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Sample records for registered nurse rn

  1. Report on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David F.; Gober, Susan L.

    Factors associated with an unusually high rate of failure on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were analyzed for nursing students at Angelo State University in San Angelo (Texas). Of the 111 nursing degree recipients who took the examination for the first time in July 1991, 18 (16.2%) failed.…

  2. Nursing Transition: An Individualized Course To Promote Mobility from the LVN to RN Role. Registered Nurse Shortage Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Marcia; Malague, Marianne

    To address a regional shortage of registered nurses (RN's), a special transition course was developed at the North Harris Montgomery Community College District in Houston, Texas, to allow licensed vocational nurses to articulate into the second year of a two-year Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Students completing the ADN program are…

  3. Why a registered nurse (RN) in the OR? The perioperative registered nurse role--a well kept secret.

    PubMed

    Shewchuk, Muriel

    2007-12-01

    The above description of the circulating Registered Nurse is only a brief over view of the detailed and complex world of perioperative nursing. Unveiling the vital, "well kept secret", of the need for a Registered Nurse, circulating at all times throughout the surgical procedure, is critical for safe patient care. The health care system is responsible, and accountable to the public, for the provision of a hospital environment that is safe for all patients and personnel. The operating theatre is the prime unit of care, in the OR, and must have the resources in the room to fully complete the intended surgery and to prepare for changes and complications that may arise. The critical thinking, clinical decision making, systems approach, and reflective high-level practice, creates a requirement that the circulating role must be filled by a Registered Nurse. A skilled perioperative Registered Nurse must be in charge of each theatre, any group of theatres, each OR shift and the OR Department. Every perioperative nurse needs to explain, be proud of, and to market the importance of the role outside the walls of the OR to the "world".

  4. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  5. Restructuring registered nurse curricula.

    PubMed

    Hegge, M

    1995-01-01

    National initiatives in higher education, health reform, and the nursing curriculum revolution are applied to five curricular patterns for registered nurse (RN) upward mobility baccalaureate education. American Association of Higher Education principles for quality baccalaureate education are applied to the curricular models. The patterns described are: community model, health promotion model, nursing diagnosis model, case management model, and caring model. Three educational strategies for prompting paradigm shifts in RNs who return to school are discussed: collaborative learning, portfolios, and self-assessments. These learning strategies are designed to move the adult student through Perry's phases of cognitive development from duality to relativism. The combination of fresh new curriculum patterns and collaborative learning strategies can empower nurses to discover new paradigms with which to transform the profession.

  6. Registered Nursing Alumni Surveys, 1990-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA. Office of Institutional Development.

    Since 1990, California's College of the Canyons (CoC) has conducted annual surveys of graduates from its Registered Nursing (RN) program. Between 1990 and 1994, surveys were sent to 193 RN graduates, with completed questionnaires received from 124 alumni. An analysis of responses for each year revealed the following: (1) 91.7% of the respondents…

  7. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities or ... of three education paths: a bachelor’s degree in nursing, an associate’s degree in nursing, or a diploma ...

  8. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  9. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  10. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  11. Motivational Factors in Registered Nurses Completing a Baccalaureate Completion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Amanda L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to investigate what motivates associate degree (AND) and diploma prepared registered nurses (RN) to pursue a baccalaureate degree (BSN) through an RN-to-BSN program. Studies have shown that the educational level of nurses has direct impact on the safety and quality of care provided to patients.…

  12. The Impact of Differentiated Instructional Techniques on Non-Traditional, Adult Student Engagement in a Baccalaureate Nursing Completion Program for Registered Nurses (RN-BSN) Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the impact of differentiated instructional techniques on non-traditional, adult student engagement in an RN-BSN completion program course. Differentiated instructional techniques have been a staple method of teaching in K-12 education for a number of years. Differentiated instruction (DI) is a…

  13. Effects of leadership characteristics on pediatric registered nurses' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Turner, Reneé; Hinds, Pamela S; Nelson, John; Pryor, Juanda; Robinson, Nellie C; Wang, Jichuan

    2014-01-01

    Job satisfaction levels among registered nurses (RNs) influence RN recruitment, retention, turnover, and patient outcomes. Researchers examining the relationship between characteristics of nursing leadership and RN job satisfaction have treated RNs as a monolithic group with little research on the satisfaction of hospital-based pediatric RNs. This study assessed the relationship of transformational and transactional nursing leadership characteristics and RN job satisfaction reported by pediatric RNs. This single site study included 935 hospital-based pediatric RNs who completed validated survey items regarding nursing leadership and job satisfaction. A structural equation model (SEM) was applied to assess how autonomy (transformational leadership) and distributive justice (transactional leadership) influence RN job satisfaction, and how RN socio-demographic characteristics influence job satisfaction via autonomy and distributive justice. Findings revealed that both autonomy and distributive justice had significant positive effects on RN job satisfaction but the largest source of influence was autonomy.

  14. Results of the Nursing Personnel Survey, Part 1: RN Recruitment and Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Marjorie; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The first of a series of articles analyzing the results of the American Hospital Association's Nursing Personnel Survey, this article discusses Registered Nurse (RN) recruitment plans, modes used to recruit RNs, and the costs for the recruitment and orientation of an RN among hospitals classified by bed size, control, and geographic region. (SSH)

  15. Nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes: a survey study among Finnish university hospital registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Tervo-Heikkinen, Tarja; Partanen, Pirjo; Aalto, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess the interrelationships between nurses' work environment and nursing outcomes. A cross-sectional survey of 664 registered nurses (RN) on 34 acute care inpatient hospital wards was used to measure nurses' perceptions. Patient data (n = 4045) consisting of a total patient satisfaction indicator were collected simultaneously with the nurse data during year 2005. RN's assessments of staffing adequacy, respect and relationships were the most important factors of work environment having an influence on job-related stress, job satisfaction, patient satisfaction and adverse events to patients and nurses. Some 77% of the RN reported adverse nurse events and 96% reported adverse patient events during a 3 month retrospective period. Ensuring sufficient and suitably qualified nurses' availability in delivering nursing care is an important management issue. Nurses are concerned about the quality of care, and the concerns perceived by nurses can influence their clinical work.

  16. Predictors of Success on the NCLEX-RN among Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Thomas W., Jr.; Dufour, Charles A.; Rhodes, Rosemary S.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 81 bachelor of science in nursing students found a strong correlation between performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN)and achievement on standardized National League for Nursing Achievement Tests. There was a significant relationship between NCLEX scores and grades in nursing courses.…

  17. Predictors for Success on the NCLEX-RN for Associate Degree Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage is a national issue that has ignited an increasing demand to address the importance of preparing students to be successful on the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN). Nursing programs are charged by the Board of Nursing to prepare graduates to be successful on the initial…

  18. Predictors for Success on the NCLEX-RN for Associate Degree Nursing Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage is a national issue that has ignited an increasing demand to address the importance of preparing students to be successful on the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN). Nursing programs are charged by the Board of Nursing to prepare graduates to be successful on the initial…

  19. RN jurisdiction over nursing care systems in nursing homes: application of latent class analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corazzini, Kirsten N.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Mueller, Christine; Thorpe, Joshua M.; McConnell, Eleanor S.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of declining registered nurse (RN) staffing levels in nursing homes, professional nursing jurisdiction over nursing care systems may erode. Objectives The purpose of this study is to develop a typology of professional nursing jurisdiction in nursing homes in relation to characteristics of RN staffing, drawing upon Abbott's (1988) tasks and jurisdictions framework. Method The study was a cross-sectional, observational study using the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (N=1,120 nursing homes). Latent class analysis tested whether RN staffing indicators differentiated facilities in a typology of RN jurisdiction, and compared classes on key organizational environment characteristics. Multiple logistic regression analysis related the emergent classes to presence or absence of specialty care programs in 8 clinical areas. Results Three classes of capacity for jurisdiction were identified, including ‘low capacity’ (41% of homes) with low probabilities of having any indicators of RN jurisdiction, ‘mixed capacity’ (26% of homes) with moderate to high probabilities of having higher RN education and staffing levels, and ‘high capacity’ (32% of homes) with moderate to high probabilities of having almost all indicators of RN jurisdiction. ‘High capacity’ homes were more likely to have specialty care programs relative to ‘low capacity’ homes; such homes were less likely to be chain-owned, and more likely to be larger, provide higher technical levels of patient care, have unionized nursing assistants, have a lower ratio of LPNs to RNs, and a higher education level of the administrator. Discussion Findings provide preliminary support for the theoretical framework as a starting point to move beyond extensive reliance on staffing levels and mix as indicators of quality. Further, findings indicate the importance of RN specialty certification. PMID:22166907

  20. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  1. Perceptions of Registered Nurses after Completing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Diane Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Background. The demands of the current health-care system support the need for more nurses to be prepared at the bachelor's level (American Association of the Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). However, only 28% of the registered nurse (RN) population in Florida holds a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), which may be the result of increased…

  2. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  3. Perceptions of Registered Nurses after Completing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Diane Yvette

    2010-01-01

    Background. The demands of the current health-care system support the need for more nurses to be prepared at the bachelor's level (American Association of the Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2007). However, only 28% of the registered nurse (RN) population in Florida holds a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN), which may be the result of increased…

  4. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  5. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  6. Registered Nurses Return to College: Lessons Learned from Hindsight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    The recent impetus to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses comes from within and outside the profession, prompting increased numbers of registered nurses (RN-BSN) to return to college. Yet little is known about what these adult, non-traditional students do to prepare for the challenges ahead. Therefore, the purpose of this…

  7. United States registered nurse workforce report card and shortage forecast.

    PubMed

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ranganathan, Vinoth; Lin, Vernon W

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a critical role in health care delivery. With an aging US population, health care demand is growing at an unprecedented pace. Using projected changes in population size and age, the authors developed demand and supply models to forecast the RN job shortage in each of the 50 states. Letter grades were assigned based on projected RN job shortage ratios. The number of states receiving a grade of "D" or "F" for their RN shortage ratio will increase from 5 in 2009 to 30 by 2030, for a total national deficit of 918 232 (725,619 - 1,112,112) RN jobs. There will be significant RN workforce shortages throughout the country in 2030; the western region will have the largest shortage ratio of 389 RN jobs per 100,000. Increased efforts to understand shortage dynamics are warranted.

  8. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  9. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  10. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  11. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  12. The Influence of Nursing Unit Characteristics on RN Vacancies in Specialized Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Lisa C; Mixer, Sandra J; Cozad, Melanie J

    2016-07-01

    The nursing shortage is projected to intensify in the United States. Organizations providing specialized hospice and palliative care will be particularly hard hit. The purpose of our study was to examine the influence of the nursing unit on registered nurse (RN) vacancies and test the moderating role of recruitment strategies in perinatal hospices. We estimated the association between the nursing unit and RN vacancies and tested the interaction effects of recruitment strategies (signing bonus and recruitment bonus). Our findings showed that increasing RN unit size and nursing leadership directly affected vacancies and that recruitment bonuses had stronger influence on reducing vacancies than signing bonuses. The findings offer critical insights for hospice administrators in attracting nurses among specialized hospice and palliative care providers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Examination of Motivating Factors Attracting Licensed Practical Nurses into a Registered Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Care, Wm. Dean

    A study identified characteristics and motivating factors that influenced licensed practical nurses (LPNs) to participate in a registered nursing (RN) upgrading program at a hospital in western Canada. A literature review considered the concepts of motivation, participation, adult learning, and life transitions and explored a variety of models and…

  14. Registered nurse retention strategies in nursing homes: a two-factor perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Selina R; Probst, Janice C; Haddock, Kathlyn S; Moran, Robert; Baker, Samuel L; Anderson, Ruth A; Corazzini, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    As the American population ages and the proportion of individuals over the age of 65 expands, the demand for high-quality nursing home care will increase. However, nursing workforce instability threatens care quality and sustainability in this sector. Despite increasing attention to nursing home staff turnover, far less is known about registered nurse (RN) retention. In this study, the relationships between retention strategies, employee benefits, features of the practice environment, and RN retention were explored. Further, the utility of Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as a framework for nursing home retention studies was evaluated. This study was a secondary analysis of the nationally representative 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The final sample of 1,174 participating nursing homes were either certified by Medicare or Medicaid or licensed by state agencies. We used a weighted multinomial logistic regression using an incremental approach to model the relationships. Although most nursing homes offered some combination of retention programs, the majority of strategies did not have a significant association with the level of RN retention reported by facilities. Director of nursing tenure and other extrinsic factors had the strongest association with RN retention in adjusted analyses. To improve RN retention, organizations may benefit greatly from stabilizing nursing home leadership, especially the director of nursing position. Second, managers of facilities with poor retention may consider adding career ladders for advancement, awarding attendance, and improving employee benefits. As a behavioral outcome of motivation and satisfaction, retention was not explained as expected using Herzberg's two-factor theory.

  15. Effect of Prior Health-Related Employment on the Registered Nurse Workforce Supply.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-kwan; Lin, Tzu-chun; Kim, Minchul; Sasaki, Tomoko; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RN) who held prior health-related employment in occupations other than licensed practical or vocational nursing (LPN/LVN) are reported to have increased rapidly in the past decades. Researchers examined whether prior health-related employment affects RN workforce supply. A cross-sectional bivariate probit model using the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses was esti- mated. Prior health-related employment in relatively lower-wage occupations, such as allied health, clerk, or nursing aide, was positively associated with working s an RN. ~>Prior health-related employ- ment in relatively higher-wage categories, such as a health care manager or LPN/LVN, was positively associated with working full-time as an RN. Policy implications are to promote an expanded career ladder program and a nursing school admission policy that targets non-RN health care workers with an interest in becoming RNs.

  16. The effects of RN staffing hours on nursing home quality: a two-stage model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang Yuol; Blegen, Mary A; Harrington, Charlene

    2014-03-01

    Based on structure-process-outcome approach, this study examined the association of registered nurse (RN) staffing hours and five quality indicators, including two process measures (catheter use and antipsychotic drug use) and three outcome measures (pressure ulcers, urinary tract infections, and weight loss). We used data on resident assessments, RN staffing, organizational characteristics, and market factors to examine the quality of 195 nursing homes operating in a rural state of United States - Colorado. Two-stage least squares regression models were performed to address the endogenous relationships between RN staffing and the outcome-related quality indicators, and ordinary least squares regression was used for the process-related ones. This analysis focused on the relationship of RN staffing to nursing home quality indicators, controlling for organizational characteristics, resources, resident casemix, and market factors with clustering to control for geographical differences. Higher RN hours were associated with fewer pressure ulcers, but RN hours were not related to the other quality indicators. The study finding shows the importance of understanding the role of 'nurse staffing' under nursing home care, as well as the significance of associated/contextual factors with nursing home quality even in a small rural state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An investigation of predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes among nursing content standardized tests.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Yei-Jin

    2013-12-01

    In order to meet increased demands for qualified registered nurses and prevent negative effects from graduates' failure on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse, it is important to promote students' success in the exam. The purpose of this study was to investigate effective predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes on the first attempt among nursing content standardized tests (adult medical-surgical, fundamentals for nursing, pharmacology, maternal-newborn, nursing care of children, mental health, community health, and leadership and management) conducted throughout the nursing program. NCLEX-RN outcomes and individual adjusted scores on the standardized tests of 151 graduates from the traditional baccalaureate nursing program of a public university located in the Midwest from May 2010 to December 2011 were analyzed by a t-test and logistic regression. The participants included 118 graduates who passed and 33 graduates who failed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. Significant statistical differences were found between the two groups with NCLEX-RN success and failure in the individual adjusted scores on all of the standardized tests except the fundamental for nursing (p=.62) and nursing care of children (p=.759) standardized tests. In addition, logistic regression indicated that the overall regression models were significant in predicting both NCLEX-RN success and failure. Adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were central to the prediction of both NCLEX-RN success and failure; however, a much lower percentage of NCLEX-RN failure than success was classified. It can be concluded that the adult medical-surgical, pharmacology, and community health standardized tests were effective in predicting NCLEX-RN success and not effective in predicting NCLEX-RN failure on the first attempt. The NCLEX-RN success predictors can be utilized to identify students at risk and provide early remediation. After early remediation is

  18. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Mohamed D; Diaz, Valerie J; Miller, Audrey P; Olenick, Maria; Simon, Sharon R

    2015-01-01

    The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University’s Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program’s main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of military skills, unemployment, the substandard income, and homelessness that many former service members face after separation from the military. PMID:26648733

  19. Nurse staffing levels and nursing outcomes: a Bayesian analysis of Finnish-registered nurse survey data.

    PubMed

    Tervo-Heikkinen, Tarja; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Partanen, Pirjo; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between patient-to-registered nurse (RN) ratios and nursing outcomes: job satisfaction and stress, nursing care quality, control of own practise, intent to leave, adequacy of material resources and attitudes towards technical equipment. Although there is a growing body of evidence showing that higher levels of RN staffing are linked to better outcomes, it still is unclear how nurse staffing produces these effects. A survey of data of RNs (n = 854) in 46 inpatient units at five university hospitals in Finland was used to create a Bayesian network (BN) model of connections between the variables. A BN model constructed showed that the quality of nursing care is influenced by multifaceted work environment measures. RNs' possibility to control their own practice and the quality of care are mediation between patient-to-RN ratio and other variables examined. New insight was given to the complex theme of the nursing practice environment and its connections to nursing outcomes. Work environment should be developed with consideration of many factors, including adequate staffing levels and the ability for nurses to control their own work. This could increase nurses' work satisfaction, retention and patient care quality outcomes.

  20. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  1. Gender-Based Barriers Experienced by Male Students in an Online RN-to-BSN Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative survey-based research study examined the experiences of 49 men through a comparative analysis of their traditional classroom-based Diploma or Associate Degree in Nursing program and their subsequent experiences in the University of Phoenix online Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree completion…

  2. School Nurses and RN to BSN Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Dabney, Beverly W; Linton, Mary; Koonmen, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Many nursing schools and public schools are facing various challenges including a lack of resources. Schools of nursing strive to provide meaningful clinical experiences despite the challenge of a limited supply of quality placements. Similarly, public schools are expected to provide more nursing services at a time when many school nurses already are overloaded. For example, new state legislation placed additional responsibilities (regarding epinephrine auto-injectors and cardiac emergency response plans) on school nurses in Michigan. Establishing a partnership between the University of Michigan-Flint and the Genesee Intermediate School District (GISD) allowed RN to BSN students in the community health nursing course to complete enriching clinical experiences at selected GISD schools. While gaining valuable clinical knowledge, these nursing students helped school nurses comply with the new legislation's requirements. This partnership benefitted the nursing students, the school nurses, and the schools that served as clinical placement sites. Nursing school administrators and faculty members should consider pursuing similar clinical placement partnerships that could be advantageous for students and local communities.

  3. [Analysis of RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency].

    PubMed

    Son, Jung Tae; Park, Myonghwa; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Woo-Sook; Oh, Kasil

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate RN-BSN students' clinical nursing competency in order to establish baseline data for developing nursing competency based clinical education for RN-BSN students. A survey of 1,453 RN-BSN students from 21 nursing schools was conducted using a self administered questionnaire. The mean score of the clinical nursing competency was 2.93. The scores for competency were shown as 2.91 for nursing management, 2.94 for developing professionalism & legal implementation, 2.95 for critical thinking, 2.96 for teaching & leadership, and data collection, basic nursing care, and communication were above 3.00. The items perceived as insufficient competency were physical examination and observation & monitoring in data collection, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, psycho-social care, spiritual care, hospice in basic nursing care, application of knowledge and theory, formulating nursing diagnosis, nursing care planning in critical thinking, education material development, leadership, delegation in teaching and leadership, analysis of organization, planning, infection control, role & job description, evaluation of nursing activities in nursing management, quality improvement, and research in developing professionalism and legal implementation. This study will contribute to developing a nursing competency based on clinical education for RN-BSN students who have various education needs and clinical backgrounds.

  4. Labor market trends among registered nurses: 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alan

    2012-11-01

    This study uses recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and Registered Nurses (RNs) licensing exam to examine the recession's effect on the RN labor market. It then reports results of a survey of 518 hospital nursing officers conducted in 2008 and 2010 matched with institutional data from the American Hospital Association (AHA). These unique data show how the recession led hospitals to slow hiring despite accelerating attrition of retirement-age nurses; shift away from H1-B, agency, and, overtime work; and reduce training, and other benefits for new hires. More broadly, results show how nurse-staffing practices adapt to market conditions. Results also suggest reduced hospital support for nursing education may strain the supply of managerial and specialty nurses as baby-boom nurses retire.

  5. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  6. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  7. Proposals for registered nurse prescribing: perceptions and intentions of nurses working in primary health care settings.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Jill

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the Nursing Council of New Zealand consulted on a proposal for introduction of registered nurse (RN) prescribing at two levels (specialist and community) within the designated class of prescriber. The proposal builds on the success of the diabetes nurse specialist prescribing project and the experience of other countries where RN prescribing is well established. To describe the views and intentions of nurses who work in primary health care (PHC) settings about the two levels of RN prescribing proposed. The study involved a self-reported survey using a non-probability sample of RNs working in PHC settings (N=305). Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed descriptively. The respondents were experienced nurses. Overall, 82.3% expressed interest in becoming a community nurse prescriber, and 62.6% expressed interest in the specialist prescriber level. RN prescribing was expected to improve efficiency and access to medicines for high-needs populations, clarify accountability and improve nurses' autonomy. The education requirements for the specialist level were viewed as appropriate but too onerous for many. Requirements were viewed as inadequate for the community level. Concerns were raised about funding for education and support for RN prescribing roles. Nurses were positive about the proposals and see a potential to meet significant unmet health need. Nurses are already engaged in the provision of medicines to patients and prescribing authority would ensure they are suitably qualified to engage in these tasks. A clear policy platform will be needed if the proposed levels of RN prescribing are to be successfully implemented.

  8. Predictors of NCLEX-RN success in a baccalaureate nursing program as a foundation for remediation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Linda K; Kirkpatrick, Bonnie L; Frazier, Susan K; Chung, Misook L; Moser, Debra K

    2003-09-01

    This study evaluated students' demographic and nursing program variables and standardized test scores to determine whether significant differences existed between students who successfully completed the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and those who were unsuccessful. In addition, the predictive accuracy of two standardized examinations, the Mosby AssessTest and the Health Education Systems, Incorporated (HESI) Exit Examination were compared. Two cohorts of graduating senior nursing students were studied (1999 cohort N = 121; 2000 cohort N = 103). Demographic and nursing program variables were obtained from student records. The Undergraduate Studies Committee provided standardized test scores (Mosby AssessTest in 1999; HESI Exit Examination in 2000). Only two program variables were consistently associated with success on the NCLEX-RN--final course grade for a didactic, senior-level medical-surgical nursing course and cumulative program grade point average. Scores on both standardized tests were significantly different in students who were successful on the NCLEX-RN and those who were not. The HESI Exit Examination demonstrated greater sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and test efficiency, compared with the Mosby AssessTest. Use of program variables and students' standardized test scores may allow faculty to identify students at risk for failing the NCLEX-RN and to provide structured remediation so these students may be successful on the licensing examination and begin their nursing careers.

  9. The fast track back to registered nurses employment.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Burns, Helen K; Hoffmann, Rosemary; Dailey, Joseph; Hornyak, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The registered nurse (RN) workforce continues to decline. One method to attract experienced RNs into the workforce is through RN refresher courses. To determine if our RN refresher program is successful in returning RNs to the workforce, we sought to measure the: characteristics of RNs who participate in our program; relationship among participants' employment and demographics; effect of high fidelity human simulation (HFHS) on participants' learning, and; program's ability to meet participants' preparation for employment. Seventy-three participants were surveyed to measure their demographics and employment; they ranked the HFHS experience and program experience on their learning and employment. Thirty-four (47%) surveys were returned. Thirty-three participants (97%) were female (mean age=50.44 years, SD=6.2). Their mean years of RN licensure was 24.93 years (SD=8.8), and their mean time out of nursing practice was 13.30 years (SD=8.0). Twenty-six (76.5%) were employed, with 20 (60.6%) employed as RNs at acute care facilities. Employed participants were licensed for less years than non-employed participants (p=0.047). Employed participants ranked their HFHS experience highly (p=0.04) and the program highly (p=0.04) on benefiting their current employment. Our refresher program appears to be successful in helping RNs re-enter the nursing workforce.

  10. Registered Nurses in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Flinter, Margaret; Hsu, Clarissa; Cromp, DeAnn; Ladden, MaryJoan D.

    2017-01-01

    The years since the passage of the Affordable Care Act have seen substantial changes in the organization and delivery of primary care. These changes have emphasized greater team involvement in care and expansion of the roles of each team member including registered nurses (RNs). This study examined the roles of RNs in 30 exemplary primary care practices. We identified the emergence of new roles and activities for RNs characterized by greater involvement in face-to-face patient care and care management, their own daily schedule of patient visits and contacts, and considerable autonomy in the care of their patients. PMID:28323721

  11. Concurrent and lagged effects of registered nurse turnover and staffing on unit-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Hye; Boyle, Diane K; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Staggs, Vincent S; Dunton, Nancy E

    2014-08-01

    We examined the concurrent and lagged effects of registered nurse (RN) turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcer rates and whether RN staffing mediated the effects. Quarterly unit-level data were obtained from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators for 2008 to 2010. A total of 10,935 unit-quarter observations (2,294 units, 465 hospitals) were analyzed. This longitudinal study used multilevel regressions and tested time-lagged effects of study variables on outcomes. The lagged effect of RN turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcers was significant, while there was no concurrent effect. For every 10 percentage-point increase in RN turnover in a quarter, the odds of a patient having a pressure ulcer increased by 4 percent in the next quarter. Higher RN turnover in a quarter was associated with lower RN staffing in the current and subsequent quarters. Higher RN staffing was associated with lower pressure ulcer rates, but it did not mediate the relationship between turnover and pressure ulcers. We suggest that RN turnover is an important factor that affects pressure ulcer rates and RN staffing needed for high-quality patient care. Given the high RN turnover rates, hospital and nursing administrators should prepare for its negative effect on patient outcomes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Concurrent and Lagged Effects of Registered Nurse Turnover and Staffing on Unit-Acquired Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin Hye; Boyle, Diane K; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Staggs, Vincent S; Dunton, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the concurrent and lagged effects of registered nurse (RN) turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcer rates and whether RN staffing mediated the effects. Data Sources/Setting Quarterly unit-level data were obtained from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators for 2008 to 2010. A total of 10,935 unit-quarter observations (2,294 units, 465 hospitals) were analyzed. Methods This longitudinal study used multilevel regressions and tested time-lagged effects of study variables on outcomes. Findings The lagged effect of RN turnover on unit-acquired pressure ulcers was significant, while there was no concurrent effect. For every 10 percentage-point increase in RN turnover in a quarter, the odds of a patient having a pressure ulcer increased by 4 percent in the next quarter. Higher RN turnover in a quarter was associated with lower RN staffing in the current and subsequent quarters. Higher RN staffing was associated with lower pressure ulcer rates, but it did not mediate the relationship between turnover and pressure ulcers. Conclusions We suggest that RN turnover is an important factor that affects pressure ulcer rates and RN staffing needed for high-quality patient care. Given the high RN turnover rates, hospital and nursing administrators should prepare for its negative effect on patient outcomes. PMID:24476194

  13. Nurse staffing levels: impact of organizational characteristics and registered nurse supply.

    PubMed

    Blegen, Mary A; Vaughn, Thomas; Vojir, Carol P

    2008-02-01

    To assess the impact of nurse supply in the geographic areas surrounding hospitals on staffing levels in hospital units, while taking into account other factors that influence nurse staffing. Data regarding 279 patient care units, in 47 randomly selected community hospitals located in 11 clusters in the United States, were obtained directly from the hospitals from the U.S. Census report, National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Cross-sectional analyses with linear mixed modeling to control for nesting of units in hospitals were conducted. For each patient care unit, the hours of care per patient day from registered nurses (RNs), LPNs, nursing assistants, and the skill-mix levels were calculated. These measures of staffing were then regressed on type of unit (intensive care, medical/surgical, telemetry/stepdown), unit size, hospital complexity, and RN supply. RN hours per patient day and RN skill mix were positively related to intensity of patient care, hospital complexity, and the supply of RNs in the geographic area surrounding the hospital. LPN hours, and licensed skill mix were predicted less reliably but appear to be used as substitutes for RNs. Overtime hours increased in areas with a lower RN supply. Vacancy and turnover rates and the use of contract nurses were not affected by nurse supply. This study is the first to show that hospital RN staffing levels on both intensive care and nonintensive care units decrease as the supply of RNs in the surrounding geographic area decreases. We also show that LPN hours rise in areas where RN supply is lower. Further research to describe the quality of hospital care in relation to the supply of nurses in the area is needed.

  14. Nurse Staffing Levels: Impact of Organizational Characteristics and Registered Nurse Supply

    PubMed Central

    Blegen, Mary A; Vaughn, Thomas; Vojir, Carol P

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of nurse supply in the geographic areas surrounding hospitals on staffing levels in hospital units, while taking into account other factors that influence nurse staffing. Data Sources Data regarding 279 patient care units, in 47 randomly selected community hospitals located in 11 clusters in the United States, were obtained directly from the hospitals from the U.S. Census report, National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Study Design Cross-sectional analyses with linear mixed modeling to control for nesting of units in hospitals were conducted. For each patient care unit, the hours of care per patient day from registered nurses (RNs), LPNs, nursing assistants, and the skill-mix levels were calculated. These measures of staffing were then regressed on type of unit (intensive care, medical/surgical, telemetry/stepdown), unit size, hospital complexity, and RN supply. Principal Findings RN hours per patient day and RN skill mix were positively related to intensity of patient care, hospital complexity, and the supply of RNs in the geographic area surrounding the hospital. LPN hours, and licensed skill mix were predicted less reliably but appear to be used as substitutes for RNs. Overtime hours increased in areas with a lower RN supply. Vacancy and turnover rates and the use of contract nurses were not affected by nurse supply. Conclusions This study is the first to show that hospital RN staffing levels on both intensive care and nonintensive care units decrease as the supply of RNs in the surrounding geographic area decreases. We also show that LPN hours rise in areas where RN supply is lower. Further research to describe the quality of hospital care in relation to the supply of nurses in the area is needed. PMID:18211523

  15. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Diane K; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = -.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations.

  16. Success-Failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses by Nurse Candidates from an Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Nine years of data from first-time nurse candidates taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were examined to identify predictors of successful performance and determine probabilities of success. Variables placing nurse candidates at risk included first-semester grade point average, sex, and whether they…

  17. Nursing practice environment and registered nurses' job satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-08-01

     Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes.   The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes.   Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs' participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs' job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied.   A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction.

  18. The Determination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement in Nursing Courses and Success on the Registered Nurse Licensure Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Julie E.

    The objective of a study was to determine if academic achievement in nursing courses could be used to predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). It investigated the relationship between NCLEX outcomes and academic achievement in theory and clinical courses and the relationship between NCLEX…

  19. Professional Nursing in State Service: Needs and Recommendations. A Skills Inventory of Registered Nurses Employed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Barbara

    This study analyzed factors in attracting and recruiting professional nurses into Massachusetts state service. Although Massachusetts had relatively many registered nurses (RN), 45% were inactive. Resulting shortages were great, especially in state hospitals. All agencies had high turnover, with impending staffing crises in some agencies because…

  20. Tools assessing nurse manager behaviours and RN job satisfaction: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Feather, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    To determine the state of the science in relation to registered nurse (RN) perceptions of nurse manager behaviours that influence registered nurse job satisfaction. Nurse managers have been related by research to the job satisfaction of their staff. However, little is known about how nurses perceive the behaviours of nurse managers as influencing their job satisfaction. A literature search was conducted to identify journal articles that included studies involving instruments of nurse manager behaviours and staff nurse job satisfaction levels. The literature shows a lack of consistency in the definitions of job satisfaction, instrumentation for measurement and conclusions that identify specific management behaviours effective for high levels of job satisfaction of RNs related to staff nurse perceptions. Studies include important aspects of what shapes a healthy work environment for nurses, but no single study identified specific nurse manager behaviours based solely on the perceptions of staff nurses and their job satisfaction. The perceptions of staff nurses are important for hospital administrators and nurse managers in order to know how to improve satisfaction and reduce turnover. Instruments developed based on manager beliefs may not provide data needed to influence a change in management behaviours that results in improved job satisfaction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Relationship Between Registered Nurses and Nursing Home Quality: An Integrative Review (2008-2014).

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Castle, Nickolas G; McGilton, Katherine S; Spilsbury, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Nursing home care is expensive; second only to acute hospital care for inpatient Medicare costs. The increased focus on costs of care accrued by Medicare beneficiaries in nursing homes presents a valuable opportunity for registered nurses (RNs) to further demonstrate quantitatively the value they add to the capacity of the nursing home nursing skill mix to provide cost-effective and efficient quality care. Most of the studies included in this review consistently reported that higher RN staffing and higher ratios of RNs in the nursing skill mix are related to better NH quality. Concerns about the costs of employing more highly skilled RNs and directors of nursing that have the potential to positively influence members of the nursing skill mix will continue to influence nursing home industry hiring practices. For both the advancement of nursing as an applied science and the benefit of society at large, nursing researchers are challenged to better demonstrate how the increased presence of a RN on each shift has the potential to enhance the cost effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of nursing homes.

  2. The registered nurse as a first assistant: the "downunder" experience.

    PubMed

    Brennan, B

    2001-04-01

    In 1996, Bernadette Brennan, RN, was awarded a fellowship from the Australian Confederation of Operating Room Nurses (now known as the Australian College of Operating Room Nurses Ltd.) to travel to the United States to study the role of the Advanced Nurse Practitioner, with an emphasis on the role of the registered nurse first assistant (RNFA). As part of this study, she undertook an RNFA course at Delaware County Community College. This article provides a description of her work to develop an educational program for RNFAs in Australia. Because of the size of the country and the many rural areas needing to be served, her challenge was to devise an accessible program that was also academically rigorous. Her trials as well as her triumphs are presented here.

  3. Registered nurse turnover and the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C B

    1996-01-01

    Changes in health care delivery and cyclic fluctuations in the registered nurse (RN) labor market affect health care costs, access, and quality. This study provides insight into one factor central to these issues, the job-change behavior of RNs. The theory of human capital provides the foundation to guide investigation, and econometric modeling is used to explore relationships among study variables. Model results show clear differences in job change behavior of nurses employed in hospital and nonhospital settings. These differences are a reflection, not only of individual nurse preferences, but also of wages, working conditions, and opportunities associated with various health care settings. Understanding these relationships is essential to leaders in the nursing profession as they plan for and respond to changes in health care delivery.

  4. Registered Nurse Persistence in Baccalaureate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krov, Kathleen Nadler

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared registered nurses to safely meet the complex healthcare needs of citizens of the United States. Since there is no research on the characteristics of registered nurse students persisting in baccalaureate education, this quantitative descriptive case study was designed to identify the…

  5. Registered Nurse Persistence in Baccalaureate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krov, Kathleen Nadler

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to increase the number of baccalaureate prepared registered nurses to safely meet the complex healthcare needs of citizens of the United States. Since there is no research on the characteristics of registered nurse students persisting in baccalaureate education, this quantitative descriptive case study was designed to identify the…

  6. The Impact of Health System Changes on States' Requirements for Registered Nurses in 1985. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Timothy C.; And Others

    The effect of future health system changes on the requirements for registered nurse (RN) personnel at the state level are examined in this report. Following a report introduction, chapter 2 discusses the baseline scenario which provides an estimate of RN requirements in the absence of three changes: the introduction of national health insurance,…

  7. Learning styles of registered nurses enrolled in an online nursing program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances assist in the proliferation of online nursing programs which meet the needs of the working nurse. Understanding online learning styles permits universities to adequately address the educational needs of the professional nurse returning for an advanced degree. The purpose of this study was to describe the learning styles of registered nurses (RNs) enrolled in an online master's nursing program or RN-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Kolb's learning style inventory (Version 3.1) was completed by 217 RNs enrolled in online courses at a Southeastern university. Descriptive statistical procedures were used for analysis. Thirty-one percent of the nurses were accommodators, 20% were assimilators, 19% were convergers, and 20% were divergers. Accommodators desire hand-on experiences, carrying out plans and tasks and using an intuitive trial-and-error approach to problem solving. The learning styles of the RNs were similar to the BSN students in traditional classroom settings. Despite their learning style, nurses felt that the online program met their needs. Implementing the technological innovations in nursing education requires the understanding of the hands-on learning of the RN so that the development of the online courses will satisfactorily meet the needs of the nurses who have chosen an online program. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of staff turnover on staffing: A closer look at registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses, and certified nursing assistants.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Castle, Nicholas G; Naufal, George S; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effects of facility and market-level characteristics on staffing levels and turnover rates for direct care staff, and we examined the effect of staff turnover on staffing levels. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,014 Texas nursing homes. Data were from the 2002 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost Report and the Area Resource File for 2003. After examining factors associated with staff turnover, we tested the significance and impact of staff turnover on staffing levels for registered nurses (RNs), licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). All three staff types showed strong dependency on resources, such as reimbursement rates and facility payor mix. The ratio of contracted to employed nursing staff as well as RN turnover increased LVN turnover rates. CNA turnover was reduced by higher administrative expenditures and higher CNA wages. Turnover rates significantly reduced staffing levels for RNs and CNAs. LVN staffing levels were not affected by LVN turnover but were influenced by market factors such as availability of LVNs in the county and women in the labor force. Staffing levels are not always associated with staff turnover. We conclude that staff turnover is a predictor of RN and CNA staffing levels but that LVN staffing levels are associated with market factors rather than turnover. Therefore, it is important to focus on management initiatives that help reduce CNA and RN turnover and ultimately result in higher nurse staffing levels in nursing homes.

  9. Relationship of Academic Variables to National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurse Performance of Graduates in a Selected Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naron, Rosarica G.; Widlak, Frederic

    This report addresses the unstable and unsatisfactory performance of Chicago, Illinois' Olive-Harvey College's (OHC) associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). An ex post facto correlation study was designed to determine the worthiness of pre-nursing admission course…

  10. Competency profile for registered nurses: NIC in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNs provide both direct care and leadership in geriatric-care facilities. In this specialized area of care, the contributions of the RN are not well recognized. In this issue, we focus on gerontological nursing and how NIC can be used to describe and communicate this highly specialized role.

  11. Longitudinal Association of Registered Nurse National Nursing Specialty Certification and Patient Falls in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Diane K.; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Staggs, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have studied inpatient falls in relation to aspects of nurse staffing, focusing primarily on staffing levels and proportion of nursing care hours provided by registered nurses (RNs). Less attention has been paid to other nursing characteristics, such as RN national nursing specialty certification. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the relationship over time between changes in RN national nursing specialty certification rates and changes in total patient fall rates at the patient care unit level. Methods We used longitudinal data with standardized variable definitions across sites from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample consisted of 7,583 units in 903 hospitals. Relationships over time were examined using multilevel (units nested in hospitals) latent growth curve modeling. Results The model indices indicated a good fit of the data to the model. At the unit level, there was a small statistically significant inverse relationship (r = −.08, p = .04) between RN national nursing specialty certification rates and total fall rates; increases in specialty certification rates over time tended to be associated with improvements in total fall rates over time. Discussion Our findings may be supportive of promoting national nursing specialty certification as a means of improving patient safety. Future study recommendations are (a) modeling organizational leadership, culture, and climate as mediating variables between national specialty certification rates and patient outcomes and (b) investigating the association of patient safety and specific national nursing specialty certifications which test plans include patient safety, quality improvement, and diffusion of innovation methods in their certifying examinations. PMID:26049719

  12. Economic evaluation of registered nurse tenure on nursing home resident outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uchida-Nakakoji, Mayuko; Stone, Patricia W; Schmitt, Susan; Phibbs, Ciaran; Wang, Y Claire

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the economic implications of nursing home (NH) registered nurse (RN) tenure on resident outcomes. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of two nurse workforce scenarios focusing on RN tenure (high versus low), and the associated transfers from NH to the hospital. A decision tree was constructed to compare the incremental costs and effects of RN tenure scenarios on NH resident transfers to the hospital under two NH staffing scenarios: high versus low levels of RN tenure. Three outcomes were modeled: 1) dollars per hospitalization avoided, 2) dollars per hospitalization and death avoided, and 3) dollars per death avoided. The total costs of care for the low tenure scenario were $34,108 per month compared to the high tenure scenario at $29,442 per month. Effectiveness of the high tenure was greater across all 3 outcomes (incremental effectiveness ranged from 0.925 to 0.974 depending on outcome), indicating that high tenure was the dominant strategy (that is less costly and more effective). Higher RN tenure was a dominant strategy across the 3 outcomes. This was a fairly robust finding despite the variations in the model and uncertainty in the input parameters. Aligning quality outcomes with cost effectiveness is imperative to driving the direction of health policy in the United States. Better prevention of hospitalizations by having an experienced RN workforce will not only improve resident quality of care but will allow NHs to realize the value of retaining a skilled workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall.

  14. Predictors of Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses among Transfer BSN Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative research study (N=175) examined predictors of first time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) among transfer students in a baccalaureate degree program (BSN). The predictors were chosen after an extensive literature review yielded few studies related to this population. Benner's…

  15. Leadership, support and acknowledgement of registered nurses work in acute mental health units.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-10-01

    In acute mental health inpatient units, it is not surprising that culture, peers, immediate management, and sources of support and acknowledgment all contribute to positive nursing outcomes. In this qualitative study, four questions targeting leadership, culture, support, and acknowledgement of work well done were asked of 40 registered nurses (RN) working in acute mental health units. Findings convey a mixed picture indicating variation across units. Three-quarters believe that senior nursing staff actively contribute to a positive working environment. Almost half of the RN nominated peers as the providers of counsel and support when required, and a similar percentage believed that senior nursing staff fulfil these roles. Of interviewees, 33% said their nursing achievements are never, or rarely, acknowledged. For these RN, management, peers, and nurse unit managers are the preferred personnel to provide appropriate positive feedback. Thus, there is a gap between the expectations and hopes that nurses have for senior management approaches and behaviours and the reality of their daily experience. Overall, the responses portray a culture that underpins and enables both subtle interpersonal interactions that might arise out of necessity given the perceived lack of support from non-hands-on RN and administrators. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  16. Political participation of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p < .001) of political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant (p < .001). Resources (time/money/civic skills) significantly contributed to political participation (p < .001). Less than half (40%) felt they could impact local decisions, and fewer (32%) felt they could impact state or national government decisions. Most respondents (80%) indicated their nursing courses lacked political content and did not prepare them for political participation. Findings showed that nurse educators and leaders of professional nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  17. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  18. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research.

  19. Relationshp between Academic Variables and Personality Type to Progression in an Associate Degree Nursing Program and Achievement on NCLEX-RN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ione Norma

    This retrospective study was done to identify academic and personality variables that predict student progression through an associate degree nursing program and achievement on the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The study searched for evidence of a decline in academic ability in the students over the 7…

  20. Quantitative research on critical thinking and predicting nursing students' NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been influential in several disciplines. Both education and nursing in general have been attempting to define, teach, and measure this concept for decades. Nurse educators realize that critical thinking is the cornerstone of the objectives and goals for nursing students. The purpose of this article is to review and analyze quantitative research findings relevant to the measurement of critical thinking abilities and skills in undergraduate nursing students and the usefulness of critical thinking as a predictor of National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) performance. The specific issues that this integrative review examined include assessment and analysis of the theoretical and operational definitions of critical thinking, theoretical frameworks used to guide the studies, instruments used to evaluate critical thinking skills and abilities, and the role of critical thinking as a predictor of NCLEX-RN outcomes. A list of key assumptions related to critical thinking was formulated. The limitations and gaps in the literature were identified, as well as the types of future research needed in this arena.

  1. Diffusion of a nursing education innovation: nursing workforce development through promotion of RN/BSN education.

    PubMed

    Diaz Swearingen, Connie; Clarke, Pamela N; Gatua, Mary Wairimu; Sumner, Christa Cooper

    2013-01-01

    Despite state, national, and organizational objectives to increase the proportion of nurses with a bachelor's degree or higher, a majority of nurses hold an associate's degree in nursing. To address the need for a better-prepared nursing workforce in this rural state, an RN/BSN recruitment and retention project was implemented. The authors discuss the Leadership Education to Advance Practice project and its outcomes.

  2. The Initiative to Move Toward a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce: Findings from the Kansas Registered Nurse Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of registered nurses (RNs) with a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) to 80% by 2020. Kansas lacks a central mechanism to collect current data on the RN workforce; therefore, detailed information about the RN workforce, including current educational level, is unknown. The purposes of the survey were to (a) describe the Kansas RN workforce, (b) examine the relationship between nursing education and employment, (c) compare and contrast the workforce to other states and national data and (d) discuss implications of strategic planning and policy making for nursing education. The on-line Kansas RN Workforce Survey link was sent to 44,568 RNs by e-mail, and the response rate was 15.6% (n = 6,948). The survey consisted of 34 questions on demographics, education, licensing, and employment. Kansas RNs were predominately women (92%) and Caucasian with an average age of 47.7 years. Approximately 46.3% of RNs obtained a BSN as their initial education. Analysis of highest level of nursing education showed that 60.5% of Kansas RNs were at least baccalaureate prepared, with 14.9% obtaining a master's degree or higher. More than 50% of RNs worked in hospitals as staff nurses. RNs with advanced education were more likely to be employed, tended to work in academic settings or ambulatory clinics, and were more likely to be faculty or in management/leadership positions. Overall, the Kansas RN workforce is closer to reaching the 80% baccalaureate-prepared goal recommended by the Future of Nursing report than has been reported. Educational level was closely related to RNs' choices of work settings and positions. Additional work such as promoting academic progression needs to continue to build a more highly educated RN workforce.

