focus of the project was at both a strategic level and with individual staff. Embedding within the culture of the trust was important for the academic staff to understand and gain the service/user perspective to some of the barriers or issues concerning learning beyond registration. Following a scoping exercise, the multiplicity of issues that required action led to the creation of an academic support framework. This framework identified potential for intervention in 4 phases: planning for study, application and access to learning, during study and outcome of study. Interventions were identified that were complimentary and adjuncts to the academic support provided by the higher education institution. New resources and services were also developed such as pathway planning support and study skill workshops. One important resource was a dedicated point of contact for staff. A "live" database also proved useful in tracking and following-up students.

  7. Reclaiming the essence of nursing: the meaning of an immersion experience in Honduras for RN to bachelor of science students.

    PubMed

    Adamshick, Pamela; August-Brady, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Cultural immersion experiences incorporated in baccalaureate nursing programs have yielded positive short- and long-term effects on the personal and professional lives of the participants. Despite this evidence, little is known about how immersion experiences affect the RN student returning to school. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to uncover the meaning of a week-long immersion in Honduras for RN students (N = 8) and its impact on their professional practice upon return from Honduras. Data were analyzed through reflective journals and two focus groups conducted postimmersion experience. Transcripts were analyzed, and four themes emerged: from the outside looking in, struggling with dissonance, searching for meaning, and from the inside looking out. These themes combined to form the essence of the meaning of the experience: reclaiming the essence of nursing. Implications for practice, education, and research are addressed.

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Characteristics Needed for Clinical Success at Military Nurse Anesthesia Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses ( NCLEX -RN). Heupel (1994) cautioned that success in a undergraduate nursing...program did not guarantee passing the NCLEX -RN. This concern carries over to nurse anesthesia where passing a certification exam at the end of training is...again had predictive ability in regard to success in an undergraduate nursing program and on the NCLEX -RN. Once again the goal was to identify those

  9. Learning Style as a Predictor of First-Time NCLEX-RN Success: Implications for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Lown, Susan G; Hawkins, Lee Ann

    2016-11-01

    Improving NCLEX-RN® pass rates remains a priority for nursing programs. Many programs collect learning style inventory data, yet few studies have looked at relationships between these data and NCLEX-RN pass/fail rates. Learning style preferences (visual, auditory, tactile, individual, group) and NCLEX pass/fail results were examined for 532 undergraduates in a Midwestern university. A significant correlation between preference for group learning and failure of the NCLEX was found (χ = 5.99, P = .05).

  10. Registered nurses perception of work satisfaction at a Tertiary Care University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khowaja, Khurshid; Merchant, Rashida J; Hirani, Doulat

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals are facing serious challenges to provide high quality care with current nursing shortages. Nursing shortages are of major concern for Nursing Management, clinicians and administrators as they lead to impact on quality of care. Under-stressed, frustrated and demoralized nurses give rise to concern for hospital Nursing Management in providing quality care according to set standards. A descriptive qualitative research design was used to explore the registered nurses' perceptions regarding the high turnover rates among nurses at a Tertiary Care University Hospital. Data was collected from nurses working at various speciality areas, which were: Critical Care, Medical and Surgical Care, Ambulatory Care, Maternal/Child and Emergency departments. A convenience sample of 45 registered nurses from nine subspecialty groups was selected for a focus group interview and five focus groups were selected for a study population. Findings of exit interviews (from 1 September 2001 to 28 February 2002) were also included in the data analysis. These exit interviews of RNs were conducted by Nurse Recruiter at the time of their resignations. The data analysis showed that the most dissatisfying factors at work and within the work setting were identified as: high workload, stress associated with high workload, biased Nursing Management, lack of appreciation and monetary incentives, finally a rigid attitude of Nursing Management. However, the most satisfying factors were: working with an internationally reputable organization, patients' positive feedback and availability of required material or equipment. The study participants recommended that nursing retention could be improved at the Tertiary Care University Hospital by launching the following strategies by Nursing Management: reducing workload by adequate nurse-patient ratios according to international standards, promoting respect of nurses in front of patients and other staff, rewards and recognition of nurses, simplifying

  11. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of a certified registered nurse... certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic rule and definitions. (a... registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant who is legally authorized to perform...

  12. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of a certified registered nurse... certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic rule and definitions. (a... registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant who is legally authorized to perform...

  13. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of a certified registered nurse... certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic rule and definitions. (a... registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant who is legally authorized to perform...

  14. The characteristics of registered nurses whose licenses expire: why they leave nursing and implications for retention and re-entry.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Susan M; Palazzo, Lorella; Hart, L Gary; Keepnews, David

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about RNs who drop their licenses and their potential re-entry into the nursing workforce. The results of this study provide insight into reasons nurses leave their careers and the barriers to re-entry, all important indicators of the current professional climate for nursing. While representing only one state, these findings suggest that RNs who allow their licenses to expire do so because they have reached retirement age or, among those who do not cite age as a factor, because many are unable or unwilling to work in the field. Inactive nurses who might otherwise appear to be likely candidates for re-entry into the profession may not be easily encouraged to practice nursing again without significant changes in their personal circumstances or the health care work environment. Effective ways to address current and pending RN workforce shortages include expanding RN education capacity to produce more RNs who can contribute to the workforce across the coming decades, and promote work environments in which RNs want to, and are able to, practice across a long nursing career.

  15. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  16. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  17. Thinking beyond "the wheelchair to the car": RN-to-BSN student understanding of community and public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Northrup-Snyder, Kathlynn; Van Son, Catherine R; McDaniel, Cynthia

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the online discussions of postlicensure nursing students taking a community health course in an RN-to-BSN program. Final discussion forums asked students to share their perceptions and understandings of the public and community health nurses' role and practice after participating in a community health clinical course. Inductive content analysis was used to assess the narratives. Analysis of the discussions yielded two categories: (1) awareness by the RNs of their individual community and the context of the public and community health nursing role, and (2) increased understanding of the patients' experience with transitions between health care settings (home-hospital-home). This research suggests a need to assess practicing RNs' professional understanding and teaching of the public and community health nurses' role if they are to facilitate effective patient transitions home and into community-based settings.

  18. Work satisfaction among California registered nurses: a longitudinal comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    California's minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratio law, the nation's first, was implemented in 2004. This study had two aims: (a) to evaluate the effect of the nurse-to-patient ratios law on nurse job satisfaction in order to advance the debate over the merits of nurse staffing law, and (b) to compare California nurses who were satisfied against those who were not, in order to facilitate the development targeted retention interventions based on empirical evidence. The sample's overall job satisfaction increased significantly as the years passed, suggesting the nurse-to-patient ratios law was associated with improvements in nurse satisfaction. Satisfied RNs were more likely to have a balanced and financially secure life that included a partner, children living at home, higher hourly wages, and higher income from sources other than a nursing job. Nurses working in direct patient care positions remained dissatisfied in larger proportions than those working in other types of positions, even after the nurse-to-patient ratios were implemented. More nurses are satisfied today than before the ratios; nevertheless, far too many nurses (18.5%) have job satisfaction scores that are neutral or worse.

  19. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  20. Identifying ethical issues of the Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Constance L; Elliott, Aaron R; Harris, Janet R

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the ethical issues Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) encountered in their anesthesia practice and how disturbed they were by these issues. This descriptive study used a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of the Army civilian registered nurses (N = 5,293). The CRNA subset (n = 97) was obtained from questionnaires that indicated a primary practice setting as anesthesia. The most frequently occurring ethical issue identified was conflict in the nurse-physician relationship, whereas the most disturbing issue was working with incompetent/impaired colleagues. Unresolved ethical conflicts can negatively influence the nurses' morale, leading to avoidance of the issue and contributing to burnout. Identifying the ethical issues and disturbance level experienced by CRNAs should contribute to the development of an ethics education program that addresses issues encountered in CRNA practice.

  1. A clinical advancement program for registered nurses with an outpatient focus.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Bonnie L

    2007-01-01

    Clinical advancement programs have been in use for almost 30 years. Although clinical advancement programs have been designed for many areas, it appears that one has never been developed specific to the outpatient-focused registered nurse. This article describes the development of a clinical advancement program for non-hospital-based registered nurses employed at the Guthrie Clinic in Sayre, Pennsylvania and highlights recommendations for instituting this program in any outpatient setting.

  2. Finding the voice of clinical experience: participatory action research with registered nurses in developing a child critical care nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Minette; Britton, Margretta; Clow, Sheila E

    2005-04-01

    The voice of clinical nurses is important to find and hear in the design of curricula. A participative action research project proposed to add this voice to the design of a new Critical Care Child Nursing programme at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill children and their perceived learning needs in this context, were the central focus of the study. Participants were registered nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit at the Red Cross Children's Hospital (a specialist hospital), which offers secondary and tertiary care in the Cape Town region and beyond. Data were gathered in five focussed group discussions. Findings indicate that the Critical Care Child Nurse needs not only a specialised knowledge base and acutely developed assessment skills, but also astute interpersonal skills. The nurse's professional identity and integration into the multidisciplinary team need exploring. Together with the development of interpersonal skills, the nurse needs to engage the child and family.

  3. The Relationship between Post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) Failure Remediation and NCLEX-RN Success of Graduates of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Patricia Gale

    2009-01-01

    An ex post facto study was conducted to determine whether any relationship exists between remediation post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) failure and NCLEX-RN success of graduates of baccalaureate nursing programs. Data was gathered from responses to the seventh annual validity study (V7S) offered to deans and directors of nursing programs by…

  4. The Challenges of Online Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Passmore, Denise; Faught, Timber

    2009-01-01

    To meet the current critical need for qualified nurses, many colleges have initiated online programs, primarily aimed towards registered nurse (RN) to BS students. Despite the growing number of online nursing programs, there is little research on instructor views of online learning. This study used interviews to investigate nursing instructor…

  5. From their own voices: the lived experience of African American registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah W

    2007-04-01

    This phenomenological study described the lived experience of African American registered nurses providing nursing care to individuals, families, and communities in southeast Louisiana. Data were collected from 13 African American registered nurses using semistructured interviews and a focus group. Analysis of the phenomenological data revealed two essential themes, (a) connecting with the patient and (b) proving yourself; and four incidental themes, (a) a fulfilling dream, (b) being invisible and voiceless, (c) surviving and persevering, and (d) mentoring and role modeling. The findings revealed that the general perception among participants was that they were not fully accepted as equal professionals by their Caucasian nurse colleagues, other health care providers, and sometimes patients. The findings of the study indicate the immediate need to address and resolve the issues of diversity within the nursing profession. Nursing will also have to reform its system and practices to embrace and support diversity.

  6. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  7. E-Learning education program for registered nurses: the experience of a teaching medical center.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Shu-Tai Hsiao; Chang, Wen-Yin; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chao, Hui-Lin; Tseng, Ching Ping

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses' experiences with an e-learning education program (ELEP) conducted at a 776-bed teaching medical center in Taipei. The study was completed in three stages: planning, implementation, and evaluation. Nurses who were registered were randomly assigned either to the ELEP or traditional in-classroom program (TICP). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Forty-two nurses participated (22 in the ELEP and 20 in the TICP). Scores for participants were all > 70 points (out of 100) for both programs. Of the five courses, only teaching and learning and communication showed significant statistical difference between the two groups (p = .001). Nearly all participants (97.6%) felt satisfied with their program (both ELEP and TICP). All nurses passed the nursing care skill tests. Findings should help guide efforts to popularize e-learning education in Taiwan and help create alternative learning methods for future continuing nursing education programs.

  8. Identifying Students at Risk for Failure on the Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Susan J.; Orr, Scott P.

    A method was developed for identifying students who may be at high risk for failing the State Board Licensing Examination (SBE) for registered nurses. The subjects used in developing prediction equations included 50 students who graduated from the nursing program at Saint Joseph's College (SJC) in North Windham (Maine) during the years 1983-84.…

  9. An Analysis of Barriers to Online Learning as Perceived by Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eddie D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States faces a substantial nursing shortage that is expected to increase over the next decade and beyond. Understaffing and erratic work schedules result in minimal opportunities to participate in continuing education courses, which are required for registered nurses (RNs) to maintaining proficiency and licensure. Online learning is…

  10. The Experiences of Registered Nurses Transitioning from Patient Care Settings to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who make the move from a patient-care service setting to an academic teaching environment often go through a transition phase in their first semesters of teaching that is difficult and traumatic. RNs that go on to higher academic degrees often do so in order to teach in schools of nursing. However, graduate work in nursing…

  11. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists: Relationship between Educator Development and Self-Efficacy toward Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Jessica Monique

    2015-01-01

    A high-demand is placed on healthcare providers to be educators during student clinical training evolutions. Certified registered nurse anesthesia clinical educators (CRNACEs) affiliated with nurse anesthesia education programs (NAEPs) in the United States face the complex duality of assuming the combined role of teacher and anesthesia provider.…

  12. Development of the Differentiation of Self and Role Inventory for Nurses (DSRI-RN): a tool to measure internal dimensions of workplace stress.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Ronald; Frisch, Noreen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the use of Bowen's theory of differentiation as a framework for understanding one aspect of vocational burnout. The theory suggests that persons with low levels of differentiation are at higher risk for emotional exhaustion than those at higher levels. The authors describe the development and pilot-testing of a tool, the Differentiation of Self and Role Inventory for Nurses (DSRI-RN) as a means to assess internal aspects of workplace stress by measuring factors suggested by the theory. Initial use of the DSRI-RN indicates that the tool is reliable and valid and that nurses with higher levels of differentiation expressed lower levels of burnout and greater enthusiasm for nursing. These findings suggest that the DSRI-RN may be used in further studies and opens the possibility of using Bowen's framework in developing interventions assisting nurses to understand and cope with the internal aspects of workplace stress.

  13. To both be like a captain and fellow worker of the caring team: the meaning of Nurse Assistants' expectations of Registered Nurses in Swedish residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Inger; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2008-03-01

    Aim.  To describe the expectations of and to illuminate the meaning of the Nurse Assistants' (NA) expectations of Registered Nurses (RN) who are responsible for the care of older people living in residential care homes in Sweden. Background.  Older people in Sweden who are provided with residential care are extremely frail and incapable of independent living. Therefore, when providing care, RN and NA encounter older people who require a great deal of care. An important precondition for the provision of satisfactory care is to have adequate collaboration between NAs and RNs and their expectations of each other. In this paper, the focus is on the NAs expectations of the RNs. Method.  The study is based on a qualitative approach and a phenomenological-hermeneutical method. Ten NAs were interviewed and asked to narrate as freely as possible, about their expectations of RNs. The narratives were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The analytical process includes the following steps; naïve reading, structural analysis, comprehensive understanding and reflection. Results.  The RNs were expected to take responsibility for being fellow human beings and experts in providing care as well as always available to participate in caring. The RNs were expected to make stand-alone decisions and create a sense of safety for both older people and the NAs and have the courage to work alone and create a safe environment for both the older people and the NAs. The meaning of these expectations was that the RNs are like a captain in providing care, but at the same time, fellow workers. Conclusion.  When the RNs do not meet the NAs expectations, there is a risk of conflict and therefore also a risk that an unsafe environment being created when caring for older people.

  14. Reaching for the stars: career advancement and the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kim

    2005-08-01

    Clinical nursing has long struggled to secure the place of primacy it deserves in the profession's hierarchy of importance and worth. It is ironic that, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a clinical nurse is generally not as well-recognized, rewarded or remunerated as a colleague working in nursing management, education or research. Until the profession recognizes and takes serious action to remedy this situation, the crisis of recruitment and retention in nursing currently ravaging the globe is likely to continue. In this paper, I present a discursive account of an exciting initiative by a leading private, acute-care hospital which addresses this very problem. A new ladder for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) introduces a rigorous and systematic approach to the appointment of three classifications of CNS, each requiring evidence of successively higher levels of competency, and which are accompanied by fiscal reward and stronger peer recognition.

  15. Attending registered nurse: an innovative role to manage between spaces.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Ditomassi, Marianne; Adams, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital embarked on the implementation of a new model that redesigned the role of selected staff nurses, advanced standardized processes, improved workflow, and introduced technology to enhance communication. These efforts included selecting 12 inpatient units to function as "Innovation Units". These units were specifically designated to support rapid change and test initiatives that would reduce costs and improve quality. The work of the Innovation Units allows nurse leaders to understand if the goals for improvement could be adopted by all inpatient units and beyond the walls of the hospital. The high-leverage intervention of introducing the role of the "Attending Nurse" in coordinating the work of the interdisciplinary team in addressing overuse, underuse, and misuse of services has been a significant staffing innovation. The Attending Nurse, while just one strategy, has placed the nurse at the center of the care team.

  16. Exploring factors affecting registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Linda; Eley, Robert; Tuckett, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in specialty nursing practice in Australia. Despite the increased requirement for postgraduate education for advanced practice, little has been reported on the contributory factors involved in the decision to undertake further education. The Nurses' Attitudes Towards Postgraduate Education instrument was administered to 1632 registered nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-Cohort Study across Australia, with a response rate of 35.9% (n = 568). Data reduction techniques using principal component analysis with varimax rotation were used. The analysis identified a three-factor solution for 14 items, accounting for 52.5% of the variance of the scale: "facilitators," "professional recognition," and "inhibiting factors." Facilitators of postgraduate education accounted for 28.5% of the variance, including: (i) improves knowledge; (ii) increases nurses' confidence in clinical decision-making; (iii) enhances nurses' careers; (iv) improves critical thinking; (v) improves nurses' clinical skill; and (vi) increased job satisfaction. This new instrument has potential clinical and research applications to support registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education.

  17. Predicting NCLEX-RN success in a diverse student population.

    PubMed

    Alameida, Marshall D; Prive, Alice; Davis, Harvey C; Landry, Lynette; Renwanz-Boyle, Andrea; Dunham, Michelle

    2011-05-01

    Many schools of nursing have implemented standardized testing using platforms such as those developed by Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) to better prepare students for success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses® (NCLEX-RN). This study extends and replicates the research on standardized testing to predict first-time pass success in a diverse student population and across two prelicensure program types. The final sample consisted of 589 students who graduated between 2003 and 2009. Demographic data, as well as academic performance and scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor, were analyzed. The findings in this study indicate that scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor were positively, significantly associated with first-time pass success. Students in jeopardy of failing the NCLEX-RN on their first attempt can be identified prior to graduation and remediation efforts can be strengthened to improve their success.

  18. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E; McKenna, L; D'Amore, A Angelo

    2014-10-27

    Abstract Changes to educational preparation and scope of practice for enrolled nurses in Australia have impacted on role expectations. This paper reports results of a survey of senior nurses in Victoria, Australia, regarding opinions of the differences in role expectation and scope of practice for graduate registered and enrolled nurses. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions was used to identify themes in the written data. Results identified education, skill level and responsibility as differences between the levels of graduate nurses despite many respondents perceiving there to be no or little difference in graduate roles.

  19. Bullying of staff registered nurses in the workplace: a preliminary study for developing personal and organizational strategies for the transformation of hostile to healthy workplace environments.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Judith A; Demarco, Rosanna F; Gaffney, Donna A; Budin, Wendy C

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to validate the perceptions of frequency and patterns of bullying behavior experienced by registered nurses (RNs) across the United States. This study was completed to develop relevant and sensitive tailored interventions for the future. A 30-item anonymous electronic survey was used to identify the frequency, type, perpetrators, and personal and professional consequences of bullying. Findings from the overall population of 303 RN respondents (mean age of 49 years) indicated that 70% of the bullying was reported by a predominant group of staff RNs (n = 212), and it is this group that is the focus of this report. Of this group, bullying occurred (a) most frequently in medical-surgical (23%), critical care (18%), emergency (12%), operating room/Post Anesthesia Care Unit (9%), and obstetrical (7%) areas of care and (b) within the 5 years or less of employment on a unit (57%). Perpetrators included senior nurses (24%), charge nurses (17%), nurse managers (14%), and physicians (8%) who publicly humiliated, isolated, excluded, or excessively criticized the staff nurses. Subsequent stress levels were reported as moderate or severe, with support found primarily with family, colleagues, and friends and not with an available workplace infrastructure of solution. Many left the workplace completely with or without jobs awaiting them. Bullying among U.S. nurses is a hidden problem with significant patient-directed quality performance and workforce implications. It is critical that innovative strategies be developed and implemented to address the root cause of this problem.

  20. Retainment incentives in three rural practice settings: variations in job satisfaction among staff registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Stratton, T D; Dunkin, J W; Juhl, N; Geller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Researchers have demonstrated repeatedly the importance of the relationship linking job satisfaction to employee retention. In rural areas of the country, where a persistent maldistribution of nurses continues to hamper health care delivery, the potential benefits of bolstering retention via enhancements in job satisfaction are of utmost utility to administrators and providers alike. Data were gathered from a multistate survey of registered nurses (RNs) practicing in rural hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and community/public health settings (N = 1,647; response rate = 40.3%). The investigators found that the use of tuition reimbursement corresponded significantly with increased levels of job satisfaction among nurses in all three practice environments, as did day care services for nurses in acute care settings. Also, among hospital-based RNs, level of nursing education was found to be a significant factor in the relationship between tuition reimbursement and job satisfaction, with the highest level occurring among diploma-prepared nurses.

  1. Creating a culture of professional development: a milestone pathway tool for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth

    2009-11-01

    The nursing shortage continues to be a significant threat to health care. Creating a culture of professional development in health care institutions is one way to combat this shortage. Professional development refers to a constant commitment to maintain one's knowledge and skill base. Increasing professional development opportunities in the health care setting has been shown to affect nurse retention and satisfaction. Several approaches have been developed to increase professional development among nurses. However, for the most part, these are "one size fits all" approaches that direct nurses to progress in lock step fashion in skill and knowledge acquisition within a specialty. This article introduces a milestone pathway tool for registered nurses designed to enhance professional development that is unique to the individual nurse and the specific nursing unit. This tool provides a unit-specific concept map, a milestone pathway template, and a personal professional development plan.

  2. Shared governance and empowerment in registered nurses working in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Barden, Agnes M; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-01-01

    Empowerment of registered nurses through professional practice models inclusive of shared governance has been proposed as essential to improve quality patient care, contain costs, and retain nursing staff. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of governance and empowerment among nurses working in acute care hospital units in which a shared governance model had been in place for 6 to 12 months. The 158 nurses who participated perceived themselves to be moderately empowered and in an early implementation stage of shared governance. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between perceptions of shared governance and empowerment. Recommendations for professional practice and future research are included.

  3. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  4. Registered Nurses´ View of Performing Pain Assessment among Persons with Dementia as Consultant Advisors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Christina; Sidenvall, Birgitta; Bergh, Ingrid; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professional caregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care in Sweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursing profession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff. Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view of pain assessment in persons with dementia in relation to their nursing profession as consultant advisers. Methods: Purposive sampling was undertaken with 11 nurses invited to participate. Data were collected by focus groups. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings: Four categories were identified to describe registered nurses´ view of pain assessment: estrangement from practical nursing care, time consuming and unsafe pain documentation, unfulfilled needs of reflection possibilities, and collaboration and coordination. Conclusions: The performance of pain assessment through a consultant advising function is experienced as frustrating and as an uncomfortable nursing situation. The nurses feel resistance to providing nursing in this way. They view nursing as a clinical task demanding daily presence among patients to enable them to make accurate and safe assessments. However, due to the consultative model, setting aside enough time for the presence seems difficult to accomplish. It is necessary to promote the quality of systematic routines in pain assessment and reflection, as well as developing professional knowledge of how pain can be expressed by dementia patients, especially those with communication difficulties. PMID:22655002

  5. Attestations by facilities using nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses--DOL. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1994-01-06

    The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Wage and Hour Division of the Employment Standards Administration (ESA) of the Department of Labor (DOL or Department) are publishing final regulations governing the filing and enforcement of attestations by facilities seeking to use nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses under H-1A visas. The attestations, required under the Immigration and Nationality Act, pertain to substantial disruption in the delivery of health care services, absence of adverse effect on wages and working conditions of similarly employed registered nurses, payment of wages to nonimmigrant alien nurses employed by the facility at wage rates paid to other registered nurses similarly employed by the facility, taking timely and significant steps designed to recruit and retain U.S. nurses in order to reduce dependence on nonimmigrant alien nurses, absence of a strike or lockout, and giving appropriate notice of filing. Facilities are required to submit these attestations to DOL as a condition for being able to petition the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for H-1A nurses. The attestation process is administered by ETA, while complaints and investigations regarding the attestations are handled by ESA.

  6. Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2009-12-01

    To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption.

  7. Social presence, satisfaction, and perceived learning of RN-to-BSN students in Web-based nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess social presence in online nursing courses and its relationship to student satisfaction and perceived learning. The Social Presence scale and the Satisfaction scale were administered via an Internet survey to students (n = 128) in an online RN-BSN program. Results indicated a strong relationship among satisfaction, social presence, and instructor performance. All subdomains of social presence correlated highly with the satisfaction subdomains, except the communication factor. A strong relationship was found between perceived learning and social presence and comfort with the online course. Overall social presence, instructor performance, and the subdomains of social presence predicted a significant amount of total variance in overall satisfaction and perceived learning. No significant relationships were found between the demographic factors and overall social presence or perceived learning. Results of this study can assist nurse educators in providing optimal online educational experiences for students.

  8. Registered nurse peer evaluation in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Melanie B

    2006-09-01

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE evaluations can be difficult to prepare and may rely, in part, on anecdotal information. PERIOPERATIVE RNs at CHRISTUS St Patrick Hospital, Lake Charles, La, developed and implemented a peer evaluation as part of nurses' annual performance evaluations. THE EVALUATION FORMS created were considered to be useful and fair by both staff members and managers.

