Science.gov

Sample records for registries

  1. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  2. JBEI Registry

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registriesmore » for data sharing and exchange.« less

  3. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future. PMID:25553603

  4. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  5. Second generation registry framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. Results This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. Conclusions We introduce the

  6. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2011 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  7. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  9. Malaysian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Jaffar, Sharifah Halimah

    2013-02-01

    The National Malaysian Twin Registry was established in Royal College of Medicine, Perak, University Kuala Lumpur (UniKL) in June 2008 through a grant provided by UniKL. The general objective is to facilitate scientific research involving participation of twins and their family members in order to answer questions of health and wellbeing relevant to Malaysians. Recruitment is done via mass media, poster, and pamphlets. We now have 266 adult and 204 children twins registered. Several research projects including reproductive health study of twins and the role of co-bedding on growth and development of children are carried out. Registry holds annual activities for twins and seeks to provide health-related information for twins. We seek international collaboration.

  10. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  11. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis.

  12. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (<40%). These proportions can be even lower when only affirmative decisions are considered. One nation provides priority status on the transplant waiting list as an incentive to affirmative registration, while another nation makes registering a donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (<0.5%). The variation in organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  13. Registries Help Moms Measure Medication Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the case of the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry, which studies the effects of drugs for ... is taking. For example, the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry website lists more than 30 medications being ...

  14. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  15. Evaluation and implementation of public health registries.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D J; Henry, R C; Hogan, J G; Van Amburg, G H; Taylor, J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid proliferation of registries has occurred during the last 20 years. Given the long-term commitment of resources associated with registries and limited public health funding, proposals for new registries should be carefully considered before being funded. A registry is defined as a data base of identifiable persons containing a clearly defined set of health and demographic data collected for a specific public health purpose. Criteria for evaluating whether a registry is needed, feasible, or the most effective and efficient means of collecting a specific set of health data are presented. They include an evaluation of the stated purpose; a review of the function, duration, and scope of the registry; consideration of existing alternative data sources; an assessment of the practical feasibility of the registry; the likelihood of sufficient start-up and long-term funding; and an evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the registry. Creating a public health registry is a complex process. A range of technical and organizational skills is required for a registry to be successfully implemented. Eight requirements are identified as crucial for the successful development of a new registry. They include an implementation plan, adequate documentation, quality control procedures, case definition and case-finding (ascertainment) procedures, determination of data elements, data collection and processing procedures, data access policy, and a framework for dissemination of registry data and findings. PMID:1902306

  16. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  17. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  18. A renal registry for Africa: first steps

    PubMed Central

    Davids, M. Razeen; Eastwood, John B.; Selwood, Neville H.; Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A.M.; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries. PMID:26798479

  19. A renal registry for Africa: first steps.

    PubMed

    Davids, M Razeen; Eastwood, John B; Selwood, Neville H; Arogundade, Fatiu A; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A M; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries.

  20. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  1. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  2. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  3. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  4. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  5. eXtended MetaData Registry

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  6. Patient registries: utility, validity and inference.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel; Vehik, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Patient registries are essential tools for public health surveillance and research inquiry, and are a particularly important resource for understanding rare diseases. Registries provide consistent data for defined populations and can support the study of the distribution and determinants of various diseases. One advantage of registries is the ability to observe caseload and population characteristics over time, which might facilitate the evaluation of disease incidence, disease etiology, planning, operation and evaluation of services, evaluation of treatment patterns, and diagnostic classification. Any registry program must collect high quality data to be useful for its stated purpose. Registries can be developed for many different needs, and caution should be taken in interpreting registry data, which has inherent biases. We describe the methodological issues, limitations, and ideal features of registries to support various rare disease purposes. The future impact of registries on our understanding and interventions for rare diseases will depend upon technological and political solutions for global cooperation to achieve consistent data (via standards) and regulations for various registry applications.

  7. National Suicide Registry Malaysia (NSRM).

    PubMed

    Hayati, A N; Kamarul, A K

    2008-09-01

    To create a nationwide system to capture data on completed suicide in Malaysia i.e. the morbidity, geographic and temporal trends and the population at high risk of suicide. Data from this registry can later be used to stimulate and facilitate further research on suicide. This paper describes the rationale and processes involved in developing a national suicide registry in 2007. The diagnosis of suicide is based on the ICD-10 codes for fatal intentional self-harm (X60-X84). A case report form with an accompanying instruction manual had been prepared to ensure systematic and uniform data collection. State Forensic Pathologist's offices are responsible for data collection in their respective states, and in turn will submit the data to a central data management unit. Data collection began in July 2007 and currently in data cleaning process. Training for source data producers is ongoing. In 2008, the NSRM plans to involve university hospitals into its network as currently only Ministry of Health hospitals are involved. The NSRM will be launching its online application for case registration this year while an overview of results will be available via its public domain at www.nsrm.gov.my beginning 20 April 2008. To efficiently capture the data on suicide, a concerted effort between various agencies is needed. A lot of conceptual work and data base development remains to be done in order to position preventive efforts on a more solid foundation. PMID:19227674

  8. [Respiratory disease registries in Spain: fundamentals and organization].

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Morales, Pilar; Blanco, Ignacio; Vendrell, Montserrat; de Gracia Roldán, Javier; Monreal, Manel; Orriols, Ramón; Isidro, Isabel; Abú-Shams, Khalil; Escribano, Pilar; Villena, Victoria; Rodrigo, Teresa; Vidal Plà, Rafael; García-Yuste, Mariano; Miravitlles, Marc

    2011-08-01

    This present paper describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the respiratory disease registries in Spain with the aim to report their activities and increase their diffusion. The document compiles information on the following registries: the Spanish Registry of Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, Spanish Registry of Bronchiectasis, International Registry of Thromboembolic Disease, Spanish Registry of Occupational Diseases, Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Artery Hypertension, Registry of Pleural Mesothelioma, Spanish Registry of Tuberculosis and Spanish Multi-center Study of Neuroendocrine Pulmonary Tumors. Our paper provides information on each of the registries cited. Each registry has compiled specific clinical information providing data in real situations, and completes the results obtained from clinical assays. Said information has been published both in national as well as international publications and has lead to the creation of various guidelines. Therefore, the activities of the professionals involved in the registries have spread the knowledge about the diseases studied, promoting the exchange of information among workgroups.

  9. 78 FR 19716 - International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries AGENCY... of Cardiovascular Registries.'' The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the development of an international consortium of cardiovascular registries with a broad array of interested stakeholders. The...

  10. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the...

  11. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  12. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  13. The importance of registries in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Leal, Yelda A; Fernández-Garrote, Leticia M; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, with 14.1 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths annually. A marked disparity exists between developed countries and developing countries, with 57% of new cases and 65% of deaths in 2012 occurring in developing countries. This global picture can only be obtained because of data obtained from population-based cancer registries, which allow cancer estimations for different geographic areas. Our objective is to perform a review of different types of registries and their role in the control of cancer. These types of registries are lacking in developing countries. In Central and South America, only 6% of the population is included in cancer registries versus 83% in North America. It is necessary to increase the coverage of cancer registries to obtain more reliable data that will more appropriately guide control programs. PMID:27557391

  14. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  15. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  16. Implementation of a Comprehensive Orthopaedic Registry System.

    PubMed

    Tokish, John M; Alexander, Thomas C

    2016-01-01

    Advances in information technology have allowed for improvements in the collection and analysis of large-scale outcomes data. These data can be used in the practice of orthopaedics for benchmarking, value analysis, and comparative effectiveness research. The implementation of registries within a busy surgical practice can be challenging, costly, and inefficient. Content, platform, and characteristics are the key elements required to successfully implement a patient-based orthopaedic outcomes data registry. Specific barriers to implementing registries are discussed, and solutions are proposed, to provide an example for optimal integration within clinical practices that may have varying goals.

  17. 75 FR 65629 - Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee AGENCY: Appraisal... the annual National Registry fee to $40. SUMMARY: Under authority in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform... Registry fee (Registry fee) to $40 from the current $25 amount at its meeting on October 13, 2010. The...

  18. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  19. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  20. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  1. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  2. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  3. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  4. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  5. The Italian registry of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Clemente, C; Orazi, A; Rilke, F

    1988-01-01

    After a review of the incidence data on malignant soft-tissue tumors in Italy (Registro dei Tumori della Regione Lombardia, provincia di Varese), Europe (nine European Cancer Registries considered representative of various geographical areas) and extra-European countries (data of ten World Cancer Registries), the aim and the organization of the Italian Malignant Soft-Tissue Tumor Registry are described. The collection system is based on dedicated forms prepared for the computerization of all data. From 1.1.1985 to 31.3.1987, 207 cases of malignant and potentially malignant soft-tissue tumors entered the Registry, with exclusion of those sarcomas arising in viscera. The distribution, categorized by histologic type, sex and site, and the preliminary results on relapses and metastases are reported.

  6. [Hoogendoorn and the medical registry].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Dirk Hoogendoorn (1914-1990) was a solo general practitioner in the village of Wijhe (eastern part of the Netherlands) from 1941, during the time of the German occupation, until 1971. From the very beginning, he combined his practice with the recording of disease patterns. He first concentrated on infectious diseases, especially whooping cough, which was the subject of his doctoral thesis. He later set up registries in two regional hospitals. When his initiative expanded to a national organisation, he became its advisor. He nonetheless continued to produce statistics on a variety of disorders as well as on surgical procedures, even more so after his retirement. The subjects ranged from traffic accidents and tonsillectomies to the discrepancy between increased body height and the unchanging height of the tennis net, but he had the most affinity with the practice of obstetrics. He stirred up much emotion by showing that a decrease in perinatal mortality was proceeding slower in the Netherlands than in other European countries, especially by suggesting a causal relationship between this lag and the high rate of Dutch home deliveries. This debate has continued to this day. PMID:23075774

  7. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization.

  8. Use of registry employees can pose legal problems.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S F

    1994-07-01

    In view of the potential legal liability to which a recipient entity can be exposed when using registry employees, some care must be taken in drafting registry contract services and in modulating the recipient entity's behavior towards the registry personnel. The following steps should generally be taken by health care establishments purchasing registry services to minimize such exposure: (1) Ensure that the registry treats its personnel as employees and complies with all applicable employment law obligations, including state and federal employment tax requirements, workers' compensation laws, and any state law wage and hour requirements in the recipient's state. (2) If using an out-of-state registry, make sure that the registry also has workers' compensation insurance in the recipient's state and complies with that state workers' compensation laws. (3) Make sure that termination decisions regarding registry employees are not made for reasons that violate any federal anti-discrimination laws. (4) Provide in the registry agreement for full indemnification by the registry to the recipient. (5) Ensure that the registry is solvent and has adequate insurance to honor its indemnification obligation. (6) Obtain a warranty from the registry that it carefully screens all of its employees before hiring them. (7) Expressly state in the registry agreement that the registry has the right to discipline and supervise the personnel it refers. (8) Do not reject registry personnel for reasons that would be improper with respect to the facility's own employees, e.g., race, sex, age, religion, disability, etc. PMID:10135140

  9. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  10. The Egyptian clinical trials' registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov).

    PubMed

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2016-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended. PMID:26843968

  11. ISHKS joint registry: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Pachore, Jawahir A; Vaidya, Shrinand V; Thakkar, Chandrasekhar J; Bhalodia, Haresh Kumar P; Wakankar, Hemant M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are the most widely practiced surgical options for arthritis all over the world and its application is rising in India. Indian Society of Hip and Knee Surgeons (ISHKS) has established a joints registry and has been collecting data for last 6 years. Materials & Methods: All members of ISHKS are encouraged to actively participate in the registry. A simple two page knee and hip form can be downloaded from the website www.ishks.com. The information collected includes patient demographics, indication for surgery, implant details and in case of revision arthroplasty: the details of implants removed and the cause of failure of primary arthroplasty. These forms are mailed to the central registry office and the data is fed in computerized registry. Data collection started in October 2006. Results: Joint registry is a very important initiative of ISHKS and till date, have data of 34,478 TKAs and 3604 THAs, contributed by 42 surgeons across India. Some important observations have emerged. Data of 34,478 TKAs was assessed: These included 8612 males (25%) and 25,866 females (75%). Average age was 64.4 years (Osteoarthritis range: 45 to 88 years; Rheumatoid arthritis range: 22 to 74 years). Average body mass index was 29.1 (Range: 18.1 to 42.9). The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis in 33,444 (97%) and rheumatoid arthritis in 759 (2.2%). Total of 3604 THA procedures were recorded. These included 2162 (60%) male patients and 1442 (40%) female patients. Average age was 52 years (Range 17 to 85 years) and average BMI was 25.8 (Range: 17.3 to 38.5). The indications for THA was AVN in 49%. Conclusion: The registry will become more meaningful in years to come. Active participation of all arthroplasty surgeons across India is vital for the success of the joints registry. PMID:24133312

  12. The Egyptian clinical trials’ registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov)

    PubMed Central

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Taha, Fatma M.

    2015-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended. PMID:26843968

  13. The Egyptian clinical trials' registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov).

    PubMed

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2016-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended.

  14. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports. PMID:19227671

  15. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports.

  16. Vascular surgical data registries for small computers.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J L; Rosenberg, N

    1984-08-01

    Recent designs for computer-based vascular surgical registries and clinical data bases have employed large centralized systems with formal programming and mass storage. Small computers, of the types created for office use or for word processing, now contain sufficient speed and memory storage capacity to allow construction of decentralized office-based registries. Using a standardized dictionary of terms and a method of data organization adapted to word processing, we have created a new vascular surgery data registry, "VASREG." Data files are organized without programming, and a limited number of powerful logical statements in English are used for sorting. The capacity is 25,000 records with current inexpensive memory technology. VASREG is adaptable to computers made by a variety of manufacturers, and interface programs are available for conversion of the word processor formated registry data into forms suitable for analysis by programs written in a standard programming language. This is a low-cost clinical data registry available to any physician. With a standardized dictionary, preparation of regional and national statistical summaries may be facilitated.

  17. [Considerations on limits and profits of registries].

    PubMed

    Addis, Antonio; Costa, Enrico; De Palma, Rossana; Magrini, Nicola; Marata, Anna Maria; Martelli, Luisa; Papini, Donato; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The article collects the summary of the discussion occurred in the setting of PRIER II, in the session dedicated to the taxonomy of registries. Shown below, some specific contributions by health professionals working at the regional departments, which deal with registries, as well as the contribution on the same subject by specialists working at some pharmaceutical companies. In particular, after the presentation summarized in the article by prof. Giuseppe Costa1, the contributions, respectively by a representative of the Emilia-Romagna Region, of a health and hospital service and by the PRIER II workgroup, are following. Finally, a collective work with all participants to the working group took place to focus on all the issues considered to be crucial in defining clinical registries. At the same discussion table, institutional representatives of the regulatory national and regional branch were also invited to take into consideration the points of view of all public and private registry users, in particular in their benefits, limits and purposes. Going through the discussion on a specific check list and deepening a number of statements identified by the working group, a list of key points, essential to characterize each clinical registry, was produced. PMID:26418504

  18. Systematic Review of Cerebral Palsy Registries/Surveillance Groups: Relationships between Registry Characteristics and Knowledge Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Donna S; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J; Pavone, Larissa; Mutlu, Akmer; Dewald, Julius PA; Msall, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive summary of the body of research disseminated by Cerebral Palsy (CP) registries and surveillance programs from January 2009 through May 2014 in order to describe the influence their results have on our overall understanding of CP. Secondly, registries/surveillance programs and the work they produced were evaluated and grouped using standardized definitions and classification systems. Method A systematic review search in PubMed, CINAH and Embase for original articles published from 1 January 2009 to 20 May 2014 originating from or supported by population based CP registries and surveillance programs or population based national registries including CP were included. Articles were grouped by 2009 World CP Registry Congress aim, registry/surveillance program classification, geographical region, and the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) domain. Registry variables were assessed using the ICF-CY classification. Results Literature searches returned 177 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The majority (69%) of registry/surveillance program productivity was related to contributions as a Resource for CP Research. Prevention (23%) and Surveillance (22%) articles were other areas of achievement, but fewer articles were published in the areas of Planning (17%) and Raising the Profile of CP (2%). There was a range of registry/surveillance program classifications contributing to this productivity, and representation from multiple areas of the globe, although most of the articles originated in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The domains of the ICF that were primarily covered included body structures and function at the early stages of life. Encouragingly, a variety of CP registry/surveillance program initiatives included additional ICF domains of participation and environmental and personal factors. Interpretation CP registries and surveillance programs, including novel non-traditional ones

  19. US Beryllium Case Registry through 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Sprince, N.L.; Kazemi, H.

    1980-02-01

    A synopsis of the cases reported to the Beryllium Case Registry between 1973 and 1977 is presented. As of 1973, there were 832 cases of beryllium disease entered into the Registry. In the five years since that report, 55 additional cases have been added, 40 men and 15 women. Exposures occured in the electronics and nuclear industries in the production and use of beryllium containing alloys and beryllium oxide ceramis. Pathological changes in the lung tissue are described. Cases continue to be reported in which the diagnosis was sarcoidosis until the history of beryllium exposure led to the finding of beryllium in the lung tissue or mediastinal lymph node biopsy. Data from the Registry support the fact that chronic beryllium disease is a continued occupational hazard.

  20. Irish National Joint Registry: a concept.

    PubMed

    Oduwole, K O; Codd, M B; Byrne, F; O'Byrne, J; Kenny, P J

    2008-12-01

    Despite the well-documented benefits, some countries have yet to agree on the establishment of a national joint register. A questionnaire study was undertaken to ascertain the opinions of the consultant orthopaedic surgeons and specialist registrars, regarding establishment of an Irish National Joint Register. The aim was to find out the possible reasons why a national joint register has not been established in Ireland. A 69% first response rate was recorded. Ninety-seven percent believe it is time to set up a registry and 81% say it should be made compulsory for unwilling surgeons and hospitals to participate. Despite the overwhelming support, privacy and liability issues were major concerns. Fifty-eight percent agree that access to registry report by general public can expose surgeons and hospitals to medico-legal implications. Legislation may be required to protect the integrity of a national joint replacement registry to ensure that the data are used as intended.

  1. The Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Jong Woo; Chung, Kee Wha; Shin, Joong Sik; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Auta, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Twin studies of Africans have been scarce although Africans have shown the highest twin birth rate in the world. As a parallel study of the South Korean Twin Registry, the Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry (NTSR) was developed to understand causal influences on the development of cognitive abilities, personality, and mental health among Nigerians. Currently, 1,134 twins and 404 full- and half-siblings have been registered with NTSR. This article describes research background, goals, major recruitment strategies, measures, and future directions of the NTSR.

  2. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  7. [Cancer registry of laryngectomized persons in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Pavlić, Blazenka

    2014-03-01

    Cancer poses a major problem in the population of Croatia. Owing to Professor Zivko Kulcar, who founded Cancer Registry at the Institute of Public Health in 1959, statistical data on patients with malignant cancer, including information on the entire territory of the Republic of Croatia, are available. The Act on Official Statistics (Official Gazette 103/2003) and Annual Implementation Plan regulate data recording in Cancer Registry, which is performed by the County Public Health Institutes that control the volume and quality of registration, after which the information is forwarded to the Croatian National Public Health Institute. If information and statistical data are needed for public health or scientific research purposes, one should approach Cancer Registry, having previously filled out a form for aggregated or individual information. However, when requesting information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy, such information is not available. If information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy is needed, e.g., how many of such individuals there are out there, when, where and how they are treated, or their demographic characteristics, such information unfortunately is not available. Therefore, establishment of the registry of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is proposed, which would be maintained by nurses working at ENT departments. PMID:24979893

  8. Registries in systemic sclerosis: a worldwide experience.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Felice; Walker, Ulrich A; Nihtyanova, Svetlana; Moinzadeh, Pia; Hunzelmann, Nicholas; Krieg, Thomas; Steen, Virginia; Baron, Murray; Sampaio-Barros, Percival; Kayser, Cristiane; Nash, Peter; Denton, Chris P; Tyndall, Alan; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2011-01-01

    SSc is a multisystem disease characterized by an unpredictable course, high mortality and resistance to therapy. The complexity and severity of SSc is a growing burden on the health-care systems. As a result, researchers are seeking new therapeutic strategies for effectively managing these patients. Disease registries are used to support care management efforts for groups of patients with chronic diseases and are meaningful to capture and track key patient information to assist the physicians in managing patients. For these reasons, SSc surveys, research associations and consortiums are pivotal to conduct ongoing research and data collection to enhance disease knowledge and support research projects. Currently, there are several national SSc registries in the UK, Germany, USA, Canada, Brazil and Australia. There is also an international registry established by the European League Against Rheumatism scleroderma trial and research (EUSTAR) called minimal essential data set (MEDS) Online, which collects data from over 8000 patients from 92 centres worldwide, including 21 European centres and 9 centres outside Europe. By collecting, analysing and disseminating data on disease progression and patient responses to long-term disease management strategies, registries help to improve understanding of the disease and keep medical professionals up to date on the latest advances. PMID:21148153

  9. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills.

  10. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills. PMID:26436185

  11. Clinical Case Registries: Simultaneous Local and National Disease Registries for Population Quality Management

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Lisa I.; Gavrilov, Sergey; Loomis, Timothy P.; Halloran, James P.; Phillips, Barbara R.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Mole, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a system-wide, patient-centric electronic medical record system (EMR) within which the authors developed the Clinical Case Registries (CCR) to support population-centric delivery and evaluation of VA medical care. To date, the authors have applied the CCR to populations with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Local components use diagnosis codes and laboratory test results to identify patients who may have HIV or HCV and support queries on local care delivery with customizable reports. For each patient in a local registry, key EMR data are transferred via HL7 messaging to a single national registry. From 128 local registry systems, over 60,000 and 320,000 veterans in VA care have been identified as having HIV and HCV, respectively, and entered in the national database. Local and national reports covering demographics, resource usage, quality of care metrics and medication safety issues have been generated. PMID:19717794

  12. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov...

  13. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  14. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  15. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS System for Award Management 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for debris...

  16. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for...

  17. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS System for Award Management 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for debris...

  18. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  19. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov when contracting for debris...

  20. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov...

  1. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov when contracting for debris...