  3. Supervising nursing students administering medication: a perspective from registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Happell, Brenda

    2012-07-01

    To explore the attitudes, experiences and opinions of registered nurses regarding supervision of undergraduate nursing students while administering medication in the healthcare setting. Medication errors present a considerable risk to safety in the healthcare setting. By virtue of their role in the administration of medication, registered nurses are considered as major contributors to this problem. Undergraduate nursing students administer medication in the clinical setting, but little attention has been paid to the implications for patient safety. This research was conducted using exploratory qualitative methodology. Focus group interviews were conducted with 13 registered nurses. The participants were asked to describe their experiences and opinions regarding the supervision of undergraduate nursing students. Data were analysed using the framework approach. Three main themes from this work are presented in this paper: 'standard of supervision', 'a beneficial experience' and 'preparation'. The participants regarded supervision as an important process in fostering student learning and ensuring safety. Preparation on the part of the healthcare facility, students and the university were essential to maximise the benefits for all concerned. Relevance to clinical practice.  The ability to administer medication safely is an important skill for all registered nurses. Nursing students need the opportunity to develop these skills as part of their undergraduate educational programme. Registered nurses must supervise students in a rigorous and supportive manner to enhance learning and to promote quality care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Caring for prisoners-patients: a quandary for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Ruth; Turner, de Sales

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to unveil the complexity of registered nurse (RN) care for prisoner-patients in an acute care perioperative setting. The study design was based on phenomenology and the philosophy of Hans George Gadamer. This study used researcher journaling and two audio-taped in-depth interviews with each of the 12 nurse participants. Five key fused horizons or joint understandings emerged that resonated for all participants. They were the following: • RNs give prisoner-patients perfunctory care; • Prisoner-patient care is reactive; • Caring for prisoner-patients is emotionally draining; • Knowing or imagining a prisoner-patient's crime creates practice dilemmas; and • Expressions of care straddle ideal and real caring perspectives. In the caring literature, caring is altruistically presented as an ideal that (ought to) guide RN interactions with patients. However, the study findings call into question the assumptions that are made about what it means to care and how RNs enact their caring role, particularly in vexatious situations. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Describing the influence of technologies on registered nurses' work.

    PubMed

    Zuzelo, Patti Rager; Gettis, Catherine; Hansell, Amanda Whitekettle; Thomas, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of technologies on registered nurses' (RNs) work. The study examined the characteristics of technologies that encourage or hinder their correct use and identified RNs' concerns when introduced to new or changed technologies. Four focus group sessions were conducted to collect data describing nurses' concerns as they work with technologies during daily practice and make decisions as to how or how not to use technologies. Transcript content was thematically analyzed, and data were organized to reveal major themes, themes, and subthemes. The study was conducted at an urban healthcare network in a large northeastern city. Registered nurses employed at 2 institutions within the network, a general acute care hospital and a tertiary care medical center, participated in the group discussions. Purposively selected RN participants (N = 31) provided direct care to patients on medical-surgical care units, including telemetry units. Participants had a minimum of 1 year of experience and were employed at least 20 hours weekly. Focus group discussions followed a preestablished query path and lasted approximately 90 minutes. Food served as an incentive for participation. Informed consent was obtained. Discussions were audiotape recorded. Discussion data were listed on flip charts during group interviews. The principal investigator served as the group moderator, and a clinical nurse specialist coinvestigator facilitated participation and took notes. Debriefing sessions followed each discussion. Content analysis revealed that technologies enhanced nursing practice by improving direct care processes, patient outcomes, and work environments. Working with inefficient systems of technology delivery, use, and repair created challenges for nurses and physically unfriendly equipment increased the burden of nurses' work. Nurses bypassed problems rather than proactively solving them, occasionally leading to safety breeches. Technologies

  6. Graduate-entry nursing students' journeys to registered nursing.

    PubMed

    Neill, Mark

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of Australian graduate-entry nursing students as they journeyed towards their wish of becoming a registered nurse. This paper reports the findings from a qualitative grounded theory study used to develop one theoretical framework for explaining graduate-entry nursing students' journeys to nursing. Computer mediated communication collected data through semi-structured electronic interviews. This study focussed on the experiences of a purposive sample of six past graduate-entry nursing students from an Australian university. Participants' decisions to pursue nursing were often long-lasting involving considerable thought and preparation. Educational experiences were a collection of detractors and facilitators throughout the course. Working as nurses post-graduation re-shaped their original perceptions of nursing, often with gender differences, however their commitment to nursing remained strong and all overtly verified having become a registered nurse. This study identified the unique experiences of graduate-entry nursing students. This uniqueness represented numerous life experiences including previous tertiary study. Avenues of further research were identified where a deeper understanding of graduate nursing students could be gained. Such knowledge may lead to courses that better capture the abilities of graduates who may not have considered nursing but for the graduate-entry pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of Guided Imagery to Facilitate the Transition of New Graduate Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Laura B.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the new graduate registered nurse (RN) transition has included a didactic and skills-based orientation accompanied by a period of preceptored practice. However, these methods do not ensure that new RNs are in a state of reduced anxiety to fully interact with their new environment. Transition to practice may cause anxiety, and the new graduate RN may perceive moderate to severe stress. One method of stress reduction is the use of guided imagery, which has shown strong potential with a variety of populations undergoing stressful events. Today, new graduate RNs expect institutions to facilitate orientation to their new employment settings and assist in the transition to their role as a professional nurse. This article proposes a model that incorporates guided imagery for refining the new graduate RN transition process. The model can be adapted for use in the context of orienting other adult learners to unfamiliar practice situations. PMID:23330588

  8. Respect as experienced by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, Clara D

    2011-10-01

    The aims of this study were to ascertain how registered nurses convey and experience respect in their day-to-day work environment with other registered nurses. Nurses generally feel respected when they are acknowledged for a job well done and for what they as individuals bring to the situation, including knowledge, skills, and experience. Findings revealed that communication was a key factor in conveying and experiencing respect, including what is communicated, how it is communicated, and what is not communicated. Experiencing respect was linked to collaboration, acknowledgment, autonomy, support, and fairness. Important findings in this study were barriers to conveying respect. Barriers were described as lack of time, lack of understanding of roles, inability to develop collegial relationships, not being shown respect, and lack of self-awareness.

  9. Utilization of registered nurses in primary care teams: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Norful, Allison; Martsolf, Grant; de Jacq, Krystyna; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2017-05-20

    Registered nurses are increasingly becoming embedded in primary care teams yet there is a wide variability in nursing roles and responsibilities across organizations. Policy makers are calling for a closer look at how to best utilize registered nurses in primary care teams. Lack of knowledge about effective primary care nursing roles and responsibilities challenges policy makers' abilities to develop recommendations to effectively deploy registered nurses in primary care needed to assure efficient, evidence-based, and quality health care. To synthesize international evidence about primary care RN roles and responsibilities to make recommendations for maximizing the contributions of RNs in team-based primary care models. Systematic review. The Meta-Analysis and Systematic Reviews of Observational Studies framework guided the conduct of this review. Five electronic databases (OVID Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library) were searched using MeSH terms: primary care, roles, and responsibilities. The term "nurs*" was truncated to identify all literature relevant to nursing. The initial search yielded 2243. Abstracts and titles were screened for relevance and seventy-one full text reviews were completed by two researchers. Inclusion criteria included: (1) registered nurses practicing in interprofessional teams; (2) description of registered nursing roles and responsibilities; (3) primary care setting. All eligible studies underwent quality appraisal using the Integrative Quality Criteria for Review of Multiple Study Designs tool. Eighteen studies met eligibility across six countries: Australia, United States, Spain, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa. Registered nurses play a large role in chronic disease management, patient education, medication management, and often can shift between clinical and administrative responsibilities. There are a limited number of registered nurses that participate in primary care policy making and research. Integrating

  10. Predictors of successful transition to registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Craig; Esterman, Adrian; Smith, Colleen; Kenny, Amanda

    2013-06-01

    To identify predictors of successful transition from undergraduate student to registered nurse and to identify whether any particular pre-registration paid employment choice impacted on transition. Nursing students in Australia and internationally, engage in a variety of paid employment whilst completing their university studies. However, there is little empirical evidence about the different types of employment chosen by students and any relationship to graduate nurse transition. A descriptive questionnaire survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted with newly graduated nurses throughout Australia. The survey data were collected over 4 months in 2011, with 392 registered nurses completing a questionnaire. Respondents were categorized into four groups, according to their chosen work type (hospitality/retail, enrolled nurse, other healthcare worker, and non-worker) and transition scores were identified. Transition scores were significantly higher for undergraduates who were employed compared with non-workers. Postregistration institutional work factors appeared to be stronger predictors of successful transition than pre-registration employment factors. Assistance in dealing with complex patients, orientation to a new environment, and respect from colleagues were the best predictors for successful transition. Engaging in some form of paid employment in the final year of undergraduate university study is beneficial. However, it is not pre-registration employment choice per se that is the best predictor of successful transition, but the influence of work factors which new graduates experience in their first year of practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Retooling the RN workforce in long-term care: nursing certification as a pathway to quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; High, Robin; Culross, Beth; Conley, Deborah Marks; Nayar, Preethy; Nguyen, Anh T; Ojha, Diptee

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a project to improve nursing care quality in long-term care (LTC) by retooling registered nurses' (RN) geriatric clinical competence. A continuing education course was developed to prepare LTC RNs (N = 84) for national board certification and improve technological competence. The certification pass-rate was 98.5%. The study used a mixed methods design with retrospective pretests administered to RN participants. Multivariate analysis examined the impact of RN certification on empowerment, job satisfaction, intent to turnover, and clinical competence. Results showed certification significantly improved empowerment, satisfaction, and competence. A fixed effects analysis showed intent to turnover was a function of changes in empowerment, job dissatisfaction, and competency (F = 79.2; p < 0.001). Changes in empowerment (t = 1.63, p = 0.11) and competency (t = -0.04, p = 0.97) did not affect changes in job satisfaction. Findings suggest RN certification can reduce persistently high RN turnover rates that negatively impact patient safety and LTC quality.

  12. Encounters in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses' experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care.

  13. Registered nurses with disabilities: legal rights and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Miller, Michelle D

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this legal case review and analysis was to determine what kinds of cases involving nurses with disabilities are typically brought to attorneys, which cases tend to be successful, and how and when a nurse with a disability should pursue legal action. The review used the standard legal case analysis method to analyze legal cases that have been brought by registered nurses (RNs) with physical or sensory disabilities from 1995 to 2013. The cases span the period following the enactment of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 through the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) of 2008. A nurse attorney reviewed the background material to find every case involving an RN with a disability, excluding those with mental health disabilities or substance abuse issues. Case analysis was conducted using standard legal case analysis procedures. Fifty-six cases were analyzed. The cases were categorized into five types of legal claims: (a) disability discrimination (84%); (b) failure to accommodate (46%); (c) retaliation (12.5%); (d) association (3.6%); and (e) hostile work environment (7%). The cases were largely unsuccessful, particularly those brought under the ADA instead of the ADAAA. The case analysis revealed that several cases brought by RNs with disabilities using the ADA might have been successful under the ADAAA. In addition, the case analysis has provided vital information for administrators, leaders, and clinical nurses regarding when a case is appropriate for legal action. These findings from this review will help nurses recognize when they are being treated in a discriminatory way in the workplace, what their legal rights and responsibilities are, and at what point they should pursue legal action. This review has relevance to all RNs working in clinical and academic settings who may have a congenital or acquired physical or sensory disability. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses in nursing homes: Experiences and opinions of administrators and nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-07-12

    To understand how nursing homes employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses (BRNs) and how they view the unique contributions of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses to staff and residents in their organizations. Although providing care for nursing home residents is complex and thus requires a high level of skills, organizations often struggle to recruit and retain BRNs. Some nursing home organizations do not employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses at all. Among those that do, it is unknown how well these organizations make use of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses' expertise or if their roles are different from those of other staff. A qualitative study, consisting of 26 individual and three group interviews was conducted in the Netherlands. Interviews were conducted at the board-, management- and staff-level in six nursing home organizations. Data were collected between January 2016-May 2016. Organizations employed baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses to fulfil an informal leadership role for direct care teams. Organizations that do not employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses were unable to articulate their role in the nursing home setting. Difficulties baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses experienced during role implementation depended on role clarity, the term used to refer to the baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurse, the extent to which nurses received support, openness from direct care teams and baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses' own behaviour. The unique contribution of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses perceived by respondents differed between and in organizations. Our findings suggest that there is no "one size fits all" approach to employing baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses in nursing homes. To ensure the satisfaction of both baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses and the organizations that employ them, careful implementation and evaluation of their role is crucial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sonya; McDonald, Sinead; Rainey, Debbie

    The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

  16. Current Status of Fellowship Programs for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in the Nurse Practitioner Role.

    PubMed

    Camal Sanchez, Carlos Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Students completing an advanced practice RN program for practice as a nurse practitioner may seek options for further advancement. Although postgraduate clinical fellowship programs exist, information about such programs is not readily available. This article offers a resource for faculty to assist graduate students in finding advanced practice RN nurse practitioner fellowship programs in the United States.

  17. Preparing the future nurses for nursing research: a creative teaching strategy for RN-to-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Liou, Shwu-Ru

    2014-02-01

    Developing effective teaching strategies to stimulate students' interest and enthusiasm are urgently needed in current research courses. The purposes of the study were to implement the Cookie Experiments teaching strategy in research course and examine the effects of the strategy on students' attitudes towards nursing research. The study was a pretest-post-test design with 95 students at a Registered Nurses to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) program enrolled in the nursing research course. Results indicated that there was a significant effect of the Cookie Experiments teaching strategy on students' attitudes towards research. Although students perceived a median high score of pressure from the research course, they regarded that the pressure is conducive to their learning of research. Students highly suggested to continuously applying this teaching strategy in the future nursing research courses. Developing and using various teaching strategies with attractive and hands-on methods to motivate nurse students, learning research is strongly recommended. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Toward a methodology for substate projections of registered nurse supply and demand in New York.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Sandra; Martiniano, Robert; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Even as concerns about nursing shortages continue nationwide and for individual states in the United States, there is little information on the impact of nursing shortages at substate levels, such as counties or groups of small counties. National and state level assessments can mask wide geographic variation in the distribution of registered nurses (RNs). The Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, developed a practical approach to projecting RN supply and demand at substate levels. The experimental model used in this research was adapted from a methodology utilized for the RN National Supply Model and National Demand Model developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration in the department of Health and Human Services to make RN supply and demand projections at the broader national and state levels. The Center's research highlighted the value of substate analyses in the identification of RN supply and demand gaps and found that supply and demand gaps vary greatly by region and within regions. This study also provided an in-depth understanding of the dynamics that drive substate labor markets for RNs as well as the need for substate analyses to help policymakers better allocate scarce resources to address nursing shortages.

  19. Perceptions of select registered nurses of the continuing competence program of the Saskatchewan registered nurses' association.

    PubMed

    Bassendowski, Sandra; Petrucka, Pammla

    2009-12-01

    Nursing is a self-regulating profession, and most professional nursing jurisdictions across Canada have undertaken the creation of Continuing Competence Programs (CCPs), with the goals of promoting good nursing practice, encouraging continuous learning, contributing to the quality of nursing practice, and optimizing client outcomes. Most CCPs call for a professional portfolio to collect, synthesize, and analyze professional experiences, including documentation of peer feedback and preparation of a learning plan. In the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, there is a self-reflective tool that enables registered nurses to self-rate their achievement of a set of foundational competencies. This article explores the perceptions that select registered nurses have about the CCP in Saskatchewan and how their view of the degree of professional control (as assessed through locus of control) that they have affects their perspective about the outcomes of the program. The study was designed to assess how perceived locus of control was related to how registered nurses view the implementation of the CCP in Saskatchewan.

  20. How does collegial support increase retention of registered nurses in homecare nursing agencies? a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Takai, Yukari

    2016-01-01

    Collegial workplace support has been linked to higher registered nurse (RN) retention in various clinical settings. In Japan, homecare agencies experience high RN turnover. The purpose of this study was to develop a conceptual framework to describe how perceived support from colleagues affects RNs' decision to remain in an agency. A qualitative research method based on grounded theory was used. Participants were RNs with at least 4 years of experience at the same homecare agency. Participants were theoretically sampled via managers of 12 homecare nursing agencies. Semi-structured interviews and supplementary participant observations were conducted. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative technique, and the process of how workplace support affected participants' decision to remain at their agency was clarified. In total, 26 RNs were interviewed, 23 of whom were observed in their practice setting. Participants' perception of support from colleagues was framed as being "encouraged to grow in one's own way", which comprised practicing with protected autonomy in an insight-producing environment. Participants reported that they were able to practice with protected autonomy, receiving 1) mindful monitoring, 2) semi-independent responsibility, 3) help as needed, and 4) collegial empathy and validation. RNs also felt supported in an insight-producing environment by 1) enlightening dialogue, 2) being set for one's next challenges, and 3) being able to grow at one's own pace. Reportedly, these were defining characteristics in their decision to continue working in their agencies. For RNs to willingly stay at a homecare nursing agency, it is essential that they are able to practice with protected autonomy in an insight-producing environment that encourages them to grow in their own way. Further research is needed to explore ways to create and enhance such environments to lower RN turnover.

  1. Registered nurse scope of practice in Australia: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Davis, Jenny; Smithson, John; Cant, Robyn

    2016-10-01

    The nursing profession comprises Australia's largest regulated health workforce yet its practice boundaries are poorly understood. The ambiguity surrounding the practice scope of nurses limits the profession's ability to fully respond to Australia's current and emerging health system challenges. The aim of this review is to explore the concept of scope of practice of registered nurses (RN) in Australia, as reflected in contemporary literature. An integrative review of literature relating to the scope of practice of the Australian registered nurse published between 2007 and 2014 was conducted. Twenty primary papers and nine secondary source papers were included in the review. Themes that arose from the analysis are: Scope of practice - an elusive concept; Scope of practice and context; Scope of practice and boundaries; and Scope of practice and advanced practice. Discussion of these themes includes consideration of the professional, legal and ethical significance of scope of practice for the RN, as well as the legislative, professional and contextual influences on, and challenges to, defining scope of practice at both a professional and individual level. For the Australian registered nursing workforce to continue to be a significant and influential contributor to Australia(')s dynamic healthcare context, a clearly articulated scope of practice is both necessary and overdue.

  2. State funding for higher education and RN replacement rates by state: a case for nursing by the numbers in state legislatures.

    PubMed

    Bargagliotti, L Antoinette

    2009-01-01

    Amid an enduring nursing shortage and state budget shortfalls, discerning how the percentage of state funding to higher education and other registered nurse (RN) workforce variables may be related to the RN replacement rates (RNRR) in states has important policy implications. Regionally, the age of RNs was inversely related to RNRR. State funding in 2000 significantly predicted the 2004 RNRR, with the percentage of LPNs in 2004 adding to the model. The stability of the model using 2000 and 2004 funding data suggests that state funding creates a climate for RNRR.

  3. The costs of NCLEX-RN failure.

    PubMed

    Roa, Michelle; Shipman, Debra; Hooten, Jack; Carter, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Nursing programs across the country are challenged with producing qualified competent graduates who can successfully pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for Registered Nurses (RN) on the first attempt. The challenge has been prompted by the largest aging population striking the nation who will need nursing care and organizations who are demanding increasing numbers of competent nurses. However, graduates from nursing programs are failing the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. The impact of NCLEX-RN failure is felt not only by the graduate student and their nursing program, but by healthcare organizations as well. Even though the impact is multi-faceted, a common theme of cost emerges.

  4. Work force policy perspectives: registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Friss, L O

    1981-01-01

    If the decline in full-time labor force participation by registered nurses in hospitals is to be reversed, the issue of equal pay for comparable work must be addressed. Under pressure for cost containment, policies tend to focus on labor force economics rather than on limitations of services. While the two are interrelated, wage policies must be considered independently. This article describes the network which determines how nurse salaries are set: the relationship between the private sector, the general schedule and the Veteran's Administration. The effects of this system are documented, using testimony from a case in the tenth circuit, as well as comparisons with other reference groups: policemen, teachers, laborers, and VA career fields. The evidence suggests that there is a need for policy intervention. Prime areas for action are the comparability practices by governments, particularly in the areas of classification standards and pay setting. Hospital personnel practices which continue past effects of occupational segregation also should be changed.

  5. Factors influencing professionalism in nursing among Korean American registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo; Baek, Hee Chong; Wynd, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    Although significant numbers of foreign nurses are currently employed in the United States, little research about nursing professionalism exists for this population. The study assessed the levels of professionalism and examined factors associated with professionalism among Korean American registered nurses (RNs). Hall's Professionalism Inventory (HPI) scale was used for this correlational descriptive study. Data were collected, using a mailing survey, with a convenience sample of Korean American RNs living in the United States (n = 221). Current position in nursing, current employment status, work setting, total years of nursing experience, total years of nursing experience in the United States, location of final degree attainment, and duration of nursing education in the United States were associated with the level of professionalism among Korean American RNs. Variables predicting professionalism included membership in professional organizations (beta = .204, P < .000) and total years of nursing experience in the United States (beta = .198, P = .001), and they accounted for 8.6% of the total variance in the HPI score. The findings suggest that multiple internal and external factors are associated with professionalism among Korean American RNs and provide an understanding of trends in professionalism from an international perspective. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Career ladder program for registered nurses in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Joan; Sassaman, Becky; Phillips, Alison

    2008-01-01

    RN ladder programs are designed to inspire and reward clinical excellence. Kaiser Permanente Colorado's (KPCO) career ladder program emerged as a result of a labor-management partnership. Career ladder point assignments are reflective of the organization's priorities and values. KPCO's career ladder point tool awards RNs for formal and continuing education, professional presentations, organizational experience and experience as an RN, certifications and active professional memberships, leadership activities, research and publications, and nursing-related volunteer work. Participation in the RN career ladder requires that the nurse achieve a self-determined, manager-approved, measurable goal that will improve patient care. Career ladder nurses at KPCO were significantly more involved in leadership and interdisciplinary activities, quality improvement projects, and preceptorship.

  7. [Nursing tasks left undone in German acute care hospitals - results from the international study RN4Cast].

    PubMed

    Zander, Britta; Dobler, L; Bäumler, M; Busse, R

    2014-11-01

    Implicit rationing of nursing care - likewise as in medical care - has never been empirically measured in German hospitals. Thus, little is known about prevalence and patterns of nursing care left undone as well as its association with nurse work environment and staffing. We surveyed 1,511 registered nurses from 49 German acute hospitals participating in the multi-country cross-sectional study RN4CAST. Analyses were made by descriptive statistics as well as multilevel regression analysis to calculate predictors from the nurse work environment and staffing. On average 4.7 out of 13 nursing tasks were rationed. The range was between 82% for "comfort/talk with patients" and 15% for "treatments and procedures". The analysis revealed that hospital work environments and staffing ratios were significantly associated with the level of nursing care left undone. Further significant associations were found between poor leadership, inadequate organisation of nursing work as well as high emotional exhaustion and rationing. The phenomenon of nursing care left undone was prevalent in German hospitals. Those tasks which are most likely to have negative consequences for patients (e. g., pain management and medication on time) seem to receive higher priority than tasks whose potential effects are less immediate or direct (e. g., psychosocial care). With regard to the measured correlation with the nurse work environment, it is recommend to invest in a good environment before (or simultaneously) investing in nurse staffing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. The Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Fusilero, Jane; Lini, Linda; Prohaska, Priscilla; Szweda, Christine; Carney, Katie; Mion, Lorraine C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse administrators focus on factors that influence nurses' levels of satisfaction to reduce turnover and improve retention. One important determinant of nurses' satisfaction is the opportunity for professional development. On the basis of feedback from the nurses, a professional development program, Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence, was instituted. The authors describe one approach to create opportunities to improve professional nurse development and the necessity for ongoing assessment of its impact on nurses' job satisfaction.

  9. Education and Practice Barriers for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Malina, Debra P; Izlar, Janice J

    2014-05-31

    Of the recognized advanced practice registered nursing (APRN) specialties, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) have historically experienced the most vigorous and organized resistance from outside entities regarding rights to practice to the full scope of their education and experience. Opposition to nurse anesthetists practicing to the full scope of their education and training is present in the clinical arena and educational milieu.

  10. The Registered Nurse Population, March 2000. Findings from the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratley, Ernell; Johnson, Ayah; Sochalski, Julie; Fritz, Marshall; Spencer, William

    The characteristics, education, employment patterns, salaries, job satisfaction, and other characteristics of registered nurses (RNs) across the United States were examined in a national survey. Of the initial sample of approximately 54,000 of the nation's more than 3,066,000 licensed RNs, 35,579 RNs (72%) submitted usable responses. From 1980 to…

  11. Cognitive apprenticeship: laying the groundwork for mentoring registered nurses in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Nickle, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Professional nursing practice within the intensive care unit (ICU) requires the registered nurse (RN) to demonstrate evidence of critical thought for the various treatments provided. A sound theoretical knowledge base, coupled with sensitivity to the socio-cultural influences within this often emotionally charged atmosphere is foundational to the provision of excellent patient care. Mentorship is one educational strategy that attempts to integrate skill development with the socialization of a novice ICU RN. However, vagueness surrounding what encompasses the mentor-mentee relationship may prevent employees from entering into these unions. In this article, I present an original mentorship model based on the concept of cognitive apprenticeship, as described by Collins, Brown, and Holum (1991). I identify the learning theories that inform this approach to professional development and conclude with select recommendations for implementation of a mentorship program within the ICU.

  12. Visits to Registered Nurses: An Opportunity to Increase Contraceptive Access in California.

    PubMed

    Parker, Emese C; Kong, Kevin; Watts, Leslie A; Schwarz, Eleanor B; Darney, Philip D; Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike

    In 2013, California passed Assembly Bill (A.B.) 2348, approving registered nurses (RNs) to dispense patient self-administered hormonal contraceptives and administer injections of hormonal contraceptives. The Family Planning, Access, Care and Treatment (Family PACT) program, which came into effect in 1997 to expand low-income, uninsured California resident access to contraceptives at no cost, is one program in which qualified RNs can dispense and administer contraceptives. The aims of this study were to (a) describe utilization of RN visits within California's Family PACT program and (b) evaluate the impact of RN visits on client birth control acquisition during the first 18 months after implementation of A.B. 2348 (January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014). A descriptive observational design using administrative databases was used. Family PACT claims were retrieved for RN visits and contraception. Paid claims for contraceptive dispensing and/or administration visits by physicians, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants were compared before and after the implementation of A.B. 2348 at practice sites where RN visits were and were not utilized. Contraceptive methods and administration procedures were identified using Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes, National Drug Codes, and Common Procedural Terminology codes. Claims data for healthcare facilities were abstracted by site location based on a unique combination of National Provider Identifier (NPI), NPI Owner, and NPI location number. RN visits were found mainly in Northern California and the Central Valley (73%). Sixty-eight percent of RN visits resulted in same-day dispensing and/or administration of hormonal (and/or barrier) methods. Since benefit implementation, RN visits resulted in a 10% increase in access to birth control dispensing and/or administration visits. RN visits were also associated with future birth control acquisition and other healthcare utilization within the

  13. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  14. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  15. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    PubMed

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the Grade Point Averages of Registered Nurses from Diploma Programs with Registered Nurses from Associate Degree Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belock, Shirley

    The transcripts of the 40 students who graduated from Castleton State College (CSC) with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1977, 1978, or 1979 were examined to determine whether registered nurses who graduated from associate degree programs earned higher grade point averages (GPA's) than registered nurses who graduated from hospital-based…

  17. Success indicators for an accelerated masters entry nursing program: staff RN performance.

    PubMed

    Ziehm, Scott R; Uibel, Isabel Cunningham; Fontaine, Dorrie K; Scherzer, Teresa

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this exploratory research study was to assess employment performance outcomes of students who completed the prelicensure segment of an accelerated graduate entry program, the Masters Entry Program in Nursing (MEPN) at the University of California, San Francisco. MEPN RNs and their managers at three study sites completed a survey constructed from staff RN performance criteria position descriptions and participated in focus groups. Data were used to evaluate staff RN employment performance and how well the educational program prepared students for the staff RN role. Findings indicate that MEPN RNs' self-assessment and their managers' performance evaluation were rated as very effective in their staff RN roles, regardless of years of nursing experience. Recommendations for further research are discussed, encouraging the use of employment performance criteria as an additional way to evaluate the quality of nursing educational programs. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Multistate Approach to Preparing Registered Nurses: How 3 Nurse Executives Shaped a New Nursing Education Model.

    PubMed

    Jones-Schenk, Jan; Burnes Bolton, Linda; Swanson, Jane; Hassmiller, Susan; Chow, Marilyn

    2015-09-01

    A new model for educating baccalaureate nurses emerged from the needs of employers and came to fruition through a unique partnership resulting in the development of the 1st competency-based, asynchronous single-curriculum prelicensure program in the United States. Three nurse executives championed the design and implementation of the multistate approach to preparing RNs (MAP RN) program. The nationally accredited program has been initiated in 5 states.

  19. Meeting the Needs of a Rural Community for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolloph, Frances; And Others

    In 1988, Shepherd College-South Branch (SC-SB), a rural institution serving primarily place-bound adults, began offering non-nursing courses that would transfer to three regional nursing programs. Student requests, however, and a recognized shortage of registered nurses led to the establishment of a two-year rural nursing program in 1993. A county…

  20. Perceptions and characteristics of registered nurses' involvement in decision making.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Kara L; Pearson, Kristina K; Schmitz, Julie R; Scherb, Cindy A; Specht, Janet P; Loes, Jean L

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the level of actual and preferred decisional involvement and ascertain whether there is decisional dissonance among registered nurses (RNs). A convenience sample of 196 RNs completed a demographic form and the Decisional Involvement Scale, a tool that measures actual and preferred decisional involvement for RNs in 6 categories: unit staffing, quality of professional practice, professional recruitment, unit governance and leadership, quality of support staff practice, and collaboration/liaison activities. From these data, the level of and difference between RN's actual and preferred decisional involvement was analyzed. In addition, the impact of level of education, years of experience, hours worked per pay period, and work setting on actual and preferred decisional involvement were measured. A statistically significant difference was found between RNs' actual and preferred decisional involvement, with RNs preferring more decisional involvement than they actually experienced. Work setting was the only variable to which a difference could be attributed. Further study is warranted to find causes of decisional dissonance and interventions that could help alleviate the problem and potentially increase job satisfaction.

  1. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  2. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  3. Turnover of registered nurses in Israel: characteristics and predictors.

    PubMed

    Toren, Orly; Zelker, Revital; Lipschuetz, Michal; Riba, Shoshana; Reicher, Sima; Nirel, Nurit

    2012-05-01

    In an era of global and local nursing shortages, nursing turnover has negative consequences in terms of diminished quality of care, increased costs and economic losses and decreased job satisfaction. To examine the turnover rate of registered nurses in Israel by assessing the varying degree of turnover between economic sectors, between hospital and community facilities, and/or between types of hospitals; and by examining potential predicting factors of turnover among registered nurses. A national phone survey was undertaken in Israel consisting of a random sampling of registered nurses of working age (up to age 60). The subjects comprised 10% of a national database of 32,000 registered nurses. The turnover rate among working nurses in Israel currently stands at 23%. In addition, 13% of employed nurses have taken a temporary leave of absence for a period greater than 6 months in the past 10 years, most up to 1 year. While job satisfaction rates were relatively high (72%), Professional satisfaction rates were 60% with no significant difference between hospital and community nurses. The turnover rate of registered nurses from a hospital setting to the community was significantly higher (p<.01) than that of community registered nurses to hospitals. Predicting factors of turnover were found to be: young age, part-time work, lack of advanced professional education, academic education and low satisfaction with the nursing profession. The shift of nursing workforce is mainly from hospitals to community health settings. There is a need to monitor and understand the characteristics of job and professional satisfaction among hospital nurses in order to implement crucial organizational interventions and retain hospital nursing staffs. Since young nurses, nurses working part time and nurses with no advanced professional and academic education, tend to move more than others, efforts should be targeted at these specific groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  4. A comparison of the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuh-Shiow; Yu, Wen-Pin; Yang, Bao-Huan; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2016-11-01

    To compare the respective views of nursing students and registered nurses on caring behaviours. Research has indicated that nursing includes not only technical skills and professional knowledge but also the expression of care. In addition to nursing care, nurses demonstrate the acts of supporting, negotiating, reinforcing and transforming. However, little research simultaneously investigates the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 657 subjects participated in this study. The research tool was a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, t-test and chi-square test. The results showed that the most important caring behaviour is 'knowing the patient', while the least is 'advocating for the patient', which includes caring behaviours to respect the patient's and family's best interests, and voicing for them, possibly because this behaviour is more difficult for nurses to practice in the Taiwanese culture. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the caring behaviours between nursing students and registered nurses. However, age was found to be a significant difference in the caring behaviours of nursing students and registered nurses. Caring behaviour is essential in clinical practice. Based on the results, this study suggested that role models should be provided to nursing students to develop proper caring behaviours. Nursing faculty can boost nursing students' interests in learning caring behaviours by incorporating diverse teaching strategies to enhance the effectiveness of caring behaviours. Much attention should be focused on education about awareness of caring behaviour for both nursing students and nursing staff. This study addressed that nursing administrators and faculty members should emphasise the importance of the essence of caring. Consequently, nursing curricula and training of nurses need to be

  5. Organizational determinants of work outcomes and quality care ratings among Army Medical Department registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Patrician, Patricia A; Shang, Jingjing; Lake, Eileen T

    2010-04-01

    The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and several single-item measures were administered to registered nurses (RNs) working within 23 U.S.-based Army Medical Department (AMEDD) hospitals. Data were analyzed with logistic regression for nested data. Unfavorable nursing practice environments had a substantial association with job dissatisfaction (OR 13.75, p < .01), emotional exhaustion (OR 12.70, p < .01), intent to leave (OR 3.03, p < .01), and fair to poor quality of care (OR 10.66, p < .01). This study provides the first system-wide analyses of nursing practice environments in AMEDD hospitals in the U.S. Similar to findings in civilian samples, poor quality work environments are associated with less favorable RN work outcomes and quality of care ratings.

  6. Registered nurses are delaying retirement, a shift that has contributed to recent growth in the nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2014-08-01

    The size of the registered nurse (RN) workforce has surpassed forecasts from a decade ago, growing to 2.7 million in 2012 instead of peaking at 2.2 million. Much of the difference is the result of a surge in new nursing graduates. However, the size of the RN workforce is particularly sensitive to changes in retirement age, given the large number of baby-boomer RNs now in the workforce. We found that in the period 1969-90, for a given number of RNs working at age fifty, 47 percent were still working at age sixty-two and 9 percent were working at age sixty-nine. In contrast, in the period 1991-2012 the proportions were 74 percent at age sixty-two and 24 percent at age sixty-nine. This trend, which largely predates the recent recession, extended nursing careers by 2.5 years after age fifty and increased the 2012 RN workforce by 136,000 people. Because many RNs tend to shift out of hospital settings as they age, employers seeking RNs for nonhospital roles may welcome (and seek to capitalize on) the growing numbers of experienced RNs potentially able to fill these positions.

  7. A Survey of Former Nursing (RN and LVN) Students. Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glyer, Culver-Betty

    In fall 2001 staff of the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former nursing (RN and LVN) students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former nursing students who earned…

  8. Understanding the supply and distribution of registered nurses: where are the data and what can they tell us?

    PubMed

    Martiniano, Robert; Mcginnis, Sandra; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Health workforce researchers routinely conduct studies to determine whether a profession is currently in short supply and whether future shortages are likely. This is particularly important for registered nursing since the profession has experienced periodic shortages over the past three decades. Registered nurse (RN) forecast studies can be valuable in quantifying supply and demand gaps and identifying the most appropriate strategies to avert future shortages. In order to quantify RN supply/demand gaps, it is important to have accurate data on RNs, including the number of active RNs as well as their demographic, education, and practice characteristics, and work location(s). A lack of relevant and timely data on the nursing workforce is a significant barrier to identifying where nursing shortages exist, where they are most severe, and determining the factors that contribute to them. This lack of understanding impedes the development of effective health workforce programs and policies to mitigate shortages and the ability to evaluate these programs and policies for effectiveness. This study describes the national data sources available to nursing researchers to study the supply and distribution of the RN workforce and assesses the sources' strengths and limitations. This study also explores the potential for using state-level data for nursing workforce research.

  9. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  10. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  11. Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses in the South, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Projections of supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) through the 1980's are presented with specific reference to the 14 southern states. The importance of manpower projections and studies for registered nurses is emphasized in light of figures that show the number of graduates from entry-level programs in the southern states has doubled…

  12. Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses in the South, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Projections of supply and demand for registered nurses (RNs) through the 1980's are presented with specific reference to the 14 southern states. The importance of manpower projections and studies for registered nurses is emphasized in light of figures that show the number of graduates from entry-level programs in the southern states has doubled…

  13. Preparing nursing students for enhanced roles in primary care: The current state of prelicensure and RN-to-BSN education.

    PubMed

    Wojnar, Danuta M; Whelan, Ellen Marie

    With the current emphasis on including registered nurses (RNs) on the primary care teams, it is essential that nursing programs prepare students for employment in these settings. This study explored the current state of prelicensure and RN-to-Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) online education regarding the implementation of primary care content in the curricula. A sample of 1,409 schools and/or colleges from across the United States was invited to participate in an online survey. About 529 surveys were returned for an overall response rate of 37.5%. Summative content analysis was used to analyze survey data. Although most respondents have implemented some primary care content, some found it challenging and others have demurred from incorporating primary care content altogether. Nursing leaders and faculty in academia must collaborate with clinical partners to design and expand didactic and clinical learning experiences that emphasize primary care content in the prelicensure and RN-to-BSN education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differences in Innovative Behavior Among Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Dy Bunpin, Jose J; Chapman, Susan; Blegen, Mary; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-03-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report, 'The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health', advocated for nurses to innovate in their practice, research, and education. However, little is known about the innovative behavior of registered nurses or whether there are differences in innovative behavior among registered nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the innovative behavior of hospital-based registered nurses and understand the differences in innovative behavior when registered nurses are categorized into various demographic groups. A survey of 251 hospital-based registered nurses from 9 hospitals in California was administered to assess demographic characteristics and innovative behavior, measured through Scott and Bruce's Individual Innovative Behavior Scale. Hospital-based registered nurses, on average, reported moderate levels of innovative behavior. There were statistically significant differences in innovative behavior when registered nurses were categorized according to specialty certification, role, level of education, hospital size, and hospital innovativeness. To support innovative behavior, organizations should provide opportunities for specialty certification and increasing levels of education.

  15. Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success of Associate Degree Graduates: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Bonny J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students not passing the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN) can adversely affect schools of nursing. This failure also adversely affects the national nursing shortage. The declining national pass rates on the NCLEX-RN for ADN graduates and the increasing…

  16. Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success of Associate Degree Graduates: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Bonny J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) students not passing the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN) can adversely affect schools of nursing. This failure also adversely affects the national nursing shortage. The declining national pass rates on the NCLEX-RN for ADN graduates and the increasing…

  17. An exploration of nursing research perceptions of registered nurses engaging in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Evans, Gemma; Duggan, Ravani; Boldy, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions about nursing research of registered nurses (RNs) who were engaged in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia. In order to improve RNs' research engagement and promote evidence-based practice, Nurse Research Consultants (NRCs) were appointed jointly by the study hospital and a local university. This joint appointment commenced in 2004 in the hospital's emergency department. Early findings indicated that the NRC role was effective in assisting registered nurses with research activities and hence the NRC role was expanded to all areas of the hospital. However, no formal investigation had been carried out to explore the effect of the NRC role on RNs' engagement with nursing research across the hospital. A qualitative interview process. Ten RN participants from the adult and paediatric wards were interviewed. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Four main themes were identified, namely: perceptions of nursing research, perceived enablers, perceived barriers and improving research engagement. There was some overlap with some sub-themes being linked with more than one theme. This appeared to be due to differing levels of research education and research engagement. 6pc some of the RNs that participated in this study were experienced in the conduct of research, finding adequate support from NRCs in the workplace, whilst others experienced barriers limiting their involvement in nursing research activities. These barriers could be reduced with additional education, support, improved communication, time and opportunities to undertake research activities.

  18. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  19. Critical Thinking Skill Acquisition in Accelerated LVN to RN Nursing Programs: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Billy Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Accelerated transitional nursing programs (ATNPs) designed specifically for licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to transition to become registered nurses (RNs) are graduating novice nurses who need critical thinking skills to solve patient problems. The health care industry and patient outcomes depend on graduate nurses to be proficient with quality…

  20. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    As advanced practice nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) have a responsibility to engage in patient education about health...Categories and themes include; engaging in perioperative patient education , focusing on explanations about anesthesia and surgery, prior nursing...experiences make patient education easier, documenting patient education is important and uncertainty about where to document it. Common topics and themes

  1. Specialized new graduate RN pediatric orientation: a strategy for nursing retention and its financial impact.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M Isabel; Delaney, Margaret M; Schmidt, Kathleen; Quinn, Carolyn; Macyk, Irene

    2013-01-01

    New graduate RN retention in the first year of employment is a challenge for hospitals, ranging from a low of 25% to a high of 64%. In 2005, hospitals in New York state spent 11.7% of their nursing budgets on temporary nursing staffing. The objectives of this study were to determine the retention and costs associated with the employment of new graduate RNs before and after the initiation of specialized year-long pediatric critical care, emergency department, and hematology/oncology orientation programs. The major study findings were improved retention of 84% to 94%, significant retention between the two groups at 9 months, and an annual financial savings related to decreased nursing turnover in the specialized orientation group. Specialized orientation programs that support new graduate RNs have documented increased RN retention and decreased RN turnover. In concert with the increased retention and decreased turnover, health care finances were positively impacted by specialized orientation programs.

  2. Assessing RN-to-RN peer review on clinical units.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Judith A; Wickline, Mary A; Deetz, Jill; Berry, Elise S

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to measure informal registered nurse (RN)-to-RN peer review (defined as collegial communication about the quality of nursing care) at the work-unit level. Survey design with cluster sampling of 28 hospital or ambulatory care units (n = 541 respondents). Results were compared with existing patient safety and satisfaction data. A chi-squared test was used to compare responses against nurse characteristics. Nurses agreed that RN-to-RN peer review takes place on their units, but no correlation with patient safety and satisfaction data was found. Misunderstandings about the meaning of peer review were evident. Open-ended comments revealed barriers to peer review: fear of retribution, language barriers and lack of professionalism. Nurses need clarification of peer review. Issues with common language in a professional environment need to be addressed and nurses can learn collaboration from each other's cultures. Managers should support RN-to-RN peer review on clinical units. Methods used here may be useful to assess current departmental nurse peer review. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. HESI admission assessment (A(2)) examination scores, program progression, and NCLEX-RN success in baccalaureate nursing: an exploratory study of dependable academic indicators of success.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Katherine A; DiBartolo, Mary C; Walsh, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to meet the demand for well-educated, high-quality nurses, schools of nursing seek to admit those candidates most likely to have both timely progression and first-time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Finding the right combination of academic indicators, which are most predictive of success, continues to be an ongoing challenge for entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs across the United States. This pilot study explored the relationship of a standardized admission examination, the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Admission Assessment (A(2)) Examination to preadmission grade point average (GPA), science GPA, and nursing GPA using a retrospective descriptive design. In addition, the predictive ability of the A(2) Examination, preadmission GPA, and science GPA related to timely progression and NCLEX-RN success were explored. In a sample of 89 students, no relationship was found between the A(2) Examination and preadmission GPA or science GPA. The A(2) Examination was correlated with nursing GPA and NCLEX-RN success but not with timely progression. Further studies are needed to explore the utility and predictive ability of standardized examinations such as the A(2) Examination and the contribution of such examinations to evidence-based admission decision making.

  4. Valuing teamwork: Insights from newly-registered nurses working in specialist mental health services.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Mannix, Judy; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-12-01

    In this qualitative study, the experiences of a small cohort of registered nurses (RN) during the first 2 years of mental health employment were documented. A total of 13 semistructured interviews were completed from within a specialist mental health setting. Eleven issues were identified: (i) teamwork; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) self-development; (iv) confidence; (v) listening; (vi) rapport; (vii) keen observation; (viii) patience; (ix) empathy; (x) learning from colleagues; and (xi) maintaining a positive approach towards patients. The nurses focused on the here-and-now circumstances, rather than on future plans, or past preparation, and were able to elucidate the qualities and skills that they brought to their clinical work. Participants were most proud of achievements that bridged the personal and professional, such as self-development, working closely with patients to develop rapport, experiential learning, and teamwork. Findings highlight the importance of teamwork to newly-graduated RN entering the mental health environment. It is known that teamwork can convey a sense of belonging and help create an environment in which applied experiential clinical learning can occur. Therefore, it is important that efforts are made to facilitate team building and opportunities for teamwork when new graduates are transitioning into the mental health clinical practice environment. © 2011 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. A comparison of two nursing program exit exams that predict first-time NCLEX-RN outcome.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Lisa D; Mills, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective descriptive correlational study compared the predictive accuracy of the Health Education Systems, Inc, Exit Exam (Elsevier) and Assessment Technologies Institute's RN Comprehensive Predictor, both of which were administered to nursing students in an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program during their final semester of study. Using logistic regression analyses, it was determined that the two examinations were statistically significant but weak predictors of success on the RN licensure examination. The RN Comprehensive Predictor had a slightly better odds ratio; however, both examinations had similar sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy. Because the RN Comprehensive Predictor was included in the Assessment Technologies Institute's Comprehensive Assessment and Review Program already being used by the BSN program, based on the results of this study, the nursing faculty decided to use only the RN Comprehensive Predictor during its NCLEX-RN preparation course.