  9. The effectiveness of teaching strategies for creativity in a nursing concepts teaching protocol on the creative thinking of two-year RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Wang, Jing-Jy; Lee Hsieh, Jane; Chen, Kuei-Min

    2002-06-01

    Because of changes in the medical environment, nurses must maintain the ability of divergent thinking to solve the health problems of patients. However, many nurses whose work in clinical practice has become routine have lost the ability of creativity. To cultivate nurses creativity should be a goal of nursing education. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a nursing concepts teaching protocol by utilizing teaching strategies directed toward creativity to promote creativity in two-year RN-BSN students. This study design is a time series and one group experiment utilizing multiple instances of treatment. Teaching strategies for creativity were applied to a teaching unit and 52 two-year RN-BSN students were tested for creativity before the end of each semester. This study was conducted from March, 1999 to May, 2000, but only 30 students completed all tests and reached a 58% return rate. Torrance s (1974) definitions of creativity includ fluency, flexibility, and uniqueness were followed and the instrument, a questionnaire on Creativity in the application of the Nursing Process Tool (CNPT), was designed based on Emerson (1988). The content validity of Chinese-version CNPT was.79. The inter-coder reliability between two researchers was.84 following a coding guide that ten nursing education experts had established. The results indicated that 30 two-year RN-BSN students had improved fluency and flexibility. The improvements reached a significant level after the third semester. Only uniqueness declined. It is suggested that nursing faculty apply teaching strategies uniqueness more often in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts. By utilizing teaching strategies of creativity in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts, it is expected that two-year RN-BSN students can acquire characteristics of creativity for problem-solving skills in clinical settings.

  10. Development of a postbasic critical care program for registered nurses: a collaborative venture between education and practice.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative venture between nursing education and nursing practice focused on continuing education. A province-wide assessment of the educational needs of registered nurses identified the need to create a critical care education program. A critical care project team was established to develop a Postbasic Critical Care Program for registered nurses. The development of the project team, initiation of the program, and the mutual benefits and challenges posed by this collaborative venture are presented.

  11. Knowledge of palliative and end-of-life care by student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Margaret Faut; Breakwell, Susan; Suhayda, Rosemarie

    2011-08-01

    As part of a 5-year study funded by the National Cancer Institute, all graduate nursing students, including student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) participated in a 2-credit-hour course called Interdisciplinary Palliative Care. Medical and health science students also participated in the course, with more than 800 students completing the course to date. The sample consisted of 62 master's-level students enrolled in either the first or second year of the nurse anesthesia program. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine changes in palliative care knowledge and perceived effectiveness in palliative care skills. There was an overall improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to course content. Students reported that, through the development of new knowledge, they felt better able to care for and advocate for their patients. Further research is needed into the appropriate roles that Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) can play in palliative and end-of-life care.

  12. Comparing NET and ERI standardized exam scores between baccalaureate graduates who pass or fail the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Bondmass, Mary D; Moonie, Sheniz; Kowalski, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, nursing programs are commonly evaluated by their graduates success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The purpose of this paper is to describe a change in NCLEX-RN success rates following the addition of standardized exams throughout our program's curriculum, and to compare these exam scores between graduates who pass NCLEX-RN and those who do not. Our results indicate an 8.5% change (p < 0.000) in the NCLEX-RN pass rate from our previous 5-year mean pass rate, and significant differences in standardized test scores for those who pass the NCLEX-RN compared to those who do not (p < 0.03). We conclude that our selected standardized exam scores are able to significantly identify graduates who are more likely to pass NCLEX-RN than not.

  13. Mock Code: A Code Blue Scenario Requested by and Developed for Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Janice; Pritchett-Kelly, Sherry; McDonald, Melissa; Mullins-Richards, Paula; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The use of simulation in medical training is quickly becoming more common, with applications in emergency, surgical, and nursing education. Recently, registered nurses working in surgical inpatient units requested a mock code simulation to practice skills, improve knowledge, and build self-confidence in a safe and controlled environment. A simulation scenario using a high-fidelity mannequin was developed and will be discussed herein. PMID:28123919

  14. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    assessed by CRNAs have medical diagnoses, and diabetes mellitus is one of the more common endocrine disorders encountered. Often patients with diabetes do...not understand how their diabetes relates to their surgery (Ouellette, 1998). When interviewing patients with diabetes mellitus CRNAs should assess...AANA journal course: Updates for nurse anesthetists- diabetes mellitus : Overview and current concepts in anesthetic management. Journal of the American

  15. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  16. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Changes to educational preparation and scope of practice for enrolled nurses (ENs) in Australia have impacted on role expectations. This paper reports results of a survey of senior nurses in Victoria, Australia, regarding opinions of the differences in role expectation and scope of practice for graduate registered and ENs. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions was used to identify themes in the written data. Results identified education, skill level and responsibility as differences between the levels of graduate nurses despite many respondents perceiving there to be no or little difference in graduate roles.

  17. Program Exit Examinations in Nursing Education: Using a Value Added Assessment as a Measure of the Impact of a New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Tama; Hancock, Dawson

    2008-01-01

    To become a registered nurse in the United States, one must pass the National Council License Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). To address the growing national nursing shortage, nurse preparation programs must better prepare students to pass this national licensure examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new…

  18. College of the Canyons Nursing Alumni Surveys, Spring 2001. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    In the summer of 2001, College of the Canyons (California) conducted of study of registered nursing (RN) and licensed vocational nursing (LVN) alumni, as well as their employers, to assess satisfaction with the preparation and training they received through the College's nursing programs. Out of the 89 invited nursing alumni, 33 surveys were…

  19. [The registered nurse and the battle against tuberculosis in Brazil: 1961-1966].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Hercília Regina do Amaral; de Almeida Filho, Antonio José; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Lourenço, Lucia Helena Silva Corrêa

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the circumstances that promoted the implementation of the new Program for Action Against Tuberculosis in Brazil (Programa de Ação na Luta contra a Tuberculose no Brasil) and discuss the strategies used by registered nurses from the Santa Maria State Hospital, Guanabara State, to adjust nursing care to the new program against tuberculosis. This was performed through document research, interviews, and statements from nurses working at the time of the reorganization. Documents were analyzed based on the concepts of habitus, field, and symbolic power by Pierre Bourdieu, and included written and oral documents as well as secondary sources. The reorganization of the nursing service was performed under the leadership of a nurse whose symbolic capital assigned power and prestige to implement the necessary changes. It is concluded that the work of that nurse made it possible to implement the new program and contributed to establishing the position and importance of the registered nurse in providing care to individuals with tuberculosis, for prevention and cure.

  20. [Management competency of persons registered as disaster nurses in the Pretorian Civil Defense].

    PubMed

    Booyens, S W; Perold, A

    1997-07-01

    The essential management role of the disaster nurse during disaster action was outlined, researched and described. Her competency to execute effectively disaster relief tasks before, during and after a disaster occurring outside a hospital, was studied. Management tasks were identified which nurses should have mastered regarding disaster situations occurring outside hospital boundaries. Research data were gathered by means of a questionnaire on the biographic detail of disaster nurses registered with Civil Defence in Pretoria, in order to recommend a course specifically aimed at fulfilling their requirements. The research project identified requirements of the disaster nurse for appropriate further training, practise and guidance regarding the identified management tasks. It became evident that training is required in most of the tasks, and a training course for nurses in disaster management was designed.

  1. An exploratory study of selected female registered nurses: meaning and expression of nurturance.

    PubMed

    Geissler, E M

    1990-05-01

    The words 'nurse' and 'nursing' originate in the word 'nurture' which dates back to the 14th century. 'Nurturance' appeared for the first time in the 1976 Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary and in a United States dictionary in 1983. Etymologically and semantically bound to nursing, little is known about the term nurturance. An exploratory design using phenomenological analysis was applied to understand the female registered nurses' experience of nurturing patients throughout the life-span and to uncover behaviours commonly believed nurturant. Interviews with 14 RNs practising in diverse settings revealed 39 nurturant behaviours that were intuited into four themes describing the subjects' perceived structure of nurturance as: (1) enabling maximum potential; (2) providing physical and emotional protection; (3) engaging in a supportive interaction; and (4) conveying shared humanity. Data were formulated into an exhaustive description of the phenomenon nurturance. Additionally, the results support Greenberg-Edelstein's theoretical model of the positive reciprocity of nurturance between nurse and patient.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, and predictors of advance directive discussions of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Amy R; Hausman, Alice J; Higgins, Patricia A; Burant, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding advance directives. A secondary purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven-hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of registered nurses in the state of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires. Descriptive t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. The respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. These findings suggest that experience with advance directives documents is critical for nurses' comfort and that developing interventions to further nurses' confidence in their discussion skills may increase advance directive discussions.

  3. Evolution of the chronic care role of the registered nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Candia Baker; Beisel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    High-quality, accessible, and efficient primary care is needed as the U.S. health care system undergoes significant change. Advancing the role of registered nurses in the primary care setting is important to the solution. A large academic health center implemented five initiatives to improve the care of chronically ill patients through the expanded role of RNs in the context of the health care team. Role evolution of nurses in the pilots required some continuing education and some additional nursing support to release the pilot nurses from their usual duties. These strategies allowed the nurses to apply interventions that enhanced the coordination of care and promoted patient self-management skills. Some short-term improvements in health status were realized and barriers to self-care were identified and resolved.

  4. Professional portfolios and Australian registered nurses' requirements for licensure: developing an essential tool.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane

    2009-06-01

    A requirement of many nurses in the process of licensing for practice each year is a declaration of continuing competence to practice. In Australia, each state and territory currently has its own regulatory authority for nurses and midwives, whose main role is to protect public safety. Like many other registering authorities in the Asia-Pacific region, Australian regulatory authorities undertake the random auditing of nurses and midwives in order to assess their competence to practice. Professional portfolios commonly are considered to be a tool that nurses can use to demonstrate to regulatory authorities, employers, and others how they meet the required competencies. This article examines the different types of portfolios that fall under the umbrella term, professional portfolio, and recommends that nurses explore the strategies that identify evidence of their continuing competence to practice for inclusion in such a document.

  5. The relationship between supervisor support and registered nurse outcomes in nursing care units.

    PubMed

    Hall, Debra S

    2007-01-01

    Workplace social support is a major characteristic related to the Job Demand-Control model of job stress. Organizational and managerial support have an effect on nurse satisfaction and burnout. The relationships between perceived supervisor support and measures of nurse occupation-related outcomes were investigated in 3 nursing units within an academic medical center. Nurses with greater levels of perceived supervisor support experienced more positive job outcomes and less negative outcomes, including less occupational stress, than nurses with less perceived supervisor support. Implications for refocusing the role of the nurse supervisor and its effect on multiple nursing occupation-related outcomes are discussed.

  6. Develop a Framework of Creative Thinking Teaching Mode for RN-BSN Students on the Basis of the Creative Process of Clinical Nurses in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kuo, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework of creative thinking teaching mode for RN-BSN students on the basis of the creative process of clinical nurses in Taiwan. Purposive samples have earned creativity awards recruited from the medical, surgical, maternity, paediatric, community and psychiatric departments in Taiwan. Semi-structured…

  7. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  8. An Exploration of Registered Nurses' Intentions to Leave the Profession: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutter, Stacy Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of female registered nurses who have intentions to leave the profession with particular attention to the influence of gender. The theoretical framework of feminist poststructuralism informed this study, which emphasizes the role of discourse and power relations in the…

  9. The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice--the view of newly registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses' perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital. Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was "Pedagogical methods in theory" with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was "Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice" with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  10. Similarities and differences in educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: An examination of curricula content.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Background: Variations exist internationally in the types and numbers of nurses registered to practice. Whilst the United Kingdom has phased out second level nurses, countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and the United States have maintained a two level system. In Australia, the two levels of nurse authorised to practice are the registered nurse whom complete an undergraduate nursing degree, and enrolled nurse whom complete either a certificate or diploma program. Recent changes to educational preparation and resulting scope of practice for enrolled nurses have resulted in increased confusion between roles and expectations of the different levels. Aim: This paper reports on findings of a study aimed at identifying differences in educational preparation of the different levels of nurse in Australia. Method: Course coordinators from nine organisations offering pre-registration nursing programs completed self-reporting questionnaires designed to obtain information on types and lengths of courses, and details of curricula including course objectives, teaching and assessment methods and content areas. Results: Comparative analysis of survey responses identified similarities and differences between registered and enrolled nurse programs. Common areas included teaching and assessment methods, core theoretical units and general nursing skills. The diploma and degree programs appear aligned in most theory and clinical skills. The main difference identified existed between skills taught in the two enrolled nurse programs. Conclusions: Findings further add to confusion regarding registered and enrolled nurses in Australia. Further research is required to determine expectations of employers and other major stakeholders with regard to the differences.

  11. NURSING 911: an orientation program to improve retention of online RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Melanie; Lyons, Evadna M

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of an eight-hour, comprehensive, face-to-face orientation program designed to improve student retention in a newly developed online RN to BSN program. A total of 179 newly enrolled RN to BSN students participated in the orientation program and evaluated the process. Student attrition decreased from 20 percent to less than 1 percent after the orientation program was extended and improved to include a technology assessment and an online practice course. A quality online program requires a well-designed orientation that includes technological assessments and hands-on, active participation by the learner. The newly improved and designed course has become effective in student retention and transition into the online learning environment.

  12. Relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient dialysis centers.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Janice L

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient hemodialysis settings. The sample consisted of 233 registered staff nurses. The Emotional Exhaustion Subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Conditions for Work Effectiveness II Questionnaire, and Psychological Empowerment Instrument were used to measure variables. Findings indicate that in this population of nurses, there is a significant inverse relationship between structured empowerment and burnout.

  13. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  14. A closer look at the "supervision" and "direction" of certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rita; MacDonald, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    A growing shortage of anesthesiologists in Canada has prompted discussion of how anesthesia provision can be expanded. Canadian anesthesiologists generally support a team approach in which physicians supervise alternative providers. In the U.S., nurses have worked as anesthetists for over 150 years, and their experiences of different models of anesthesia provision provide valuable insights into the potential pitfalls of the team approach as well as the benefits of autonomous nurse anesthetist roles. The authors conducted a qualitative study of the anesthesia team and the role of nurse anesthesia practice in the U.S., and here they present a summary of some of their preliminary findings and the implications for evolving models of care in Canada. Inefficiencies associated with the medical supervision and direction of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are discussed.

  15. Predictors for Associate Degree Nursing Students' First Attempt on NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing program administrators need to identify significant predictors for associate degree nursing (ADN) students to determine characteristics of those who will most likely pass the NCLEX-RN® on the first attempt. The purpose of the quantitative study with a correlation prediction design was to determine if a relationship existed between the…

  16. 24/7 Registered Nurse Staffing Coverage in Saskatchewan Nursing Homes and Acute Hospital Use.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Margaret J; Murphy, Janice M; Poss, Jeffrey W; McGrail, Kimberlyn M; Kuramoto, Lisa; Huang, Huei-Chung; Bryan, Stirling

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ La législation, dans de nombreuses juridictions, nécessite les établissements des soins de longue durée (SLD) d'avoir une infirmière en service 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine. Bien que la recherche considérable existe sur l'intensité SLD de la dotation en personnel infirmier, il n'existe pas de la recherche empirique relative à cette exigence. Notre étude rétrospectif d'observation a comparé des installations en Saskatchewan avec 24/7 RN couverture aux établissements offrant moins de couverture, complétées par divers modèles de dotation des postes de nuit. Les ratios de risque associés à moins de 24/7 couverture RN complété de la dotation infirmière autorisé de nuit, ajusté pour l'intensité de dotation en personnel infirmier et d'autres facteurs de confusion potentiels, étaient de 1,17, IC 95% [0,91, 1,50] et 1.00, IC à 95% [0,72, 1,39], et avec moins de couverture 24/7 RN complété avec soin par aides personnels de nuit, les ratios de risque étaient de 1,46, IC 95% [1,11, 1,91] et 1,11, IC 95% [0,78, 1,58], pour les patients hospitalisés et de visites aux services d'urgence, respectivement. Ces résultats suggèrent que l'utilisation des soins de courte durée peut être influencée négativement par l'absence de la couverture 24/7 RN.

  17. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  18. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  19. A Study on the Effects of Collaborative Teaching as Measured by the Student Nurse's HESI-RN Exam Scores in an AD/RN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Irene O.

    2014-01-01

    The inquiry to be addressed in this Action Research Study (ARS) is the effective teaching modality that will increase the class average pass rate and reduce the percent of students who do not score 850 or above on the HESI-RN exams. The researcher's intent was to provide data in support of a collaborative teaching environment in which to…

  20. What is provided and what the registered nurse needs--bioscience learning through the pre-registration curriculum.

    PubMed

    Davis, Geraldine M

    2010-11-01

    Registered nurses undertaking programmes of study to become non-medical prescribers appear to have limited biological science knowledge. A case study was undertaken to determine whether the nurses entering Prescriber programmes considered studies in bioscience in their pre-registration nursing courses had been sufficient, linked to practice, and had prepared them for their roles as registered nurses. The literature identifies a continuing trend amongst nursing students describing a lack of sufficient bioscience in initial nurse education; there is limited literature on the views of experienced registered nurses. The participants in this study were 42 registered nurses from adult and mental health nursing, community and inpatient services. The results obtained from questionnaires and interviews are described. Questionnaire analysis identified that 57.1% of participants indicated bioscience in their pre-registration nursing programme had been limited and 40.5% stated the bioscience content had not prepared them for their roles on registration. Those reporting extensive coverage of bioscience were all aged over 41 years and had qualified before 1995. Greatest coverage of bioscience in pre-registration programmes was reported in relation to anatomy and physiology, with relatively limited coverage of microbiology, pharmacology or biochemistry. Respondents considered all five topics to be important. Interviews supported the questionnaire findings.

  1. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  2. Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1996-09-01

    Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

  3. Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Gardulf, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

  4. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    PubMed

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  5. Registered Nurse Care Coordination: Creating a Preferred Future for Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jean; Minaudo, Judith

    2015-09-30

    The concept of care coordination is often touted as the preferred way to streamline care for complex patients. Care coordination is even more popular with the mention of it in the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and with new Medicare payment models. The purpose of this article is to define care coordination, briefly describe trends for older adults and care coordination, and explore roles for registered nurses. We describe elder-appropriate models of care coordination useful for older adults with multimorbidity. A brief exemplar provides an example of evidence-based care coordination services provided by a nursing and social work team, a model supported by recent literature. As a result of this discussion, readers will become informed about possibilities for the future of care delivery and the future of professional nursing practice.

  6. Barriers to advanced practice registered nurse scope of practice: issue analysis.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Whitney J; Allen, Patricia E

    2012-09-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have the unique potential to affect the changing needs of health care in the United States, but are restricted in care provision by varying state regulations and reimbursement policies. Although research shows APRN care to be safe, cost-effective, and of high quality, most medical professional organizations continue to oppose the removal of scope-of-practice barriers, citing patient safety concerns. Nursing organizations at the state and national levels have already begun to invest the time and resources needed for policy change. However, empirical evidence of APRN quality of care must be shared with policymakers, funding entities, and the public. Additionally, support must be garnered from the public and other health care disciplines. Scope-of-practice policy change will occur through the emergence of strong individuals within nursing professional organizations and the joining together of organizations to form one voice.

  7. The use of discriminant function analysis to predict student success on the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Haas, Richard E; Nugent, Katherine E; Rule, Rebecca A

    2004-10-01

    Predicting whether a student will be successful on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) has been an important endeavor for faculty in schools of nursing for the past 2 decades. Extensive documentation exists in the literature concerning research aimed at exploring the academic and nonacademic predictors of success on the NCLEX-RN. Reviews of the findings of these studies indicate that various factors emerge as academic predictors of success. The results of this study suggest that first-time success on the NCLEX-RN can be predicted with a high level of accuracy using existing student data. The findings also support the belief that it is possible to identify students who may be at risk for unsuccessful first time performance on the NCLEX-RN. Early identification of at-risk students will promote timely intervention strategies to optimize the students' potential for success.

  8. Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing.

  9. Factors related to progression and graduation rates for RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing programs: searching for realistic benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sue; Canary, Cheryl Westlake; Orr, Marsha; Herberg, Paula; Rutledge, Dana N

    2010-03-01

    Measurement and analysis of progression and graduation rates is a well-established activity in schools of nursing. Such rates are indices of program effectiveness and student success. The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (2008), in its recently revised Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Degree Nursing Programs, specifically dictated that graduation rates (including discussion of entry points, timeframes) be calculated for each degree program. This context affects what is considered timely progression to graduation. If progression and graduation rates are critical outcomes, then schools must fully understand their measurement as well as interpretation of results. Because no national benchmarks for nursing student progression/graduation rates exist, schools try to set expectations that are realistic yet academically sound. RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students are a unique cohort of baccalaureate learners who need to be understood within their own learning context. The purposes of this study were to explore issues and processes of measuring progression and graduation rates in an RN-to-BSN population and to identify factors that facilitate/hinder their successful progression to work toward establishing benchmarks for success. Using data collected from 14 California schools of nursing with RN-to-BSN programs, RN-to-BSN students were identified as generally older, married, and going to school part-time while working and juggling family responsibilities. The study found much program variation in definition of terms and measures used to report progression and graduation rates. A literature review supported the use of terms such as attrition, retention, persistence, graduation, completion, and success rates, in an overlapping and sometimes synonymous fashion. Conceptual clarity and standardization of measurements are needed to allow comparisons and setting of realistic benchmarks. One of the most important factors identified

  10. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  11. Belief in the "free choice" model of homosexuality: a correlate of homophobia in registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Christopher W

    2007-01-01

    A great amount of social science research has supported the positive correlation between heterosexuals' belief in the free choice model of homosexuality and homophobia. Heterosexuals who believe gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) persons consciously choose their sexual orientation and practice a lifestyle conducive to that choice are much more likely to possess discriminatory, homophobic, homonegative, and heterosexist beliefs. In addition, these individuals are less likely to support gay rights initiatives such as nondiscrimination policies or same-sex partner benefits in the workplace or hate crime enhancement legislation inclusive of GLBT persons. Although researchers have demonstrated this phenomenon in the general population, none have specifically assessed it in the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine registered nurses' overall levels of homophobia and attitudes toward a workplace policy protective of gays and lesbians. These variables were then correlated with belief in the free choice model of homosexuality. Results indicated that belief in the free choice model of homosexuality was the strongest predictor of homophobia in nurses. Implications for nursing leadership and management, nursing education, and future research are discussed.

  12. Can success and failure be predicted for baccalaureate graduates on the computerized NCLEX-RN?

    PubMed

    Seldomridge, Lisa A; Dibartolo, Mary C

    2004-01-01

    The current shortage of nurses and declining national pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) has heightened educators' interest in identifying students at risk for failure. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted at a rural, public baccalaureate nursing program to determine variables that best predict NCLEX-RN success and failure. Data collected from 1998 through 2002 (N = 186) included entry as native or transfer student, preadmission grade point average (GPA), GPA after completing one semester of nursing courses, cumulative GPA at graduation, grades earned in prerequisite and core nursing courses, test averages in beginning and advanced medical/surgical nursing courses, and performance on the National League for Nursing Comprehensive Achievement Test for Baccalaureate Students (NLNCATBS). Logistic regression analysis revealed that a combination of test average in advanced medical/surgical nursing and percentile score on the NLNCATBS predicted 94.7 percent of NCLEX-RN passes and 33.3 percent of failures. The combination of NLNCATBS score and pathophysiology grade predicted 93.3 percent of NCLEX-RN passes and 50 percent of failures. Although success could be accurately predicted across all models, predicting failure was far more difficult.

  13. The Impact of Health System Changes on the Nation's Requirements for Registered Nurses in 1985. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Timothy C.; And Others

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of three anticipated changes in the health care system on the future requirements for registered nurses. The changes investigated were the introduction of national health insurance (NHI), the increased enrollment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), and the reformulation of nursing roles. Following…

  14. Using problem-based learning in staff development: strategies for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Chunta, Kristy S; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2010-12-01

    Problem-based learning, described as an active teaching strategy, provides a framework for the development of self-directed learning, self-evaluation, interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and access and retrieval of information. This teaching method can be modified to fit almost any situation. Problem-based learning provides an opportunity to actively engage staff members in learning situations, making it a great asset for teaching in staff development. This article describes the use of problem-based learning for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses. It provides a scenario and facilitator guide pertaining to a real patient situation on an inpatient telemetry unit and offers general tips for implementing problem-based learning in staff education.

  15. Interview with Julie Viveros, RN, Director of Nursing, Charlotte Rescue Mission, Rebound men's program. Interview by Joan Kub.

    PubMed

    Viveros, Julie; Kub, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The Charlotte Rescue Mission is a 90-day residential program that serves approximately 530 men and 365 women experiencing the disease of addiction annually. It has a long rich history and has been serving the Charlotte community for over 75 years for men and almost 25 years for women. "The men's program provides a five-fold, client-centered treatment approach addressing spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational needs to battle addiction. The objective is to help individuals fighting addiction and homelessness to accomplish spiritual, mental, physical, social, and vocational goals and be free of addiction." "Dove's Nest, Charlotte Rescue Mission's women's recovery program, opened its doors in 1992. The program provides a structured, yet loving and stable living environment, with a dedicated staff aimed at helping women understand and deal with the core issues of addiction as a disease". (Web site: http:// charlotterescuemission.org/). I had the privilege of interviewing Julie Viveros, RN, the Director of Nursing for the Rebound men's program, about her unique role at the Rescue Mission.

  16. Writing for publication in an RN to Baccalaureate program: an exercise in critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Bechtel, G A; Tiller, C M

    1999-01-01

    More than 35,700 registered nurses are currently enrolled in an RN to Baccalaureate completion program (I). The demand for these graduates is expected to continue, along with an increased demand for community-based educational programs. Many of these students have significant clinical experience and expertise. Nursing faculty are challenged to develop learning experiences and program outcomes that enhance their professional skills and add to their expertise.

  17. Comparative Cost Analysis of Increasing Registered Nursing Staff on the Labor and Delivery Unit at the National Naval Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    recognized L&D Nurses 9 the central role of the registered nurse. In its most recent Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, JCAHO requires that "a...far beyond that of a L&D Nurses 60 comparably-sized civilian instituCion . Above all else NNMC is a Navy hospital, with responsibilities far beyond...1990). Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, 1990. Chicago: Author. Klarman, H. E. (1974). Application of cost-benefit analysis to the health services and

  18. Full Practice Authority for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses is a Gender Issue

    PubMed

    Rudner Lugo, Nancy

    2016-05-04

    In the United States, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) regulations are determined at the state level, through legislation and rule making. The lack of an evidence base to APRN regulation has resulted in a patchwork of varied regulations and requirements for nurse practitioners. The author begins this article by reviewing the history of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the United States and describing her study that assessed APRN fullpractice authority in states that ratified the ERA versus states that opposed it. She presents the study findings, limitations of the comparison, and discussion of the findings and implications. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that progress toward full APRN practice will require building strategies for political support and framing the need to update APRN regulations in a manner that aligns with each state’s social and political values.