  2. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  3. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  4. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  5. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  6. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  7. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  8. Ankylosing spondylitis clinical registries: principles, practices and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Liron; Clegg, Daniel O; Inman, Robert D

    2013-06-01

    The need for a rigorously developed longitudinal registry of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) is clear and urgent. Like randomized controlled trials, registries rely on a prospective, systematic protocol-driven approach to data acquisition to assess outcomes for a prescribed cohort of patients. Registries seek to capture large numbers of patients across large geographic zones and can serve as a valuable resource for patient advocacy, patient education and support, incidence and prevalence, and broad demographic profiles. Building on 3 existing registries--the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Ankylosing Spondylitis, the Program to Understand the Longterm Outcomes of Spondyloarthritis (PULSAR) and the University Health Network Spondyloarthritis Program--these registries and the Spondylitis Association of America propose to form a combined registry of North American SpA patients. The combined registry would, ideally, complement ongoing clinical goals and improve patient care. PMID:23841118

  9. METADATA REGISTRY, ISO/IEC 11179

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Buttler, D J

    2008-01-03

    ISO/IEC-11179 is an international standard that documents the standardization and registration of metadata to make data understandable and shareable. This standardization and registration allows for easier locating, retrieving, and transmitting data from disparate databases. The standard defines the how metadata are conceptually modeled and how they are shared among parties, but does not define how data is physically represented as bits and bytes. The standard consists of six parts. Part 1 provides a high-level overview of the standard and defines the basic element of a metadata registry - a data element. Part 2 defines the procedures for registering classification schemes and classifying administered items in a metadata registry (MDR). Part 3 specifies the structure of an MDR. Part 4 specifies requirements and recommendations for constructing definitions for data and metadata. Part 5 defines how administered items are named and identified. Part 6 defines how administered items are registered and assigned an identifier.

  10. A statewide cancer registry: the Pennsylvania experience.

    PubMed

    Powell, R L; Dietrich, R J

    1990-12-01

    Pennsylvania has been successful in establishing a statewide cancer registry. The success of this registry results from the efforts of many different groups. The program has benefited from strong legislation making cancer a reportable disease and assigning the responsibility of reporting to hospitals. The PCR has implemented many initiatives to ensure that the cooperation of hospitals in operating the system is maintained, and that there is sufficient knowledge among hospital personnel to ensure complete casefinding. As the amount of statewide incidence data is increased over several years, the utility of these data for program planning and epidemiologic studies will increase greatly. The establishment and ongoing operation of the PCR ensure that cancer incidence data are available in providing answers to questions such as some of those asked following the accident at Three Mile Island. PMID:10108500

  11. [Implications of the REACH registry for neurologists].

    PubMed

    Roquer, Jaume

    2009-09-01

    Data from the REACH registry help to understand distinct problems affecting patients with arteriosclerotic disease. The arteriosclerotic burden evaluated by quantifying the number of diseased vascular territories is a marker of poor prognosis that increases the risk of recurrences, morbidity and mortality and death at 1 year. In cerebrovascular disease, it is important to highlight that patients with stroke are those with the highest rates of cerebral reinfarction and also show the highest combined rate of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke. Special care must be taken in patients who have had a transient ischemic attack since these patients accumulate a number of vascular risk factors. Data from the REACH registry suggest that preventive treatment and control of vascular risk factors could be improved, especially control of hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Consequently, preventive measures should be intensified in these patients to achieve adequate control of risk factors through encouraging healthy lifestyle habits, appropriate use of drugs and treatment adherence.

  12. The Lupus Family Registry and Repository

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Astrid; Sevier, Sydney; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Aberle, Teresa; Cooney, Carisa M.; Grether, Anya; James, Ellen; Ning, Jared; Tesiram, Joanne; Morrisey, Jean; Powe, Tiny; Drexel, Mark; Daniel, Wes; Namjou, Bahram; Ojwang, Joshua O.; Nguyen, Kim L.; Cavett, Joshua W.; Te, Jeannie L.; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Moser, Kathy; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Carson, Craig W.; Quintero-del-Rio, Ana I.; Ballesteros, Maria del Carmen; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Karp, David R.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael; Merrill, Joan T.; Rivera, Roberto; Petri, Michelle A.; Albert, Daniel A.; Espinoza, Luis R.; Utset, Tammy O.; Shaver, Timothy S.; Arthur, Eugene; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bruner, Gail R.

    2011-01-01

    The Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR) was established with the goal of assembling and distributing materials and data from families with one or more living members diagnosed with SLE, in order to address SLE genetics. In the present article, we describe the problems and solutions of the registry design and biometric data gathering; the protocols implemented to guarantee data quality and protection of participant privacy and consent; and the establishment of a local and international network of collaborators. At the same time, we illustrate how the LFRR has enabled progress in lupus genetics research, answering old scientific questions while laying out new challenges in the elucidation of the biologic mechanisms that underlie disease pathogenesis. Trained staff ascertain SLE cases, unaffected family members and population-based controls, proceeding in compliance with the relevant laws and standards; participant consent and privacy are central to the LFRR’s effort. Data, DNA, serum, plasma, peripheral blood and transformed B-cell lines are collected and stored, and subject to strict quality control and safety measures. Coded data and materials derived from the registry are available for approved scientific users. The LFRR has contributed to the discovery of most of the 37 genetic associations now known to contribute to lupus through 104 publications. The LFRR contains 2618 lupus cases from 1954 pedigrees that are being studied by 76 approved users and their collaborators. The registry includes difficult to obtain populations, such as multiplex pedigrees, minority patients and affected males, and constitutes the largest collection of lupus pedigrees in the world. The LFRR is a useful resource for the discovery and characterization of genetic associations in SLE. PMID:20864496

  13. An active registry for bioinformatics web services

    PubMed Central

    Pettifer, S.; Thorne, D.; McDermott, P.; Attwood, T.; Baran, J.; Bryne, J. C.; Hupponen, T.; Mowbray, D.; Vriend, G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The EMBRACE Registry is a web portal that collects and monitors web services according to test scripts provided by the their administrators. Users are able to search for, rank and annotate services, enabling them to select the most appropriate working service for inclusion in their bioinformatics analysis tasks. Availability and implementation: Web site implemented with PHP, Python, MySQL and Apache, with all major browsers supported. (www.embraceregistry.net) Contact: steve.pettifer@manchester.ac.uk PMID:19460889

  14. Innovative Interventional and Imaging Registries: Precision Medicine in Cerebrovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Precision medicine in cerebrovascular disorders may be greatly advanced by the use of innovative interventional and imaging-intensive registries. Registries have remained subsidiary to randomized controlled trials, yet vast opportunities exist to leverage big data in stroke. Summary This overview builds upon the rationale for innovative, imaging-intensive interventional registries as a pivotal step in realizing precision medicine for several cerebrovascular disorders. Such enhanced registries may serve as a model for expansion of our translational research pipeline to fully leverage the role of phase IV investigations. The scope and role of registries in precision medicine are considered, followed by a review on the history of stroke and interventional registries, data considerations, critiques or barriers to such initiatives, and the potential modernization of registry methods into efficient, searchable, imaging-intensive resources that simultaneously offer clinical, research and educational added value. Key Messages Recent advances in technology, informatics and endovascular stroke therapies converge to provide an exceptional opportunity for registries to catapult further progress. There is now a tremendous opportunity to deploy registries in acute stroke, intracranial atherosclerotic disease and carotid disease where other clinical trials leave questions unanswered. Unlike prior registries, imaging-intensive and modernized methods may leverage current technological capabilities around the world to efficiently address key objectives and provide added clinical, research and educational value. PMID:26600792

  15. Arizona Alzheimer's Registry: Strategy and Outcomes of a Statewide Research Recruitment Registry

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, K.T.; Langbaum, J.B.; Holt, C.J.; Chen, W.; High, N.; Langlois, C.; Sabbagh, M.; Tariot, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium (AAC) created the Arizona Alzheimer's Registry, a screening and referral process for people interested in participating in Alzheimer's disease related research. The goals of the Registry were to increase awareness of Alzheimer's disease research and accelerate enrollment into AAC research studies. METHODS Participation was by open invitation to adults 18 and older. Those interested provided consent and completed a written questionnaire. A subset of Registrants underwent an initial telephone cognitive assessment. Referral to AAC sites was based on medical history, telephone cognitive assessment, and research interests. RESULTS A total of 1257 people consented and 1182 underwent an initial cognitive screening. Earned media (38.7%) was the most effective recruitment strategy. Participants had a mean age of 68.1 (SD 10.6), 97% were Caucasian, had 15.2 (SD 2.7) mean years of education, and 60% were female. 30% reported a family history of dementia and 70% normal cognition. Inter-rater agreement between self-reported memory status and the initial telephone cognitive assessment had a kappa of 0.31-0.43. 301 were referred to AAC sites. CONCLUSION IThe Registry created an infrastructure and process to screen and refer a high volume of eager Registrants. These methods were found to be effective at prescreening individuals for studies, which facilitated AAC research recruitment. The established infrastructure and experiences gained from the Registry have served as the prototype for the web-based Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, a national registry focusing on Alzheimer's disease prevention research. PMID:26491650

  16. Recent trends in population-based cancer registries in Japan: the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries and drastic changes in the historical registry.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomohiro; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2015-02-01

    Cancer registration in Japan has a long history spanning over 60 years; the first population-based cancer registry was established in Miyagi prefecture in 1951. The progress made in the regional population-based cancer registries in terms of standardization and quality improvement during the 10 years of the third comprehensive strategy for cancer control was highlighted in the history of cancer registration in Japan. However, there were still weak points regarding local government-oriented cancer registries that remained, e.g., the reporting of cancer cases to the population-based cancer registries was not a mandatory task for medical institutions. After the Cancer Control Act in 2006, the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries was finally enacted in Japan on December 6, 2013. According to that Act, hospital managers must report information on any primary cancer that was first diagnosed in their institutions from January 1, 2016 to the prefectural governors. Given the increasing number of cases and amount of information recorded, it would have been almost impossible to maintain our cancer registries using the same system, and changes were required to obtain reliable cancer statistics. This was particularly important in Japan, because the country is facing a hyper-aging society, with two to three million cancer patients requiring entry of detailed information. We appreciate the long history of the Japanese cancer registry, but it is necessary to make dramatic changes to bring the registry up to date and to be able to track the increasing amount of information.

  17. Registries as Tools for Clinical Excellence and the Development of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry.

    PubMed

    Weber LeBrun, Emily E

    2016-03-01

    Surgical device innovation has been less regulated than drug development, allowing integration of unproven techniques and materials into standard practice. Successful device registries gather information on patient outcomes and can provide postmarket surveillance of new technologies and allow comparison with currently established treatments or devices. The Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry was developed in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration, device manufacturers, and other stakeholders to serve as a platform for industry-sponsored postmarket device surveillance, investigator-initiated research, and quality and effectiveness benchmarking, all designed to improve the care of women with pelvic floor disorders. PMID:26880512

  18. [Influence of registries on the quality of care].

    PubMed

    Stengel, D; Dreinhöfer, K; Kostuj, T

    2016-06-01

    Registries are a topic of lively debate amongst all stakeholders in healthcare, politics and economics. In general, registries are national or international (prospective) databases documenting the current state of diagnostic, therapeutic and long-term outcome variables of subjects with a distinct condition or health problem. The access to and handling of registry information is subject to strict legal, methodological and ethical principles and regulations before these data can be scientifically utilized and reentered into the routine daily practice. Because of the representativeness and reality of data, registries are widely regarded as the backbone of health systems and budgets.Currently there is only indirect evidence that registries influence outcomes and the quality of care. Recent statistical techniques may allow quasi-experimental modelling of observational information. In orthopedic and trauma surgery, current and upcoming registries should be wisely utilized to develop and evaluate innovations and to make informed decisions relevant to care. PMID:27164976

  19. An Update on the Florida State Twin Registry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeanette E.; Hart, Sara A.; Mikolajewski, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Florida State Twin Registry began in 2002 through a pilot study of personality disorders and executive cognitive functioning in adult twins. Since 2006, the registry has grown substantially as part of the Learning Disability Research Center at Florida State University that recently began its second funding cycle through the National Institute of Child Health and Development. An update on the Florida State Twin Registry sample, focus, and measures is provided as well as future directions. PMID:23067863

  20. The International Takotsubo Registry: Rationale, Design, Objectives, and First Results.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena-R; Cammann, Victoria L; Templin, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) was first described in Japan in 1990. The clinical presentation is similar to that of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Cardiac enzymes are commonly elevated. A global initiative was launched and the InterTAK Registry was established to provide a systematic database. The major goals of the International Takotsubo Registry (InterTAK Registry) are to provide a comprehensive clinical characterization on natural history, treatment, and outcomes. We linked a biorepository to identify biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis and to investigate the genetic basis as well as disease-related factors. We focus on the rationale, objectives, design, and first results of the InterTAK Registry. PMID:27638029

  1. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  2. The Sri Lankan Twin Registry: 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hotopf, Mathew; McGuffin, Peter; Glozier, Nick; Ball, Harriet; Kovas, Yulia; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Yatawara, Lalani; Pariante, Carmine; Zavos, Helena; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Pannala, Gayani; Jayaweera, Kaushalya; Adikari, Anushka; Gunewardane, Dinesha

    2013-02-01

    The Sri Lankan Twin Registry (SLTR), established in 1997, is a unique resource for twin and genetic research in a low- and middle-income country (LMIC). It comprises of a volunteer cohort of 14,120 twins (7,060 pairs) and 119 sets of triplets, and a population-based cohort of 19,040 (9,520 pairs) twins and 89 sets of triplets. Several studies have been conducted using this registry, including the Colombo Twin and Singleton Study (CoTaSS 1; 4,387 twins, 2,311 singletons), which have explored the prevalence and heritability of a range of psychiatric disorders as well as gene-environmental interplay. Currently, a follow-up study (CoTaSS 2) of the same cohort is underway, looking at the prevalence and interrelationship of key cardiovascular and metabolic risk markers (e.g., metabolic syndrome). A significant feature of CoTaSS 2 is the establishment of a biobank. Current SLTR work is extending beyond mental health and the interface between mental and physical health to new horizons, extending collaborations with the wider global twin research community. Ethics and governance have been given special emphasis in the initiative. Capacity building and public engagement are two crucial components. Establishment of a state-of-the-art genetic laboratory was a major accomplishment. SLTR is a classic showcase of successful North-South partnership in building a progressive research infrastructure in a LMIC. PMID:23302519

  3. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria's overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  4. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health. PMID:6419276

  5. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    PubMed Central

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  6. The Kaiser Permanente Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ake, Christopher F; Burke, Mary F; Singh, Anshuman; Yian, Edward H; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Navarro, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed in the United States with increasing frequency. We describe the medium-term findings from a large integrated healthcare system shoulder arthroplasty registry. Patients and methods Shoulder arthroplasty cases registered between January 2005 and June 2013 were included for analysis. The registry included patient characteristics, surgical information, implant data, attrition, and patient outcomes such as surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and revision procedures. Results During the study period, 6,336 primary cases were registered. Median follow-up time for all primaries was 3.3 years; 461 cases were lost to follow-up by ending of health plan membership. Primary cases were predominantly female (56%) and white (81%), with an average age of 70 years. The most common reason for surgery was osteoarthritis in 60% of cases, followed by acute fracture (17%) and rotator cuff tear arthropathy (15%). In elective shoulder arthroplasty procedures, 200 all-cause revisions (4%) were reported, with glenoid wear being the most common reason. Interpretation Most arthroplasties were elective procedures: over half performed for osteoarthritis. Glenoid wear was the most common reason for revision of primary shoulder arthroplasty in elective cases. PMID:25727949

  7. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  8. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria’s overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  9. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  10. 76 FR 38619 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Saltwater Angler Registry and State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Saltwater Angler Registry and State Exemption Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... currently approved collection. The National Saltwater Angler Registry Program (Registry Program) was established to implement recommendations included in the review of national saltwater angling data...

  11. 76 FR 28403 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... of a National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (National Registry), 73 FR 73129. The National... medical examiners about FMCSA's physical qualification standards. See 73 FR 73132-33. However, the Agency... Certified Medical Examiners ACTION: Notice of availability of draft guidance; request for comments....

  12. The National Film Registry: Acquiring Our Film Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Roy A.

    The National Film Registry, which is primarily a designated list of films to be preserved by the Library of Congress, is also a valuable tool for selecting "films that are culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant." Following a brief discussion of the history and selection process of the National Film Registry, Southeast Missouri…

  13. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  14. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  15. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  16. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  17. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  18. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedures. (f) Effect of recordation. The Copyright Office will record statements in the Visual Arts... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section...

  19. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  20. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  1. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  2. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  3. 14 CFR 47.19 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 FAA Aircraft Registry. Each application, request, notification, or...

  4. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  5. 76 FR 37064 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part 600, subpart P, was published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2008 (73 FR 79705). The final rule... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA490 National Saltwater Angler Registry...

  6. 76 FR 4092 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA131 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part...

  7. 76 FR 22082 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA368 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part...

  8. 78 FR 49478 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC403 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... registration of anglers, spear fishers and for-hire fishing vessels to register under the National Saltwater... final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part 600, subpart P,...

  9. The GEOSS Component and Service Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, L.; Bai, Y.; Shen, D.; Shao, Y.; Shrestha, R.; Wang, H.; Nebert, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Petabytes of Earth science data have been accumulated through space- and air-borne Earth observation programs during the last several decades. The data are valuable both scientifically and socioeconomically. The value of these data could be further increased significantly if the data from these programs can be easily discovered, accessed, integrated, and analyzed. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is addressing this need. Coordinated by the Group on Earth Observations (or GEO), a voluntary partnership of 86 governments, the European Commission, and 61 intergovernmental, international, and regional organizations has been working on implementing GEOSS for a number of years. After four years of international collaboration, the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) has been established. GCI consists of the Standards and Interoperability Registry (SIR), the Component and Service Registry (CSR), the GEO clearinghouse, and the GEO Portal. The SIR maintains the list of the public standards recognized by the GEO. CSR provides a centralized registry for available Earth Observation resources. The GEO clearinghouse works as a single search facility for GEOSS-wide resources and the GEO Portal provides an integrated Web-based interfaces for users. Since January 2007, researchers at CSISS, GMU have collaborated with officials from the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) on designing, implementing, maintaining, and upgrading CSR. Currently CSR provides the following capabilities for data providers: user registration, resource registration, and service interface registration. The CSR clients can discover the resources registered in CSR through OGC Catalog for Web (CSW), UUDI, and other standard interfaces. During the resource registration process, providers may define detailed descriptive information for their resources, in particular, the targeted societal benefit area and sub-areas of focus, and the targeted critical Earth Observations. The service

  10. Symptom Patterns Among Gulf War Registry Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, William K.; Kipen, Howard M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Boyd, Kendal; Kang, Han; Leventhal, Howard; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We identify symptom patterns among veterans who believe they suffer from Gulf War–related illnesses and characterize groups of individuals with similar patterns. Methods. A mail survey was completed by 1161 veterans drawn from the Gulf War Health Registry. Results. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 symptom factors. A K-means cluster analysis revealed 2 groups: (1) veterans reporting good health and few moderate/severe symptoms, and (2) veterans reporting fair/poor health and endorsing an average of 37 symptoms, 75% as moderate/severe. Those in Cluster 2 were more likely to report having 1 or more of 24 medical conditions. Conclusions. These findings are consistent with previous investigations of symptom patterns in Gulf War veterans. This multisymptom illness may be more fully characterized by the extent, breadth, and severity of symptoms reported. PMID:12660208

  11. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research.

  12. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Brandão, Andréa Araújo; Malachias, Marcus V. Bolívar; Gomes, Marco Mota; Moreno Júnior, Heitor; Barbosa, Eduardo Costa Duarte; Póvoa, Rui Manoel dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background: A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. Objective: To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP) control, and adherence to treatment. Methods: National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis < 1 year. Evaluations will be performed at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up. The parameters that will be evaluated include anthropometric data, lifestyle habits, BP levels, lipid profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. Results: The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of modifying the prognosis of

  13. The Twin Research Registry at SRI International.

    PubMed

    Krasnow, Ruth E; Jack, Lisa M; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Bergen, Andrew W; Swan, Gary E

    2013-02-01

    The Twin Research Registry (TRR) at SRI International is a community-based registry of twins established in 1995 by advertising in local media, mainly on radio stations and in newspapers. As of August 2012, there are 3,120 same- and opposite-sex twins enrolled; 86% are 18 years of age or older (mean age 44.9 years, SD 16.9 years) and 14% less than 18 years of age (mean age 8.9 years, SD 4.5); 67% are female, and 62% are self-reported monozygotic (MZ). More than 1,375 twins have participated in studies over the last 15 years in collaboration with the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Each twin completes a registration form with basic demographic information either online at the TRR Web site or during a telephone interview. Contact is maintained with members by means of annual newsletters and birthday cards. The managers of the TRR protect the confidentiality of twin data with established policies; no information is given to other researchers without prior permission from the twins; and all methods and procedures are reviewed by an Institutional Review Board. Phenotypes studied thus far include those related to nicotine metabolism, mutagen sensitivity, pain response before and after administration of an opioid, and a variety of immunological responses to environmental exposures, including second-hand smoke and vaccination for seasonal influenza virus and Varicella zoster virus. Twins in the TRR have participated in studies of complex, clinically relevant phenotypes that would not be feasible to measure in larger samples. PMID:23084148

  14. Australian Twin Registry: 30 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John L; Foley, Debra L; White, Paul A; Pollaers, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    The Australian Twin Registry (ATR) is a national volunteer resource of twin pairs and higher-order multiples willing to consider participating in health, medical, and scientific research. The vision of the ATR is 'to realize the full potential of research involving twins to improve the health and well-being of all Australians'. The ATR has been funded continuously by the National Health and Medical Council for more than 30 years. Its core functions entail the recruitment and retention of twin members, the maintenance of an up-to-date database containing members' contact details and baseline information, and the promotion and provision of open access to researchers from all institutes in Australia, and their collaborators, in a fair and equitable manner. The ATR is administered by The University of Melbourne, which acts as custodian. Since the late 1970s the ATR has enrolled more than 40,000 twin pairs of all zygosities and facilitated more than 500 studies that have produced at least 700 peer-reviewed publications from classical twin studies, co-twin control studies, within-pair comparisons, twin family studies, longitudinal twin studies, randomized controlled trials, and epigenetics studies, as well as studies of issues specific to twins. New initiatives include: a Health and Life Style Questionnaire; data collection, management, and archiving using a secure online software program (The Ark); and the International Network of Twin Registries. The ATR's expertise and 30 years of experience in providing services to national and international twin studies has made it an important resource for research across a broad range of disciplines.