  6. Use of aptitude to understand bachelor of science in nursing student attrition and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E; Moore, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Attrition is a serious issue among Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students with attrition rates around 50% nationwide. To help minimize BSN student attrition, many nursing programs use commercially available standardized nursing aptitude tests as adjuncts to scholastic aptitude data, usually operationalized as pre-nursing grade point average, to select students for admission. Little is known regarding the usefulness of scholastic and nursing aptitude data for predicting long-term retention in a BSN program and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among scholastic aptitude, nursing aptitude, BSN student attrition prior to the final semester of the curriculum, and BSN student readiness for the NCLEX-RN. This study's findings, along with other findings in the literature, suggest the need for a parsimonious explanatory model of BSN student attrition that can be used to guide admission and progression policies, and ensure that students ready for the NCLEX-RN are the ones graduating from BSN programs.

  7. The orientation period: essential for new registered nurses' adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore adaptation in new registered nurses using the Roy adaptation model as the guiding conceptual framework. This quantitative study employed a random sampling of new nurses in the state of North Carolina. Personal attributes of the new registered nurses and characteristics of their work setting were modeled with four measures considered suitable proxies for adaptation. Being in a formal orientation period significantly supported the new nurses' overall adaptation. This may represent the benefit of social support, including education, which seems to facilitate adaptation.

  8. Non-Bachelor of Science in Nursing Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Registered Nurse: A Change in Critical Thinking.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Constance E; Thomas, Cynthia M; Siela, Debra

    With recommendations from national nursing associations and accrediting bodies to transition to an all baccalaureate prepared nurse workforce by 2020, it is important to understand the expertise that a baccalaureate degreed nurse brings to patient care. The purpose of this article is to establish the differences of a non-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) registered nurse and a 4-year prepared nurse, as well as to identify the education and clinical trends in critical care that require a BSN-prepared nurse. The history of associate degree and diploma degree nurses is admirable and served a purpose serving up to and post World War II. In more recent years, particularly in critical care, as health care is becoming more complex, extension of technology, and pay-for-performance issues are tied to patient outcomes, it is essential the non-BSN registered nurses return to continue their education earning a BSN degree.

  9. Assessment and documentation of patients' nutritional status: perceptions of registered nurses and their chief nurses.

    PubMed

    Persenius, Mona Wentzel; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Bååth, Carina; Larsson, Bodil Wilde

    2008-08-01

    To study, within municipal care and county council care, (1) chief nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of patient nutritional status assessment and nutritional assessment/screening tools, (2) registered nurses' perceptions of documentation in relation to nutrition and advantages and disadvantages with a documentation model. Chief nurses and registered nurses have a responsibility to identify malnourished patients and those at risk of malnutrition. In this descriptive study, 15 chief nurses in municipal care and 27 chief nurses in county council care were interviewed by telephone via a semi-structured interview guide. One hundred and thirty-one registered nurses (response rate 72%) from 14 municipalities and 28 hospital wards responded to the questionnaire, all in one county. According to the majority of chief nurses and registered nurses, only certain patients were assessed, on admission and/or during the stay. Nutritional assessment/screening tools and nutritional guidelines were seldom used. Most of the registered nurses documented nausea/vomiting, ability to eat and drink, diarrhoea and difficulties in chewing and swallowing, while energy intake and body mass index were rarely documented. However, the majority documented their judgement about the patient's nutritional condition. The registered nurses perceived the VIPS model (Swedish nursing documentation model) as a guideline as well as a model obstructing the information exchange. Differences were found between nurses (chief nurses/registered nurses) in municipal care and county council care, but not between registered nurses and their chief nurses. All patients are not nutritionally assessed and important nutritional parameters are not documented. Nutritionally compromised patients may remain unidentified and not properly cared for. Assessment and documentation of the patients' nutritional status should be routinely performed in a more structured way in both municipal care and county council care

  10. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  11. Academic predictors of success on the NCLEX-RN examination for associate degree nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lengacher, C A; Keller, R

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between selected admission variables (entrance GPA, ACT subtests scores in English and mathematics, composite ACT scores), age, perception of role strain, achievement in clinical and nursing courses, achievement on NLN examinations, exit GPA, and performance on NCLEX-RN examination. Data were attained from records of 146 associate degree graduates who were admitted to a specially-designed associate degree program in nursing and on those graduates who wrote the NCLEX-RN examination in July 1987 and July 1988. Pearson product moment correlations and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to identify the relationship between the predictor variables (admission criteria, age, perception of role strain, achievement in clinical and nursing courses), achievement on NLN examinations, exit GPA, and the criterion variable (scores on the NCLEX-RN examination). The best predictor for performance on the NCLEX-RN of the selected admission variables, age, perception of role strain, and exit GPA, were exit GPA (R = .71) and ACT composite scores (R = .75). The ACT math, ACT English scores, entrance GPA, age, and perception of role strain, had no predictive value. The best predictor for performance on the NCLEX-RN of nursing theory course and clinical course grades were the two theory courses in the second year of the program NUR 2712 (R = .77) and NUR 2713 (R = .79). NUR 2711 and 2711L, NUR 2712L, 2713L, and 2813 had no predictive value for success on the NCLEX-RN.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The NCLEX-RN examination: charting the course of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The author describes the changes in the 2004 NCLEX-RN(R) Test Plan and provides information about the alternate item formats that are being developed for the NCLEX examination. Nursing educators will learn details about the new test plan and review sample alternate items. Information from this article can be used for curriculum review and to prepare students to take the NCLEX examination.

  13. Differences in Pediatric Non-Interventional Radiology Procedural Sedation Practices and Adverse Events by Registered Nurses and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Crego, Nancy; Baernholdt, Marianne; Merwin, Elizabeth

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in sedation-related adverse events according to the type of provider monitoring and delivering sedation. A retrospective, cross-sectional, correlational design using secondary data from the Pediatric Sedation Research Consortium database was used for this study. A sample of 36,352 cases (0-14 years of age) sedated and monitored for diagnostic radiology procedures by three types of providers (registered nurses [RNs] alone, physicians (MDs) alone, or registered nurse + physician [RN+MD sedation teams]) were compared. Patients sedated by RNs alone or MDs alone had lower odds of unanticipated adverse events (odds ratios 0.46 and 0.53, respectively; p<0.0001) compared with RN+MD sedation provider teams. Team skills may be an important competency for RN+MD sedation teams in the non-interventional radiology setting. This study can inform clinicians, administrators, and quality-improvement managers of the differences in adverse event outcomes of pediatric radiology procedures when RN+MD teams provide sedation compared with RNs or MDs alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Present and Future Supply of Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Stuart H.

    During the 1960's, nursing education shifted dramatically away from hospital-operated diploma schools toward associate degree and baccalaureate programs. This report examines the nature of this shift in training and its anticipated impact on future supply. Other important factors affecting the future supply of nurses are analyzed, including the…

  15. The NCLEX-RN experience: qualitative interviews with graduates of a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Linda L; Epeneter, Beverly J

    2002-06-01

    It is important for nursing faculty to pay attention to individual as well as institutional results on the National Council Licensure Examination for RNs (NCLEX-RN). This study was designed to identify themes to help faculty understand the NCLEX-RN experience from students' perspectives and help future students pass the examination at the first sitting. A sample of 1998 graduates of a baccalaureate program was selected, which included 10 students who were successful and 9 who were unsuccessful on the first testing attempt. Participants were interviewed about the testing experience and the relationship between nursing education and the NCLEX-RN. Findings indicate that participants who passed on the first attempt accepted responsibility for learning, were proactive in test preparation, took the examination when they felt ready, and used stress management techniques to cope with this challenge. The unsuccessful participants tended to perceive their lack of success on the NCLEX-RN was the responsibility of others, seemed less able to manage stress, and took the examination when they did not feel ready. Both successful and unsuccessful participants felt unprepared to answer NCLEX-RN-type questions and believed nothing had prepared them for this experience.

  16. [The prescribing rights of registered nurses in Canada].

    PubMed

    Roussel, Josette

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of the healthcare system in Canada, registered nurses have been given the right to prescribe. The Canadian Nurses Association played a central role in the implementation of this change by developing a national reference framework, now available to Canadian provinces and territories.

  17. A Survey of Registered Nurses in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Postsecondary Research and Information Systems.

    As part of the 1989 triennial registration of registered nurses (RNs) in New York State, a survey of professional, personal, and practice characteristics of nurses was conducted. Basic information from this survey is enhanced by information from earlier surveys to illustrate significant trends. Usable survey questionnaires were received from…

  18. The effectiveness of problem-based learning and concept mapping among Taiwanese registered nursing students.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Chou, Fan-Hao; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Ko, Hsun-Kuei; Jian, Shu-Yuan; Weng, Wei-Che

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of adopting problem-based learning (PBL) and concept mapping (CM) in the educational programs for Taiwanese registered nursing (RN) students. We used a quasi-experimental design with experimental and control groups to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL-CM in three time schedules: before the course began (pre-test), at the end of the course (post-test), and six months after the end of the course (follow-up test). A convenience sample of 120 RN students participated, 51in the experimental group and 69 in the control group. Finding showed that the experimental group had higher scores than the control group for the Critical-Thinking Scale, Self-Directed Learning Scale, and Students' Performance in PBL Tutorial Sessions Questionnaire at the post-test and follow-up test stages. The PBL-CM increased students' critical-thinking skills and personal accountability for self-directed learning, and it would enhance the skills of independent study, reasoning, group interaction and active participation. This study offers guidelines for new nurse-training programs and continuing nursing education in clinical practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Being a team leader: newly registered nurses relate their experiences.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Louise; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how newly qualified registered nurses experience their leadership role in the ward-based nursing care team. A nurse's clinical leadership affects the quality of care provided. Newly qualified nurses experience difficulties during the transition period from student to qualified professional and find it challenging to lead nursing care. Twelve nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts analysed using qualitative content analysis to assess both manifest and latent content. Five themes were identified: feeling stranded; forming well-functioning teams; learning to lead; having the courage, strength, and desire to lead; and ensuring appropriate care. The findings indicate that many factors limit nurses' leadership but some circumstances are supportive. The leadership prerequisites for newly registered nurses need to improve, emphasizing different ways to create a supportive atmosphere that promotes professional development and job satisfaction. To increase nurse retention and promote quality of care, nurse managers need to clarify expectations and guide and support newly qualified nurses in a planned way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Caring for adolescent females with anorexia nervosa: registered nurses' perspective.

    PubMed

    King, S J; de Sales Turner

    2000-07-01

    This phenomenological study was undertaken to explore in depth the experiences of registered nurses caring for adolescent anorexic females within paediatric wards of general hospitals in Victoria, Australia. A qualitative design underpinned by the philosophy of Edmund Husserl was employed for this study. Audio taped in-depth interviews with five registered nurses working within the public health care system were conducted. Using Colaizzi's procedural steps of analysis, six themes of meaning were explicated. They were: (a) personal core values of nurses; (b) core values challenged; (c) emotional turmoil; (d) frustration; (e) turning points; and (f) resolution. These themes, when taken together, described the essence of the journey undertaken by registered nurses who cared for adolescent anorexic females. The findings of this study indicated that there is a need for extensive registered nurse preparation, on-going support, and development of education programmes to enable registered nurses to care for these patients with greater understanding. Further, the participants identified the need for new care regimes and protocols to be developed that incorporated new ways of thinking. They also expressed a desire to be have greater involvement in the planned care of their patients.

  1. Emotional intelligence levels in baccalaureate-prepared early career registered nurses

    PubMed Central

    Reemts, Glenda S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The increasing complexity of the healthcare environment calls for increasing emotional intelligence (EI) competence in nurses. This study assessed the EI competence of 164 baccalaureate nursing alumni who graduated during the years 2007-2010 from three Benedictine institutions located in the Midwestern United States to see if there was growth of EI with experience as a registered nurse (RN), and to determine if age, gender, grade point average (GPA), and years of total healthcare work experience prior to graduation predicted EI. Methods: Participants completed the web-based Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and a demographic survey. Results: Findings indicated 79.4% of participants were competent or higher on the MSCEIT total EI score. Percentages of nurses scoring in the competent or higher range on each of the four branch scores of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions were 80.6%, 72.7%, 84.2%, and 84.9% respectively. There were no significant differences on EI scores between graduates with 1-2 years compared to 3-5 years of experience as a RN. Results of a linear stepwise regression indicated being female was a significant predictor on the MSCEIT total EI score (P = 0.015) and using emotions branch (P = 0.047). Findings also indicated GPA (P < 0.001) and being female (P = 0.023) were significant predictors of EI on the understanding emotions branch. Conclusions: The findings indicate there is work to be done to improve the EI competence of nursing graduates. Continued research on the topic of EI and nursing is needed to build the knowledge base on how to promote positive patient outcomes. PMID:27981097

  2. Registered Nurses working together with family members of older people.

    PubMed

    Weman, Karin; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to reach a more profound understanding, through looking at nurses' working situation, of those factors that influence how nurses are able to work together with family members of older people living in nursing homes or similar facilities. Working with the care of older people as a Registered Nurse provides a varied job with many challenges. Nurses have to co-operate with family members of those in community health care. Co-operation is important and necessary for all involved. Nurses working in elder care in a geographically defined area received a questionnaire with three open-ended questions, on the difficulties and/or problems involved with working together with family members, and the positive or negative aspects of this co-operation. Analysis was carried out using the latent content analysis method. Three themes, problems within the system, interaction with families and caring in nursing work, are presented with categories and their subcategories. The nurses wanted their superior to be a nurse so that their working situation would be better understood. Appreciation from their superior and family members was also a very important part of their work as nurses in community health care. The frequent changes and the lack of time in the work of elder care often put nurses under considerable psychological pressure. For the most part family members are a resource for the elder, but sometimes they will avoid contact, which will make co-operating difficult. Registered Nurses and family members are dependent on each other in their care of the elder. Relevance to clinical practice. More attention should be paid to the working situation of Registered Nurses in community health care, and their ability to work together with family members of older people.

  3. Unconscious Race and Class Biases among Registered Nurses: Vignette-Based Study Using Implicit Association Testing.

    PubMed

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Zogg, Cheryl K; Dhiman, Nitasha; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Freischlag, Julie A; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A

    2015-06-01

    Implicit bias is an unconscious preference for a specific social group that can have adverse consequences for patient care. Acute care clinical vignettes were used to examine whether implicit race or class biases among registered nurses (RNs) impacted patient-management decisions. In a prospective study conducted among surgical RNs at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, participants were presented 8 multi-stage clinical vignettes in which patients' race or social class were randomly altered. Registered nurses were administered implicit association tests (IATs) for social class and race. Ordered logistic regression was then used to examine associations among treatment differences, race, or social class, and RN's IAT scores. Spearman's rank coefficients comparing RN's implicit (IAT) and explicit (stated) preferences were also investigated. Two hundred and forty-five RNs participated. The majority were female (n=217 [88.5%]) and white (n=203 [82.9%]). Most reported that they had no explicit race or class preferences (n=174 [71.0%] and n=108 [44.1%], respectively). However, only 36 nurses (14.7%) demonstrated no implicit race preference as measured by race IAT, and only 16 nurses (6.53%) displayed no implicit class preference on the class IAT. Implicit association tests scores did not statistically correlate with vignette-based clinical decision making. Spearman's rank coefficients comparing implicit (IAT) and explicit preferences also demonstrated no statistically significant correlation (r=-0.06; p=0.340 and r=-0.06; p=0.342, respectively). The majority of RNs displayed implicit preferences toward white race and upper social class patients on IAT assessment. However, unlike published data on physicians, implicit biases among RNs did not correlate with clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Delphi approach to developing a core competency framework for family practice registered nurses in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Azadeh; Gallinaro, Anna; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Hammond, Melanie; Oandasan, Ivy

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a Delphi panel process to gain consensus on a role description and competency framework for family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs) in Ontario. Based on the findings from interviews and focus groups with family practice registered nurses and their inter-professional colleagues throughout Ontario, a core competency framework for FP-RNs emerged consisting of six distinct roles - Professional, Expert, Communicator, Synergist, Health Educator and Lifelong Learner - with accompanying enabling competency statements. This framework was refined and validated by a panel of experts from various nursing and family medicine associations and organizations through a Delphi consensus process. This core competency framework for FP-RNs was developed as a stepping stone for clarifying this very important and poorly understood role in family practice. As a result of this research, we expect a greater acknowledgement of the contributions and expertise of the FP-RN as well as the need to celebrate and profile this role. This work has already led to the establishment of a network of stakeholders from nursing organizations in Ontario who are considering opportunities to move the development and use of the competency framework forward.

  5. Numeracy Needs of the Beginning Registered Nurse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Margaret

    1996-01-01

    Medication orders were classified into 17 groups according to the nature of the calculation required and the level of complexity. Except for pediatrics, the frequency with which nurses have to perform other than a simple calculation is low, although the potential for more complex calculations exists. (SK)

  6. Registered nurses' reflections on bioscience courses during the undergraduate nursing programme: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Craft, Judy A; Hudson, Peter B; Plenderleith, Mark B; Gordon, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    To explore new graduate registered nurses' reflections of bioscience courses during their nursing programme and the relationship between bioscience content and their clinical practice. Undergraduate nursing students internationally find bioscience courses challenging, which may be due to the volume of content and level of difficulty of these courses. Such challenges may be exacerbated by insufficient integration between bioscience theory and nursing clinical practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted. A 30-item questionnaire with five written response questions which explored recently registered nurses' reflections on bioscience courses during their nursing degree was employed. Descriptive analyses were reported for individual items. Thematic analysis of qualitative responses was grouped to reveal emerging themes. Registered nurses' (n = 22) reflections revealed that bioscience courses were a significant challenge during their undergraduate programme, and they lacked confidence explaining the biological basis of nursing. Participants would like improved knowledge of the relevant bioscience for nursing and agreed that bioscience courses should be extended into the undergraduate final year. The importance of relating bioscience content to nursing practice was elaborated extensively throughout written responses. Although registered nurses reflected that bioscience courses were difficult with large volumes of content, having more bioscience with greater relevance to nursing applications was considered important in their current clinical practice. It is suggested that bioscience academics develop greater contextual links between bioscience content and clinical practice relevant to nursing. After working as a registered nurse, there was appreciation of bioscience relevance for clinical practice, and the nurses believed they would have benefitted from more nursing-related bioscience during their undergraduate programme. Focussed

  7. Cultural competence of practicing nurses entering an RN-BSN program.

    PubMed

    Riley, Dierdre; Smyer, Tish; York, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory research was to examine the cultural competence of practicing nurses entering an RN to BSN program. As nonwhite populations increase in the United States, the cultural competence of nurses increases in importance. With 38 percent of baccalaureate nursing students in RN-BSN programs, it is important to examine the cultural competence of this population. Fifty-three RN-BSN students completed the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competency Among Healthcare Professionals-Revised (IAPCC-R) upon program entry; 50.9 percent were culturally competent as determined by the tool. A strong correlation existed between IAPCC-R scores and student age, with students 20 to 30 years old scoring significantly higher than those in the age range of 41 to 50. The findings suggest and invite more extensive research on the success of the systematic nursing education initiatives of current associate degree programs and adherence to NLNAC standards for cultural competence, particularly in the cultural skill construct.

  8. Clinical nursing competence of RN-to-BSN students in a nursing concept-based curriculum in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee-Hsieh, Jane; Kao, Chihui; Kuo, Chienlin; Tseng, Hung-Fu

    2003-12-01

    This 3-year longitudinal study used a questionnaire to evaluate the clinical nursing competence of RN-to-BSN students in a nursing concept-based curriculum in Taiwan. The research sample consisted of 52 full-time and 69 part-time RN-to-BSN students. A four-dimensional Clinical Nursing Competence Questionnaire was developed to measure student caring, communication/coordination, management/teaching, and professional self-growth competence. Results indicated full-time students' scores on self-evaluations of overall clinical nursing competence significantly increased with each successive evaluation (p < .05). The scores of part-time students fell significantly with successive evaluations, with the exception of professional self-growth competence (p < .01). Instructor evaluations generally showed no significant difference between the two groups. Student self-evaluations were significantly higher than instructor evaluations (p < .05). The results of this study may serve as a reference for nurse educators developing curricula for RN-to-BSN education.

  9. [Important role of a nurse parctitioner-like specialized registered nurse in a cardiac surgery team].

    PubMed

    Izutani, Hironori

    2012-11-01

    Team medical practice by physician, nurse, and other co-medical staffs has been performed and it provides numerous values to the patients. Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare reported that a registered nurse was a key person of medicine. The importance of nurse's role expansion and involving medical cure by a registered nurse was emphasized in the report. Japanese nurse practitioner for a new profession is going to start in near future. In our institute, a specialized registered nurse has joined a cardiac surgery team. She plays an important role of assisting and consulting cardiac physicians for patient cure and care as a member of the surgery team. Cardiac surgery team including specialized registered nurse gives quality surgical results and patient satisfaction.

  10. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  11. Registered nurse job satisfaction and collective bargaining unit membership status.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jennifer

    2007-10-01

    To examine differences in job satisfaction levels between registered nurses who were or were not members of a nursing collective bargaining unit. The nursing shortage could lead to decreased quality of patient care, heavier workloads, and mandatory overtime, resulting in decreased job satisfaction and increased intent to leave. Nursing collective bargaining units use contracts to help decrease patient workload, decrease and eliminate mandatory overtime, increase pay and benefits, and increase job security. Exploring differences in job satisfaction between nurses who are and are not members of collective bargaining units is pertinent to understanding the retention and recruitment of nurses. A descriptive secondary analysis using a survey database from the Minnesota Department of Health. The survey, which included a job satisfaction section largely based on the Index of Work Satisfaction, was sent in 2002 to 3,645 registered nurses in Minnesota. Members of collective bargaining units had higher satisfaction with wages. Nonmembers had higher satisfaction with nursing supervision, patient care, work setting, professional relationships, and overall job satisfaction. There is a need for interventions in institutions with collective bargaining units to improve job satisfaction, nurse retention, and job recruitment.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Registered Nurses' and Nursing Students' Attitudes and Use of Nonpharmacologic Methods of Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Malcolm; Cox-Davenport, Rebecca A

    2015-08-01

    Despite the benefits that nonpharmacologic methods of pain management have to offer, nurses cite barriers that inhibit their use in practice. The purpose of this research study was to compare the perceptions of prelicensed student nurses (SNs) and registered nurses (RNs) toward nonpharmacologic methods of pain management. A sample size of 64 students and 49 RNs was recruited. Each participant completed a questionnaire about their use and perceptions nonpharmacologic pain control methods. Sixty-nine percent of RNs reported a stronger belief that nonpharmacologic methods gave relief to their patients compared with 59% of SNs (p = .028). Seventy-five percent of student nurses felt they had adequate education about nonpharmacologic pain modalities compared with 51% of RN who felt less than adequately educated (p = .016). These findings highlight the need for education about nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management. Applications of these findings may decrease barriers to the use of nonpharmacologic methods of pain management. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Esther McCready, RN: Nursing Advocate for Civil Rights

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Phoebe A

    2016-02-15

    More than a decade before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as an African American teenager from Baltimore, Maryland, Esther McCready challenged the discriminatory admissions policies of the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON). The article explores nurse advocacy and how Esther McCready advocated for herself and greater racial equity in nursing education during a time of civil rights turmoil. Her actions eventually resulted in the formation of numerous schools of nursing for African Americans across the south. This article recounts McCready’s early life experiences and the powerful impact her actions had on creating educational options for nurses during a time when they were severely limited for African American women, including discussion of her student days at UMSON and her journey after nursing school. A review of pertinent legal cases and policies related to segregation and integration of higher education in the mid-twentieth century is presented, along with details of McCready’s continued education and advocacy.

  14. Factors that facilitate registered nurses in their first-line nurse manager role.

    PubMed

    Cziraki, Karen; McKey, Colleen; Peachey, Gladys; Baxter, Pamela; Flaherty, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    To determine the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role. The first-line nurse manger role is pivotal in health-care organisations. National demographics suggest that Canada will face a first-line nurse manager shortage because of retirement in the next decade. Determination of factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses will assist organisations and policy makers to employ strategies to address this shortage. The study used an exploratory, descriptive qualitative approach, consisting of semi-structured individual interviews with 11 Registered Nurses in first-line nurse manager roles. The findings revealed a discrepancy between the factors that attract and retain Registered Nurses in the first-line nurse manager role, underscored the importance of the mentor role and confirmed the challenges encountered by first-line nurse managers practicing in the current health-care environment. The first-line nurse manager role has been under studied. Further research is warranted to understand which strategies are most effective in supporting first-line nurse managers. Strategies to support nurses in the first-line nurse manager role are discussed for the individual, programme, organisation and health-care system/policy levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Supply and distribution of primary healthcare registered nurses in british columbia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E; Young, Ella; Mooney, Dawn

    2009-11-01

    WHAT DID WE DO?: This study uses an existing data source to (a) describe the population and geographic distribution of registered nurses (RNs) working in primary healthcare (PHC) in British Columbia, (b) compare this workforce to PHC physicians and (c) assess the distribution of PHC-RNs relative to population health status. WHAT DID WE LEARN?: Of the 27,570 practising RNs in British Columbia in 2000, there were 3,179 (12%) in the PHC workforce. This translates into 147 people per practising RN and 1,277 people per PHC-RN. In 2000, there were 990 people per PHC physician. PHC-RNs represented 43% of the combined PHC workforce of physicians and RNs. A large proportion (47%) of PHC-RNs worked in community health centres, whereas less than 2% worked in physicians' offices. Geographic distribution of PHC-RNs is similar to the distribution of PHC physicians and is not associated with population health status. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?: There seem to be sufficient PHC-RNs to implement policy objectives in support of interdisciplinary PHC teams, but physicians and nurses will increasingly need to practice in the same location or have access to electronic information systems to support coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of PHC. The PHC workforce could be better deployed to align with population health status.

  16. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses on commencement to practice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a project to examine the expectations of senior nurses regarding graduate roles of registered and enrolled nurses educated in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed an online survey to indicate whether predetermined competencies were in the roles of graduate enrolled or registered nurses or not in the role of either nurse. Chi-squared analysis was used to identify differences between participant groups. Participants expressed variations in role expectations for the different level of graduate nurse. Although basic nursing care was undertaken by both graduate enrolled and registered nurses, no specific role was identified for enrolled nurses. Differences were found in the opinions of senior nurses over the roles of graduate nurses, demonstrating considerable variation in expectations. Management, education and research roles were not identified as the role of either nurse on graduation. Differences were found in the expectations of the different senior nurse groups regarding the roles of the enrolled nurse, particularly in the new skills taught in the enrolled nurse diploma program. Confusion exists regarding the roles of both types of nurse on graduation. Further research across Australia is required to clarify the roles of the different level of nurse in different practice contexts.

  17. Education for registered nurse middle managers in rural Victoria.

    PubMed

    Sellers, E T

    1996-11-01

    The Ballarat Health Education Forum has the express purpose of identifying and responding to the educational needs of registered nurses (RNs) in western Victoria. Since the senior nurse members of the forum believed that there was a strong need for management education amongst the nurses involved in middle management in the target region, the total nursing population was surveyed to determine if that perception was shared by RNs themselves. Results of the study confirm that educative programs in management are viewed as a high priority for the professional development of nurses but that family and work commitments are dominant factors which hinder participation. It is argued that education for the managerial role into which many nurses are thrust is sporadic and bereft of appropriate content. Background to the issue of management skills and training among RNs is provided and survey methodology and outcomes are described. The paper discusses the implications of survey outcomes and makes recommendations based on findings.

  18. Confronting the cultural challenge of the whiteness of nursing: Aboriginal registered nurses' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anne-Maree; Stuart, Lynne Alice; Gorman, Don

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the findings of a study that interviewed Aboriginal nurses to explore their experiences of the whiteness of nursing. Despite concerted efforts to improve the health of Aboriginal Australians, it still remains equivalent to third world countries. One strategy identified to address this is to increase the participation rates of Aboriginal registered nurses within the Australian healthcare workforce. Presently Aboriginal nurses account for only a small percentage of the nursing workforce. While there has been research into the recruitment and retention strategies dedicated to improving the numbers of Aboriginal registered nurses, this paper focus on the experiences of Aboriginal registered nurses within Australia's mainstream healthcare system, where they are exposed and subjected on a daily basis to the 'whiteness of nursing.'

  19. Confronting the Cultural Challenge of the Whiteness of Nursing: Aboriginal Registered Nurses' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anne-Maree; Stuart, Lynne Alice; Gorman, Don

    2014-07-11

    Abstract This paper presents the findings of a study that that interviewed Aboriginal nurses to explore their experiences of the whiteness of nursing. Despite concerted efforts to improve the health of Aboriginal Australians, it still remains equivalent to third world countries. One strategy to address this that has been identified is to increase the participation rates of Aboriginal registered nurses within the Australian healthcare workforce. Presently Aboriginal nurses account for only a small percentage of the nursing workforce. While there has been research into the recruitment and retention strategies dedicated to improving the numbers of Aboriginal registered nurses, this paper focus on the experiences of Aboriginal registered nurses within Australia's mainstream healthcare system, where they are exposed and subjected on a daily basis to the 'whiteness of nursing'.

  20. Preparing underemployed Latino U.S. nurses through the Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Josefina; Little, Kermit

    2010-12-01

    The critical nursing shortage in U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border is compounded by the need for nurses who are linguistically and culturally concordant with the growing number of Latinos in these communities. The innovative 16-week Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program responds to this need by helping underemployed Latino nurses, who were educated in Mexico and live in the United States, adapt linguistically and culturally to multiple-choice testing. Ten of the program students have taken the NCLEX-RN with a 50% pass rate, which is twice as high as the internationally educated candidate passing average. This demonstrates potential for the program to build the human capacity of U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border by infusing linguistically and culturally concordant nurses into the workforce and materializing the dream of underemployed Latino nurses to implement their hard-earned and urgently needed nursing skills. Lessons learned from the program are discussed.

  1. Assistants-at-surgery: recognition of the role of the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, C A

    1992-01-01

    In the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (OBRA '89), Congress directed the Physician Payment Review Commission (PPRC or "the Commission") to make recommendations on payment policies for assistants-at-surgery, including physicians, physician assistants (PAs) and registered nurses (RNs). The National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON), via the Government Relations Committee and Executive Board, participated in the public hearing on this issue and submitted testimony on the role of the RN first assistant during orthopaedic surgery. In its 1991 report to Congress, the Commission recommended that inappropriate utilization of assistants-at-surgery could be reduced by implementing "profiling"--a variety of techniques to examine the use of assistants. PPRC failed to comment on policies related to non-physician providers, determining that this was a coverage issue, not a payment issue and thus outside the scope of their jurisdiction. However, as global surgical payment policy is further defined by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and Congress, consideration will again be given to incorporating payment for assistants-at-surgery into a comprehensive fee schedule. Recognition of the registered nurse as an assistant-at-surgery will continue to be a primary goal of NAON.

  2. Educating registered nursing and healthcare assistant students in community-based supportive care of older adults: A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Barbara; McLean, Tammy; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Hartrick-Doane, Gweneth; Hutchings, Deanna; Russell, Lara B

    2015-09-01

    Collaborative education that prepares nursing and healthcare assistant students in supportive care for older adults living at home with advanced chronic illness is an important innovation to prepare the nursing workforce to meet the needs of this growing population. To explore whether a collaborative educational intervention could develop registered nursing and healthcare assistant students' capabilities in supportive care while enhancing care of clients with advanced chronic illness in the community. Mixed method study design. A rural college in Canada. Twenty-one registered nursing and 21 healthcare assistant students completed the collaborative workshop. Eight registered nursing students and 13 healthcare assistant students completed an innovative clinical experience with fifteen clients living with advanced chronic illness. Pre and post-test measures of self-perceived competence and knowledge in supportive care were collected at three time points. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to evaluate the innovative clinical placement. Application of Friedman's test indicated statistically significant changes on all self-perceived competence scores for RN and HCA students with two exceptions: the ethical and legal as well as personal and professional issues domains for HCA students. Application of Friedman's test to self-perceived knowledge scores showed statistically significant changes in all but one domain (interprofessional collaboration and communication) for RN students and all but three domains for HCA students (spiritual needs, ethical and legal issues, and inter-professional collaboration and communication). Not all gains were sustained until T-3. The innovative community placement was evaluated positively by clients and students. Collaborative education for nursing and healthcare assistant students can enhance self-perceived knowledge and competence in supportive care of adults with advanced chronic illness. An innovative clinical experience can

  3. Mastering the professional role as a newly graduated registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Pennbrant, Sandra; Nilsson, Maria Skyvell; Öhlén, Joakim; Rudman, Ann

    2013-07-01

    Professional development is a process starting during undergraduate education and continuing throughout working life. A new nurse's transition from school to work has been described as difficult. This study aims to develop a model describing the professional development of new nurses during their first years of work. To develop this model, constant comparative analyses were performed. The method was a qualitative study of survey data on 330 registered nurses. The results showed that mastering the professional role was the result of an ongoing process building on the nurse's experiences and interactions with the surrounding environment. The professional developmental process involves the following interrelated sub-processes: evaluating and re-evaluating educational experiences, developing professional self-efficacy and developing clinical competence. These sub-processes are influenced by the following factors: social values and norms, healthcare organization, management of new nurses, co-workers, patients and significant others and the nurse's own family and friends. These factors affect professional development directly, indirectly or as mediating influences and can lead to possible outcomes, as new nurses choose to remain in or leave the profession. The results underscore the importance of developing a professional nursing role within the new working context. To facilitate this professional development, new nurses need support from their nursing-school educators and their healthcare employers. The model described here will be the subject of further measurement and testing.

  4. Accelerated second-degree nursing students: predictors of graduation and NCLEX-RN first-time pass rates.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara B; Harris, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand and identify factors that affect students' academic performance before entry into a nursing program and as they progress through the program. The authors discuss a study, and its outcomes, that assessed accelerated second-degree nursing students' prenursing and core nursing grades that served to predict their success at completing the nursing program and passing NCLEX-RN on first attempt. Strategies were identified to help at-risk students to be successful in the program and with first-time passage of NCLEX-RN.

  5. Job satisfaction of Malaysian registered nurses: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Narges; Abdullah, Khatijah L; Wong, Li P

    2016-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important factor in health care settings. Strong empirical evidence supports a causal relationship between job satisfaction, patient safety and quality of care. However, there have not been any studies exploring the job satisfaction of Malaysian nurses. The main purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the factors related to feelings of job satisfaction as well as job dissatisfaction experienced by registered nurses in Malaysia. A convenient sample of 46 Malaysian nurses recruited from a large hospital (number of beds = 895) participated in the study. A total of seven focus group discussions were conducted with nurses from surgical, medical and critical care wards. A semi-structured interview guide was used to facilitate the interviews, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. The transcripts were used as data and were analysed using a thematic approach. The study identified three main themes that influenced job satisfaction: (1) nurses' personal values and beliefs; (2) work environment factors and (3) motivation factors. Concerning the nurses' personal values and beliefs, the ability to help people made the nurses felt honoured and happy, which indirectly contributed to job satisfaction. For work environment factors, team cohesion, benefit and reward, working conditions play an important role in the nurses' job satisfaction. Motivation factors, namely, professional development and clinical autonomy contributed to job satisfaction. It is important for nurse leaders to provide more rewards, comfortable work environments and to understand issues that affect nurses' job satisfaction. Our findings highlight the importance of factors that can improve nurses' job satisfaction. The study provides basic information for hospital administrators in planning effective and efficient policies to improve nursing job satisfaction in order to increase the quality of patient care and decrease nursing turnover. © 2014

  6. Registered nurses select multiple factors associated with their errors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mary Beth

    2010-06-01

    Errors in health care are a leading cause of death and injury, requiring new methods for evaluating the efficacy of health care services. A board of nursing staff member conducted a study to examine perceptions of registered nurses who had been sanctioned for practice errors to ascertain the level of patient harm, and individual, health care team, patient, and system factors that contributed to the error or patient harm. Gaining the perspective of nurses who have been involved in a practice error can contribute to a better understanding of the factors involved in error commission.

  7. The Storied Experiences of Registered Nurses' Transition from Paper to Electronic Nursing Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative inquiry was designed to bring to life the storied experiences of registered nurses who have transitioned from paper to electronic nursing documentation and to provide a foundation for others who may be preparing to implement electronic documentation and wish to consider the significance of these nurses' stories of change in their…

  8. The Storied Experiences of Registered Nurses' Transition from Paper to Electronic Nursing Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative inquiry was designed to bring to life the storied experiences of registered nurses who have transitioned from paper to electronic nursing documentation and to provide a foundation for others who may be preparing to implement electronic documentation and wish to consider the significance of these nurses' stories of change in their…

  9. The predictive ability of critical thinking, nursing GPA, and SAT scores on first-time NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the predictability of several variables in achieving first-time success on the NCLEX-RN. Several researchers have attempted to investigate the differences between students who passed the NCLEX-RN the first time and those who failed. No studies used a large enough failure group to have statistical significance. The three specific variables in this study were nursing GPA, SAT combined math and verbal scores, and critical thinking measured on a standardized assessment examination. An ex post facto study design was used to examine data from the records of associate degree nursing graduates during a three-year period. The most significant predictors of NCLEX-RN success were the students' nursing GPA and the overall standardized assessment examination score. The findings of this study could potentially influence the identification of students at risk for NCLEX-RN failure.

  10. Patient safety: numerical skills and drug calculation abilities of nursing students and registered nurses.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Miriam; Jones, Ray; Lea, Susan

    2010-04-01

    This paper is a report of a correlational study of the relations of age, status, experience and drug calculation ability to numerical ability of nursing students and Registered Nurses. Competent numerical and drug calculation skills are essential for nurses as mistakes can put patients' lives at risk. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2006 in one United Kingdom university. Validated numerical and drug calculation tests were given to 229 second year nursing students and 44 Registered Nurses attending a non-medical prescribing programme. The numeracy test was failed by 55% of students and 45% of Registered Nurses, while 92% of students and 89% of nurses failed the drug calculation test. Independent of status or experience, older participants (> or = 35 years) were statistically significantly more able to perform numerical calculations. There was no statistically significant difference between nursing students and Registered Nurses in their overall drug calculation ability, but nurses were statistically significantly more able than students to perform basic numerical calculations and calculations for solids, oral liquids and injections. Both nursing students and Registered Nurses were statistically significantly more able to perform calculations for solids, liquid oral and injections than calculations for drug percentages, drip and infusion rates. To prevent deskilling, Registered Nurses should continue to practise and refresh all the different types of drug calculations as often as possible with regular (self)-testing of their ability. Time should be set aside in curricula for nursing students to learn how to perform basic numerical and drug calculations. This learning should be reinforced through regular practice and assessment.

  11. Preceptoring nursing students: registered nurses' perceptions of nursing students' preparation and study approaches in clinical education.

    PubMed

    Hallin, Karin; Danielson, Ella

    2010-05-01

    Preceptorship influences Registered Nurses' (RNs) daily work to different degrees depending on nursing students' knowledge, and willingness to learn. Consequently, it is of the utmost importance to investigate how RNs assess nursing students in clinical education. The aim of this study was to describe RNs' perceptions of nursing students' preparation and study approaches at hospital workplaces, and to explore relationships between RNs' perceptions and their personal/clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional design was used. In 2006, 142 of 196 RNs at a Swedish hospital answered a questionnaire (response rate 72.5%). The majority of RNs (63-84%) rated students' study approaches highly and thought students comprehended the outcomes of learning. Fewer (45-49%), rated students as having adequate theoretical knowledge highly and were of the opinion that they had acquired knowledge about the unit. Statistically, non specialist nurses rated significantly higher compared with specialist nurses. Significant positive correlations were found between the RNs' perceptions of nursing students and their interest in preceptoring. The extent to which preparation programmes, established in collaboration between a university and a hospital, had improved preceptors and nursing students was not graded. Further descriptive and intervention studies are therefore needed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Barriers to Research Utilization by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    At present, no documentation pertaining to the factors influencing utilization of research into clinical practice by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) exists. An investigation was undertaken to determine perceptions of CRNAs regarding factors within the context of the work setting, which may serve to influence their utilization of…

  13. Barriers to Research Utilization by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    At present, no documentation pertaining to the factors influencing utilization of research into clinical practice by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) exists. An investigation was undertaken to determine perceptions of CRNAs regarding factors within the context of the work setting, which may serve to influence their utilization of…

  14. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  15. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  16. Integrated Employee Occupational Health and Organizational-Level Registered Nurse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Schult, Tamara; Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; Awosika, Ebi; McPhaul, Kathleen M

    2016-05-01

    The study examined organizational culture, structural supports, and employee health program integration influence on registered nurse (RN) outcomes. An organizational health survey, employee health clinical operations survey, employee attitudes survey, and administration data were collected. Multivariate regression models examined outcomes of sick leave, leave without pay, voluntary turnover, intention to leave, and organizational culture using 122 medical centers. Lower staffing ratios were associated with greater sick leave, higher turnover, and intention to leave. Safety climate was favorably associated with each of the five outcomes. Both onsite employee occupational health services and a robust health promotion program were associated with more positive organizational culture perceptions. Findings highlight the positive influence of integrating employee health and health promotion services on organizational health outcomes. Attention to promoting employee health may benefit organizations in multiple, synergistic ways.

  17. How New Mexico licensed registered nurses gained cultural self-efficacy and their stories.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Lynda Wilson

    2007-01-01

    The cultural self-efficacy of licensed registered nurses in New Mexico has been reported by this author in two previous articles (Hagman, 2004 & 2006). The Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) developed by Bernal and Froman (1987) was used to quantify New Mexico RN's knowledge of cultural concepts, skills and life patterns of five ethnic groups (White-non Hispanic, Hispanic, African American, Asian American and Native American). Methods used included quantitative survey results and written responses to two open-ended questions yielding both quantitative and qualitative data. This article provides details of the qualitative data which revealed how the RNs in that study gained their reported level of self-efficacy and the stories they shared. Data analysis revealed four major themes; experience, education, travel, and military service. Examples are provided for each theme. Participants also shared cultural stories/anecdotes

  18. Compassion fatigue among registered nurses: connecting theory and research.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Kate

    2015-02-01

    Unresolved compassion fatigue often causes physical and emotional exhaustion, and can significantly impair job performance. It is also known to cause increased absenteeism and even turnover among health care providers such as registered nurses. Often those experiencing compassion fatigue attempt to self-medicate in order to numb the intense emotions, and distance themselves from patients, colleagues, friends, and even family. This article describes the challenges of applying one widely used conceptual model to research among nurses who are at risk for experiencing this important and debilitating phenomenon. Through two qualitative studies that explored compassion fatigue among registered nurses, symptoms were identified that fit within the conceptual model. Several additional elements were not adequately captured by the conceptual model, and the term was perceived as being stigmatizing.

  19. Letting go: How newly graduated registered nurses in Western Canada decide to exit the nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Chachula, Kathryn M; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) estimates a nursing shortage in Canada will rise to 60,000 registered nurses by 2022. Further compounding this crisis is the approximate 14-61% of new nursing graduates who will change nursing roles or exit the profession. To explore the factors and basic psychosocial process involved in the decisions of newly graduated registered nurses in Western Canada who permanently exit the nursing profession within five years. Data was collected through unstructured and semi-structured interviews using the Glaserian grounded theory method. Participants were found to be in a process of letting go of nursing that commenced as students and continued as they entered practice as registered nurses. Four major themes were identified. 1) Navigating constraints of the healthcare system and workplace: participants encountered difficulties adjusting to shiftwork and workload. 2) Negotiating social relationships, hierarchies, and troublesome behaviors; specifically hierarchal and horizontal violence. 3) Facing fears, traumas and challenges. 4) Weighing competing rewards and tensions which resulted in leaving the nursing profession. Students and subsequently new nursing graduates require a variety of supports to establish a nursing identity and remain in the profession. These supports include a manageable workload; meaningful orientation; interprofessional teamwork; and engagement within transformational and authentic leadership constructs. New nurses require a sense of being welcomed, valued, respected and accepted into the workplace environment, as well as constructive feedback, emotional support and debriefing to face workplace challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurse forecasting in Europe (RN4CAST): Rationale, design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Sermeus, Walter; Aiken, Linda H; Van den Heede, Koen; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Griffiths, Peter; Moreno-Casbas, Maria Teresa; Busse, Reinhard; Lindqvist, Rikard; Scott, Anne P; Bruyneel, Luk; Brzostek, Tomasz; Kinnunen, Juha; Schubert, Maria; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Zikos, Dimitrios

    2011-04-18

    Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences.This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of changing different aspects of the

  1. Nurse forecasting in Europe (RN4CAST): Rationale, design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. Methods/Design A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences. This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of changing

  2. Predictors of Success and Failure for ADN Students on the NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) analyze the relationship of preprogram and nursing program variables on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) success and failure, and 2) develop a model to predict success and failure on the NCLEX-RN. The convenience sample was comprised of 245 spring, summer, and fall midterm…

  3. Predictors of Success and Failure for ADN Students on the NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benefiel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) analyze the relationship of preprogram and nursing program variables on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) success and failure, and 2) develop a model to predict success and failure on the NCLEX-RN. The convenience sample was comprised of 245 spring, summer, and fall midterm…

  4. Perceptions of Community of Associate Degree Nurse Learners in an RN-to-BSN Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Cherie R.