  19. Stress: perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Chipas, Anthony; Cordrey, Dan; Floyd, David; Grubbs, Lindsey; Miller, Sarah; Tyre, Brooks

    2012-08-01

    Stress is a response to change from the norm. Stress affects all individuals to varying degrees and can be positive, such as eustress, or negative, such as distress. The purpose of this qualitative, cross-sectional study was to investigate the stressors of the typical student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA), with the objective of identifying trends in the perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of stress. An online (SurveyMonkey) questionnaire composed of 54 study-specific questions was developed to assess stress in the SRNA population. The questionnaire was sent to members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists via email invitation. The study yielded a sample of 1,282 SRNA participants. Analysis revealed statistically significant relationships between self-reported stress and negative outcomes, such as increased sick days, decreased health and wellness, and depression. The study demonstrated that SRNAs perceive their stress as above average, and it remains a central concern for them.

  20. Making the Grade through the Front Door: Evaluation and Innovation in a Registered Practical Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Sue; Lindsay, Gail M.; Cochrane, Marianne; Cummings, Katherine; Macdonald, Karen; Mairs, Sandra; Sproul, Susan; Bouchard, Shelley; Lulat, Zainab; Salamat, Nadia; Bell, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Education of nurses from a diploma to a degree is a global phenomenon. However, bridging is often seen as a "backdoor" route to becoming a Registered Nurse and very little evaluation data exists to challenge this notion. Objectives: This research project was undertaken to explore student characteristics, academic performance,…

  1. Actions and beliefs related to hepatitis B and influenza immunization among registered nurses in Texas.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Melanie; Farren, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Studies indicate that roughly half of health care workers are not immunized against hepatitis B and influenza. Findings from a survey of 1,000 registered nurses (RNs) conducted to analyze their beliefs and actions related to immunization recommendations are reported. Only 8% of the responding RNs chose not to receive vaccination against hepatitis B. The primary reasons that nurses declined hepatitis B vaccination were because they were not working in nursing or did not believe they were at risk of exposure. Similarly, 86% of the RNs reported they had ever received a flu shot, and 69% reported of being immunized during 2 of the previous 4 years. Rationale for receiving immunization included belief in its effectiveness, belief that they were at risk of exposure, and that it was provided free of charge. Reasons for declining included concerns about side effects, lack of concern about getting the illness, and doubts about effectiveness. The nurses who responded to the survey appear to value immunizations and generally adhere to immunization recommendations. Further study needs to be conducted on related issues, including follow-up for assessment of long-term protection of hepatitis B immunization and adherence to guidelines for postexposure prophylaxis. Ongoing monitoring and further study of serious complications of hepatitis B immunizations are also needed.

  2. Employer-based support for registered nurses undertaking postgraduate study via distance education.

    PubMed

    Black, Kirsten E; Bonner, Ann

    2011-02-01

    Previous literature has focused on the need for support of undergraduate nursing students during clinical placements. Little is known about the support provided by employers for registered nurses (RNs) who pursue further education. This study sought to identify and describe the types, levels and perceived need for support in the workplace for RNs as they undertake further postgraduate nursing study by distance education (DE). Using an exploratory descriptive design a self-report questionnaire was distributed to a convenient sample of 270 RNs working in one acute care public hospital in Tasmania, Australia. 92 questionnaires (response rate 34%) were returned with 26 (28%) reporting being currently enrolled in further study by DE and a further 50 (54)% of RNs planning future study. Results revealed that 100% of participants with a Masters degree completed this by DE. There were differences between the support sought by RNs to that offered by employers, and 16 (34%) who had done or were currently doing DE study, received no support to undertake DE. There was an overwhelming desire by RNs for support; 87 (94%), with a majority believing some support should be mandatory 76 (83%). This study may encourage employers to introduce structured support systems that will actively assist nurses to pursue further study.

  3. The registered nurse first assistant classroom that isn't really a classroom.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A

    2001-04-01

    Faculty and students in the 21st century need to be skilled in the use of computer technology. In this registered nurse first assistant (RNFA) program, distance learning modalities are used to link students and faculty from different locales, expanding the accessibility of RNFA education. Independent study is used to stimulate critical thinking and skill acquisition in a safe, user friendly environment. The strategies described are simple yet powerful and can be similarly developed by faculty in other RNFA programs without the need for large budgetary expenditures or sophisticated technology.

  4. Surgical site infection and prevention guidelines: a primer for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Valerie; Newman, Johanna

    2015-02-01

    Each year 500,000 surgical site infections occur in the US. Surgical site infections are the second most common healthcare-associated infections resulting in readmissions, prolonged hospital stays, higher medical costs, and increased morbidity and mortality. Surgical site infections are preventable in most cases by following evidence-based guidelines for hand hygiene, administration of prophylactic antibiotics, and perioperative patient temperature management. As attention to issues of healthcare quality heightens, the demands for positive surgical patient outcomes are intensifying. The Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist can provide transparent high-quality care by implementing evidence-based guidelines for timely and appropriate antibiotic use, maintenance of normothermia, and hand washing.

  5. Immersion scenarios bridge the education-practice gap for new graduate registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Marianne J; Crump, Mark D

    2013-07-01

    An education gap exists for new graduate registered nurses in mental health because of insufficient clinical experience. In an effort to bridge this gap, defined competencies and assessments provided the framework and direction for educational immersion scenarios with standardized patients. Kirkpatrick's (1995) model directed the evaluation of the learning achieved through the immersion scenarios. A qualitative evaluation provided themes of realism, safety, and opportunity. Formative and summative competencies were met effectively and efficiently. This educational method can be used to actively achieve competency and enhance the transition to clinical practice.

  6. Nursing support of laboring women. An official position statement of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nursing.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) asserts that continuously available labor support from a registered nurse (RN) is a critical component to achieve improved birth outcomes. The RN assesses, develops,implements and evaluates an individualized plan of care based on each woman's physical,psychological and socio-cultural needs, including the woman's desires for and expectations of the laboring process. Labor care and labor support are powerful nursing functions, and it is incumbent on health care facilities to provide an environment that encourages the unique patient-RN relationship during childbirth.

  7. Barriers to Research Utilization among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fen; Maier, Manfred; Hao, Yufang; Tang, Ling; Guo, Hong; Liu, Hongxia; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background. As there might be relevant differences with regard to research utilization in the general hospitals, we aimed to study research utilization among registered nurses working in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals. Methods. A total of 648 registered nurses from 4 tertiary-level hospitals in China were recruited for participation. A modified BARRIERS Scale and self-designed questionnaires were used for data collection. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and one-way ANOVAs and Spearman correlation analysis. Results. Overall, items which belong to the subscale “Research” were identified as the most important barriers. Among the individual items, the lack of time on the job was ranked as the top barrier, followed by the lack of knowledgeable colleagues and by overwhelming research publications. Clinical experience, working pressure, job satisfaction, and research experience could be identified as associated factors for barriers to research utilization. Conclusions. Registered nurses in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals felt high barriers to research utilization. Reducing registered nurses' working pressure, promoting their positive attitude to nursing, and improving research training might be helpful for increasing research utilization. Close cooperation between clinical and nursing schools or academic research centres might facilitate the necessary change in nursing education and routine. PMID:26649060

  8. NCLEX-RN performance: predicting success on the computerized examination.

    PubMed

    Beeman, P B; Waterhouse, J K

    2001-01-01

    Since the adoption of the Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) format of the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN), no studies have been reported in the literature on predictors of successful performance by baccalaureate nursing graduates on the licensure examination. In this study, a discriminant analysis was used to identify which of 21 variables can be significant predictors of success on the CAT NCLEX-RN. The convenience sample consisted of 289 individuals who graduated from a baccalaureate nursing program between 1995 and 1998. Seven significant predictor variables were identified. The total number of C+ or lower grades earned in nursing theory courses was the best predictor, followed by grades in several individual nursing courses. More than 93 per cent of graduates were correctly classified. Ninety-four per cent of NCLEX "passes" were correctly classified, as were 92 per cent of NCLEX failures. This degree of accuracy in classifying CAT NCLEX-RN failures represents a marked improvement over results reported in previous studies of licensure examinations, and suggests the discriminant function will be helpful in identifying future students in danger of failure. J Prof Nurs 17:158-165, 2001.

  9. Predictors of Successful Nursing Education Outcomes: A Study of the North Carolina Central University's Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ukpabi, Chinasa Victor

    2008-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to specify the variables that would play the greatest role in predicting success of North Carolina Central University (NCCU) nursing graduates in the National Certification Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Participants for this study include a convenience sample of 39 students who…

  10. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  11. The effect of preceptor role effectiveness on newly licensed registered nurses' perceived psychological empowerment and professional autonomy.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Chanell; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    The first year turnover rate for newly licensed registered nurses is roughly 30% and increases to about 57% in the second year (Twibell et al., 2012). An effective preceptorship has been shown to better facilitate the first year transition (Hodges et al., 2008) and increase retention rates (Pine and Tart, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between newly licensed registered nurses' perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment and professional autonomy. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Sixty-nine newly licensed registered nurses were recruited and surveyed. Newly licensed registered nurses were found to have moderately high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment, and professional autonomy. Preceptor role effectiveness had significant, moderately, positive relationships with professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. There was also a significant relationship found between professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Results show that preceptor role effectiveness is linked to increased professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Therefore, effective preceptorships are necessary in easing the newly licensed registered nurse's transition to practice. Strategies to ensure effective preceptorships and enhance the NRLN's transition to practice are proposed.

  12. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion.

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Meyer, S M

    2006-03-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba's (1981: 215-216) criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991: 217), were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps--product, price, place, and promotion) could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion) and by ensuring effective service (product) delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community's perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard.

  13. Nursing Education Follow-Up Study--1982 R.N.'s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David C.

    In 1982, a follow-up study of nursing graduates of the Bakersfield College Registered Nursing (RN) program was conducted to obtain information that would lead to improvement in program quality and to a better match between supply and demand in the local nursing labor market. In addition, the study compared results with similar studies conducted…

  14. Registered nurses' perceptions of nurse staffing ratios and new hospital payment regulations.

    PubMed

    Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; DesRoches, Catherine; Hess, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Two regulatory initiatives weigh heavily on the nursing workforce: establishing minimum patient-to-nurse staffing ratios in hospitals and payment policy that eliminates payment to hospitals for negative consequences of care. Although the majority of RNs favor ratios, results also indicate that a good number of RNs either do not support ratios or are unsure, which suggests that while strong support for ratios exists, the support is not universal. With regard to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hospital payment regulations, while many RNs expect that this policy change will increase the emphasis on prevention and additional education and training, RNs also believe they will be blamed if adverse patient conditions occur. A clear majority think that their work will increase, and only a small percentage of RNs think the regulations will lead to added respect, more staffing, higher pay, or raise their status. Beyond affecting the clinical environment, both regulations will impact RNs' economic value in the eyes of the hospitals that employ them.

  15. Survey of syringe and needle safety among student registered nurse anesthetists: are we making any progress?

    PubMed

    Ford, Kelli

    2013-02-01

    Anesthesia providers serve a vital role in preventing the transmission of disease by following safe injection practices, yet violations of these standards have occurred. The goal of this study was to determine the extent of unsafe injection practices that exist among student anesthesia providers. An online survey containing 8 yes-no questions that assessed injection practices as outlined by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists was sent to student registered nurse anesthetists with at least 3 months' clinical experience. Three hundred twenty-five students completed the survey. Results showed that 14 (approximately 4%) have administered medications from the same syringe to multiple patients, 59 (18%) have reused a needle on the same patient, 266 (82%) have refilled used syringes, and 2 (0.6%) have reused infusion sets for more than 1 patient. Furthermore, 71 (22%) have reused a syringe or needle to withdraw medication from a multidose vial, and 160 (49%) have reentered a single-use medication vial to prepare doses for multiple patients. Students also were asked to report their experiences with nurse anesthetists who engaged in these practices. The results demonstrate that additional education on injection safety must take place to improve practice, increase patient safety, and reduce healthcare costs.

  16. Emotional intelligence as a noncognitive factor in student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Collins, Shawn

    2013-12-01

    Current nurse anesthesia program admissions requirements usually focus on high grade point averages, Graduate Record Examination scores, number of years of acute care experience, and a personal interview to assist in predicting those who will succeed in these intensive academic and clinical programs. Some people believe these criteria may not be sufficient in predicting success and have suggested that the use of noncognitive criteria such as emotional intelligence measurements may be helpful. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic factors of student registered nurse anesthetists at 3 points in a program--matriculation, at 1 year of study, and in the last semester of study--and the relationship of these to clinical scores and National Certification Examination scores. An ex post facto cross-sectional study design was used to gather data at 3 critical times in nurse anesthesia programs to explore the relationships between emotional intelligence scores, preadmission demographics, clinical scores, and National Certification Examination scores. The online Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test instrument provided 15 individual emotional intelligence scores for each subject. The statistical relationship between variables was examined.

  17. Spirit at Work (SAW): fostering a healthy RN workplace.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joan I J; Gregory, David M

    2015-02-01

    A cross-sectional mixed-method survey explored and measured relationships between spirit at work (SAW) concepts, experience, education, practice context, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment using LISREL 8.80 and 2012 survey data from a random sample of 217 surgical and 158 home care registered nurses (RNs) in western Canada. Qualitative data underwent content analysis using a priori coding categories based on established theory. Final model indices fit the observed data. SAW concepts of engaging work and mystical experience accounted for moderate to large amounts of model variance for both home care and surgical nurses, while significant positive relationships between SAW concepts, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment were also reported. Researchers concluded that SAW contributes to improved job satisfaction and organizational commitment while being sensitive to RN experiences across clinical contexts. As an holistic measure of RN workplace perceptions, SAW contributes essential information directed at creating optimal environments for both health care providers and recipients.

  18. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses' Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Wu, Che-Yu; Pan, Chih-Long; Tian, Zhong; Wen, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Jet-Chau

    2017-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS) experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs) participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O), critical (NT-C), and noncritical (NT-NC) cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS), fracture fixation (T-F), and general trauma (T-G) cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs' attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P = .016 and .017, resp.). Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h) rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan.

  19. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses' Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Wu, Che-Yu; Pan, Chih-Long; Tian, Zhong; Wen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS) experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs) participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O), critical (NT-C), and noncritical (NT-NC) cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS), fracture fixation (T-F), and general trauma (T-G) cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs' attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P = .016 and .017, resp.). Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h) rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan. PMID:28280734

  20. Experienced registered nurses' satisfaction with using self-learning modules versus traditional lecture/discussion to achieve competency goals during hospital orientation.

    PubMed

    Carcich, Grace M; Rafti, Karen R

    2007-01-01

    Staff development educators are challenged with various levels of experience and learning styles among newly hired registered nurses in a hospital orientation group. This diversity forces the educator to use various teaching strategies to meet the learning needs of the group. This study investigated the experienced registered nurses' satisfaction with using self-learning modules versus traditional lecture/discussion methods during the nursing orientation process. The results revealed that experienced nurses prefer the more traditional method of learning by lecture/discussion.

  1. Examining the effects of problem-based learning and NCLEX-RN scores on the critical thinking skills of associate degree nursing students in a Southeastern Community College.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Evadna M

    2008-01-01

    Teaching methodologies used to promote critical thinking should be investigated to enhance the delivery of safe and effective care and to improve student success on the NCLEX-RN Exam. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a problem-based learning methodology on the critical thinking skills of associate degree nursing students in a 12-week NCLEX-Review Course. An experimental pre-post treatment comparative design was utilized to determine the effects of the two teaching methods on the critical thinking skills of fourth semester students enrolled in a NCLEX-Review Course.

  2. Young Registered Nurses' Intention to Leave the Profession and Professional Turnover in Early Career: A Qualitative Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Salanterä, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    In a time of global nursing shortages an alarming number of young registered nurses have expressed a willingness to leave the profession. In this qualitative case study we investigate in depth why young nurses leave nursing profession and reeducate themselves for a new career. The study is based on longitudinal interviews of three young registered nurses in Finland. These nurses were first interviewed between December 2006 and May 2007, when they were 29–32 years old and having an intention to leave the profession. The second interview took place four years later, from January 2011 to March 2011 when all of them had made the transition to a new career. Data were analyzed in two stages. In the first stage, comprehensive career story narratives were formed on the basis of the interviews. In the second stage, emerging themes in these stories were compared, contrasted, and interpreted in the context of the overall career histories. Nursing as a second career choice and demanding work content as well as poor practice environment and the inability to identify with the stereotypical images of nurses were main themes that emerged from these career stories. The results of this interpretative qualitative study reflect a shift toward insights into understanding professional turnover as a complex and long-lasting process. PMID:24027640

  3. Disrupted by disaster: shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists affected by hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Bennett, Marsha J; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Biddle, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) whose senior year of education and training was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, as well as to determine the storm's psychosocial impact on them. A convenience sample of 10 former SRNAs participated in focus groups that were audiorecorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed. Three major themes emerged from the study: Seriousness of Urgency, Managing Uncertainty, and Stability Equaled Relief. The themes represented how the SRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the SRNAs resulted mainly in temporary increased alcohol consumption and short-term anxiety. One person started smoking. The results of this study should serve as a guide to formulate policies regarding the education of SRNAs during and immediately after a disaster and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding SRNAs.

  4. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  5. From RAF to RN--the transition from Princess Mary's RAF Nursing Service (PMRAFNS) to Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service (QARNNS).

    PubMed

    Masawi, S K

    2015-01-01

    I transferred from the Royal Air Force to the Royal Navy (RN) on 10 July 2014. I would like to share my experiences as a junior RN Officer during Op GRITROCK, looking at some of the similarities and differences between the two Services and their deployed environments: maritime and air.

  6. Ensuring NCLEX-RN success for first-time test-takers.

    PubMed

    Norton, Colleen K; Relf, Michael V; Cox, Catherine W; Farley, Jean; Lachat, Maryanne; Tucker, Michelle; Murray, Jason

    2006-01-01

    A major indicator of baccalaureate nursing program effectiveness is the pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examinations, Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) among first-time candidates. This article highlights the scope, instructional methods, and outcomes of the remediation program at Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies (GU-NHS). With implementation of the multifaceted program, the NCLEX-RN pass rate for first-time takers at GU-NHS has been consistently above the national mean among all first-time candidates. Although it is impossible to determine which strategy made the greatest contribution to the success of the program, the cumulative effect is impressive and indicates the students are prepared for the challenge of the examination and contemporary nursing practice.

  7. The Nursing Shortage and the Role of Community Colleges in Nurse Education. Executive Summary. AACC Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viterito, Arthur; Teich, Carolyn

    This is a report by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) on a the shortage of registered nurses (RN) in the United States and the role of community colleges in nurse education. Reasons for the shortage include: (1) inadequate wages; (2) heavy workloads; (3) undesirable work schedules; (4) increased administrative duties; (5) low…

  8. Registered Nurses' Knowledge about Adverse Effects of Analgesics when Treating Postoperative Pain in Patients with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Kvist, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2015-08-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a pivotal role in treating pain and preventing and recognizing the adverse effects (AEs) of analgesics in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine RNs' knowledge of potentially clinically relevant AEs of analgesics. A descriptive, cross-sectional study design was used. In all, 267 RNs treating orthopedic patients, including patients with dementia, in 7 university hospitals and 10 central hospitals in Finland, completed a questionnaire. Analgesics were defined according to the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification as strong opioids, weak opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDs), and paracetamol. Definitions of AEs were based on the literature. Logistic regression analysis was applied to analyze which variables predicted nurses' knowledge. The RNs had a clear understanding of the AEs of paracetamol and strong opioids. However, the AEs of NSAIDs, especially renal and cardiovascular AEs, were less well known. The median percentage of correct answers was 87% when asked about strong opioids, 73% for weak opioids, and 60% for NSAIDs. Younger RNs had better knowledge of opioid-related AEs (odds ratio [OR] per 1-year increase, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.00) and weak opioids (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99). This study provides evidence of a deficiency in RNs' knowledge, especially regarding the adverse renal and cardiovascular effects of NSAIDs. Such lack of knowledge indicates that hospitals may need to update the knowledge of older RNs, especially those who treat vulnerable patients with dementia.

  9. Reinforcing communication skills while registered nurses simultaneously learn course content: a response to learning needs.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, B B

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of Integrated Skills Reinforcement (ISR) in a baccalaureate nursing course entitled "Principles of Health Assessment" for 15 registered nurse students. ISR is a comprehensive teaching-learning approach that simultaneously reinforces student writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while they learn course content. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of ISR on writing skills and student satisfaction. A learner's guide and teacher's guide, created in advance by the teacher, described specific language activities and assignments that were implemented throughout the ISR course. During each class, the teacher promoted discussion, collaboration, and co-inquiry among students, using course content as the vehicle of exchange. Writing was assessed at the beginning and end of the course. The influence of ISR on the content, organization, sentence structure, tone, and strength of position of student writing was analyzed. Writing samples were scored by an independent evaluator trained in methods of holistic scoring. Ninety-three per cent (14 of 15 students) achieved writing growth from .5 to 1.5 points on a scale of 6 points. Student response to both the ISR approach and specific ISR activities was assessed by teacher-created surveys administered at the middle-end of the course. One hundred per cent of the students at the end of this project agreed that the ISR activities, specifically the writing and reading activities, helped them better understand the course content. These responses differed from evaluations written by the same students at the middle of the course. The ISR approach fostered analysis and communication through active collaboration, behaviors cited as critical for effective participation of nurses in today's complex health care environment.

  10. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services by the State in which the services are furnished. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this part... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic rule and definitions. 410.69 Section 410.69...

  11. Project: MOBILITY. A Federally Funded Research and Design Project for Disadvantaged and Handicapped Vocational Education Students. Registered Nurses. Curriculum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Coll., CA.

    The results of a five-step curriculum analysis of the registered nursing program at Fresno City College, California, are provided in this booklet. (An analysis of four other vocational programs are provided in CE 019 817-820.) The products of step 1 include a definition of the employment opportunity for this area and a statement of the…

  12. The Designing and Development of a Program to Prepare Inactive Registered Nurses for Reentry into Practice. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The planning and design of a course for the inactive registered nurse desiring to return to active practice is reported in this practicum paper. Current literature was reviewed with emphasis on the needs in rural states, such as Vermont, and characteristics of the target group. The first three modules of the course were developed, entitled: The…

  13. The fundamentals of integrating service in a post-licensure RN to BSN program.

    PubMed

    Washington-Brown, Linda; Ritchie, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    Integrating service in a post-licensure registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing (RN to BSN) program provides licensed registered nurse (RN) students the opportunity to learn, develop, and experience different cultures while serving the community and populations in need (McKinnon & Fitzpatrick, 2012). Service to the community, integrated with academic learning can be applied in a wide variety of settings, including schools, universities, and community faith-based organizations. Academic service-learning (ASL) can involve a group of students, a classroom, or an entire school. In the RN to BSN program, the authors use a student-directed service learning approach that integrates service-learning throughout the curriculum. RN students are introduced to service-learning at program orientation prior to the start of classes and receive reinforcement and active engagement throughout the curriculum. The students and volunteer agencies receive and give benefits from the services provided and the life lessons gained through mentorship, education, and hands-on experiences.

  14. Registered nurses as responsible clinicians under the New Zealand Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian G; O'Brien, Anthony J; Dal Din, Toni; Thom, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine how many registered nurses are working as 'responsible clinicians', under what phases of the legislation they are functioning, and to describe the enabling processes and barriers to nurses undertaking this statutory role. An anonymous descriptive survey was distributed to the 11 nurses who were currently responsible clinicians as well as five senior nurses selected from each of the 21 District Health Boards and the Auckland Regional Forensic Psychiatry Services (n = 121). The response rate was 88.4% (n = 107). The survey questioned respondents on statutory roles currently undertaken. Respondents were asked whether the responsible clinician role was a legitimate one for nurses and whether they were motivated to attain it. They were also asked which competencies of the role they believed they met, their perceptions of credentialing processes and the educational requirements needed to achieve the role. A descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken and open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Of the approximately 395 responsible clinicians nationally, 11 (2.8%) are nurses. Most nurses viewed the role as legitimate. However, many were unaware of competencies for the role and credentialing processes, and were somewhat ambivalent about achieving the role due to current workload, role conflict and lack of remuneration. Competency deficits were highlighted. There are grounds to encourage nurses as responsible clinicians given the intent of the legislation. This will require the promulgation of appropriate mental health policy, and a concerted effort by major stakeholders in mental health service delivery.

  15. Role and Responsibilities of the School Nurse (Registered Nurse) and the Child with Special Health Care Needs. Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board of Nursing, Baltimore.

    This set of guidelines by the Maryland Board of Nursing presents the role and responsibilities of the school nurse in relation to the child with special health care needs. The introduction identifies four basic issues including necessary level of preparation, who determines what nursing care can be delegated, under what conditions nursing care can…

  16. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Developers Economists Investors Jobseekers Media Public Policymakers Students & Teachers Survey Respondents At a Glance Tables » U.S. ... Speakers Available Commissioner's Corner Research Spotlight on Statistics Students' Pages Errata Other Statistical Sites Subjects Inflation & Prices » ...

  17. A Core Course on Veterans' Health in an Online RN to BSN Program: Preparing Nurses to Work with Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keavney, Elaine C.

    2015-01-01

    The Joining Forces Initiative challenges nursing programs throughout the country to develop curriculum that addresses the unique healthcare issues facing veterans. It is imperative that Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students acquire the knowledge that will help them to care for veterans in all areas of nursing practice. This article…

  18. A pilot study evaluating the perceptions of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists toward human patient simulation.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert; Bendickson, Lee; Benson, Pretoria; Osborne, Lisa; McPherson, Jennifer; Todd, Larry; Snelson, Jennifer; Bruner, Sandra; Bohan, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    An evaluation was conducted of perceptions of practicing Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) toward use of simulation for initial certification, continuing education, and recertification. The hypothesis was that a 1-day simulation experience would improve their perceptions toward simulation use. The first phase developed content-valid questions to examine CRNAs' perceptions toward simulation. The second phase used these questions to survey practicing CRNAs in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. During the third phase, 9 CRNAs were selected to complete a 1-day simulation experience and complete the perception questionnaire before and after the experience. Through content validity index calculations, 25 of 27 questions were retained for use in this study. A total of 378 CRNAs responded to the questionnaire. There was consensus that human patient simulation (HPS) is an important part of anesthesia provider training, and 85.7% strongly agreed, agreed, or somewhat agreed that HPS should be a required component for initial certification. Additionally, 52.9% of respondents agreed (somewhat agreed or strongly agreed) that continuing education units from HPS should be required for recertification. After the simulation, a significant (P < .05) positive change in level of agreement was noted for 13 of 25 questions, including questions related to initial training and recertification.