  15. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  16. Epidemiology of Rett syndrome: a population-based registry.

    PubMed

    Kozinetz, C A; Skender, M L; MacNaughton, N; Almes, M J; Schultz, R J; Percy, A K; Glaze, D G

    1993-02-01

    The Texas Rett Syndrome Registry maintains the largest population-based registry of cases and potential cases of Rett syndrome in the world. The most precise estimate of the prevalence of Rett syndrome of 1 per 22800 (0.44/10000) females aged 2 through 18 years of age was generated from this Registry. In addition, the first prevalence figures for black and Hispanic female cases were estimated. Registry cases are actively ascertained from multiple sources. Registry staff identify presumptive cases from review of information provided to the Registry by the parent or guardian. Preliminary diagnostic evaluation includes standardized review of medical records and videotape of key behaviors. Diagnosis is confirmed at clinical evaluation. The active surveillance system is monitored with the two-source capture-recapture methodology and case ascertainment is projected. The 1990 prevalence estimate of Rett syndrome indicates that the syndrome occurs less frequently than previously estimated. Until a biologic marker for Rett syndrome is identified or a standard definition for an incident case of Rett syndrome is designated, the prevalence of Rett syndrome will remain a major investigative issue of its epidemiology, and the Registry will be an important, systematic mean to gather case material for clinical and laboratory studies providing the foundation for the development of preventive interventions.

  17. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network : an evolving methodology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K; Richards, Janice; Robertson, Annette; Stamplecoski, Melissa; Silver, Frank L

    2011-06-01

    Stroke registries can provide information on evidence-based practices and interventions, which are critical for us to understand how stroke care is delivered and how outcomes are achieved. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN) was initiated in 2001 and has evolved over the past decade. In the first two years, we found it extremely difficult to obtain informed consent from the patient or surrogate which led to selection biases in the registry. Subsequently (2003 onwards), under the new health privacy legislation in Ontario, Canada, the RCSN was granted special status as a "prescribed registry" which allowed us to collect data on all consecutive patients at the regional stroke centres without consent. The stroke data was encrypted and all personal contact information had been removed, therefore we could no longer conduct follow- up interviews. To obtain patient outcomes after discharge, we linked the non-consent-based registry database to population-based administrative databases to obtain information on patient mortality, readmissions, socioeconomic status, medication use and other clinical information of interest. In addition, the registry methodology was modified to include a periodic population-based audit on a sample of all stroke patients from over 150 acute hospitals across the province, in addition to continuous data collection at the 12 registry hospitals in the province. The changes in the data collection methodology developed by the RCSN can be applied to other provinces and countries. PMID:21739386

  18. The Russian School Twin Registry (RSTR): project PROGRESS.

    PubMed

    Kovas, Yulia; Galajinsky, Eduard V; Boivin, Michel; Harold, Gordon T; Jones, Alice; Lemelin, Jean-Pascal; Luo, Yu; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert; Tikhomirova, Tatiana; Zhou, Xinlin; Malykh, Sergey

    2013-02-01

    The Russian School Twin Registry (RSTR) was established in 2012, supported by a grant from the Government of the Russian Federation. The main aim of the registry is to contribute to Progress in Education through Gene-Environment Studies (PROGRESS). The formation of the registry is ongoing and it is expected that most schools in the Russian Federation (approximately 50,000 schools) will contribute data to the registry. With a total of 13.7 million students in Grades 1-11 (ages 7-18), the potential number of twin pairs exceeds 100,000. Apart from the large sample size and its representative nature, the RSTR has one unique feature: in collaboration with the International Advisory Committee to the Registry, genetically sensitive cross-cultural investigations are planned, aided by the use of the common assessment instruments. Other strengths of the registry include the assessment of a large sample of non-twin school children, including those studying in the same classes as the twins in the registry. It is hoped that the RSTR will provide an important research platform for national and international educationally relevant research.

  19. 76 FR 72424 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Program on the Genetic Testing Registry AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), PHS, DHHS. ACTION... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: The Genetic Testing Registry; Type of Information Collection... developing a voluntary registry of genetic tests. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) will provide...

  20. [Information in Home Nutrition: the importance of the registries].

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, C; Sanz-Valero, J; Culebras, J

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the registries is determined by its data. In order for a registry to meet its objectives quality in codification, transcription and analysis is essential. These premises applied to a home nutrition registry give an information able to meet all the researchers' targets. The NADYA Group registry of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Spain tries to measure home artificial nutrition, its indications, methods and ways of administration and other variables. From their studies we may conclude that Parenteral Nutrition is underutilized at present, probably due to a lack of supporting structures able to meet all the needs of home patients. However, tube enteral nutrition is increasing, which represents a reduction in hospital costs and, more important represents an improvement of the patients quality of life and, in turn, also of their relatives.

  1. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  2. A Computer System for Processing Tumor Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer system for processing tumor registry data has been developed by the Washington, D.C. VA Medical Center Systems Development Group. The automated registry system replaces a manual registry, which had been implemented according to the guidelines established for Cancer Programs by the American College of Surgeons. A permanent on-line data base of patient data is maintained by a minicomputer at the medical center. A user oriented application program provides entry, edit, and retrieval of patient data in the following formats - Suspense, Master, Accession, and Follow-up registers, and in Abstract form. Data entered in any of the formats is stored in a common file, and is available as needed in any other format. The programs were written in the standard Mumps Language. Construction of the Tumor Registry application was greatly assisted by use of the File Manager, a data base file management package written in the standard Mumps language.

  3. Introduction to the 2006 UK Renal Registry report (chapter 2).

    PubMed

    Ansell, David; Will, Es; Tomson, Charlie

    2007-08-01

    The UK Renal Registry is part of the UK Renal Association and provides independent audit and analysis of renal replacement therapy in the UK. The Registry is funded directly by participating renal units through an annual fee per patient registered. The Registry is now collecting data on incidence and prevalence from 100% of UK renal units, with the five remaining non-linked sites in England providing summary data. Maintaining and enhancing Registry functionality will be an important touchstone for the Connecting for Health initiative. Collaboration with other formal agencies also promises an exciting prospect for future development. After a long proving period, the means, methods and roles have come together to complete an effective adjunct to clinical activity, planning, research and the performance of the renal community.

  4. The Cuban Twin Registry: initial findings and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marcheco-Teruel, Beatriz; Cobas-Ruiz, Marcia; Cabrera-Cruz, Niviola; Lantigua-Cruz, Araceli; García-Castillo, Elsa; Lardoeyt-Ferrer, Roberto; Robaina-Jiménez, Zoe; Fuentes-Smith, Evelyn; Morales-Calatayud, Francisco; Lemus-Valdés, María Teresa; Portuondo-Sao, Miriam; Comas-Pérez, Lenier; Pérez-Crispí, Juan M; Díaz-De Villal Villa, Thais; Icart-Perera, Emelia; Jordán-Hernández, Aida; Lage-Castellanos, Agustín; Rabell-Piera, Sergio; Llibre-Rodríguez, Juan de Jesús; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-02-01

    The Cuban Twin Registry is a nation-wide, prospective, population-based twin registry comprising all zygosity types and ages. It was initiated in 2004 to study genetic and environmental contributions to complex diseases with high morbidity and mortality in the Cuban population. The database contains extensive information from 55,400 twin pairs enrolled in the period 2004-2006. Additionally, 2,600 new multiple births have been included from 2007 to date. In the past 4 years, more than 130 studies have been carried out using the registry with a classical genetic epidemiological approach in which concordance rates for monozygotic and dizygotic twins and heritability of various disease traits were estimated. This article summarizes the history, registry's methodology, recent research findings, and future directions of work. PMID:23228217

  5. The Canadian Registry for Pulmonary Fibrosis: Design and Rationale of a National Pulmonary Fibrosis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ryerson, Christopher J.; Tan, Benjamin; Fell, Charlene D.; Manganas, Hélène; Shapera, Shane; Mittoo, Shikha; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; To, Teresa; Gershon, Andrea; Fisher, Jolene H.; Johannson, Kerri A.; Hambly, Nathan; Khalil, Nasreen; Marras, Theodore K.; Morisset, Julie; Wilcox, Pearce G.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Khan, Mohammad Adil; Kolb, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relative rarity and diversity of fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) have made it challenging to study these diseases in single-centre cohorts. Here we describe formation of a multicentre Canadian registry that is needed to describe the outcomes of fibrotic ILD and to enable detailed healthcare utilization analyses that will be the cornerstone for future healthcare planning. Methods. The Canadian Registry for Pulmonary Fibrosis (CARE-PF) is a prospective cohort anticipated to consist of at least 2,800 patients with fibrotic ILD. CARE-PF will be used to (1) describe the natural history of fibrotic ILD, specifically determining the incidence and outcomes of acute exacerbations of ILD subtypes and (2) determine the impact of ILD and acute exacerbations of ILD on health services use and healthcare costs in the Canadian population. Consecutive patients with fibrotic ILD will be recruited from five Canadian ILD centres over a period of five years. Patients will be followed up as clinically indicated and will complete standardized questionnaires at each clinic visit. Prespecified outcomes and health services use will be measured based on self-report and linkage to provincial health administrative databases. Conclusion. CARE-PF will be among the largest prospective multicentre ILD registries in the world, providing detailed data on the natural history of fibrotic ILD and the healthcare resources used by these patients. As the largest and most comprehensive cohort of Canadian ILD patients, CARE-PF establishes a network for future clinical research and early phase clinical trials and provides a platform for translational and basic science research. PMID:27445528

  6. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses. PMID:26579661

  7. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses.

  8. Cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of cancer affects all countries; while high-income countries have the capacity and resources to establish comprehensive cancer control programs, low and middle-income countries have limited resources to develop such programs. This paper examines factors associated with the development of cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey. It looks at the progress made by these registries, the challenges they faced, and the lessons learned. Other countries with similar resources can benefit from the lessons identified in this case study. Methods A mix of qualitative case study methods including key informant interviews, document review and questionnaires was used. Results This case study showed that surveillance systems that accurately report current cancer-related data are essential components of a country’s comprehensive cancer control program. At the initial stages, Turkey established one cancer registry with international support, which was used as a model for other registries. The Ministry of Health recognized the value of the registry data and its contribution to the country’s cancer control program and is supporting sustainability of these registries as a result. Conclusions This study demonstrates how Turkey was able to use resources from multiple sources to enhance its population based cancer registry system in four provinces. With renewed international interest in non-communicable diseases and cancer following the 2011 UN high-level meeting on NCDs, low- and middle- income countries can benefit from Turkey’s experience. Other countries can utilize lessons learned from Turkey as they address cancer burden and establish their own registries. PMID:23110989

  9. Portuguese National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology, 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Diogo; Morgado, Francisco; Bonhorst, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the results of the national registry of electrophysiology of the Portuguese Association for Arrhythmology, Pacing and Electrophysiology (APAPE) for 2013 and 2014. The registry is annual and voluntary, and data are collected retrospectively. Data for electrophysiological studies, ablations and cardioverter-defibrillator implantations for 2013 and 2014 are presented. Developments over the years and their implications are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27396627

  10. The cancer registry: a clinical repository of oncology data.

    PubMed

    Hoyler, S S

    1997-02-01

    Health care institutions need complete and accurate data to plan, monitor, and evaluate their oncology programs. Although financial and discharge data are available, clinical repositories generally are not. For oncology, the cancer registry database serves as a clinical repository. The data in the registry are complete, accurate, and readily available. They can be used to plan new services, evaluate existing programs, and monitor patient care. PMID:10165382

  11. [Presentation of the new Spanish home artificial nutrition registry].

    PubMed

    Cuerda, C; Parón, L; Planas, M; Gómez Candela, C; Moreno, J M

    2007-01-01

    The registries are databases including information about a treatment or a disease in a definite population. Concerning home artificial nutrition there are registries of patients in different European countries, USA and Japan, collecting data such as the prevalence, indication, follow-up and complications of these treatments. The Spanish group of Home Artificial Nutrition (HAN), NADYA, was established in 1992 with professionals devoted to the practise of artificial nutrition. Since then, one of its wills was the development of the Spanish registry of HAN. This is a voluntary registry accessible through the web page www.nadya-senpe.com. In 2005, this group decided to update the registry according to the Data Protection Law and including other improvements. Thank to the work of all the members of this group we have many data on the practise of HAN in our country. Since 1994, except the years 97-98, the annual registries of patients on home parenteral nutrition and home enteral nutrition have been published periodically, observing an increase in both, the number of patients and collaborating centres, presenting to us the actual practise of HAN in our country.

  12. Big data in organ transplantation: registries and administrative claims.

    PubMed

    Massie, A B; Kucirka, L M; Kuricka, L M; Segev, D L

    2014-08-01

    The field of organ transplantation benefits from large, comprehensive, transplant-specific national data sets available to researchers. In addition to the widely used Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)-based registries (the United Network for Organ Sharing and Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data sets) and United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data sets, there are other publicly available national data sets, not specific to transplantation, which have historically been underutilized in the field of transplantation. Of particular interest are the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and State Inpatient Databases, produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The USRDS database provides extensive data relevant to studies of kidney transplantation. Linkage of publicly available data sets to external data sources such as private claims or pharmacy data provides further resources for registry-based research. Although these resources can transcend some limitations of OPTN-based registry data, they come with their own limitations, which must be understood to avoid biased inference. This review discusses different registry-based data sources available in the United States, as well as the proper design and conduct of registry-based research.

  13. Lessons learned from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, James D; Westphal, Joslyn A; Bansal, Neha; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare disorder of the heart muscle, affecting 1.13 cases per 100,000 children, from birth to 18 years of age. Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of heart transplantation in children over the age of 1. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry funded in 1994 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was established to examine the epidemiology of the disease in children below 18 years of age. More than 3500 children across the United States and Canada have been enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, which has followed-up these patients until death, heart transplantation, or loss to follow-up. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry has provided the most in-depth illustration of this disease regarding its aetiology, clinical course, associated risk factors, and patient outcomes. Data from the registry have helped in guiding the clinical management of cardiomyopathy in children under 18 years of age; however, questions still remain regarding the most clinically effective diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients. Future directions of the registry include the use of next-generation whole-exome sequencing and cardiac biomarkers to identify aetiology-specific treatments and improve diagnostic strategies. This article provides a brief synopsis of the work carried out by the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry since its inception, including the current knowledge on the aetiologies, outcomes, and treatments of cardiomyopathy in children.

  14. Data available from birth and death registries and cancer registries in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.L. |; Houser, A.R.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, cancer registries have been compiling data for decades, and state vital statistics offices have been compiling birth and death data for nearly a century. Although this information has been well used for disease surveillance and various studies, it could be better exploited by making it more readily available, reducing the duplication of effort that occurs when researchers at the private, city, county, state, and federal levels work separately on their data collection and disease investigations. This report summarizes the nationwide availability of birth and death records and cancer registry data, with particular emphasis on subcounty geographic detail, such as zip code and census tract. Birth and death data are available at the county level for the entire United States from the National Center for Health Statistics. However, county level data are inadequate for small area studies of potential environmental hazards. Hazards of current interest to the Department of Energy (DOE) include DOE facilities, nuclear power plants, and sources of electromagnetic radiation such as broadcasting towers and power lines.

  15. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines. PMID:25894119

  16. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines.

  17. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  18. The European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry: valuable lessons learned on how to sustain a disease registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Disease registries have the invaluable potential to provide an insight into the natural history of the disease under investigation, to provide useful information (e.g. through health indicators) for planning health care services and to identify suitable groups of patients for clinical trials enrolment. However, the establishment and maintenance of disease registries is a burdensome initiative from economical and organisational points of view and experience sharing on registries management is important to avoid waste of resources. The aim of this paper is to discuss the problems embedded in the institution and management of an international disease registry to warn against common mistakes that can derail the best of intentions: we share the experience of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry, which collects data on almost 30,000 patients from 23 countries. Methods We discuss the major problems that researchers often encounter in the creation and management of disease registries: definition of the aims the registry has to reach, definition of the criteria for patients referral to the registry, definition of the information to record, set up of a data quality process, handling of missing data, maintenance of data confidentiality, regulation of data use and dissemination of research results. Results We give examples on how many crucial aspects were solved by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry regarding objectives, inclusion criteria and variables definition, data management, data quality controls, missing data handling, confidentiality maintenance, data use and results dissemination. Conclusions We suggest an extensive literature research and discussions in working groups with different stake holders, including patient representatives, on the objectives, inclusion criteria and the information to record. We propose to pilot the recording of few variables and test the applicability of their definition first. The use of a

  19. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  20. Childhood Vesicoureteral Reflux Studies: Registries and Repositories Sources and Nosology

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Russell W.; Patters, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite several recent studies, the advisability of antimicrobial prophylaxis and certain imaging studies for urinary tract infections (UTIs) remains controversial. The role of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on the severity and re-infection rates for UTIs is also difficult to assess. Registries and repositories of data and biomaterials from clinical studies in children with VUR are valuable. Disease registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition or procedure. Registries differ from indices in that they contain more extensive data. A research repository is an entity that receives, stores, processes and/or disseminates specimens (or other materials) as needed. It encompasses the physical location as well as the full range of activities associated with its operation. It may also be referred to as a biorepository. This report provides information about some current registries and repositories that include data and samples from children with VUR. It also describes the heterogeneous nature of the subjects, as some registries and repositories include only data or samples from patients with primary reflux while others also include those from patients with syndromic or secondary reflux. PMID:23044377

  1. The development of a nationwide registry of wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Kelleher, Annmarie; Teodorski, Emily; Collins, Diane M; Boninger, Michael; Cooper, Rory A

    2007-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the development of a wheelchair users registry and subsequently describes a population of individuals who use wheelchairs. The characteristics of Americans who permanently use wheelchairs and scooters are currently unknown. As the result of developing a Registry of individuals who use wheeled mobility devices for systematic recruitment for research studies, this study provides a description of a nationwide sample of over 1000 individuals who used wheelchairs or scooters for their daily mobility. The Registry is predominantly Caucasian (83%), 63% male, with a mean age of 50 years. Some 54% used manual wheelchairs for an average of 16 years. When quality of wheelchairs was compared, results indicated those in more customizable manual wheelchairs were significantly more likely to be younger. Males were significantly more likely to receive more customizable, heavy duty power wheelchairs than females. The Wheelchair Users Registry provides an organized and systematic way to maintain contact with previous research participants. Expected to grow in size, the Registry may enable an even more diverse pool of subjects interested in participating in research studies.

  2. Nephrology registry gives specialty control of quality data.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Adam; Beckrich, Amy; Singer, Dale

    2015-11-01

    It is important for providers and practices to begin working with registry level data. Submitting data to a qualified clinical data registry currently satisfies Meaningful Use Stage II menu set items. In the future, with the rollout of MIPS and the increasing focus on sharing risk, registry data will be used as a benchmark for both publicly-reported performance (the physician compare program will be linked to provider-level QCDR data) and modifications to reimbursement. It is important to remember that PQRS data is the basis for the value based modifier now and MIPS- related quality data after 2018. The RPA has launched and is evolving a unique and versatile nephrology-specific data collection and analytics tool. In collaboration with the American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology, vascular access measures will be added to the registry for 2016. The registry and the analytics platform is a tier of software operating above your practice management system and EHR and, if data can be obtained, it can span all the locations in which nephrologists provide care.

  3. Big Data in Organ Transplantation: Registries and Administrative Claims

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Allan B.; Kucirka, Lauren; Segev, Dorry L.

    2015-01-01

    The field of organ transplantation benefits from large, comprehensive, transplant-specific national datasets available to researchers. In addition to the widely-used OPTN-based registries (the UNOS and SRTR datasets) and USRDS datasets, there are other publicly available national datasets, not specific to transplantation, which have historically been underutilized in the field of transplantation. Of particular interest are the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and State Inpatient Databases (SID), produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) database provides extensive data relevant to studies of kidney transplantation. Linkage of publicly available datasets to external data sources such as private claims or pharmacy data provides further resources for registry-based research. Although these resources can transcend some limitations of OPTN-based registry data, they come with their own limitations, which must be understood to avoid biased inference. This review discusses different registry-based data sources available in the United States, as well as the proper design and conduct of registry-based research. PMID:25040084

  4. The NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research Patient Registry Standard: A Report from the University of New Mexico’s Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvari, Shamsi; Youssof, Sarah; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries remove barriers to performing research by assembling patient cohorts and data in a systematic, efficient, and proactive manner. Consequently, registries are a valuable strategy for facilitating research and scientific discovery. Registries for rare diseases are arguably even more valuable since there is difficulty in assembling cohorts of adequate size for study. Recently, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research created a rare disease registry Standard to facilitate research across multiple registries. We implemented the Standard for the Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy patient registry created at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. We performed a data element analysis for each Common Data Element defined in the Standard. Problems included the use of previous HL7 versions, non-structured data types, and a recent update to the Standard. Overall, the Standard is an excellent first step toward standardizing patient registries to facilitate work on broader questions and promote novel interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:24551336

  5. REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

    2012-12-12

    Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

  6. Data management of an inflammatory bowel disease registry.

    PubMed

    Reed, J F; Moser, K A; Faust, L A; Mills, S

    1992-06-01

    The history and etiology of inflammatory bowel disease which is characterized by two major disease processes: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, remain unknown. Research is focussing on seven major areas of genetic, environmental and physiologic factors that apparently relate to this disease. Based on this background, a population based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Registry was established in 1987 in the Lehigh Valley area of southeastern Pennsylvania. Consent forms, patient data forms and protocols for operation and implementation were developed, and databases were designed to accommodate demographic, basic history, follow-up and relative history data. The databases were correlated with an IBD registry ID number which both enabled relational analyses and ensured confidentiality of data information. The registry continues to grow, providing feedback for both continued medical research and supportive information for IBD patients and their physicians. PMID:1402437

  7. Data management of an inflammatory bowel disease registry.

    PubMed

    Reed, J F; Moser, K A; Faust, L A; Mills, S

    1992-06-01

    The history and etiology of inflammatory bowel disease which is characterized by two major disease processes: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, remain unknown. Research is focussing on seven major areas of genetic, environmental and physiologic factors that apparently relate to this disease. Based on this background, a population based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Registry was established in 1987 in the Lehigh Valley area of southeastern Pennsylvania. Consent forms, patient data forms and protocols for operation and implementation were developed, and databases were designed to accommodate demographic, basic history, follow-up and relative history data. The databases were correlated with an IBD registry ID number which both enabled relational analyses and ensured confidentiality of data information. The registry continues to grow, providing feedback for both continued medical research and supportive information for IBD patients and their physicians.