    2010-01-01

    Registered Nurses (RNs), when educated in an Associate Degree (AD) program, learn in a face-to-face environment. Today's preferred standard of education for RNs is to achieve a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. For convenience while they continue working, numerous AD-prepared nurses seek online education to complete their Bachelor of Science in…

  5. Perceptions of Community of Associate Degree Nurse Learners in an RN-to-BSN Online Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebar, Cherie R.

    2010-01-01

    Registered Nurses (RNs), when educated in an Associate Degree (AD) program, learn in a face-to-face environment. Today's preferred standard of education for RNs is to achieve a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. For convenience while they continue working, numerous AD-prepared nurses seek online education to complete their Bachelor of Science in…

  6. An interview with Peter I. Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN: on hopes and threats for nursing's future.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison P; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2007-01-01

    Peter I. Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN, reflects on several recently published studies examining workforce and nurse survey data and reveals more findings. Dr. Buerhaus identifies several policy and research priorities to accelerate progress and secure a more stable future for nursing. Dr. Buerhaus will be the recipient of the 2007 Nursing Economics/Margaret D. Sovie Writer's Award, for his collective works on nursing workforce issues in the journal, during the Nurse Faculty/Nurse Executive Summit, sponsored by Nursing Economics, in Scottsdale, AZ, November 29-December 1.

  7. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  8. Factors influencing the supervision of nursing students administering medication: the registered nurse perspective.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Happell, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Administering medication is an important function of registered nurses. It is therefore necessary that nursing students develop knowledge and skill in this field. Given the propensity for, and negative consequences of, medication errors, it is essential that nursing students are property supervised in this role. There is currently a paucity of research examining the practices of supervising medication administration by nursing students, particularly from the perspectives of registered nurses. The aim of this study was to explore the opinions and insights of registered nurses regarding the supervision of nursing students administering medication. Focus groups were conducted with registered nurses with experience of working with students in the clinical environment. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim and data analysis was conducted using the five stage framework approach. Four main themes were identified that reflected the participants' views of the factors most strongly influencing the provision of supervision: communication, busyness, attitudes, and pressure to conform. The participants identified the importance of providing student supervision and suggested strategies for improvement, such as a closer working relationship between the clinical facilitator and the registered nurses providing supervision.

  9. Nurse Anesthetists: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services Member Advantage Program Insurance Patients All About Anesthesia Questions You Should Ask Brochures and Resources Videos ... Page Content History: Nurse anesthetists have been providing anesthesia care to patients in the United States for ...

  10. A Nursing Workforce Diversity Project: Strategies for Recruitment, Retention, Graduation, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ted A; Pole, David C; Ciarlo, Erica M; Holmes, Shearon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative project designed to recruit and retain students from underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged backgrounds into nursing education. Ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in the nursing workforce in comparison to the general population. The numbers of minorities enrolled in nursing education programs are insufficient to meet the health care workforce diversity needs of the future. High school students were provided with a preprofessional education program to prepare them for admission into a nursing program. Retention strategies were implemented for newly admitted and enrolled nursing education students. Twenty-one high school students enrolled in a nursing education program. The students enrolled in the nursing education program graduated and passed the licensure examination. Early recruitment and multiprong retention programs can be successful in diversifying the registered nurse workforce.

  11. Nursing home facility risk factors for infection and hospitalization: importance of registered nurse turnover, administration, and social factors.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hebel, J Richard; Sloane, Philip D; Magaziner, Jay

    2002-12-01

    Determine the relationship between a broad array of structure and process elements of nursing home care and (a) resident infection and (b) hospitalization for infection. Baseline data were collected from September 1992 through March 1995, and residents were followed for 2 years; facility data were collected at the midpoint of follow-up. A stratified random sample of 59 nursing homes across Maryland. Two thousand fifteen new admissions aged 65 and older. Facility-level data were collected from interviews with facility administrators, directors of nursing, and activity directors; record abstraction; and direct observation. Main outcome measures included infection (written diagnosis, a course of antibiotic therapy, or radiographic confirmation of pneumonia) and hospitalization for infection (indicated on medical records). The 2-year rate of infection was 1.20 episodes per 100 resident days, and the hospitalization rate for infection was 0.17 admissions per 100 resident days. Except for registered nurse (RN) turnover, which related to both infection and hospitalization, different variables related to each outcome. High rates of incident infection were associated with more Medicare recipients, high levels of physical/occupational therapist staffing, high licensed practical nurse staffing, low nurses' aide staffing, high intensity of medical and therapeutic services, dementia training, staff privacy, and low levels of psychotropic medication use. High rates of hospitalization for infection were associated with for-profit ownership, chain affiliation, poor environmental quality, lack of resident privacy, lack of administrative emphasis on staff satisfaction, and low family/friend visitation rates. Adjustment for resident sex, age, race, education, marital status, number of morbid diagnoses, functional status, and Resource Utilization Group, Version III score did not alter the relationship between the structure and process of care and outcomes. The association between RN

  12. In the Balance: Registered Nurse Supply and Demand, 1996. IES Report 315.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seccombe, I.; Smith, G.

    A survey of 6,000 registered nurses in membership in the Royal College of Nursing across the United Kingdom examined some key factors that determined the supply of nurses. A study of the UK nursing labor market indicated that the number of registered nurses has remained more or less static since the late 1980s. Rising demand appeared to be met by…

  13. Academic and nursing aptitude and the NCLEX-RN in baccalaureate programs.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mary Ann; Harris, Debra; Tracz, Susan M

    2014-03-01

    Accurately predicting NCLEX-RN® success has a positive impact on all nursing education stakeholders. This study focused on the ability to predict NCLEX-RN pass rates on the basis of prenursing academic aptitude variables and the Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) nursing aptitude program. The ATI predictors were the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) and fi ve ATI subject tests: Fundamentals, Medical Surgical, Nursing Care of Children, Mental Health, and Maternal Newborn. The prenursing variables comprised the prenursing grade point average, a prerequisite communication course, and the ATI TEAS composite subscores of TEAS Reading, TEAS Math, TEAS Science, and TEAS English. This study included participants from four baccalaureate nursing programs in the California State University system. Results of canonical correlation, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression revealed a significant correlation among prenursing, ATI scores, and NCLEXRN fi rst-try pass rates. Prediction of NCLEX-RN success rate using standardized testing data was supported, with the strongest predictors being the ATI Medical Surgical and ATI Mental Health tests.

  14. Differences in ethical attitudes between registered nurses and medical students.

    PubMed

    Elder, Ruth; Price, John; Williams, Gail

    2003-03-01

    In this study we compared the ethical attitudes of a group of experienced, predominantly female, registered nurses (n = 67) with those of a group of final year, mixed sex, medical students (n = 125). The purpose was to determine the basis of differences in attitudes that could lead to ethical disagreements between these two groups when they came to work together. A questionnaire developed to explore ethical attitudes was administered and the responses of the two groups were compared using t-tests. Because of the preponderance of females among the nurses an analysis of variance of the gender-adjusted scores for each group was also carried out. On comparing the responses, the nurses differed significantly from the medical students in a number of ethical domains. A potential source of conflict between these two groups is that the nurses were inclined to adopt the perspective of patients but the medical students identified with their profession. When corrected for the effects of gender, the differences persisted, indicating that it was discipline that determined the differences. We recommend that students of nursing and medicine receive ethics education together, and that more open dialogue between doctors and nurses with respect to their different ethical viewpoints is needed in the work setting. This article will be of interest to educators of students of medicine and nursing, as well as to doctors and nurses who are eager to improve their professional relations and thereby improve patient care.

  15. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  16. Future distinguishing competencies of baccalaureate-educated registered nurses in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2015-01-01

    In view of the likelihood that the complexity of care required by those admitted to nursing homes will continue to increase, an expert consensus study was conducted to reach consensus on the competencies which distinguish baccalaureate-educated registered nurses from other nursing staff working in nursing homes. Thirty-one international experts, identified through literature and our professional network, participated in a two-round web-based survey and an expert meeting. Experts reached consensus on 16 desirable competencies, including some not traditionally associated with nursing expertise e.g. being a team leader, role model and coach within the nursing team. These findings suggest that revision of current nursing curricula, nurse training programs and nursing home job profiles might be needed to meet the medically and psychologically complex needs of nursing home residents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of the registered nurse in primary health care: meeting health care needs in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Smolowitz, Janice; Speakman, Elizabeth; Wojnar, Danuta; Whelan, Ellen-Marie; Ulrich, Suzan; Hayes, Carolyn; Wood, Laura

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread interest in the redesign of primary health care practice models to increase access to quality health care. Registered nurses (RNs) are well positioned to assume direct care and leadership roles based on their understanding of patient, family, and system priorities. This project identified 16 exemplar primary health care practices that used RNs to the full extent of their scope of practice in team-based care. Interviews were conducted with practice representatives. RN activities were performed within three general contexts: episodic and preventive care, chronic disease management, and practice operations. RNs performed nine general functions in these contexts including telephone triage, assessment and documentation of health status, chronic illness case management, hospital transition management, delegated care for episodic illness, health coaching, medication reconciliation, staff supervision, and quality improvement leadership. These functions improved quality and efficiency and decreased cost. Implications for policy, practice, and RN education are considered.

  18. Working postures and physical activity among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard

    2016-05-01

    Nurses report a high prevalence of musculoskeletal discomfort, particularly of the low back and neck/shoulder. This study characterized the full-shift upper arm and trunk postures and movement velocities of registered nurses using inertial measurement units (IMUs). Intensity of occupational physical activity (PA) was also ascertained using a waist-worn PA monitor and using the raw acceleration data from each IMU. Results indicated that nurses spent a relatively small proportion of their work time with the arms or trunk in extreme postures, but had few opportunities for rest and recovery in comparison to several other occupational groups. Comparisons between nurses in different PA groups suggested that using a combination of accelerometers secured to several body locations may provide more representative estimates of physical demands than a single, waist-worn PA monitor. The findings indicate a need for continued field-based research with larger sample sizes to facilitate the development of maximally effective intervention strategies.

  19. Operating Room Personnel Viewpoints About Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Desiree; Cooper, Rachel; Craney, Neil

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore what attitudes physicians, nurses, and operating room technicians had about working with Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to better understand practice barriers and facilitators. This Q methodology study used a purposive sample of operating room personnel from four institutions in the Midwestern United States. Participants completed a -4 to +4 rank-ordering of their level of agreement with 34 attitude statements representing a wide range of beliefs about nurse anesthetists. Centroid factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to analyze 24 returned Q sorts. Three distinct viewpoints emerged that explained 66% of the variance: favoring unrestricted practice, favoring anesthesiologist supervision, and favoring anesthesiologist practice. Research is needed on how to develop workplace attitudes that support autonomous nurse anesthetist practice and to understand preferences for restricted practice in team members other than physicians.

  20. Attributes of nursing work environment as predictors of registered nurses' job satisfaction and intention to leave.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sandy Pin-Pin; Cheung, Kin; Pang, Samantha Mei-Che

    2013-04-01

    To examine how front-line registered nurses' perception of their work environment associates with and predicts nurse outcomes in terms of job satisfaction and turnover intention. Mounting evidence has pointed to an inseparable link between attributes of the nursing work environment and nurse outcomes. However, there is a paucity of research examining nurses' perception of their work environment beyond the Western context. This cross-sectional survey involved 1271 registered nurses working in 135 inpatient units in 10 public hospitals in Hong Kong. The instrument comprised items developed from in-depth interviews with front-line nurses that explored nurses' perception of their work environment. Factor analysis identified five dimensions (professionalism, co-worker relationship, management, staffing and resources, and ward practice) of the nursing work environment. Logistic regression analysis further identified professionalism, management and ward practice as significant factors in predicting nurses' turnover intention, and staffing and resources as an additional factor in predicting their job satisfaction. Attributes of the nursing work environment have a significant bearing on nurses' job satisfaction and intention to leave. Managerial effort should focus on improving nurses' work conditions through detailed resource planning, effective management and removal of work constraints that affect nursing practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Introducing the New American Nurses Association President: Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Pamela F

    2014-11-01

    This month in the Magnet® Perspectives column, Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAAN, new President of the American Nurses Association, discusses her priorities for the future and partnerships that are being forged to support nursing.

  2. An evaluation of the drug calculation skills of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Sandra; Brady, Anne-Marie; Malone, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical skill and proficiency underpin a number of nursing activities, with the most common application being in relation to drug dosage calculation and administration. Medication errors have been identified as the most common type of error affecting patient safety and the most common single preventable cause of adverse events and they can occur as a result of mathematical calculation error and or conceptual error. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the drug calculation skills of registered nurses (n = 124) on commencement of employment. The findings of this study indicate that there are inconsistencies in the amount of pharmacology content and drug calculation skills delivered within nursing curricula. The most frequent type of drug calculation errors are attributed to conceptual errors and participants identified ward based education on drug calculation as a pathway for improving the drug calculation skills of registered nurses. The study recommends that medication education, encompassing mathematical and conceptual drug calculation skills should be identified as a distinct competency in nursing curricula and continuing education programme.

  3. The transition from nursing student to registered nurse: the mentor's possibilities to act as a supporter.

    PubMed

    Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja; Lakanmaa, Riitta-Liisa; Salminen, Leena

    2013-09-01

    The transition from nursing student to registered nurse can be exciting, stressful and challenging. It is common for nursing students to feel insecure about their competence and ability to step into working life. The role of the mentor in the final clinical practice is essential, as they guide students in their clinical learning process and professional growth. This study describes the mentor's support in the transition from nursing student to registered nurse. Sixteen nursing students wrote narrative essays about the significance of the clinical mentor in their role change in the transition process from nursing student to registered nurse. The essays were analysed using inductive content analysis. The findings show that the mentor has a significant role. Three main categories emerged in mentor's role: role change support, the mentor's actions and the qualities of the mentor. In future in clinical nursing practice, it is important to allocate resources to the mentor's work and understand its importance for nursing students' transition to nursing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Becoming a web-based learner: registered nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Atack, Lynda

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe Registered Nurses' experiences when taking a web-based course from either the workplace or home, and the impact of their learning on clinical practice. Little is known about the web-based learners' experience, particularly when courses are accessed from the nursing practice setting. Even less is known about whether nurses transfer their web-based learning to clinical practice. A qualitative design employing focus group interviews was used. Participants included hospital and community nurses from three Canadian provinces and one territory. Data were collected at three points over a 6-month period and analysed using a thematic analysis process. These findings emanate from a larger study using survey method and focus group interviews. The focus group interviews captured the hurdles nurses faced during the first weeks when they struggled with technology, re-framed their views of teaching and adjusted to web-based learning from home and work. These first stressful weeks were followed by a period during which nurses developed relationships with the teacher and peers that enabled them to focus on learning and prevented attrition. Most nurses reported the web course was convenient and that they would be interested and comfortable using technology for learning and work purposes in the future. Six weeks after the course was completed, nurses articulated a number of ways the course had improved their practice. Initial weeks in a web-based course can be very challenging for novice Internet users, however, most nurses who completed the course reported a positive learning experience. Nurses, employers and educators should evaluate computer skills, computer access and the learning environment when preparing for web-based learning.

  5. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect. PMID:28044103

  6. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Inga E; Sahlsten, Monika J M

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  7. Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Peter; Ball, Jane; Murrells, Trevor; Jones, Simon; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2016-02-09

    To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing. Secondary care provided in acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England. Two data sets are examined: Administrative data from 137 NHS acute hospital trusts (staffing measured as beds per staff member). A cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses in a subsample of 31 trusts (measured patients per ward nurse). Risk-adjusted mortality rates for adult patients (administrative data). For medical admissions, higher mortality was associated with more occupied beds per RN (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.43, p=0.02) and per doctor (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15, p <0.01) employed by the trust whereas, lower HCSW staffing was associated with lower mortality (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.00, p=0.04). In multivariable models the relationship was statistically significant for doctors (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.15, p=0.02) and HCSWs (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98, p<01) but not RNs (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.38, p=0.17). Trusts with an average of ≤ 6 patients per RN in medical wards had a 20% lower mortality rate compared to trusts with >10 patients per nurse (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.85, p<0.01). The relationship remained significant in the multivariable model (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.95, p<0.01). Results for surgical wards/admissions followed a similar pattern but with fewer significant results. Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  8. Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Ball, Jane; Murrells, Trevor; Jones, Simon; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing. Setting Secondary care provided in acute hospital National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England. Participants Two data sets are examined: Administrative data from 137 NHS acute hospital trusts (staffing measured as beds per staff member). A cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses in a subsample of 31 trusts (measured patients per ward nurse). Outcome measure Risk-adjusted mortality rates for adult patients (administrative data). Results For medical admissions, higher mortality was associated with more occupied beds per RN (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.43, p=0.02) and per doctor (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.15, p <0.01) employed by the trust whereas, lower HCSW staffing was associated with lower mortality (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.00, p=0.04). In multivariable models the relationship was statistically significant for doctors (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.15, p=0.02) and HCSWs (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98, p<01) but not RNs (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.38, p=0.17). Trusts with an average of ≤6 patients per RN in medical wards had a 20% lower mortality rate compared to trusts with >10 patients per nurse (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.85, p<0.01). The relationship remained significant in the multivariable model (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.95, p<0.01). Results for surgical wards/admissions followed a similar pattern but with fewer significant results. Conclusions Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered. PMID

  9. Measuring Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Organizational Climate: Instrument Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Donald; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2017-08-01

    No tool exists measuring certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) organizational climate. The study's purpose is to adapt a validated tool to measure CRNA organizational climate. Content validity of the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Organizational Climate Questionnaire (CRNA-OCQ) was established. Pilot testing was conducted to determine internal reliability consistency of the subscales. Experts rated the tool as content valid. The subscales had high internal consistency reliability (with respective Cronbach's alphas): CRNA-Anesthesiologist Relations (.753), CRNA-Physician Relations (.833), CRNA-Administration Relations (.895), Independent Practice (.830), Support for CRNA Practice (.683), and Professional Visibility (.772). Further refinement of the CRNA-OCQ is necessary. Measurement and assessment of CRNA organizational climate may produce evidence needed to improve provider and patient outcomes.

  10. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation element...

  11. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation element...

  12. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  13. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation...

  14. 20 CFR 655.1116 - Element VI-What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... provide to registered nurses? 655.1116 Section 655.1116 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1116 Element VI—What notification must facilities provide to registered nurses? (a) The sixth attestation element...

  15. Registered nurse perspectives on delayed or missed nursing cares in a New Zealand Hospital.

    PubMed

    Winters, Rosie; Neville, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Nurses have an essential role to play in ongoing patient surveillance. The quality of nursing care patients receive has implications for both their recovery and long term health outcomes. Currently, due to a number of factors, nurses are facing increasing challenges to meeting the care needs of hospital patients. These include fluctuations in nursing skill mix and staffing levels, inconsistent availability of equipment and supplies, and higher patient acuity. The additional impact of healthcare restructuring on nursing has been reflected in the demand to do more with less. Consequently nurses are constantly forced to prioritise certain aspects of nursing care as being less important than others, resulting in some nursing cares being delayed or missed. In this study the concept of "missed care" was explored using a qualitative descriptive approach. Five registered nurses working within a New Zealand hospital were interviewed and the data obtained analysed using a general inductive approach. Two of the main categories were identified: 'the types of care that were regularly delayed or missed', and 'the reasons for regularly delaying or missing care'. The third main category identified was 'moral distress'. This related to the feelings of guilt and frustration experienced by the nurses as a result of delaying or missing care. It is argued that by understanding issues affecting direct care delivery to patients, registered nurses will be more able to effect constructive change in their work environments. This will have the benefit of enhancing both the quality of the nurses' work environment and the quality of care delivered to patients.

  16. Priorities for the professional development of registered nurses in nursing homes: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Emily; Spilsbury, Karen; McCaughan, Dorothy; Thompson, Carl; Butterworth, Tony; Hanratty, Barbara

    2017-01-08

    To establish a consensus on the care and professional development needs of registered nurses (RNs) employed by UK care homes. Two-stage, online modified Delphi study. A panel (n = 352) of individuals with experience, expertise or interest in care home nursing: (i) care home nurses and managers; (ii) community healthcare professionals (including general practitioners, geriatricians, specialist and district nurses); and (iii) nurse educators in higher education. RNs employed by nursing homes require particular skills, knowledge, competence and experience to provide high-quality care for older residents. The most important responsibilities for the nursing home nurse were: promoting dignity, personhood and wellbeing, ensuring resident safety and enhancing quality of life. Continuing professional development priorities included personal care, dementia care and managing long-term conditions. The main barrier to professional development was staff shortages. Nursing degree programmes were perceived as inadequately preparing nurses for a nursing home role. Nursing homes could improve by providing supportive learning opportunities for students and fostering challenging and rewarding careers for newly RNs. If nurses employed by nursing homes are not fit for purpose, the consequences for the wider health and social-care system are significant. Nursing homes, the NHS, educational and local authorities need to work together to provide challenging and rewarding career paths for RNs and evaluate them. Without well-trained, motivated staff, a high-quality care sector will remain merely an aspiration.

  17. Registered Nurse Staffing in Pennsylvania Nursing Homes: Comparison before and after Implementation of Medicare's Prospective Payment System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanda, Katsuya; Mezey, Mathy

    1991-01-01

    Examined changes in resident acuity and registered nurse staffing in all nursing homes in Pennsylvania before and after introduction of Medicare Prospective Payment System (PPS) in 1983. Found that acuity of nursing home residents increased significantly since introduction of PPS, full-time registered nurse staffing remained unchanged, and…

  18. Clinical education experiences: perceptions of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Elisha, Sass; Rutledge, Dana N

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) related to clinical instruction. This descriptive study used a cross-sectional survey method with a regionally stratified randomly selected sample of SRNA members from the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists data bank. A total of 2,673 SRNAs were invited by email to respond to an online, 54-item questionnaire; 696 SRNAs participated. Verbal abuse was reported by almost 70% of SRNA participants, but fewer experienced sexual harassment (13%), physical abuse (14%), or racial discrimination (72%). However, SRNAs reported that their Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) preceptors most often served as positive role models. These SRNAs found CRNA preceptors, unique cases, reading, and clinical lectures more helpful to their clinical learning compared with grand rounds, surgeons, and anesthesiology residents. The SRNAs' perceptions of the ideal behavioral characteristics for CRNA preceptors included calmness during stressful events, use of nonthreatening communication, clear communication, and encouraging independent decision making. The educational process for nurse anesthetists is continually evolving and improving. Study findings offer insights that may assist in improvements in the clinical component of SRNA education.

  19. Psychological Distress and Workplace Bullying Among Registered Nurses

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy Ann; Gillespie, Gordon L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Gormley, Denise; Haynes, Jared T

    2016-08-10

    Workplace bullying (WPB) behaviors are pervasive in some healthcare organizations leading to difficult work environments for registered nurses. We conducted an exploratory quantitative dominant (QUANT/qual) mixed method design study to determine the differences in respondents in three Midwestern states on psychological distress symptoms using WPB exposure levels and select nurse characteristics. This article discusses background information and WPB consequences. We report on the study purpose, methods, and Phase I qualitative results, including significant differences with perceived stress, anxiety, and posttraumatic symptoms reported by persons with frequent to daily WPB behavior exposure. The discussion section considers significant differences found between respondents related to age and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Narrative analysis on strategies used after bullying also illuminates the discussion. Finally, we examine implications for nurse leaders and empowerment of their direct reports to resolve minor interpersonal conflicts and move swiftly to resolve escalating bullying.

  20. A comprehensive approach to NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Nancy C

    2007-01-01

    Nurse educators face many challenges in their efforts to prepare graduates for success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). A proactive, coordinated, and comprehensive effort to prepare graduates for NCLEX-RN success developed as an essential element in curriculum planning and delivery by a university-based associate degree program is described. The plan incorporates interventions in each semester of the curriculum and uses a commercially available standardized assessment and remediation package.

  1. Career Motivation in Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: What Makes Them Remain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Zarata Mann; Bailey, Jessica H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite vast research on newly licensed registered nurses (RNs), we don't know why some newly licensed registered nurses remain in their current jobs and others leave the nursing profession early in their career. Job satisfaction, the most significant factor emerging from the literature, plays a significant role in nurses' decisions to remain in…

  2. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who: (1... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse...

  3. Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Gustafsson, Margareta; Blomberg, Karin; Holmström, Inger K; Allvin, Renée

    2015-12-01

    One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices. A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design. RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1 year were included in the study (n=113, response rate 57%). Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon. This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Wadensten, Barbro; Häggström, Elisabeth; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena

    2014-08-01

    To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use. Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care. A cross-sectional survey study. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011-January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested. According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of 'other' obstacles. Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing. Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders among Registered Nurses: Evidence from the Thai Nurse Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thinkhamrop, W; Laohasiriwong, W

    2015-01-01

    Background Health, safety, and well being have been known to be influenced by occupational characteristics. Nurses constantly encounter musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) from work demands worldwide. Nevertheless, there is insufficient of knowledge regarding causes of musculoskeletal disorders among nurses in Thailand. Objective To investigate factors associated with musculoskeletal disorder among registered nurses in Thailand. Method This study is part of the 2009 Thai Nurse Cohort Study which consisted of 18,756 nationally representative sample of registered nurses. Data collection was performed via postal self-administered questionnaires. Manifesting musculoskeletal disorders was self-reported by registered nurses, 1,070 nurses were excluded since they were unemployed during previous 12 months. Multiple logistic regression was used for data analysis. Result Of 17,686 registered nurses, the overall 12 months prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 47.8%. It was found that workplace violence was the strongest factor which statistically significant associated with musculoskeletal disorders (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.42 to 2.83; P < 0.001), anxiety/depression (OR = 1.96: 95% CI: 1.78 to 2.15; P < 0.001), perceiving job required a lot of physical effort (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.52 to 1.87; P < 0.001), every 10 years increased of age (OR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62; P < 0.001), overweight (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.52; P = 0.015). Conclusion Registered nurses were most vulnerable of musculoskeletal disorders especially those who experienced workplace violence, anxiety/depression, strenuous work, older age, and overweight. Consequently, recommending safety practices to nurses should be considered for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) prevention by ergonomics and workplace design.

  6. Collaboration among nurse practitioners and registered nurses in outpatient oncology settings in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jane; Prentice, Dawn

    2013-07-01

    This article is a report on a case study that described and analysed the collaborative process among nurse practitioners and registered nurses in oncology outpatient settings to understand and improve collaborative practice among nurses. Changes in the health system have created new models of care delivery, such as collaborative nursing teams. This has resulted in the increased opportunity for enhanced collaboration among nurse practitioners and registered nurses. The study was guided by Corser's Model of Collaborative Nurse-Physician Interactions (1998). Embedded single case design with multiple units of analysis. Qualitative data were collected in 2010 using direct participant observations and individual and joint (nurse dyads) interviews in four outpatient oncology settings at one hospital in Ontario, Canada. Thematic analysis revealed four themes: (1) Together Time Fosters Collaboration; (2) Basic Skills: The Brickworks of Collaboration; (3) Road Blocks: Obstacles to Collaboration; and (4) Nurses' Attitudes towards their Collaborative Work. Collaboration is a complex process that does not occur spontaneously. Collaboration requires nurses to not only work together but also spend time socially interacting away from the clinical setting. While nurses possess the conceptual knowledge of the meaning of collaboration, findings from this study showed that nurses struggle to understand how to collaborate in the practice setting. Strategies for improving nurse-nurse practitioner collaboration should include: the support and promotion of collaborative practice among nurses by hospital leadership and the development of institutional and organizational education programmes that would focus on creating innovative opportunities for nurses to learn about intraprofessional collaboration in the practice setting. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Grade Point Average as a Predictor of Timely Graduation from Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Delores J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if admission selection strategies that utilize cumulative and/or pre-requisite GPA are predictive of timely graduation for associate degree nursing (RN-AD) students. Data were obtained from de-identified records of 437 associate degree nursing students enrolled in three Midwest community colleges from…

  8. Registered nurses' self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nemcek, Mary Ann

    2007-08-01

    Knowledge of factors that help nurses thrive, including satisfaction with life and self-nurturance, can be used to enhance retention of a healthy work force. This study determined whether nurses are happy or satisfied with their lives; how self-nurturing or "good to self" they are; and whether a relationship exists among self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction. A descriptive, correlational study of 136 registered nurses involving measures of self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction was conducted. Mean scores for life satisfaction and self-nurturance were consistent with those from studies of well adults. Self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction were positively correlated with each other; thus, improving one is expected to improve the others. Knowledge of the significant positive correlation among life satisfaction, self-nurturance, and career satisfaction may prove useful in improving the mental health and safety of nurses. Strategies consistent with Magnet hospital characteristics are suggested for the occupational health nurse.

  9. The Relationship between Selected Variables and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of Pass/Fail Performance for Traditional and Second-Degree Baccalaureate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englert, Nadine Cozzo

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between selected variables and performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Data were collected from one hundred twenty graduates of a baccalaureate program; graduates completed either the traditional four-year track or an accelerated…

  10. A simultaneous-equation model of labor supply, fertility and earnings of married women: the case of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Link, C R; Settle, R F

    1981-01-01

    A simultaneous-equation model of labor supply, fertility, and earnings is developed and estimated for an important subset of the female population, married registered nurses (RNs). Measures of variables specific to married nurses age 21-64 are developed by aggregating observations on individual nurses or their families into Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) averages, from the 1-in-100 Public Use Sample of the 1970 Census of Population in the U.S. The sample was restricted in certain ways: the grouped observations apply only to white RNs who are married with husband present and live in SMSAs of over 250,000 population in 1970 (except Honolulu). The sample is further restricted so that each included observation (representing an SMSA average) is based upon an underlying pool of at least 15 individual nurses. This last restriction reduces the sample of SMSAs to 88 from 124. The coefficient on the nurse wage variable is positive and statistically significant with an implied wage elasticity of .40 at the means. These estimates are consistent with those observed using the analogous microcensus data on RNs. RN fertility has the predicted negative effect on nurse labor supply but is statistically insignificant, but the magnitude of the fertility coefficient is plausible. A 10% increase in nurse fertility within an SMSA (number of children ever born/1000 nurses ever married within an SMSA) is associated with a reduction in the SMSA nurse labor supply. The estimated coefficients of the husband-earnings and nonlabor-income variables are negative but only the former is statistically significant at the 90% level or above. The estimated effect of the nurse's earnings opportunities on her fertility are statistically insignificant, but the wage coefficient is negative as expected and implies an elasticity of nurse fertility with respect to the nurse wage rate of approximately -.2. The coefficient on the labor supply variable is negative and statistically significant

  11. Early Indicators of NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Schooley, Angela; Kuhn, Jonathan Richard Dixon

    2013-09-01

    Health Education Systems Incorporated (HESI(™)) test results, course grades, and National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN(®)) outcomes of students in an associate degree nursing program at a midwestern public university were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed that introductory Fundamentals HESI test scores, more than either comprehensive HESI Exit Exam scores or other specialty HESI test scores, significantly predicted NCLEX-RN outcomes in this study (p < 0.05), while controlling for grade point average and high school percentile rank. In addition, of the general education courses and the nursing courses in the associate nursing program examined, Pediatric Nursing, Medical-Surgical Nursing, and Maternity Nursing course grades were found most statistically significantly influential of all the HESI test scores (p < 0.01).

  12. Registered nurses' thinking strategies on malnutrition and pressure ulcers in nursing homes: a scenario-based think-aloud study.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Mariann; Alexander, Gregory L; Göransson, Katarina E; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the thinking strategies and clinical reasoning processes registered nurses use during simulated care planning for malnutrition and pressure ulcers in nursing home care. Clinical reasoning is an essential component of nursing practice. Registered nurses' thinking strategies and clinical reasoning have received limited attention in nursing science. Further research is needed to understand registered nurses' clinical reasoning, especially for prevention of malnutrition and pressure ulcers as they are important quality indicators of resident care in nursing homes. A qualitative explorative design was used with a think-aloud interview technique. The transcribed verbalisations were analysed with qualitative deductive content analysis. Data were collected during six months in 2007-2008 from 30 registered nurses at nine nursing homes in Norway. The registered nurses used a variety of thinking strategies, but there were differences in the frequency of use of the different strategies. The three most commonly used thinking strategies were 'making choices', 'forming relationships' and 'drawing conclusions'. None of the nurses performed a structured risk assessment of malnutrition or pressure ulcers. Registered nurses started with assessing data from the scenarios, but after a short and elementary assessment they moved directly to planning. Many different thinking strategies were used in registered nurses' clinical reasoning for prevention of malnutrition and pressure ulcers. The thinking strategy 'making choices' was most commonly used and registered nurses' main focus in their reasoning was on planning nursing interventions. This study showed that most of the registered nurses go directly to planning when reasoning clinically about residents in nursing homes. A lack of systematic risk assessments was identified. The insight gained from this study can be used to recommend improvements in tools designed for nursing homes to support the

  13. How fast will the registered nurse workforce grow through 2030? Projections in nine regions of the country.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    After an unprecedented increase in nursing school enrollment and graduates in the past 10 years, projected shortages of nurses have been erased at a national level. However, nursing markets are local, and an uneven distribution of health care providers of all types is a longstanding feature of health care in the United States. The purpose of this study was to understand how the outlook for future registered nurse (RN) supply varies regionally across the United States. We apply our nursing supply model to the nine U.S. Census Divisions to produce separate supply forecasts for each region. We find dramatic differences in expected future growth of the nursing workforce across U.S. regions. These range from zero expected growth in the number of RNs per capita in New England and in the Pacific regions between 2015 and 2030 to 40% growth in the East South Central region (Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky) and in the West South Central region (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana). Assuming growth in the demand for RNs per population, some regions of the United States are expected to face shortfalls in their nursing workforce if recent trends do not change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retaining early career registered nurses: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane; Chamberlain-Salaun, Jennifer; Harrison, Helena; Yates, Karen; O'Shea, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A core objective of the Australian health system is to provide high quality, safe health care that meets the needs of all Australians. To achieve this, an adequate and effective workforce must support the delivery of care. With rapidly changing health care systems and consumer demographics, demand for care is increasing and retention of sufficient numbers of skilled staff is now a critical priority to meet current and future health care demands. Nurses are the largest cohort of professionals within the health workforce. Reducing the rates at which nurses leave the profession and supporting nurses to practice in their profession longer will have beneficial implications for the sustainability of a nursing workforce and, ultimately, to patient outcomes. The aim of the study was to describe and explain early career registered nurses' (ECRNs) experiences and support requirements during the first five years of practice for the purposes of identifying strategies that would support greater retention of ECRNs. A single case study design focused on early career registered nurses (ECRNs) working in a hospital and health service in northern Australia. The research team adopted Djukic et al's definition of ECRNs as "RNs who have practiced for less than 5 years". Data was collected via three individual interviews and two focus groups. Thirty-five ECRNs participated in the study. Qualitative analysis of data generated during interviews and focus groups, identified the key themes of receiving career advice and choice or no choice. Analysis of study data in the context of the broader literature resulted in the researchers identifying six areas of focus for ECRN retention: 1) well-planned, supported and structured transition periods; 2) consideration of rotation through different areas with a six month minimum for skills development; 3) empowering decision making; 4) placement opportunities and choice in decisions of where to work; 5) career advice and support that considers ECRNs

  15. Moral distress in certified registered nurse anesthetists: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Radzvin, Linda Clerici

    2011-02-01

    Registered nurses are frequently confronted with ethical dilemmas in their nursing practice. As a consequence of their decisions regarding ethical challenges, nurses report experiencing moral distress. This experience is often manifested by such feelings as anger, guilt, and sadness, and has been identified as a contributing factor to burnout and turnover in nursing. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) experience moral distress in their nursing practice. A random sample of 800 CRNAs from the registry of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists was selected to participate in this study. Participating nurses were asked to complete a demographic data survey and the Ethics Stress Scale. Three hundred surveys were analyzed for this study. The data supported the assumption that CRNAs do experience moral distress in their nursing practice. Although a small number of nurse anesthetists experienced high levels of moral distress, CRNAs generally experienced moderate levels of moral distress. Moral distress was associated with situations in which anesthetists believed they were aware of the morally correct course of action but were unable to follow through with these behaviors. Also, CRNAs reported physical and psychological manifestations in relation to moral distress.

  16. Predicting academic progression for student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sharon M

    2011-06-01

    In order to foster academic progression and improve retention in nurse anesthesia programs, admission selection criteria require attention. With the escalating cost of graduate education coupled with the current economic crisis, efforts by educational leaders to minimize attrition remain pivotal. Selecting potential candidates who are most likely to succeed, aligned with data-driven evidence, offers the greatest potential for academic success for student registered nurse anesthetists. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if a relationship existed between admission criteria (grade point average [GPA], science grade point average [SGPA], Graduate Record Examination scores, and critical care experience) and academic progression (current academic status and GPA). Key findings revealed that statistically significant relationships exist between the admission selection criteria and academic progression. Findings also indicated that a combination of the independent variables, specifically the GPA and SGPA, predict academic progression. Further research that includes examination of cognitive and noncognitive admission criteria may offer greater evidence predicting academic performance by student registered nurse anesthetists.

  17. Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulations to permit full practice authority of three roles of VA advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) when they are acting within the scope of their VA employment. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) will not be included in VA's full practice authority under this final rule, but comment is requested on whether there are access issues or other unconsidered circumstances that might warrant their inclusion in a future rulemaking. The final rulemaking establishes the professional qualifications an individual must possess to be appointed as an APRN within VA, establishes the criteria under which VA may grant full practice authority to an APRN, and defines the scope of full practice authority for each of the three roles of APRN. The services provided by an APRN under full practice authority in VA are consistent with the nursing profession's standards of practice for such roles. This rulemaking increases veterans' access to VA health care by expanding the pool of qualified health care professionals who are authorized to provide primary health care and other related health care services to the full extent of their education, training, and certification, without the clinical supervision of physicians, and it permits VA to use its health care resources more effectively and in a manner that is consistent with the role of APRNs in the non-VA health care sector, while maintaining the patient-centered, safe, high-quality health care that veterans receive from VA.

  18. The roller coaster supply of registered nurses: lessons from the eighties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, C S

    1996-08-01

    The strong labor demand of the eighties for nurses has evaporated under reform proposals and cost constraints. In this study, the 1984 and 1988 National Sample Surveys of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) were used to examine the labor supply of nurses. Ordinary least squares and logistic regression analyses indicated that the responsiveness of registered nurses to the wage was greater than previous research has indicated. If wage growth is slow relative to other occupations due to a decreased demand for nurses, registered nurses will in turn reduce their supply of labor more than previous research has indicated. Whether the response by nurses will balance the reduction of demand by employers remains to be seen.

  19. Comparisons of the educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: the educators' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Similar to the U.S.A., New Zealand and Singapore, Australia registers two levels of nurse, the degree or postgraduate entry prepared registered nurse and diploma or certificate-prepared enrolled nurse. Over the past decade, significant changes have occurred in educational preparation of enrolled nurses. This has resulted in enrolled nurses undertaking many roles and responsibilities previously undertaken only by registered nurses. An exploratory qualitative research study using interviews with educators of both registered and enrolled nurses was undertaken to investigate differences in educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia. This paper describes perceptions around how participants viewed educational approaches and different cohorts, types and levels of students. Similarities included topics covered and the majority skills taught, although high acuity skills remain a difference between the levels of nurse. Differences were also found in type of student, educational background and teaching methods.

  20. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Registered nurses' perceptions of cultural and linguistic hospital resources.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Marilyn V; Davis, Jullet A

    2009-01-01

    As the patient population continues to diversify, the need to provide care that is culturally and linguistically appropriate is intensifying. This study describes the perceptions of registered nurses (RNs) in Alabama hospitals regarding the training and resources available for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate care. The population consists of all RNs working in Alabama hospitals. A sample of 1976 RNs was obtained using an online survey. The findings indicate that although some resources and training are currently provided to nurses, the majority of respondents still lack sufficient resources and training to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate care. The lack of uniformity in resources and training makes it difficult to ensure that all healthcare providers are receiving the same information. However, hospitals do have the flexibility to tailor training to areas that are specific to their population needs.

  2. Newly licensed registered nurse job turnover and turnover intent.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Zhang, Ning Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Through survey data, this study examines job leaving behaviors of newly licensed registered nurses and identifies educational and managerial issues that need to be addressed to retain them. Within 1.5-2.5 years of graduating, one third of all respondents had left their first job, most for work-related reasons. Predictors of job leaving or intentions to leave included not having had a good orientation, information issues, having difficulties doing a good job, not being rewarded fairly, and low job satisfaction.

  3. The Quality of Nurses' Work Environment and Workforce Outcomes From the Perspective of Swiss Allied Healthcare Assistants and Registered Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Stefanie; De Geest, Sabina; Denhaerynck, Kris; Trede, Ines; Ausserhofer, Dietmar

    2015-09-01

    Anticipating nursing shortages, the Swiss healthcare system recently introduced the position of allied healthcare assistant (AHA). However, indicators of AHAs' integration and stability, particularly their perceptions of their work environment quality and related outcomes (i.e., burnout, job satisfaction, and intention to leave), remain unclear. (a) To describe AHAs' ratings of the quality of the nurse work environment, job satisfaction, burnout, and intention to leave their workplaces; (b) to compare AHAs' and registered nurses' (RNs') work environment quality ratings and related outcomes; and (c) to assess links between AHAs' work environment quality ratings and related workforce outcomes. A secondary analysis of RN4CAST data (October 2009 to June 2010) on 61 AHAs and 466 RNs in 13 Swiss acute care hospitals. We used descriptive statistics to summarize data of AHAs and RNs on their units and hospitals. Via binary logistic regression models, we compared AHAs and RNs and identified associations between work environment ratings and workforce outcomes. AHAs' work environment quality ratings were significantly higher than those of RNs, and were associated with lower odds of burnout and intention to leave their current job and higher odds of reported job satisfaction. This study provides primary evidence linking AHAs' work environment quality ratings to burnout, job satisfaction, and intention to leave in acute care hospitals. Given the increasing importance of AHAs for nursing care provision, hospitals should assess the quality of nurse work environment and nurse outcomes from the perspective of all nurses. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Downsizing and reorganization: demands, challenges and ambiguity for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Hertting, Anna; Nilsson, Kerstin; Theorell, Töres; Larsson, Ullabeth Sätterlund

    2004-01-01

    The 1990s were characterized by substantial financial cuts, and related staff redundancies and reorganizations in the Swedish health care sector. A large hospital in Sweden was selected for the study, in which downsizing had occurred between 1995 and 1997. The number of staff in the hospital was reduced by an average of 20%, and 10% were relocated to other departments. The aims of this study were to explore registered nurses' experiences of psychosocial 'stressors' and 'motivators', and how they handled their work situations, following a period of personnel reductions and ongoing reorganization. Interviews were undertaken with 14 nurses working in one Swedish hospital. Nurses were interviewed in 1997 about the recent and last round of redundancies, and were followed up 1 year later in 1998 and again in 2001. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed for thematic content. Five themes emerged in relation to nurses' perceived stressors, motivators, and coping options: 'distrust towards the employer', 'concurrent demands and challenges', 'professional ambiguity, 'a wish for collaboration', and 'efforts to gain control'. A common feature was duality and ambiguity in nurses' descriptions of the phenomena studied, meaning that identified themes had underlying sub-themes with both negative and positive dimensions. The concurrence of 'ever-growing job demands' and 'work going unrewarded' contributed to a feeling of being taken advantage of by the employer. The 'waste of human resources' and 'competence drain' that followed redundancies provoked anger. Unfulfilled collaboration with doctors was a major stress producer, which related to both the downsized work organization, and the complex 'deference-dominance' doctor-nurse relationship. The well-being of nurses depends on being an equal/parallel health professional in a comprehensive team that shares knowledge and improves collaborative care of patients. A consciously formulated nursing philosophy emerged as a

  5. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  6. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  7. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

  8. Leadership styles of nurse managers and registered sickness absence among their nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Jolanda A H; Roelen, Corné A M; van Zweeden, Nely F; Jongsma, Dianne; van der Klink, Jac J L; Groothoff, Johan W

    2011-01-01

    Sickness absence leads to understaffing and interferes with nursing efficiency and quality. It has been reported in literature that managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence in the working population. This study investigated the relationship between managerial leadership and sickness absence in health care by associating nurse managers' leadership styles with registered sickness absence among their nursing staff. The cross-sectional study included 699 nurses working in six wards (staff range = 91-140 employees) of a Dutch somatic hospital employing a total of 1,153 persons. The nurse managers heading the wards were asked to complete the Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description questionnaire for situational leadership. The Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description scores were linked to employer-registered nursing staff sickness absence. High relationship-high task behavior (odds ratio [OR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.65-0.85) and high relationship-low task behavior (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.14 -0.98) were inversely related to the number of short (one to seven consecutive days) episodes of sickness absence among the staff. Low relationship-high task styles (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.14-5.22) as well as low relationship-low task styles (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.26-4.71) were positively associated with the number of short episodes of sickness absence. However, the leadership styles only explained 10% of the variance in short episodes of sickness absence. Leadership styles are associated with registered sickness absence. The nursing staff of relationship-oriented nurse managers has fewer short episodes of sickness absence than the staff of task-oriented managers. Training nurse managers in relational leadership styles may reduce understaffing and improve nursing efficiency and quality.