  19. Descriptors of anesthesia support personnel from the perspective of practicing certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2012-12-01

    Anesthesia support personnel provide direct support to anesthesia providers. They bring extra supplies or equipment, prepare equipment for the case, maintain and clean equipment, and generally function as directed by the anesthesia provider. Given the importance of anesthesia support personnel in maintaining equipment essential to safe anesthesia practice, it is necessary to ensure that these individuals are properly trained and capable of complying with safety standards. However, the literature describing this population is limited and shows variation in the utilization and qualifications of these personnel. A prospective, descriptive survey of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists was conducted to describe the education, training, job functions, and work environment of anesthesia support personnel. Results (N = 354) indicated that utilization of anesthesia support personnel varies by hospital but has a propensity to be greater at larger medical centers that have a level I or II trauma center. Formal supervision of these personnel is limited. Their tasks tended to be more frequently directed at equipment management, with a smaller portion of anesthesia support personnel performing tasks related to direct patient care. Further research is needed to adequately describe this population.

  20. The specialized role of the RN in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) interdisciplinary care team.

    PubMed

    Madden, Karen A; Waldo, Mary; Cleeter, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing volume of literature supporting the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) as an innovative model of health care delivery for frail seniors. Registered Nurses (RN) hold an essential position among the PACE interdisciplinary teams (IDT) which serve as the foundational practice approach to patient care. There are currently 97 PACE programs in 31 states. Federal and respective state laws provide comprehensive specifications for IDT composition, minimum qualification of team members and services provided. The role of the RN is not fully defined beyond the requirement of periodic assessments. The intent of this study was to explore and describe the role of the nurse in PACE and to compare nursing care delivery models. Focused interviews and survey results show great variation in nursing roles as well as some common themes among nursing leaders for the vision of PACE nurses.

  1. Effective Utilization of Computerized Curricular Assistive Tools in Improving NCLEX-RN Pass Rates for a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Joy R; Chavez, Ruth A; Keane, Patricia; Butz, Susan; Yowler, Susan K

    2016-11-10

    Achieving satisfactory first-time pass rates on the national nursing licensure examination represents a challenge for nursing programs across the United States. The consequences of examination failure for first-time test takers can be devastating, both emotionally and financially. Nursing programs are evaluated by national higher-education credentialing bodies and state boards of nursing based on the first-time pass rate of their students. One Midwestern nursing program faced unsatisfactory first-time pass rates and developed strategies for improving first-time pass rates over a 3-year period. The nursing program utilized several strategies documented in the literature but found implementing computerized curricular assistive tools that complemented the nursing program's curriculum to be most effective. In addition, changing faculty and student culture on preparation for the national licensure examination was beneficial to all involved in the process.

  2. Online case studies: HESI Exit Exam scores and NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Young, Anne; Rose, Gloria; Willson, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using data obtained for the 7th HESI Exit Exam (E(2)) validity study, the value of Elsevier's online case studies in assisting students to prepare for the E(2) and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) was investigated. Of the 137 randomly selected schools of nursing, 72 (52.55%) participated in the study. The student sample consisted of 4,383 students from associate degree, baccalaureate, and diploma schools of nursing. Findings indicated that the mean E(2) score and the NCLEX-RN pass rate were significantly higher for students attending schools that used the case studies than they were for students attending schools that did not use the case studies. Descriptive data indicated that the case studies were most often used for remediation and examination preparation.

  3. Patient safety culture in acute care: a web-based survey of nurse managers' and registered nurses' views in four Finnish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Hannele; Partanen, Pirjo; Kvist, Tarja; Miettinen, Merja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2013-12-01

    Nurse managers (NMs) and registered nurses (RNs) have key roles in developing the patient safety culture, as the nursing staff is the largest professional group in health-care services. We explored their views on the patient safety culture in four acute care hospitals in Finland. The data were collected from NMs (n = 109) and RNs (n = 723) by means of a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument and analyzed statistically. Both groups recognized patient safety problems and critically evaluated error-prevention mechanisms in the hospitals. RNs, in particular, estimated the situation more critically. There is a need to develop the patient safety culture of hospitals by discussing openly about them and learning from mistakes and by developing practices and mechanisms to prevent them. NMs have central roles in developing the safety culture at the system level in hospitals in order to ensure that nurses caring for patients do it safely.

  4. Profile of students registered in nursing auxiliary and technician courses of the Nursing Worker Professionalization Project (PROFAE) in Rio de Janeiro - Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista; Porto, Isaura Setenta; de Assunção Ferreira, Márcia; de Abreu Castro, Joyce Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a profile of students registered in the Professional Training Courses for Nursing Auxiliaries and Complementation Courses for Nursing Technicians of the Nursing Worker Professionalization Project - PROFAE. This quantitative study was carried out in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from August 2004 to January 2005, through the application of 1,400 questionnaires. Data analysis used descriptive statistics, with simple frequencies and percentages. After tabulation, data were divided in the following categories: sociodemographic data, educational background, family profile, habits, professional activity, salary range, expectations about PROFAE and nursing, difficulties to participate in the project and the teaching-learning process. Students/workers graduated from the PROFAE program tend to improve the quality of hospital and outpatient care, contributing to labor market dynamics in the health sector.

  5. Swedish forensic nursing care: nurses' professional contributions and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Rask, Mikael; Aberg, Jonas

    2002-10-01

    Nurses (registered nurses, RN, and licensed mental nurses, LMN) working in five Swedish forensic psychiatric units filled in a questionnaire designed for general psychiatric nursing, but modified for forensic use. In this report, data regarding how nursing care could contribute to improved care and the organizational changes needed and what knowledge the nurses need, in order to be able to meet the demands in the future, were analysed by means of content analysis. The salient findings were: (i) an interpersonal patient-nurse relationship based on trust, empathy, respect and responsibility for the patients' personal resources and knowledge seems to be the essence of nursing care and a way to improve care; and (ii) the nurses' educational needs emanate from different treatment modalities, how to perform different treatments, how to establish developing relationships and in-service training adapted to the ward-specific problems.

  6. The Impact of a Violent Physical Assault on a Registered Nurse: Her Healing Journey and Return to Work.

    PubMed

    Graham, Holly

    2017-03-28

    Healthcare practitioners are at an increased risk for workplace violence. What happens to a practitioner after a devastating physical assault from a patient in the workplace? This case report describes the impact of a violent assault on a registered nurse and her healing journey and return to the workplace. The Department of Veteran Affairs/Department of Defense "Clinical Practice Guidelines for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder" outline three categories of risk factors that are associated with the development of posttraumatic stress disorder: pretraumatic factors, peritraumatic or trauma-related factors, and posttraumatic factors. Each of these risk factors can contribute to the likelihood of an individual developing posttraumatic stress disorder after a traumatic incident and will be used to frame the discussion of this case. The registered nurse gave her full and informed consent for the author to tell her story.

  7. Baccalaureate Courses for Nurses Online and on Campus: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummerow, Andreas; Miller, Marcia; Reed, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of student learning outcomes between distance education and campus-based nursing students in a mental health course working toward registered nurse (RN) licensure in a baccalaureate (BS) degree program is presented. Learning outcomes were evaluated using results from a commercially developed content mastery test taken by students who…

  8. Simulation: The Effects of Simulation on High Stakes Testing in Undergradute Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Many nursing programs use standardized testing packages in order to evaluate students' content mastery as well as predict probability of passing the National Council Licensure for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Instead of a diagnosis for weak content areas, programs implement testing policies in the belief that such policies ensure student success…

  9. A Statewide Study of Academic Variables Affecting Performance of Baccalaureate Nursing Graduates on Licensure Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Eleanor; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study validated findings from two previous studies investigating the relationships between admission selection variables and achievement in baccalaureate nursing programs and performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Results suggest that students' prenursing grade point average and American…

  10. Effect of a Nontechnical Skills Intervention on First-Year Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Skills During Crisis Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Linda L

    2016-02-01

    Simulation-based education provides a safe place for student registered nurse anesthetists to practice non-technical skills before entering the clinical arena. An anesthetist's lack of nontechnical skills contributes to adverse patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an educational intervention on nontechnical skills could improve the performance of nontechnical skills during anesthesia crisis simulation with a group of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists. Thirty-two first-year students volunteered for this quasi-experimental study. Each subject was videotaped and rated as he or she performed 6 simulated crisis scenarios: 3 scenarios before the intervention and 3 after the intervention. Findings revealed that the nontechnical skills mean posttest score was greater than pretest scores: t (df = 31) = 1.99, P = .028. The mean gain in scores for standardized nontechnical skills were significantly greater than those for standardized technical skills: t (df = 30) = 1.81, P = .04. In conclusion, a 3-hour educational intervention on nontechnical skills resulted in significant improvement. Nontechnical skills therefore are not acquired through experience, but rather through instruction. An educational intervention using the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills system is a valuable tool in the measurement of nontechnical skills assessment of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists.

  11. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  13. AACJC/Metropolitan Life Foundation Registered Nurse Shortage Project: Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, James F.

    The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges's Nurse Shortage Project was designed to alleviate the nurse shortage by helping community colleges improve recruitment, retention, and graduation in nursing programs through direct mini-grants, with a special emphasis on Tech Prep/Associate Degree initiatives between secondary schools and…

  14. Exploring nurse education in Canada, Finland and the United States.

    PubMed

    Thobaben, Marshelle; Roberts, Deborah; French, Susan E; Tallberg, Marianne

    2005-12-01

    A global registered nursing (RN) shortage has caused an increase in migration and international recruitment of nurses. There is growing interest among some countries of having common standards and competencies for entry-level registered nurses to guide future registered nurse agreements between countries or multi-country licensure programs. Nursing education in one country may not be accepted as equivalent for a nurse to become licensed in another country. An exploratory study was conducted to gain a better understanding of how nurses are educated in various countries. Nurse researchers sent a nursing education questionnaire to nurse educators in eleven countries inviting them to participate in the study. Nurse educators from six countries agreed to participate in the study. They provided information about their country's nursing history, types of nursing programs, use of national nursing licensing examination, and political influences on nursing education. The People's Republic of China, Japan and Turkey nurse educators' responses were the first to be analyzed and the results were published in the July/August 2005 issue of Contemporary Nurse (volume 19/1-2). This second article (in Contemporary Nurse volume 20/2) provides information about and a comparison of nursing programs in Canada, Finland and the United States.

  15. Fostering RN-to-BSN students' confidence in searching online for scholarly information on evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    McCulley, Carol; Jones, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Graduates of bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs are increasingly expected to take an active role in assessing and improving nursing practice, and nurse educators are expected to prepare BSN students for this expanding role. Information literacy, the ability to search for, find, get, and use scholarly information to inform nursing practice, should be a critical component of nursing education. This article focuses on five strategies for teaching information literacy to registered nurse (RN)-to-BSN students in an online continuing education environment. These strategies include the addition of an embedded librarian to the online courses, collaboration between the librarian and nursing faculty, a subject guide with access to resources and tutorials at the point of need, student-centered learning with authentic assignments, and reflection on the learning process. Student reflections suggest that these strategies result in increased confidence in searching for and finding the evidence-based scholarship that they need.

  16. Improving NCLEX-RN pass rates by implementing a testing policy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jean

    2013-01-01

    To improve the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) pass rates and to address the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission's outcomes standard, a testing policy was developed and implemented at an associate degree of nursing (ADN) program located in a suburb south of Denver, CO. This article describes the testing policy strategies that were implemented by the ADN faculty to evaluate the curriculum. Strategies used for internal curriculum evaluation addressed test item writing, test blueprinting, and the use of item analysis data to evaluate and improve faculty-designed exams. Strategies used for external curriculum evaluation employed the use of HESI specialty exams that were administered at the completion of each course and HESI Exit Exams that were administered at the completion of the first and second years of the curriculum. These strategies were formalized with the development of a testing policy manual that described the procedures used to implement internal and external curriculum evaluation. To measure the effectiveness of the testing policy, NCLEX-RN outcomes were compared before and after implementing the testing policy. Findings indicated that the mean NCLEX-RN pass rate for the 5 years following implementation of the testing policy was significantly higher (P < .01) than the mean NCLEX-RN pass rate for the 5 years preceding implementation of the testing policy.

  17. [Masculinity and femininity in self-perceptions and ideals of registered nurses].

    PubMed

    Kada, Olivia; Brunner, Eva

    2010-08-01

    Despite of intensive professionalisation efforts and changed legal frameworks the public image of nursing is still full of gender-stereotypes. This study investigates to what extend public stereotypes of "typically female" and "typically male" are reflected in the self-concept and ideals of nurses. Using a cross-sectional research design 174 female nurses were surveyed regarding their sex-role orientation and ideals (femininity and masculinity) using a standardized questionnaire (BSRI). Contrary to stereotypes the respondents indentified more with masculine traits. Masculine attributes predominated especially in ideas about the ideal nurse. No differences between nurses who work in different areas could be revealed. In all endeavors regarding autonomy and masculinity the significance of the feminine function of "caring" must not be forgotten. Teachers in healthcare and nursing play a central role in sensibilising students for gender issues.

  18. The reorganization of the nursing labor process: from team to primary nursing.

    PubMed

    Brannon, R L

    1990-01-01

    The author presents a labor process analysis of recent changes in nursing work on hospital wards. In the immediate post-World War II decades, hospital nursing was organized to include stratified nurses--registered and auxiliary nurses (licensed practical nurses and nurses' aides)--in a common labor process called "team nursing." Team nursing adapted Taylorist principles to sharply demarcate tasks between registered nurses (RNs) and auxiliaries. In the 1970s and 1980s, team nursing increasingly replaced by "primary nursing" with a majority of RNs. Auxiliaries were displaced as RNs assumed undivided responsibility for complete nursing care. The transition to primary nursing is partly explained through the convergence of managerial interests with the professionalizing interests of nursing's elite. However, primary nursing was not simply imposed from the top down. Team nursing produced divisiveness between RNs and auxiliaries at the same time that it forced these workers to violate the official differentiation of tasks and held RNs responsible for work performed by auxiliaries. Primary nursing eliminates the problems of team nursing as RNs perform reunified tasks in an unmediated RN-patient relationship. However, primary nursing has produced a new set of contradictions, including an intensified labor process.

  19. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  20. Perceptions of Writing Confidence, Critical Thinking, and Writing Competence among Registered Nurse-Learners Studying Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    Historically, nursing education has recognized that writing enhances critical thinking, the basis of the clinical reasoning process. The online learning recently adopted by Nursing involves considerable writing, which may enhance critical thinking more than face-to-face courses. In the study reported here, the critical thinking and writing…

  1. A Study of Factors Affecting the Retention of Civilian Registered Nurses in the Army Medical Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    MONITORING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army-Baylor University (If applicable) Graduate Program in Health Care Idmin/HSHA-[HC 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP % , " Health Care , Retention{ o--fC-iyi-n RN, Witin1 die AMEDD 0 19, ABSTRACT...least the subsystems depicted in Mobley’s comprehensive schematic of the primary variables affecting turnover (Figure 1-2). It is important to note that

  2. Psychosocial work environment and prediction of job satisfaction among Swedish registered nurses and physicians - a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    In Sweden, the health care sector was subject to considerable changes during the 1990s: decreased costs, related staff redundancies and high rates of sick leave. The situation has now changed, and the sector is not facing the same all-embracing and turbulent changes. In addition, there is a shortage of nurses and physicians and a difficulty in retaining qualified staff. Regarding the psychosocial work environment, there is a lack of studies where both physicians and nurses are in focus. It is from a managerial perspective important to take a holistic approach towards questions regarding the work environment in general and the psychosocial work environment in particular. The aims of this study were to analyse similarities and differences in Registered Nurses and physicians' experience of quantitative and qualitative demands, control, role conflicts, role clarity, social support and job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009 and to analyse the stability in the prediction of job satisfaction over time. Questionnaires regarding psychosocial work environment aspects were distributed in 2002 and 2009, and a total of 860 nurses and 866 physicians answered the questionnaire. Independent t tests and linear stepwise regression analyses were conducted. The results indicate that the work environment has improved between 2002 and 2009 and that nurses experience their psychosocial working environment as more satisfactory than physicians. Social support, control, role conflicts, role clarity and qualitative demands were the best predictors of job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009. Quantitative demands did not contribute to predicting job satisfaction. Variables predicting job satisfaction are quite stable over time and are quite comparable for both nurses and physicians.

  3. Direct care registered nurses' and nursing leaders' review of the clinical competencies needed for the successful nurse of the future: a gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Strong, Margaret; Kane, Irene; Petras, Denise; Johnson-Joy, Cheryl; Weingarten, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Direct care nurses and nurse leaders were surveyed on their perceptions of the appropriateness, importance, and use in daily practice of 10 clinical nursing competencies needed for nurses to be successful in the future. Competencies needed in the 21st century are not based entirely on task-driven motor skills because comprehensive knowledge is essential to care for complex patients. Differences identified between direct care nurses, leaders, and educational levels provide educational opportunities for both groups.

  4. A survey of threats and violent behaviour by patients against registered nurses in their first year of practice.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian G; Poole, Suzette J; Smith, Naumai A; Coverdale, John H; Gale, Chris K

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of aggressive behaviours by patients against nurses in the first year of practice, and to determine the psychological impact of this behaviour. An anonymous survey was sent to registered nurses in their first year of practice. From the 1169 survey instruments that were distributed, 551 were returned completed (a response rate of 47%). The most common inappropriate behaviour by patients involved verbal threats (n = 192, 35%), verbal sexual harassment (n = 167, 30%) and physical intimidation (n = 161, 29%). There were 22 incidents of assault requiring medical intervention and 21 incidents of participants being stalked by patients. Male graduates and younger nurses were especially vulnerable. Mental health was the service area most at risk. A most distressing incident was described by 123 (22%) of respondents. The level of distress caused by the incident was rated by 68 of the 123 respondents (55%) as moderate or severe. Only half of those who described a most distressing event indicated they had some undergraduate training in protecting against assault or in managing potentially violent incidents (n = 63 of 123; 51%). After registration, 45 (37%) indicated they had had such training. The findings of this study indicate priorities for effective prevention programmes. The issues highlighted need to be addressed in undergraduate nursing curricula and in the development of orientation programmes supporting new graduates.

  5. RN-BSN Students' Perceptions of the Differences in Practice of the ADN- and BSN-Prepared RN.

    PubMed

    Matthias, April D; Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study explored RN-BSN students' perceptions of practice differences between nurses prepared with an ADN and BSN. Five themes were identified in 20 students' discussion posts: "a nurse is a nurse" at the bedside, beyond the bedside, BSN wanted, digging deeper, and appraisal. Results illustrate the need for educators to assist nurses in translating the differentiated educational competencies to the practice role of the bedside RN.

  6. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  7. Taking a degree after qualifying as a registered general nurse: constraints and effects.

    PubMed

    Davey, Barbara; Robinson, Sarah

    2002-11-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing emphasis on nurses obtaining degrees with many arguing for an all graduate profession. Traditionally trained nurses may feel increased pressure to obtain degrees to compete with their diploma and degree trained successors. This paper presents findings from the sixth questionnaire in a Department of Health-funded, longitudinal study into the careers of traditionally trained nurses who qualified in 1990/91. It discusses the experiences of a cohort of 620 nurses eight years after qualification, in terms of the proportion who had taken/were taking a degree, the support offered by employers and the perceived effects of a nursing/healthcare degree on their work. The findings showed that almost half did not plan to take a degree and that a main constraint was the difficulty of combining paid work with studying, especially for women with childcare responsibilities. However, for the minority who had taken/were taking a degree, the perceived effects included increased self-confidence, with the majority reporting enhancement of clinical skills and better career prospects. The findings point to a need for employers to address issues of flexible working, study leave and funding in order that nurses are given every opportunity for career development.

  8. An Approximation of a Hierarchical Logistic Regression Model Used To Establish the Predictive Validity of Scores on a Nursing Licensure Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Amy Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Conducted a validity study to examine the degree to which scores on the newly developed Diagnostic Readiness Test (DRT) and National League for Nursing Pre-Admission Test scores could predict success or failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Results for 5,698 students indicate that the DRT is a…

  9. A community-wide RN refresher course: a collaborative success.

    PubMed

    White, J; Poirrier, G P

    1995-01-01

    By combining forces, nurse educators and practitioners developed a unique RN refresher course that provided a supportive environment for successful reentry into professional nursing practice. Nursing faculty and administrators from a baccalaureate nursing program collaborated with nursing clinicians from seven acute care hospitals to meet the assessed needs of community nurses for reentry programs. The collaborative effort provided accessible courses at lower costs with qualified faculty and a variety of clinical practice experiences for nurses areawide. This article describes the planning, development, implementation, and analysis of this successful areawide RN refresher course.

  10. Work-Family Conflict Among Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: A Structural Equation Model of Antecedents and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Raffenaud, Amanda; Fottler, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Conflict between work and family is a human resource management issue that is particularly relevant for nurses. Nursing is a demanding profession, and a high proportion of nurses are women, who tend to have greater family responsibilities than men. Little is known regarding work-family conflict among nurses, and even less is known about how this affects newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs), who can be stressed from their new jobs and careers. This study empirically tests a model of antecedents and outcomes of work-family and family-work conflict among a sample of NLRNs. We developed a model of the relationships between personal and work environment characteristics, work-family and family-work conflicts, job satisfaction, and intent to leave the job and profession. We used structural equation modeling (Amos, IBM SPSS) to test the model with data from.a survey of NLRNs. We examined a number of latent variables, as well as direct and mediating relationships. The measurement models for all latent variables were validated. The final model indicated that age, health, and family responsibilities are antecedents of family-work conflict; job demands lead to work-family conflict; family-work conflict contributes to job difficulties, which lowers job satisfaction, which, in turn, increases the intent to leave the job and profession; and work-family conflict increases the intent to leave the job and profession (but does not directly affect job satisfaction). Policies to help NLRNs with family responsibilities could reduce family-work conflict, which might reduce job difficulties and improve satisfaction and retention. In addition, policies to reduce job demands could reduce work-family conflict and improve retention.

  11. Current Assessments of Quality and Safety Competencies in Registered Professional Nurses: An Examination of Nurse Leader Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elaine Lois

    2012-01-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare is a national concern. It has been proposed that nurses and other clinicians need to develop a new set of competencies in order to make significant improvements in the quality and safety of patient care. These new competencies include: patient-centered care; teamwork and collaboration; evidence-based practice;…

  12. Implementing a standardized testing program: preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Phyllis; Koehn, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The undergraduate nursing faculty of a large Midwestern university initiated a program of standardized computerized testing for two purposes: to provide students experience with standardized computerized testing prior to taking the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to increase the students' NCLEX-RN passing rate. This article chronicles the process of implementing a comprehensive testing program developed by the Assessment Technologies Institute (Overland Park, KS). Although the first class of students to have taken the entire testing package has just graduated, midprogram results have demonstrated potential as key indicators for identifying at-risk students. The trends in scores on standardized computerized tests, grades in prerequisite science courses, and grades in medical-surgical courses are used to identify students who are at risk for failure in the program and on the NCLEX-RN. Faculty advisors meet with these students to develop individual plans of study and to provide additional resources. The testing process is going on smoothly, and faculty members are learning to use the extensive information on students' test scores to further assist them in passing the NCLEX-RN.

  13. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses and Physician Assistants in Sleep Centers and Clinics: A Survey of Current Roles and Educational Background

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E.; Rogers, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Methods: Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Results: Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through “on the job” training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. Conclusions: APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap. Citation: Colvin L, Cartwright Ann, Collop N, Freedman N, McLeod D, Weaver TE, Rogers AE. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):581-587. PMID:24812545

  14. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  15. AACJC/Metropolitan Life Foundation Registered Nurse Shortage Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Lihue. Kauai Community Coll.

    In an effort to increase the number of graduating Kauai High School (KHS) seniors prepared to enter the Kauai Community College (KCC) Career Ladder Nursing Program, a special 2 + 2 program was initiated involving college/high school curriculum articulation, academic and career counseling, and early admission to KCC. At the outset of the project,…

  16. A Statewide Assessment of Preferences of Registered Nurses Desiring Academic Credit-Bearing Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Christine A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 535 of 844 nurses to a telephone survey found that 359 desired academic credit for continuing education courses. Interest was greatest among full-time hospital, and rural workers. Those interested in undergraduate credit preferred independent study; those interested in graduate credit were more receptive to the use of technology.…

  17. Taking a Degree after Qualifying as a Registered General Nurse: Constraints and Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Barbara; Robinson, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Of 620 traditionally trained (nondegree) nurses, 22% had obtained or were currently working on degrees; 20% intended to; 46% did not. Primary reasons for not taking a degree included difficulties combining work and study. Many studying part time received study leave and/or tuition support from employers. Four-fifths of those with degrees felt they…

  18. The Relationship between Barcode Medication Administration Satisfaction and the Use of Workarounds among Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sally F.

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug events, resulting in preventable patient harm or death, are of great concern. To keep patients safe, hospitals have implemented barcode medication administration (BCMA) technology for RNs who have accepted this technology with varying levels of satisfaction. When nurses are dissatisfied with a BCMA system, they may find alternative…

  19. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that explain NP role transition is important to inform the discipline how best to support NPs during entry into practice. PMID:25685113

  20. Exploring the Factors that Influence Nurse Practitioner Role Transition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Hilary

    2015-02-01

    The transition from registered nurse (RN) to nurse practitioner (NP) is often a stressful career change. Data are lacking on the factors affecting NP role transition. This study examined the relationships between NP role transition, prior RN experience, and a formal orientation. From a sample of 352 NPs, only a formal orientation contributed significantly to the regression model indicating a positive relationship with NP role transition (b = 6.24, p < .001). Knowledge of the factors that explain NP role transition is important to inform the discipline how best to support NPs during entry into practice.