  8. Exploring the Usefulness of Occupational Exposure Registries for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Genesove, Leon; Moore, Kris; Del Bianco, Ann; Kramer, Desre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The ongoing presence of asbestos in products used across workplaces in Canada reinforces the importance of occupational exposure surveillance. This study evaluates the usefulness of the Ontario Asbestos Workers Registry. Methods: The study includes 30,829 workers aged 15 to 80 years. Researchers reported on the data quality and analyzed the proportions of workers exposed by industry, and standardized rates by geographic areas and over time. Results: The incidence of exposure started to decrease around 1990; but about 2000 workers were still exposed annually until 2006. Results showed large geographical disparities. Unexpectedly, workers from industries other than construction reported exposure. Conclusions: The Ontario Asbestos Workers Registry is a useful but challenging source of information for the surveillance of asbestos exposure in Ontario. The registry could benefit from well-defined surveillance objectives, a clear exposure definition, systematic enforcement, regular data analyses, and results dissemination. PMID:25162835

  9. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  10. Global comparisons for developing a national dementia registry in Cuba.

    PubMed

    González, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A review/analysis of current literature on exemplary multicenter registries of clinical dementias was conducted as a comparative basis for a proposed Cuban registry on cognitive impairment and dementia. The study of mental health disorders has been predominantly based on clinical concepts and criteria, and only in recent years a public health approach has been applied. Traditional epidemiological studies do not reveal patterns of cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders (particularly dementias) in routine clinical practice in a defined geographic area, which would provide essential information for long-term planning and allocation of health and social resources. Thus, multicenter clinical registries have become an important source of clinical and epidemiological data on dementias in recent decades. This article addresses the Cuban proposal for an automated national dementia registry, comparing it to others internationally. The registry would be housed in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute, and would include a duly protected surveillance network hosted on the Institute's website. Such a multicenter dementia registry based on epidemiological surveillance methods and limited to a defined area would provide new, valid, representative and current data on dementia occurrence patterns by subtype, flow of case identification and referral from primary care, as well as the main clinical features of patients at the time of their first contact with health services. This information would support development of health planning policies for implementation of programs aimed at improved distribution of social and health resources in the affected population, monitoring of the disorder's natural evolution and identification of preventive measures. The scientific benefits would be equally important: production of new knowledge, generation of hypotheses for clinical research projects, standardization of diagnostic criteria, and promotion of multicenter research in both

  11. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders. PMID:25457963

  12. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  13. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Oct. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  14. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Jan. 1993 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  15. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Jul. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  16. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders.

  17. DANBIO: a nationwide registry of biological therapies in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Hetland, M L

    2005-01-01

    Since the year 2000, Danish rheumatologists have been collecting data on a routine basis in the nationwide DANBIO registry, which includes all rheumatologic patients receiving biological drugs. Demographic data, markers of disease activity, current treatment, serious and non-serious adverse events and reasons for discontinuation are registered at each visit either on paper forms or on-line. By June 2005, approximately 3000 treatment courses (18,000 visits) were in the registry, corresponding to close to 90% of eligible patients. Rheumatoid arthritis was the most prevalent diagnosis (75%) followed by ankylosing spondylitis (11%) and psoriatic arthritis (7%). Infections occurred in 43% of the treatment series. PMID:16273809

  18. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  19. A modular approach to disease registry design: successful adoption of an internet-based rare disease registry.

    PubMed

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Macgregor, Andrew; Janon, Fred; Harvey, Adam; O'Leary, Peter; Hunter, Adam; Dawkins, Hugh

    2012-10-01

    There is a need to develop Internet-based rare disease registries to support health care stakeholders to deliver improved quality patient outcomes. Such systems should be architected to enable multiple-level access by a range of user groups within a region or across regional/country borders in a secure and private way. However, this functionality is currently not available in many existing systems. A new approach to the design of an Internet-based architecture for disease registries has been developed for patients with clinical and genetic data in geographical disparate locations. The system addresses issues of multiple-level access by key stakeholders, security and privacy. The system has been successfully adopted for specific rare diseases in Australia and is open source. The results of this work demonstrate that it is feasible to design an open source Internet-based disease registry system in a scalable and customizable fashion and designed to facilitate interoperability with other systems.

  20. A report of the Malaysian dialysis registry of the National Renal Registry, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y N; Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Wong, H S; Ong, L M; Shaariah, W; Rozina, G; Morad, Z

    2008-09-01

    The Malaysian National Renal Registry was set up in 1992 to collect data for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT). We present here the report of the Malaysian dialysis registry. The objectives of this papar are: (1) To examine the overall provision of dialysis treatment in Malaysia and its trend from 1980 to 2006. (2) To assess the treatment rate according to the states in the country. (3) To describe the method, location and funding of dialysis. (4) To characterise the patients accepted for dialysis treatment. (5) To analyze the outcomes of the dialysis treatment. Data on patients receiving dialysis treatment were collected at initiation of dialysis, at the time of any significant outcome, as well as yearly. The number of dialysis patients increased from 59 in 1980 to almost 15,000 in 2006. The dialysis acceptance rate increased from 3 per million population in 1980 to 116 per million population in 2006, and the prevalence rate from 4 to 550 per million population over the same period. The economically advantaged states of Malaysia had much higher dialysis treatment rates compared to the less economically advanced states. Eighty to 90% of new dialysis patients were accepted into centre haemodialysis (HD), and the rest into the chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) programme. The government provided about half of the funding for dialysis treatment. Patients older than 55 years accounted for the largest proportion of new patients on dialysis since the 1990s. Diabetes mellitus has been the main cause of ESRD and accounted for more than 50% of new ESRD since 2002. Annual death rate averaged about 10% on HD and 15% on CAPD. The unadjusted 5-year patient survival on both HD and CAPD was about 80%. Fifty percent of dialysis patients reported very good median QoL index score. About 70% of dialysis patients were about to work full or part time. There has been a very rapid growth of dialysis provision in Malaysia particularly in the older age groups. ESRD

  1. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice Regarding Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP):...

  2. The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marrow Transplants The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table ... the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and its Be The Match Registry are nonprofit organizations dedicated to ...

  3. Process produces accurate registry between circuit board prints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Tapes and quick-mount circles of contrasting colors aid in obtaining precise registry between the two circuits of two-sided printed circuit boards. The tapes and circles are mounted on opposite sides of transparent plastic film to define the conductive path and feed-through hole locations.

  4. 22 CFR 96.70 - Operation of the Complaint Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operation of the Complaint Registry. 96.70 Section 96.70 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF PERSONS UNDER THE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ACT OF 2000 (IAA) Oversight Through Review of Complaints § 96.70 Operation of the...

  5. 77 FR 24103 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement, published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476), or you...) to establish the National Registry (73 FR 73129). The public comment period for the NPRM closed on... CMV drivers (57 FR 33276; July 28, 1992). All medical examiners were required to be...

  6. 22 CFR 96.70 - Operation of the Complaint Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operation of the Complaint Registry. 96.70 Section 96.70 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF PERSONS UNDER THE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ACT OF 2000 (IAA) Oversight Through Review of Complaints § 96.70 Operation of the...

  7. Toxic Substances Registry System Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The July 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  8. hPSCreg--the human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  9. hPSCreg—the human pluripotent stem cell registry

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  10. Reporting Melanoma: A Nationwide Surveillance of State Cancer Registries.

    PubMed

    Raji, Kehinde O; Payne, Lauren; Chen, Suephy C

    2015-01-01

    The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was conducted in 2012 over the same time frame and results were compared. Kansas state cancer registry provided no data. As of August 2014, 96% of 49 state cancer registries had electronic methods available to all designated reporters. Seven (14%) states required an electronic-only method of reporting melanoma cases. Eighty-six percent allowed hard copy pathology report submission. Compared to the 2012 survey, 2 additional states were found to have initiated electronic reporting methods by 2014. In conclusion, a variety of methods exist for reporting diagnosed melanoma cases. Although most state cancer registries were equipped for electronic transmission of cases for mandated reporters, a number of states were ill-equipped for electronic submission from outpatient dermatologists. There was a general trend towards electronic versus nonelectronic reporting from 2012 to 2014. PMID:26839706

  11. Clinical Cancer Registries - Are They Up for Health Services Research?

    PubMed

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical cancer registries are a valuable data source for health services research (HSR). HSR is in need of high quality routine care data for its evaluations. However, the secondary use of routine data - such as documented cancer cases in a disease registry - poses new challenges in terms of data quality, IT-management, documentation processes and data privacy. In the clinical cancer registry Heilbronn-Franken, real-world data from the Giessen Tumor Documentation System (GTDS) was utilized for analyses of patients' disease processes and guideline adherence in follow-up care. A process was developed to map disease state definitions to fields of the GTDS database and extract patients' disease progress information. Thus, the disease process of sub-cohorts could be compared to each other, e.g., comparison of disease free survival of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-positive and -negative women who were treated with Trastuzumab, a targeted therapy applied in breast cancer. In principle, such comparisons are feasible and of great value for HSR as they depict a routine care setting of a diverse patient cohort. Yet, local documentation practice, missing flow of information from external health care providers or small sub-cohorts impede the analyses of clinical cancer registries data bases and usage for HSR. PMID:27577380

  12. 27 CFR 18.23 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry of stills. 18.23 Section 18.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Qualification §...

  13. 27 CFR 18.23 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry of stills. 18.23 Section 18.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Qualification §...

  14. Retinoblastoma Registry report--Hospital Kuala Lumpur experience.

    PubMed

    Jamalia, R; Sunder, R; Alagaratnam, J; Goh, P P

    2010-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is a childhood ocular cancer. The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with retinoblastoma in a major paediatric ophthalmology center in the country. Retrospective information was collected through the retinoblastoma registry. Late presentation with advanced staging is a major problem.

  15. 46 CFR 11.807 - Experience requirements for registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Experience requirements for registry. 11.807 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Registration of Staff Officers § 11.807 Experience requirements for... experience as follows: (1) Chief purser. Two years of service aboard vessels performing duties relating...

  16. The Ped-APS Registry: the antiphospholipid syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Avcin, T; Cimaz, R; Rozman, B

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has been increasingly recognised in various paediatric autoimmune and nonautoimmune diseases, but the relatively low prevalence and heterogeneity of APS in childhood made it very difficult to study in a systematic way. The project of an international registry of paediatric patients with APS (the Ped-APS Registry) was initiated in 2004 to foster and conduct multicentre, controlled studies with large number of paediatric APS patients. The Ped-APS Registry is organised as a collaborative project of the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Working Group of the Paediatric Rheumatology European Society. Currently, it documents a standardised clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data of 133 children with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-related thrombosis from 14 countries. The priority projects for future research of the Ped-APS Registry include prospective enrollment of new patients with aPL-related thrombosis, assessment of differences between the paediatric and adult APS, evaluation of proinflammatory genotype as a risk factor for APS manifestations in childhood and evaluation of patients with isolated nonthrombotic aPL-related manifestations.

  17. Implementation and analysis of initial trauma registry in Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Vincent; DeUgarte, Daniel; Bliss, David; Salazar, Ernesto; Casapia, Martin; Ford, Henri; Upperman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Peru, 11% of deaths are due to trauma. Iquitos is a large underserved Peruvian city isolated from central resources by its geography. Our objective was to implement a locally driven trauma registry to sustainably improve trauma healthcare in this region. Methods: All trauma patients presenting to the main regional referral hospital were included in the trauma registry. A pilot study retrospectively analyzed data from the first two months after implementation. Results: From March to April 2013, 572 trauma patients were entered into the database. Average age was 26.9 years. Ten percent of patients presented more than 24 hours after injury. Most common mechanisms of injury were falls (25.5%), motor vehicle collisions (23.3%), and blunt assault (10.5%). Interim analysis revealed that 99% of patients were entered into the database. However, documentation of vital signs was poor: 42% of patients had temperature, 26% had oxygen saturation documented. After reporting to registry staff, a significant increase in temperature (42 to 97%, P < 0.001) and oxygen saturation (26 to 92%, P < 0.001) documentation was observed. Conclusion: A trauma registry is possible to implement in a resource-poor setting. Future efforts will focus on analysis of data to enhance prevention and treatment of injuries in Iquitos. PMID:27766233

  18. 76 FR 14366 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 390 and 391 RIN 2126-AA97 National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Transportation. ACTION... Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is making available for public comment a modification of...

  19. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25 Section 201.25 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE... owners of buildings, or their duly authorized representatives, for recordation in the Copyright...

  20. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25 Section 201.25 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... owners of buildings, or their duly authorized representatives, for recordation in the Copyright...

  1. 75 FR 72793 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA050 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... registration of anglers, spear fishers and for-hire fishing vessels to register under the National Saltwater...: Gordon.Colvin@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National...

  2. BioSWR--semantic web services registry for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Repchevsky, Dmitry; Gelpi, Josep Ll

    2014-01-01

    Despite of the variety of available Web services registries specially aimed at Life Sciences, their scope is usually restricted to a limited set of well-defined types of services. While dedicated registries are generally tied to a particular format, general-purpose ones are more adherent to standards and usually rely on Web Service Definition Language (WSDL). Although WSDL is quite flexible to support common Web services types, its lack of semantic expressiveness led to various initiatives to describe Web services via ontology languages. Nevertheless, WSDL 2.0 descriptions gained a standard representation based on Web Ontology Language (OWL). BioSWR is a novel Web services registry that provides standard Resource Description Framework (RDF) based Web services descriptions along with the traditional WSDL based ones. The registry provides Web-based interface for Web services registration, querying and annotation, and is also accessible programmatically via Representational State Transfer (REST) API or using a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. BioSWR server is located at http://inb.bsc.es/BioSWR/and its code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/bioswr/under the LGPL license.

  3. The Murcia Twin Registry: a population-based registry of adult multiples in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ordoñana, Juan R; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Carrillo, Eduvigis; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; García-Palomo, Francisco J; González-Javier, Francisca; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Aznar Oviedo, José M; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    The Murcia Twin Registry (MTR) was created in 2006, under the auspices of the University of Murcia and the regional Health Authority, aiming to develop a research resource in Spain intended to stimulate current research and new investigation on the analysis of genetic factors related to health and health-related behaviors. The MTR development strategy was designed as a step-by-step process. Initially, it was focused on women's health but nowadays it includes males and opposite-sex twins. The database comprises 2,281 participants born between 1940 and 1966 in the region of Murcia, in Spain. There have been three waves of data collection and today the MTR databases include questionnaire and anthropometric data as well as biological samples. The current main areas of research interest are health and health-related behaviors, including lifestyle, health promotion, and quality of life. Future short-term development points to the completion of the biobank and continuing the collection of longitudinal data.

  4. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  5. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  6. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other Federal regulation or law. Any person accessing the... Registry. 310.8 Section 310.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry....

  7. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  8. The Emerging Role of Adoption Reunion Registries: Adoptee and Birthparent Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The State of Georgia Adoption Reunion Registry assists adoptees in searching for birthparents and biological siblings, and provides referral to support services. Responses to a mail-in survey of 45 adoptees and 46 birthparents, all users of the Georgia registry, indicated high levels of satisfaction with the registry's services. Birthparents…

  9. The Euro-VO Registry, Re-engineering the Back-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, C.; Perdikeas, M.; Osuna, P.; Gonzalez, J.

    2015-09-01

    The Euro-VO Registry, located, developed and operated at ESAC, is one of the full searchable registries available worldwide, gathering information about all VO-compliant resources. The Euro-VO Registry serves as a registration point for European - and other countries- VO actors and data centres wishing to publish VO services. It harvests other registries to ensure its completeness so VO applications developers and VO users can use it to discover all VO resources, from Europe and from all other VO projects. The Euro-VO Registry provides as well a harvesting interface to other registries in the world to make sure the European VO services are also included in all other worldwide full registries. In particular, the new Euro-VO registry will be supporting the new RegTAP search interface for the relational registry allowing arbitrary ADQL queries against its contents over a compliant TAP service. The recently obsolete (for future developments) SOAP-based legacy search interface will also be supported for backwards compatibility purposes. Furthermore, in the context of the IVOA, some quality control and curation procedures for the registry resources are being defined. The Euro-VO Registry implements these procedures to ensure the high quality of the VO resources it references. This paper gives an overview of the recent development of the new Euro-VO Registry, together with its new curation facilities, both of which are being performed under a contract awarded to Neuropublic, under ESA special initiative to Greece.

  10. 78 FR 54956 - Agency Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment....rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW, Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment Questionnaire.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard...

  11. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  12. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  13. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16 000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI. PMID:25183748

  14. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry).

    PubMed

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-06-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16,000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI. PMID:25183748

  15. [Monitoring of pregnancies exposed to drugs in France: the experience of the registries of congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice

    2014-01-01

    Registries of congenital malformations were implemented in many industrialized countries following the drama of thalidomide. In 2013, four French registries of congenital malformations in France provide the systematic epidemiological surveillance of birth defects. All are part of international networks of registries, especially European surveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT). If the development of prevention actions including prenatal diagnosis has gradually led the registries to play a key role of assessment on the impact of public health policies, one of the major roles of registries of congenital malformations remains early detection of clusters of malformations secondary to teratogenic effects.

  16. Developing registries of volunteers: key principles to manage issues regarding personal information protection.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Emmanuelle; Leclerc, Dominic; Puymirat, Jack; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2010-11-01

    Much biomedical research cannot be performed without recruiting human subjects. Increasingly, volunteer registries are being developed to assist researchers with this challenging task. Yet, volunteer registries raise confidentiality issues. Having recently developed a registry of volunteers, the authors searched for normative guidance on how to implement the principle of confidentiality. The authors found that the protection of confidentiality in registries are based on the 10 key elements which are elaborated in detail in the Canadian Standards Association Model Code. This paper describes how these 10 detailed key principles can be used during the developmental stages of volunteer registries.

  17. Need for a roadmap for development of a coordinated national registry programme.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, S; Best, R L; Evans, S M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical quality registries are an overlooked and under-funded arm of clinical research in Australia. Registries are databases for patients with a particular disease, or who undergo a procedure, or use a health resource. Registries, where properly funded and universally adopted, have provided substantial benefits to the quality of healthcare and, in some cases, have had demonstrable effect in reducing costs. There is a lack of a coordinated programme for both funding and development of registries in Australia. A coordinated effort is required to address key gaps in registry coverage and ensure registries comply with appropriate technical and operating principles, and target areas where registries can add value to the health system. This will ensure that Australia is competitive with its international peers in this dynamic environment.

  18. Characteristics and temporal trends in patient registries: focus on the life sciences industry, 1981–2012

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Karin; Sallum, Rachel H; Burns, Meghan D; Barr, Charles E; Beattie, Mary S; Pashos, Chris L; Luce, Bryan R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patient registries are used to monitor safety, examine real-world effectiveness, and may potentially contribute to comparative effectiveness research. To our knowledge, life sciences industry (LSI)-sponsored registries have not been systematically categorized. This study represents a first step toward understanding such registries over time. Methods Studies described as registries were identified in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. Characteristics from these registry records were abstracted and analyzed. Results Of 1202 registries identified, approximately 47% reported LSI sponsorship. These 562 LSI registries varied in focus: medical devices (n = 193, 34%), specific drugs (n = 173, 31%), procedures (n = 29, 5%), or particular diseases (n = 139, 25%). Thirty-three registries (<6%) evaluated pregnancy outcomes. The most common therapeutic area was cardiovascular (n = 234, 42%); others included endocrinology, immunology, oncology, musculoskeletal disorders, and neurology. The two most often measured outcomes were clinical effectiveness and safety, each of which appeared in 363/562 (65%) of LSI registries. Other outcomes included real-world clinical practice patterns (n = 122, 22%), patient-reported outcomes (n = 106, 19%), disease epidemiology/natural history (n = 69, 12%), and economic outcomes (n = 30, 5%). The number of LSI registries and their geographic diversity has increased over time. Conclusions The LSI registries represent a substantial proportion of all patient registries documented in ClinicalTrials.gov. These prospective studies are growing in number and encompass diverse therapeutic areas and geographic regions. Most registries measure multiple outcomes and capture real-world data that may be unavailable through other study designs. This classification of LSI registries documents their use for studying heterogeneity of diseases, examining treatment patterns, measuring patient-reported outcomes, examining economic outcomes, and performing

  19. [Quality management in oncology supported by clinical cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Gerken, Michael; Barlag, Hagen; Tillack, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Efforts in nationwide quality management for oncology have so far failed to comprehensively document all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries or certified organ cancer centers were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they have to be accompanied by valid trans-sectoral documentation and evaluation of clinical data. To measure feasibility and qualitative effectiveness of guideline implementation we approached this problem with a nationwide investigation from 2000 to 2011. The rate of neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy in stage UICC II/III rectum cancer, cut-off point 80% for separating good from insufficient quality, was used as a quality indicator. The nationwide analysis indicates an increase from 45% to 70%, but only with the implementation strategy of CME. The combination of new structures, evidence-based quality indicators, organ cancer center and clinical cancer registries has shown good feasibility and seems promising.