  9. Registered nurses' perceptions regarding nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation in Hhohho region, Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Mavhandu-Mudzusi, A H; Sandy, P T; Hettema, A

    2017-04-25

    Swaziland has the highest HIV prevalence globally. It faces a critical shortage of health workers for addressing the HIV pandemic. To curb this human resource challenge, Swaziland adopted a nurse-driven model for antiretroviral therapy delivery in line with the recommendations of the World Health Organization on task shifting. The study explored the perceptions of registered nurses on the nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme in the Hhohho region of Swaziland (NARTIS). The study utilized a phenomenological design, specifically a phenomenographic design. The study was conducted in ten health facilities in the Hhohho region of Swaziland. These facilities comprised eight clinics, a hospital and a health centre. These were registered nurses, trained and certified in the nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme. The nurses also had experience of working in a nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme. Eighteen (18) nurses were purposively selected and recruited to participate in the study. Data were collected through open and deep individual interviews guided by a semi-structured interview schedule. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically using Sjöström and Dahlgren's approach to data analysis. Three major themes emerged from the study data: nurses' emotional reactions to the implementation of the NARTIS programme, and influences and overcoming barriers to the programme. The study findings have generated insights into this program which is useful for the provision of care to people living with HIV/AIDS in Swaziland. But nurses need support to ensure effective implementation. The study findings have implications for both the practice of the NARTIS programme and health policy development. The development of a health policy that alleviates the barriers to the NARTIS programme can enhance nurses' role and make care provision to people living with HIV/AIDS more effective. © 2017 International Council

  10. Interpersonal relationships between registered nurses and student nurses in the clinical setting--A systematic integrative review.

    PubMed

    Rebeiro, Geraldine; Edward, Karen-leigh; Chapman, Rose; Evans, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    A significant proportion of undergraduate nursing education occurs in the clinical setting in the form of practising skills and competencies, and is a requirement of all nursing curriculum for registration to practice. Education in the clinical setting is facilitated by registered nurses, yet this interpersonal relationship has not been examined well. To investigate the experience of interpersonal relationships between registered nurses and student nurses in the clinical setting from the point of view of the registered nurse. Integrative review Review methods: The databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and OVID were searched. Key words used included: Registered Nurse, Preceptor, Buddy Nurse, Clinical Teacher, Mentor, Student Nurse, Nursing Student, Interpersonal Relationships, Attitudes and Perceptions. Additional review of the literature was manually undertaken through university library textbooks. 632 abstracts were returned after duplicates were removed. Twenty one articles were identified for full text read (quantitative n=2, mixed n=6, qualitative n=14); of these, seven articles addressed the experience of interpersonal relationships between registered nurses and student nurses in the clinical setting from the point of view of the registered nurse and these were reviewed. Providing education for registered nurses to enable them to lead student education in the clinical setting communicates the organizational value of the role. Registered nurses identified being supported in having the time-to-teach were considered important in facilitation of the clinical teaching role. The integrative review did not provide evidence related to the impact diverse clinical settings can have on the relationships between registered nurses and student nurses revealing an area for further examination. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Registered nurses' health in community elderly care in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, K

    2012-09-01

    To describe registered nurses' (RNs) ratings of their work-related health problems, sickness presence and sickness absence in community care of older people. To describe RNs' perceptions of time, competence and emotional pressure at work. To describe associations between time, knowledge and emotional pressure with RNs' perceptions of work-related health problems, sickness presence and sickness absence. There is a global nursing shortage. It is a challenge to provide working conditions that enable RNs to deliver quality nursing care. A descriptive design and a structured questionnaire were used. 213 RNs in 60 care homes for older people participated, with a response rate of 62%. RNs' reported work-related health problems, such as neck/back disorders, dry skin/dry mucous membranes, muscles/joints disorders, sleep disorders and headache. They had periods of fatigue/unhappiness/sadness because of their work (37%). Most of the RNs felt at times psychologically exhausted after work, with difficulties leaving their thoughts of work behind. RNs stated high sickness presence (68%) and high sickness absence (63%). They perceived high time pressure, adequate competence and emotional pressure at work. There was a weak to moderate correlation between RNs' health problems and time pressure. We cannot afford a greater shortage of RNs in community care of older people. Politicians and employers need to develop a coordinated package of policies that provide a long-term and sustainable solution with healthy workplaces. It is important to prevent RNs' work-related health problems and time pressure at work. © 2012 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  12. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...

  13. Survey of Registered Nurses Licensed by New York State Education Department, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Higher and Professional Education.

    A survey of professional nurses registered by the New York State Education Department was conducted in 1983, updating 1961, 1973, and 1977 surveys. Usable responses were completed by 171,109 registered nurses (RNs) licensed by the state and 137,116 in-state RNs (82% response rate). In-state RNs who were employed in nursing in New York numbered…

  14. Survey of Registered Nurses Licensed by New York State Education Department, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Higher and Professional Education.

    A survey of professional nurses registered by the New York State Education Department was conducted in 1983, updating 1961, 1973, and 1977 surveys. Usable responses were completed by 171,109 registered nurses (RNs) licensed by the state and 137,116 in-state RNs (82% response rate). In-state RNs who were employed in nursing in New York numbered…

  15. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who: (1... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of...

  16. Job satisfaction among psychiatric registered nurses in New England.

    PubMed

    Sharp, T P

    2008-06-01

    This research used Herzberg et al.'s two-factor theory as a framework with which to examine job satisfaction in a sample of 161 registered psychiatric nurses in the states of Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Weiss et al.'s Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short form was used to measure possible relationships between ability utilization, compensation, co-workers, achievement and job satisfaction. Findings support Herzberg et al.'s theory, showing moderate correlations among nurses' ability utilization, achievement and job satisfaction. Mean general satisfaction of respondents was closer to satisfied than neutral; respondents indicated greatest satisfaction with ability utilization (86%) and achievement (83%); 67% were satisfied with co-workers, and 52% with compensation. Respondents were least satisfied with compensation, with 14% indicating that they were very dissatisfied. Although compensation was an issue, it is possible that other factors, such as safety, management conflict, and balancing the needs of job and family, if addressed, may help increase job satisfaction and retention of psychiatric nursing staff.

  17. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  18. Critical thinking of registered nurses in a fellowship program.

    PubMed

    Zori, Susan; Kohn, Nina; Gallo, Kathleen; Friedman, M Isabel

    2013-08-01

    Critical thinking is essential to nursing practice. This study examined differences in the critical thinking dispositions of registered nurses (RNs) in a nursing fellowship program. Control and experimental groups were used to compare differences in scores on the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) of RNs at three points during a fellowship program: baseline, week 7, and month 5. The control group consisted of RNs who received no education in critical thinking. The experimental group received education in critical thinking using simulated scenarios and reflective journaling. CCTDI scores examined with analysis of variance showed no significant difference within groups over time or between groups. The baseline scores of the experimental group were slightly higher than those of the control group. Chi-square analysis of demographic variables between the two groups showed no significant differences. Critical thinking dispositions are a combination of attitudes, values, and beliefs that make up one's personality based on life experience. Lack of statistical significance using a quantitative approach did not capture the development of the critical thinking dispositions of participants. A secondary qualitative analysis of journal entries is being conducted. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Influenza vaccination by registered nurses: a personal decision.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Donna M Pierrynowski; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Sethi, Sarla

    2009-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious respiratory virus that causes high rates of morbidity and mortality and is associated with life-threatening complications. Despite the wide availability of a highly effective influenza vaccine, nurses are reluctant to receive influenza vaccination and vaccination rates among them are low. The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive theory/theoretical model regarding the phenomenon of influenza vaccination uptake by registered nurses (RNs). The study used grounded theory to develop a deeper understanding of RNs' decision-making regarding the acceptance or refusal to be vaccinated against influenza in Nova Scotia, Canada. Data were collected from 11 RNs using an unstructured and conversational interview format and analysed using the constant comparative method. The primary finding of this study is that nurses consider getting vaccinated to be a personal decision (the core variable). Their decisions are based on sources of information (including formal education, continuing education and the media); personal knowing (personal philosophy, perceived risks and benefits and personal experience); and personal modifiers (the availability and accessibility of the vaccine). The process of making a personal decision defined in this study provides a framework for creating more effective influenza immunization education and delivery programs.

  20. Educators' expectations of roles, employability and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, like other countries, two levels of nurse are registered for entry to practice. Educational changes for second level nurses in Australia have led to questions regarding roles and career options. This paper reports on interviews with nursing course coordinators to examine educator expectations of roles and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses. Coordinators of eight degree (registered) and diploma (enrolled) nursing programs were interviewed to determine their opinions on roles and careers that students were prepared for. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Educators reported similar graduate roles, although high acuity care was primarily the role of registered nurses. Career expectations differed with enrolled nurses having limited advancement opportunity, and registered nurses greater career options. Health organisations were unprepared to accommodate increased practice scope of enrolled nurses and limited work practice through policies stipulating who could perform procedures. Organisational health policies need to accommodate increased enrolled nurse skill base. Education of practising nurses is necessary regarding increased scope of enrolled nurse practice to ensure they are used to their full potential. Increasing patient acuity requires more registered nurses, as enrolled nurses are unprepared to care for complex or deteriorating patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  2. Assisting at-risk students in preparing for NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Siktberg, L L; Dillard, N L

    2001-01-01

    The graduate who fails the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt is psychologically, socially, and financially devastated. It is humiliating for the graduate to inform family, friends, and potential employers of the failure. It is also devastating for the graduate to have to wait until the 91st day following the NCLEX-RN failure to retake the computer adapted test (CAT). This length of time between examinations may increase the graduate's risk for failing the NCLEX-RN a subsequent time, because the graduate is not authorized to function as a graduate nurse in the clinical setting; there is no ongoing reinforcement of nursing knowledge, nursing process, critical thinking, or clinical performance skills. The graduate's NCLEX-RN performance also impacts the school of nursing's annual NCLEX-RN pass rate.

  3. Frequency of postlicensure registered nurse boundary violations with patients in the state of Ohio: a comparison based on type of prelicensure registered nurse education.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey S; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Drake, Virginia K

    2008-12-01

    Nurse-Patient boundary violations remain a problem. Efforts to address the problem through postlicensure education and stronger disciplinary measures are well documented. However, efforts to understand this problem based on prelicensure components are less studied. Using data from The Ohio Board of Nursing from 2002 to 2006, the difference in frequency of incidents of violations between associate degree-prepared registered nurses and baccalaureate degree-prepared registered nurses was studied. A statistically significant difference was found through chi-square analysis: Associate degree-prepared nurses had higher frequency of boundary violations. Further studies on prelicensure curricular influences on registered nurses' postlicensure behavior, particularly in relation to curricular content focused on interpersonal skill development, are recommended.

  4. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  5. Online Faculty Mentoring and Transition Balance in Family Nurse Practitioner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poronsky, Cathlin B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of online faculty mentoring on Registered Nurse (RN) to Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) role transition balance during graduate education. Making the transition from RN to an FNP can seem daunting and there is limited information in the literature about RN to FNP role transition during graduate…

  6. Through the Looking Glass: The Labor Market for Registered Nurses in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Carol S.

    1997-01-01

    Demand for registered nurses is changing in a managed care environment and wages are likely to decrease. These trends will affect nursing school enrollments, and schools will need to monitor market conditions and adjust policies accordingly. (SK)

  7. Queensland nursing staffs' perceptions of the preparation for practice of registered and enrolled nurses.

    PubMed

    Hegney, Desley; Eley, Robert; Francis, Karen

    2013-10-01

    In Australia, unlike other countries, programmes which lead to registration as a registered or enrolled nurse (called "entry to practice" programmes) are carried out solely in the tertiary sector. In Australian nursing and the wider community, there continues to be a debate over the place of preparation and the "work readiness" of graduates. Despite several opinion papers on the preparation of registered nurses, there is a dearth of published research on the perceptions of the clinical nursing workforce on the suitability of the current preparation for practice models. Data were collected from approximately 3000 nurses in Queensland, Australia in 2007 and 2010. The aim of these studies was to ascertain issues around nursing work. This paper reports on qualitative data that were collected as part of that larger survey. Specifically this paper provides the thematic analysis of one open-ended question: "what are the five key issues and strategies that you see could improve nursing and nursing work?" as it was apparent when we undertook thematic analysis of this question that there was a major theme around the preparation of nurses for the nursing workforce. We therefore carried out a more detailed thematic analysis around this major theme. The major sub-themes that we identified from comments on the preparation of the nursing workforce were: perceptions of lack of clinical exposure and the need to increase the amount of clinical hours; the design of the curriculum, the place of preparation (solely within industry or a great focus on industry), financial consideration (students to be paid for their work); and in 2007 only, the need for students to have better time management. The findings suggest that a majority of respondents believed there should be changes to the entry to practice preparation for nurses. The major focus of these comments was the perception of insufficient clinical experience and inappropriate curriculum content. Thus, graduates are not "work ready

  8. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  9. Critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students in associate, baccalaureate, and RN-to-BSN programs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungrim; Jung, Duk Yoo; Shin, Sujin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2006-06-01

    This study investigated the critical thinking dispositions and skills of senior nursing students. Study participants were students enrolled in associate (n = 137), baccalaureate (n = 102), and RN-to-BSN (n = 66) programs accredited by the Korean Ministry of Education. The California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used. A comparison of the CCTDI scores revealed a statistically significant difference between the students enrolled in different programs (F = 4.159, p = 0.017), as did a comparison of the CCTST scores (F = 24.205, p < 0.0001). Within the total sample (n = 305), the relationship between CCTDI and CCTST scores was significant (r = 0.305, p = 0.000). Developments in medical technology, the growing number of older adults and patients with chronic illnesses, and the demand for high-quality nursing care have led to various, increasingly complex, professional, legal, and educational issues within the nursing workplace. Therefore, nurses need creativity and critical thinking skills to make the decisions required of them in their nursing practice. In line with this, when conducting a survey of the effectiveness of nursing education, the necessity of critical thinking skills cannot be overlooked. In fact, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) (1999) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) (1998) require the concept of critical thinking be included as one of the core elements of curricula and that it be measured as an outcome when evaluating nursing education. In 1998, during the evaluation of colleges of nursing conducted by the South Korean Council for University Education, several universities presented the fostering of critical thinking as one of the terminal learning goals of nursing education based on the idea that critical thinking is important not only in the nursing workplace, but also in nursing education. To evaluate the effectiveness of

  10. AN ENQUIRY INTO THE NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR REGISTERED NURSES IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLAHERTY, M. JOSEPHINE

    A RANDOM SAMPLE OF FEMALE REGISTERED NURSES ON THE ROLL OF THE COLLEGE OF NURSES OF ONTARIO IN APRIL 1965 WERE SURVEYED TO DETERMINE THEIR NEED FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. NURSES PREFERRED TO STUDY NURSING SUBJECTS, ON A CREDIT BASIS, IN A SHORT COURSE. AGE, MARITAL AND EMPLOYMENT STATUS, LEVEL OF EDUCATION, OCCUPATIONAL GOAL, TYPE OF POSITION, AND…

  11. [RN4CAST Study in Murcia: Hospital organizational characteristics and nursing staff profiles].

    PubMed

    Abad-Corpa, E; Molina-Durán, F; Vivo-Molina, M C; Moya-Ruiz, B; Martínez-Hernández, A; Romero-Pelegrín, J M; Leal-Llopis, J; Hernández-Méndez, S; García-Arsac, I; Muñoz-Sánchez, M; Rodríguez-Ródenas, J M; Iniesta-Sánchez, J; García-Jiménez, C; Caravaca-Alcaraz, B; Fuentelsaz-Gallego, C; Moreno-Casbas, T; González-María, E

    2013-01-01

    To determine the profile of nurses in public hospitals in Murcia and to assess how they perceive their work environment, the quality of care and their level of burnout (the RN4CAST project repetition). A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in 8 hospitals in Murcia. Data were collected between 2009 and 2010 from 687 nurses (stratified by the type of unit) using a self-completed questionnaire with 149 items covering variables related to sociodemographics; work; perception of the work place (PES-NWI); burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory); and the quality of patient care, and patient safety. Non parametric tests, for two samples or k samples according to the comparison. A total of 495 questionnaires were collected (72%). Most respondents were female (80.4%) having a mean age of 34.1 (SD=7.1) years, and they had been working for 9.4 (SD=7.4) years. Just over one-quarter (25.7%) had carried out more than 300 hours of training in the previous 24 months. The patient/nurse ratio was 11.7 (SD=3.6), varying between hospitals. The nurses reported 25% of hospitals as having an unfavorable work environment, whereas 37.5% had favorable ones; large hospitals were less highly valued. Few respondents intended to give up their jobs (16.8%). Burnout levels revealed emotional exhaustion in 18.4% of respondents; depersonalization in 7.5%, and personal fulfillment in 28.8%. Perception of quality varied between centers and the perception of adverse effects was more favorable in small hospitals. Our professionals were generally satisfied, but given the unfavorable work environment, measures should be adopted for improving well-being and reducing weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Demographic and Academic Characteristics and NCLEX-RN Passing among Urban and Rural Campus Students in a Midwest Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacos-Burds, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study was initiated to determine: (1) the predictive relationship between demographic and academic variables and NCLEX-RN success; and (2) if there were significant differences between urban and rural nursing students that could account for an increased percentage of rural NCLEX-RN failures. A convenience sample was comprised of…

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Demographic and Academic Characteristics and NCLEX-RN Passing among Urban and Rural Campus Students in a Midwest Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacos-Burds, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective study was initiated to determine: (1) the predictive relationship between demographic and academic variables and NCLEX-RN success; and (2) if there were significant differences between urban and rural nursing students that could account for an increased percentage of rural NCLEX-RN failures. A convenience sample was comprised of…

  14. Exploring the experience of Canadian registered psychiatric nurses: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J; Morrissette, P J

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a phenomenological study that was conducted in 2012 and investigated the experiences of registered psychiatric nurses working in the province of Manitoba. Ten registered psychiatric nurses participated in semistructured, audio-recorded interviews, during which they described their experiences, yielding written protocols that were thematically analysed. Results from this study revealed six predominant themes that included (1) perception of psychiatric nursing; (2) patient aggression; (3) patient family involvement; (4) nurse-doctor relationship; (5) responsibility and worry; and (6) shift in practice and educational standards. The results of this study can assist in better understanding registered psychiatric nursing practice, inform educational programmes, and spawn future research.

  15. Caring for elders: the role of registered nurses in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Bedin, Maria Grazia; Droz-Mendelzweig, Marion; Chappuis, Marianne

    2013-06-01

    Gerontological care in nursing homes receives little interest from students and newly qualified nurses alike. Yet, this population does have ever-more complex needs that call for a wide array of nursing competencies. This article highlights the essential contributions of registered nurses in the context of nursing homes and is part of a research study aimed at grasping the nature of caring for elders. The researchers used the methodology inspired from activity analysis using focus groups. Situations identified by the respondents as being disruptive have been looked at in cross-perspective. The results show that the work carried out by the registered nurses constitutes the linchpin of institutional functioning. Their contribution consists of coordinating all the activities that take place, while striving to make them relevant to the caretakers, residents, and their relatives. This key role comprises three fields of activities: organizational and innovative activities; autonomous, person-centered activities; and ethical tension management activities. By helping to meet the daily challenges pertaining to the care and monitoring of very old people and by dealing with situations that are often tragic, they carry out tasks that are stimulating on human, intellectual, and relational levels. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Recent RN graduate perceptions of educational preparation.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Bowles, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Nursing education programs strive to deliver curricula that prepare and transition graduates not just to survive but to truly thrive in any workplace environment. It is therefore important to reach out to those who have recently entered the nursing workforce to understand their views on educational preparation for practice. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to examine the perceptions of recent nurse graduates with regard to how well their educational programs prepared them for practice in their first jobs as registered nurses. Three hundred fifty-two nurses registered in the state of Nevada who graduated from a basic nursing program within the past five years completed the Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation. Respondents perceived they were inadequately prepared in pharmacology, clinical practice, leadership/management, and the use of patient electronic medical records. In addition, respondents felt their programs prepared them more for success on the NCLEX-RN than for practice. Recommendations for addressing these issues are offered.

  17. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gillian; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behnam; Gohar, Basem; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2015-01-01

    Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs) was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace. PMID:25830063

  18. Educational Experiences and the Professional Reintegration of Registered Nurses Returning for Baccalaureate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einhellig, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to understand the experiences of RN to BSN graduates within their educational experience and their subsequent reintegration into professional practice. The goal of the study was to elucidate the experiences of nurses as they returned for a baccalaureate degree in order to more fully…

  19. Scope of Practice Barriers for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses: A State Task Force to Minimize Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Maria A; Berends, Susan K; Reyes, Jimmy; Wycoff, Carmen; Kinnetz, Meghan; Frohling, Ami; Baker, Laura; Whitty, Sue; Dirks, Mary; OʼBrien, Mary

    2017-09-01

    Collegial relationships, administrative champions, and persistence are key components to breaking down barriers to advanced practice RN (APRN) practice. This article addresses how Iowa APRNs in a state-sanctioned task force identified barriers for practicing at the top of their licensure in a full practice authority state including defending the right to control the scope of nursing practice in court.

  20. Educational Experiences and the Professional Reintegration of Registered Nurses Returning for Baccalaureate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einhellig, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to understand the experiences of RN to BSN graduates within their educational experience and their subsequent reintegration into professional practice. The goal of the study was to elucidate the experiences of nurses as they returned for a baccalaureate degree in order to more fully…

  1. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Perceptions of Factors Impacting Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Susan P; Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Shirey, Maria R

    Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) provide more than 40 million anesthetics each year in the United States. This article describes a study that investigates relationships among CRNA organizational structures (CRNA practice models, work setting, workload, level of education, work experience), CRNA ratings of patient safety culture, and CRNA adverse anesthesia-related event (ARE) reporting. This is a cross-sectional survey study of 336 CRNAs randomly selected from American Association of Nurse Anesthetists database. Workload was measured using NASA Task-Load Index and the Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale and Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Patient Safety Grade Scale were utilized to measure safety culture. Dependent variables (ARE) included difficult intubation/extubation, inadequate ventilation/oxygenation, and pulmonary aspiration. The Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale workload was significantly associated with ARE. Years' experience and Patient Safety Grade Scale were inversely associated with ARE. Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale was significantly and inversely associated with ARE. Practice model, education, and work setting were not associated with ARE. Based on findings, CRNA workload, years' experience, and patient safety culture may be important markers for ARE. Administrative interventions designed to upgrade patient safety culture and ensure manageable CRNA workload may foster quality patient care.

  2. Registered nurses' clinical reasoning skills and reasoning process: A think-aloud study.

    PubMed

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Young Joo; Bae, JuYeon; Seo, Minjeong

    2016-11-01

    As complex chronic diseases are increasing, nurses' prompt and accurate clinical reasoning skills are essential. However, little is known about the reasoning skills of registered nurses. This study aimed to determine how registered nurses use their clinical reasoning skills and to identify how the reasoning process proceeds in the complex clinical situation of hospital setting. A qualitative exploratory design was used with a think-aloud method. A total of 13 registered nurses (mean years of experience=11.4) participated in the study, solving an ill-structured clinical problem based on complex chronic patients cases in a hospital setting. Data were analyzed using deductive content analysis. Findings showed that the registered nurses used a variety of clinical reasoning skills. The most commonly used skill was 'checking accuracy and reliability.' The reasoning process of registered nurses covered assessment, analysis, diagnosis, planning/implementation, and evaluation phase. It is critical that registered nurses apply appropriate clinical reasoning skills in complex clinical practice. The main focus of registered nurses' reasoning in this study was assessing a patient's health problem, and their reasoning process was cyclic, rather than linear. There is a need for educational strategy development to enhance registered nurses' competency in determining appropriate interventions in a timely and accurate fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Contemplative Practices, Self-efficacy, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Elizabeth

    2016-10-04

    Despite program completion, not all graduates are successful on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Contemplative practices such as meditation and guided imagery were added to an NCLEX-RN preparatory course. The difference between self-efficacy scores at the beginning and end of the course was statistically significant. Students reported that the contemplative activities were beneficial, and they would use these activities again in the future.

  4. Research teaching in learning disability nursing: Exploring the views of student and registered learning disability nurses.

    PubMed

    Northway, Ruth; Parker, Michelle; James, Neil; Davies, Lynsey; Johnson, Kaye; Wilson, Sally

    2015-12-01

    Whilst there is a need to develop the research base within learning disability nursing it is also significant that currently there is little published data as to how research is taught to this group of nurses. To increase understanding of how research is currently taught to learning disability nurses within the UK. A survey design was used. The research was undertaken at a conference held in the UK in March 2014. 310 learning disability nurses attending the conference of which 212 completed the free text question. This comprised student nurses (n=158), registered nurses working in practice settings (n=25) and registered nurses working in educational institutions (n=24). Five participants did not specify their background. Participants were invited to complete a questionnaire that included a free text question regarding the teaching of research to learning disability nurses: it is the responses to this question that are reported in this paper. Responses were transcribed and thematically analysed. Eight themes emerged: Teaching approach--the good and the bad; finding the right level; right from the start; we need more time; generic versus specialist; there's not enough; getting research into practice; and what should we focus on? Variations exist in terms of the timing of research education, the teaching approaches used, and hence the quality of student experience. Of particular concern is the apparent gap between research teaching and the use of research in practice, and the reported lack of support for research within practice settings. However, enthusiasm for research is evident and hence recommendations are made both to enhance teaching and to strengthen links with practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Teaching nursing students and newly registered nurses strategies to deal with violent behaviors in the professional practice environment.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cynthia M

    2010-07-01

    Direct and indirect violent behaviors toward nursing students and newly registered nurses must be eliminated. Nursing students and newly registered nurses are particularly vulnerable to acts of violence. The article discusses the effect of violence on students and newly registered nurses, the role of the continuing education nurse in eliminating violence, examples of aggressive situations, and strategies to educate and support students and new nurses and empower them to eliminate violence directed toward them. Strategies include confrontation tips, implementation of violence-free contracts, participation in role-play activities, adoption of a professional communication technique, reflection journaling and cognitive recognition, promotion of carefronting, introduction of dialogue through the World Café, and use of nurse preceptors, practice partnerships, residency programs.

  6. Characteristics of Registered Nurses in Rural versus Urban Areas: Implications for Strategies to Alleviate Nursing Shortages in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skillman, Susan M.; Palazzo, Lorella; Keepnews, David; Hart, L. Gary

    2006-01-01

    Methods: This study compares characteristics of rural and urban registered nurses (RNs) in the United States using data from the 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. RNs in 3 types of rural areas are examined using the rural-urban commuting area taxonomy. Findings: Rural and urban RNs are similar in age and sex; nonwhites and…

  7. Registered nurses' perceptions of new nursing graduates' clinical competence: A systematic integrative review.

    PubMed

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, many questions have been raised about graduates' clinical competence and fitness for practice upon completion of their undergraduate education. Despite the significance of this issue, the perspectives of registered nurses have rarely been examined. This systematic review explores the perceptions of experienced registered nurses regarding the clinical competence of new nursing graduates. Original research studies published between 2004-2014 were identified using electronic databases, reference lists, and by searching "grey literature." Papers were critically reviewed and relevant data extracted and synthesized using an approach based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. From 153 studies initially identified, 15 original research papers were included. Four main research themes were identified: clinical/technical skills, critical thinking, interaction/communication, and overall readiness for practice. Areas of concern in relation to the clinical competence of new nursing graduates specifically related to two themes: critical thinking and clinical/technical skills. Further research is required on strategies identified within the literature with the ultimate aim of ensuring new nursing graduates are safe and competent practitioners. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Meta-analysis of the reliability and validity of the Anticipated Turnover Scale across studies of registered nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Kathleen M; Zangaro, George A

    2010-10-01

    Globally, there are serious human and financial costs associated with registered nurse (RN) turnover. Anticipating turnover before turnover occurs is important to prevent costly and unnecessary turnover. Using a reliable and valid measure of anticipated turnover is essential to credible healthcare research on which nursing policy decisions are based. This meta-analysis provides a systematic way to determine the legitimacy of the use of the Anticipated Turnover Scale (ATS) in RN workforce research. The aims of this meta-analysis were to determine the consistency of reliability estimates and evidence of construct validity of ATS scores across studies of RNs in the US. A secondary purpose was to evaluate variability in reliability and validity according to study quality, century within which studies were conducted and whether studies were published or unpublished. Search strategies included accessing computerized databases, emailing researchers, consulting experts, footnote-chasing and accessing unpublished reports. Two independent reviewers examined studies according to inclusion criteria and quality. Consensus was reached on selected studies and quality ratings. Overall mean weighted effect size (MWES) of reliability from 12 studies was 0.89. Overall MWES of validity correlating the ATS and four job satisfaction measures for seven studies was -0.53. There was variability in reliability according to quality of studies. The ATS demonstrated excellent reliability and construct validity across studies of RNs in the US.   Nursing management should consider the ATS in research on prevention of RN turnover. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Analyzing the teaching effectiveness of clinical nursing faculty of full- and part-time generic BSN, LPN-BSN, and RN-BSN nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; Wieland, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Effective clinical teaching has been a focus for scrutiny across the health-care disciplines. Nursing researchers have investigated students' and faculty members' views of effective clinical teaching. Various students (diploma, ADN, BSN) and their respective faculty have been studied, and some investigators have researched opinions of part-time students. No study was available that analyzed effective clinical teaching from the perspectives of students representing various formats of nursing education (basic BSN, RN-BSN, LPN-BSN students) and whether they were full or part time. The purpose of the study was to examine full- and part-time basic BSN, LPN-BSN, and RN-BSN students' ratings of effective clinical teaching behaviors. A stratified sample (n = 198) of baccalaureate nursing students (basic, LPN-BSN, RN-BSN) who represented both full- and part-time attendees was obtained. Students were informed about the study's purpose and asked to complete a demographic questionnaire and two instruments, by Knox and Mogan [Knox, J. E., & Mogan, J. (1985). Important clinical teaching behaviors as perceived by university nursing faculty, students, and graduates. The Journal of Nursing Education , 10, 295-301] and Zimmerman and Westfall [Zimmerman, L., & Westfall, J. (1988). The development and validation of a scale measuring effective clinical teaching behaviors. The Journal of Nursing Education , 27, 274-277], measuring perceptions of effective clinical teaching. Responses to open-ended questions were recorded on one instrument. Data were analyzed using summary and inferential statistics utilizing SPSS version 12.0. Responses to open-ended questions were thematically analyzed. Findings from the study demonstrated that part-time students rated their clinical instructors statistically significantly higher in effective clinical teaching and associated subscales. Type of student (basic BSN, LPN-BSN, RN-BSN) did not affect students' ratings. Type of program format and type of

  10. The Nursing Performance Instrument: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses in Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Sagherian, Knar; Steege, Linsey M; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Harrington, Donna

    2017-07-13

    The optimal performance of nurses in healthcare settings plays a critical role in care quality and patient safety. Despite this importance, few measures are provided in the literature that evaluate nursing performance as an independent construct from competencies. The nine-item Nursing Performance Instrument (NPI) was developed to fill this gap. The aim of this study was to examine and confirm the underlying factor structure of the NPI in registered nurses. The design was cross-sectional, using secondary data collected between February 2008 and April 2009 for the "Fatigue in Nursing Survey" (N = 797). The sample was predominantly dayshift female nurses working in acute care settings. Using Mplus software, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were applied to the NPI data, which were divided into two equal subsamples. Multiple fit indices were used to evaluate the fit of the alternative models. The three-factor model was determined to fit the data adequately. The factors that were labeled as "physical/mental decrements," "consistent practice," and "behavioral change" were moderately to strongly intercorrelated, indicating good convergent validity. The reliability coefficients for the subscales were acceptable. The NPI consists of three latent constructs. This instrument has the potential to be used as a self-monitoring instrument that addresses nurses' perceptions of performance while providing patient care.

  11. Reclaiming the essence of nursing: the meaning of an immersion experience in Honduras for RN to bachelor of science students.

    PubMed

    Adamshick, Pamela; August-Brady, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Cultural immersion experiences incorporated in baccalaureate nursing programs have yielded positive short- and long-term effects on the personal and professional lives of the participants. Despite this evidence, little is known about how immersion experiences affect the RN student returning to school. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to uncover the meaning of a week-long immersion in Honduras for RN students (N = 8) and its impact on their professional practice upon return from Honduras. Data were analyzed through reflective journals and two focus groups conducted postimmersion experience. Transcripts were analyzed, and four themes emerged: from the outside looking in, struggling with dissonance, searching for meaning, and from the inside looking out. These themes combined to form the essence of the meaning of the experience: reclaiming the essence of nursing. Implications for practice, education, and research are addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stories of Exemplary Hospital Registered Nurses: A Narrative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Donna Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Today the multidimensional global shortage of nurses is negatively impacting the work environment of hospital nurses and causing, in a cyclical fashion, decreasing work satisfaction, increasing nurse turnover, and decreasing patient outcomes. While strategies aimed at causation of the nursing shortage must be addressed, to support nursing until…

  13. Stories of Exemplary Hospital Registered Nurses: A Narrative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snelson, Donna Ayers

    2010-01-01

    Today the multidimensional global shortage of nurses is negatively impacting the work environment of hospital nurses and causing, in a cyclical fashion, decreasing work satisfaction, increasing nurse turnover, and decreasing patient outcomes. While strategies aimed at causation of the nursing shortage must be addressed, to support nursing until…

  14. Creating tomorrow's leaders and innovators through an RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing consortium curricular model.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Susan M; Phillips, Janet M; Narwold, Lynda; Laux, Marcia; Rouse, Susan; Dulemba, Ladonna; Makielski, Marta; Halstead, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    The critical need to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared RNs to improve the safety and quality of patient care in today's complex health care system is a pressing issue in health care. One part of the solution lies in the attainment of higher education of RNs prepared at the associate and diploma levels who make up the majority of the nursing workforce in the United States today. The Indiana University Schools of Nursing located throughout the state of Indiana collaborated to create a statewide RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing curriculum that is flexible, innovative, and meaningful. The plan focuses on the strengths and unique learning needs of returning RN students. Specifically, this curriculum offers year-round online courses in 7-week terms, which allows students to enter and exit the program within 1 year, and a curriculum with more choices and fewer constraints than is typical for baccalaureate nursing degrees. This learner-centered plan fully incorporates the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials for Baccalaureate Education (2009) throughout the curriculum. It is conveniently delivered online, takes into account and gives credit for students' previous learning and work experience, and allows the students to pursue nursing specialty knowledge for college credit. Working together as a consortium to achieve these goals across an entire state with 8 regional campuses required focused attention on the concerns and strengths of all the stakeholders and successful implementation of effective communication strategies.

  15. Becoming a professional: What is the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment?

    PubMed

    Ó Lúanaigh, Padraig

    2015-11-01

    This research was undertaken to understand the influence of registered nurses on nursing students' learning in the clinical environment to inform strategies to enable registered nurses to provide effective support to learners while also assisting nursing students to adopt approaches to maximise their learning in the clinical environment. A case study approach was applied in this research to explore descriptions of clinical experience of five final year nursing students. The student participants identified the importance of the clinical environment to their learning and wanted to and had actively managed their learning in the clinical environment. The students did not passively acquire knowledge or simply replicate what they observed from others. There was evidence that the students had strong and established perceptions of what constituted 'good' nursing and described an ability to discriminate between differing levels of nursing practice. Nursing knowledge was gained from respected registered nurses who were best able to describe and demonstrate the 'tricks of the trade' and 'little things that matter' when providing 'good' nursing. The outcomes from this research indicate an important role for registered nurses in both shaping nursing students' professional nursing identity and access to clinical learning.

  16. Reflections on Distributive Leadership for Work-Based Mobile Learning of Canadian Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahlman, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity, flexibility, and accessibility of mobile devices can transform how registered nurses in Canada learn beyond the confines of traditional education/training boundaries in their work settings. Many Canadian registered nurses have actively embraced mobile technologies for their work-based learning to meet their competency requirements…

  17. 78 FR 69539 - Removal of Attestation Process for Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration 20 CFR Part 655 RIN 1205-AB67 Removal of Attestation Process for Facilities Using H-1A Registered Nurses AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor... governing health care facilities using nonimmigrant foreign workers as registered nurses under the H-1A visa...

  18. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  19. Exploring Preferences of Mentoring Activities among Generational Groups of Registered Nurses in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey-Goodwin, Patricia Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore differences in perceptions of mentoring activities from four generations of registered nurses in Florida, using the Alleman Mentoring Activities Questionnaire ® (AMAQ ®). Statistical procedures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to explore differences among 65 registered nurses in Florida from…

  20. Projected Supply, Demand, and Shortages of Registered Nurses, 2000-2020.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Center for Health Workforce Analysis.

    The supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses (RNs) were projected and analyzed for 2000-2020. According to the analysis, the national supply of full-time-equivalent registered nurses in 2000 was estimated at 1.89 million versus an estimated demand of 2 million, leaving a shortage of 110,000 (6%). The shortage is expected to grow…

  1. Exploring Preferences of Mentoring Activities among Generational Groups of Registered Nurses in Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey-Goodwin, Patricia Ann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore differences in perceptions of mentoring activities from four generations of registered nurses in Florida, using the Alleman Mentoring Activities Questionnaire ® (AMAQ ®). Statistical procedures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to explore differences among 65 registered nurses in Florida from…

  2. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  3. Learning Style as a Predictor of First-Time NCLEX-RN Success: Implications for Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Lown, Susan G; Hawkins, Lee Ann

    Improving NCLEX-RN® pass rates remains a priority for nursing programs. Many programs collect learning style inventory data, yet few studies have looked at relationships between these data and NCLEX-RN pass/fail rates. Learning style preferences (visual, auditory, tactile, individual, group) and NCLEX pass/fail results were examined for 532 undergraduates in a Midwestern university. A significant correlation between preference for group learning and failure of the NCLEX was found (χ = 5.99, P = .05).

  4. The value of registered nurses in ambulatory care settings: a survey.

    PubMed

    Mastal, Margaret; Levine, June

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory care settings employ 25% of the three million registered nurses in the United States. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN) is committed to improving the quality of health care in ambulatory settings, enhancing patient outcomes, and realizing greater health care efficiencies. A survey of ambulatory care registered nurses indicates they are well positioned to lead and facilitate health care reform activities with organizational colleagues. They are well schooled in critical thinking, triage, advocating for patients, educating patients and families, collaborating with medical staff and other professionals, and care coordination. The evolving medical home concept and other health care delivery models reinforces the critical need for registered nurses to provide chronic disease management, care coordination, health risk appraisal, care transitions, health promotion, and disease prevention services. Recommendations are offered for organizational leaders, registered nurses, and AAACN to utilize nursing knowledge and skills in the pursuit of leading change and advancing health.

  5. The effect of work environment on intent to leave the nursing profession: a case study of bedside registered nurses in rural Florida.

    PubMed

    Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall H; Unruh, Lynn; Fottler, Myron D

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the effect work environment has on the intent to leave the profession for rural hospital bedside registered nurses (RNs). Subscales of autonomy, control over the practice setting, nurse-physician relationship and organizational support were incorporated into the analysis to determine which aspects of work environment directly affect the intent to leave the profession. An explanatory cross-sectional survey was distributed to 259 direct care bedside RNs employed at a rural system-affiliated hospital in Central Florida between February 2007 and June 2007. Anonymity was assured. A questionnaire containing demographic questions, the Nursing Work Index-Revised and Blau's intent to leave scale was distributed to all direct care nurses. A 32.8% response rate was achieved for a total of 85 complete and usable surveys. Data analysis shows that the work environment in general is negatively related to intent to leave. In addition, each of the four subscales was also negatively related to the intent to leave the profession. The results of this study support several recommendations for practice and education, including the promotion of professional practice environments, fostering inter-departmental relationships, and increasing the managerial training of RN managers.

  6. Insertion of intrauterine contraceptive devices by registered nurses in Australia.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, Fiona; Digiusto, Erol; Bateson, Deborah

    2016-02-01

    In spite of many advantages, intrauterine contraception (IUC) is underutilised in Australia: only 5% of Australian women using contraceptive methods in 2011 were using IUC. In 2012, Family Planning New South Wales (FPNSW) commenced training registered nurses (RNs) to insert IUC. This article reports outcomes of insertion attempts by the first four trained RNs and suggests strategies for increasing IUC utilisation in Australia. Data regarding client characteristics and outcomes of insertion attempts, including relevant adverse events that occurred during a 6-month follow-up period after the IUC insertions, were retrospectively extracted from the FPNSW clinical record system and analysed in SPSS. Of 207 insertion attempts by RNs, 91% were successful without Medical Officer (MO) assistance. The likelihood of insertion attempts being successful did not differ significantly between nulliparous and parous clients. Incidence of a postinsertion adverse event was equal to or less than rates in previous studies. All adverse events involved parous clients. We have shown that RNs who undertook competency-based IUC insertion training had a high rate of successful insertions and a low rate of adverse outcomes. Utilisation of IUC in Australia could be increased by engaging RNs as inserters, and it is timely to review the barriers that make it difficult for private medical services to employ RNs to insert IUC. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. Implementing a collaborative framework for academic support for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Debra; Ugboma, Debra; Knight, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the collaboration between a national health service acute hospital trust and a higher education institution, to implement a framework for academic support for registered nurses undertaking learning beyond registration. A small percentage of the educational budget was utilised to fund two academic staff (0.6 whole time equivalent) to work within the trusts' own learning and development department. The initial aim of the project was to maximise the utilisation of the funding available for learning beyond registration study. The focus of the project was at both a strategic level and with individual staff. Embedding within the culture of the trust was important for the academic staff to understand and gain the service/user perspective to some of the barriers or issues concerning learning beyond registration. Following a scoping exercise, the multiplicity of issues that required action led to the creation of an academic support framework. This framework identified potential for intervention in 4 phases: planning for study, application and access to learning, during study and outcome of study. Interventions were identified that were complimentary and adjuncts to the academic support provided by the higher education institution. New resources and services were also developed such as pathway planning support and study skill workshops. One important resource was a dedicated point of contact for staff. A "live" database also proved useful in tracking and following-up students.

  8. Increasing the Registered Nursing Workforce Through a Second-Degree BSN Program Coaching Model.

    PubMed

    Wise, Tiffani; Gautam, Bibha; Harris, Rebbecca; Casida, Deborah; Chapman, Rachel; Hammond, Lori

    The coach model is an innovative approach to clinical education in which registered nurses facilitate clinical instruction. The nursing students are assigned with a specific coach throughout the 12-month accelerated baccalaureate nursing curriculum. The purpose of this article is to share our experience using the coach model for students' clinical education including the benefits, challenges, and outcomes.

  9. A Refresher Course for Registered Nurses: A Guide for Instructors and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Nursing.

    Designed to help the inactive registered nurse, the Federally funded refresher course, developed by the Arizona State Nurses' Association, focuses on the review and updating of nursing knowledge and skills. The course uses a self-instructional, individualized learning process that can be applicable to as few as one or two students. The curriculum…

  10. Changing Times: A Survey of Registered Nurses in 1998. IES Report 351.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, G.; Seccombe, I.

    A national survey of registered nurses and analysis of official statistics provided an overview of the dimensions and dynamics of the labor market for nurses in the United Kingdom. Findings indicated the following: enrollment in preregistration nurse training courses decreased by 27 percent over the 1990s; initial entries to the UK Central Council…

  11. United States registered nurses' self-report of access to the Web.

    PubMed

    Kleib, Manal; Sales, Anne E; Andrea Baylon, Melba; Beaith, Amy; Lima, Isac

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the proportion and characteristics of Registered Nurses who reported having had an access to the Web in the year 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. We conducted a secondary data analysis using more than 25 000 respondents to the year 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. Using bivariate and logistic regression, we examined the association of reporting access to the Web with demographic, educational, and other characteristics of Registered Nurse respondents to the survey. We found that several factors were associated with the increased likelihood of Registered Nurses' reporting having had an access to the Web in the year 2000. These included race/ethnicity, marital and family status, highest level of nursing education, current enrollment in a nursing education program, annual household income, and continuing education in informatics. The likelihood of reporting having had access decreased with sex, age, experience since first nursing degree, and primary job responsibility. The results of this study indicate that having access to the Web enhances Registered Nurses' participation in professional development and continuing education opportunities.

  12. The answer is questions: accelerated-nursing students report practice questions are fundamental to first-time NCLEX-RN success.