  1. Use of Standardized Mastery Content Assessments Given during the First Year of a Baccalaureate Nursing Program for Predicting NCLEX-RN Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory, DeAnna Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between standardized content specific mastery assessments and NCLEX-RN outcomes. Three content-specific standardized assessments testing Fundamentals, Pharmacology and Mental Health concepts were used to explain the dichotomous NCLEX-RN outcome of pass or fail. The three assessments were…

  2. Requirements and interventions used by BSN programs to promote and predict NCLEX-RN success: a national study.

    PubMed

    Crow, Carolyn S; Handley, Marilyn; Morrison, Ruby Shaw; Shelton, M Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to identify specific program requirements and educational interventions used to promote National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) success among graduates of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs and (2) to determine the best predictors of NCLEX-RN success used by BSN nursing programs. This descriptive correlational study used the survey method for data collection. Participants were recruited from 513 generic BSN programs. One hundred sixty usable responses were received for a response rate of 31.2 percent. This is the only recent national study of variables associated with NCLEX-RN success that could be found in the literature; therefore, it addresses a gap in the literature. Significant findings related to NCLEX passing rates included (1) the use of standardized entrance exams and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores for admission criteria, (2) National League for Nursing (NLN) content at-risk scores for mental health and community health nursing for progression, (3) clinical proficiency and use of exit examinations as graduation requirements, (4) commercial reviews as an intervention, and (5) percent White as a demographic variable. Additionally, the findings support the use of standardized entrance examinations and content area examinations to assess readiness for NCLEX.

  3. The relationship of burnout, use of coping strategies and curricular program of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Ceslowitz, S B

    1990-03-01

    This study examined the relationships of nursing curricular program, burnout, and use of coping strategies among 150 randomly selected staff nurses from four hospitals. The instruments used were the frequency dimension of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach & Jackson, 1981) and the Ways of Coping (Revised) (Folkman & Lazarus, 1985). Discriminant analysis demonstrated that (a) diploma graduates differed from associate-degree graduates in their greater experience of Emotional Exhaustion (p less than .05) and (b) baccalaureate-degree graduates differed from associate-degree graduates in their greater use of Planful Problem Solving and Confronting Coping (p less than .05). Recommendations include additional research to discover relevant factors for the greater experience of Emotional Exhaustion among diploma graduates. If related to perceptions of limited career mobility due to the lack of a baccalaureate degree, expansion of educational opportunities is indicated. Another recommendation is curricular incorporation of content on burnout and coping.

  4. A call for change: clinical evaluation of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Collins, Shawn; Callahan, Margaret Faut

    2014-02-01

    The ability to integrate theory with practice is integral to a student's success. A common reason for attrition from a nurse anesthesia program is clinical issues. To document clinical competence, students are evaluated using various tools. For use of a clinical evaluation tool as possible evidence for a student's dismissal, an important psychometric property to ensure is instrument validity. Clinical evaluation instruments of nurse anesthesia programs are not standardized among programs, which suggests a lack of instrument validity. The lack of established validity of the instruments used to evaluate students' clinical progress brings into question their ability to detect a student who is truly in jeopardy of attrition. Given this possibility, clinical instrument validity warrants research to be fair to students and improve attrition rates based on valid data. This ex post facto study evaluated a 17-item clinical instrument tool to demonstrate the need for validity of clinical evaluation tools. It also compared clinical scores with scores on the National Certification Examination.

  5. Self-efficacy, stress, and social support in retention of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Conner, Megan

    2015-04-01

    Many studies document the presence of stress and the need for social support in anesthesia students. By addressing these, one can increase students' self-efficacy, which is related to beliefs in one's ability to accomplish an objective. By measuring and instituting measures to increase self-efficacy, we could improve student selection in nurse anesthesia programs, and increase academic success and likelihood of retention. This article reviews the literature on this topic and makes recommendations for increasing student self-efficacy.

  6. NCLEX-RN success: evidence-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marie H; Baker, Susan Scott

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing requires that students think reflectively and use clinical inquiry to develop clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Likewise, nursing students need a strategy to be successful in passing the NCLEX-RN. The authors identify strategies based on nursing research to facilitate student success. While learning the evidence-based nursing process, the student must begin to think like a nurse while answering clinical practice questions. Using the skills taught for evidence-based nursing can be a powerful tool to approach the NCLEX-RN and succeed.

  7. Registered Nurses in Primary Care: Emerging New Roles and Contributions to Team-Based Care in High-Performing Practices.

    PubMed

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D; Wagner, Edward H

    2017-03-20

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  8. The psychosocial work environment and burnout among Swedish registered and assistant nurses: the main, mediating, and moderating role of empowerment.

    PubMed

    Hochwälder, Jacek

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore: the main effect of empowerment on burnout; empowerment as a mediator between the work environment and burnout; and empowerment as a moderator of the association between the work environment and burnout. In order to explore these effects, multiple regression analyses were performed on questionnaire data from 838 registered nurses and 518 assistant nurses in Sweden. The analyses showed that: empowerment has a negative association to burnout; empowerment has a mediating effect between the work environment (especially for control and social support) and burnout; and the moderating effect of empowerment on the association between the work environment and burnout was weak. The results suggest that: empowerment explains variation with regard to burnout over and above what can be explained by established work situation dimensions; the improvement of the work environment is associated with a higher sense of empowerment which, in turn, is related to lower degrees of burnout; and individual and group differences should be considered in workplace health promotion.

  9. Assessing the degree of involvement of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in airway management and trauma stabilization in rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Penn, Marlo; Ruthman, Jacklyn

    2005-06-01

    Certified Registered Nurses Anesthetists (CRNAs) are airway experts who can stabilize the condition of trauma patients with skills acquired from practice as an anesthetist. CRNAs practice in a variety of settings; one of the most challenging is the rural hospital. Anesthetists have a wide range of skills. However, the setting in which CRNAs practice may influence the skills needed. This study was designed to address the issue of CRNA involvement in airway management and trauma stabilization in rural hospitals through a descriptive, quantitative, nonexperimental design study. A random sample of 382 CRNAs who practice in rural hospitals were invited to answer questions using a practice pattern questionnaire about these experiences developed for this study. Data were analyzed descriptively. The 13-item Airway Management and Trauma Stabilization Practice Pattern Questionnaire performed reliably (alpha = .8320). Results revealed the majority of CRNAs working in rural and semirural settings manage airways and stabilize the condition of trauma patients. Practice patterns suggest that nurse anesthesia students be trained to manage airways and stabilize trauma, particularly if they plan to work in rural or semirural settings.

  10. An educational curriculum used to improve the knowledge and the perceptions of certified registered nurse anesthetist clinical educators.

    PubMed

    Elisha, Sass

    2008-08-01

    An educational curriculum using adult learning principles in an active learning format was developed for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist clinical educators (CRNACEs) to help improve the quality of the clinical learning experiences for student nurse anesthetists (SNAs). This exploratory study sought to determine the extent to which an 8-hour educational course modified the behavioral perceptions and the knowledge of CRNACEs. The effects of the CRNACE course were measured using a questionnaire that consisted of 22 Likert scale items and 8 open-ended questions. The study population included 33 CRNACEs. Their responses were assessed before the course, after the course, and during a 2-month follow-up. It was determined that the CRNACE course positively modified participants' perceived behaviors and knowledge after instruction and at the 2-month followup. Additional findings included that information provided during the CRNACE course did not change the perceptions of CRNACEs related to their ability to communicate with students or their willingness to modify their teaching practices. Providing instruction incorporating principles of adult learning using an active learning format for CRNACEs may improve the clinical learning experiences for SNAs. As a result, SNAs would be better prepared to make the transition to clinical expert.

  11. Call-shift fatigue and use of countermeasures and avoidance strategies by certified registered nurse anesthetists: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Domen, Ramona; Connelly, Cynthia D; Spence, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    This study surveyed Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) on their frequency of call-shift fatigue, fatigue symptoms, medical errors associated with fatigue, and use of fatigue countermeasures and avoidance strategies. A secondary aim was to identify predictors of call-shift fatigue. An invitation to complete an anonymous electronic survey was sent to 2,500 randomly selected AANA members. Data were collected on CRNAs' fatigue experience, call-shift length and frequency, errors in patient care, and use of fatigue countermeasures and avoidance strategies. Analysis included descriptive and inferential statistics. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of call-shift fatigue. Of 325 CRNAs who provided data, 82% reported experiencing call-shift fatigue, 87% used fatigue countermeasures, 77% used fatigue-avoidance strategies, and 28% reported committing a medical error because of fatigue. Predictors included hours to recovery from a call shift (odds ratio [OR] = 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04-1.12), working 5 to 6 calls per month (OR = 3.78, CI = 1.17-12.23), working 7 or more calls per month (OR = 4.87, CI = 1.93-12.33), use of fatigue countermeasures (OR = 5.44, CI = 2.15-13.77), and fatigue symptoms (OR = 2.19, CI = 1.03-4.67). Call-shift fatigue is a common problem among CRNAs and is associated with medical errors and negative health consequences.

  12. The future of the nurse shortage: will wage increases close the gap?

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Given, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In recent years the U.S. media have been reporting a shortage of registered nurses (RNs). In theory, labor-market shortages are self-correcting; wage increases will bring labor markets into equilibrium, and policy intervention is not necessary. In this paper we develop a simple forecasting model and ask the question: How high must RN wages rise in the future to end the RN shortage? We find that inflation-adjusted wages must increase 3.2-3.8 percent per year between 2002 and 2016, with wages cumulatively rising up to 69 percent, to end the shortage. Total RN expenditures would more than double by 2016.

  13. Applying nursing theory to perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Gillette, V A

    1996-08-01

    The perioperative nursing role has evolved from that of task-oriented specialists to patient-centered professionals. The concept of caring is significant to perioperative nurses and is manifested by the many caring behaviors perioperative nurses demonstrate toward surgical patients. This article describes how the element of caring is an essential function of perioperative nursing and relates the perioperative nursing role to the work of three nursing theorists (le, Florence Nightingale; Virginia Henderson, RN, AM; Carol L. Montgomery, RN, PhD).

  14. Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse's experiences. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anne-Marie; Connor-Fenelon, Maureen O'; Lyons, Rosemary

    2012-03-01

    This is the first of two articles presenting the findings of a qualitative study which explored the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. The article reports and critically discusses the findings in the context of the policy and service delivery discourses of person-centredness, inclusion, choice and independence. Arguably, RNIDs are the profession who most frequently encounter people with an intellectual disability and communication impairment. The results suggest that the communication studied is both complicated and multifaceted. An overarching category of 'familiarity/knowing the person' encompasses discrete but related themes and subthemes that explain the process: the RNID knowing the service-user; the RNID/service-user relationship; and the value of experience. People with an intellectual disability, their families and disability services are facing a time of great change, and RNIDs will have a crucial role in supporting this transition.

  15. Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse's experiences. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Anne-Marie; Connor-Fenelon, Maureen O'; Lyons, Rosemary

    2012-06-01

    This is the second of two articles presenting the findings of a qualitative study which explored the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. While Part 1 outlined the study background, context and methodology along with the overarching, multi-dimensional category of 'familiarity/knowing the person', the current article critically discusses the themes and subthemes encapsulated in this category. Each theme is considered in the light of current policies, strategies and philosophies shaping the provision of services to people with an intellectual disability in Ireland. The results suggest that the RNID is ideally located and key to supporting the implementation of these policies and strategies due to their highly developed and proficient skill set as well as experience of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally.

  16. Use of video-feedback, reflection, and interactive analysis to improve nurse leadership practices.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeannette T

    2012-01-01

    The chronic shortage of registered nurses (RNs) affects patient safety and health care quality. Many factors affect the RN shortage in the workforce, including negative work environments, exacerbated by ineffective leadership approaches. Improvements in the use of relationship-based leadership approaches lead to healthier work environments that foster RN satisfaction and reduce RN turnover and vacancy rates in acute care settings. In this article, an innovative approach to reduce nurse turnover and decrease vacancy rates in acute care settings is described. Video feedback with reflection and interactive analysis is an untapped resource for nurse leaders and aspiring nurse leaders in their development of effective leadership skills. This unique method may be an effective leadership strategy for addressing recruitment and retention issues in a diverse workforce.

  17. Multi-level model of missed nursing care in the context of hospital merger.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Wu, Yow-Wu B; Dean-Baar, Susan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the multi-level relationships of individual registered nurse (RN) and nursing unit factors on missed nursing care. This was a quantitative model-building study using a descriptive, cross-sectional design. Surveys (N = 553) and administrative unit records from nurses in one hospital system undergoing merger were included. The results showed that 36% of the variation in missed nursing care is due to the unit context, with a corresponding 64% due to individual nurse differences. At the unit level, workload, skill mix, and critical unit type affected the amount of missed nursing care. At the individual nurse level, more experience, supplies problems, communication problems, and involvement in errors of commission all increased the perception of the amount of missed nursing care. Education level was not related to the amount of missed nursing care. The findings highlight the importance of unit- and individual-level interventions to redesign hospital nursing care.

  18. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses 1

    PubMed Central

    Cónsul-Giribet, María; Medina-Moya, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups. METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class) with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups. RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life. PMID:25493666

  19. Computerized Testing of Level III Associate Degree Nursing Students versus Paper and Pencil Testing Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullo, Shirna R.

    2014-01-01

    Computerized testing may be one solution to enhance performance on the curricular Health Education Systems Inc. (HESI) exam and the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Due to the integration of improved technological processes and procedures in healthcare for computerized documentation and electronicmedical records,…

  20. Predicting Student Retention and Academic Achievement in Western United States Associate Degree in Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret

    This study addresses the extreme shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in California and the changing demographics of those entering the occupation. It focuses on the issue that racially diverse RN students have shown a significantly lower completion rate than their white counterparts. Since community colleges provide 70% of the hospital-based RN…

  1. Community College Nursing Student Success on Professional Qualifying Examinations from Admission to Licensure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Lenora; Sandiford, Janice

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to investigate variables associated with learning and performance as measured by the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN), (2) to validate the predictive value of the Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) achievement exit exam, and (3) to provide a model that could…

  2. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: Gateway to Screening for Bipolar Disorder in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel-Gasparro, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this mixed methods descriptive study was to explore Advanced Practice Registered Nurses’ (APRNs’) knowledge of bipolar disorder (BPD) and their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to screening patients with known depression for BPD. Methods: A mixed method study design using surveys on BPD knowledge and screening practices as well as focus group data collection method for facilitators and barriers to screening. Results: 89 APRNs completed the survey and 12 APRNs participated in the focus groups. APRNs in any practice setting had low knowledge scores of BPD. No significant differences in screening for BPD for primary and non primary care APRNs. Qualitative findings revealed screening relates to tool availability; time, unsure of when to screen, fear of sigma, symptoms knowledge of BPD, accessible referral system, personal experiences with BPD, and therapeutic relationships with patients. Conclusion: Misdiagnosis of BPD as unipolar depression is common in primary care settings, leading to a long lag time to optimal diagnosis and treatment. The wait time to diagnosis and treatment could be reduced if APRNs in primary care settings screen patients with a diagnosis of depression by using validated screening tools. These results can inform APRN practice and further research on the effectiveness of screening for reducing the morbidity and mortality of BPDs in primary care settings; underscores the need for integration of mental health care into primary care as well as the need for more APRN education on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorders. PMID:27347256

  3. Efficacy of integrating information literacy education into a women's health course on information literacy for RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Sheu, Sheila; Kuo, Shih-Ming

    2007-03-01

    Information literacy, essential to evidences-based nursing, can promote nurses' capability for life-long learning. Nursing education should strive to employ information literacy education in nursing curricula to improve information literacy abilities among nursing students. This study explored the effectiveness of information literacy education by comparing information literacy skills among a group of RN-BSN (Registered Nurse to Bachelors of Science in Nursing) students who received information literacy education with a group that did not. This quasi-experimental study was conducted during a women's health issues course taught between March and June 2004. Content was presented to the 32 RN-BSN students enrolled in this course, which also taught skills on searching and screening, integrating, analyzing, applying, and presenting information. At the beginning and end of the program, 75 RN-BSN student self-evaluated on a 10 point Likert scale their attained skills in searching and screening, integrating, analyzing, applying, and presenting information. Results identified no significant differences between the experimental (n = 32) and control groups (n = 43) in terms of age, marital status, job title, work unit, years of work experience, and information literacy skills as measured at the beginning of the semester. At the end of the semester during which content was taught, the information literacy of the experimental group in all categories, with the exception of information presentation, was significantly improved as compared to that of the control group. Results were especially significant in terms of integrating, analyzing, and applying skill categories. It is hoped that in the future nursing students will apply enhanced information literacy to address and resolve patients' health problems in clinical settings.

  4. Supporting children whose parent has a mental health problem: an assessment of the education, knowledge, confidence and practices of registered psychiatric nurses in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, D; Sharek, D; Higgins, A

    2013-04-01

    Health professionals, including nurses, stand accused of ignorance or oversight of children whose parent experience a mental health problem. Psychiatric nurses are in an ideal position to respond to children's needs and support their parents in a proactive and sensitive manner. The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' education, knowledge, confidence and practice with regard to the support needs of children whose parent has a mental health problem. This study employed a self-completion anonymous survey design with a sample of registered psychiatric nurses from one integrated mental health service in Ireland. The sample reported relatively low levels of education, knowledge, confidence and supportive clinical practice when it came to children whose parent has a mental health problem. There is an urgent need for education on family-focused care, and the development of guidelines and child focused services if the needs of parents and children are to be met.

  5. Registered nurses' thoughts on blended learning in a postgraduate course in cancer care--content analyses of web surveys and a focus group interview.

    PubMed

    Arving, Cecilia; Wadensten, Barbro; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-06-01

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  6. Student achievement and NCLEX-RN success: Problems that persist.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2011-01-01

    While most nurse graduates are successful on the NCLEX-RN licensure examination, certain students continue to be at risk for failure. To understand the complexity of at-risk students and NCLEX-RN failure, systems theory was used to analyze the interdependency of the nursing education system and the nursing student learning system. From this perspective, these problems relate to flaws in perceived learning gaps and student outcome measures. Predicting NCLEX-RN success is further complicated because students leave the teaching system prior to taking the exam, making them vulnerable to other influencing variables. The student's approach to learning (SAL) theory was used to aid in identifying effective strategies. The literature supports this theoretical approach, which targets changing the teaching and learning environment. However, there is limited research on the nursing student's approach to learning, on the benefits of innovative student-centered learning environments, and the most effective use of NCLEX-RN assessment products.

  7. Predicting NCLEX-RN success with the HESI Exit Exam: eighth validity study.

    PubMed

    Langford, Rae; Young, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam (E(2)) is being used to assess students' readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Seven previously conducted validity studies indicate that the E(2) is 96.36%-99.16% accurate in predicting NCLEX-RN success. Findings of this eighth validity study, which also investigated the predictive accuracy of repeat testing with parallel versions of the E(2), indicated that the E(2) is highly accurate (94.93%-98.32%) in predicting NCLEX-RN success for the initial testing and 2 retests. Of the 66 participating nursing programs, deans and directors from 43 (65.15%) of the programs reported implementing a policy that used E(2) scores as a benchmark for remediation. A score of 850 was the most common E(2) benchmark designated by faculties, and students who failed to achieve the faculty-designated E(2) benchmark score were required to retest with a parallel version of the E(2). Remediation resources used to assist students in achieving faculty-designated E(2) benchmark scores varied widely, with many programs employing multiple remediation methods.

  8. Assessment of the Nurse Medication Administration Workflow Process

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Rita; Vidal, José M.; Sharif, Omor; Cai, Bo; Parsons, Bridgette; Bennett, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents findings of an observational study of the Registered Nurse (RN) Medication Administration Process (MAP) conducted on two comparable medical units in a large urban tertiary care medical center in Columbia, South Carolina. A total of 305 individual MAP observations were recorded over a 6-week period with an average of 5 MAP observations per RN participant for both clinical units. A key MAP variation was identified in terms of unbundled versus bundled MAP performance. In the unbundled workflow, an RN engages in the MAP by performing only MAP tasks during a care episode. In the bundled workflow, an RN completes medication administration along with other patient care responsibilities during the care episode. Using a discrete-event simulation model, this paper addresses the difference between unbundled and bundled workflow and their effects on simulated redesign interventions.

  9. The impact of state certification of community health workers on team climate among registered nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Siemon, Mark; Shuster, Geoff; Boursaw, Blake

    2015-04-01

    A number of states have adopted certification programs for community health workers (CHWs) to improve recognition of CHWs as members of health care teams, increase oversight, and to provide sustainable funding. There has been little research into the impact of state CHW certification on the diffusion and adoption of CHWs into existing health care systems. This study examined the impact of state CHW certification on the perceptions of team climate among registered nurses (RNs) who work with CHWs in states with and without CHW certification programs. The study recruited RNs using a purposeful sampling method and used an online survey, which included the Team Climate Inventory (TCI), and compared the perceptions of team climate between the two groups. The study found no significant differences in the overall mean TCI score or TCI subscale scores between RNs who work in states with CHW certification programs (n = 81) and those who work in states without CHW certification programs (n = 115). There was a statistically significant difference on one survey question regarding whether RNs believe state certification of CHWs improved the ability of their health care team to deliver quality care. More research is needed to assess impact of state certification of CHWs and other factors that influence the diffusion and adoption of CHWs into the current health care system.

  10. The role of the registered nurse-first assistant in the implantable left ventricular assist device program.

    PubMed

    Hlozek, C C; Zacharias, W M; Vargo, R L; Elias, B A; Yeager, M; McCarthy, P M

    1995-01-01

    Successful support of patients using the implantable left ventricular assist device requires sustained and coordinated efforts by physicians and medical personnel. The authors describe the role of their registered nurse-first assistant (RNFA) as it has evolved through caring for 43 implantable pneumatic left ventricular assist device patients and 8 vented-electric left ventricular assist system patients during a 3 year period. Intraoperatively, the RNFA is responsible for pump assembly, including pre sealing all grafts and connecting areas of the pump using a combination of cryoprecipitate and thrombin. The RNFA assists with pump insertion during surgery. At device explantation, the RNFA dismantles the pump according to the FDA protocol for disassembly. Post operatively, the RNFA assesses and maintains patient hemodynamic stability and intervenes to manage hemodynamic and mechanical problems. Of the 51 patients, 13 are still on support, 9 died before transplantation (17.6%), and post transplant survival is 96.0%. In conclusion, an active left ventricular assist device program requires skilled personnel to manage complex problems and contributes to a successful patient outcome.

  11. Does Moral Distress Differ Between California Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Independent Versus Medically Supervised Practice: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Dumouchel, Michael; Boytim, Michael; Gorman, Nicholas; Weismuller, Penny

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if moral distress levels differed between certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) working in medically supervised versus independent practice in California. A 63-question survey was administered to 1,190 California CRNAs. Moral distress was measured by the included Ethics Stress Scale. The response rate was 14.7%, yielding demographic and Ethics Stress scores for 175 respondents. Sixty-five participants answered an open-ended question about moral distress yielding qualitative data. Medically supervised CRNAs had a lower mean moral distress scores (176.8) versus independent practice CRNAs (187.8) (p = .002). Lower scores on the ESS indicate higher moral distress. Qualitative data demonstrated that CRNAs experienced moral distress in the following situations: when pressured to give anesthesia to unoptimized patients, when differences of opinion regarding anesthetic plans occurred, in dealing with end-of-life issues, when working with incompetent providers, and during interprofessional struggles between CRNAs and anesthesiologists. In order to reduce moral distress among CRNAs, implications for practice include increased administrative support, increased communication and reciprocated collegial respect between anesthesiologists and CRNAs, and CRNA representation on ethics committees.

  12. Factors affecting incident reporting by registered nurses: the relationship of perceptions of the environment for reporting errors, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographics on intent to report errors.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Terry; Etchegaray, Jason

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety has assumed an international focus. In the past, the focus on detecting and preventing errors was up to the individual clinician, often the registered nurse. With impetus from the Institute of Medicine and other national agencies, a shift to emphasis on systems and processes and near miss and error reporting has occurred. Information from caregiver reporting has taken on new importance. This study was conducted to explore nurses' willingness to report errors of varying degrees of severity and the factors that impacted that intent. Registered nurses were selected randomly from the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners' roster and surveyed regarding perceptions of the environment for reporting, perceptions of reasons for not reporting, knowledge of the nursing practice act, and demographic variables. A majority of nurses were willing to report all levels of errors. Primary position, reasons for not reporting, and years since initial licensure were predictors of intent to report incidents with no injury and those with minimal injury. All but four nurses (99%) indicated that they would report incidents resulting in moderate to severe injury or death.

  13. Hospital demand for licensed practical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dyer, Wendy T; Chapman, Susan; Seago, Jean Ann

    2006-10-01

    Despite evidence that hospital use of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) declined in the 1990s, the current registered nurse (RN) shortage has prompted interest in LPNs as substitutes for RNs. Hospitals, being the dominant employer of RNs, have an economic incentive to use less expensive LPNs as substitutes. Beside wages, there are several forces underlying hospital demand for LPNs. In this article, the authors model and estimate hospital demand for LPNs as a function of nurse wages and hospital, market, and patient characteristics using a longitudinal data set of short-term general hospitals in the United States. The authors find evidence that higher RN wages increase hospital demand for LPNs, both in levels and relative to RNs, suggesting that hospitals at least partially substitute RNs with LPNs.