  20. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2006.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad E; Suri, Rita S; Zoller, Rezso; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Lindsay, Robert M

    2006-07-01

    Interest in short daily and nocturnal hemodialysis (HD) regimens continues to grow worldwide. Despite growing optimism that these therapies will afford better patient outcomes over conventional HD, the current literature has not been viewed as sufficiently compelling to affect widespread implementation in most jurisdictions. Before these therapies can gain wider acceptance, larger and more rigorous studies will likely be needed. In June 2004, the Quotidian Dialysis Registry, based at the Lawson Health Research Institute at the University of Western Ontario, Canada, began recruiting patients across North America. By using an Internet-based data entry platform, patients from various centers worldwide will eventually be recruited, and studied prospectively. This paper constitutes the second annual update on patient and center recruitment, patient and treatment characteristics, and future directions for the registry. PMID:16805881

  1. The use of databases and registries to enhance colonoscopy quality.

    PubMed

    Logan, Judith R; Lieberman, David A

    2010-10-01

    Administrative databases, registries, and clinical databases are designed for different purposes and therefore have different advantages and disadvantages in providing data for enhancing quality. Administrative databases provide the advantages of size, availability, and generalizability, but are subject to constraints inherent in the coding systems used and from data collection methods optimized for billing. Registries are designed for research and quality reporting but require significant investment from participants for secondary data collection and quality control. Electronic health records contain all of the data needed for quality research and measurement, but that data is too often locked in narrative text and unavailable for analysis. National mandates for electronic health record implementation and functionality will likely change this landscape in the near future. PMID:20889074

  2. A preventive registry for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Madlensky, L; Berk, T C; Bapat, B V; McLeod, R S; Couture, J; Baron, D; Hiruki, T; Redston, M; Cohen, Z; Gallinger, S

    1995-07-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a genetic disorder characterized by a strong family history of colorectal and extracolonic cancers, usually at a young age. This article presents a new provincial service for families with HNPCC. The Steve Atanas Stavro Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital is accruing patients that meet a set of criteria establishing a putative diagnosis of HNPCC. The objectives of the Registry are to develop and assess patient pedigrees, to coordinate screening procedures for at-risk persons, to maintain a prospective database of patient information, to provide education and support for families and to contribute to research. To date, surgeons and patients are the most common referral sources, while oncologists and geneticists are the least common. The ultimate goal of the HNPCC service is the secondary prevention of cancer and a corresponding decrease in mortality for HNPCC family members. PMID:8853507

  3. 75 FR 38145 - Announcing the New National Electronic Job Registry for Use in the H-2A Temporary Agricultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Announcing the New National Electronic Job Registry for Use in the H... that the National Electronic Job Registry (job registry) in which H-2A job orders will be posted and... the job registry, please contact the iCERT System Team, Office of Foreign Labor ] Certification...

  4. Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2013-01-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  5. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  6. Toxic Substances Registry System. Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The October 1994 revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSD's) is presented. The listed MSD's which were submitted to the TSRS are maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  7. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which have been submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide a means to access information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  8. VTE Registry: What Can Be Learned from RIETE?

    PubMed

    Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Papadakis, Manolis; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE Registry) is an ongoing, international, prospective registry of consecutive patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) designed to gather and analyze data on treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with acute VTE. It started in Spain in 2001, and 6 years later the database was translated into English with the aim to expand the Registry to other countries. In contrast to randomized controlled trials, there is no imposed experimental intervention: the management is determined solely by physicians. Thus, it provides data on patients with VTE in a real-world situation with an unselected patient population. Data from RIETE are hypothesis-generating and provide feedback from real-world clinical situations. So far, we learned about the natural history of VTE in patients with relative or absolute contraindications to anticoagulant therapy. We also learned interesting aspects on the natural history of VTE, and we built a number of prognostic scores to identify VTE patients at low, moderate, or high risk for adverse outcome.

  9. Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry: Quality Data Now Available.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jessica C; Greer, Renee M; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) orginally began as part of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and became a live registry in 2013. As a quality improvement process, this study examined MOTR data for 20 female amputees compared with DoDTR data. The DoDTR provided diagnosis and procedure codes as a list but no details. The MOTR provided additional data, including specific limb, fracture classifications, and associated injuries per limb. The MOTR allowed for construction of a treatment time line for each limb, including number and timing of debridements, antibiotics, and implant types. Orthopaedic-specific complications were also coded more frequently in the MOTR and clearly identified with a specific injury and treatment. During initial quality control checks, the MOTR provides a greater volume and granularity of detail for orthopaedic-specific injury and treatment information, indicating that the MOTR is on track to provide a valuable repository for data-driven orthopaedic management of combat injury. PMID:27518292

  10. Apheresis technologies and clinical applications: the 2007 International Apheresis Registry.

    PubMed

    Malchesky, Paul S; Koo, Anna P; Skibinski, Christine I; Hadsell, Angela T; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2010-02-01

    The developments in apheresis technologies and techniques and their clinical applications worldwide are technologically, sociologically, and economically motivated. As in the past apheresis surveys, the statistics have highlighted both the differences by geographic region in clinical practice and in the type of technologies utilized. While a national view of apheresis is very important, an international view may be more representative overall of this therapeutic modality than national results that are highly dependent on the local economics and the available technologies. These regional differences have provided a basis for scientific and clinical assessment of these apheresis technologies and their clinical outcomes, and have impacted the marketing and business developments of new technologies worldwide. The results of the International Apheresis Registry for 2007 report data from 20 centers on five continents. The survey collected data exclusively via a secure internet website on 1735 patients for a total of 6787 treatments. As with our prior registry for 2005, information on stem cell infusions was gathered. Information collected included patients demographics, medical history, treatment diagnoses, treatment specifics (type, methodology, access type, anticoagulants, drugs, and equipment usage), side effects, clinical response, and payment provider. As in prior International Apheresis Registries for 1983, 2000, 2002, and 2005, the survey results highlight the regional differences in apheresis usage and treatment methodologies indicating that an international overview of apheresis may be more representative of the impact of this therapeutic modality.

  11. Online registry for mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including nomenclature recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rowczenio, Dorota M; Noor, Islam; Gillmore, Julian D; Lachmann, Helen J; Whelan, Carol; Hawkins, Philip N; Obici, Laura; Westermark, Per; Grateau, Gilles; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary systemic amyloidosis comprises a group of rare monogenic diseases inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It is associated with mutations in genes encoding eight different proteins, including transthyretin, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein AII, lysozyme, fibrinogen A α-chain, cystatin C, gelsolin and beta-2-microglobulin. With support from the EU FP6 EURAMY project we have designed an online registry of genes and mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including their associated clinical phenotypes, with a view to having a single free online portal for the collection and distribution of this information. Users can search the registry by either mutation, phenotype or authors who have published or submitted mutations. It provides a submission form for reporting newly identified mutations. We also wanted to introduce nomenclature which complies with recommendations set out by Human Genome Variation Society and HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for description of new and known genetic variants. We hope this registry would be a useful and convenient tool for the medical and scientific community. PMID:25044787

  12. Apheresis technologies and clinical applications: the 2005 International Apheresis Registry.

    PubMed

    Malchesky, Paul S; Koo, Anna P; Roberson, Gerald A; Hadsell, Angela T; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2007-10-01

    The developments in apheresis technologies and techniques and their clinical applications worldwide are technologically, sociologically, and economically motivated. In past apheresis surveys the statistics have highlighted both the differences by geographic region in clinical practice and in the types of technologies utilized. While a national view of apheresis is very important, an international view may be more representative overall of this therapeutic modality than national results that are highly dependent on the local economics and the available technologies. These regional differences have provided a basis for scientific and clinical assessment of these apheresis technologies and their clinical outcomes, and have impacted the marketing and business developments of new technologies worldwide. The results of the International Apheresis Registry for 2005 reporting from 22 centers on 5 continents are presented. The survey collected data exclusively via a secure internet website on 1133 patients for a total of 6501 treatments. Unlike our prior registries, information on stem cell infusions was gathered. Information gathered included patient demographics, medical history, treatment diagnoses, treatment specifics (type, methodology, access type, anticoagulants, drugs, and equipment usage), side-effects, clinical response, and payment provider. As in the prior International Apheresis Registries for 1983, 2000, and 2002 the survey results highlight the regional differences in apheresis usage and treatment methodologies, indicating that an international overview of apheresis may be more representative of the impact of this therapeutic modality.

  13. The importance of rheumatology biologic registries in Latin America.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Maria; da Silveira de Carvalho, Hellen M; Ventura Ríos, Lucio; Goycochea Robles, Maria V; Casado, Gustavo C

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by joint articular pain and disability. Although there is scarcity of data available on the incidence and prevalence of RA in Latin America, there is a growing recognition of this disease where chronic diseases are on the rise and infectious disease on the decline. RA is a substantial burden to patients, society, and the healthcare system. The heterogeneity identified within RA presents an opportunity for personalized medicine, especially in regions with such demographic diversity as that of Latin America. To understand the long-term effects of treatment for RA especially on safety, registries have been established, a number of which have been created in Latin America. Despite their weaknesses (e.g., lack of controls and randomization), registries have provided additional and complementary information on the use of biologics in clinical practice in Latin America and other regions. Although certain challenges remain in the implementation and maintenance of registries, they continue to provide real-life data to clinical practice contributing to improved patient care.

  14. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  15. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  16. TSOC-HFrEF Registry: A Registry of Hospitalized Patients with Decompensated Systolic Heart Failure: Description of Population and Management

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Hung-Yu; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Long; Chen, Shyh-Ming; Yang, Ning-I; Chang, Heng-Chia; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, Ji-Hung; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure (HF) is a medical condition with a rapidly increasing incidence both in Taiwan and worldwide. The objective of the TSOC-HFrEF registry was to assess epidemiology, etiology, clinical management, and outcomes in a large sample of hospitalized patients presenting with acute decompensated systolic HF. Methods The TSOC-HFrEF registry was a prospective, multicenter, observational survey of patients presenting to 21 medical centers or teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Hospitalized patients with either acute new-onset HF or acute decompensation of chronic HFrEF were enrolled. Data including demographic characteristics, medical history, primary etiology of HF, precipitating factors for HF hospitalization, presenting symptoms and signs, diagnostic and treatment procedures, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and discharge medications, were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 1509 patients were enrolled into the registry by the end of October 2014, with a mean age of 64 years (72% were male). Ischemic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy were diagnosed in 44% and 33% of patients, respectively. Coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and chronic renal insufficiency were the common comorbid conditions. Acute coronary syndrome, non-compliant to treatment, and concurrent infection were the major precipitating factors for acute decompensation. The median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 2.4%. At discharge, 62% of patients were prescribed either angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, 60% were prescribed beta-blockers, and 49% were prescribed mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Conclusions The TSOC-HFrEF registry provided important insights into the current clinical characteristics and management of hospitalized decompensated systolic HF patients in Taiwan. One important observation was that adherence to guideline-directed medical therapy was suboptimal

  17. Rationale and Design of the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) Registry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the management of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) has improved significantly, patients presenting with aortic dissections, rupture or other acute complications of TAAs continue to suffer high rates of morbidity and mortality. Accumulating data have indicated that many TAAs are due to underlying gene mutations. A comprehensive approach to the study of TAAs resulting from genetic mutations is needed to translate this information into advances in treatment. Objective The National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) was established to provide a biospecimen inventory and bioinformatics infrastructure to enable research to advance the clinical management of genetically-triggered TAAs and related complications. Methods The GenTAC Registry is a longitudinal observational cohort study enrolling patients with conditions related to genetically-induced TAAs from five regional clinical centers in the United States. Results Over 700 subjects with associated clinical histories, physical examinations, imaging data, and biospecimens have been enrolled in the Registry to date. Enrollment is expected to continue until September 2010. Total enrollment of nearly 3,000 subjects is expected. No interim analysis has yet been undertaken. Conclusions GenTAC has been established to facilitate studies by GenTAC investigators and others that will advance multiple scientific frontiers in thoracic aortic disease. Genotypic, proteomic, clinical, and imaging data will be integrated systematically with outcomes data to determine the optimal clinical management of patients suffering from genetically-induced TAAs. PMID:19185640

  18. A comprehensive stroke center patient registry: advantages, limitations, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Dorsey, Adrianne M.; Monlezun, Dominique J.; George, Alex J.; Shaban, Amir; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Albright, Karen C.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of a medical data registry allows institutions to effectively manage information for many different investigations related to the registry, as well as evaluate patient's trends over time, with the ultimate goal of recognizing trends that may improve outcomes in a particular patient population. Methods The purpose of this article is to illustrate our experience with a stroke patient registry at a comprehensive stroke center and highlight advantages, disadvantages, and lessons learned in the process of designing, implementing, and maintaining a stroke registry. We detail the process of stroke registry methodology, common data element (CDE) definitions, the generation of manuscripts from a registry, and the limitations. Advantages The largest advantage of a registry is the ability to prospectively add patients, while allowing investigators to go back and collect information retrospectively if needed. The continuous addition of new patients increases the sample size of studies from year to year, and it also allows reflection on clinical practices from previous years and the ability to investigate trends in patient management over time. Limitations The greatest limitation in this registry pertains to our single-entry technique where multiple sites of data entry and transfer may generate errors within the registry. Lessons Learned To reduce the potential for errors and maximize the accuracy and efficiency of the registry, we invest significant time in training competent registry users and project leaders. With effective training and transition of leadership positions, which are continuous and evolving processes, we have attempted to optimize our clinical research registry for knowledge gain and quality improvement at our center. PMID:26913217

  19. Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry: Study Design and Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Weber LeBrun, Emily; Adam, Rony A; Barber, Matthew D; Boyles, Sarah Hamilton; Iglesia, Cheryl B; Lukacz, Emily S; Moalli, Pamela; Moen, Michael D; Richter, Holly E; Subak, Leslee L; Sung, Vivian W; Visco, Anthony G; Bradley, Catherine S

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders affect up to 24% of adult women in the United States, and many patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) choose to undergo surgical repair to improve their quality of life. While a variety of surgical repair approaches and techniques are utilized, including mesh augmentation, there is limited comparative effectiveness and safety outcome data guiding best practice. In conjunction with device manufacturers, federal regulatory organizations, and professional societies, the American Urogynecologic Society developed the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry (PFDR) designed to improve the quality of POP surgery by facilitating quality improvement and research on POP treatments. The PFDR will serve as a resource for surgeons interested in benchmarking and outcomes data and as a data repository for Food and Drug Administration-mandated POP surgical device studies. Provider-reported clinical data and patient-reported outcomes will be collected prospectively at baseline and for up to 3 years after treatment. All data elements including measures of success, adverse events, and surgeon characteristics were identified and defined within the context of the anticipated multifunctionality of the registry, and with collaboration from multiple stakeholders. The PFDR will provide a platform to collect high-quality, standardized patient-level data from a variety of nonsurgical (pessary) and surgical treatments of POP and other pelvic floor disorders. Data from this registry may be used to evaluate short- and longer-term treatment outcomes, patient-reported outcomes, and complications, as well as to identify factors associated with treatment success and failure with the overall goal of improving the quality of care for women with these conditions.

  20. Malignancies in Swedish persons with haemophilia: a longitudinal registry study.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Susanna; Henriksson, Karin M; Baghaei, Fariba; Holmström, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik; Astermark, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, over time, the incidence of and mortality due to malignant diseases among persons with haemophilia, compared to matched controls. Persons with haemophilia A or B were enrolled via registries at each haemophilia centre, as well as from the National Patient Registry, and were compared to five sex and age-matched controls per patient. Data from the national Cancer Registry were linked to the study participants. A total of 1431 persons with haemophilia and 7150 matched controls were enrolled. Between the years 1972 and 2008, 164 malignancies were reported. The most common type of cancer among patients was prostate cancer, followed by haematologic malignancies, including lymphoma and leukaemia, which were significantly more frequent in patients [n = 35 (2.4%) vs. n = 60 (0.8%); P < 0.001]. Malignancies in bladder and other urinary organs were also significantly different [n = 21 (1.5%) vs. n = 46 (0.6%); P < 0.01]. The overall incidence rate ratio of malignancies per 1000 person-years compared to the controls was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 1.6]. In subgroup analysis, the corresponding incidence rate ratios per 1000 person-years for persons with severe haemophilia was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9, 3.1) and that for mild/moderate haemophilia 1.1 (95% CI 0.8, 1.5). Swedish persons with haemophilia had a significantly higher incidence of malignant diseases than controls. These were primarily haematologic malignancies and cancer in urinary organs, and the difference independent of any co-infections with HIV and/or viral hepatitis. The findings indicate the importance of further studies and close follow-up of malignancies in persons with haemophilia.

  1. Baseline Characteristics of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wook-Jin; Park, Yong Bum; Jeon, Chan Hong; Jung, Jo Won; Ko, Kwang-Phil; Choi, Sung Jae; Seo, Hye Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Jung, Hae Ok

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the pathobiology and targeted treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), epidemiologic data from large populations have been limited to western countries. The aim of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (KORPAH) was to examine the epidemiology and prognosis of Korean patients with PAH. KORPAH was designed as a nationwide, multicenter, prospective data collection using an internet webserver from September 2008 to December 2011. A total of 625 patients were enrolled. The patients' mean age was 47.6 ± 15.7 yr, and 503 (80.5%) were women. The diagnostic methods included right heart catheterization (n = 249, 39.8%) and Doppler echocardiography (n = 376, 60.2%). The etiologies, in order of frequency, were connective tissue disease (CTD), congenital heart disease, and idiopathic PAH (IPAH) (49.8%, 25.4%, and 23.2%, respectively). Patients with WHO functional class III or IV at diagnosis were 43.4%. In total, 380 (60.8%) patients received a single PAH-specific treatment at the time of enrollment, but only 72 (18.9%) patients received combination therapy. Incident cases during the registry represented 297 patients; therefore, the incidence rate of PAH was 1.9 patients/yr/million people. The 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-yr estimated survival rates were 90.8%, 87.8%, and 84.4%, respectively. Although Korean PAH patients exhibited similar age, gender, and survival rate compared with western registries, they showed relatively more CTD-PAH in the etiology and also systemic lupus erythematosus among CTD-PAH. The data suggest that earlier diagnosis and more specialized therapies should be needed to improve the survival of PAH patients.

  2. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    PubMed

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  3. Malignancies in Swedish persons with haemophilia: a longitudinal registry study.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Susanna; Henriksson, Karin M; Baghaei, Fariba; Holmström, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik; Astermark, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, over time, the incidence of and mortality due to malignant diseases among persons with haemophilia, compared to matched controls. Persons with haemophilia A or B were enrolled via registries at each haemophilia centre, as well as from the National Patient Registry, and were compared to five sex and age-matched controls per patient. Data from the national Cancer Registry were linked to the study participants. A total of 1431 persons with haemophilia and 7150 matched controls were enrolled. Between the years 1972 and 2008, 164 malignancies were reported. The most common type of cancer among patients was prostate cancer, followed by haematologic malignancies, including lymphoma and leukaemia, which were significantly more frequent in patients [n = 35 (2.4%) vs. n = 60 (0.8%); P < 0.001]. Malignancies in bladder and other urinary organs were also significantly different [n = 21 (1.5%) vs. n = 46 (0.6%); P < 0.01]. The overall incidence rate ratio of malignancies per 1000 person-years compared to the controls was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 1.6]. In subgroup analysis, the corresponding incidence rate ratios per 1000 person-years for persons with severe haemophilia was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9, 3.1) and that for mild/moderate haemophilia 1.1 (95% CI 0.8, 1.5). Swedish persons with haemophilia had a significantly higher incidence of malignant diseases than controls. These were primarily haematologic malignancies and cancer in urinary organs, and the difference independent of any co-infections with HIV and/or viral hepatitis. The findings indicate the importance of further studies and close follow-up of malignancies in persons with haemophilia. PMID:26974329

  4. Global polar geospatial registry centre system and its realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Wang, Wei; Chen, Nengcheng; Chen, Zeqiang; Chen, Jiaying

    2008-12-01

    Antarctica plays a key role in many scientific questions, of which those related to global climate change are probably the most prominent examples. There are many researches on Antarctic are carried out at present, and some special institutes sponsored by public and private communities are responsible for antarctica data management and maintenance. Antarctic Spatial Data Infrastructure (AntSDI) [1]sponsored by SCAR's Standing Committee on Antarctic Geographic Information (SC-AGI) is the one responsible for Antarctica spatial data maintenance and sharing by means of OGC standard and specification. Antarctica Spatial Data Infrastructure (AntSDI) has already collected huge volumes of geospatial data and offer an opening geospatial information service. In order to management and use Geospatial data efficiently, and enable most of the users can access to Geospatical data and service at will, we firstly must registry data and service into one or more registry center, then we should construct a building system which can supply users a uniform interface to access data and service in registry center and user also can add their own data and service to system and become part of system's capability. in this paper we present GeoAnt, a prototype interoperable AntSDI building system. GeoAnt is a three-tier standard-based open geospatial web service system which fully automates data discovery, access, and integration steps of the geospatial information discovery process under the interoperable service framework. The paper discusses the system architecture, the individual components of the system and the use of the system in the international project- Grove Mountains GIService Portal (GMGP).

  5. Information Management in Cancer Registries: Evaluating the Needs for Cancer Data Collection and Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Iris; Boren, Suzanne A; Simoes, Eduardo; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Davis, J Wade; Hicks, Lanis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer registry data collection involves, at a minimum, collecting data on demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment. A common, identified, and standardized set of data elements is needed to share data quickly and efficiently with consumers of this data. This project highlights the fact that, there is a need to develop common data elements; Surveys were developed for central cancer registries (CCRs) and cancer researchers (CRs) at NCI-designated Cancer Centers, in order to understand data needs. Survey questions were developed based on the project focus, an evaluation of the research registries and database responses, and systematic review of the literature. Questions covered the following topics: 1) Research, 2) Data collection, 3) Database/ repository, 4) Use of data, 5) Additional data items, 6) Data requests, 7) New data fields, and 8) Cancer registry data set. A review of the surveys indicates that all cancer registries' data are used for public health surveillance, and 96% of the registries indicate the data are also used for research. Data are available online in interactive tables from over 50% of CRs and 87% of CCRs. Some other survey responses indicate that CCR treatment data are not complete for example treatment data, however cancer researchers are interested in treatment variables from CCRs. Cancer registries have many data available for review, but need to examine what data are needed and used by different entities. Cancer Registries can further enhance usage through collaborations and partnerships to connect common interests in the data by making registries visible and accessible. PMID:26392844

  6. The potential and limitations of data from population-based state cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, J N; Schoenbach, V J

    2000-05-01

    Cancer incidence varies markedly among states because of population heterogeneity regarding risk, genetic, and demographic factors. Population-based cancer registries are essential to monitoring cancer trends and control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, through the National Program of Cancer Registries, are helping state registries generate more and better data nationwide. The National Program of Cancer Registries has supported the enhancement of 36 registries and the creation of 13 new registries in 45 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia, providing national standards for completeness, timeliness, and quality; financial support; and technical assistance. Users must be aware of diverse issues that influence collection and interpretation of cancer registry data, such as multiple cancer diagnoses, duplicate reports, reporting delays, misclassification of race/ethnicity, and pitfalls in estimations of cancer incidence rates. Attention to these issues and intense use of the available data for cancer surveillance will enable maximum societal benefit from the emerging network of population-based state cancer registries.