    PubMed

    Blozen, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of anecdotal reports on demographic characteristics and academic success of accelerated-nursing students; yet few empirical studies have examined accelerated-nursing students NCLEX-RN success. Applying Knowles' adult learning theory as a guiding framework, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore, from the accelerated-nursing students' perspective, the factors reported as contributing to their success on the NCLEX-RN. The research questions aimed to elicit participants' descriptions of their experiences and factors contributing to their success via individual interviews. The most significant finding the participants identified as the factor that contributed to their success was the practicing of NCLEX-RN questions. The findings of this study have several implications for educational policy and practice for universities and schools of nursing as the information gained from this study applies to recruitment and retention as well as curriculum and educational strategies in an accelerated-nursing program.

  13. Thinking beyond "the wheelchair to the car": RN-to-BSN student understanding of community and public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Northrup-Snyder, Kathlynn; Van Son, Catherine R; McDaniel, Cynthia

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the online discussions of postlicensure nursing students taking a community health course in an RN-to-BSN program. Final discussion forums asked students to share their perceptions and understandings of the public and community health nurses' role and practice after participating in a community health clinical course. Inductive content analysis was used to assess the narratives. Analysis of the discussions yielded two categories: (1) awareness by the RNs of their individual community and the context of the public and community health nursing role, and (2) increased understanding of the patients' experience with transitions between health care settings (home-hospital-home). This research suggests a need to assess practicing RNs' professional understanding and teaching of the public and community health nurses' role if they are to facilitate effective patient transitions home and into community-based settings.

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Characteristics Needed for Clinical Success at Military Nurse Anesthesia Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses ( NCLEX -RN). Heupel (1994) cautioned that success in a undergraduate nursing...program did not guarantee passing the NCLEX -RN. This concern carries over to nurse anesthesia where passing a certification exam at the end of training is...again had predictive ability in regard to success in an undergraduate nursing program and on the NCLEX -RN. Once again the goal was to identify those

  15. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  16. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  17. Nurse Staffing Levels and Medicaid Reimbursement Rates in Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H; Carrillo, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between nursing staffing levels in U.S. nursing homes and state Medicaid reimbursement rates. Data Sources Facility staffing, characteristics, and case-mix data were from the federal On-Line Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) system and other data were from public sources. Study Design Ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares regression analyses were used to separately examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) and total nursing hours in all U.S. nursing homes in 2002, with two endogenous variables: Medicaid reimbursement rates and resident case mix. Principal Findings RN hours and total nursing hours were endogenous with Medicaid reimbursement rates and resident case mix. As expected, Medicaid nursing home reimbursement rates were positively related to both RN and total nursing hours. Resident case mix was a positive predictor of RN hours and a negative predictor of total nursing hours. Higher state minimum RN staffing standards was a positive predictor of RN and total nursing hours while for-profit facilities and the percent of Medicaid residents were negative predictors. Conclusions To increase staffing levels, average Medicaid reimbursement rates would need to be substantially increased while higher state minimum RN staffing standards is a stronger positive predictor of RN and total nursing hours. PMID:17489906

  18. Verbal abuse from nurse colleagues and work environment of early career registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Budin, Wendy C; Brewer, Carol S; Chao, Ying-Yu; Kovner, Christine

    2013-09-01

    This study examined relationships between verbal abuse from nurse colleagues and demographic characteristics, work attributes, and work attitudes of early career registered nurses (RNs). Data are from the fourth wave of a national panel survey of early career RNs begun in 2006. The final analytic sample included 1,407 RNs. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample, analysis of variance to compare means, and chi square to compare categorical variables. RNs reporting higher levels of verbal abuse from nurse colleagues were more likely to be unmarried, work in a hospital setting, or work in a non-magnet hospital. They also had lower job satisfaction, and less organizational commitment, autonomy, and intent to stay. Lastly, they perceived their work environments unfavorably. Data support the hypothesis that early career RNs are vulnerable to the effects of verbal abuse from nurse colleagues. Although more verbal abuse is seen in environments with unfavorable working conditions, and RNs working in such environments tend to have less favorable work attitudes, one cannot assume causality. It is unclear if poor working conditions create an environment where verbal abuse is tolerated or if verbal abuse creates an unfavorable work environment. There is a need to develop and test evidence-based interventions to deal with the problems inherent with verbal abuse from nurse colleagues. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  20. Experiences of Incivility and Ageism in Currently Enrolled RN to BS Nursing Students and Their Intent to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balko, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurses face barriers to successful completion of a bachelor's of science degree program when faced with memories of incivility within their basic nursing program and their current experiences of incivility and ageism in the classroom, as well as in the workplace. This incivility, along with generational differences, adds to the…

  1. The characteristics of registered nurses whose licenses expire: why they leave nursing and implications for retention and re-entry.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Susan M; Palazzo, Lorella; Hart, L Gary; Keepnews, David

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about RNs who drop their licenses and their potential re-entry into the nursing workforce. The results of this study provide insight into reasons nurses leave their careers and the barriers to re-entry, all important indicators of the current professional climate for nursing. While representing only one state, these findings suggest that RNs who allow their licenses to expire do so because they have reached retirement age or, among those who do not cite age as a factor, because many are unable or unwilling to work in the field. Inactive nurses who might otherwise appear to be likely candidates for re-entry into the profession may not be easily encouraged to practice nursing again without significant changes in their personal circumstances or the health care work environment. Effective ways to address current and pending RN workforce shortages include expanding RN education capacity to produce more RNs who can contribute to the workforce across the coming decades, and promote work environments in which RNs want to, and are able to, practice across a long nursing career.

  2. Attention to nurses' rewarding - an interview study of registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare in Finland.

    PubMed

    Seitovirta, Jaana; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Mitronen, Lasse; De Gieter, Sara; Kvist, Tarja

    2017-04-01

    To identify meaningful types of rewards and the consequences of rewards as expressed by Finnish registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare. Previous studies have found significant associations between nurses' rewards and both their commitment and job satisfaction. Furthermore, appropriate rewards can have beneficial effects on factors including workforce stability and occupational satisfaction that are highly important in times of nurse shortages. A cross-sectional, qualitative interview study. Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews (n = 20) with registered nurses working in Finland's primary and private healthcare, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Six meaningful types of rewards were identified by the registered nurses: Financial compensation and benefits, Work-Life balance, Work content, Professional development, Recognition, and Supportive leadership. Rewards encouraged respondents to perform their work correctly and reinforced occupational satisfaction, but also caused feelings of envy and stress. It is essential to pay attention to nurses' preferences for particular rewards and to reward management. When designing effective reward systems for registered nurses, it is not sufficient to provide financial rewards alone, as various kinds of non-financial rewards are both meaningful and necessary. When trying to improve registered nurses' commitment and job satisfaction through reward management, it is important to listen to nurses' opinions to create a reward system that integrates financial and non-financial rewards and is fair from their perspective. Healthcare organisations that offer registered nurses a holistic reward system are more likely to retain satisfied and committed nurses at a time of increasing nursing shortages. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The relative geographic immobility of new registered nurses calls for new strategies to augment that workforce.

    PubMed

    Kovner, Christine T; Corcoran, Sean P; Brewer, Carol S

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about registered nurses' geographic mobility after they earn their first professional degree and become licensed to practice. Through a cross-sectional mailed survey of newly licensed registered nurses in fifteen states, we found that 52.5 percent work within forty miles of where they attended high school. Our complementary analysis of Census Bureau data shows that next to teaching, nursing is one of the least mobile professions for women, for reasons that remain unclear. To ensure that underserved areas have an adequate workforce of registered nurses, policy makers should expand the number of educational programs in these areas; fund programs that provide incentives to young people from these areas to attend nursing programs; consider supporting extension programs from accredited nursing schools; and review admission policies for nursing programs and the financial aid they offer. If states find it difficult to retain out-of-state graduates, giving preference to in-state applicants may make sense. Finally, programs and policies that offer financial incentives to attract registered nurses to underserved areas, such as the National Health Service Corps and the Area Health Education Centers, are critically important. When sufficiently funded, such programs could serve to offset the low mobility of new registered nurses that we observed.

  4. Registered nurses perception of work satisfaction at a Tertiary Care University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khowaja, Khurshid; Merchant, Rashida J; Hirani, Doulat

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals are facing serious challenges to provide high quality care with current nursing shortages. Nursing shortages are of major concern for Nursing Management, clinicians and administrators as they lead to impact on quality of care. Under-stressed, frustrated and demoralized nurses give rise to concern for hospital Nursing Management in providing quality care according to set standards. A descriptive qualitative research design was used to explore the registered nurses' perceptions regarding the high turnover rates among nurses at a Tertiary Care University Hospital. Data was collected from nurses working at various speciality areas, which were: Critical Care, Medical and Surgical Care, Ambulatory Care, Maternal/Child and Emergency departments. A convenience sample of 45 registered nurses from nine subspecialty groups was selected for a focus group interview and five focus groups were selected for a study population. Findings of exit interviews (from 1 September 2001 to 28 February 2002) were also included in the data analysis. These exit interviews of RNs were conducted by Nurse Recruiter at the time of their resignations. The data analysis showed that the most dissatisfying factors at work and within the work setting were identified as: high workload, stress associated with high workload, biased Nursing Management, lack of appreciation and monetary incentives, finally a rigid attitude of Nursing Management. However, the most satisfying factors were: working with an internationally reputable organization, patients' positive feedback and availability of required material or equipment. The study participants recommended that nursing retention could be improved at the Tertiary Care University Hospital by launching the following strategies by Nursing Management: reducing workload by adequate nurse-patient ratios according to international standards, promoting respect of nurses in front of patients and other staff, rewards and recognition of nurses, simplifying

  5. Work satisfaction among California registered nurses: a longitudinal comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    California's minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratio law, the nation's first, was implemented in 2004. This study had two aims: (a) to evaluate the effect of the nurse-to-patient ratios law on nurse job satisfaction in order to advance the debate over the merits of nurse staffing law, and (b) to compare California nurses who were satisfied against those who were not, in order to facilitate the development targeted retention interventions based on empirical evidence. The sample's overall job satisfaction increased significantly as the years passed, suggesting the nurse-to-patient ratios law was associated with improvements in nurse satisfaction. Satisfied RNs were more likely to have a balanced and financially secure life that included a partner, children living at home, higher hourly wages, and higher income from sources other than a nursing job. Nurses working in direct patient care positions remained dissatisfied in larger proportions than those working in other types of positions, even after the nurse-to-patient ratios were implemented. More nurses are satisfied today than before the ratios; nevertheless, far too many nurses (18.5%) have job satisfaction scores that are neutral or worse.

  6. Enhanced registered nurse care coordination with sensor technology: Impact on length of stay and cost in aging in place housing.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn; Lane, Kari; Phillips, Lorraine J; Despins, Laurel A; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Gregory L; Koopman, Richelle J; Hicks, Lanis; Skubic, Marjorie; Miller, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    When planning the Aging in Place Initiative at TigerPlace, it was envisioned that advances in technology research had the potential to enable early intervention in health changes that could assist in proactive management of health for older adults and potentially reduce costs. The purpose of this study was to compare length of stay (LOS) of residents living with environmentally embedded sensor systems since the development and implementation of automated health alerts at TigerPlace to LOS of those who are not living with sensor systems. Estimate potential savings of living with sensor systems. LOS for residents living with and without sensors was measured over a span of 4.8 years since the implementation of sensor-generated health alerts. The group living with sensors (n = 52) had an average LOS of 1,557 days (4.3 years); the comparison group without sensors (n = 81) was 936 days (2.6 years); p = .0006. Groups were comparable based on admission age, gender, number of chronic illnesses, SF12 physical health, SF12 mental health, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), activities of daily living, independent activities of daily living, and mini-mental status examination scores. Both groups, all residents living at TigerPlace since the implementation of health alerts, receive registered nurse (RN) care coordination as the standard of care. Results indicate that residents living with sensors were able to reside at TigerPlace 1.7 years longer than residents living without sensors, suggesting that proactive use of health alerts facilitates successful aging in place. Health alerts, generated by automated algorithms interpreting environmentally embedded sensor data, may enable care coordinators to assess and intervene on health status changes earlier than is possible in the absence of sensor-generated alerts. Comparison of LOS without sensors TigerPlace (2.6 years) with the national median in residential senior housing (1.8 years) may be attributable to the RN care coordination

  7. Development of the Differentiation of Self and Role Inventory for Nurses (DSRI-RN): a tool to measure internal dimensions of workplace stress.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Ronald; Frisch, Noreen

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the use of Bowen's theory of differentiation as a framework for understanding one aspect of vocational burnout. The theory suggests that persons with low levels of differentiation are at higher risk for emotional exhaustion than those at higher levels. The authors describe the development and pilot-testing of a tool, the Differentiation of Self and Role Inventory for Nurses (DSRI-RN) as a means to assess internal aspects of workplace stress by measuring factors suggested by the theory. Initial use of the DSRI-RN indicates that the tool is reliable and valid and that nurses with higher levels of differentiation expressed lower levels of burnout and greater enthusiasm for nursing. These findings suggest that the DSRI-RN may be used in further studies and opens the possibility of using Bowen's framework in developing interventions assisting nurses to understand and cope with the internal aspects of workplace stress.

  8. The Relationship between Post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) Failure Remediation and NCLEX-RN Success of Graduates of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Patricia Gale

    2009-01-01

    An ex post facto study was conducted to determine whether any relationship exists between remediation post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) failure and NCLEX-RN success of graduates of baccalaureate nursing programs. Data was gathered from responses to the seventh annual validity study (V7S) offered to deans and directors of nursing programs by…

  9. The Relationship between Post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) Failure Remediation and NCLEX-RN Success of Graduates of Baccalaureate Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Patricia Gale

    2009-01-01

    An ex post facto study was conducted to determine whether any relationship exists between remediation post Reach Exit Exam (E[superscript 2]) failure and NCLEX-RN success of graduates of baccalaureate nursing programs. Data was gathered from responses to the seventh annual validity study (V7S) offered to deans and directors of nursing programs by…

  10. Predicting NCLEX-RN success in a diverse student population.

    PubMed

    Alameida, Marshall D; Prive, Alice; Davis, Harvey C; Landry, Lynette; Renwanz-Boyle, Andrea; Dunham, Michelle

    2011-05-01

    Many schools of nursing have implemented standardized testing using platforms such as those developed by Assessment Technologies Institute (ATI) to better prepare students for success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses® (NCLEX-RN). This study extends and replicates the research on standardized testing to predict first-time pass success in a diverse student population and across two prelicensure program types. The final sample consisted of 589 students who graduated between 2003 and 2009. Demographic data, as well as academic performance and scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor, were analyzed. The findings in this study indicate that scores on the ATI RN Comprehensive Predictor were positively, significantly associated with first-time pass success. Students in jeopardy of failing the NCLEX-RN on their first attempt can be identified prior to graduation and remediation efforts can be strengthened to improve their success. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [Career guidance for registered nurse in the UK].

    PubMed

    Simón Melchor, Lucía; Simón Melchor, Alba

    2014-04-01

    Cuts in temporary contracts has had big consequences for newly qualified nurses with regards to finding employment. This cut in contracts has resulted in a doubling in the rate of unemployment in this profession. In the past nurses emigrated to other countries for purposes like knowledge of the language or to extend their training and experience, however today the emigration has become the only way out for many professional nurses. The reputation of nurses in Spain is recognised internationally, with the UK being one of the countries with the largest demand for Spanish nurses. Due to the great amount of job opportunities that are emerging in the UK, nurses need help and guidance in their careers, and also nurses need training in areas such as Professional Body, developing a curriculum, facing an interview etc...

  12. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  13. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  14. New graduate registered nurses' knowledge of patient safety and practice: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melanie; Sundin, Deborah; Cope, Vicki

    2017-03-02

    To critically appraise available literature and summarise evidence pertaining to the patient safety knowledge and practices of new graduate registered nurses. Responsibility for patient safety should not be limited to the practice of the bedside nurses, rather the responsibility of all in the healthcare system. Previous research identified lapses in safety across the health care, more specifically with new practitioners. Understanding these gaps and what may be employed to counteract them is vital to ensuring patient safety. A focused review of research literature. The review used key terms and Boolean operators across a 5-year time frame in CINAHL, Medline, psycINFO and Google Scholar for research articles pertaining to the area of enquiry. Eighty-four articles met the inclusion criteria, 39 discarded due to irrelevant material and 45 articles were included in the literature review. This review acknowledges that nursing has different stages of knowledge and practice capabilities. A theory-practice gap for new graduate registered nurses exists, and transition to practice is a key learning period setting new nurses on the path to becoming expert practitioners. Within the literature, there was little to no acknowledgement of patient safety knowledge of the newly registered nurse. Issues raised in the 1970s remain a concern for today's new graduate registered nurses. Research has recognised several factors affecting transition from nursing student to new graduate registered nurse. These factors are leaving new practitioners open to potential errors and risking patient safety. Understanding the knowledge of a new graduate registered nurse upon entering clinical practice may assist in organisations providing appropriate clinical and theoretical support to these nurses during their transition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. From challenges to advanced practice registered nursing role development: Qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Jokiniemi, Krista; Haatainen, Kaisa; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the factors hindering and facilitating the implementation of the advanced practice registered nurses role at Finnish university hospitals, and to examine the implications for its future development. A descriptive qualitative approach, using thematic individual interviews, was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 11 advanced practice registered nurses. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The advanced practice registered nurses role barriers had an impact on the role development needs. In turn, the facilitating factors helped encounter the challenges of the role, therefore having an impact on both the current role achievement, as well as contributing to the future role development. The factors hindering and facilitating the advanced practice registered nurses role need to be acknowledged to support the role implementation and planning of the future of the role. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Transformational leadership: effect on the job satisfaction of Registered Nurses in a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Nantsupawat, Raymoul

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses at a tertiary care hospital in China. The healthcare system is changing rapidly. Research in Western countries has shown that transformational leadership affects job satisfaction. However, very little research related to this subject has been conducted in healthcare settings in China. The sample consisted of 238 nurses who work at a tertiary care hospital in China. Data were collected from April to August 2006. Research instruments included a demographic data form, a Leadership Practice Inventory and a Job Satisfaction Scale for clinical registered nurses. Both the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses were at a moderate level. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction (r = 0·556, P < 0·001). The findings indicate that the transformational leadership of nurse managers could have an effect on the job satisfaction of clinical Registered Nurses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Predictors of actual turnover in a national sample of newly licensed registered nurses employed in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Carol S; Kovner, Christine T; Greene, William; Tukov-Shuser, Magdalene; Djukic, Maja

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study of factors that affect turnover of newly licensed registered nurses in United States hospitals. There is a large body of research related to nursing retention; however, there is little information specific to newly licensed registered nurse turnover. Incidence rates of turnover among new nurses are unknown because most turnover data are not from nationally representative samples of nurses. This study used a longitudinal panel design to obtain data from 1653 registered nurses who were recently licensed by examination for the first time. We mailed surveys to a nationally representative sample of hospital registered nurses 1 year apart. The analytic sample consisted of 1653 nurses who responded to both survey mailings in January of 2006 and 2007. Full-time employment and more sprains and strains (including back injuries) result in more turnover. Higher intent to stay and hours of voluntary overtime and more than one job for pay reduces turnover. When we omitted intent to stay from the probit model, less job satisfaction and organizational commitment led to more turnover, confirming their importance to turnover. Magnet Recognition Award(®) hospitals and several other work attributes had no effect on turnover.   Turnover problems are complex, which means that there is no one solution to decreasing turnover. Multiple points of intervention exist. One specific approach that may improve turnover rates is hospital policies that reduce strains and sprains. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Competence and certification of registered nurses and safety of patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Kendall-Gallagher, Deborah; Blegen, Mary A

    2010-10-01

    Adverse events that place patients at risk for harm are common in intensive care units. Clinicians' level of knowledge and judgment appear to play a role in the prevention, mitigation, and creation of adverse advents. Research suggests a possible association between nurses' specialty certification and clinical expertise. The relationship between specialty certification and clinical competence of registered nurses and safety of patients is a relatively new area of inquiry in nursing. To explore the relationship between the proportion of certified staff nurses in a unit and risk of harm to patients. Hierarchical linear modeling was used in a secondary data analysis of 48 intensive care units from a random sample of 29 hospitals to examine the relationships between unit certification rates, organizational nursing characteristics(magnet status, staffing, education, and experience), and rates of medication administration errors, falls, skin breakdown,and 3 types of nosocomial infections. Medicare case mix index was used to adjust for patient risk. Unit proportion of certified staff registered nurses was inversely related to rate of falls, and total hours of nursing care was positively related to medication administration errors. The mean number of years of experience of registered nurses in the unit was inversely related to frequency of urinary tract infections; however, the small sample size requires that caution be exercised when interpreting results. Specialty certification and competence of registered nurses are related to patients' safety. Further research on this relationship is needed.

  19. Competence and certification of registered nurses and safety of patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Kendall-Gallagher, Deborah; Blegen, Mary A

    2009-03-01

    Adverse events that place patients at risk for harm are common in intensive care units. Clinicians' level of knowledge and judgment appear to play a role in the prevention, mitigation, and creation of adverse advents. Research suggests a possible association between nurses' specialty certification and clinical expertise. The relationship between specialty certification and clinical competence of registered nurses and safety of patients is a relatively new area of inquiry in nursing. To explore the relationship between the proportion of certified staff nurses in a unit and risk of harm to patients. Hierarchical linear modeling was used in a secondary data analysis of 48 intensive care units from a random sample of 29 hospitals to examine the relationships between unit certification rates, organizational nursing characteristics (magnet status, staffing, education, and experience), and rates of medication administration errors, falls, skin breakdown, and 3 types of nosocomial infections. Medicare case mix index was used to adjust for patient risk. Unit proportion of certified staff registered nurses was inversely related to rate of falls, and total hours of nursing care was positively related to medication administration errors. The mean number of years of experience of registered nurses in the unit was inversely related to frequency of urinary tract infections; however, the small sample size requires that caution be exercised when interpreting results. Specialty certification and competence of registered nurses are related to patients' safety. Further research on this relationship is needed.

  20. Experiences of registered nurses who supervise international nursing students in the clinical and classroom setting: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Newton, Louise; Pront, Leeanne; Giles, Tracey M

    2016-06-01

    To examine the literature reporting the experiences and perceptions of registered nurses who supervise international nursing students in the clinical and classroom setting. Nursing education relies on clinical experts to supervise students during classroom and clinical education, and the quality of that supervision has a significant impact on student development and learning. Global migration and internationalisation of nursing education have led to increasing numbers of registered nurses supervising international nursing students. However, a paucity of relevant literature limits our understanding of these experiences. An integrative literature review. Comprehensive database searches of CINAHL, Informit, PubMed, Journals@Ovid, Findit@flinders and Medline were undertaken. Screening of 179 articles resulted in 10 included for review. Appraisal and analysis using Whittemore and Knafl's (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 52, 2005, 546) five stage integrative review recommendations was undertaken. This review highlighted some unique challenges for registered nurses supervising international nursing students. Identified issues were, a heightened sense of responsibility, additional pastoral care challenges, considerable time investments, communication challenges and cultural differences between teaching and learning styles. It is possible that these unique challenges could be minimised by implementing role preparation programmes specific to international nursing student supervision. Further research is needed to provide an in-depth exploration of current levels of preparation and support to make recommendations for future practice, education and policy development. An awareness of the specific cultural learning needs of international nursing students is an important first step to the provision of culturally competent supervision for this cohort of students. There is an urgent need for education and role preparation for all registered nurses supervising international nursing

  1. A clinical advancement program for registered nurses with an outpatient focus.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Bonnie L

    2007-01-01

    Clinical advancement programs have been in use for almost 30 years. Although clinical advancement programs have been designed for many areas, it appears that one has never been developed specific to the outpatient-focused registered nurse. This article describes the development of a clinical advancement program for non-hospital-based registered nurses employed at the Guthrie Clinic in Sayre, Pennsylvania and highlights recommendations for instituting this program in any outpatient setting.

  2. Hospital organizational factors influence work-family conflict in registered nurses: Multilevel modeling of a nation-wide cross-sectional survey in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, C; Chungkham, H S; Westerlund, H; Tishelman, C; Lindqvist, R

    2014-05-01

    The present shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in many European countries is expected to continue and worsen, which poses a substantial threat to the maintenance of healthcare in this region. Work-family conflict is a known risk factor for turnover and sickness absence. This paper empirically examines whether the nurse practice environment is associated with experienced work-family conflict. A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analyzed here is based on a national sample of 8356 female and 592 male RNs from 369 hospital departments. We found that 6% of the variability in work-family conflict experienced by RNs was at the department level. Organizational level factors significantly accounted for most of the variability at this level with two of the work practice environment factors examined, staffing adequacy and nurse involvement in hospital affairs, significantly related to work-family conflict. Due to the design of the study, factors on ward and work group levels could not be analyzed, but are likely to account for additional variance which in the present analysis appears to be on the individual level, with private life factors likely explaining another major part. These results suggest that higher level organizational factors in health care have a significant impact on the risk of work-family conflict among RNs through their impact on the nurse practice environment. Lower level organizational factors should be investigated in future studies using hierarchical multilevel sampling. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Reducing Readmissions After Stroke With a Structured Nurse Practitioner/Registered Nurse Transitional Stroke Program.

    PubMed

    Condon, Christina; Lycan, Sarah; Duncan, Pamela; Bushnell, Cheryl

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to determine whether a standardized Transitional Stroke Clinic (TSC) led by nurse practitioners could reduce 30-day and 90-day readmissions for stroke or transient ischemic attack patients discharged home. Phase I consisted of nurse practitioners calling only high-risk patients discharged home within 7 days and performing an office visit within 2 to 4 weeks of discharge. Phase II consisted of all patients discharged home receiving both a 2-day follow-up phone call by a registered nurse and a follow-up visit with a nurse practitioner within 7 to 14 days. Differences in process metrics and readmissions across the 2 phases and overall were assessed. Increasing complexity with multiple chronic conditions (diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure) was represented in a continuous variable from 0 to 3. Multivariable logistic regression models for 30-day and 90-day readmissions were performed with adjustment for National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and previous hospitalizations. From October 2012 through September 2015, 510 patients were enrolled. From phase I to II, a higher proportion of follow-up calls were made and days from discharge to TSC decreased. Patients readmitted within 30 days were less likely to show for TSC visits (60.85% versus 76.3%; P=0.021). Multivariable modeling showed that TSC visit was associated with a 48% reduction in 30-day readmission (odds ratio, 0.518; 95% confidence interval, 0.272-0.986), whereas multiple chronic conditions and previous stroke/transient ischemic attack increased the risk. TSC visit did not impact 90-day readmissions. Evaluation in a nurse practitioner-led structured clinic is a model that may reduce readmissions at 30 days for stroke patients discharged home. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Identifying ethical issues of the Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Constance L; Elliott, Aaron R; Harris, Janet R

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the ethical issues Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) encountered in their anesthesia practice and how disturbed they were by these issues. This descriptive study used a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of the Army civilian registered nurses (N = 5,293). The CRNA subset (n = 97) was obtained from questionnaires that indicated a primary practice setting as anesthesia. The most frequently occurring ethical issue identified was conflict in the nurse-physician relationship, whereas the most disturbing issue was working with incompetent/impaired colleagues. Unresolved ethical conflicts can negatively influence the nurses' morale, leading to avoidance of the issue and contributing to burnout. Identifying the ethical issues and disturbance level experienced by CRNAs should contribute to the development of an ethics education program that addresses issues encountered in CRNA practice.

  5. To both be like a captain and fellow worker of the caring team: the meaning of Nurse Assistants' expectations of Registered Nurses in Swedish residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Inger; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Fagerberg, Ingegerd

    2008-03-01

    Aim.  To describe the expectations of and to illuminate the meaning of the Nurse Assistants' (NA) expectations of Registered Nurses (RN) who are responsible for the care of older people living in residential care homes in Sweden. Background.  Older people in Sweden who are provided with residential care are extremely frail and incapable of independent living. Therefore, when providing care, RN and NA encounter older people who require a great deal of care. An important precondition for the provision of satisfactory care is to have adequate collaboration between NAs and RNs and their expectations of each other. In this paper, the focus is on the NAs expectations of the RNs. Method.  The study is based on a qualitative approach and a phenomenological-hermeneutical method. Ten NAs were interviewed and asked to narrate as freely as possible, about their expectations of RNs. The narratives were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The analytical process includes the following steps; naïve reading, structural analysis, comprehensive understanding and reflection. Results.  The RNs were expected to take responsibility for being fellow human beings and experts in providing care as well as always available to participate in caring. The RNs were expected to make stand-alone decisions and create a sense of safety for both older people and the NAs and have the courage to work alone and create a safe environment for both the older people and the NAs. The meaning of these expectations was that the RNs are like a captain in providing care, but at the same time, fellow workers. Conclusion.  When the RNs do not meet the NAs expectations, there is a risk of conflict and therefore also a risk that an unsafe environment being created when caring for older people.

  6. Reaching for the stars: career advancement and the registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kim

    2005-08-01

    Clinical nursing has long struggled to secure the place of primacy it deserves in the profession's hierarchy of importance and worth. It is ironic that, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a clinical nurse is generally not as well-recognized, rewarded or remunerated as a colleague working in nursing management, education or research. Until the profession recognizes and takes serious action to remedy this situation, the crisis of recruitment and retention in nursing currently ravaging the globe is likely to continue. In this paper, I present a discursive account of an exciting initiative by a leading private, acute-care hospital which addresses this very problem. A new ladder for clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) introduces a rigorous and systematic approach to the appointment of three classifications of CNS, each requiring evidence of successively higher levels of competency, and which are accompanied by fiscal reward and stronger peer recognition.

  7. Attending registered nurse: an innovative role to manage between spaces.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives; Ditomassi, Marianne; Adams, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital embarked on the implementation of a new model that redesigned the role of selected staff nurses, advanced standardized processes, improved workflow, and introduced technology to enhance communication. These efforts included selecting 12 inpatient units to function as "Innovation Units". These units were specifically designated to support rapid change and test initiatives that would reduce costs and improve quality. The work of the Innovation Units allows nurse leaders to understand if the goals for improvement could be adopted by all inpatient units and beyond the walls of the hospital. The high-leverage intervention of introducing the role of the "Attending Nurse" in coordinating the work of the interdisciplinary team in addressing overuse, underuse, and misuse of services has been a significant staffing innovation. The Attending Nurse, while just one strategy, has placed the nurse at the center of the care team.

  8. Finding the voice of clinical experience: participatory action research with registered nurses in developing a child critical care nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Minette; Britton, Margretta; Clow, Sheila E

    2005-04-01

    The voice of clinical nurses is important to find and hear in the design of curricula. A participative action research project proposed to add this voice to the design of a new Critical Care Child Nursing programme at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Nurses' experiences of nursing critically ill children and their perceived learning needs in this context, were the central focus of the study. Participants were registered nurses working in the paediatric intensive care unit at the Red Cross Children's Hospital (a specialist hospital), which offers secondary and tertiary care in the Cape Town region and beyond. Data were gathered in five focussed group discussions. Findings indicate that the Critical Care Child Nurse needs not only a specialised knowledge base and acutely developed assessment skills, but also astute interpersonal skills. The nurse's professional identity and integration into the multidisciplinary team need exploring. Together with the development of interpersonal skills, the nurse needs to engage the child and family.

  9. The Information Needs of Registered Nurses in Northeastern New York State (HSA V).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Theresa C.

    The information needs of registered nurses from all fields in a 17 county area of upstate New York were surveyed. Nurses expressed a significant need for improved information in new developments in their specializations, government regulations relating to health care, and other subjects. Sources of information most frequently used were colleagues,…

  10. The Experiences of Registered Nurses Transitioning from Patient Care Settings to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who make the move from a patient-care service setting to an academic teaching environment often go through a transition phase in their first semesters of teaching that is difficult and traumatic. RNs that go on to higher academic degrees often do so in order to teach in schools of nursing. However, graduate work in nursing…

  11. An Analysis of Barriers to Online Learning as Perceived by Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eddie D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States faces a substantial nursing shortage that is expected to increase over the next decade and beyond. Understaffing and erratic work schedules result in minimal opportunities to participate in continuing education courses, which are required for registered nurses (RNs) to maintaining proficiency and licensure. Online learning is…

  12. An Analysis of Barriers to Online Learning as Perceived by Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eddie D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States faces a substantial nursing shortage that is expected to increase over the next decade and beyond. Understaffing and erratic work schedules result in minimal opportunities to participate in continuing education courses, which are required for registered nurses (RNs) to maintaining proficiency and licensure. Online learning is…

  13. The Experiences of Registered Nurses Transitioning from Patient Care Settings to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who make the move from a patient-care service setting to an academic teaching environment often go through a transition phase in their first semesters of teaching that is difficult and traumatic. RNs that go on to higher academic degrees often do so in order to teach in schools of nursing. However, graduate work in nursing…

  14. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists: Relationship between Educator Development and Self-Efficacy toward Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Jessica Monique

    2015-01-01

    A high-demand is placed on healthcare providers to be educators during student clinical training evolutions. Certified registered nurse anesthesia clinical educators (CRNACEs) affiliated with nurse anesthesia education programs (NAEPs) in the United States face the complex duality of assuming the combined role of teacher and anesthesia provider.…

  15. Identifying Students at Risk for Failure on the Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Susan J.; Orr, Scott P.

    A method was developed for identifying students who may be at high risk for failing the State Board Licensing Examination (SBE) for registered nurses. The subjects used in developing prediction equations included 50 students who graduated from the nursing program at Saint Joseph's College (SJC) in North Windham (Maine) during the years 1983-84.…

  16. COMPETENCE AND CERTIFICATION OF REGISTERED NURSES AND SAFETY OF PATIENTS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

    PubMed Central

    Kendall-Gallagher, Deborah; Blegen, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Adverse events that place patients at risk for harm are common in intensive care units. Clinicians’ level of knowledge and judgment appear to play a role in the prevention, mitigation, and creation of adverse advents. Research suggests a possible association between nurses’ specialty certification and clinical expertise. The relationship between specialty certification and clinical competence of registered nurses and safety of patients is a relatively new area of inquiry in nursing. Objective To explore the relationship between the proportion of certified staff nurses in a unit and risk of harm to patients. Methods Hierarchical linear modeling was used in a secondary data analysis of 48 intensive care units from a random sample of 29 hospitals to examine the relationships between unit certification rates, organizational nursing characteristics (magnet status, staffing, education, and experience), and rates of medication administration errors, falls, skin breakdown, and 3 types of nosocomial infections. Medicare case mix index was used to adjust for patient risk. Results Unit proportion of certified staff registered nurses was inversely related to rate of falls, and total hours of nursing care was positively related to medication administration errors. The mean number of years of experience of registered nurses in the unit was inversely related to frequency of urinary tract infections; however, the small sample size requires that caution be exercised when interpreting results. Conclusions Specialty certification and competence of registered nurses are related to patients’ safety. Further research on this relationship is needed. PMID:19255100

  17. Ratings of the Performances of Practicing Internists by Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Marjorie D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In a survey, 1,851 registered nurses evaluated 232 internists' humanistic qualities, communication skills, and selected aspects of their clinical skills. Their ratings corresponded moderately with peer physician evaluations and had a common structure but were lower for several humanistic qualities. A reliable assessment required 11-15 nurses'…

  18. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists: Relationship between Educator Development and Self-Efficacy toward Clinical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Jessica Monique

    2015-01-01

    A high-demand is placed on healthcare providers to be educators during student clinical training evolutions. Certified registered nurse anesthesia clinical educators (CRNACEs) affiliated with nurse anesthesia education programs (NAEPs) in the United States face the complex duality of assuming the combined role of teacher and anesthesia provider.…

  19. Registered nurses' constructed meaning of concepts of solution and their use in clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1991-12-01

    Since the introduction of nursing into tertiary institutions in Australia in 1975, there has been increasing interest in the teaching of physical science to nurses. Various courses in physical science for nurse students have been developed. They vary in length and content but there is agreement that concepts taught should be closely related to nursing applications. The choice of relevant concepts tends to be made by individual curriculum developers. This paper reports an examination of the use of physical science concepts and their relevance from the perspective of registered nurses practising in general ward areas. Inherent in this study is the premise that for registered nurses to have ideas of the physical science underlying their practice they must have constructed meaning first for these concepts. Specific chemical concepts related to solutions are discussed in these terms.

  20. E-Learning education program for registered nurses: the experience of a teaching medical center.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Shu-Tai Hsiao; Chang, Wen-Yin; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chao, Hui-Lin; Tseng, Ching Ping

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe registered nurses' experiences with an e-learning education program (ELEP) conducted at a 776-bed teaching medical center in Taipei. The study was completed in three stages: planning, implementation, and evaluation. Nurses who were registered were randomly assigned either to the ELEP or traditional in-classroom program (TICP). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Forty-two nurses participated (22 in the ELEP and 20 in the TICP). Scores for participants were all > 70 points (out of 100) for both programs. Of the five courses, only teaching and learning and communication showed significant statistical difference between the two groups (p = .001). Nearly all participants (97.6%) felt satisfied with their program (both ELEP and TICP). All nurses passed the nursing care skill tests. Findings should help guide efforts to popularize e-learning education in Taiwan and help create alternative learning methods for future continuing nursing education programs.

  1. From their own voices: the lived experience of African American registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deborah W

    2007-04-01

    This phenomenological study described the lived experience of African American registered nurses providing nursing care to individuals, families, and communities in southeast Louisiana. Data were collected from 13 African American registered nurses using semistructured interviews and a focus group. Analysis of the phenomenological data revealed two essential themes, (a) connecting with the patient and (b) proving yourself; and four incidental themes, (a) a fulfilling dream, (b) being invisible and voiceless, (c) surviving and persevering, and (d) mentoring and role modeling. The findings revealed that the general perception among participants was that they were not fully accepted as equal professionals by their Caucasian nurse colleagues, other health care providers, and sometimes patients. The findings of the study indicate the immediate need to address and resolve the issues of diversity within the nursing profession. Nursing will also have to reform its system and practices to embrace and support diversity.

  2. Confidence in delegation and leadership of registered nurses in long-term-care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jungmin; Kim, Miyoung; Shin, Juhhyun

    2016-07-01

    Effective delegation improves job satisfaction, responsibility, productivity and development. The ageing population demands more nurses in long-term-care hospitals. Delegation and leadership promote cooperation among nursing staff. However, little research describes nursing delegation and leadership style. We investigated the relationship between registered nurses' delegation confidence and leadership in Korean long-term-care hospitals. Our descriptive correlational design sampled 199 registered nurses from 13 long-term-care hospitals in Korea. Instruments were the Confidence and Intent to Delegate Scale and Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Confidence in delegation significantly aligned with current-unit clinical experience, length of total clinical-nursing experience, delegation-training experience and leadership. Transformational leadership was the most statistically significant factor influencing delegation confidence. When effective delegation integrates with efficient leadership, staff can deliver optimal care to long-term-care patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The changing roles of registered nurses in Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Patricia; Forrest, Emily

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on whether and how Pioneer Accountable Care Organization (ACO) leaders believe the deployment of the registered nurse workforce is changing in response to the shared savings incentives. Semistructured phone interviews with leaders from 18 of the original 32 Pioneer ACOs were conducted. Narrative analysis suggests that all of the organizations are developing new and enhanced roles for registered nurses across the continuum of care. Overall, eight types of changes were reported: enhancement of roles, substitution, delegation, increased numbers of nurses, relocation of services, transfer of nurses from one setting to another, the use of liaison nurses across settings, and partnerships between nurses coordinating care in primary and acute care settings. This exploratory study suggests that Pioneer ACO leaders believe that payment models are affecting the deployment of the health workforce and that these changes are, in turn, driving outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Challenges of Online Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Passmore, Denise; Faught, Timber

    2009-01-01

    To meet the current critical need for qualified nurses, many colleges have initiated online programs, primarily aimed towards registered nurse (RN) to BS students. Despite the growing number of online nursing programs, there is little research on instructor views of online learning. This study used interviews to investigate nursing instructor…

  5. The Challenges of Online Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Passmore, Denise; Faught, Timber

    2009-01-01

    To meet the current critical need for qualified nurses, many colleges have initiated online programs, primarily aimed towards registered nurse (RN) to BS students. Despite the growing number of online nursing programs, there is little research on instructor views of online learning. This study used interviews to investigate nursing instructor…

  6. From RN to BSN: seeing familiar situations in different ways.

    PubMed

    Callin, M

    1996-01-01

    Registered nurses enrolled in post-RN programs are a special group of students with unique learning needs. One important outcome of a successful post-RN program is the ability of its graduates to see familiar situations in different ways and to demonstrate these changes in new and different approaches to patient care. This shift in the way nurses see themselves and their worlds can be described and explained by Mezirow's Theory of Perspective Transformation. This article discusses perspective transformation related to post-RN students in nursing programs; describes teaching-learning models that assists perspective transformation to take place; identifies conditions that promote perspective transformation; and suggests some strategies to facilitate the process.

  7. Exploring factors affecting registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Linda; Eley, Robert; Tuckett, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in specialty nursing practice in Australia. Despite the increased requirement for postgraduate education for advanced practice, little has been reported on the contributory factors involved in the decision to undertake further education. The Nurses' Attitudes Towards Postgraduate Education instrument was administered to 1632 registered nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-Cohort Study across Australia, with a response rate of 35.9% (n = 568). Data reduction techniques using principal component analysis with varimax rotation were used. The analysis identified a three-factor solution for 14 items, accounting for 52.5% of the variance of the scale: "facilitators," "professional recognition," and "inhibiting factors." Facilitators of postgraduate education accounted for 28.5% of the variance, including: (i) improves knowledge; (ii) increases nurses' confidence in clinical decision-making; (iii) enhances nurses' careers; (iv) improves critical thinking; (v) improves nurses' clinical skill; and (vi) increased job satisfaction. This new instrument has potential clinical and research applications to support registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education.

  8. Nursing home staffing, turnover, and case mix.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H

    2003-09-01

    This study examined the predictors of total nurse and registered nurse (RN) staffing hours per resident day separately in all free-standing California nursing homes (1,555), using staffing data from state cost reports in 1999. This study used a two-stage least squares model, taking into account nursing turnover rates, resident case mix levels, and other factors. As expected, total nurse and RN staffing hours were negatively associated with nurse staff turnover rates and positively associated with resident case mix. Facilities were resource dependent in that a high proportion of Medicare residents predicted higher staffing hours, and a higher proportion of Medicaid residents predicted lower staffing hours and higher turnover rates. Nursing assistant wages were positively associated with total nurse staffing hours. For-profit facilities and high-occupancy rate facilities had lower total nurse and RN staffing hours. Medicaid reimbursement rates and multifacility organizations were positively associated with RN staffing hours.

  9. Social presence, satisfaction, and perceived learning of RN-to-BSN students in Web-based nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Susan C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess social presence in online nursing courses and its relationship to student satisfaction and perceived learning. The Social Presence scale and the Satisfaction scale were administered via an Internet survey to students (n = 128) in an online RN-BSN program. Results indicated a strong relationship among satisfaction, social presence, and instructor performance. All subdomains of social presence correlated highly with the satisfaction subdomains, except the communication factor. A strong relationship was found between perceived learning and social presence and comfort with the online course. Overall social presence, instructor performance, and the subdomains of social presence predicted a significant amount of total variance in overall satisfaction and perceived learning. No significant relationships were found between the demographic factors and overall social presence or perceived learning. Results of this study can assist nurse educators in providing optimal online educational experiences for students.

  10. RN-BS Students' Reports of Their Self-Care and Health-Promotion Practices in a Holistic Nursing Course.

    PubMed

    Padykula, Bozena M

    2016-07-01

    This study explored RN-BS students' self-care and health-promotion (SCHP) practices in a semester-long holistic nursing course with emphasis on the utility of self-reflection through journal writing. A qualitative single case study blended in practical action research. Fifteen RN-BS students enrolled in the holistic nursing course completed (a) three reflective journal entries (beginning, midterm, and conclusion); (b) two IHWA-short form surveys (beginning and conclusion); and (c) one demographic form (beginning) of the course. Three reflective journals indicated that students' understanding of their SCHP practices progressed from novice, to advanced, and finally to competent from the beginning, middle, and at the conclusion of the course. Four findings emerged in relation to reports of their SCHP practices: (a) new awareness of self, (b) application of SCHP practices knowledge, (c) role modeling, and (d) dedication to SCHP practices beyond the semester. Four findings emerged in relation to participation in the reflective journaling about reports of their SCHP practices: (a) self-discovery, (b) retrospective self-evaluation, (c) useful intervention for SCHP, and (d) beneficial learning tool in academic environment. Reflective journaling enhanced students' SCHP practices and was recognized as useful instructional strategy to improve learning in the classroom. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Comparing NET and ERI standardized exam scores between baccalaureate graduates who pass or fail the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Bondmass, Mary D; Moonie, Sheniz; Kowalski, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, nursing programs are commonly evaluated by their graduates success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). The purpose of this paper is to describe a change in NCLEX-RN success rates following the addition of standardized exams throughout our program's curriculum, and to compare these exam scores between graduates who pass NCLEX-RN and those who do not. Our results indicate an 8.5% change (p < 0.000) in the NCLEX-RN pass rate from our previous 5-year mean pass rate, and significant differences in standardized test scores for those who pass the NCLEX-RN compared to those who do not (p < 0.03). We conclude that our selected standardized exam scores are able to significantly identify graduates who are more likely to pass NCLEX-RN than not.