  14. Taking action: An exploration of the actions of exemplary oncology nurses when there is a sense of hopelessness and futility perceived by registered nurses at diagnosis, during treatment, and in palliative situations.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Katherine J; Perry, Beth

    2015-01-01

    "There is nothing more that can be done" is a phrase that may occasionally cross the minds of oncology nurses. This paper reports on the actions of exemplary oncology nurses who were faced with such situations where their colleagues gave up or turned away. The research question, "What actions do exemplary clinical oncology nurses (RNs) undertake in patient-care situations where further nursing interventions seem futile?" prefaced data collection via a secure website where 14 Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs) provided narratives documenting their actions. Thematic analysis utilized QRS NVivo 10 software and hand coding. Four themes were generated from data analysis: advocacy, not giving up, genuine presence, and moral courage. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  15. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the clinical experience of newly graduated registered nurses from their pre-registration paid employment: A narrative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Law, Yee-Shui Bernice; Chan, E Angela

    2016-09-01

    Paid employment within clinical setting, such as externships for undergraduate student, are used locally and globally to better prepare and retain new graduates for actual practice and facilitate their transition into becoming registered nurses. However, the influence of paid employment on the post-registration experience of such nurses remains unclear. Through the use of narrative inquiry, this study explores how the experience of pre-registration paid employment shapes the post-registration experience of newly graduated registered nurses. Repeated individual interviews were conducted with 18 new graduates, and focus group interviews were conducted with 11 preceptors and 10 stakeholders recruited from 8 public hospitals in Hong Kong. The data were subjected to narrative and paradigmatic analyses. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the knowledge and performance of graduates who worked in the same unit for their undergraduate paid work experience were uncovered. These assumptions affected the quantity and quality of support and time that other senior nurses provided to these graduates for their further development into competent nurses and patient advocates, which could have implications for patient safety. It is our hope that this narrative inquiry will heighten awareness of taken-for-granted assumptions, so as to help graduates transition to their new role and provide quality patient care.

  16. A hospital-level analysis of the work environment and workforce health indicators for registered nurses in Ontario's acute-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shamian, J; Kerr, M S; Laschinger, H K; Thomson, D

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between hospital-level indicators of the work environment and aggregated indicators of health and well-being amongst registered nurses working in acute-care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. This ecological analysis used data from a self-reported survey instrument randomly allocated to nurses using a stratified sampling approach. Multivariable linear regression models were used to examine hospital-level associations for burnout, musculoskeletal pain, self-rated general health, and absence due to illness. The unit of analysis was the hospital (n = 160), with individual nurse responses (n = 6,609) aggregated within hospitals. After controlling for basic differences in nurse workforces, including mean age and education, higher (better) work-environment scores were found to be generally associated with higher health-indicator scores, while a larger proportion of full-time than part-time nurses was found to be associated with lower (poorer) health scores. This study may provide direction for policy-makers in coping with the recruitment and retention of nursing staff in light of the current nursing shortage.

  17. RN to FNP: a qualitative study of role transition.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Laura J; Steiner, Susan H; Burman, Mary E

    2004-09-01

    Registered nurses who return to school in a nurse practitioner program undergo role transition throughout the educational process and into the postgraduate period. This study examined the role transition that occurs in family nurse practitioner (FNP) students. A descriptive, qualitative design was used with in-depth telephone interviews of 9 female FNPs who had recently graduated. A conceptual model was generated that described the role transition from RN to FNP. Two phases of role transition occurred and were depicted by the central categories that emerged: extrinsic obstacles, intrinsic obstacles, turbulence, positive extrinsic forces, positive intrinsic forces, and role development. Although the central categories were found to be the same in Phase I and Phase II, the defining characteristics differed. This study has implications for FNPs, students, and educators regarding role transition. It presents new findings not identified in prior research: personal commitments and sacrifices were identified as specific obstacles encountered during the educational process, and differences were found between inexperienced and experienced RNs in relation to the FNP role transition during the educational period.

  18. Certified nurse-midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States. The first program used public health registered nurses who had been educated in England. These nurses ... Applicants for nurse-midwife programs usually must be registered nurses and have at least 1 to 2 years ...

  19. Factors associated with evidence-based practice among registered nurses in Sweden: a national cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence-based practice (EBP) is emphasized to increase the quality of care and patient safety. EBP is often described as a process consisting of distinct activities including, formulating questions, searching for information, compiling the appraised information, implementing evidence, and evaluating the resulting practice. To increase registered nurses’ (RNs’) practice of EBP, variables associated with such activities need to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine individual and organizational factors associated with EBP activities among RNs 2 years post graduation. Methods A cross-sectional design based on a national sample of RNs was used. Data were collected in 2007 from a cohort of RNs, included in the Swedish Longitudinal Analyses of Nursing Education/Employment study. The sample consisted of 1256 RNs (response rate 76%). Of these 987 RNs worked in healthcare at the time of the data collection. Data was self-reported and collected through annual postal surveys. EBP activities were measured using six single items along with instruments measuring individual and work-related variables. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results Associated factors were identified for all six EBP activities. Capability beliefs regarding EBP was a significant factor for all six activities (OR = 2.6 - 7.3). Working in the care of older people was associated with a high extent of practicing four activities (OR = 1.7 - 2.2). Supportive leadership and high collective efficacy were associated with practicing three activities (OR = 1.4 - 2.0). Conclusions To be successful in enhancing EBP among newly graduated RNs, strategies need to incorporate both individually and organizationally directed factors. PMID:23642173

  20. Exploring direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction for early-career registered nurses employed in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine T; Brewer, Carol S; Fatehi, Farida; Greene, William H

    2014-08-01

    We explored direct and indirect influences of physical work environment on job satisfaction in a nationally representative sample of 1,141 early-career registered nurses. In the fully specified model, physical work environment had a non-significant direct effect on job satisfaction. The path analysis used to test multiple indirect effects showed that physical work environment had a positive indirect effect (p < .05) on job satisfaction through ten variables: negative affectivity, variety, workgroup cohesion, nurse-physician relations, quantitative workload, organizational constraints, distributive justice, promotional opportunity, local and non-local job opportunities. The findings make important contributions to the understanding of the relationship between physical work environment and job satisfaction. The results can inform health care leaders' insight about how physical work environment influences nurses' job satisfaction.

  1. Affirming At-Risk Minorities for Success (ARMS): retention, graduation, and success on the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Judith A; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Goodman, Nancy

    2007-08-01

    Increasing ethnic and racial diversity in the U.S. population combined with inadequate minority representation in the nursing profession requires innovative strategies to recruit, retain, and graduate nurses from diverse ethnic and racial populations. Affirming At-Risk Minorities for Success (ARMS) was funded by a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Basic Nurse Education and Practice Program grant. Participants (N = 64) were enrolled in a baccalaureate degree nursing program that has been predominantly White/ Anglo and is located in the south-central region of the United States. Research objectives were to increase program retention, graduation rates, and success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) for minority or educationally disadvantaged students through programmatic interventions, including mentoring and advising, tutoring, and educational seminars. The comparison group was non-ARMS students derived from a comprehensive database (N = 265). Results indicated that interventions positively affected graduation rates (measure of retention = 98%), significantly affected grades in the Leadership-Management capstone course, and eliminated the effects of ethnicity on NCLEX-RN success.

  2. Enrolled nurses and the professionalisation of nursing: a comparison of nurse education and skill-mix in Australia and the UK.

    PubMed

    Francis, B; Humphreys, J

    1999-04-01

    In the UK prior to 1989 two levels of nurse were trained: first level, or 'Registered Nurses' (RNs), and second Level, or 'Enrolled Nurses' (ENs). In 1989 changes to nurse education driven by 'Project 2000' marked the end of EN training: nurse education moved into the higher education sector and a single type of RN education replaced the original split-level training. Yet in Australia, where RN training has followed a similar path into higher education, the split level training of ENs and RNs has been maintained. The reasons for this difference in approach to ENs are investigated and discussed. The paper goes on to explore the implications and possible outcomes of the two different approaches in terms of the professionalisation of nursing and skill-mix in the health care workforce. Now that some UK nursing bodies are pressing for a degree-led profession, it is suggested that the Australian model may have an advantage, as concerns are being raised that English nurses may 'price themselves out of the market', with the nursing role being encroached upon by non-nurse Health Care Assistants.

  3. Is there a case for tailoring graduate programs for nurses who have previously practiced as Enrolled Nurses?

    PubMed

    Cubit, Katrina A; Leeson, Bradley G

    2009-11-01

    The nursing workforce in Australia, the UK and New Zealand has traditionally comprised two levels of nurse - the Registered Nurse (RN) and the Enrolled Nurse (EN). There is a significant difference in the role and scope of practice between the two levels. This difference is clearly reflected in the education required which, in Australia, is delivered the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector for ENs and in the tertiary education sector for RNs. In an attempt to redress worldwide shortage of RNs, conversion programs have been developed for ENs to upgrade to the RN qualification. In Australia a variety of such courses are on offer, yet these are not without their critics. There have been issues identified as to the appropriateness of credit awarded by universities for recognised prior learning as well as concerns raised regarding the difficult transfer of knowledge between the VET sector and the tertiary education system. This paper presents a review of published research exploring the development and implementation of EN conversion programs. While ENs have been identified as having 'specific' needs during their first year as Registered Nurses these 'specific' needs have not been articulated. Moreover, there is no evidence to suggest health care organisations address these needs in graduate programs. This paper therefore has highlighted a need to identify what the 'specific' needs are and then to develop a graduate program tailored specifically for the RN graduate who previously practiced as an EN.

  4. Objective Structured Clinical Examination as an educational initiative for summative simulation competency evaluation of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists' clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Linda L; Glymph, Derrick C; Newman, Johanna; Gonzalez, Vicente; Gonzalez, Juan E; Groom, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    The use of simulation to imitate real-life scenarios reaches back many centuries. In the last decade, the use of simulation in healthcare has gained acceptance as a valuable tool for teaching and learning technical and nontechnical skills in healthcare. The use of simulation technology has moved medical education from the standard of pen and paper examinations to the assessment of clinical competency before caring for patients. The old thinking of "see one, do one, teach one" is behind us as healthcare works to create a culture of safety that holds healthcare personnel accountable. A current use of testing clinical competence is the use of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) by physician training programs. As a testing tool, the OSCE has great potential to assess the clinical competence of students before they enter the clinical setting. The nurse anesthesia program at the authors' university has moved toward creating a formal assessment to ensure clinical competence of their student registered nurse anesthetists. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of an OSCE to ensure clinical competence of first-year student registered nurse anesthetists before they begin their clinical training.

  5. Lessons in media advocacy: a look back at Saskatchewan's nursing education debate.

    PubMed

    Leurer, Marie Dietrich

    2013-05-01

    Nurses are encouraged to exert their influence in the realm of public policy, particularly policies related to the nursing profession, the health care system and the health of their clients. Media advocacy can be used by nursing organizations to mobilize public support on policy issues in order to influence policy makers. This article retrospectively examined the media advocacy efforts of nursing stakeholders in Saskatchewan, Canada in response to a new government policy that would have impacted educational requirements for licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in that province. Print media sources from the period January to March, 2000 were examined to determine the specific media advocacy techniques used by nursing organizations within the framework of the policy cycle. The success of nursing stakeholders in reversing the government position highlights the effectiveness of media advocacy as a tool to disseminate messages from the nursing profession in order to impact policy.

  6. Emergency Nurses Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ribbon Commands Skip to main content ENA - Emergency Nurses Association - Safe Practice, Safe Care Sign In Join ... Wiley, MSN, RN, CEN, Takes Office as Emergency Nurses Association President 01-04-17 ENA Applauds VA’s ...

  7. Towards a values-based person specification for recruitment of compassionate nursing and midwifery candidates: a study of registered and student nurses' and midwives' perceptions of prerequisite attributes and key skills.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Anne; Smith, Dave; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Gray, Morag

    2014-09-01

    Selection and retention of preregistration nursing and midwifery students are issues that exercise educators, universities and commissioning bodies both nationally and internationally. It has recently become an expectation that a values-based approach is used within recruitment and selection activities in the UK. The desirability of a person specification to support transparent recruitment and selection is well recognised. An online survey of registered and student nurses and midwives found consensus around the desirability of several personal attributes and key skills. There was consensus in the top seven ranked attributes which were honesty and trustworthiness, communication skills, being a good listener, patience and tactfulness, sensitivity and compassion, the ability to seek and act on guidance and being a good team worker; this was between registered and unregistered nurses and midwives and also between participants representing all fields of nursing and midwifery practice. Some of the responses from Practice Education Facilitators (PEFs) (n=5) and senior managers (n=15) differed from those of other registrants surveyed. The attribute 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' was considered more important by PEFs and 'Observant and able to act on your own initiative within your level of responsibility' and 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' were ranked more highly by senior managers.

  8. Qualitative Inquiry into Challenges Experienced by Registered General Nurses in the Emergency Department: A Study of Selected Hospitals in the Volta Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Adatara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Registered General Nurses (RGNs) play crucial roles in emergency departments (EDs). EDs in Ghana are primarily staffed by RGNs who have had no additional formal education in emergency care. Additionally, basic, master's, or doctoral level nursing education programs provide limited content on the complexities of emergency nursing. Nurses in EDs are affected by many challenges such as growing patient population, financial pressures, physical violence, verbal abuse, operational inefficiencies, overcrowding, and work overload. There is a paucity of research on challenges experienced by RGNs in EDs in the Volta Region of Ghana. In this qualitative study, twenty RGNs in EDs from three selected hospitals in the Volta Region of Ghana were interviewed. All recorded interviews were transcribed, reviewed several times by researchers and supervisors, and analyzed using content analysis. Five thematic categories were identified. These thematic categories of challenges were lack of preparation for ED role, verbal abuse from patients relatives, lack of resources in ED, stressful and time consuming nature of ED, and overcrowding in ED. Formal education of RGNs in the advanced role of emergency care, adequate supply of resources, increased hospital management support, and motivations for RGNs working in ED are necessary to improve the practice of emergency care. PMID:27885343

  9. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  10. Teaching Korean RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Eleanor T

    2009-01-01

    The author describes the challenges and issues related to teaching small cohorts of foreign-educated Korean registered nurses in the United States. Teaching-learning strategies for educating this ethnic group and other culturally different student cohorts are discussed.

  11. Guidance Counselors' Ratings of Important Attributes for Registered Nurses and Prospective Nursing Students: A Comparison of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Career Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Leslie K.; Hoke, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of counselors from Hispanic serving high schools regarding professional nursing as a career have received limited study. A cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenience sample of 55 guidance counselors from Hispanic serving institutions identified the number of requests/referrals to nursing programs and perceptions of prospective…

  12. Assumptions and realities of the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Julia W; Treas, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    Every three years the National Council of State Boards of Nursing conducts a practice analysis to verify the activities that are tested on the licensure exam (NCLEX-RN). Faculty can benefit from information in the practice analysis to ensure that courses and experiences adequately prepare graduates for the NCLEX-RN. This summary of the practice analysis challenges common assumptions and provides recommendations for faculty.

  13. Standardized mastery content assessments for predicting NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Emory, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Nurse educators need predictors of failure for early intervention. This study investigated the predictability of fundamentals, mental health, and pharmacology standardized assessment scores to identify the risk of baccalaureate students' failure on the NCLEX-RN. Using logistic regression the pharmacology assessment score was predictive with 73.7% accuracy. Use of the pharmacology assessment can assist in early identification of at-risk students in efforts to better prepare for the NCLEX-RN examination.

  14. Post-graduation factors predicting NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Pamela Butler; Waterhouse, Julie Keith

    2003-01-01

    The academic and nonacademic factors that influence nursing students' success on the licensure exam have been widely reported. However, many questions remain as to why certain candidates fail the exam. This pilot study explores postgraduation influences on the NCLEX-RN.(R) Factors such as length and type of study, work hours, review course participation, sleep, and stress were recorded using the newly developed NCLEX Preparation Survey. Results suggest both expected and unexpected relationships between these factors and NCLEX-RN mastery.

  15. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  16. Attestations filed by facilities using nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses--Employment and Training Administration, DOL. Notice.

    PubMed

    1994-04-08

    The Department of Labor (DOL) is publishing, for public information, a list of the following health care facilities which plan on employing nonimmigrant alien nurses. These organizations have attestations on file with DOL for that purpose.

  17. Reverse Engineering: Strategy to Teach Evidence-Based Practice to Online RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Gary, Jodie C; Hudson, Cindy E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative approach to introducing RN-to-BSN students to nursing research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Reverse engineering updates an existing EBP project to better emphasize the role of research and evidence to practicing RNs enrolled in an RN-to-BSN program. Reverse engineering of a nursing practice guideline offers a method for teaching an appreciation of research and supporting nursing practice with best evidence.

  18. Informing pre-registration nurse education: a proposal outline on the value, methods and ethical considerations of involving children in doctoral research.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya

    2014-12-01

    As pre-registration nurse education programmes evolve within the United Kingdom, it is imperative to involve patient/client groups within the research process, as the outcome may invoke a change in the care delivery of the registered nurse (RN). This paper focuses upon children and how children might hypothetically contribute to informing a generic nursing programme in their capacity as a rights holder and expert in their own lives. Even though their contribution and value has been debated around their capacity as research advisor, research participant and co researcher, this paper explores how the child's view of their experience of hospital and of the good nurse could be best captured. Research is a powerful vehicle that can enable their voice to equally inform UK nurse educators and policy makers so that the child's health care needs are effectively met in hospital by RN's who complete a generic programme.

  19. 42 CFR 410.69 - Services of a certified registered nurse anesthetist or an anesthesiologist's assistant: Basic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Basic rule. Medicare Part B pays for anesthesia services and related care furnished by a certified... anesthesia at a level that builds on a premedical undergraduate science background. Anesthetist includes both... respect to non-physician anesthetists; (3) Has graduated from a nurse anesthesia educational program...

  20. The Role of Organizational Culture in Retaining Nursing Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Castle, Nicholas G.; Lin, Michael K.; Shrivastwa, Nijika; Spreitzer, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We examined how organizational culture in nursing homes affects staff turnover, because culture is a first step to creating satisfactory work environments. Design and Methods: Nursing home administrators were asked in 2009 to report on facility culture and staff turnover. We received responses from 419 of 1,056 administrators contacted. Respondents reported the strength of cultural values using scales from a Competing Values Framework and percent of staff leaving annually for Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practice Nurse (LPN), and nursing aide (NA) staff. We estimated negative binomial models predicting turnover.  Results: Turnover rates are lower than found in past but remain significantly higher among NAs than among RNs or LPNs. Facilities with stronger market values had increased turnover among RNs and LPNs, and among NAs when turnover was adjusted for facilities with few staff. Facilities emphasizing hierarchical internal processes had lower RN turnover. Group and developmental values focusing on staff and innovation only lowered LPN turnover. Finally, effects on NA turnover become insignificant when turnover was adjusted if voluntary turnover was reported. Implications: Organizational culture had differential effects on the turnover of RN, LPN, and NA staff that should be addressed in developing culture-change strategies. More flexible organizational culture values were important for LPN staff only, whereas unexpectedly, greater emphasis on rigid internal rules helped facilities retain RNs. Facilities with a stronger focus on customer needs had higher turnover among all staff. PMID:24218146

  1. Junior nursing students' experiences of vertical violence during clinical rotations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sandra P; Burk, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal violence is a form of workplace violence, a phenomenon that is prevalent in the nursing profession. Research has revealed a variety of negative peer-to-peer behaviors that lower morale and lead to turnover. However, little research has been conducted on "eating our young" (violence occurring between individuals with unequal power, such as staff nurse and student). We propose "vertical violence" as the appropriate term when abusive registered nurse (RN) behavior is directed towards students. We report a content analysis of stories written by junior nursing students about incidents of injustice perpetrated by staff RNs during their clinical experiences. Four levels of injustice were described. Nursing leadership, both in hospitals and educational institutions, must become engaged in efforts to eradicate vertical violence towards students.

  2. Critical thinking ability of associate, baccalaureate and RN-BSN senior students in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sujin; Ha, Juyoung; Shin, Kyungrim; Davis, Michael K

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the critical thinking ability of students enrolled in associate, baccalaureate, and Registered Nurse-Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) programs in Korea. The participants were 301 undergraduate nursing students. The instrument used for this study was the Watson & Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and analysis of variance with Scheffe's multiple comparison. The average critical thinking ability score was 41.59. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students scored significantly higher on critical thinking than the other 2 groups. Students < or = 22 years of age scored higher than the other age groups on critical thinking. This study provides preliminary evidence that the length and content of an educational program is as important as its focus on enabling students to develop their critical thinking abilities. This finding suggests a need to infuse critical thinking activities early in existing secondary school curricula as a way of encouraging students to develop their thinking abilities earlier.

  3. Registered nurses' beliefs of the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their patient teaching regarding exercise.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Eileen M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-08-01

    Recommendations by experts have been in place for > 10 years encouraging every adult to participate in ≥ 30 min of daily moderate-intensity physical activity. Despite extensive research supporting the value of physical activity, only about one-third of all adults meet physical activity recommendations. Using Pender's Health Promotion Theory as the framework, this study was focused on the relationships between nurses' beliefs regarding the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their recommendation of exercise for health promotion or as part of a treatment plan. Results showed positive correlations between exercise benefits, physical activity and recommendation of exercise to patients. Nurses who believe in health promotion and embrace healthy behaviours are more likely to be positive role models and teach healthy behaviours to their patients. Recommendations for practice and future research are included.

  4. Notice of attestations filed by facilities using nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses--Employment and Training Administration, DOL. Notice.

    PubMed

    1995-02-28

    The Department of Labor (DOL) is publishing, for public information, a list of the following health care facilities that have submitted attestations (Form ETA 9029 and explanatory statements) to one of four Regional Offices of DOL (Boston, Chicago, Dallas and Seattle) for the purpose of employing nonimmigrant alien nurses. A decision has been made on these organizations' attestations and they are on file with DOL.

  5. The effects of staff nurses' morale on patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Ping; Huang, Chen-Kuan

    2005-06-01

    This study, designed by descriptive and inferential methods, study aimed to examine staff nurses' morale and its effect on patient satisfaction, the most commonly used variable to measure patient outcomes. Data were collected with structured questionnaires from 332 nurses and 265 inpatients in 21 medical-surgical units of a medical center in Taiwan. All registered nurses (RN) among the 21 sample units were recruited and administered with Litwin and Stringerm's (1968) Work Morale Scale, which was modified by Hsu in 1981. A convenience sampling was implemented to select those patients who had been admitted for at least 3 days and were ready to be discharged. Yang's (1997) Nursing-Sensitive Patient Satisfaction Scale was used to measure patient outcomes. The results showed that job position and pay had a significant effect on nurses' work morale. Nurses' work morale may not necessarily be an impact factor on patient satisfaction, but it accounts for 66.7 percent of the discriminate power to predict nursing-sensitive patient satisfaction. In view of the findings, every attempt should be made to highlight the nature of a caring profession. Nursing leaders should put effort into improving nurses' involvement and identification with their organizations, both of which are significant factors associated with nursing unit morale. The findings of this study may contribute to a body of knowledge regarding nurses' work morale and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes.

  6. Resonant leadership, workplace empowerment, and "spirit at work": impact on RN job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joan I J; Warren, Sharon; Cummings, Greta; Smith, Donna L; Olson, Joanne K

    2013-12-01

    Canadian researchers have developed the Spirit At Work (SAW) tool for identifying the experiences of individuals who are passionate about and energized by their work. This article describes (a) what registered nurses perceive as contributing to their personal SAW; and (b) the relationships among resonant leadership, structural empowerment concepts, psychological empowerment concepts, SAW concepts, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and the demographic variables of experience, education, and rank in the RN workplace. The theoretical model was tested using LISREL 8.80 and survey data from 147 randomly selected RNs. Engaging work was found to account for 63% of the explained variance in the model's endogenous variables. Spiritual connection had a causal effect on organizational commitment, while resonant leadership and individual empowerment had significant causal influence on SAW, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. These results strengthen those of previous studies reporting workplace structures/processes/contributions leading to superior care environments. Future studies will clarify the role of SAW in the workplace.

  7. Registered Nurses’ Perceptions about the Situation of Family Caregivers to Patients with Heart Failure - A Focus Group Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure is a growing public health problem associated with poor quality of life and significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of heart failure care is provided by family caregivers, and is associated with caregiver burden and reduced quality of life. Research emphasizes that future nursing interventions should recognize the importance of involving family caregivers to achieve optimal outcomes. Aims The aims of this study are to explore registered nurses’ perceptions about the situation of family caregivers to patients with heart failure, and registered nurses’ interventions, in order to improve family caregivers’ situation. Methods The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Six focus group interviews were held with 23 registered nurses in three hospitals and three primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Two content areas were identified by the a priori study aims. Four categories and nine sub-categories emerged in the analysis process. The content area “Family caregivers' situation” includes two categories: “To be unburdened” and “To comprehend the heart failure condition and its consequences”. The content area “Interventions to improve family caregivers' situation” includes two categories: “Individualized support and information” and “Bridging contact”. Conclusions Registered nurses perceive family caregivers' situation as burdensome, characterized by worry and uncertainty. In the PHCCs, the continuity and security of an RN as a permanent health care contact was considered an important and sustainable intervention to better care for family caregivers' worry and uncertainty. In the nurse-led heart failure clinics in hospitals, registered nurses can provide family caregivers with the opportunity of involvement in their relative's health care and address congruence and relationship quality within the family through the use of "Shared care

  8. Strategies to promote success on the NCLEX-RN for students with English as a second language.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Helene; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R; Towle, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Faced with an increasingly diverse population and a shortage of nurses, US schools of nursing need to educate nurses from diverse backgrounds. These students may use English as a second language (ESL), leading to challenges that can place them at risk for not passing the NCLEX-RN. The authors present several challenges for ESL students preparing for the NCLEX-RN and successful strategies to coach them. These preparation issues and strategies may also help foreign-educated nurses prepare for the NCLEX-RN.

  9. Comparison of Successful Intubation Between Video Laryngoscopy View Before Attempted Intubation and Direct Laryngoscopic Intubation by Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wands, Brenda; Minzola, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Airway management is a primary focus when student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) begin clinical rotations in their nurse anesthesia program. Successful endotracheal intubation requires both knowledge of and experience with the airway and its structures. Lack of clinical maturity and unfamiliarity with the patient airway intensifies student anxiety in the clinical arena. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the success rate of direct laryngoscopy by 9 SRNAs who were just entering clinical practice rotations. This study required group 1 to perform direct laryngoscopy in their first clinical opportunity in the operating room; group 2 was required to observe a minimum of 3 video laryngoscopic (GlideScope, Verathon Inc) intubations performed by the clinical preceptor before the students' first attempt using direct laryngoscopy. Other modalities used to secure the airway in this study included the GlideScope and a laryngeal mask airway. Results of the data analysis revealed there was no significant difference between groups for success of direct laryngoscopy (group 1, 54%; group 2, 58%; P = .45).

  10. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  11. Applying the Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes Circle of Success to improving and sustaining quality.