  7. The potential and limitations of data from population-based state cancer registries.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, J N; Schoenbach, V J

    2000-01-01

    Cancer incidence varies markedly among states because of population heterogeneity regarding risk, genetic, and demographic factors. Population-based cancer registries are essential to monitoring cancer trends and control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, through the National Program of Cancer Registries, are helping state registries generate more and better data nationwide. The National Program of Cancer Registries has supported the enhancement of 36 registries and the creation of 13 new registries in 45 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia, providing national standards for completeness, timeliness, and quality; financial support; and technical assistance. Users must be aware of diverse issues that influence collection and interpretation of cancer registry data, such as multiple cancer diagnoses, duplicate reports, reporting delays, misclassification of race/ethnicity, and pitfalls in estimations of cancer incidence rates. Attention to these issues and intense use of the available data for cancer surveillance will enable maximum societal benefit from the emerging network of population-based state cancer registries. PMID:10800415

  8. PARENT joint action: increasing the added value of patient registries in a cross-border setting.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Matic; Doupi, Persephone; Pristaš, Ivan; Skalkidis, Yannis; Zaletel, Metka; Orel, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries are poorly interoperable and as a result data exchange or aggregation across organizations, regions and countries for secondary purposes (i.e. research and public health) is difficult to perform. PARENT Joint Action aims to provide EU Member States with a set of guidelines, recommendations and tools to support setting-up, management and governance of interoperable patient registries, thus helping EU Member States to drive down cost and interoperability risks of patient registries as well as improving secondary us-age of registry data in a cross-border setting. PMID:23920935

  9. Hereditary cancer registries improve the care of patients with a genetic predisposition to cancer: contributions from the Dutch Lynch syndrome registry.

    PubMed

    Vasen, Hans F A; Velthuizen, Mary E; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Menko, Fred H; Nagengast, Fokke M; Cats, Annemieke; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Breuning, Martijn H; Roukema, Anne J; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-07-01

    The Dutch Hereditary Cancer Registry was established in 1985 with the support of the Ministry of Health (VWS). The aims of the registry are: (1) to promote the identification of families with hereditary cancer, (2) to encourage the participation in surveillance programs of individuals at high risk, (3) to ensure the continuity of lifelong surveillance examinations, and (4) to promote research, in particular the improvement of surveillance protocols. During its early days the registry provided assistance with family investigations and the collection of medical data, and recommended surveillance when a family fulfilled specific diagnostic criteria. Since 2000 the registry has focused on family follow-up, and ensuring the quality of surveillance programs and appropriate clinical management. Since its founding, the registry has identified over 10,000 high-risk individuals with a diverse array of hereditary cancer syndromes. All were encouraged to participate in prevention programmes. The registry has published a number of studies that evaluated the outcome of surveillance protocols for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Lynch syndrome, as well as in familial colorectal cancer. In 2006, evaluation of the effect of registration and colonoscopic surveillance on the mortality rate associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) showed that the policy led to a substantial decrease in the mortality rate associated with CRC. Following discovery of MMR gene defects, the first predictive model that could select families for genetic testing was published by the Leiden group. In addition, over the years the registry has produced many cancer risk studies that have helped to develop appropriate surveillance protocols. Hereditary cancer registries in general, and the Lynch syndrome registry in particular, play an important role in improving the clinical management of affected families. PMID:26973060

  10. The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry: a multi-national, community-based registry of pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research (Global Network) supports and conducts clinical trials in resource-limited countries by pairing foreign and U.S. investigators, with the goal of evaluating low-cost, sustainable interventions to improve the health of women and children. Accurate reporting of births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, maternal mortality, and measures of obstetric and neonatal care is critical to efforts to discover strategies for improving pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. Because most of the sites in the Global Network have weak registration within their health care systems, the Global Network developed the Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR), a prospective, population-based registry of pregnancies at the Global Network sites to provide precise data on health outcomes and measures of care. Methods Pregnant women are enrolled in the MNHR if they reside in or receive healthcare in designated groups of communities within sites in the Global Network. For each woman, demographic, health characteristics and major outcomes of pregnancy are recorded. Data are recorded at enrollment, the time of delivery and at 42 days postpartum. Results From 2010 through 2013 Global Network sites were located in Argentina, Guatemala, Belgaum and Nagpur, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Zambia. During this period, 283,496 pregnant women were enrolled in the MNHR; this number represented 98.8% of all eligible women. Delivery data were collected for 98.8% of women and 42-day follow-up data for 98.4% of those enrolled. In this supplement, there are a series of manuscripts that use data gathered through the MNHR to report outcomes of these pregnancies. Conclusions Developing public policy and improving public health in countries with poor perinatal outcomes is, in part, dependent upon understanding the outcome of every pregnancy. Because the worst pregnancy outcomes typically occur in countries with limited health registration

  11. [Food-induced anaphylaxis - data from the anaphylaxis registry].

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Grünhagen, Josefine; Dölle, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions due to food occur in the context of food allergy and, together with venom and drugs, are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions. In small children the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions according to data from the anaphylaxis registry are hen's egg and milk, whereas in school children peanut and hazelnut are frequent elicitors of allergic reactions. Other frequent elicitors of anaphylactic reactions in childhood are wheat and soy. In adults the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions due to food, based on data from the anaphylaxis registry, are wheat, soy, celery, shellfish and hazelnut. Rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis in German-speaking countries are mustard and cabbage. However, the panel of rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis show regional differences. As of March 2015, 17 cases of fatal anaphylaxis were registered and among these seven were food-induced. Co-factors can either trigger the elicitation of a severe allergic reaction or affect its severity. Among such co-factors are physical activity, the intake of certain drugs, and psychological stress. The data on the role of cofactors is sparse. The management of food-induced anaphylaxis includes acute management according to current guidelines, but also long-term management, which should include educational measures regarding treatment but also information about the food allergen in daily life.

  12. [Food-induced anaphylaxis - data from the anaphylaxis registry].

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Grünhagen, Josefine; Dölle, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions due to food occur in the context of food allergy and, together with venom and drugs, are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions. In small children the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions according to data from the anaphylaxis registry are hen's egg and milk, whereas in school children peanut and hazelnut are frequent elicitors of allergic reactions. Other frequent elicitors of anaphylactic reactions in childhood are wheat and soy. In adults the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions due to food, based on data from the anaphylaxis registry, are wheat, soy, celery, shellfish and hazelnut. Rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis in German-speaking countries are mustard and cabbage. However, the panel of rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis show regional differences. As of March 2015, 17 cases of fatal anaphylaxis were registered and among these seven were food-induced. Co-factors can either trigger the elicitation of a severe allergic reaction or affect its severity. Among such co-factors are physical activity, the intake of certain drugs, and psychological stress. The data on the role of cofactors is sparse. The management of food-induced anaphylaxis includes acute management according to current guidelines, but also long-term management, which should include educational measures regarding treatment but also information about the food allergen in daily life. PMID:27255298

  13. [The contribution of cancer registries in environmental health studies].

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Fazzo, L; Fusco, M; Benedetti, M; Pirastu, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    Cancer incidence is an outcome of interest in studies assessing the health impact of polluted sites, for which an example is represented by SENTIERI Project. Incidence data are characterized by better diagnostic quality and are not influenced by survival factors, furthermore they allow the investigation of high-survival neoplasms (i.e. childhood cancer) and rare malignancies. Furthermore, the study of incidence is more informative than mortality for non-lethal tumours, therefore it represents an advancement in respect to the study of mortality completed in SENTIERI Project. In the last decade in Italy some environmental epidemiology studies used cancer register data, for example the Biancavilla (Sicily) investigation on fluoro-edenite related mesothelioma and the study in an area of Naples Province where hazardous waste was extensively dumped. In this frame, ISS planned some collaborative studies with Siracusa, Mantua and Ferrara cancer Registries, where three major polluted sites are located. Following these pilot studies an ISS-AIRTUM (Italian Association of Cancer Registries) collaborative study has been planned. For a description of SENTIERI, refer to the 2010 supplement of Epidemiology & Prevention, devoted to the Project.

  14. Towards data integration automation for the French rare disease registry

    PubMed Central

    Maaroufi, Meriem; Choquet, Rémy; Landais, Paul; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Building a medical registry upon an existing infrastructure and rooted practices is not an easy task. It is the case for the BNDMR project, the French rare disease registry, that aims to collect administrative and medical data of rare disease patients seen in different hospitals. To avoid duplicating data entry for health professionals, the project plans to deploy connectors with the existing systems to automatically retrieve data. Given the data heterogeneity and the large number of source systems, the automation of connectors creation is required. In this context, we propose a methodology that optimizes the use of existing alignment approaches in the data integration processes. The generated mappings are formalized in exploitable mapping expressions. Following this methodology, a process has been experimented on specific data types of a source system: Boolean and predefined lists. As a result, effectiveness of the used alignment approach has been enhanced and more good mappings have been detected. Nonetheless, further improvements could be done to deal with the semantic issue and process other data types. PMID:26958224

  15. Towards data integration automation for the French rare disease registry.

    PubMed

    Maaroufi, Meriem; Choquet, Rémy; Landais, Paul; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Building a medical registry upon an existing infrastructure and rooted practices is not an easy task. It is the case for the BNDMR project, the French rare disease registry, that aims to collect administrative and medical data of rare disease patients seen in different hospitals. To avoid duplicating data entry for health professionals, the project plans to deploy connectors with the existing systems to automatically retrieve data. Given the data heterogeneity and the large number of source systems, the automation of connectors creation is required. In this context, we propose a methodology that optimizes the use of existing alignment approaches in the data integration processes. The generated mappings are formalized in exploitable mapping expressions. Following this methodology, a process has been experimented on specific data types of a source system: Boolean and predefined lists. As a result, effectiveness of the used alignment approach has been enhanced and more good mappings have been detected. Nonetheless, further improvements could be done to deal with the semantic issue and process other data types. PMID:26958224

  16. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  17. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2005.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Suri, Rita S; Lindsay, Robert M

    2005-07-01

    The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry was designed to collect data describing treatments, characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated with quotidian hemodialysis (HD) worldwide. In July 2004, North American centers were first invited to enroll patients. By March 1, 2005, a total of 70 nocturnal and 8 short-daily HD patients from three Canadian and two US centers were enrolled. As recruitment continues, projected enrollment for 2005 may exceed 200 patients from North America alone. Preliminary analyses indicate that the current registry cohort is younger (mean age, 49.5 +/- 1.6 years) and carries a lower burden of comorbidity than the overall North American HD population. The low event rate expected in this cohort underlines the need for a large sample size if an appropriately powered survival study is to be undertaken. Increasing recruitment in the United States by including HD centers owned or managed by large dialysis organizations, and beginning overseas collaborations to include Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and South America will be the primary areas of focus for 2005.

  18. Dispelling myths about rare disease registry system development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rare disease registries (RDRs) are an essential tool to improve knowledge and monitor interventions for rare diseases. If designed appropriately, patient and disease related information captured within them can become the cornerstone for effective diagnosis and new therapies. Surprisingly however, registries possess a diverse range of functionality, operate in different, often-times incompatible, software environments and serve various, and sometimes incongruous, purposes. Given the ambitious goals of the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) by 2020 and beyond, RDRs must be designed with the agility to evolve and efficiently interoperate in an ever changing rare disease landscape, as well as to cater for rapid changes in Information Communication Technologies. In this paper, we contend that RDR requirements will also evolve in response to a number of factors such as changing disease definitions and diagnostic criteria, the requirement to integrate patient/disease information from advances in either biotechnology and/or phenotypying approaches, as well as the need to adapt dynamically to security and privacy concerns. We dispel a number of myths in RDR development, outline key criteria for robust and sustainable RDR implementation and introduce the concept of a RDR Checklist to guide future RDR development. PMID:24131574

  19. The Columbia Registry of Information and Utilization Management Trials.

    PubMed Central

    Balas, E A; Stockham, M G; Mitchell, M A; Austin, S M; West, D A; Ewigman, B G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: T systematically locate, register, and abstract information used in comparing effects of various information services (computerized and noncomputerized) and utilization management interventions on the process and outcome of patient care. DESIGN: Manual and electronic database searches located reports that met three main criteria: 1) randomized controlled trial; 2) information or utilization management intervention in the study group with no similar intervention in the control group; and 3) effect of the intervention on the process and/or outcome of patient care had been measured. Published reports were registered in the Columbia Registry. RESULTS: Nearly 600 reports were collected from 24 countries and 189 different publications. Frequently tested interventions included patients or physician education, telephone follow-up, patient or physician reminders, and home care services. Frequently reported effect variables included hospitalization rate, length of stay, immunization rate, and mortality rate. Standardized formal tools were developed for the separation and abstraction of practical information and methodologic details from the collected trial reports. CONCLUSIONS: The registry provides a new source of information for meta-analyses, traditional reviews, and executive summaries of quality improvement of health services. The streamlined knowledge engineering process of quality evaluation and abstraction of critical information can generate helpful information for practitioners and researchers simultaneously. PMID:7496880

  20. Publications list of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, 1968--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.; Hunacek, M.; Gervais, T.

    1993-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) began with the establishment of the National Plutonium Registry in 1968. In 1910, the name was changed to the United States Transuranium Registry to reflect a broader concern with the entire spectrum of transuranium elements, and in 1918, a parallel but separate United States Uranium Registry was created to study the uranium decay series. With similar goals of understanding the biokinetics, dosimetry, and potential health effects of transuranic elements and uranium series based on actual human experience, the two registries were administratively joined in February 1992. Accordingly, compilation and publication of a complete listing and collection of Registries publications for from the inception through July 1993 was undertaken to coincide with the silver anniversary of the Registries. The following criteria were established for the various categories of publications included in the listing of publications: Journal Articles and Conference Proceedings -- Comprised of all known publications in the open peer reviewed scientific literature for research and related activities carried out, funded, or otherwise sponsored, wholly or in part, by the Registries. The peer reviewed literature was taken to include scientific journals and formal published proceedings of scientific meetings. Annual Reports -- These are annual or progress reports published by the Registries. Miscellaneous Publications -- These are professional or scientific publications of staff affiliated with the Registries at the time of publication that do not fit into the above categories. Included are abstracts, book reviews, letters to the editor, articles from the peer reviewed scientific literature and technical reports. Books and Book Chapters -- This category consists of scientific or technical books and book chapters authored by professional staff affiliated with the Registries at the time of preparation.

  1. Comparative study on the National Renal Disease Registry in America, England and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Ehteshami, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Context: A disease registry is a database that includes information about people diagnosed with specific types of diseases. The registry collects information that can be used for capturing, managing, and organizing specific information for patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) in selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Settings and Design: Retrieval of data of the NRDR performed through scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Materials and Methods: This research was an applied and descriptive, comparative study. The study population consisted of the National Renal Disease Registry of the selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran, from which data were collected using forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, data registries, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, and related documents. Data were gathered through phone, e-mail, study, observation, and interview. Statistical Analysis Used: The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: There is no NRDR in Iran to report the short- and long-term results of renal disease. Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as single-center experiences. America and Britain have pre-eminent national registry of renal disease, compared to other countries. Conclusions: The Iranian Society of Nephrology should be actively involved to create a National Renal Registry in Iran. The registry should have

  2. Developing a CKD Registry in Primary Care: Provider Attitudes and Input

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Dannielle; Dohan, Daniel; Handley, Margaret A.; Powe, Neil R.; Tuot, Delphine S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Chronic disease registries have been successful at promoting delivery of guideline-concordant primary care for diabetes and hypertension but not for chronic kidney disease (CKD). To understand whether a registry could be designed to improve CKD management in primary care, we explored primary care provider (PCP) attitudes about the benefits (or lack thereof) of a CKD registry compared to other chronic diseases and the key facilitators of successfully implementing a CKD registry in safety-net primary care. Study Design: Semistructured interview study. Setting & Participants. We conducted and recorded semi-structured, one-hour interviews with medical directors and quality improvement champions from safety-net adult primary care clinics in San Francisco. Analytic Approach. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach until thematic saturation was achieved. Results. Twenty primary care providers were interviewed. Four themes relevant to the development of a successful CKD registry for safety-net primary care were identified: (1) provider beliefs that a CKD registry could aid in the delivery of team-based, high-quality CKD care; (2) clinic workflow re-design and staffing are key facilitators to successful implementation of a CKD registry; (3) unique complexities of CKD, such as varying etiologies, may limit the use of a CKD registry by non-physicians; and (4) a CKD registry is aligned with current primary care priorities and health care delivery strategies. Limitations. Small sample size and reliance on clinician leaders within one health care delivery system. Conclusions. A CKD registry directed at the entire health care team, with the functionality to track, standardize and enhance CKD care through decision support, has potential to improve the management of CKD in safety-net primary care settings. These data directly informed the development of a CKD registry in these settings in San Francisco. PMID:24295612

  3. 75 FR 29350 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Reportable Food Registry as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Questions and Answers Regarding the Reportable Food Registry as Established by the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007... information to the industry in complying with the Reportable Food Registry requirements prescribed by the...

  4. 77 FR 69548 - Proposed Information Collection (Agent Orange Registry Code Sheet); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... required to organize and update the information contained in AOR to be able to notify Vietnam era veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam of any increased health risks resulting from exposure to dioxin... VA that is similar to the Persian Gulf War Veterans Health Registry. Registry examination is...

  5. 77 FR 16471 - Pipeline Safety: Implementation of the National Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...: Implementation of the National Registry of Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas Operators AGENCY: Pipeline and... registry of pipeline and liquefied natural gas operators. This notice provides updates to the information... the Federal Register (75 FR 72878) titled: ``Pipeline Safety: Updates to Pipeline and...

  6. Myositis registries and biorepositories: powerful tools to advance clinical, epidemiologic and pathogenic research

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Dankó, Katalin; Miller, Frederick W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Clinical registries and biorepositories have proven extremely useful in many studies of diseases, especially rare diseases. Given their rarity and diversity, the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, or myositis syndromes, have benefited from individual researchers’ collections of cohorts of patients. Major efforts are being made to establish large registries and biorepositories that will allow many additional studies to be performed that were not possible before. Here we describe the registries developed by investigators and patient support groups that are currently available for collaborative research purposes. Recent findings We have identified 46 myositis research registries, including many with biorepositories, which have been developed for a wide variety of purposes and have resulted in great advances in understanding the range of phenotypes, clinical presentations, risk factors, pathogenic mechanisms, outcome assessment, therapeutic responses, and prognoses. These are now available for collaborative use to undertake additional studies. Two myositis patient registries have been developed for research, and myositis patient support groups maintain demographic registries with large numbers of patients available to be contacted for potential research participation. Summary Investigator-initiated myositis research registries and biorepositories have proven extremely useful in understanding many aspects of these rare and diverse autoimmune diseases. These registries and biorepositories, in addition to those developed by myositis patient support groups, deserve continued support to maintain the momentum in this field as they offer major opportunities to improve understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases in cost-effective ways. PMID:25225838

  7. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE 16 CFR PART 310 § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry. (a) It is a violation of this Rule for any seller to initiate, or cause any telemarketer... required to access, the National Do Not Call Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other...

  8. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE 16 CFR PART 310 § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry. (a) It is a violation of this Rule for any seller to initiate, or cause any telemarketer... required to access, the National Do Not Call Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other...

  9. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE 16 CFR PART 310 § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry. (a) It is a violation of this Rule for any seller to initiate, or cause any telemarketer... required to access, the National Do Not Call Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other...

  10. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE 16 CFR PART 310 § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry. (a) It is a violation of this Rule for any seller to initiate, or cause any telemarketer... required to access, the National Do Not Call Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other...

  11. 36 CFR 704.1 - Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry. 704.1 Section 704.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS § 704.1 Films selected for inclusion in...

  12. 36 CFR 704.1 - Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry. 704.1 Section 704.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS § 704.1 Films selected for inclusion in...

  13. 36 CFR 704.1 - Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry. 704.1 Section 704.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS § 704.1 Films selected for inclusion in...

  14. The Trace Center International Hardware/Software Registry: Programs for Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary

    1982-01-01

    The Trace Center (University of Wisconsin) has assembled a registry of hardware/software programs and adaptations for the handicapped user. The registry contains information on augmentative devices for motoric, sensory, or cognitive skills; special inputs that provide access to standard software; and other programs with speech output. (CL)

  15. 36 CFR 704.1 - Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry. 704.1 Section 704.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS § 704.1 Films selected for inclusion in...

  16. The North Carolina Online Sex Offender Registry: Awareness and Utilization by Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jennifer L.; Malesky, L. Alvin, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined childcare providers' usage of the North Carolina Sex Offender and Public Protection Registry. One hundred twenty three childcare providers in 76 counties in North Carolina were surveyed via telephone interview about their utilization of the registry Web site. Responses revealed that most providers knew about the registry…

  17. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  18. Limitations of using a cancer registry to identify incident primary intracranial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Counsell, C.; Collie, D.; Grant, R.

    1997-01-01

    The completeness and accuracy of registration of primary intracranial tumours in the Scottish Cancer Registry was compared with a detailed incidence study performed over a two year period (1989-90). Of 228 patients with any primary intracranial tumour in the incidence study, 124 (54%) were identified as intracranial tumours in the cancer registry. The registry excluded benign tumours (although this was not consistent) and so the sensitivity of the registry varied with tumour type (84% for neuroepithelial tumours, 22% meningeal, 29% sellar, 0% cranial nerve). Of the 31 malignant tumours not found in the registry on our initial search, nine were found to have been included between 1989-90 but using different International Classification of Diseases-9th revision (ICD-9) codes or postcodes, and seven were found registered after 1990.Eleven per cent of cases (18/170) identified in the cancer registry were excluded from the incidence study: 11 had evidence of an intracranial tumour before 1989 whereas four definitely did not have an intracranial tumour. The cancer registry therefore significantly underestimated the incidence of all primary intracranial tumours, and of malignant intracranial tumours. Incidence studies must use additional methods to identify all primary tumours. Cancer registries should consider registering all primary intracranial tumours and may improve case ascertainment by screening neuroradiology data.