  12. Bullying of staff registered nurses in the workplace: a preliminary study for developing personal and organizational strategies for the transformation of hostile to healthy workplace environments.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Judith A; Demarco, Rosanna F; Gaffney, Donna A; Budin, Wendy C

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to validate the perceptions of frequency and patterns of bullying behavior experienced by registered nurses (RNs) across the United States. This study was completed to develop relevant and sensitive tailored interventions for the future. A 30-item anonymous electronic survey was used to identify the frequency, type, perpetrators, and personal and professional consequences of bullying. Findings from the overall population of 303 RN respondents (mean age of 49 years) indicated that 70% of the bullying was reported by a predominant group of staff RNs (n = 212), and it is this group that is the focus of this report. Of this group, bullying occurred (a) most frequently in medical-surgical (23%), critical care (18%), emergency (12%), operating room/Post Anesthesia Care Unit (9%), and obstetrical (7%) areas of care and (b) within the 5 years or less of employment on a unit (57%). Perpetrators included senior nurses (24%), charge nurses (17%), nurse managers (14%), and physicians (8%) who publicly humiliated, isolated, excluded, or excessively criticized the staff nurses. Subsequent stress levels were reported as moderate or severe, with support found primarily with family, colleagues, and friends and not with an available workplace infrastructure of solution. Many left the workplace completely with or without jobs awaiting them. Bullying among U.S. nurses is a hidden problem with significant patient-directed quality performance and workforce implications. It is critical that innovative strategies be developed and implemented to address the root cause of this problem.

  13. Curriculum Development for Part-Time Programs for Certified Nurse Assistant to Licensed Vocational Nurse; and Licensed Vocational Nurse to Associate Degree Nurse Program (CNA-VN-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Ellen; And Others

    This report describes the Imperial Valley College nursing program, a program developed to provide for the nursing needs of Imperial County, California. The program provides part-time education to help train nursing assistants and to allow nursing assistants to upgrade their skills to vocational nurse level and vocational nurses to become…

  14. The effectiveness of teaching strategies for creativity in a nursing concepts teaching protocol on the creative thinking of two-year RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kao Lo, Chi-Hui; Wang, Jing-Jy; Lee Hsieh, Jane; Chen, Kuei-Min

    2002-06-01

    Because of changes in the medical environment, nurses must maintain the ability of divergent thinking to solve the health problems of patients. However, many nurses whose work in clinical practice has become routine have lost the ability of creativity. To cultivate nurses creativity should be a goal of nursing education. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a nursing concepts teaching protocol by utilizing teaching strategies directed toward creativity to promote creativity in two-year RN-BSN students. This study design is a time series and one group experiment utilizing multiple instances of treatment. Teaching strategies for creativity were applied to a teaching unit and 52 two-year RN-BSN students were tested for creativity before the end of each semester. This study was conducted from March, 1999 to May, 2000, but only 30 students completed all tests and reached a 58% return rate. Torrance s (1974) definitions of creativity includ fluency, flexibility, and uniqueness were followed and the instrument, a questionnaire on Creativity in the application of the Nursing Process Tool (CNPT), was designed based on Emerson (1988). The content validity of Chinese-version CNPT was.79. The inter-coder reliability between two researchers was.84 following a coding guide that ten nursing education experts had established. The results indicated that 30 two-year RN-BSN students had improved fluency and flexibility. The improvements reached a significant level after the third semester. Only uniqueness declined. It is suggested that nursing faculty apply teaching strategies uniqueness more often in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts. By utilizing teaching strategies of creativity in a teaching protocol of nursing concepts, it is expected that two-year RN-BSN students can acquire characteristics of creativity for problem-solving skills in clinical settings.

  15. A phenomenographic study of registered nurses' understanding of their role in student learning--an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Jillian

    2006-11-01

    Students may be 'buddied' with registered nurses during their clinical experience since the designated clinical facilitator cannot be available for each student at all times. Little is known about the way registered nurses understand this informal role. The rationale for this study was to gain an insight of the variation of understanding registered nurses have of their role with students, and explored the qualitatively different ways registered nurses perceive their role with students on clinical experience and the implications of this understanding for student learning. A phenomenographic approach was used to identify the variation of understanding and meaning of the role of the registered nurse with students on clinical practice from the perspective of the registered nurse. Phenomenography is a field of descriptive research concerned with the variation in ways people experience and understand similar phenomena. A purposive sample of 30 registered nurses from 15 public and private hospitals in central and south eastern Queensland, Australia. Individual semi-structured interviews from a final sample of 28 interviews were analysed to identify Categories of Description. Eight variations of understanding registered nurses have of their informal role with students were identified. The registered nurses' understanding varies from a focus that is 'student-centred', to 'completion of workload-centred', to 'registered nurse control', to a preference for no contact with students. As a consequence some students may have positive learning experiences while others will have limited learning opportunities. The research highlights the varied ways registered nurses understand their role with students that may promote or impede the quality of student learning and development to meet professional competency standards. Formal recognition of the complexity of the registered nurse role by health care agencies and tertiary education providers is essential to ensure registered nurses

  16. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E; McKenna, L; D'Amore, A Angelo

    2014-10-27

    Abstract Changes to educational preparation and scope of practice for enrolled nurses in Australia have impacted on role expectations. This paper reports results of a survey of senior nurses in Victoria, Australia, regarding opinions of the differences in role expectation and scope of practice for graduate registered and enrolled nurses. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions was used to identify themes in the written data. Results identified education, skill level and responsibility as differences between the levels of graduate nurses despite many respondents perceiving there to be no or little difference in graduate roles.

  17. An Exploratory Descriptive Study of Registered Nurse Innovation: Implications for Levels of Adoption.

    PubMed

    Polster, Debra; Villines, Dana

    The aims of this study were to describe registered nurses' levels of personal innovativeness and registered nurses' perceived organizational innovativeness and determine the relationship between these 2 variables. There is limited research to describe the levels of innovation of nurses within a hospital. The levels of innovation can determine the likelihood of adoption of evidence-based practices at the bedside. As change agents, clinical nurse specialists can determine successful implementation strategies tailored to nurse levels of innovation. This was a descriptive study at a midwest, urban, teaching, 408-bed Magnet hospital. Surveys were completed by 217 nurses. The participants reported high personal innovativeness ((Equation is included in full-text article.)= 32.1; SD, 6.4), and the institution was perceived as innovative, with 90.3% of scores categorized as positive innovativeness. The statistically significant correlation was in the medical-surgical unit (r = -0.52, P < .01). There is no correlation between personal innovativeness and organizational innovativeness except for medical-surgical nurses (P = .03). They are likely to perceive the organization more innovative than themselves. Determining adopter characteristics can be valuable to the clinical nurse specialist by adapting strategic interventions to advance nursing practice. Exploring levels of adoption can be an innovative strategy to transform nursing at the bedside and throughout the organization.

  18. Creating a culture of professional development: a milestone pathway tool for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth

    2009-11-01

    The nursing shortage continues to be a significant threat to health care. Creating a culture of professional development in health care institutions is one way to combat this shortage. Professional development refers to a constant commitment to maintain one's knowledge and skill base. Increasing professional development opportunities in the health care setting has been shown to affect nurse retention and satisfaction. Several approaches have been developed to increase professional development among nurses. However, for the most part, these are "one size fits all" approaches that direct nurses to progress in lock step fashion in skill and knowledge acquisition within a specialty. This article introduces a milestone pathway tool for registered nurses designed to enhance professional development that is unique to the individual nurse and the specific nursing unit. This tool provides a unit-specific concept map, a milestone pathway template, and a personal professional development plan.

  19. Retainment incentives in three rural practice settings: variations in job satisfaction among staff registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Stratton, T D; Dunkin, J W; Juhl, N; Geller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Researchers have demonstrated repeatedly the importance of the relationship linking job satisfaction to employee retention. In rural areas of the country, where a persistent maldistribution of nurses continues to hamper health care delivery, the potential benefits of bolstering retention via enhancements in job satisfaction are of utmost utility to administrators and providers alike. Data were gathered from a multistate survey of registered nurses (RNs) practicing in rural hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and community/public health settings (N = 1,647; response rate = 40.3%). The investigators found that the use of tuition reimbursement corresponded significantly with increased levels of job satisfaction among nurses in all three practice environments, as did day care services for nurses in acute care settings. Also, among hospital-based RNs, level of nursing education was found to be a significant factor in the relationship between tuition reimbursement and job satisfaction, with the highest level occurring among diploma-prepared nurses.

  20. Early career experiences and perceptions - a qualitative exploration of the turnover of young registered nurses and intention to leave the nursing profession in Finland.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mervi; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-11-01

    To describe why young registered nurses (RNs) had previously left an organisation and why they intend to leave the profession. Currently, many young registered nurses, including those in Finland, are considering leaving their job or have an intention to leave the profession. An in-depth, descriptive approach was adopted. Data were collected in 2012 from interviews with 15 registered nurses (under the age of 30 years). The interviews were semi-structured and analysed using conventional content analysis. The main questions addressed were: 'Why had the young registered nurses left their previous organisation?' and 'Why do young registered nurses have an intention to leave the profession?' The findings centre on three themes: poor nursing practice environments; lack of support, orientation and mentoring, and nursing as a 'second best' or serendipitous career choice. The first years of nursing are particularly stressful for newly-graduated and inexperienced registered nurses. An in-depth, qualitative approach reveals more complex reasons behind the turnover of registered nurses and intention to leave the profession than questionnaire surveys. Young registered nurses need social support from nurse managers and experienced colleagues to successfully transition into nursing practice environments. Adequate orientation and mentoring programmes are needed to facilitate this transition. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Swedish registered nurses' and nurse managers' attitudes towards patient advocacy in community care of older patients.

    PubMed

    Josse-Eklund, Anna; Petzäll, Kerstin; Sandin-Bojö, Ann-Kristin; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2013-07-01

    To describe and compare registered nurses' (RNs) and nurse managers' (NMs) attitudes towards patient advocacy in the community care of older patients. RNs may act as patients' advocates in the care of older patients. NMs should support patient advocacy in order to make the best care available to patients. A modified Attitudes towards Patient Advocacy Scale was used to collect data from 207 RNs and 23 NMs in the Swedish community care of older patients. The response rate was 52%. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Both RNs and NMs showed positive attitudes towards patient advocacy. They were more positive towards patient advocacy for patients unable to help themselves than for competent patients. This study showed that RNs and NMs did not differ in their attitudes towards patient advocacy. This result is consistent with the idea of giving the neediest and vulnerable patients greater care. It is important for NMs to clarify their own and RNs attitudes towards patient advocacy as disparities may affect cooperation between the groups. Any effects on cooperation may, by extension, affect the quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Shared governance and empowerment in registered nurses working in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Barden, Agnes M; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-01-01

    Empowerment of registered nurses through professional practice models inclusive of shared governance has been proposed as essential to improve quality patient care, contain costs, and retain nursing staff. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of governance and empowerment among nurses working in acute care hospital units in which a shared governance model had been in place for 6 to 12 months. The 158 nurses who participated perceived themselves to be moderately empowered and in an early implementation stage of shared governance. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between perceptions of shared governance and empowerment. Recommendations for professional practice and future research are included.

  3. Relationship of field dependence/independence with learning styles and locus of control among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P H

    1993-06-01

    This study investigated the relations among scores on field dependence/independence, learning styles, and locus of control for 199 Registered Nurses. Hypotheses were that nurses with higher scores on field independence would score higher on internal locus of control and nurses with scores on concrete learning styles would score higher on field independence and internal locus of control. The Group Embedded Figures Test, Learning Style Inventory, and the Internal-External Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were administered. Analysis showed that nurses were field dependent, used the Reflective Observation mode of learning, displayed abstract and active learning styles, and scored as internal on the measure of locus of control.

  4. Contradictions between ideals and reality: Swedish registered nurses' experiences of dialogues with inpatients in psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Slotte, Anna; Säfsten, Helena Markström; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2014-05-01

    This study explored ten registered nurses' experiences of dialogues with inpatients in psychiatric care. Data were collected through four focus group discussions, and two individual interviews. The nurses described contradictions between their nursing ideals about dialogues and the reality faced in psychiatric inpatient care, resulting in an unsatisfactory work situation and feelings of insufficiency. We conclude that in order to improve quality of care and increase well-being for both patients and health care workers, nursing interventions, such as dialogues and meaningful activities, need to be offered to patients. A management that is visible and present on-site should encourage and facilitate health care workers' participation in clinical supervision.

  5. Factors influencing the retention of registered nurses in the Gauteng Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mokoka, Kgaogelo E; Ehlers, Valerie J; Oosthuizen, Martha J

    2011-12-14

    South Africa is a source country for many destination countries that recruit registered nurses who emigrate for personal and/or professional reasons. A large number of South African nurses belong to the baby boomer generation (born between 1943 and 1964) who will retire within the foreseeable future. Statistics from the South African Nursing Council show a decline of 42.0% in the number of nurses who completed their training in South Africa from 1996 to 2005. These aspects combine to predict a potential dire shortage of nurses in South Africa within the foreseeable future. Retention of registered nurses should be the focus of health-care planners to avoid crises in South Africa's health-care services. This study attempted to identify factors that would influence registered nurses' decisions to stay with their current employers in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. An exploratory descriptive quantitative design was adopted and questionnaires were sent to a sample of nurses, registered with the South African Nursing Council (SANC), with addresses in the Gauteng Province. A total of 108 nurses completed and returned questionnaires, of whom 77 (73.1%) had considered leaving their current employers. The most important factors that would influence more than 90.0% of these nurses' decisions to stay with their current employers related to finances, safety and security, equipment and/or supplies, management, staff and patients. In terms of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory, deficiency needs (physiological, safety and social needs) should be met by improved salaries revised on an annual basis, paying long-service and outstanding-service bonuses, and improving the safety and security, as well the available equipment and supplies, at institutions. Sufficient numbers of nurses should be employed and vacancies should be filled rapidly. However, not all changes required to enhance nurses' retention rates involve increased costs. Managers should lead by example and respect

  6. Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses' views about nursing work: a survey of motivation and maintenance factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Kirk, Ray; Wright, Sarah; Andrew, Cathy

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on-line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Prior to the economic recession of 2007-2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given the ageing New Zealand nursing workforce, an ageing population and the increasing demands for health care, it is imperative that issues of retention of Generation Y nurses are resolved prior to the imminent retirement of more experienced nurses. A descriptive exploratory approach using a national wide, on-line survey, eliciting both quantitative and qualitative data was used. The survey, conducted from August 2009-January 2010, collected data from Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses (n = 358) about their views about nursing, work and career. Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory was used as the framework for the analysis of the open text data. The factors that nurses wanted changed were skewed towards Herzberg's hygiene-maintenance factors rather than motivating factors. This is of concern because hygiene-maintenance factors are considered to be dissatisfiers that are likely to push workers to another employment option.

  7. Registered nurse peer evaluation in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Melanie B

    2006-09-01

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE evaluations can be difficult to prepare and may rely, in part, on anecdotal information. PERIOPERATIVE RNs at CHRISTUS St Patrick Hospital, Lake Charles, La, developed and implemented a peer evaluation as part of nurses' annual performance evaluations. THE EVALUATION FORMS created were considered to be useful and fair by both staff members and managers.

  8. Undergraduate nursing students' placement in speciality clinical areas: understanding the concerns of the student and registered nurse.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Elisabeth; Needham, Judith

    2012-08-01

    Student nurses in Australia are regularly placed in acute clinical areas providing them with clinical experience to link theory with real patient situations. Specialist clinical areas such as day oncology and renal dialysis often exclude students on the basis that their clinical area may not be able to meet normal clinical expectations, including holistic care of four to six patients with minimal direction from the registered nurse. However, specialist clinical areas provide students with unique learning experiences. This paper reports on an evaluation of speciality clinical placements for student nurses with an aim to increase our understanding of this type of placement. Semi-structured audiotaped interviews were undertaken with 7 third year final semester students and 13 registered nurses working with the third year students. All interviews were transcribed and a thematic analysis conducted. Key themes from the students and registered nurses were knowledge and preparedness for specialist placement, team work and being included and customising learning needs. Speciality placements provide a valuable experience for the undergraduate nurse including opportunities to see excellence in team work, communication and assessment as well as identifying future intention to become an oncology or renal specialist nurse.

  9. Patient safety in practical nurses' education: A cross-sectional survey of newly registered practical nurses in Canada.

    PubMed

    VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Sears, Nancy; Edge, Dana S; Tregunno, Deborah; Ginsburg, Liane

    2017-04-01

    Practical nurses have experienced an increasing scope of practice, including an expectation to care for complex patients and function on interdisciplinary teams. Little is known about the degree to which patient safety principles are addressed in practical nursing education. To examine self-reported patient safety competencies of practical nurses. A cross-sectional online survey (July 2014) and face-to-face interviews (June 2015). Ontario, Canada. Survey participants were practical nurses newly registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario between January 2012 and December 2013. Interview participants were faculty and students in a practical nursing program in Ontario. Survey respondents completed the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey online. Self-reported competencies in various patient safety domains were compared between classroom and clinical settings. Faculty members were interviewed about educational preparation of practical nurses and students were interviewed to provide insight into interpretation of survey questions. The survey response rate was 28.4% (n=1104/3883). Mean domain scores indicated a high level of confidence in patient safety competence (<4.0/5.0). Confidence was highest in respondents registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario >2years and in those who obtained their education outside of Canada. Faculty believed their approach to teaching and learning instilled a deep understanding of the limits to practical nurse autonomous practice. Practical nurses were confident in what they learned about patient safety in their educational programs. The high degree of patient safety competence may be a true reflection of practical nurses understanding of, and comfort with, the limits of their knowledge and, ultimately, the limits of their individual autonomous practice. Further exploration as to whether the questionnaire requires additional modification for use with practical nurse populations is warranted. However, this

  10. Leadership and teamwork in medical emergencies: performance of nursing students and registered nurses in simulated patient scenarios.

    PubMed

    Endacott, Ruth; Bogossian, Fiona E; Cooper, Simon J; Forbes, Helen; Kain, Victoria J; Young, Susan C; Porter, Joanne E

    2015-01-01

    To examine nursing students' and registered nurses' teamwork skills whilst managing simulated deteriorating patients. Studies continue to show the lack of timely recognition of patient deterioration. Management of deteriorating patients can be influenced by education and experience. Mixed methods study conducted in two universities and a rural hospital in Victoria, and one university in Queensland, Australia. Three simulation scenarios (chest pain, hypovolaemic shock and respiratory distress) were completed in teams of three by 97 nursing students and 44 registered nurses, equating to a total of 32 student and 15 registered nurse teams. Data were obtained from (1) Objective Structured Clinical Examination rating to assess performance; (2) Team Emergency Assessment Measure scores to assess teamwork; (3) simulation video footage; (4) reflective interview during participants' review of video footage. Qualitative thematic analysis of video and interview data was undertaken. Objective structured clinical examination performance was similar across registered nurses and students (mean 54% and 49%); however, Team Emergency Assessment Measure scores differed significantly between the two groups (57% vs 38%, t = 6·841, p < 0·01). In both groups, there was a correlation between technical (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) and nontechnical (Team Emergency Assessment Measure) scores for the respiratory distress scenario (student teams: r = 0·530, p = 0·004, registered nurse teams r = 0·903, p < 0·01) and hypovolaemia scenario (student teams: r = 0·534, p = 0·02, registered nurse teams: r = 0·535, p = 0·049). Themes generated from the analysis of the combined quantitative and qualitative data were as follows: (1) leadership and followership behaviours; (2) help-seeking behaviours; (3) reliance on previous experience; (4) fixation on a single detail; and (5) team support. There is scope to improve leadership, team work and task management skills for registered

  11. Registered Nurses´ View of Performing Pain Assessment among Persons with Dementia as Consultant Advisors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Christina; Sidenvall, Birgitta; Bergh, Ingrid; Ernsth-Bravell, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain assessment in persons with dementia is well known as a challenging issue to professional caregivers, because of these patients´ difficulties in verbalising pain problems. Within municipal dementia care in Sweden, pain assessment has become problematic for registered nurses, as they have entered a new role in their nursing profession, from being clinical practitioners to becoming consultant advisers to other health care staff. Aim: To present municipal registered nurses´ view of pain assessment in persons with dementia in relation to their nursing profession as consultant advisers. Methods: Purposive sampling was undertaken with 11 nurses invited to participate. Data were collected by focus groups. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings: Four categories were identified to describe registered nurses´ view of pain assessment: estrangement from practical nursing care, time consuming and unsafe pain documentation, unfulfilled needs of reflection possibilities, and collaboration and coordination. Conclusions: The performance of pain assessment through a consultant advising function is experienced as frustrating and as an uncomfortable nursing situation. The nurses feel resistance to providing nursing in this way. They view nursing as a clinical task demanding daily presence among patients to enable them to make accurate and safe assessments. However, due to the consultative model, setting aside enough time for the presence seems difficult to accomplish. It is necessary to promote the quality of systematic routines in pain assessment and reflection, as well as developing professional knowledge of how pain can be expressed by dementia patients, especially those with communication difficulties. PMID:22655002

  12. Developing ambulatory care registered nurse competencies for care coordination and transition management.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila; Swan, Beth Ann; Haynes, Traci

    2013-01-01

    The need for care coordination and management of transitions between Patient-Centered Medical Home providers, outpatient and community settings, including the Accountable Care Organization is often overlooked, episodic, and accountability for coordinating care and managing transitions between providers and services is lacking. Recognizing the potential of the RN to contribute to enhanced quality, cost effectiveness, and access to care in ambulatory settings, the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN) created a care coordination competencies action plan with three phases to delineate RN competencies and develop an education program for care coordination and transition management in ambulatory care. The first Expert Panel completed a comprehensive, interdisciplinary literature review and analysis focused on care coordination and transition management. The second Expert Panel--representing nu rsing, medicine, and pharmacy--defined the dimensions, identified core competencies, and described the activities linked with each competency for care coordination and transition management in ambulatory settings. The third Expert Panel reviewed, confirmed, and created a table of dimensions, activities, and competencies (including knowledge, skills, attitudes) for ambulatory care RN care coordination and transition management.

  13. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Truc; Alderson, Marie; Nadon, Michelle; Kershaw-Rousseau, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs) could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1) the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2) LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3) the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4) the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5) an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation) is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs. PMID:22135732

  14. Attestations by facilities using nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses--DOL. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1994-01-06

    The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) and the Wage and Hour Division of the Employment Standards Administration (ESA) of the Department of Labor (DOL or Department) are publishing final regulations governing the filing and enforcement of attestations by facilities seeking to use nonimmigrant aliens as registered nurses under H-1A visas. The attestations, required under the Immigration and Nationality Act, pertain to substantial disruption in the delivery of health care services, absence of adverse effect on wages and working conditions of similarly employed registered nurses, payment of wages to nonimmigrant alien nurses employed by the facility at wage rates paid to other registered nurses similarly employed by the facility, taking timely and significant steps designed to recruit and retain U.S. nurses in order to reduce dependence on nonimmigrant alien nurses, absence of a strike or lockout, and giving appropriate notice of filing. Facilities are required to submit these attestations to DOL as a condition for being able to petition the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for H-1A nurses. The attestation process is administered by ETA, while complaints and investigations regarding the attestations are handled by ESA.

  15. Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2009-12-01

    To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption.

  16. Job satisfaction and horizontal violence in hospital staff registered nurses: the mediating role of peer relationships.

    PubMed

    Purpora, Christina; Blegen, Mary A

    2015-08-01

    To describe the association between horizontal violence and job satisfaction in hospital staff registered nurses and the degree to which peer relationships mediates the relationship. Additionally, the association between nurse and work characteristics and job satisfaction were determined. Horizontal violence is a major predictor of nurses' job satisfaction. Yet, not enough is known about the relationship between these variables. Job satisfaction is an important variable to study because it is a predictor of patient care quality and safety internationally. Peer relationships, a job satisfier for nurses, was identified as a potential mediator in the association between horizontal violence and job satisfaction. Cross-sectional mediational model testing. An anonymous four-part survey of a random sample of 175 hospital staff registered nurses working in California provided the data. Data about horizontal violence, peer relationships, job satisfaction, and nurse and work characteristics were collected between March-August 2010. A statistically significant negative relationship was found between horizontal violence and peer relationships, job satisfaction and a statistically significant positive relationship was found between peer relationships and job satisfaction. Peer relationships mediated the association between horizontal violence and job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was reported as higher by nurses who worked in teaching hospitals. There were no statistically significant differences in job satisfaction based on gender, ethnicity, basic registered nurse education, highest degree held, size of hospital or clinical area. The results suggest that peer relationships can attenuate the negative relationship between horizontal violence and job satisfaction. This adds to the extant literature on the relationship between horizontal violence and job satisfaction. The findings highlight peer relationships as an important factor when considering effective interventions that

  17. The Role of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Patient Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    assessed by CRNAs have medical diagnoses, and diabetes mellitus is one of the more common endocrine disorders encountered. Often patients with diabetes do...not understand how their diabetes relates to their surgery (Ouellette, 1998). When interviewing patients with diabetes mellitus CRNAs should assess...AANA journal course: Updates for nurse anesthetists- diabetes mellitus : Overview and current concepts in anesthetic management. Journal of the American

  18. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  19. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  20. Develop a Framework of Creative Thinking Teaching Mode for RN-BSN Students on the Basis of the Creative Process of Clinical Nurses in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kuo, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework of creative thinking teaching mode for RN-BSN students on the basis of the creative process of clinical nurses in Taiwan. Purposive samples have earned creativity awards recruited from the medical, surgical, maternity, paediatric, community and psychiatric departments in Taiwan. Semi-structured…

  1. Develop a Framework of Creative Thinking Teaching Mode for RN-BSN Students on the Basis of the Creative Process of Clinical Nurses in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, Ya-Lie; Kuo, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework of creative thinking teaching mode for RN-BSN students on the basis of the creative process of clinical nurses in Taiwan. Purposive samples have earned creativity awards recruited from the medical, surgical, maternity, paediatric, community and psychiatric departments in Taiwan. Semi-structured…

  2. Registered nurses' perceptions of their professional work in nursing homes and home-based care: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Rämgård, Margareta; Bolmsjö, Ingrid; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-05-01

    In Sweden, as well as in most industrialised countries, an increasing older population is expected to create a growing demand for health care staff. Previous studies have pointed to lack of proficient medical and nursing staff specialised in geriatric care, which poses serious threats to the care of a vulnerable population. At the same time, there are studies describing elderly care as a low-status career choice, attracting neither nurses nor student nurses. Judging from previous research it was deemed important to explore how nurses in elderly care perceive their work, thus possibly provide vital knowledge that can guide nurse educators and unit managers as a means to promote a career in elderly care. The aim of the present study was to illuminate how nurses, working in nursing homes and home-based care, perceived their professional work. This was a qualitative study using focus groups. 30 registered nurses in seven focus groups were interviewed. The participants worked in nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly in rural areas and in a larger city in southern Sweden. The interviews were analysed in line with the tradition of naturalistic inquiry. Our findings illustrate how nurses working in elderly care perceived their professional work as holistic and respectful nursing. Three categories of professional work emerged during analysis: (1) establishing long-term relationships, (2) nursing beyond technical skills, and (3) balancing independence and a sense of loneliness. The findings are important as they represent positive alternatives to the somewhat prevailing view on elderly care as depressing and undemanding. Nurse educators might use the key aspects as good examples, thus influencing student nurses' attitudes towards elderly care in a positive way. Elderly care agencies might find them helpful when recruiting and retaining nurses to a much needed area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The value of portfolio building and the registered nurse: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McColgan, Karen

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to explore the value of portfolio building and the registered nurse under the following themes: assessment of competence; work-based reflection; lifelong learning; creating career pathways and the contribution a portfolio makes to the professional development of the nurse. This review concludes that for portfolios to work effectively, nurses and their employers require a working partnership to see the value and the opportunities that exist through the development of a personal portfolio. The need exists for an organisational culture of learning that encourages a facilitative environment combined with nurses who support their colleagues and explore their skills through experiential learning. This work was submitted in part fulfilment for the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing at Queen's University of Belfast, School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2007 and was supported by ERFF.

  4. NURSING 911: an orientation program to improve retention of online RN-BSN students.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Melanie; Lyons, Evadna M

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of an eight-hour, comprehensive, face-to-face orientation program designed to improve student retention in a newly developed online RN to BSN program. A total of 179 newly enrolled RN to BSN students participated in the orientation program and evaluated the process. Student attrition decreased from 20 percent to less than 1 percent after the orientation program was extended and improved to include a technology assessment and an online practice course. A quality online program requires a well-designed orientation that includes technological assessments and hands-on, active participation by the learner. The newly improved and designed course has become effective in student retention and transition into the online learning environment.

  5. Knowledge of palliative and end-of-life care by student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Margaret Faut; Breakwell, Susan; Suhayda, Rosemarie

    2011-08-01

    As part of a 5-year study funded by the National Cancer Institute, all graduate nursing students, including student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) participated in a 2-credit-hour course called Interdisciplinary Palliative Care. Medical and health science students also participated in the course, with more than 800 students completing the course to date. The sample consisted of 62 master's-level students enrolled in either the first or second year of the nurse anesthesia program. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine changes in palliative care knowledge and perceived effectiveness in palliative care skills. There was an overall improvement in knowledge and attitudes related to course content. Students reported that, through the development of new knowledge, they felt better able to care for and advocate for their patients. Further research is needed into the appropriate roles that Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) can play in palliative and end-of-life care.

  6. Development of a postbasic critical care program for registered nurses: a collaborative venture between education and practice.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative venture between nursing education and nursing practice focused on continuing education. A province-wide assessment of the educational needs of registered nurses identified the need to create a critical care education program. A critical care project team was established to develop a Postbasic Critical Care Program for registered nurses. The development of the project team, initiation of the program, and the mutual benefits and challenges posed by this collaborative venture are presented.

  7. The Gulf Coast Health Services Steering Committee: a business-education partnership to solve the registered nurse shortage.

    PubMed

    Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert; Distefano, Susan; Rice, Tabitha

    2006-12-01

    The need to increase the registered nurse work-force has historically been the concern only of nursing school administrators and educators and, occasionally, the focus of hospital administrators during spikes in demand. How can nursing educators develop and sustain a productive partnership with local hospitals and the business community? The authors describe their experience in creating and developing a long-term, employer-led, and sustainable partnership for increasing their own registered nurse workforce.

  8. Mock Code: A Code Blue Scenario Requested by and Developed for Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Janice; Pritchett-Kelly, Sherry; McDonald, Melissa; Mullins-Richards, Paula; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The use of simulation in medical training is quickly becoming more common, with applications in emergency, surgical, and nursing education. Recently, registered nurses working in surgical inpatient units requested a mock code simulation to practice skills, improve knowledge, and build self-confidence in a safe and controlled environment. A simulation scenario using a high-fidelity mannequin was developed and will be discussed herein. PMID:28123919

  9. Defining the role of a forensic hospital registered nurse using the Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Newman, Claire; Patterson, Karen; Eason, Michelle; Short, Ben

    2016-11-01

    A Delphi survey was undertaken to refine the position description of a registered nurse working in a forensic hospital, in New South Wales, Australia. Prior to commencing operation in 2008, position descriptions were developed from a review of legislation, as well as policies and procedures used by existing forensic mental health services in Australia. With an established workforce and an evolving model of care, a review of the initial registered nurse position description was required. An online Delphi survey was undertaken. Eight executive (88.9%) and 12 (58.3%) senior nursing staff participated in the first survey round. A total of four survey rounds were completed. At the final round, there was consensus (70%) that the revised position description was either very or somewhat suitable. There were a total of nine statements, from 31 originally produced in round 1, that did not reach consensus. The Delphi survey enabled a process for refining the Forensic Hospital registered nurse position description. Methods that facilitate executive and senior nursing staff consensus in the development and review of position descriptions should be considered in nursing management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Senior nurse role expectations of graduate registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Changes to educational preparation and scope of practice for enrolled nurses (ENs) in Australia have impacted on role expectations. This paper reports results of a survey of senior nurses in Victoria, Australia, regarding opinions of the differences in role expectation and scope of practice for graduate registered and ENs. Content analysis of open-ended survey questions was used to identify themes in the written data. Results identified education, skill level and responsibility as differences between the levels of graduate nurses despite many respondents perceiving there to be no or little difference in graduate roles.

  11. A logit analysis of the likelihood of leaving rural settings for registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Pan, S; Dunkin, J; Muus, K J; Harris, R; Geller, J M

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the net effects of individual and community factors on the likelihood of registered nurses leaving current jobs using a logit analysis. Based on data from a survey of 2,509 rural nurses, four separate models were estimated and compared: one for nurses in rural settings as a whole and the other three for nurses in hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and community/public health agencies. Results of the general model indicated that nurses' marital status, age, position, income, job satisfaction, and satisfaction with the community were significant determinants of the likelihood of leaving current jobs. Job satisfaction was the most significant factor, followed by satisfaction with the community. Findings from the models for three different employment settings were similar to those of the general model. However, the significance of factors and their strength of effect on nurses' decisions to leave or stay in their current jobs differed across the three types of facilities. Based on these findings rural nursing administrators and policy-makers should give priority to retention strategies that focus on improving the job environment. The development of different strategies for different groups of nurses (i.e., by age or marital status) and different types of facilities should increase the benefit/cost ratio. In addition, programs that involve rural health care agencies in community and economic development should be further explored as an avenue to increased nurse retention in rural areas.

  12. Nursing assessment of older people who are in hospital: exploring registered nurses' understanding of their assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Penney, Wendy; Poulter, Nola; Cole, Clare; Wellard, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Nurses worldwide are expected to take a leading role in caring for older people. Considerable literature dedicated to the range and application of assessment skills used by nurses vary. There is limited knowledge of registered nurses' (RNs) views of their assessment of older adults. The aim of this project was to explore RNs current perceptions of nursing assessment, and the core skills they identified as necessary. A qualitative descriptive design study was conducted in three inpatient units in one regional hospital in Victoria. Date were collected through participant observation of RNs (n = 13) followed by 1:1 semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed thematically. This research has illuminated that an ill-defined repertoire of skills was used by RNs when assessing older persons. Skills identified appeared to be based on years of personal-professional experience. Differences were noted between the descriptions nurses gave and what was observed during interactions with older persons.

  13. Program Exit Examinations in Nursing Education: Using a Value Added Assessment as a Measure of the Impact of a New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Tama; Hancock, Dawson

    2008-01-01

    To become a registered nurse in the United States, one must pass the National Council License Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). To address the growing national nursing shortage, nurse preparation programs must better prepare students to pass this national licensure examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new…

  14. College of the Canyons Nursing Alumni Surveys, Spring 2001. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    In the summer of 2001, College of the Canyons (California) conducted of study of registered nursing (RN) and licensed vocational nursing (LVN) alumni, as well as their employers, to assess satisfaction with the preparation and training they received through the College's nursing programs. Out of the 89 invited nursing alumni, 33 surveys were…

  15. Evidence-based use of electronic clinical tracking systems in advanced practice registered nurse education: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, M Laurie; Smith, Lynette S; Brooks, Andrea F

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, the federal government has mandated healthcare providers to incorporate electronic health records into practice by 2015. This technological update in healthcare documentation has generated a need for advanced practice RN programs to incorporate information technology into education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties created core competencies to guide program standards for advanced practice RN education. One core competency is Technology and Information Literacy. Educational programs are moving toward the utilization of electronic clinical tracking systems to capture students' clinical encounter data. The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate current research on advanced practice RN students' documentation of clinical encounters utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems to meet advanced practice RN curriculum outcome goals in information technology as defined by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. The state of the science depicts student' and faculty attitudes, preferences, opinions, and data collections of students' clinical encounters. Although electronic clinical tracking systems were utilized to track students' clinical encounters, these systems have not been evaluated for meeting information technology core competency standards. Educational programs are utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems with limited evidence-based literature evaluating the ability of these systems to meet the core competencies in advanced practice RN programs.

  16. [The registered nurse and the battle against tuberculosis in Brazil: 1961-1966].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Hercília Regina do Amaral; de Almeida Filho, Antonio José; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Lourenço, Lucia Helena Silva Corrêa

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the circumstances that promoted the implementation of the new Program for Action Against Tuberculosis in Brazil (Programa de Ação na Luta contra a Tuberculose no Brasil) and discuss the strategies used by registered nurses from the Santa Maria State Hospital, Guanabara State, to adjust nursing care to the new program against tuberculosis. This was performed through document research, interviews, and statements from nurses working at the time of the reorganization. Documents were analyzed based on the concepts of habitus, field, and symbolic power by Pierre Bourdieu, and included written and oral documents as well as secondary sources. The reorganization of the nursing service was performed under the leadership of a nurse whose symbolic capital assigned power and prestige to implement the necessary changes. It is concluded that the work of that nurse made it possible to implement the new program and contributed to establishing the position and importance of the registered nurse in providing care to individuals with tuberculosis, for prevention and cure.

  17. The relationship between supervisor support and registered nurse outcomes in nursing care units.

    PubMed

    Hall, Debra S

    2007-01-01

    Workplace social support is a major characteristic related to the Job Demand-Control model of job stress. Organizational and managerial support have an effect on nurse satisfaction and burnout. The relationships between perceived supervisor support and measures of nurse occupation-related outcomes were investigated in 3 nursing units within an academic medical center. Nurses with greater levels of perceived supervisor support experienced more positive job outcomes and less negative outcomes, including less occupational stress, than nurses with less perceived supervisor support. Implications for refocusing the role of the nurse supervisor and its effect on multiple nursing occupation-related outcomes are discussed.

  18. Migration of Spanish nurses 2009-2014. Underemployment and surplus production of Spanish nurses and mobility among Spanish registered nurses: A case study.

    PubMed

    Galbany-Estragués, Paola; Nelson, Sioban

    2016-11-01

    After the financial crisis of 2008, increasing numbers of nurses from Spain are going abroad to work. To examine the health and workforce policy trends in Spain between 2009 and 2014 and to analyze their correlation with the migration of nurses. Single embedded case study. We examined data published by: Health Statistics, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (1996 to 2013); Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports (2006 to 2013); Ministry of Employment and Social Security (2009 to 2014); Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality (1997 to 2014); and National Institute of Statistics (1976 to 2014). In addition to reviewing the scholarly literature on the topic in Spanish and English, we also examined Spanish mobility laws and European directives. We used the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development definition of "professionally active nurses" which defines practising nurses and other nurses as those for whom their education is a prerequisite for employment as a nurse. Moreover, we used the term "nursing graduate" as defined by Spanish Ministry of Education to describe those who have obtained a recognized qualification in nursing in a given year, the term "registered nurses" is defined by Spanish law as nurses registered in the Nurses Associations and "unemployed nurses" are those without work and registered as seeking employment. A transformation of the Spanish health system has reduced the number of employed nurses per capita since 2010. Moreover, reductions in public spending, labour market reforms and widespread unemployment have affected nurses in two ways: first by increasing the number of applicants per vacancy between 2009 and 2013, and second, by an increase in casual positions. However, despite the poor job market and decreasing job security, the number of registered nurses and nursing graduates in Spain per year has continued to grow, increasing the pressure on the labour market. Spain is transforming from a stable

  19. Knowledge, attitudes, and predictors of advance directive discussions of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Amy R; Hausman, Alice J; Higgins, Patricia A; Burant, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences regarding advance directives. A secondary purpose was to examine predictors of advance directive discussions between nurses and patients. Seven-hundred and nineteen respondents, randomly selected from a list of registered nurses in the state of Ohio, completed mailed questionnaires. Descriptive t test, chi-square, and logistic regression statistics were used in the data analyses. The respondents were knowledgeable and possessed positive attitudes about advance directives. Higher self-perceived confidence in advance directive discussion skills and the experience of caring for at least one patient with a current advance directive were found to be significant predictors of advance directive discussions. These findings suggest that experience with advance directives documents is critical for nurses' comfort and that developing interventions to further nurses' confidence in their discussion skills may increase advance directive discussions.

  20. An exploratory study of selected female registered nurses: meaning and expression of nurturance.

    PubMed

    Geissler, E M

    1990-05-01

    The words 'nurse' and 'nursing' originate in the word 'nurture' which dates back to the 14th century. 'Nurturance' appeared for the first time in the 1976 Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary and in a United States dictionary in 1983. Etymologically and semantically bound to nursing, little is known about the term nurturance. An exploratory design using phenomenological analysis was applied to understand the female registered nurses' experience of nurturing patients throughout the life-span and to uncover behaviours commonly believed nurturant. Interviews with 14 RNs practising in diverse settings revealed 39 nurturant behaviours that were intuited into four themes describing the subjects' perceived structure of nurturance as: (1) enabling maximum potential; (2) providing physical and emotional protection; (3) engaging in a supportive interaction; and (4) conveying shared humanity. Data were formulated into an exhaustive description of the phenomenon nurturance. Additionally, the results support Greenberg-Edelstein's theoretical model of the positive reciprocity of nurturance between nurse and patient.

  1. [Management competency of persons registered as disaster nurses in the Pretorian Civil Defense].

    PubMed

    Booyens, S W; Perold, A

    1997-07-01

    The essential management role of the disaster nurse during disaster action was outlined, researched and described. Her competency to execute effectively disaster relief tasks before, during and after a disaster occurring outside a hospital, was studied. Management tasks were identified which nurses should have mastered regarding disaster situations occurring outside hospital boundaries. Research data were gathered by means of a questionnaire on the biographic detail of disaster nurses registered with Civil Defence in Pretoria, in order to recommend a course specifically aimed at fulfilling their requirements. The research project identified requirements of the disaster nurse for appropriate further training, practise and guidance regarding the identified management tasks. It became evident that training is required in most of the tasks, and a training course for nurses in disaster management was designed.

  2. Evolution of the chronic care role of the registered nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Candia Baker; Beisel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    High-quality, accessible, and efficient primary care is needed as the U.S. health care system undergoes significant change. Advancing the role of registered nurses in the primary care setting is important to the solution. A large academic health center implemented five initiatives to improve the care of chronically ill patients through the expanded role of RNs in the context of the health care team. Role evolution of nurses in the pilots required some continuing education and some additional nursing support to release the pilot nurses from their usual duties. These strategies allowed the nurses to apply interventions that enhanced the coordination of care and promoted patient self-management skills. Some short-term improvements in health status were realized and barriers to self-care were identified and resolved.

  3. Professional portfolios and Australian registered nurses' requirements for licensure: developing an essential tool.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane

    2009-06-01

    A requirement of many nurses in the process of licensing for practice each year is a declaration of continuing competence to practice. In Australia, each state and territory currently has its own regulatory authority for nurses and midwives, whose main role is to protect public safety. Like many other registering authorities in the Asia-Pacific region, Australian regulatory authorities undertake the random auditing of nurses and midwives in order to assess their competence to practice. Professional portfolios commonly are considered to be a tool that nurses can use to demonstrate to regulatory authorities, employers, and others how they meet the required competencies. This article examines the different types of portfolios that fall under the umbrella term, professional portfolio, and recommends that nurses explore the strategies that identify evidence of their continuing competence to practice for inclusion in such a document.

  4. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  5. An Exploration of Registered Nurses' Intentions to Leave the Profession: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutter, Stacy Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of female registered nurses who have intentions to leave the profession with particular attention to the influence of gender. The theoretical framework of feminist poststructuralism informed this study, which emphasizes the role of discourse and power relations in the…

  6. Development of an Intravenous Therapy Module for Second Year Registered Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balint, Marilyn

    A study aimed at developing an intravenous therapy module for second-year registered nursing students is described in this practicum report. The report's five chapters define the underlying problem and purpose of the study; discuss the history of intravenous therapy and the significance of the module to the host institution; review the relevant…

  7. Qualitative Analysis of Registered Nurses' Perceptions of Lactation Assessment Tools: Why and How They Are Completed.

    PubMed

    Kuhnly, Joan Esper; Chapman, Donna J

    2017-08-01

    Although lactation assessment tools are consistently used in clinical practice, there is no evidence describing registered nurses' perspectives regarding the purpose and thought processes involved when conducting a breastfeeding assessment. Research aim: This study aimed to explore registered nurses' perceptions on the purpose of lactation assessment tools and the thought processes involved in completing one. Seven focus groups were held from April 2015 through July 2015, in coordination with regional and international lactation and perinatal conferences. Participants included 28 hospital-based registered nurses who routinely used a lactation assessment tool to assess postpartum mothers with healthy breastfeeding newborns. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and content analyzed by two lactation researchers to identify relevant themes and subthemes. The analyses identified four different purposes of breastfeeding assessment tools (Teaching and Assessing Simultaneously, Infant Safety, Standardized Practice, and "It's Your Job!") and four themes related to the thought processes used in completing the tool (Novice vs. Expert, Real-Time vs. Recalled Documentation, Observation or Not, and "Fudging the Score"). Registered nurses found lactation assessment tool completion to be an essential part of their job and that it ensured infant safety, standardized care, maternal instruction, and lactation assessment. Differences in the lactation assessment tool completion process were described, based on staff expertise, workload, hospital policies, and varying degrees of compliance with established protocols. These findings provide critical insight for the development of future breastfeeding assessment tools.