    PubMed

    Bakerjian, Debra; Zisberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Looking forward to the Quality Assurance Performance Improvement (QAPI) program to be implemented and required in 2014, and as nursing home staff provide care for residents with increasingly complex health issues, knowledge of how to implement quality improvement (QI) is imperative. The nursing home administrator and director of nursing (DON) provide overall leadership, but it is the primary responsibility of the DON and other registered nurse staff to implement and manage the day to day QI process. This article describes potential roles of nursing leaders and key components of a QI project using a pressure ulcer case study exemplar to illustrate a quality improvement process. The authors suggest specific methods that RN leaders can employ using the Advancing Excellence Campaign Circle of Success as an organizing framework along with evidence-based resources. Nursing home leaders could use this article as a guideline for implementing any clinical quality improvement process.

  12. From beta-blockers to boot camp: Preparing students for the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Herrman, Judith W; Johnson, Amy Nagorski

    2009-01-01

    Although it is thought that reviewing essential materials and learning how to answer computer-generated questions are optimal preparations for NCLEX-RN, strategies that build knowledge, self-confidence, and professionalism of the nurse taking the exam are equally important. A senior seminar course that guides formal NCLEX-RN preparation is presented in this article with specific course strategies and a blueprint of seminar content that can be adapted to the nursing curriculum.

  13. Quality Outcomes of Hospital Supplemental Nurse Staffing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Aiken, Linda H.; Freund, Deborah A.; Noyes, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Background Use of supplemental registered nurses (SRNs) is common practice among U.S. hospitals to fill gaps in nurse staffing. Objective To examine the relationship between use of SRNs and patient outcomes. Methods Multilevel modeling was performed to analyze hospital administrative data from 19 hospital units in a large tertiary medical center for the years 2003–2006. Patient outcomes included in-hospital mortality, medication errors, falls, pressure ulcers, and patient satisfaction with nurses. Results SRN use ranged from 0–30.4% of total RN hours per unit quarter. Among 188 of the 304 unit quarters in which SRNs were used, the average SRN use was 9.8% in non-ICUs and 6.4% in ICUs. All observed effects of SRN use on patient outcomes were non-significant. Conclusions SRN use was substantial and varied widely by unit. No evidence was found that links SRN use to either adverse or positive patient outcomes. PMID:23151931

  14. Implementing a writing course in an online RN-BSN program.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carol J; D'Angelo, Barbara; Rennell, Nathalie; Muzyka, Diann; Pannabecker, Virginia; Maid, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly writing is an essential skill for nurses to communicate new research and evidence. Written communication directly relates to patient safety and quality of care. However, few online RN-BSN programs integrate writing instruction into their curricula. Nurses traditionally learn how to write from instructor feedback and often not until midway into their baccalaureate education. Innovative strategies are needed to help nurses apply critical thinking skills to writing. The authors discuss a collaborative project between nursing faculty and technical communication faculty to develop and implement a writing course that is 1 of the 1st courses the students take in the online RN-BSN program.

  15. Strategies for lowering attrition rates and raising NCLEX-RN pass rates.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Bonnie

    2005-12-01

    This study was designed to determine strategies to raise the NCLEX-RN pass rate and lower the attrition rate in a community college nursing program. Ex-post facto data were collected from 213 former nursing student records. Qualitative data were collected from 10 full-time faculty, 30 new graduates, and 45 directors of associate degree nursing programs in Texas. The findings linked the academic variables of two biology courses and three components of the preadmission test to completion of the nursing program. A relationship was found between one biology course, the science component of the preadmission test, the HESI Exit Examination score, and the nursing skills course to passing the NCLEX-RN. Qualitative data indicated preadmission requirements, campus counselors, remediation, faculty, test-item writing, and teaching method were instrumental in completion of the program and passing the NCLEX-RN.

  16. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    PubMed

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described.

  17. The relationship of critical thinking to performance on the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Gloeckner, Gene W

    2005-02-01

    This study investigated the relationship of critical thinking to performance on the NCLEX-RN. The sample (N = 218) was composed of baccalaureate nursing students from a university-based nursing program in the southwestern United States, and participants completed two critical thinking instruments: the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) and the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI). Results showed that there was a difference between participants who passed and failed the NCLEX-RN on both the entry and exit CCTST. Students in the pass group also had higher scores on the exit CCTDI, but scores for the fail group were comparable with national norms for nursing students. No changes in CCTST or CCTDI total scores occurred between program entry and exit, and neither instrument was useful in the prediction of NCLEX-RN performance. There were no differences in NCLEX-RN performance between the pass and fail groups for age or gender.

  18. Attitude, Knowledge, and Practice on Evidence-Based Nursing among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Multiple Center Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yufang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study was to describe RNs' attitude, knowledge, and practice on evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional Chinese nursing field and to estimate the related sociodemographic and professional factors. Methods. A multiple institutional cross-sectional survey design with self-reported EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) and self-designed questionnaires were used. Results. The average scores of the total EBPQ were with a mean of 4.24 (SD = 0.79). The score of attitude was the highest one, followed by the knowledge score, and the lowest one is practice. RNs with longer experience reported stronger EBP knowledge (H = 6.64, P < 0.05). And RNs under higher working pressure reported less positive attitudes (ρ = 0.17, P < 0.001), whereas RNs holding negative professional attitude reported lower scores (Spearman's ρ: 0.12 to 0.15, P < 0.001). Significant statistics were found between RNs with research experience and without in attitude (t = −2.40, P < 0.05) and knowledge (t = −2.43, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Respondents generally viewed EBP positively and their attitudes towards EBP tended to be more positive than knowledge and practice of EBP. Data also showed that longer working experience, having administrative position, research experience, lighter working load, and better professional attitude might facilitate EBP. PMID:27528882

  19. Wage Inequity: Within-Market Comparative Analysis of Salary for Public Health Nurses and Hospital Nurses.

    PubMed

    Issel, L Michele; Lurie, Christine Fitzpatrick; Bekemeier, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The labor market perspective focuses on supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) as employees. This perspective contrasts with beliefs in the public health sector that RNs working in local health departments (LHD) as public health nurses (PHNs) accept lower wages because of factors other than market demand. This study sought to describe the extent to which hourly wages of RNs working in LHDs are competitive with hospital RN wages within the same county market. A repeated measures survey design was used in collecting 2010 and 2014 data. The unit of analysis was the county, as an RN labor market for LHDs and hospitals. Survey questions captured factors common in human resources benefits and wage packages, such as differential pay, hourly rate pay based on years of experience, components of benefit packages (eg, sick and vacation leave), and reimbursement for education. Within each county, the LHD and all hospitals constituted a "market," yielding a potential 12 markets in our study sample. Human resources representatives from each of the 12 LHDs and from all hospitals within those 12 counties were invited to participate. We conducted comparisons with survey data using t test of mean differences on mean RN wages across years of experience. On average, LHDs paid significantly less than hospitals in their markets, at all levels of RN experience, and this gap increased with RN experience in the sample markets. Salary compression was evident in 2010 and worsened for PHNs in 2014, when compared with hospital RNs. In 2014, 100% of the sample LHDs offered reimbursements for continuing education for PHNs compared with 89% of hospitals providing this benefit. This study contributes to our understanding of the human resources challenges faced by LHDs and provides evidence elucidating resources issues that need to be addressed in order to improve recruitment and retention of PHNs.

  20. Barriers and facilitators affecting African Americans continuation into graduate programs in nursing.

    PubMed

    Mingo, Aunderia Doreen

    2008-01-01

    The population in the United States (US) is becoming more and more diverse. With each year the minority population in the US continues to grow. In the year 2000 there were over 281 million Americans with approximately 23% of them being minorities (US Census, 2000). African-Americans accounted for 34.6 million of the population or 12.3% in the 2000 census. Yet despite their growing numbers in the general population African-American Registered Nurses (RNs) only accounted for 4.9% of the total nurse population in the 2002 National Sample Survey of RN's (Health Resources Services Administration [HRSA], 2002).

  1. Measuring the influence of professional nursing practice on global hospital performance in an organizational context.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Dijon R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of professional nursing practice (PNP) on global hospital performance (GHP). Evidence links PNP and positive outcomes for patients and nurses, however, little is known about PNP influence on GHP measures used for patient decision-making and hospital management resource allocation decisions. A quantitative study using multiple regression analysis to predict a composite measure of GHP was conducted. Two survey instruments measuring perspectives of the PNP environment were completed by 1815 (31.3%) Registered Nurses (RN) and 28 (100%) Senior Nurse Executives (SNE) at 28 northeastern US hospitals. Secondary data provided organizational attributes. The degree of PNP was consistently reported by RNs and SNEs. When regressed with organizational factors, PNP was not a significant predictor of GHP. Better GHP was associated with lower lengths of stay, lower profitability, less admission growth, and non-health system affiliation. Further research is needed to define a nursing-sensitive GHP measure.

  2. Early Identification of At-Risk LPN-to-RN Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    Nurse education programs are implementing standardized assessments without evaluating their effectiveness. Graduates of associate degree nursing programs continue to be unsuccessful with licensure examinations, despite standardized testing and stronger admission criteria. This problem is also prevalent for LPN-to-RN education programs due to a…

  3. Preceptor and Self-Evaluation Competencies Among New RN Graduates.

    PubMed

    Prion, Susan; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn; West, Nikki

    2015-07-01

    Four transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates who had not yet found employment in nursing were based on the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies of knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs). To support consistent evaluation of participants by preceptors, a 35-item tool was developed that used a 4-point scale to assess selected behaviors. This article describes the initial reliability and validity testing of the tool, which had good internal consistency, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92 for preceptor evaluation of participants and 0.82 when used as a self-evaluation tool. Six content experts evaluated the tool's face validity; it successfully discriminated between junior-level baccalaureate nursing students and nursing faculty. Although the tool does not exhaustively reflect the QSEN KSAs, it provides a way to assess competencies among new nurse graduates.

  4. Work environment issues and intention-to-leave in Portuguese nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Bruyneel, Luk; Anderson, Janet E; Murrells, Trevor; Dussault, Gilles; Henriques de Jesus, Élvio; Sermeus, Walter; Aiken, Linda; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2015-12-01

    This study extends the Registered Nurses Forecasting (RN4CAST) study evidence base with newly collected data from Portuguese nurses working in acute care hospitals, in which the measurement of the quality of work environment, workload and its association with intention-to-leave emerge as of key importance. Data included surveys of 2235 nurses in 144 nursing units in 31 hospitals via stratified random sampling. Multilevel multivariate regression analysis shows that intention-to-leave is higher among nurses with a specialty degree, nurses aged 35-39, and in nursing units where nurses are less satisfied with opportunities for career advancement, staffing levels and participation in hospital affairs. Analysis with moderation effects showed the observed effect of age and of having a specialty degree on intention-to-leave during the regression analysis is reduced in nursing units where nurses are more satisfied with opportunities for career advancement. The most important finding from the study suggests that promoting retention strategies that increase satisfaction with opportunities for career advancement among Portuguese nurses has the potential to override individual characteristics associated with increased turnover intentions.

  5. Nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable elderly care services

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Fabian Ling Ngai; Yan, Vincent Chun Man; Tai, Winnie Ling Yin; Chen, Jing Han; Chung, Joanne Wai-yee; Wong, Thomas Kwok Shing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to explore nurses' knowledge of universal health coverage (UHC) for inclusive and sustainable development of elderly care services. Method: this was a cross-sectional survey. A convenience sample of 326 currently practicing enrolled nurses (EN) or registered nurses (RN) was recruited. Respondents completed a questionnaire which was based on the implementation strategies advocated by the WHO Global Forum for Governmental Chief Nursing Officers and Midwives (GCNOMs). Questions covered the government initiative, healthcare financing policy, human resources policy, and the respondents' perception of importance and contribution of nurses in achieving UHC in elderly care services. Results: the knowledge of nurses about UHC in elderly care services was fairly satisfactory. Nurses in both clinical practice and management perceived themselves as having more contribution and importance than those in education. They were relatively indifferent to healthcare policy and politics. Conclusion: the survey uncovered a considerable knowledge gap in nurses' knowledge of UHC in elderly care services, and shed light on the need for nurses to be more attuned to healthcare policy. The educational curriculum for nurses should be strengthened to include studies in public policy and advocacy. Nurses can make a difference through their participation in the development and implementation of UHC in healthcare services. PMID:26959330

  6. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  7. Accelerated RN-to-BSN Service-Learning Program Serves the Vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Margaret

    The definition, implementation, and benefits support the value of service-learning for nursing education. However, accelerated RN-to-BSN programs may have difficulty requiring service-learning experiences. This article offers a biblical rationale for service with vulnerable populations and an example of how service-learning is implemented into the curriculum of an accelerated, nontraditional, online/onsite RN-BSN completion program at a Christian university.

  8. Do progression and remediation policies improve NCLEX-RN pass rates?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Susan; Free, Kathleen Walsh; Newman, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Administrators at 5 schools of nursing who implemented a progression policy based on HESI Exit Exam scores were interviewed regarding their NCLEX-RN pass rates before and after initiating the policy and methods used for remediation. Even though the methods used for remediation were quite different among the participating schools, data obtained from these interviews indicated that the schools' NCLEX-RN pass rates improved 9-41% within 2 years after implementing the progression policies.

  9. Do progression and remediation policies improve NCLEX-RN pass rates?

    PubMed

    Morrison, Susan; Free, Kathleen Walsh; Newman, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Administrators at 5 schools of nursing who implemented a progression policy based on HESI Exit Examtrade mark scores were interviewed regarding their NCLEX-RN pass rates before and after initiating the policy and methods used for remediation. Even though the methods used for remediation were quite different among the participating schools, data obtained from these interviews indicated that the schools' NCLEX-RN pass rates improved 9-41% within 2 years after implementing the progression policies.

  10. The nursing shortage. Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Murray, Marilyn Kettering

    2002-02-01

    According to healthcare experts, the present nursing shortage is going to extend to 2020 with an estimated 400,000 RN vacancies. A number of factors are contributing to the shortage: an increase in the age of registered nurses, decreased school enrollment, increased career opportunities for women, changes in the healthcare delivery system, nurse "burn-out," and the public's misunderstanding of what nurses do. Additionally, a number of social and economic trends are going to affect the healthcare delivery system in the future, such as: aging of the population, increased technology, the increase of the health/wellness movement, changes in employee's work ethic, influence of Generation X and dot.com workers, and scarcity of entry-level and low-wage workers. If nursing is going to be a major player in the healthcare delivery system in 2020, nurses must take an active role in developing and implementing a strategic plan. We need to look beyond solutions used in the past, such as increasing compensation and modifying school curriculums.

  11. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  12. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students.

  13. Nursing Alumni Surveys: 2002 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA.

    This document reports on outcomes of the College of the Canyons, California, 2002 survey of nursing alumni. Surveys of RN, LVN, and LVN-RN graduates and their employers aimed to assess graduates' satisfaction with the preparation and training they received. Surveys also collected information intended to assess the current position in which the…

  14. Developing a Successful Online RN to BSN Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotts, Cheryl; Smith, Richard; Edwards-Schafer, Patricia; Schmidt, Cheryl; Smith, Jo Ann

    In 1999, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing received a 5-year grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Service Administration to provide online baccalaureate completion courses for RNs (Registered Nurses). At the completion of the first year, all six theory courses were offered online. Clinical courses are offered…

  15. NCLEX-RN Performance: Predicting Success on the Computerized Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Julie Keith; Beeman, Pamela Butler

    2001-01-01

    Discriminant analysis was used to identify variables predictive of success in the computerized National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses with data from 289 nursing graduates. Using seven significant predictors, 94% of passes and 92% of failures were correctly identified. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  16. Predicting NCLEX-RN Success: Can It Be Simplified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Julie Keith; Beeman, Pamela B.

    2003-01-01

    The Risk Appraisal Instrument was adapted and applied to records of 538 graduates of a nursing program 1995-1998. The instrument correctly classified nearly 61% of failures on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses and correctly predicted 72% of overall results. In comparison, statistically more complex methods classify 76-92%…

  17. Predicting Success for Baccalaureate Graduates on the NCLEX-RN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, Sue Ayers; Kissling, Grace

    2001-01-01

    For 505 nursing graduates, significant relationships were found between C, D, and F grades and scores on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurses. Those who passed the exam had significantly higher grade point averages, fewer grades below B, and higher Mosby AssessTest scores. Nontraditional-age students tended to have higher…

  18. Impact of a standardized test package on exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN outcomes.

    PubMed

    Homard, Catherine M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this ex post facto correlational study was to compare exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN(®) pass rates of baccalaureate nursing students who differed in level of participation in a standardized test package. Three cohort groups emerged as a standardized test package was introduced: (a) students who did not participate in a standardized test package; (b) students with two semesters of a standardized test package; and (c) students with four semesters of a standardized test package. Benner's novice-to-expert theory framed the study in the belief that students best acquire knowledge and skills through practice and reflection. Students participating in four semesters of a standardized test package demonstrated higher exit examination scores and NCLEX-RN pass rates compared with students who did not participate in this package. This study's results could inform nurse educators about strategies to facilitate nursing student success on exit examinations and the NCLEX-RN.

  19. A systematic review of the effectiveness of remediation interventions to improve NCLEX-RN pass rates.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Tracy D; Spurlock, Darrell

    2010-09-01

    First-time NCLEX-RN pass rates are important measures of educational quality in prelicensure nursing education programs. Licensure pass rate problems has been the subject of countless nursing education articles and studies over the past several decades. To improve NCLEX-RN pass rates, remediation is often prescribed for students who have academic performance deficits. This article presents a systematic review of studies on remediation interventions and their effects on NCLEX-RN pass rates. Most studies of remediation and its effects on licensure pass rates are descriptive program evaluation reports. The overall quality of studies included in this review is uneven but generally low. Nursing education researchers should focus on conducting higher quality intervention studies in which the fidelity of remediation interventions can be examined. Viewing licensure pass rates from a process improvement perspective and accounting for pass rate variations could also change the nature of scholarship on this topic.

  20. A writing intensive introductory course for RN to BSN students.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Anita S; Hyde, Yolanda M; Kautz, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    This article describes learning strategies used with RN to BSN students in their 1st nursing course to successfully learn how to write formal papers using the American Psychological Association (APA) format. This 1st nursing course, a writing intensive, requires 4 short papers with self, peer, and teacher critiques and opportunities to rewrite. Students learn the style of professional nursing discourse, mastery of APA format, and development of additional skills in following directions and in critiquing their own work. An additional benefit is to enhance learning about professional nursing topics. By mastering writing skills in this initial course, students are able to successfully complete writing assignments in future courses and, in some cases, move on to publication.

  1. A Comparison of Single-Purpose and Non-Single-Purpose Clinical Education on the Retention Rates of Registered Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Dana I.

    2012-01-01

    There are 26 single-purpose nursing programs in the United States. They are nursing programs operated by hospitals with the single purpose of supplying the hospitals with well-prepared health care staff. Using a quantitative methodology and an ex post facto design, this study compared employment retention rates between single-purpose and…

  2. Identification of Anticipated Job Stressors of Registered Nurse Refresher Students as They Prepare to Reenter the Work Force Following a Career Break

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial reasons have produced a growing nursing shortage. One possible group that could reverse this shortage is inactive nurses. Many stakeholders wonder about allocating scarce resources to identify, locate, educate, and redeploy this group into active practice. The purpose of this one-phase embedded validating quantitative mixed…

  3. Attestations by facilities using nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses--Employment and Training Administration and Employment Standards Administration, Labor--Final rule and amendment and announcement of effective date.

    PubMed

    1994-02-04

    On January 6, 1994, the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Wage and Hour Division of the Employment Standards Administration of the Department of Labor published final regulations governing the filing and enforcement of attestations by health care facilities seeking to use the services of nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses under H-1A visas. At that time, ETA submitted the information collection requirements to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980. This document amends the January 6, 1994, Federal Register document to display the OMB control numbers and announces the effective date for the sections containing information collection requirements for which OMB approval has been received.

  4. Predictors of NCLEX-RN success across 3 prelicensure program types.

    PubMed

    Landry, Lynette G; Davis, Harvey; Alameida, Marshall D; Prive, Alice; Renwanz-Boyle, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Nursing faculty are concerned about the ability of recent graduates to successfully pass NCLEX-RN on their first-attempt. To facilitate student first-time success on the examination, nurse educators need to understand what student characteristics are predictive of success. The purpose of this study was to explore student characteristics across 3 different programs types (university-based BSN, master's entry, and satellite BSN) and in each of the 3 program types to identify predicators of first-time NCLEX-RN success.

  5. Joint Venture Arrangement for RN to BSN: A Model of Synergy between Academia and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargagliotti, L. Antoinette; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Joint venture among educational and practice institutions is well on its way toward becoming the norm in nursing education and practice. Kaiser Permanente and the University of San Francisco School of Nursing offer a venture that allows registered nurses to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing degree. (JOW)

  6. Spectroscopy of 215Rn86

    SciTech Connect

    Debray, M. E.; Davidson, M.; Davidson, J.; Hojman, D.; Kreiner, A. J.; Cardona, M. A.; Lenzi, S.; Napoli, D.

    2007-02-12

    The yrast level structure of 215,216Rn has been studied using in beam spectroscopy {alpha} - {gamma} - {gamma} coincidence techniques mainly through the 207Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) and 208Pb(18O, 2{alpha}2n) reactions in the 91-93 MeV energy range, using the 8{pi} GASP-ISIS spectrometer at Legnaro. The obtained low lying level scheme of 215Rn does not exhibit the alternating parity structure observed in their heavier known isotones 216Fr, 217Ra and 218Ac. The level scheme of 216Rn resulting from this study shows >From this result, the lightest nucleus showing evidence for reflection asymmetry is 216Fr defining one lowest-mass corner for this kind of phenomenon as N{>=}129 and Z{>=}87.

  7. The effectiveness of Tai Chi, yoga, meditation, and Reiki healing sessions in promoting health and enhancing problem solving abilities of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Raingruber, Bonnie; Robinson, Carol

    2007-10-01

    Given the current necessity of retaining qualified nurses, a self-care program consisting of Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation classes, and Reiki healing sessions was designed for a university-based hospital. The effectiveness of these interventions was evaluated using self-care journals and analyzed using a Heideggerian phenomenological approach. Outcomes of the self-care classes described by nurses included: (a) noticing sensations of warmth, tingling, and pulsation which were relaxing, (b) becoming aware of an enhanced problem solving ability, and (c) noticing an increased ability to focus on patient needs. Hospitals willing to invest in self-care options for nurses can anticipate patient and work related benefits.

  8. Internal migration of nurses in the United States: migratory prompts and difference in job satisfaction between migrants and non-migrants.

    PubMed

    Siow, Elaine; Ng, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, nurses are highly mobile due to a nursing shortage and the transferability of their skills. Despite the importance of internal migration (inter-state movement) of nurses in the distribution of the supply nurses, little is known about such migration. Researchers used data from the 2004 and 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses to examine the factors associated with nurses' internal migration as well as the difference in job satisfaction for migrant and non-migrant nurses. Factors associated with a higher likelihood of internal migration were: a change in employer, higher earnings, not foreign-educated, less nursing experience, a younger age, being male, being single, having no children, the Nursing Licensure Compact, and not being employed in the state where the first RN license was obtained. Migrant nurses had lower job satisfaction than non-migrant nurses; higher job satisfaction is noted with higher earnings levels. The development of policies such as relocation and social support to help migrant nurses cope and adjust to a new working environment are proposed.

  9. Best practices in NCLEX-RN readiness preparation for baccalaureate student success.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H; Sewell, Jeanne P; Clark, Deborah J

    2006-01-01

    Success for first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN has implications for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. As the passing standard for the NCLEX-RN has risen, some programs have experienced a corresponding decrease in their graduates' first-time pass rates. This article describes one baccalaureate program's journey from low first-time NCLEX-RN pass rates in 2001 to greater student and program success using a data-based, analytical approach. Although passing an exit exam was a program requirement for 20 years, the change to computerized testing and more in-depth test preparation has enhanced opportunities for success for students and reduced stress.among faculty. The resulting best practices for preparing students for NCLEX-RN success are described.

  10. Best practices in NCLEX-RN readiness preparation for baccalaureate student success.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H; Sewell, Jeanne P; Clark, Deborah J

    2005-01-01

    Success for first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN has implications for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. As the passing standard for the NCLEX-RN has risen, some programs have experienced a corresponding decrease in their graduates' first-time pass rates. This article describes one baccalaureate program's journey from low first-time NCLEX-RN pass rates in 2001 to greater student and program success using a data-based, analytical approach. Although passing an exit exam was a program requirement for 20 years, the change to computerized testing and more in-depth test preparation has enhanced opportunities for success for students and reduced stress among faculty. The resulting best practices for preparing students for NCLEX-RN success are described.

  11. Best practices in NCLEX-RN readiness preparation for baccalaureate student success.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H; Sewell, Jeanne P; Clark, Deborah J

    2008-01-01

    Success for first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN has implications for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. As the passing standard for the NCLEX-RN has risen, some programs have experienced a corresponding decrease in their graduates' first-time pass rates. This article describes one baccalaureate program's journey from low first-time NCLEX-RN pass rates in 2001 to greater student and program success using a data-based, analytical approach. Although passing an exit exam was a program requirement for 20 years, the change to computerized testing and more in-depth test preparation has enhanced opportunities for success for students and reduced stress among faculty. The resulting best practices for preparing students for NCLEX-RN success are described.

  12. A study of critical thinking, teacher-student interaction, and discipline-specific writing in an online educational setting for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lorraine M; Rukholm, Ellen

    2008-03-01

    Based on work conducted by Laurentian University's School of Nursing and Centre for Continuing Education in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, working in conjunction with community partners, this article looks at the findings of an analysis of nurses' writing activity in a university-level web-based module for evidence of critical thinking using Johns' Model of Structured Reflection (1995). Also considered are student-teacher interactions and discipline-specific writing. The findings suggest that high levels of critical thinking by nurse learners and growth in thinking and writing competence over time can occur in an online setting. Further highlighted are the role of the instructor, assignment design, and support in fostering such development.