 PMID:9221974

  19. 78 FR 33894 - Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment... members of the Armed Forces to toxic airborne chemicals and fumes caused by open burn pits. DATES: Written...: cynthia.harvey-pryor@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW, Open Burn Pit Registry...

  20. 36 CFR 704.1 - Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Films selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry. 704.1 Section 704.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS § 704.1 Films selected for inclusion in...

  1. 75 FR 68604 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program Designation of Exempted States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ91 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR Subpart P,...

  2. Classification of Topographical Pattern of Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy: A Registry Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Susan M.; Carlin, John B.; Reddihough, Dinah S.

    2011-01-01

    This study used data from a population-based cerebral palsy (CP) registry and systematic review to assess the amount of heterogeneity between registries in topographical patterns when dichotomised into unilateral (USCP) and bilateral spastic CP (BSCP), and whether the terms diplegia and quadriplegia provide useful additional epidemiological…

  3. 76 FR 36896 - Notice of Establishment of a New Plant Protection and Quarantine Stakeholder Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... email subscription service and advises current subscribers on how to continue receiving emails on topics... Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) stakeholder registry is an email subscription service that allows individuals... Stakeholder Registry in order to continue receiving emails on PPQ-related topics. Subscribers will be able...

  4. Exploring Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Interstitial Lung Diseases: Rationale, Aims, and Design of a Nationwide Prospective Registry--The EXCITING-ILD Registry.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Michael; Herth, Felix J F; Wacker, Margarethe; Leidl, Reiner; Hellmann, Andreas; Pfeifer, Michael; Behr, Jürgen; Witt, Sabine; Kauschka, Dagmar; Mall, Marcus; Günther, Andreas; Markart, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Despite a number of prospective registries conducted in past years, the current epidemiology of interstitial lung diseases (ILD) is still not well defined, particularly regarding the prevalence and incidence, their management, healthcare utilisation needs, and healthcare-associated costs. To address these issues in Germany, a new prospective ILD registry, "Exploring Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Interstitial Lung Diseases" (EXCITING-ILD), is being conducted by the German Centre for Lung Research in association with ambulatory, inpatient, scientific pulmonology organisations and patient support groups. This multicentre, noninterventional, prospective, and observational ILD registry aims to collect comprehensive and validated data from all healthcare institutions on the incidence, prevalence, characteristics, management, and outcomes regarding all ILD presentations in the real-world setting. Specifically, this registry will collect demographic data, disease-related data such as ILD subtype, treatments, diagnostic procedures (e.g., HRCT, surgical lung biopsy), risk factors (e.g., familial ILD), significant comorbidities, ILD managements, and disease outcomes as well as healthcare resource consumption. The EXCITING-ILD registry will include in-patient and out-patient ILD healthcare facilities in more than 100 sites. In summary, this registry will document comprehensive and current epidemiological data as well as important health economic data for ILDs in Germany. PMID:26640781

  5. The role of the hospital registry in achieving outcome benchmarks in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Greene, Frederick L; Gilkerson, Sharon; Tedder, Paige; Smith, Kathy

    2009-06-15

    The hospital registry is a valuable tool for evaluating quality benchmarks in cancer care. As payment for performance standards are adopted, the registry will assume a more dynamic and economically important role in the hospital setting. At Carolinas Medical Center, the registry has been a key instrument in the comparison of state and national benchmarks and for program improvement in meeting standards in the care of breast and colon cancer. One of the significant successes of the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) Hospital Approvals Program is the support of hospital registries, especially in small and midsized community hospitals throughout the United States. To become a member of the Hospital Approvals Program, a registry must be staffed appropriately and include analytic data for patients who have their primary diagnosis or treatment at the facility 1. The current challenge for most hospitals is to prove that the registry has specific worth when many facets of care are not compensated. Unfortunately a small number of hospitals have disbanded their registries because of the short-sighted decision that the registry and its personnel are a drain on the hospital system and do not generate revenue. In the present era of meeting benchmarks for care as a prelude to being paid by third party and governmental agencies 2,3, a primary argument is that the registry can be revenue-enhancing by quantifying specific outcomes in cancer care. Without having appropriate registry and abstract capability, the hospital leadership cannot measure the specific outcome benchmarks required in the era of "pay for performance" or "pay for participation".

  6. Creation of a Hyponatremia Registry Supported by an Industry-Derived Quality Control Methodology

    PubMed Central

    D., Giunta; N., Fuentes; V., Pazo; M. L., Posadas-Martínez; H., Michellangelo; G., Waisman; F., González Bernaldo De Quirós

    2010-01-01

    Background A clinical registry encompasses a selective set of rigorously collected and stored clinical data focused on a specific condition. Hyponatremia has multiple, complex underlying causes and is one of the most frequent laboratory abnormalities. No systematic registries of hyponatremic patients have been reported in the medical literature. The purpose of this project was to create a registry for hyponatremia in order to obtain epidemiological data that will help to better understand this condition. Objective This paper describes the creation of a registry for hyponatremia within a single institution that employs industry-based approaches for quality management to optimize data accuracy and completeness. Methods A prospective registry of incident hyponatremia cases was created for this study. A formalized statistically based quality control methodology was developed and implemented to analyze and monitor all the process indicators that were developed to ensure data quality. Results Between December 2006 and April 2009, 2443 episodes of hyponatremia were included. Six process indicators that reflect the integrity of the system were evaluated monthly, looking for variation that would suggest systematic problems. The graphical representation of the process measures through control charts allowed us to identify and subsequently address problems with maintaining the registry. Conclusion In this project we have created a novel hyponatremia registry. To ensure the quality of the data in this registry we have implemented a quality control methodology based on industrial principles that allows us to monitor the performance of the registry over time through process indicators in order to detect systematic problems. We postulate that this approach could be reproduced for other registries. PMID:23616856

  7. National nephrectomy registries: Reviewing the need for population-based data.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John; Williamson, Timothy; Ischia, Joseph; Bolton, Damien M; Frydenberg, Mark; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Nephrectomy is the cornerstone therapy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and continued refinement of the procedure through research may enhance patient outcomes. A national nephrectomy registry may provide the key information needed to assess the procedure at a national level. The aim of this study was to review nephrectomy data available at a population-based level in Australia and to benchmark these data against data from the rest of the world as an examination of the national nephrectomy registry model. A PubMed search identified records pertaining to RCC nephrectomy in Australia. A similar search identified records relating to established nephrectomy registries internationally and other surgical registries of clinical importance. These records were reviewed to address the stated aims of this article. Population-based data within Australia for nephrectomy were lacking. Key issues identified were the difficulty in benchmarking outcomes and no ongoing monitoring of trends. The care centralization debate, which questions whether small-volume centers provide comparable outcomes to high-volume centers, is ongoing. Patterns of adherence and the effectiveness of existing protocols are uncertain. A review of established international registries demonstrated that the registry model can effectively address issues comparable to those identified in the Australian literature. A national nephrectomy registry could address deficiencies identified in a given nation's nephrectomy field. The model is supported by evidence from international examples and will provide the population-based data needed for studies. Scope exists for possible integration with other registries to develop a more encompassing urological or surgical registry. Need remains for further exploration of the feasibility and practicalities of initiating such a registry including a minimum data set, outcome indicators, and auditing of data.

  8. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis - data from the malaysian psoriasis registry.

    PubMed

    Mazlin, M B; Chang, C C; Baba, R

    2012-10-01

    All around the world, there is growing evidence of the association between psoriasis and comorbidities which increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study aims to determine the prevalence of various comorbidities among adult psoriasis patients in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients in the Malaysian Psoriasis Registry from January 2007 to December 2008. A total of 2,267 adult patients with psoriasis from 13 dermatology centers were included. Prevalence of various comorbidities were: hypertension 25.9%, diabetes mellitus 17.7 %, dyslipidaemia 17.8%, overweight 33.2%, obesity 20.7%, ischaemic heart disease 5.8% and cerebrovascular disease 1.4%. These comorbidities were more prevalent in patients with psoriasis of late-onset and longer duration. Active screening of these comorbidities in all adult psoriasis patients is recommended.

  9. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months.

  10. Standardized Cardiovascular Data for Clinical Research, Registries, and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, H. Vernon; Weintraub, William S.; Radford, Martha J.; Kremers, Mark S.; Roe, Matthew T.; Shaw, Richard E.; Pinchotti, Dana M.; Tcheng, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been focused on standardization of data exchange in clinical research studies and patient care activities. Both are usually managed locally using separate and generally incompatible data systems at individual hospitals or clinics. In the past decade there have been nascent efforts to create data standards for clinical research and patient care data, and to some extent these are helpful in providing a degree of uniformity. Nevertheless these data standards generally have not been converted into accepted computer-based language structures that could permit reliable data exchange across computer networks. The National Cardiovascular Research Infrastructure (NCRI) project was initiated with a major objective of creating a model framework for standard data exchange in all clinical research, clinical registry, and patient care environments, including all electronic health records. The goal is complete syntactic and semantic interoperability. A Data Standards Workgroup was established to create or identify and then harmonize clinical definitions for a base set of standardized cardiovascular data elements that could be used in this network infrastructure. Recognizing the need for continuity with prior efforts, the Workgroup examined existing data standards sources. A basic set of 353 elements was selected. The NCRI staff then collaborated with the two major technical standards organizations in healthcare, the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium and Health Level 7 International, as well as with staff from the National Cancer Institute Enterprise Vocabulary Services. Modeling and mapping were performed to represent (instantiate) the data elements in appropriate technical computer language structures for endorsement as an accepted data standard for public access and use. Fully implemented, these elements will facilitate clinical research, registry reporting, administrative reporting and regulatory compliance, and patient care. PMID

  11. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months. PMID:27610126

  12. Staffing and Training Requirements for Tumor Registry Centers in the State of Louisiana. Technical Report 69-101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, C. Dennis

    An exploratory study was conducted to obtain information regarding staff requirements in small tumor registry centers, involving a brief analysis of existing tumor registry centers and exploration of training and organizational factors that might be associated with establishing new centers. Activities performed by tumor registry personnel were…

  13. [The role of drug registries in the post-marketing surveillance].

    PubMed

    Traversa, Giuseppe; Sagliocca, Luciano; Magrini, Nicola; Venegoni, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to issue of Recenti Progressi in Medicina, devoted to the role of drug registries in the post-marketing surveillance. We first motivate the need to implement registries as a tool in promoting the appropriateness of drug use and acquiring additional information on the risk-benefit profile of drugs. Then, the different role that can be played by registries in comparison with prescription monitoring systems and observational studies is clarified. The presentation of some of the most relevant registries established in Italy since the end of the '90s, with the analysis of their strengths and weaknesses, helps to understand some of the crucial issues that should be taken into account before a new registry is adopted. Specifically, we deal with the relationship between objectives - of appropriateness, effectiveness and safety - and methods; the overlapping between drug-based registries and disease-based ones; the duration and extension of data collection, which may be either exhaustive or based on a sampling frame; the importance of ensuring the quality of the data and to minimize the number of subjects who are lost to follow-up; the importance of infrastructures, and of ad hoc funding, for the functioning of a registry; the independence in data analysis and publication of findings.

  14. Enhancing cancer registry data for comparative effectiveness research (CER) project: overview and methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vivien W; Eheman, Christie R; Johnson, Christopher J; Hernandez, Monique N; Rousseau, David; Styles, Timothy S; West, Dee W; Hsieh, Meichin; Hakenewerth, Anne M; Celaya, Maria O; Rycroft, Randi K; Wike, Jennifer M; Pearson, Melissa; Brockhouse, Judy; Mulvihill, Linda G; Zhang, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Following the Institute of Medicine's 2009 report on the national priorities for comparative effectiveness research (CER), funding for support of CER became available in 2009 through the American Recovery and Re-investment Act. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) received funding to enhance the infrastructure of population-based cancer registries and to expand registry data collection to support CER. The CDC established 10 specialized registries within the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) to enhance data collection for all cancers and to address targeted CER questions, including the clinical use and prognostic value of specific biomarkers. The project also included a special focus on detailed first course of treatment for cancers of the breast, colon, and rectum, as well as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) diagnosed in 2011. This paper describes the methodology and the work conducted by the CDC and the NPCR specialized registries in collecting data for the 4 special focused cancers, including the selection of additional data variables, development of data collection tools and software modifications, institutional review board approvals, training, collection of detailed first course of treatment, and quality assurance. It also presents the characteristics of the study population and discusses the strengths and limitations of using population-based cancer registries to support CER as well as the potential future role of population-based cancer registries in assessing the quality of patient care and cancer control.

  15. Ethical aspects of registry-based research in the Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Håberg, Siri E; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Lafolie, Pierre; Zoega, Helga; Sarkkola, Catharina; von Kraemer, Stephanie; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Nørgaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    National health care registries in the Nordic countries share many attributes, but different legal and ethical frameworks represent a challenge to promoting effective joint research. Internationally, there is a lack of knowledge about how ethical matters are considered in Nordic registry-based research, and a lack of knowledge about how Nordic ethics committees operate and what is needed to obtain an approval. In this paper, we review ethical aspects of registry-based research, the legal framework, the role of ethics review boards in the Nordic countries, and the structure of the ethics application. We discuss the role of informed consent in registry-based research and how to safeguard the integrity of study participants, including vulnerable subjects and children. Our review also provides information on the different government agencies that contribute registry-based data, and a list of the major health registries in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Both ethical values and conditions for registry-based research are similar in the Nordic countries. While Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden have chosen different legal frameworks, these differences can be resolved through mutual recognition of ethical applications and by harmonizing the different systems, likely leading to increased collaboration and enlarged studies. PMID:26648756

  16. BioShaDock: a community driven bioinformatics shared Docker-based tools registry.

    PubMed

    Moreews, François; Sallou, Olivier; Ménager, Hervé; Le Bras, Yvan; Monjeaud, Cyril; Blanchet, Christophe; Collin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Linux container technologies, as represented by Docker, provide an alternative to complex and time-consuming installation processes needed for scientific software. The ease of deployment and the process isolation they enable, as well as the reproducibility they permit across environments and versions, are among the qualities that make them interesting candidates for the construction of bioinformatic infrastructures, at any scale from single workstations to high throughput computing architectures. The Docker Hub is a public registry which can be used to distribute bioinformatic software as Docker images. However, its lack of curation and its genericity make it difficult for a bioinformatics user to find the most appropriate images needed. BioShaDock is a bioinformatics-focused Docker registry, which provides a local and fully controlled environment to build and publish bioinformatic software as portable Docker images. It provides a number of improvements over the base Docker registry on authentication and permissions management, that enable its integration in existing bioinformatic infrastructures such as computing platforms. The metadata associated with the registered images are domain-centric, including for instance concepts defined in the EDAM ontology, a shared and structured vocabulary of commonly used terms in bioinformatics. The registry also includes user defined tags to facilitate its discovery, as well as a link to the tool description in the ELIXIR registry if it already exists. If it does not, the BioShaDock registry will synchronize with the registry to create a new description in the Elixir registry, based on the BioShaDock entry metadata. This link will help users get more information on the tool such as its EDAM operations, input and output types. This allows integration with the ELIXIR Tools and Data Services Registry, thus providing the appropriate visibility of such images to the bioinformatics community.

  17. BioShaDock: a community driven bioinformatics shared Docker-based tools registry.

    PubMed

    Moreews, François; Sallou, Olivier; Ménager, Hervé; Le Bras, Yvan; Monjeaud, Cyril; Blanchet, Christophe; Collin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Linux container technologies, as represented by Docker, provide an alternative to complex and time-consuming installation processes needed for scientific software. The ease of deployment and the process isolation they enable, as well as the reproducibility they permit across environments and versions, are among the qualities that make them interesting candidates for the construction of bioinformatic infrastructures, at any scale from single workstations to high throughput computing architectures. The Docker Hub is a public registry which can be used to distribute bioinformatic software as Docker images. However, its lack of curation and its genericity make it difficult for a bioinformatics user to find the most appropriate images needed. BioShaDock is a bioinformatics-focused Docker registry, which provides a local and fully controlled environment to build and publish bioinformatic software as portable Docker images. It provides a number of improvements over the base Docker registry on authentication and permissions management, that enable its integration in existing bioinformatic infrastructures such as computing platforms. The metadata associated with the registered images are domain-centric, including for instance concepts defined in the EDAM ontology, a shared and structured vocabulary of commonly used terms in bioinformatics. The registry also includes user defined tags to facilitate its discovery, as well as a link to the tool description in the ELIXIR registry if it already exists. If it does not, the BioShaDock registry will synchronize with the registry to create a new description in the Elixir registry, based on the BioShaDock entry metadata. This link will help users get more information on the tool such as its EDAM operations, input and output types. This allows integration with the ELIXIR Tools and Data Services Registry, thus providing the appropriate visibility of such images to the bioinformatics community. PMID:26913191

  18. Compliance of clinical trial registries with the World Health Organization minimum data set: a survey

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo P; Moschetti, Ivan; Nurbhai, Munira; Compagnoni, Anna; Liberati, Alessandro; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Chan, An-Wen; Dickersin, Kay; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela; Moher, David; Sim, Ida; Volmink, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    Background Since September 2005 the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors has required that trials be registered in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) minimum dataset, in order to be considered for publication. The objective is to evaluate registries' and individual trial records' compliance with the 2006 version of the WHO minimum data set. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 21 online clinical trial registries (international, national, specialty, pharmaceutical industry and local) from April 2005 to February 2007 and a cross-sectional evaluation of a stratified random sample of 610 trial records from the 21 registries. Results Among 11 registries that provided guidelines for registration, the median compliance with the WHO criteria were 14 out of 20 items (range 6 to 20). In the period April 2005–February 2007, six registries increased their compliance by six data items, on average. None of the local registry websites published guidelines on the trial data items required for registration. Slightly more than half (330/610; 54.1%, 95% CI 50.1% – 58.1%) of trial records completed the contact details criteria while 29.7% (181/610, 95% CI 26.1% – 33.5%) completed the key clinical and methodological data fields. Conclusion While the launch of the WHO minimum data set seemed to positively influence registries with better standardisation of approaches, individual registry entries are largely incomplete. Initiatives to ensure quality assurance of registries and trial data should be encouraged. Peer reviewers and editors should scrutinise clinical trial registration records to ensure consistency with WHO's core content requirements when considering trial-related publications. PMID:19624821

  19. Roles of cancer registries in enhancing oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Soon, Swee-Sung; Lim, Hwee-Yong; Lopes, Gilberto; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Hu, Min; Ibrahim, Hishamshah Mohd; Jha, Anand; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Lee, Pak Wai; Macdonell, Diana; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer registries help to establish and maintain cancer incidence reporting systems, serve as a resource for investigation of cancer and its causes, and provide information for planning and evaluation of preventive and control programs. However, their wider role in directly enhancing oncology drug access has not been fully explored. We examined the value of cancer registries in oncology drug access in the Asia-Pacific region on three levels: (1) specific registry variable types; (2) macroscopic strategies on the national level; and (3) a regional cancer registry network. Using literature search and proceedings from an expert forum, this paper covers recent cancer registry developments in eight economies in the Asia-Pacific region - Australia, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand - and the ways they can contribute to oncology drug access. Specific registry variables relating to demographics, tumor characteristics, initial treatment plans, prognostic markers, risk factors, and mortality help to anticipate drug needs, identify high-priority research area and design access programs. On a national level, linking registry data with clinical, drug safety, financial, or drug utilization databases allows analyses of associations between utilization and outcomes. Concurrent efforts should also be channeled into developing and implementing data integrity and stewardship policies, and providing clear avenues to make data available. Less mature registry systems can employ modeling techniques and ad-hoc surveys while increasing coverage. Beyond local settings, a cancer registry network for the Asia-Pacific region would offer cross-learning and research opportunities that can exert leverage through the experiences and capabilities of a highly diverse region. PMID:23725106

  20. BioShaDock: a community driven bioinformatics shared Docker-based tools registry

    PubMed Central

    Moreews, François; Sallou, Olivier; Ménager, Hervé; Le bras, Yvan; Monjeaud, Cyril; Blanchet, Christophe; Collin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Linux container technologies, as represented by Docker, provide an alternative to complex and time-consuming installation processes needed for scientific software. The ease of deployment and the process isolation they enable, as well as the reproducibility they permit across environments and versions, are among the qualities that make them interesting candidates for the construction of bioinformatic infrastructures, at any scale from single workstations to high throughput computing architectures. The Docker Hub is a public registry which can be used to distribute bioinformatic software as Docker images. However, its lack of curation and its genericity make it difficult for a bioinformatics user to find the most appropriate images needed. BioShaDock is a bioinformatics-focused Docker registry, which provides a local and fully controlled environment to build and publish bioinformatic software as portable Docker images. It provides a number of improvements over the base Docker registry on authentication and permissions management, that enable its integration in existing bioinformatic infrastructures such as computing platforms. The metadata associated with the registered images are domain-centric, including for instance concepts defined in the EDAM ontology, a shared and structured vocabulary of commonly used terms in bioinformatics. The registry also includes user defined tags to facilitate its discovery, as well as a link to the tool description in the ELIXIR registry if it already exists. If it does not, the BioShaDock registry will synchronize with the registry to create a new description in the Elixir registry, based on the BioShaDock entry metadata. This link will help users get more information on the tool such as its EDAM operations, input and output types. This allows integration with the ELIXIR Tools and Data Services Registry, thus providing the appropriate visibility of such images to the bioinformatics community. PMID:26913191

  1. Standardization of Patient Registries for Improved Data Collection and Outcome Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Spisla, Christine M.; Lundberg, Cynthia B.