  8. Spirit at work and hope among the ruins: registered nurses' covenant of care.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joan I J; Gregory, David M

    2015-09-01

    To explore registered nurses' (RNs) perspectives about the health care system, management/leadership, patients and spirit at work (SAW). Researchers investigating RNs experiences of reduced job satisfaction and diminishing organisational commitment are looking carefully at spirit at work as a means to foster healthier workplaces. A descriptive, cross-sectional mixed methods design was used to measure and explore the relationships between spirit at work, job satisfaction and organisational commitment. A 2012 postal survey sent by the provincial licensing body to a random sample of 217 surgical and 158 home care registered nurses' in western Canada returned 179 surveys. Seventy-five respondents answered the open-ended survey question. Their responses warrant further content analysis and serve as the foundation of this article. Participants noted that organisational structures and policies, combined with unsupportive leadership, were associated with a reduced sense of community, lack of trust and diminished accountability. Spirit at work was described as sustaining registered nurses' and providing them with hope as they fulfilled their covenant of care with patients. Leadership attention to the advancement of SAW may support the covenant of care between the registered nurses and patient while fostering healthier workplaces. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. An Exploration of Registered Nurses' Intentions to Leave the Profession: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutter, Stacy Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of female registered nurses who have intentions to leave the profession with particular attention to the influence of gender. The theoretical framework of feminist poststructuralism informed this study, which emphasizes the role of discourse and power relations in the…

  10. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P < 0.0001). The introduction of the professional practice model may have raised awareness of the components of job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. A systematic review of Registered Nurses; experiences of the influence of workplace culture and climatic factors on nursing workloads.

    PubMed

    Ross-Walker, Cheryl; Rogers-Clark, Cath; Pearce, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing workload is an issue that effects both the recruitment and retention of nurses, and patient safety. Historically, measurement has focussed on the delivery of direct patient care and excluded workload of facilitating hands-on care and supporting the organisation via duties that reflect organisation cultural and climate needs. Qualitative research is appropriate to understand this complexity. To determine the best available evidence in relation to registered nurses experiences of workplace cultural and climatic factors that influence nursing workloads, in an acute health care setting. This review sought high quality studies which explored registered nurses' experiences of the influence of cultural and climatic factors on their workloads. Qualitative research studies and opinion-based text were considered. An extensive search of the literature was conducted to identify published and unpublished studies between January 1990 and June 2011 in English, and indexed in the following databases: CINAHL, Medline, Medline-In Process, PsychINFO, Emerald, Current Contents, TRIP, JSTOR Nursing Consult Psychology & Behavioural Sciences collections, Emerald Management Reviews, Emerald Full Text Journals, Embase, Dissertation Abstracts, ERIC, Proquest and MedNar, EBSCOhost, Science Direct, Wiley Interscience. Two independent reviewers (CRW and CRC), using appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), assessed fifteen articles; one was excluded. Data were extracted from included papers using standardised tools developed by the JBI. Data from qualitative studies and textual/opinion papers were meta-synthesised separately using standardised instruments. Data synthesis involved the pooling of findings, then grouped into categories on the basis of similarity of meaning. The categories were further aggregated into synthesised findings. 14 papers were identified as high quality and meeting the inclusion criteria. 81 findings were identified from the 10 qualitative research

  12. The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice--the view of newly registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses' perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital. Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was "Pedagogical methods in theory" with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was "Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice" with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  13. Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Bjoerg O; Daehlin, Gro K; Johansson, Inger; Farup, Per G

    2014-11-21

    Nurses experience insufficient medication knowledge; particularly in drug dose calculations, but also in drug management and pharmacology. The weak knowledge could be a result of deficiencies in the basic nursing education, or lack of continuing maintenance training during working years. The aim of this study was to compare the medication knowledge, certainty and risk of error between graduating bachelor students in nursing and experienced registered nurses. Bachelor students in closing term and registered nurses with at least one year job experience underwent a multiple choice test in pharmacology, drug management and drug dose calculations: 3x14 questions with 3-4 alternative answers (score 0-42). Certainty of each answer was recorded with score 0-3, 0-1 indicating need for assistance. Risk of error was scored 1-3, where 3 expressed high risk: being certain that a wrong answer was correct. The results are presented as mean and (SD). Participants were 243 graduating students (including 29 men), aged 28.2 (7.6) years, and 203 registered nurses (including 16 men), aged 42.0 (9.3) years and with a working experience of 12.4 years (9.2). The knowledge among the nurses was found to be superior to that of the students: 68.9%(8.0) and 61.5%(7.8) correct answers, respectively, (p < 0.001). The difference was largest in drug management and dose calculations. The improvement occurred during the first working year. The nurses expressed higher degree of certainty and the risk of error was lower, both overall and for each topic (p < 0.01). Low risk of error was associated with high knowledge and high sense of coping (p < 0.001). The medication knowledge among experienced nurses was superior to bachelor students in nursing, but nevertheless insufficient. As much as 25% of the answers to the drug management questions would lead to high risk of error. More emphasis should be put into the basic nursing education and in the introduction to medication procedures in

  14. A Study on the Effects of Collaborative Teaching as Measured by the Student Nurse's HESI-RN Exam Scores in an AD/RN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Irene O.

    2014-01-01

    The inquiry to be addressed in this Action Research Study (ARS) is the effective teaching modality that will increase the class average pass rate and reduce the percent of students who do not score 850 or above on the HESI-RN exams. The researcher's intent was to provide data in support of a collaborative teaching environment in which to…

  15. A Study on the Effects of Collaborative Teaching as Measured by the Student Nurse's HESI-RN Exam Scores in an AD/RN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Irene O.

    2014-01-01

    The inquiry to be addressed in this Action Research Study (ARS) is the effective teaching modality that will increase the class average pass rate and reduce the percent of students who do not score 850 or above on the HESI-RN exams. The researcher's intent was to provide data in support of a collaborative teaching environment in which to…

  16. Predictors for Associate Degree Nursing Students' First Attempt on NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing program administrators need to identify significant predictors for associate degree nursing (ADN) students to determine characteristics of those who will most likely pass the NCLEX-RN® on the first attempt. The purpose of the quantitative study with a correlation prediction design was to determine if a relationship existed between the…

  17. Predictors for Associate Degree Nursing Students' First Attempt on NCLEX-RN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing program administrators need to identify significant predictors for associate degree nursing (ADN) students to determine characteristics of those who will most likely pass the NCLEX-RN® on the first attempt. The purpose of the quantitative study with a correlation prediction design was to determine if a relationship existed between the…

  18. Nurses' perceptions of critical issues requiring consideration in the development of guidelines for professional registered nurse staffing for perinatal units.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Wilson, Jane; Ruhl, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To solicit input from registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) on critical considerations for review and revision of existing nurse staffing guidelines. Thematic analysis of responses to a cross-sectional on-line survey question: "Please give the staffing task force your input on what they should consider in the development of recommendations for staffing of perinatal units." Members of AWHONN (N = 884). Descriptions of staffing concerns that should be considered when evaluating and revising existing perinatal nurse staffing guidelines. Consistent themes identified included the need for revision of nurse staffing guidelines due to requirements for safe care, increases in patient acuity and complexity, invisibility of the fetus and newborn as separate and distinct patients, difficulties in providing comprehensive care during labor and for mother-baby couplets under current conditions, challenges in staffing small volume units, and the negative effect of inadequate staffing on nurse satisfaction and retention. Participants overwhelmingly indicated current nurse staffing guidelines were inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary perinatal clinical practice and required revision based on significant changes that had occurred since 1983 when the original staffing guidelines were published. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Patient involvement climate: views and behaviours among registered nurses in myocardial infarction care.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Judith E; Zhdanova, Ludmila

    2015-02-01

    To introduce and define the patient involvement climate and measure its quality and strength via views and behaviours among nurses in coronary care units. Patient involvement is receiving increased attention among healthcare providers. To better understand and optimise the interpersonal dynamics of patient involvement, it is important to study the organisational context in which the patient-provider interaction occurs. Cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire study. Registered nurses across 12 coronary care units (n = 303) completed a questionnaire reporting their views and behaviours regarding patient involvement. Analyses assessed climate quality (the positive or negative nature of nurses' perceptions) and climate strength (the degree of consensus within coronary care units). Climate quality and strength were greatest for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of patient involvement, the nurse-patient information exchange process and nurses' responsiveness to patient needs. Climate quality and strength were weaker for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of the hindrances associated with patient involvement, discussion of daily activities and efforts to motivate patients to take responsibility for their health. In units with consensus that patient involvement poses hindrances, nurses were less likely to address patient needs. When nurses perceived patient involvement as less of a hindrance in their work, they were more responsive to patient needs. A patient involvement climate characterised by motivational behaviour among nurses was marked by better information exchange and discussion of suitable activities postdischarge. Managers can capitalise on positive climate aspects by encouraging ward activities that facilitate active patient involvement among nurses. One suggestion is educational interventions at the workplace focused on reducing perceptions of patient involvement as a hindrance and encouraging the attitudes that it can enrich nursing work and

  20. Registered nurses' experiences of patient violence on acute care psychiatric inpatient units: an interpretive descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Kelly N; Jack, Susan M; O'Mara, Linda; LeGris, Jeannette

    2015-01-01

    Nurses working in acute care psychiatry settings experience high rates of patient violence which influences outcomes for nurses and the organization. This qualitative study explored psychiatric nurses' experiences of patient violence in acute care inpatient psychiatric settings. An interpretive descriptive design guided this study that included 17 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 12 Canadian registered nurses who self-reported experiencing patient violence within acute care inpatient psychiatry. Thematic analysis and constant comparison techniques were used for analysis. A problem, needs and practice analysis was also used to structure overall data interpretation. Thirty three unique exposures to patient violence among the sample of nurses were analysed. Nurses reported experiencing physical, emotional and verbal violence. For many, patient violence was considered "part of the job." Nurses often struggled with role conflict between one's duty to care and one's duty to self when providing care following a critical incident involving violence. Issues of power, control and stigma also influenced nurse participant perceptions and their responses to patient violence. Nurses used a variety of strategies to maintain their personal safety and to prevent, and manage patient violence. Nurses endorsed the need for improved education, debriefing following an incident, and a supportive work environment to further prevent patient violence. Present findings have implications for reducing the barriers to reporting violent experiences and the creation of best practice guidelines to reduce patient violence in the workplace. Understanding the perspectives and experiences of nurses in acute inpatient psychiatry leads to greater understanding of the phenomenon of patient violence and may inform the development of interventions to prevent and to respond to patient violence, as well as support nurses working within the acute care setting.

  1. Registered nurse-performed flexible sigmoidoscopy in Ontario: development and implementaton of the curriculum and program.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mary Anne; Tinmouth, Jill Margaret; Rabeneck, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death in Canada, it is curable if detected in the early stages. Flexible sigmoidoscopy has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in patients who are at average risk for this disease and, therefore, is an appropriate screening intervention. Moreover, it may be performed by nonphysicians. A program to enable registered nurses to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy to increase colorectal cancer screening capacity in Ontario was developed. This program incorporated practical elements learned from other jurisdictions as well as specific regional considerations to fit within the health care system of Ontario. The nurses received structured didactic and simulation training before performing sigmoidoscopies on patients under physician supervision. After training, nurses were evaluated by two assessors for their ability to perform complete sigmoidoscopies safely and independently. To date, 17 nurses have achieved independence in performing flexible sigmoidoscopy at 14 sites. In total, nurses have screened >7000 Ontarians, with a cancer detection rate of 5.1 per 1000 screened, which is comparable with rates in other jurisdictions and with sigmoidoscopy performed by gastroenterologists, surgeons and other trained nonphysicians. We have shown, therefore, that with proper training and program structure, registered nurses are able to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy in a safe and thorough manner resulting in a significant increase in access to colorectal cancer screening.

  2. Registered nurse-performed flexible sigmoidoscopy in Ontario: Development and implementation of the curriculum and program

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mary Anne; Tinmouth, Jill Margaret; Rabeneck, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death in Canada, it is curable if detected in the early stages. Flexible sigmoidoscopy has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in patients who are at average risk for this disease and, therefore, is an appropriate screening intervention. Moreover, it may be performed by nonphysicians. A program to enable registered nurses to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy to increase colorectal cancer screening capacity in Ontario was developed. This program incorporated practical elements learned from other jurisdictions as well as specific regional considerations to fit within the health care system of Ontario. The nurses received structured didactic and simulation training before performing sigmoidoscopies on patients under physician supervision. After training, nurses were evaluated by two assessors for their ability to perform complete sigmoidoscopies safely and independently. To date, 17 nurses have achieved independence in performing flexible sigmoidoscopy at 14 sites. In total, nurses have screened >7000 Ontarians, with a cancer detection rate of 5.1 per 1000 screened, which is comparable with rates in other jurisdictions and with sigmoidoscopy performed by gastroenterologists, surgeons and other trained nonphysicians. We have shown, therefore, that with proper training and program structure, registered nurses are able to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy in a safe and thorough manner resulting in a significant increase in access to colorectal cancer screening. PMID:24416735

  3. Turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses: do local labor market factors matter?

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Kent V; Williams, Eric S; Wagar, Terry H

    2008-01-01

    Turnover of nursing staff is a significant issue affecting health care cost, quality, and access. In recent years, a worldwide shortage of skilled nurses has resulted in sharply higher vacancy rates for registered nurses in many health care organizations. Much research has focused on the individual, group, and organizational determinants of turnover. Labor market factors have also been suggested as important contributors to turnover and vacancy rates but have received limited attention by scholars. This study proposes and tests a conceptual model showing the relationships of organization-market fit and three local labor market factors with organizational turnover and vacancy rates. The model is tested using ordinary least squares regression with data collected from 713 Canadian hospitals and nursing homes. Results suggest that, although modest in their impact, labor market and the organization-market fit factors do make significant yet differential contributions to turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses. Knowledge of labor market factors can substantially shape an effective campaign to recruit and retain nurses. This is particularly true for employers who are perceived to be "employers-of-choice."

  4. Work engagement of older registered nurses: the impact of a caring-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Mary

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this evaluation research was to measure the impact of a caring-based intervention on the level of work engagement in older nurses. Every effort is needed to retain older nurses at the bedside by assisting them to revitalise the internal motivation and self- reward that brought them to nursing. A mixed method evaluation research approach using both qualitative and quantitative measurements was used to determine the impact of a caring-based programme on improving the work engagement scores of older Registered Nurses (RNs). The results of this study suggest that leadership strategies aimed at improving work engagement using caring theories have a significant positive impact. The findings contribute to our understanding of how work engagement can be enhanced through building work environments where there is a sense of belonging and teamwork, where staff are allowed time to decompress as well as build positive work relationships. Nurse Leaders (NLs) bear a responsibility to partner with older Registered Nurses (RNs) to build engagement in their work life while enhancing the quality of care. Successful leaders will find ways to meet these unique challenges by creating a healthy work environment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Similarities and differences in educational preparation of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia: An examination of curricula content.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Background: Variations exist internationally in the types and numbers of nurses registered to practice. Whilst the United Kingdom has phased out second level nurses, countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and the United States have maintained a two level system. In Australia, the two levels of nurse authorised to practice are the registered nurse whom complete an undergraduate nursing degree, and enrolled nurse whom complete either a certificate or diploma program. Recent changes to educational preparation and resulting scope of practice for enrolled nurses have resulted in increased confusion between roles and expectations of the different levels. Aim: This paper reports on findings of a study aimed at identifying differences in educational preparation of the different levels of nurse in Australia. Method: Course coordinators from nine organisations offering pre-registration nursing programs completed self-reporting questionnaires designed to obtain information on types and lengths of courses, and details of curricula including course objectives, teaching and assessment methods and content areas. Results: Comparative analysis of survey responses identified similarities and differences between registered and enrolled nurse programs. Common areas included teaching and assessment methods, core theoretical units and general nursing skills. The diploma and degree programs appear aligned in most theory and clinical skills. The main difference identified existed between skills taught in the two enrolled nurse programs. Conclusions: Findings further add to confusion regarding registered and enrolled nurses in Australia. Further research is required to determine expectations of employers and other major stakeholders with regard to the differences.

  6. New graduate registered nurse transition into primary health care roles: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Murray-Parahi, Pauline; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia M

    2016-11-01

    To summarise the literature describing new graduate nurse transition to professional practice within the primary health care (PHC) setting. There is a plethora of research literature spanning several decades about new graduate nurse transition in the acute care setting. Yet, the experiences of new graduate nurse in the PHC setting is unremarkable particularly considering the increasing demand for skilled health care workers and focus of health reform to provide care where people work and live. Electronic data bases, Academic Search Complete, EBSCO, Medline, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and ERIC were searched using a combination of terms and synonyms arising from three key concepts which identify the phenomenon; 'transition', 'new graduate registered nurse' and 'primary health care. An inclusive search strategy placed no limits on language or publication date. Of the 50 articles located and examined for relevance; 40 were sourced through databases and 10 from Google Scholar/Alerts and hand-searching references. None of the 19 articles retained for analysis addressed all key concepts. Some challenges of researching the professional transition of graduate nurses in PHC settings included, an absence of definitive transition models, a dearth of literature and deference to acute care research. Nursing in PHC settings, particularly the client's home is notably different to hospital settings because of higher levels of isolation and autonomy. Societal changes, health reform and subsequent demand for skilled workers in PHC settings has caused health care providers to question the logic that such roles are only for experienced nurses. Implications arise for education and health service providers who desire to close the theory practice gap and mitigate risk for all stakeholders when next generation nurses have limited opportunities to experience PHC roles as undergraduates and newly graduated registered nurses are already transitioning in this setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 24/7 Registered Nurse Staffing Coverage in Saskatchewan Nursing Homes and Acute Hospital Use.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Margaret J; Murphy, Janice M; Poss, Jeffrey W; McGrail, Kimberlyn M; Kuramoto, Lisa; Huang, Huei-Chung; Bryan, Stirling

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ La législation, dans de nombreuses juridictions, nécessite les établissements des soins de longue durée (SLD) d'avoir une infirmière en service 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine. Bien que la recherche considérable existe sur l'intensité SLD de la dotation en personnel infirmier, il n'existe pas de la recherche empirique relative à cette exigence. Notre étude rétrospectif d'observation a comparé des installations en Saskatchewan avec 24/7 RN couverture aux établissements offrant moins de couverture, complétées par divers modèles de dotation des postes de nuit. Les ratios de risque associés à moins de 24/7 couverture RN complété de la dotation infirmière autorisé de nuit, ajusté pour l'intensité de dotation en personnel infirmier et d'autres facteurs de confusion potentiels, étaient de 1,17, IC 95% [0,91, 1,50] et 1.00, IC à 95% [0,72, 1,39], et avec moins de couverture 24/7 RN complété avec soin par aides personnels de nuit, les ratios de risque étaient de 1,46, IC 95% [1,11, 1,91] et 1,11, IC 95% [0,78, 1,58], pour les patients hospitalisés et de visites aux services d'urgence, respectivement. Ces résultats suggèrent que l'utilisation des soins de courte durée peut être influencée négativement par l'absence de la couverture 24/7 RN.

  8. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  9. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  10. Facilitating the transition from a nursing student to a Registered Nurse in the final clinical practicum: a scoping literature review.

    PubMed

    Kaihlanen, Anu-Marja; Haavisto, Elina; Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Salminen, Leena

    2017-08-22

    Transition from a nursing student to a Registered Nurse is a stressful and challenging process. Different postgraduate residency and orientation programmes have been developed to ease the first year of employment, but less attention has been paid to pregraduate programmes and how the final clinical practicum of nursing education should be conducted to facilitate this transition. To review the empirical studies concerning interventions that aim to facilitate the transition from nursing student to Registered Nurse in the final clinical practicum of nursing education. The aim was to scrutinise the structures and contents of the interventions and factors connected with the facilitated transition. A scoping literature review was conducted with systematic searches in three electronic databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE and ERIC. The searches were limited to studies that were written in English, had available abstract and were published between 2005 and 2016. Two researchers assessed the studies regarding their eligibility with reference to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 17 articles were included in this review. Inductive content analysis was used to categorise the contents of studies. The structures of the interventions described included: the participation, learning environment, amount of clinical work, supervisor criteria and supervision methods. The contents of the interventions included supervisor support, transition supportive learning activities and the student's practicum duties. The factors that were connected with facilitated transition were the quality of the supervision, adjusting to a professional nurse's role, achieved comfort and confidence and achieved competence. This scoping review offers insight into the diversity of interventions facilitating transition implemented in the final clinical practicum of nursing education. In order to unify these practices and determine the elements necessary to include, studies with stronger designs need to be conducted

  11. Relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient dialysis centers.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Janice L

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient hemodialysis settings. The sample consisted of 233 registered staff nurses. The Emotional Exhaustion Subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Conditions for Work Effectiveness II Questionnaire, and Psychological Empowerment Instrument were used to measure variables. Findings indicate that in this population of nurses, there is a significant inverse relationship between structured empowerment and burnout.

  12. RN4CAST@IT-Ped: nurse staffing and children's safety.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Loredana; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Petralia, Paolo; Scelsi, Silvia; Zanini, Milko; Catania, Gianluca; Aleo, Giuseppe; Dasso, Nicoletta; Rossi, Silvia; Watson, Roger; Sermeus, Walter; Icardi, Giancarlo; Aiken, Linda H

    2017-09-27

    Some authors argue that it is not longer ethically correct to expose hospitalized patients to death risks associated with understaffing (Nickitas, 2014). Also the Care Quality Commission (CQC, an independent regulator of all health and social care services in England) has included staffing levels as one of the auditing quality standards when inspecting hospitals and health centres. The Royal College of Nursing, in its document Mandatory Nurse Staffing Levels (RCN, 2012), clearly defined which nurse staffing levels should be adopted by policy makers to ensure the provision of safe care. However, even in the UK where such pressure exists there are no legally defined nurse staffing levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  14. A closer look at the "supervision" and "direction" of certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rita; MacDonald, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    A growing shortage of anesthesiologists in Canada has prompted discussion of how anesthesia provision can be expanded. Canadian anesthesiologists generally support a team approach in which physicians supervise alternative providers. In the U.S., nurses have worked as anesthetists for over 150 years, and their experiences of different models of anesthesia provision provide valuable insights into the potential pitfalls of the team approach as well as the benefits of autonomous nurse anesthetist roles. The authors conducted a qualitative study of the anesthesia team and the role of nurse anesthesia practice in the U.S., and here they present a summary of some of their preliminary findings and the implications for evolving models of care in Canada. Inefficiencies associated with the medical supervision and direction of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are discussed.

  15. A prospective cohort study examining the preferred learning styles of acute care registered nurses.

    PubMed

    McCrow, Judy; Yevchak, Andrea; Lewis, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the preferred learning styles of Registered Nurses practicing in acute care environments and relationships between gender, age, post-graduate experience and the identified preferred learning styles. A prospective cohort study design was used. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and the Felder-Silverman Index of Learning Styles (ILS) questionnaire to determine preferred learning styles. Most of the Registered Nurse participants were balanced across the Active-Reflective (n = 77, 54%), and Sequential-Global (n = 96, 68%) scales. Across the other scales, sensing (n = 97, 68%) and visual (n = 76, 53%) were the most common preferred learning style. There were only a small proportion who had a preferred learning style of reflective (n = 21, 15%), intuitive (n = 5, 4%), verbal (n = 11, 8%) or global learning (n = 15, 11%). Results indicated that gender, age and years since undergraduate education were not related to the identified preferred learning styles. The identification of Registered Nurses' learning style provides information that nurse educators and others can use to make informed choices about modification, development and strengthening of professional hospital-based educational programs. The use of the Index of Learning Styles questionnaire and its ability to identify 'balanced' learning style preferences may potentially yield additional preferred learning style information for other health-related disciplines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of discriminant function analysis to predict student success on the NCLEX-RN.

    PubMed

    Haas, Richard E; Nugent, Katherine E; Rule, Rebecca A

    2004-10-01

    Predicting whether a student will be successful on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) has been an important endeavor for faculty in schools of nursing for the past 2 decades. Extensive documentation exists in the literature concerning research aimed at exploring the academic and nonacademic predictors of success on the NCLEX-RN. Reviews of the findings of these studies indicate that various factors emerge as academic predictors of success. The results of this study suggest that first-time success on the NCLEX-RN can be predicted with a high level of accuracy using existing student data. The findings also support the belief that it is possible to identify students who may be at risk for unsuccessful first time performance on the NCLEX-RN. Early identification of at-risk students will promote timely intervention strategies to optimize the students' potential for success.

  17. Reflective Journaling for Critical Thinking Development in Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Students.

    PubMed

    Raterink, Ginger

    2016-02-01

    Critical thinking, clinical decision making, and critical reflection have been identified as skills required of nurses in every clinical situation. The Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation report suggested that critical reflection is a key to improving the educational process. Reflective journaling is a tool that helps develop such skills. This article presents the tool of reflective journaling and the use of this process by educators working with students. It describes the use of reflective journaling in graduate nursing education, as well as a scoring process to evaluate the reflection and provide feedback. Students and faculty found the journaling to be helpful for reflection of a clinical situation focused on critical thinking skill development. The rubric scoring tool provided faculty with a method for feedback. Reflective journaling is a tool that faculty and students can use to develop critical thinking skills for the role of the advanced practice RN. A rubric scoring system offers a consistent format for feedback. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Fatigue, performance and the work environment: a survey of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Barker, Linsey M; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study of perceived levels of mental, physical and total fatigue, and also acute and chronic fatigue states, among registered nurses. Relationships between dimensions of fatigue and performance were investigated, as were differences in fatigue across levels of several demographic and work environment variables. Fatigue is a factor that has been linked to performance decrements in healthcare workers. As a result of the nature of their work, nurses may be particularly susceptible to multiple dimensions of fatigue, and their performance is closely linked to patient safety. An online survey was used to measure mental, physical, and total fatigue dimensions, acute and chronic fatigue states, and performance. Participants were recruited via convenience sampling in cooperation with professional nursing organizations; 745 registered nurses completed the survey between February 2008 and April 2009. Reported mental fatigue levels were higher than physical fatigue levels, and acute fatigue levels were higher than chronic fatigue levels. All fatigue dimensions and states were negatively correlated with perceived performance. Longer shift lengths and hours worked per week were associated with increases in physical and total fatigue levels. Mental, physical and total fatigue levels also differed with shift schedule. Fatigue levels were negatively correlated with performance, further supporting the role of fatigue in nurse performance. Work environment variables were strongly associated with differences in perceived levels of fatigue. By altering the work environment, it may thus be possible to reduce fatigue levels and the rates of medical errors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. [Nursing registers on sleep and patient perception in a psychiatric unit. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Osés, J Antomás; Del Barrio, S Huarte; Murillo, C Gárriz

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is a frequent problem in people who suffer from mental illnesses. The nursing staff control and register whether or not patients sleep. The aim of this article is to analyze the concordance between the perceptions of the patients of a psychiatric unit on the quality of sleep, and the notes in this respect contained in the nursing records. A comparative study between the answers given by the patients of our unit to 126 questions on insomnia on specific nights, and what was reflected in their nursing records. A reduced version of the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-5) was used. The average value obtained according to the patients' answers was higher (worse sleep) than that given by the nurses, both globally and by item. The nursing records showed much lower values than those given by the patient; Pearson's correlation analysis gave a coefficient of 0.26. Analysis of the degree of agreement provided an index of 0.13 that does not differ significantly from nil agreement. There is a difference between the nursing observations and the subjective sensations of the patients about how they sleep. They indicate that they sleep worse than the nursing records reflect. External observation and self-perception are not antagonistic aspects, but two complementary aspects of patients' sleep.

  20. Knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS in Chinese registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Yinglan; Zeng, Kai; Wu, Ying

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the current knowledge and attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PWHAs) in Chinese registered nurses (RNs) and describe the relationships between the nurses' HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes towards PWHAs. A cohort of 1350 RNs from 51 comprehensive hospitals in Hunan, China were studied over a 4-month period. A 3-stage random sampling method was used. The total correct rate in AIDS Knowledge Scale was 63.2%. Most nurses were good at conceptions of routes of AIDS infection and some basic characteristics, with more than 80% of the correct responses rate of relevant items. Their weakness was in the knowledge of some activities which would not transfer AIDS, such as "eating in a restaurant where the cook has AIDS may infect HIV", with less than 50% of the correct response rate of relevant items. As for attitudes, 94% of the nurses sympathized with HIV patients. About 82.7% of the nurses showed little sympathy to patients getting HIV by sexual promiscuity. Among all the AIDS related knowledge, nurses' conception of non-infectious activities was significantly related to their attitudes to HIV/AIDS. Chinese nurses waster well about HIV/AIDS basic characteristics and the routes of infection, and most nurses sympathize with PWHAs. Their weakness is in the knowledge of non-HIV-infectious activities and they hold different attitudes to those patients getting HIV/AIDS in different ways. There are some barriers for Chinese nurses to take care of all patients equally. Professional development programs are urgently needed to remedy this situation including clarifying the nurses' misconceptions on AIDS related knowledge, developing non-judgmental professional attitudes, and using universal prevention measures when they take care of all patients.

  1. Prior depression and incident back pain among military registered nurses: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D Alan; Menzel, Nancy; Horoho, Patricia

    2017-06-28

    Occupational back pain rates are substantial among registered nurses, and nurses also report high rates of depression. The role of depression as a potential predictor of back pain among nurses appears understudied. The objective of the study was to determine whether a history of depression predicted incident back pain in a population of military registered nurses when controlling for relevant risk factors. We employed a retrospective cohort approach using longitudinal data in which gender-specific subject groups were followed from the beginning of duty as a registered nurse to the occurrence of an outcome, or to censoring due to completion of service or the end of available data. This study included all United States Army registered nurses who began work during 2011-2014 without evidence of prior back pain in clinical records. Data from automatically-collected medical and administrative sources were combined and used to provide 2134 person-years of observation on 1248 individuals. These data were organized at the person-month level in a panel data structure to support discrete-time multivariable logistic regression models. The models examined the relationships between prior depression, Body Mass Index, the presence of prior combat duty and selected control variables and the outcome, the incident occurrence of back pain. The incidence rate of back pain was 18.6 per 100 person-years and the period prevalence was 31.7%. Prior depression was a statistically-significant predictor of incident back pain among female subjects (odds ratio [OR]: 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-2.83, P-value<0.05). Body Mass Index of 30kg/m(2) or greater, prior combat deployments, and age 36 years or older was each associated with back pain for male and female nurses. The study's findings provide the first evidence of a temporal link between antecedent depression and later back pain among female military nurses. High Body Mass Index was found to be a further, modifiable risk factor

  2. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: Results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, Marieke; van Dijk, Liset; Groenewegen, Peter P; de Rond, Marlies; de Veer, Anke J E; Francke, Anneke L

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are generally less supportive and more concerned about nurse prescribing than nurses are. However, direct comparisons between doctors' and nurses' views are scarce and are often based on small sample sizes. To gain insight into the views of Dutch registered nurses (RNs), nurse specialists (with a master's in Advanced Nursing Practice) and physicians on the consequences of nurse prescribing. Survey study. Survey questionnaires were sent to national samples of RNs, nurse specialists and physicians. The questionnaire addressed, among others, respondents' general views on the consequences of nurse prescribing for the quality of care, the nursing and medical professions, and the relationship between the medical and nursing professions. The net response rate was 66.0% for RNs (n=617), 28.3% for nurse specialists (n=375) and 33.7% for physicians (n=265). It was found that all groups agreed that nurse prescribing benefits nurses' daily practice and the nursing profession. There were few concerns about negative consequences for physicians' practice and the medical profession. Nurse specialists gave significantly (P<0.05) more positive scores on most items than RNs and physicians. We found relatively little difference in views between RNs and physicians. It was only on issues surrounding the quality of care and patient safety that doctors showed more concerns, albeit mild, than RNs and nurse specialists. RNs, nurse specialists and physicians generally hold neutral to moderately positive views on nurse prescribing. This is beneficial for the implementation and potential success of nurse prescribing in practice, as a lack of peer support and/or objections from physicians can be a hampering factor

  3. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  4. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  5. Aged over 50 years and practising: separation and changes in nursing practice among New Zealand's older Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Lee, Rochelle

    2014-12-01

    To describe temporary and permanent separation patterns and changes in nursing practice over 5 years, for the 2006 cohort of nurses aged ≥50 years in New Zealand. As ageing populations increase demand on nursing services, workforce projections need better information on work and retirement decision-making of large 'baby-boomer' cohorts. Retrospective cohort analysis using the Nursing Council of New Zealand administrative dataset. A cohort of all nurses aged ≥50 years on the register and practising in 2006 (n = 12,606) was tracked until 2011. After 5 years, a quarter (n = 3161) of the cohort (equivalent to 8·4% of all 2006 practising nurses) was no longer practising. There were no significant differences in permanent separation rates between the ages of 50-58; between 18-54% of annual separations re-entered the workforce. On re-entry, 56% returned to the same clinical area. Annual separations from the workforce declined sharply during the global financial crisis and more of those leaving re-entered the workforce. In 2006, half the cohort worked in hospitals. After 5 years, the number of cohort nurses working in hospitals fell by 45%, while those in community settings increased by 12%. Over 5 years, weekly nursing practice hours declined significantly for every age-band. To retain the experience of older nurses for longer, workforce strategies need to take account of patterns of leaving and re-entering the workforce, preferences for work hours and the differences between the sub-groups across employment settings and practice areas. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Academic and Demographic Predictors of NCLEX-RN Pass Rates in First- and Second-Degree Accelerated BSN Programs.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud A; Flint, Elizabeth P; Van Dyke, Olga; Yang, Qing; Chiang, Li-Chi

    Relatively few studies have addressed predictors of first-attempt outcomes (pass-fail) on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) for accelerated BSN programs. The purpose of this study was to compare potential predictors of NCLEX outcomes in graduates of first-degree accelerated (FDA; n=62) and second-degree accelerated (SDA; n=173) BSN programs sharing a common nursing curriculum. In this retrospective study, bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression assessed significance of selected demographic and academic characteristics as predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes. FDA graduates were more likely than SDA graduates to fail the NCLEX-RN (P=.0013). FDA graduates were more likely to speak English as a second or additional language (P<.0001), have lower end-of-program GPA and HESI Exit Exam scores (both P<.0001), and have a higher proportions of grades ≤ C (P=.0023). All four variables were significant predictors of NCLEX-RN outcomes within both FDA and SDA programs. The only significant predictors in adjusted logistic regression of NCLEX-RN outcome for the pooled FDA+SDA graduate sample were proportion of grades ≤ C (a predictor of NCLEX-RN failure) and HESI Exit Exam score (a predictor of passing NCLEX-RN). Grades of C or lower on any course may indicate inadequate mastery of critical NCLEX-RN content and increased risk of NCLEX-RN failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A structural equation model of turnover for a longitudinal survey among early career registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Carol S; Chao, Ying-Yu; Colder, Craig R; Kovner, Christine T; Chacko, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    Key predictors of early career nurses' turnover are job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job search, intent to stay, and shock (back injuries) based on the literature review and our previous research. Existing research has often omitted one of these key predictors. The purpose of this study in a sample of early career nurses was to compare predictors of turnover to nurses' actual turnover at two time points in their careers. A multi-state longitudinal panel survey of early career nurses was used to compare a turnover model across two time periods. The sample has been surveyed five times. The sample was selected using a two-stage sample of registered nurses nested in 51 metropolitan areas and nine non-metropolitan, rural areas in 34 states and the District of Columbia. The associations between key predictors of turnover were tested using structural equation modeling and data from the earliest and latest panels in our study. We used predictors from the respondents who replied to the Wave-1 survey in 2006 and their turnover status from Wave 2 in 2007 (N=2386). We compared these results to the remaining respondents' predictors from Wave 4 in 2011 and their turnover status in Wave 5 in 2013 (N=1073). We tested and found no effect for missingness from Wave 1-5 and little evidence of attrition bias. Strong support was found for the relationships hypothesized among job satisfaction, organizational commitment, intent to stay, and turnover, with some support for shock and search in the Wave 1-2 sample. However, for Wave 4-5 sample (n=1073), none of the paths through search were significant, nor was the path from shock to turnover. Nurses in the second analysis who had matured longer in their career did not have a significant response to search or shock (back injuries), which may indicate how easily experienced registered nurses find new jobs and/or accommodation to jobs requiring significant physicality. Nurse turnover is a major concern for healthcare organizations

  8. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  9. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  10. Factors related to progression and graduation rates for RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing programs: searching for realistic benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sue; Canary, Cheryl Westlake; Orr, Marsha; Herberg, Paula; Rutledge, Dana N

    2010-03-01

    Measurement and analysis of progression and graduation rates is a well-established activity in schools of nursing. Such rates are indices of program effectiveness and student success. The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (2008), in its recently revised Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Degree Nursing Programs, specifically dictated that graduation rates (including discussion of entry points, timeframes) be calculated for each degree program. This context affects what is considered timely progression to graduation. If progression and graduation rates are critical outcomes, then schools must fully understand their measurement as well as interpretation of results. Because no national benchmarks for nursing student progression/graduation rates exist, schools try to set expectations that are realistic yet academically sound. RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students are a unique cohort of baccalaureate learners who need to be understood within their own learning context. The purposes of this study were to explore issues and processes of measuring progression and graduation rates in an RN-to-BSN population and to identify factors that facilitate/hinder their successful progression to work toward establishing benchmarks for success. Using data collected from 14 California schools of nursing with RN-to-BSN programs, RN-to-BSN students were identified as generally older, married, and going to school part-time while working and juggling family responsibilities. The study found much program variation in definition of terms and measures used to report progression and graduation rates. A literature review supported the use of terms such as attrition, retention, persistence, graduation, completion, and success rates, in an overlapping and sometimes synonymous fashion. Conceptual clarity and standardization of measurements are needed to allow comparisons and setting of realistic benchmarks. One of the most important factors identified

  11. Turnover intention among hospital-based registered nurses in the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Lansiquot, Beverley Anne; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2012-06-01

    Vacancy rates for nurses in the English-speaking Caribbean are estimated at 30% with turnover typically associated with migration. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of hospital-based registered nurses (RNs) in the sub-region, their practice environment and turnover intention in two and five years, respectively, and to determine the relationships among practice environment characteristics and turnover intention. A descriptive correlational design was used with self-reported questionnaires from a convenience sample of 301 RNs working in hospitals in four English speaking Eastern Caribbean countries. Single-item visual analog scales (VAS) were used to measure turnover intention in 2 years and 5 years. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) measured the characteristics in the practice environment. The mean age of the nurses was 32.5 (SD = 6.75) years. Most nurses (58.8%) were single and 91.4% had relatives living abroad. Nurses scored three PES-NWI subscales < 2.5, indicating a less positive practice environment: resource adequacy, nurse participation in hospital affairs, and nurse managers' ability, leadership, and support. The subscale for collegial nurse-physician relations received the best rating (mean = 2.61, SD = .62). For 2-year intention to leave, the mean rating on the 100-mm VAS was 63.2, while that for the 5-year intention to leave was 65.6. No significant correlations were found among four of the five PES-NWI subscales and turnover intention in 2 and 5 years. The practice environment, while generally unfavorable, is not associated with the nurses' intention to leave their jobs. These findings support the current policy position that calls for managing turnover among nurses. Nursing and health system administrators should assess, plan, and implement workforce policies to slow the outflow of nurses. Initiatives to improve the work environment and the delivery of high-quality care are important to RNs in

  12. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  13. Preadmission Academic Achievement Criteria as Predictors of Nursing Program Completion and NCLEX-RN Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    Admission policies and practices in higher education, including those in nursing programs, are diverse; yet administrators have traditionally relied upon preadmission academic achievement for selection of qualified students. Higher education administrators have the responsibility to serve the institution and all of its constituents, ensuring that…

  14. Receptivity to mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare workers among registered nurses working on inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Poland, Gregory A; Ofstead, Cori L; Tucker, Sharon J; Beebe, Timothy J

    2008-02-01

    A survey that included questions about preferred methods of influenza prevention was completed by 513 registered nurses working on inpatient units. Vaccination was the preferred influenza prevention method among 83.0% of respondents. Of 506 respondents, 283 (56.0%) stated that mandatory influenza vaccination was appropriate for healthcare workers, and 394 (59.4%) of 512 RNs reported that they would support a policy requiring annual influenza vaccination for healthcare workers that allowed for informed declination.

  15. The prevalence and risk factors for percutaneous injuries in registered nurses in the home health care sector.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Pearson, Julie M; Sherman, Martin F; Samar, Stephanie M; Canton, Allison N; Stone, Patricia W

    2009-09-01

    Patients continue to enter home health care (HHC) "sicker and quicker," often with complex health problems that require extensive intervention. This higher level of acuity may increase the risk of percutaneous injury (PI), yet information on the risk and risk factors for PI and other types of exposures in this setting is exceptionally sparse. To address this gap, a large cross-sectional study of self-reported exposures in HHC registered nurses (RNs) was conducted. A convenience sample of HHC RNs (N=738) completed a survey addressing 5 major constructs: (1) worker-centered characteristics, (2) patient-related characteristics, (3) household characteristics, (4) organizational factors, and (5) prevalence of PIs and other blood and body fluid exposures. Analyses were directed at determining significant risk factors for exposure. Fourteen percent of RNs reported one or more PIs in the past 3 years (7.6 per 100 person-years). Nearly half (45.8%) of all PIs were not formally reported. PIs were significantly correlated with a number of factors, including lack of compliance with Standard Precautions (odds ratio [OR], 1.72; P=.019; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-2.71); recapping of needles (OR, 1.78; P=.016; 95% CI: 1.11-2.86); exposure to household stressors (OR, 1.99; P=.005; 95% CI: 1.22-3.25); exposure to violence (OR, 3.47; P=.001; 95% CI: 1.67-7.20); mandatory overtime (OR, 2.44; P=.006; 95% CI: 1.27-4.67); and safety climate (OR, 1.88; P=.004; 95% CI: 1.21-2.91) among others. The prevalence of PI was substantial. Underreporting rates and risk factors for exposure were similar to those identified in other RN work populations, although factors uniquely associated with home care were also identified. Risk mitigation strategies tailored to home care are needed to reduce risk of exposure in this setting.

  16. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  17. The Effect of Classroom and Clinical Learning Approaches on Academic Achievement in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrick, Jo Anne

    2010-01-01

    While many students compete aggressively to enter into nursing schools, those who succeed have no guarantee they will be successful in their nursing studies, graduating, and passing the National Council Licensing Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN[R]). This study's objective was to gain a better understanding of how nursing students approach…

  18. Model of anesthesia care that combines anesthesiologists and registered nurses during cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Erie, Andrew J; McHugh, Ryan; Warner, Mary; Erie, Jay C

    2011-03-01

    To determine the safety and practicality of a combined anesthesiologist and registered nurse model of anesthesia care in cataract surgery. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Case series. This retrospective review comprised consecutive patients having phacoemulsification cataract surgery and peribulbar injection anesthesia combined with propofol intravenous sedation between August 1, 2004, and July 31, 2006. In all cases, anesthesiologist-supervised intravenous propofol sedation during injection anesthesia was followed by registered nurse observation for the remainder of the surgery. Outcome measures were the rate of subsequent anesthesiologist intervention, intraoperative complications, and associated risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to estimate risk for anesthesiologist intervention. The study reviewed 3656 cases. There were no serious medical complications leading to postoperative hospitalization. Fifty-four cases (1.5%) required subsequent intraoperative anesthesiologist intervention. Evaluation of systolic hypertension (40 of 54 cases, 74%) was the most common reason for anesthesiologist intervention. There was no correlation between anesthesiologist intervention and patient age or sex (P=.77 and P=.41, respectively). The risk for anesthesiologist intervention increased 2.2-fold for every 1 unit increase in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status score (P=.007). The monitoring of cataract surgery patients by registered nurses after anesthesiologist-supervised intravenous propofol sedation during injection anesthesia was associated with very low complication and anesthesiologist intervention rates. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Registered nurses' ideas of physical science concepts relevant to their clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Lesley M.; Batts, Judith E.

    1996-09-01

    Experience in teaching science to nurses has raised the question of whether nurses' expressions of their understanding of concepts in physical science are adequate for professional practice. Nurses' descriptions of physical science concepts relevant to their practice must be explicated before educators can develop strategies to enhance nurses' learning of science. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to establish registered nurses' conceptions of physical science in their clinical practice. Data were collected using a multiple choice question survey, field work and focused interviews. Six categories of conceptions emerged from data analysis. Of the three which related to complexity of understanding “association” and “definition” were predominant and related in the main, to two of the three contextual categories “instrumentation/equipment” and “procedure.” There were few examples of the other two categories of “elaboration” and “body processes.” We argue that the conceptions held by the nurses were not adequate to allow them to fulfil their roles as professional practitioners in health care.

  20. Myths and stereotypes: how registered nurses screen for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ruthie

    2010-11-01

    Intimate partner violence, sometimes referred to as domestic violence, is a prevalent problem in the United States and across the world. Emergency nurses are often the first health care providers to ask individuals about this health issue and are often the first to offer intervention and prevention measures. This study used a phenomenological qualitative approach to examine the role of the registered nurse in the emergency setting as it relates to intimate partner violence. Thirteen emergency nurses from the South Central United States were interviewed for this study. Four major themes emerged during analysis of the interviews. The 4 themes were (1) myths, stereotypes, and fears; (2) demeanor; (3) frustrations; and (4) safety benefits. This study suggests that emergency nurses are not screening for intimate partner violence based on a protocol as suggested by many professional organizations but rather are screening certain patients for violence based on the nurses' perception of whether particular patients are likely to be victims of violence. Copyright © 2010 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.