  13. First-time NCLEX-RN pass rate: measure of program quality or something else?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Heidi; Loftin, Collette; Reyes, Helen

    2014-06-01

    The first-time NCLEX-RN(®) pass rate is considered by many to be the primary, if not sole, indicator of the quality of prelicensure nursing education programs. Used by state boards of nursing, educational program accreditors, and nursing faculty, the first-time NCLEX-RN pass rate influences important decisions about overall program quality, admission and progression policies, curricula, and teaching and learning practices. In this article, the authors call for a professional dialogue about the use of first-time pass rate (F-TPR) as an indicator of program quality, offer alternative methods for using the F-TPR as one measure of program quality, and suggest further research. One program's experience with low F-TPRs is offered as an exemplar of the unintended negative consequences that occur when the F-TPR is used as a sole criterion by a state board of nursing in judging a program's quality.

  14. Facilitating program and NCLEX-RN success in a generic BSN program.

    PubMed

    Uyehara, Janet; Magnussen, Lois; Itano, Joanne; Zhang, Shuqiang

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on a study of predictors of program and NCLEX-RN success and withdrawal in a generic BSN program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing. Data were collected over a 5-year period after a new curriculum was implemented. High program (95.09%) and NCLEX-RN (97.25%) success were achieved. Of the 11 who did not meet the definition of program success, 100% completed the program by another two to three semesters and 90.91% passed the NCLEX-RN as first-time takers. The program withdrawal rate was 20%. It is very important to use measures to promote program completion and NCLEX passing for both the normally progressing and at-risk student to meet the demands of the nursing shortage.

  15. A study of the usefulness of the HESI Exit Exam in predicting NCLEX-RN failure.

    PubMed

    Spurlock, Darrell R; Hunt, Linda A

    2008-04-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are implementing progression policies that prohibit students from graduating or from taking the nursing licensure examination, sometimes based solely on a single predictive test score. In addition, little empirical evidence exists that supports progression policies as effective in increasing a school's NCLEX-RN pass rates. This article reports on a study conducted when one school did not achieve the results they expected after implementing a progression policy. With use of logistic regression, diagnostic indexes, and other methods, reasons for the disparity between expected and observed NCLEX-RN pass rates were examined. Results revealed that the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Exit Exam was not able to accurately predict NCLEX-RN outcomes for graduates and, further, that progression policies that allow retest after retest so as to achieve a minimum score on the HESI Exit Exam are not supported empirically. Conclusions and suggestions for schools using or considering progression policies are provided.

  16. The Mediating Effects of Basic Psychological Needs at Work on the Relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and Organizational Commitment in Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Bonni Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mediating effects of the Basic Psychological Needs at Work, comprised of competence, autonomy and relatedness, on the relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and affective and normative organizational commitment in the United States nursing population. The study incorporated…

  17. Program and Student Characteristics Related to the Performance of New York State Associate Degree Graduates on the Registered Nurse Licensing Examination. Research Publication No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muncrief, Martha

    Characteristics of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs in New York State which relate to the achievement of their graduates on the State Board Test Pool Examination (SBTPE) were identified. A questionnaire was designed and mailed to all two-year colleges in the states offering the ADN. A total of 32 questionnaires were returned (91 percent).…

  18. Navy Nurse Corps Promotion During War: The Deployment Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    to Commander. The study also finds that being a Nurse Practitioner or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist positively affects promotion across all...negative impact on promotion to Commander. The study also finds that being a Nurse Practitioner or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist ...CRNA Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist CTS Contingency Tracking System DEERS Defense Eligibility Enrollment Reporting System DMDC Defense

  19. Using Adobe Connect to Deliver Online Library Instruction to the RN to BSN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes a look at how one academic health sciences librarian brought mediated literature searching to the distance RN to BSN nursing students. It takes a look at why Adobe Connect was the webinar software that was selected to deliver online instruction to the students. The article explains how students participated in a pre-class survey…

  20. NCLEX-RN Examination Performance by BSN Graduates of Four Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesney, Anita M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative multiple-case study research explored and described differences as well as NCLEX-RN preparation strategies used by Historically Black College and University (HBCU) baccalaureate nursing programs with consistent NCLEX pass rates versus those with inconsistent pass rates. Two of the four selected programs had a history of consistent…

  1. 38 CFR 51.130 - Nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... service must be under the direction of a full-time registered nurse who is currently licensed by the State... nurses 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. (c) The director of nursing service must designate a registered nurse as a supervising nurse for each tour of duty. (1) Based on the application and results of the...

  2. Retracted: 'A model of abusive supervision, self-efficacy and work engagement among Registered Nurses: the mediating role of self-efficacy' by Lv D.-M., Zheng Q.-L., Sun N., Li Q.-J., Fan Y.-Y., Hong S. & Liu S.-Q.

    PubMed

    2016-12-01

    The above article, published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing on 21st July2016 on Early View, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement of the journal Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Roger Watson, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The article has been retracted due to significant overlap with the following article published in the Journal of Nursing Management. Fan Y., Zheng Q., Liu S. & Li Q. (2016) Construction of a new model of job engagement, psychological empowerment and perceived work environment among Chinese registered nurses at four large university hospitals: implications for nurse managers seeking to enhance nursing retention and quality of care. Journal of Nursing Management 24(5), 646-655.

  3. Nursing home performance in resident care in the United States: is it only a matter of for-profit versus not-for-profit?

    PubMed

    Decker, Frederic H

    2008-04-01

    Poorer resident care in US for-profit relative to not-for-profit nursing homes is usually blamed on the profit motive. But US nursing home performance may relate to Medicaid public financing in a manner qualifying the relationship between ownership and quality. We investigated effects of Medicaid resident census, Medicaid payment, and occupancy on performance. Resource dependence theory implies these predictors may affect discretion in resources invested in resident care across for-profit and not-for-profit facilities. Models on physical restraint use and registered nurse (RN) staffing were studied using generalized estimating equations with panel data derived from certification inspections of nursing homes. Restraint use increased and RN staffing levels decreased among for-profit and not-for-profit facilities when the Medicaid census increased and Medicaid payment decreased. Interaction effects supported a theory that performance relates to available discretion in resource allocation. Effects of occupancy appear contingent on the dependence on Medicaid. Poorer performance among US for-profit nursing homes may relate to for-profit homes having lower occupancy, higher Medicaid census, and operating in US states with lower Medicaid payments compared to not-for-profit homes. Understanding the complexity of factors affecting resources expended on resident care may further our understanding of the production of quality in nursing homes, whether in the US or elsewhere.

  4. Patient perceptions of pain management therapy: a comparison of real-time assessment of patient education and satisfaction and registered nurse perceptions.

    PubMed

    Bozimowski, Greg

    2012-12-01

    Nurses must have an understanding of their patients' perception to assist in meeting analgesic goals. Adequate patient teaching is essential. The value of a simplified tool to assess patients' satisfaction has not been widely examined. This study examined if nurses' perceptions of their patients' satisfaction with pain management are congruent with patients' self-report, and if patients' level of satisfaction corresponds with the type of therapy used and adequacy of teaching related to their pain management plan. Data were collected though a survey in a community hospital. It was designed as an evaluative study of the variables in two nursing units and as a pilot study of the survey tool. Ratings of patient satisfaction by nurses (3.8 ± 0.88 [mean ± SD]) were similar to patients' self-ratings (4.08 ± 1.06). Higher self-report of pain (visual analog scale 4.00 ± 2.22) was associated with lower levels of satisfaction (3.80 ± 0.881). Patients reporting adequate teaching rated a higher satisfaction score (4.46) than patients reporting inadequate teaching [3.59; t (48) = -3.12; p = .003]. Patients receiving intravenous analgesia as needed had higher pain VAS scores (4.74) than patients receiving other analgesia protocols [3.37; t(48) = -2.26; p = .028]. Measuring patient satisfaction has become critical in evaluating adequacy of treatment. Factors that affect patients' satisfaction with pain management include the adequacy of teaching they receive and the type of therapy they are provided. A simple survey can be a useful tool in measuring satisfaction.

  5. (220)Rn/(222)Rn isotope pair as a natural proxy for soil gas transport.

    PubMed

    Huxol, Stephan; Brennwald, Matthias S; Henneberger, Ruth; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-12-17

    Radon (Rn) is a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, which is ubiquitous in soil gas. Especially, its long-lived isotope (222)Rn (half-life: 3.82 d) gained widespread acceptance as a tracer for gas transport in soils, while the short-lived (220)Rn (half-life: 55.6 s) found less interest in environmental studies. However, in some cases, the application of (222)Rn as a tracer in soil gas is complex as its concentrations can be influenced by changes of the transport conditions or of the (222)Rn production of the soil material. Due to the different half-lives of (220)Rn and (222)Rn, the distances that can be traveled by the respective isotopes before decay differ significantly, with (220)Rn migrating over much shorter distances than (222)Rn. Therefore, the soil gas concentrations of (220)Rn and (222)Rn are influenced by processes on different length scales. In laboratory experiments in a sandbox, we studied the different transport behaviors of (220)Rn and (222)Rn resulting from changing the boundary conditions for diffusive transport and from inducing advective gas movements. From the results gained in the laboratory experiments, we propose the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn to determine gas transport processes in soils. In a field study on soil gases in the cover soil of a capped landfill we applied the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn in soil gas for the first time and showed the feasibility of this approach to characterize soil gas transport processes.

  6. Meanings Over Time of Working as a Nurse in Elderly Care

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Karin; James, Inger; Kihlgren, Annica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although registered nurses (RNs) play a central role in the care of older persons, their work in elderly care has historically been described as “low status” in nursing. This is especially problematic due to the global issue of RN turnover, but there is still little evidence of how to change this trend. Better understanding is needed of the reasons why RNs work in elderly care, as well as knowledge of whether these reasons have changed over time. Aim: The aim was to explore the meaning of working in elderly care, over time, from the perspective of RNs. Method: We interviewed thirteen RNs working in nursing homes, six of them in 2000 and the remaining seven in 2012, and analysed the resulting data using Interpretive Description. Results: The results show similarities and differences over time in the RNs’ reasoning about the meaning of their work with older persons, from a focus on obstacles to a view of opportunities. Conclusion: An RN’s intention to continue working in elderly care might be based on their beliefs; their view of older people, and their experiences of being able to influence the care. Managing this knowledge could be an essential factor in reversing the historical trend of RN work in elderly care being seen as low status, and the increasing turnover in such nurses. Our results could stimulate reflection on daily care and beliefs about caring for older persons. PMID:24044032

  7. Soil radon ( 222 Rn) monitoring at Furnas Volcano (São Miguel, Azores): Applications and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Ferreira, T.; Viveiros, F.; Allard, P.

    2015-05-01

    A soil 222Rn continuous monitoring test was performed in three sampling points inside Furnas Volcano caldera and 222Rn concentration varied between 0 and 153000 Bq/m3. Multivariate regression and spectral analyses were applied to the time series registered in order to understand and filter the influence of external factors on soil 222Rn concentration and to recognise anomalies correlated with deep processes. The regression models show that barometric pressure, soil water content, soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed are the statistical meaningful variables explaining between 15.8% and 73.6% of 222Rn variations. Spectral analysis allowed to identify seasonal variations and daily variations associated with one cycle per day on winter months only in one of the monitored sites. This diurnal variation is correlated with air temperature, relative air humidity and wind speed cycles. The change in the location of the sampling points was caused by both artificial and natural constrains. On the three monitoring sites, after a period of continuous register, a sudden drop on the 222Rn concentration values was observed and the cause is still under debate. The work performed can be applied for seismovolcanic monitoring and for public health risk assessment.

  8. 42 CFR 405.2416 - Visiting nurse services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed vocational nurse who is...: (1) Services that must be performed by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Visiting nurse services. 405.2416 Section...

  9. 42 CFR 405.2416 - Visiting nurse services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed vocational nurse who is...: (1) Services that must be performed by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Visiting nurse services. 405.2416 Section...

  10. 42 CFR 405.2416 - Visiting nurse services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed vocational nurse who is...: (1) Services that must be performed by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Visiting nurse services. 405.2416 Section...

  11. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  12. Retirement Financial Planning and the RN: An Integrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2015-10-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  13. Retirement financial planning and the RN: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Keele, Shanna; Alpert, Patricia T

    2013-11-01

    This integrative literature review examined the current research on RN retirement. The review identified 3 critical gaps in knowledge: (a) minimal knowledge regarding the economic impact on RN retirement, (b) incomplete information regarding the demographics of RN retirement, and (c) a scarcity of prospective longitudinal RN workforce studies. Future research must address these gaps to better address RN workforce sustainability.

  14. Norma Rae, R.N.

    PubMed

    Bilchik, G S

    2001-03-01

    Unions are becoming more attractive to nurses who feel increasingly unappreciated and disenfranchised from the decisionmaking process. But unions can cause big headaches for management and the board. The best way to keep unions off your doorstep is to listen to what your nurses want.

  15. RN-to-BSN programs in the community college setting: challenges and successes.

    PubMed

    Babbo, Gerianne; Fought, Sharon; Holk, Minerva; Mulligan, Anne Marie; Perrone, Cheryl

    2013-02-01

    The complexity of health care and the recommendation of the Institute of Medicine to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80% by 2020 requires educators and other stakeholders to consider a range of structures for providing RN-to-BSN programs. Although relatively few RN-to-BSN programs are offered in a community college setting, the concept is generating interest. This article provides a broad analysis of one region's experience with respect to this trend that is influencing nursing education. Facing significant challenges that are associated with planning and implementing the first bachelor's degree to be offered at a community college in Washington State, faculty from both Olympic College's and University of Washington Tacoma's nursing programs joined in a unique and constructive partnership. The faculty team used plans and successful strategies to overcome potential obstacles. The authors outline recommendations for others considering this approach to BSN education.

  16. Role transition during RN-to-FNP education.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Susan H; McLaughlin, Diana G; Hyde, Roberta S; Brown, Rosemary H; Burman, Mary E

    2008-10-01

    This study examines the role transition that occurs during RN-to-family nurse practitioner (FNP) education, described in an earlier qualitative study that identified a role transition framework of influential positive forces and obstacles. The purposes of the study were to validate the educational phase of the original framework and explore other role transition issues. The study used a descriptive correlational design by asking all FNPs in two rural western states to participate by answering a questionnaire. Findings evidenced a stronger level of agreement with the positive forces than with the obstacles. In addition, two significant relationships were found between the positive forces and obstacles and personal life circumstances. These included personal support systems, which were significant for those who had to travel to class, and personal sacrifices, which were significant for those who had children at home. Further research will focus on testing across nurse practitioner specialties nationally.

  17. KATTS: a framework for maximizing NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Betsy M

    2008-04-01

    A key indicator of the quality of a nursing education program is the performance of its graduates as first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN. As a result, nursing schools are open to strategies that strengthen the performance of their graduates on the examination. The Knowledge base, Anxiety control, Test-Taking Skills (KATTS) framework focuses on the three components of achieving a maximum score on an examination. In KATTS, all three components must be present and in proper balance to maximize a test taker's score. By strengthening not just one but all of these components, graduates can improve their overall test scores significantly. Suggested strategies for strengthening each component of KATTS are provided. This framework has been used successfully in designing remedial tutoring programs and in assisting first-time NCLEX test takers in preparing for the licensing examination.

  18. 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations in soil gas of Karkonosze-Izera Block (Sudetes, Poland).

    PubMed

    Malczewski, Dariusz; Zaba, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Soil gas 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations were measured at 18 locations in the Karkonosze-Izera Block area in southwestern Poland. Measurements were carried out in surface air and at sampling depths of 10, 40 and 80 cm. Surface air 222Rn concentrations ranged from 4 to 2160 Bq m(-3) and 220Rn ranged from 4 to 228 Bq m(-3). The concentrations for 10 and 40 cm varied from 142 Bq m(-3) to 801 kBq m(-3) and 102 Bq m(-3) to 64 kBq m(-3) for 222Rn and 220Rn, respectively. At 80 cm 222Rn concentrations ranged from 94 Bq m(-3) to >1 MBq m(-3). The 220Rn concentrations at 80 cm varied from 45 Bq m(-3) to 48 kBq m(-3). The concentration versus depth profiles for 222Rn differed for soils developed on fault zones, uranium deposits or both. Atmospheric air temperature and soil gas 222Rn and 220Rn were negatively correlated. At sampling sites with steep slopes, 220Rn concentrations decreased with depth.

  19. Planning for and positioning a solo RN first assistant practice.

    PubMed

    DeFrancesco, Joyce

    2004-11-01

    Registered nurse first assistants who go into practice for themselves need to construct a budget for the business and determine how the practice will be organized by developing a business plan. After a practice is established, it is important to position the practice in the marketplace by creating a positive image in prospective clients' minds.

  20. Worker productivity and ventilation rate in a call center: Analyses of time-series data for a group of registered nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Price, Phillip; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas; Dibartolomeo, Dennis

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the relationship of ventilation rates with the performance of advice nurses working in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated; temperatures, humidities, and CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored; and worker performance data, with 30-minute resolution, were collected. Multivariate linear regression was used to investigate the association of worker performance with indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration (which increases with decreasing ventilation rate per worker) and with building ventilation rate. Results suggest that the effect of ventilation rate on worker performance in this call center was very small (probably less than 1%) or nil, over most of the range of ventilation rate (roughly 12 L s{sup -1} to 48 L s{sup -1} per person). However, there is some evidence of worker performance improvements of 2% or more when the indoor CO{sub 2} concentration exceeded the outdoor concentration by less than 75 ppm.

  1. The Impact of Electronic Knowledge-Based Nursing Content and Decision-Support on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    baseline assessments were carried out on 11- MAR through 30-JUN-2014: - Nonparticipant Observations (N=379 RN/Patient observations, 54 Nurse Leaders...Post-Intervention assessments were carried out: MAR through 20-JUL-201 - Nonparticipant Observations (N=362 RN/Patient observations, 60 Nurse Leaders...Letter– 24-FEB-2014 • AHC IRB Modification #5 with final Nurse Survey with Learning Connection ppt to introduce survey - Approved 25- MAR -2014

  2. Measurements of 220Rn emanation from rocks.

    PubMed

    Howard, A J; Simsarian, J E; Strange, W P

    1995-12-01

    Alpha-particle and gamma-ray measurements are employed to determine the individual emanation and production rates associated with the thorium radioactive series for thirty-seven rock specimens of approximately 200 cm3 individual volume representing igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic types. These results are combined to establish 220Rn emanating powers for each of these specimens, and a wide range of values is observed. The generally large 220Rn emanation observed for these specimens strongly indicates that non-tortuous diffusion paths are commonly present in the associated structures, which gives more evidence for the existence of well-connected pore networks at the nanometer level in many of the specimens studied. While the results are qualitatively explainable, they are not predictable in terms of the current macroscopic observables. Since 220Rn and 222Rn emanation rates from rock specimens have previously been found to be comparable in magnitude, the relatively fast determination of 220Rn emanation rates described herein (measurements involving 1-h duration) is in reasonable probability indicative of a comparable 222Rn emanation rate: The employment of 220Rn as a convenient screening tool for potentially high 222Rn emanation sources is indicated.

  3. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ...) nearing graduation, in an effort to expeditiously meet the growing demand for primary care nurse practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  4. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  5. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  6. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  7. 42 CFR 440.166 - Nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are furnished by a registered professional nurse who meets a State's advanced educational and clinical... registered nurses. (b) Requirements for certified pediatric nurse practitioner. The practitioner must be a registered professional nurse who meets the requirements specified in either paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2)...

  8. Diabetes related knowledge among residents and nurses: a multicenter study in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of knowledge among resident trainees and nurses is very important since majority of patients admitted in hospital have underlying diabetes which could lead to adverse clinical outcomes if not managed efficiently. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the knowledge related to the management of diabetes among registered nurses (RN) and trainee residents of internal medicine (IMR), family medicine (FMR) and surgery (SR) at tertiary care hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A validated questionnaire consisting of 21 open ended questions related to diabetes awareness was acquired through a study done at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia with the permission of primary author. Results 169 IMR, 27 FMR, 86 SR and 99 RN completed a questionnaire that assessed the knowledge related to different aspects of management of diabetes. The results were further stratified by participant's specialty and level of training. The percentage of knowledge based questions answered correctly was found to be low. The overall mean correct percentage among all the participants was 50% +/- 21. There was no statistical difference in terms of knowledge between IMR & FMR residents (64% +/- 14 vs. 60% +/- 16, p = 0.47) respectively. The total scores of SR and RN were quite low (40% +/- 16 & 31% +/- 15 respectively).SR and RN were found to have profound deficit in both inpatient and outpatient knowledge of diabetes. We did not observe any improvement in level of knowledge of FMR & SR with increase in duration of their training (p = 0.47 & 0.80 respectively). In contrast, improvement in the level of knowledge of IMR was observed from first to second year of their training (p = 0.03) with no further improvement thereafter. RN's didn't respond correctly on most of the items related to in-patient management of diabetes (Mean score 40% +/- 20). Conclusion As there are no prior studies in our setting evaluating knowledge

  9. D 1 , 2 (RN) versus C (RN) local minimizer and a Hopf-type maximum principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Siegfried; Costa, David G.; Tehrani, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    We consider functionals of the form Φ (u) =1/2∫RN | ∇u|2 -∫RN b (x) G (u) on D 1 , 2 (RN), N ≥ 3, whose critical points are the weak solutions of a corresponding elliptic equation in the whole RN. We present a Brezis-Nirenberg type result and a Hopf-type maximum principle in the context of the space D 1 , 2 (RN). More precisely, we prove that a local minimizer of Φ in the topology of the subspace V must be a local minimizer of Φ in the D 1 , 2 (RN)-topology, where V is given by V : = { v ∈D 1 , 2 (RN) : v ∈ C (RN)withsupx∈RN ⁡ (1 + | x| N - 2) | v (x) | < ∞ }. It is well-known that the Brezis-Nirenberg result has been proved a strong tool in the study of multiple solutions for elliptic boundary value problems in bounded domains. We believe that the result obtained in this paper may play a similar role for elliptic problems in RN.

  10. Empowering nurses through an innovative scheduling model.

    PubMed

    Maxson-Cooper, Pamela A

    2011-03-01

    In 1980, Froedtert Hospital opened its doors using an innovative registered nurse scheduling model. The hospital has grown to 500 beds, with over 1,600 registered nurses, and continues to use the 7/70 staffing pattern as a core scheduling model. Registered nurses work a straight seven, 10-hour days, and then have 1 week off, or 26 weeks off a year. For professional registered nurses in acute care, the schedule is predictable and consistent for years. This scheduling pattern has resulted in excellent registered nurse satisfaction, increased retention, and consistency in care delivery teams since 1980.

  11. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  12. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  13. 42 CFR 484.30 - Condition of participation: Skilled nursing services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services by or under the supervision of a registered nurse and in accordance with the plan of care. (a) Standard: Duties of the registered nurse. The registered nurse makes the initial evaluation visit... supervises and teaches other nursing personnel. (b) Standard: Duties of the licensed practical nurse....

  14. Radiological risk of actinon (/sup 219/Rn)

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.J.

    1981-12-01

    The research reported was designed to provide information on the following subjects: (1) development of the functional relations between exposure to the /sup 219/Rn decay chain and pertinent health effects; (2) specification of the circumstances under which a significant concentration of the decay chain may occur; (3) recommendation of an exposure standard which will provide protection of the public from significant elevation of health effects; and (4) an assessment of the impact of /sup 219/Rn on determinations of the concentration of the /sup 222/Rn decay chain and/or its precursors.

  15. Interrelationship between core interventions and core competencies of forensic psychiatric nursing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Tenkanen, Helena; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kinnunen, Juha

    2011-03-01

    The importance of core competencies (CC) and their relationship to core interventions in clinical practice guidelines on schizophrenia (CPGS), and the abilities to master these competencies were studied among registered nurses (RN) and practical mental nurses (PMN) in a forensic psychiatric setting. Data were collected from RNs, PMNs, and managers of all five forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland. The research material was obtained by using a 360-degree feedback method. The response rate was 68% (N = 428). The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the importance of and ability to master the following CCs: (1) pharmacotherapy, (2) knowledge in forensic psychiatry and violent behavior, (3) the treatment of violent patients, (4) processing patient's and own emotion, and (5) need-adapted treatment of the patient. Overall, RNs exceeded PMNs in mastering the CCs, however the principles of the CPGS were not achieved within the current resources in Finland. In summary, RNs, rather than PMNs, should be recruited for work in forensic psychiatric nursing, although a considerable amount of specific training would still be required to achieve competence. Implications of our research indicate that all nurses working in this area need to receive further education in forensic psychiatry and in forensic psychiatric nursing.

  16. Supply and demand for cardiac nurses in Ontario: perceptions of CNOs.

    PubMed

    Pink, G H; Sholdice, M; Fucile, W; Petryshen, P; Sherrard, H; Vimr, M

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the results of a nursing survey of cardiac care hospitals undertaken by a Cardiac Care Network of Ontario Consensus Panel on Cardiovascular Human Resources. The focus of the Panel was to identify areas of current or pending shortages in human resources and make recommendations to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care about human resource management in adult cardiac care in Ontario. The article presents the number and mix of full-time, part-time and casual nursing staff, the age distribution of RNs, and the number of vacant Registered Nurse (RN) positions for a sample of cardiac care hospitals in Ontario. Next a sample of Chief Nursing Officer opinions about factors contributing to current difficulties in recruiting RNs and the outlook for future shortages are presented. Implications for nurse managers are offered, including development of new recruitment and retention strategies, identification of further efficiencies in care provision, and a need for nurse manager involvement in debates about the future of how health care is provided in Canada.

  17. 42 CFR 440.165 - Nurse-midwife service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provider agreements for nurse-midwives.) (b) “Nurse-midwife” means a registered professional nurse who... program for preparing registered nurses to furnish gynecological and obstetrical care to women during... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse-midwife service. 440.165 Section...

  18. 42 CFR 440.165 - Nurse-midwife service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provider agreements for nurse-midwives.) (b) “Nurse-midwife” means a registered professional nurse who... program for preparing registered nurses to furnish gynecological and obstetrical care to women during... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse-midwife service. 440.165 Section...

  19. 42 CFR 440.165 - Nurse-midwife service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provider agreements for nurse-midwives.) (b) “Nurse-midwife” means a registered professional nurse who... program for preparing registered nurses to furnish gynecological and obstetrical care to women during... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse-midwife service. 440.165 Section...

  20. 42 CFR 440.165 - Nurse-midwife service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provider agreements for nurse-midwives.) (b) “Nurse-midwife” means a registered professional nurse who... program for preparing registered nurses to furnish gynecological and obstetrical care to women during... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse-midwife service. 440.165 Section...