    2012-01-01

    Patient registries provide key data for clinical trials, patient safety and disease progression research. Current standards are insufficient to guide consistent authoring and reuse of registry questions. An outcome measure and its accompanying measurable indicators provide the means for the collection of data over a continuum of care. These data can be translated into comparison research, supporting the development of evidence-based knowledge. Lack of standardized approach to question/answer authoring and identification of outcome measure indicators have been an obstacle to interoperability of registry data with electronic medical and personal health records. PMID:24199127

  2. A Registry for Evaluation of Efficiency and Safety of Surgical Treatment of Cartilage Defects: The German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for documentation in cartilage defects is as obvious as in other medical specialties. Cartilage defects can cause significant pain, and lead to reduced quality of life and loss of function of the affected joint. The risk of developing osteoarthritis is high. Therefore, the socioeconomic burden of cartilage defects should not be underestimated. Objective The objective of our study was to implement and maintain a registry of all patients undergoing surgical treatment of cartilage defects. Methods We designed this multicenter registry for adults whose cartilage defects of a knee, ankle, or hip joint are treated surgically. The registry consists of two parts: one for the physician and one for the patient. Data for both parts will be gathered at baseline and at 6-, 12-, 24-, 36-, 60-, and 120-month follow-ups. Results To date, a wide range of German, Swiss, and Austrian trial sites are taking part in the German Cartilage Registry, soon to be followed by further sites. More than 2124 (as of January 31, 2016) cases are already documented and the first publications have been released. Conclusions The German Cartilage Registry addresses fundamental issues regarding the current medical care situation of patients with cartilage defects of knee, ankle, and hip joints. In addition, the registry will help to identify various procedure-specific complications, along with putative advantages and disadvantages of different chondrocyte products. It provides an expanding large-scale, unselected, standardized database for cost and care research for further retrospective studies. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00005617; https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/ drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00005617 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6hbFqSws0) PMID:27357998

  3. [Considerations on what we can (and what we should not) ask to registries].

    PubMed

    Addis, Antonio; Berti, Elena; De Palma, Rossana; Fiori, Giovanni; Papini, Donato; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a summary of the discussion which took place during the works of PRIER II in the session dedicated to the methodology of registries. Following a thorough analysis of the possible methods and the limits which deal with the collection of clinical data through the registries, the different points of view were compared, perhaps the most relevant, related to this activity. All this has been done by taking advantage by the possibility to observe aspects from different points of view. In particular, the exercise considered those who have to deal with the methodological aspects of the registries as an operator of public health or as a private operator who creates services for companies. The final goal, again, was to line up a few essential points accompanied by reasoning and comments useful to anyone who wants to address the issue of registries from the methodological point of view. PMID:26418506

  4. 77 FR 22284 - Notice of Establishment of a Veterinary Services Stakeholder Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Establishment of a Veterinary Services Stakeholder... announces the availability of a new Veterinary Services email subscription service. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a Veterinary Services (VS) Stakeholder Registry, an...

  5. The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories: A Call for Community Curation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott E.; Trizna, Michael G.; Graham, Eileen; Crane, Adele E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories is an online metadata resource for biodiversity collections, the institutions that contain them, and associated staff members. The registry provides contact and address information, characteristics of the institutions and collections using controlled vocabularies and free-text descripitons, links to related websites, unique identifiers for each institution and collection record, text fields for loan and use policies, and a variety of other descriptors. Each institution record includes an institutionCode that must be unique, and each collection record must have a collectionCode that is unique within that institution. The registry is populated with records imported from the largest similar registries and more can be harmonized and added. Doing so will require community input and curation and would produce a truly comprehensive and unifying information resource. PMID:27660523

  6. The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories: A Call for Community Curation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott E.; Trizna, Michael G.; Graham, Eileen; Crane, Adele E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories is an online metadata resource for biodiversity collections, the institutions that contain them, and associated staff members. The registry provides contact and address information, characteristics of the institutions and collections using controlled vocabularies and free-text descripitons, links to related websites, unique identifiers for each institution and collection record, text fields for loan and use policies, and a variety of other descriptors. Each institution record includes an institutionCode that must be unique, and each collection record must have a collectionCode that is unique within that institution. The registry is populated with records imported from the largest similar registries and more can be harmonized and added. Doing so will require community input and curation and would produce a truly comprehensive and unifying information resource.

  7. Analysis of Existing Guidelines for the Systematic Planning Process of Clinical Registries.

    PubMed

    Löpprich, Martin; Knaup, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Clinical registries are a powerful method to observe the clinical practice and natural disease history. In contrast to clinical trials, where guidelines and standardized methods exist and are mandatory, only a few initiatives have published methodological guidelines for clinical registries. The objective of this paper was to review these guidelines and systematically assess their completeness, usability and feasibility according to a SWOT analysis. The results show that each guideline has its own strengths and weaknesses. While one supports the systematic planning process, the other discusses clinical registries in great detail. However, the feasibility was mostly limited and the special requirements of clinical registries, their flexible, expandable and adaptable technological structure was not addressed consistently. PMID:27577423

  8. The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories: A Call for Community Curation.

    PubMed

    Schindel, David E; Miller, Scott E; Trizna, Michael G; Graham, Eileen; Crane, Adele E

    2016-01-01

    The Global Registry of Biodiversity Repositories is an online metadata resource for biodiversity collections, the institutions that contain them, and associated staff members. The registry provides contact and address information, characteristics of the institutions and collections using controlled vocabularies and free-text descripitons, links to related websites, unique identifiers for each institution and collection record, text fields for loan and use policies, and a variety of other descriptors. Each institution record includes an institutionCode that must be unique, and each collection record must have a collectionCode that is unique within that institution. The registry is populated with records imported from the largest similar registries and more can be harmonized and added. Doing so will require community input and curation and would produce a truly comprehensive and unifying information resource. PMID:27660523

  9. Effects of record linkage errors on registry-based follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Brenner, H; Schmidtmann, I; Stegmaier, C

    1997-12-15

    The importance of reliable record linkage for high quality-population-based disease registration is widely recognized. Systematic methodologic work is lacking, however, on the effects of record linkage errors on the use of disease registries for epidemiologic purposes. The present paper provides algebraic models describing the effects of record linkage errors on monitoring survival of registered patients, which is commonly performed by matching registry records against a database of death certificates, and on registry-based incidence follow-up of external cohorts. Homonym errors, that is, erroneous linkage of records that pertain to distinct individuals, lead to underestimation of survival of registered patients and to overestimation of disease incidence among external cohorts linked to the registry, while synonym errors, that is, failure to link notifications on the same individual, have opposite effects. The magnitude of effects of record linkage errors are illustrated with numerical examples.

  10. Research recruitment through US central cancer registries: balancing privacy and scientific issues.

    PubMed

    Beskow, Laura M; Sandler, Robert S; Weinberger, Morris

    2006-11-01

    Cancer registries are a valuable resource for recruiting participants for public health-oriented research, although such recruitment raises potentially competing concerns about patient privacy and participant accrual. We surveyed US central cancer registries about their policies for research contact with patients, and results showed substantial variation. The strategy used most frequently (37.5% of those that allowed patient contact), which was among the least restrictive, was for investigators to notify patients' physicians and then contact patients with an opt-out approach. The most restrictive strategy was for registry staff to obtain physician permission and contact patients with an opt-in approach. Population-based studies enhance cancer control efforts, and registry policies can affect researchers' ability to conduct such studies. Further discussion about balanced recruitment approaches that protect patient privacy and encourage beneficial research is needed.

  11. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  12. Analysis of Existing Guidelines for the Systematic Planning Process of Clinical Registries.

    PubMed

    Löpprich, Martin; Knaup, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Clinical registries are a powerful method to observe the clinical practice and natural disease history. In contrast to clinical trials, where guidelines and standardized methods exist and are mandatory, only a few initiatives have published methodological guidelines for clinical registries. The objective of this paper was to review these guidelines and systematically assess their completeness, usability and feasibility according to a SWOT analysis. The results show that each guideline has its own strengths and weaknesses. While one supports the systematic planning process, the other discusses clinical registries in great detail. However, the feasibility was mostly limited and the special requirements of clinical registries, their flexible, expandable and adaptable technological structure was not addressed consistently.

  13. [Importance of the National Childhood Cancer Registry in the field of paediatric oncology care in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Garami, Miklós; Schuler, Dezső; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2014-05-11

    National Childhood Cancer Registry has been operated since 1971 by the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network. This Registry collects data on epidemiology, treatment modalities and effectiveness, as well as late follow-up of childhood cancers. An internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network has been introduced in April, 2010. The National Childhood Cancer Registry contains data of all paediatric cancer patients (0-18 yrs) who have insurance covered by the Hungarian Social Security Card. Creation (1971) and operation of the National Childhood Cancer Registry have been very important steps in the field of childhood oncology to evaluate the efficiency of paediatric oncology treatments as well as maximize return on medical investment.

  14. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report February 1, 2001--January 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the activities of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) from February 2001 through January 2002. Progress in continuing collaborations and several new collaborations is reviewed.

  15. 75 FR 53953 - The National Saltwater Angler Registry Program; Designation of Exempted States for Anglers, Spear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX66 The National Saltwater Angler Registry....Colvin@noaa.gov SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater...

  16. Thai Twin Registry: description of the initial stage.

    PubMed

    Nanakorn, Somsong; Chusilp, Kusuma; Kutanan, Wibhu

    2013-02-01

    The present study describes the initial phase of the Thai Twin Registry (TTR) in Khon Kaen University, a pioneer research university located in the Northeast of Thailand. The initial steps of the study included the analysis of dermatoglyphic information in Thai twins for answering the research question: Are monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins different in dermatoglyphic variables? Subjects were 212 twin pairs (131 MZ and 81 [corrected] DZ), consisting of 155 males and 269 females. Four types of fingerprint pattern (FP) - that is, arch, radial loop, ulnar loop, and whorl - were classified and analyzed and compared between MZ and DZ twins. The arch radial loop and whorl frequencies differ between MZ and DZ twins. When comparing FP in each finger, only the right little finger shows a statistically different FP, while the FP similarity average from 10 homologous fingers of co-twins was greater in MZ than DZ twins. By using the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis, the MZ twins could be differentiated from DZ twins by the FP similarity. Summarizing, this valuable report about TTR was conducted by analysis of FP data, which indicated that the MZ and DZ twins exhibited FP pattern and FP similarity differences. Other dermatoglyphic studies of the existing FP database, such as finger ridge count, finger ridge density, and minutia, will be considered for ongoing research at the TTR.

  17. The National ALS Registry: A Recruitment Tool for Research

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Angela M.; Stickler, David E.; Antao, Vinicius C.; Horton, D. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subject recruitment is critical for understanding fatal diseases like ALS, however linking patients with researchers can be challenging. The US population-based National ALS Registry allows recruitment of persons with ALS (PALS) for research opportunities. Methods The Registry’s Research Notification Mechanism was used to recruit PALS aged ≥21 years; participants completed a web-based epidemiologic survey. PALS (n=2,232) were sent an email describing the study, and 268 surveys were completed. Results The mean age (± SD) of eligible participants was 57.7 ± 9.3 years for men and 61.5 ± 8.9 for women. Most were men (63%) and Caucasian (92%). Of 256 potentially eligible participants, 37.5% (n=96) returned an authorization to disclose protected health information. ALS was confirmed for 94% (83/88) from physician responses. Discussion This analysis demonstrates the National ALS Registry’s usefulness in recruiting PALS for research. This recruitment source can potentially foster the discovery of better treatment options and therapies, and of prevention strategies. PMID:25111654

  18. The origin of registry-based medical research and care.

    PubMed

    Irgens, L M

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, registers comprising medical data have played an increasingly important role in medicine, both in health care and research. It is reasonable to expect that their importance will also increase in the future. Thus, a search for the origin of register-based medicine seems meaningful. Admittedly, collections of individual data on a number of patients may have occurred way back in history (Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen, 96, 1976:295). However, if we accept WHO's definition of a register, it implies more than a number of notifications. A register requires that a permanent record be established, that the cases be followed up and that basic statistical tabulations be prepared both on frequency and survival (Epidemiological Methods on the study of chronic diseases, Geneva, WHO Expert committee on Health Statistics, 1967). Thus, a register should aim at improving surveillance, health care and research. If we apply these criteria, we find the origin of register-based medicine in Norway in terms of the National Leprosy Registry, representing the world's first national patient register for any disease, established 1856 (Int J Epidemiol, 2, 1973: 81).

  19. Dioxin Registry report for Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.A.; Fingerhut, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri. The company manufactured sodium-2,4,5-trichlorophenate (NaTCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic-acid (2,4,5-T), and esters and amines of 2,4,5-T from 1949 through 1970. The company manufactured Agent-Orange for the Air Force from 1967 until 1969. The facility, its processes, its workforce, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1746016) (TCDD) analytical results for these products were examined. As this firm filed for bankruptcy in 1970, there was only limited data available. The facility employed about 12 persons year round and about double this number during the busy season and during the Agent-Orange contract. Almost no information was available about the production processes. Nine persons developed chloracne after an accident and fire in the NaTCP process. Few personnel records were available. The authors conclude that workers employed from 1949 through 1970 are suitable for inclusion into the Dioxin Registry. There is not enough information available to construct a TCDD exposure matrix for this site.

  20. Postirradiation sarcoma. Analysis of a nationwide cancer registry material

    SciTech Connect

    Wiklund, T.A.; Blomqvist, C.P.; Raety, J.E.; Elomaa, I.; Rissanen, P.; Miettinen, M. )

    1991-08-01

    Thirty-three cases of postirradiation sarcoma (PIS) from the files of the Finnish Cancer Registry were analyzed. The most frequent first primary tumors were cancers of the breast (seven cases) and female reproductive organs (13 cases). Five patients had a childhood cancer. The median total radiation dose at the site of the PIS was 3600 cGy (1600 cGy to 11200 cGy). The median interval from start of radiation therapy to detection of PIS was 13.2 years (3.4 to 22.8 years). The PIS was of soft tissue origin in 25 of 33 cases. The most frequent histologic types were osteosarcoma (ten cases, including four extraskeletal tumors), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (ten cases), and fibrosarcoma (six cases). The overall crude 5-year survival rate was 29% (calculated from the start of treatment for PIS), and for patients initially treated with either radical surgery or combined marginal surgery and postoperative irradiation it was 67%. The authors conclude that there is a chance for cure for radically treated patients with postirradiation sarcoma that emphasizes the importance of regular long-term follow-up of cancer patients.

  1. Dioxin registry report of Monsanto Company, Nitro, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.A.; Fingerhut, M.A.; Piacitelli, L.A.

    1989-08-01

    Information was collected concerning the Monsanto Company, Nitro, West Virginia, for the purpose of evaluating the procedures and the data available to determine if this company would be suitable for inclusion in a study of the causes of death among workers exposed to products contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins (HxCDD). Sodium-2,4,5-trichlorophenate (Na-2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic-acid (2,4,5-T-acid) were produced at the facility, and both compounds have been shown to be contaminated with TCDD. Based on the information gathered from Monsanto concerning Na-2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,5-T-acid production processes, the workers involved were suitable for inclusion in the NIOSH Dioxin Registry study. Work histories for these workers could be constructed. Descriptions of the tasks performed in the various processes through the years were available. Analytical data was available for the years 1958 through 1969 and could be combined with the work histories, the knowledge of the tasks performed, and the concentration of TCDD in the 2,4,5-T-acid.

  2. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver.

  3. Design and Development of a Web-Based Saudi National Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Subhani, Shazia; Khalid, Al-Rubeaan

    2010-01-01

    Background Given that diabetes is an extremely common disorder in Saudi Arabia, the National Diabetes Registry was designed by King Saud University Hospital Diabetes Center in collaboration with King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in the year 2001. The aim of the registry is to identify risk factors related to diabetes and to provide statistics to public health programs and health care professionals for use in planning and evaluation. The registry was designed to provide information on the extent and nature of specific types of diabetes, diabetes complications, and treatment of diabetes in the Kingdom. The registry has been available since 2001, with major collaborations from 26 hospitals as part of Phase I in which 100,000 patient data is to be collected on a regional level from Ar-Riyadh before extending the program to other regions of Saudi Arabia. Methods The web application was designed using relational database techniques along with on-line help topics to assist users to get acquainted with application functionalities. All Internet forms were designed with validation checks and appropriate messages to ensure quality of data. The security measures established within the application ensure that only authorized users can gain access to the functionalities of the registry at allowed times. Administrative features were designed to manage the registry-related operations easily. Results The diabetes registry has been in operation for almost 10 years, and around 67,000 patients have been registered to date. The Web-application offers an anytime-anywhere access to the registry’s data, removing geographical boundaries and allowing the national registry to provide real-time data entry, updates, reporting, and mapping functionalities more easily. Conclusion Merging related information in the form of databases can provide improved health care operations through instant access to data, ease of managing complex data structures, and

  4. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community.

    PubMed

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

  5. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    PubMed Central

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community’s level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. PMID:24098075

  6. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver. PMID:26188310

  7. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2011 ERA–EDTA Registry Annual Report

    PubMed Central

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M.; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón; Arcos Fuster, Emma; Bikbov, Boris T.; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; Čala, Svetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Ferrer-Alamar, Manuel; Finne, Patrik; García Bazaga, María de los Angelos; Garneata, Liliana; Golan, Eliezer; Gonzalez Fernández, Raquel; Heaf, James G.; Hoitsma, Andries; Ioannidis, George A.; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kramar, Reinhard; Lasalle, Mathilde; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Lopot, Frantisek; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W.M.; Macário, Fernando; Magaz, Ángela; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; de Meester, Johan; Metcalfe, Wendy; Ots-Rosenberg, Mai; Palsson, Runolfur; Piñera, Celestino; Pippias, Maria; Prütz, Karl G.; Ratkovic, Marina; Resić, Halima; Rodríguez Hernández, Aurelio; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Spustová, Viera; Stel, Vianda S.; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2014-01-01

    Background This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA–EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). Methods Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were used. From 27 registries, individual patient data were received, whereas 17 registries contributed data in aggregated form. We present the incidence and prevalence of RRT, and renal transplant rates in 2011. In addition, survival probabilities and expected remaining lifetimes were calculated for those registries providing individual patient data. Results The overall unadjusted incidence rate of RRT in 2011 among all registries reporting to the ERA–EDTA Registry was 117 per million population (pmp) (n = 71.631). Incidence rates varied from 24 pmp in Ukraine to 238 pmp in Turkey. The overall unadjusted prevalence of RRT for ESRD on 31 December 2011 was 692 pmp (n = 425 824). The highest prevalence was reported by Portugal (1662 pmp) and the lowest by Ukraine (131 pmp). Among all registries, a total of 22 814 renal transplantations were performed (37 pmp). The highest overall transplant rate was reported from Spain, Cantabria (81 pmp), whereas the highest rate of living donor transplants was reported from Turkey (39 pmp). For patients who started RRT between 2002 and 2006, the unadjusted 5-year patient survival on RRT was 46.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.6–47.0], and on dialysis 39.3% (95% CI 39.2–39.4). The unadjusted 5-year patient survival after the first renal transplantation performed between 2002 and 2006 was 86.7% (95% CI 86.2–87.2) for kidneys from deceased donors and 94.3% (95% CI 93.6–95.0) for kidneys from living donors. PMID:25852881

  8. Tribal Linkage and Race Data Quality for American Indians in a State Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer C.; Soliman, Amr S.; Tadgerson, Dan; Copeland, Glenn E.; Seefeld, David A.; Pingatore, Noel L.; Haverkate, Rick; Banerjee, Mousumi; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Racial misclassification of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals as non-AI/AN in cancer registries presents problems for cancer surveillance, research, and public health practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of tribal linkages in enhancing the quality of racial information in state cancer registries. Methods Registry Plus™ Link Plus 2.0 probabilistic record linkage software was used to link the Michigan state cancer registry data (1985–2004; 1,031,168 cancer cases) to the tribal membership roster (40,340 individuals) in July of 2007. A data set was created containing AI/AN cancer cases identified by the state registry, Indian Health Service (IHS) linkages, and tribal linkage. The differences between these three groups of individuals were compared by distribution of demographic, diagnostic, and county-level characteristics using multilevel analysis (conducted in 2007–2008). Results From 1995 to 2004, the tribal enrollment file showed linkages to 670 cancer cases (583 individuals) and the tribal linkage led to the identification of 190 AI/AN cancer cases (168 individuals) that were classified as non-AI/AN in the registry. More than 80% of tribal members were reported as non-AI/AN to the registry. Individuals identified by IHS or tribal linkages were different from those reported to be AI/AN in terms of stage at diagnosis, tumor confirmation, and characteristics of the county of diagnosis, including contract health services availability, tribal health services availability, and proportion of AI/AN residents. Conclusions The data linkage between tribal and state cancer registry data sets improved racial classification validity of AI/AN Michigan cancer cases. Assessing tribal linkages is a simple, noninvasive way to improve the accuracy of state cancer data for AI/AN populations and to generate tribe-specific cancer information. PMID:19356888

  9. The NeuroAiD Safe Treatment (NeST) Registry: a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Kumar, Ramesh; Soertidewi, Lyna; Abu Bakar, Azizi; Laik, Carine; Gan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction NeuroAiD (MLC601, MLC901), a combination of natural products, has been shown to be safe and to aid neurological recovery after brain injuries. The NeuroAiD Safe Treatment (NeST) Registry aims to assess its use and safety in the real-world setting. Methods and analysis The NeST Registry is designed as a product registry that would provide information on the use and safety of NeuroAiD in clinical practice. An online NeST Registry was set up to allow easy entry and retrieval of essential information including demographics, medical conditions, clinical assessments of neurological, functional and cognitive state, compliance, concomitant medications, and side effects, if any, among patients on NeuroAiD. Patients who are taking or have been prescribed NeuroAiD may be included. Participation is voluntary. Data collected are similar to information obtained during standard care and are prospectively entered by the participating physicians at baseline (before initialisation of NeuroAiD) and during subsequent visits. The primary outcome assessed is safety (ie, non-serious and serious adverse event), while compliance and neurological status over time are secondary outcomes. The in-person follow-up assessments are timed with clinical appointments. Anonymised data will be extracted and collectively analysed. Initial target sample size for the registry is 2000. Analysis will be performed after every 500 participants entered with completed follow-up information. Ethics and dissemination Doctors who prescribe NeuroAiD will be introduced to the registry by local partners. The central coordinator of the registry will discuss the protocol and requirements for implementation with doctors who show interest. Currently, the registry has been approved by the Ethics Committees of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia) and National Brain Center (Indonesia). In addition, for other countries, Ethics Committee approval will be obtained in accordance with local requirements. Trial

  10. The importance of national registries/databases in metabolic surgery: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, James; Welbourn, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) National Bariatric Surgery Registry (NBSR) is a registry of self-reported bariatric surgery from members of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society. We describe the registry and its usefulness and limitations in improving the knowledge base for metabolic and bariatric surgery, reviewing the main results for the first 5 years of its introduction since 2009. We also review the reports of other national and international bariatric surgery registries and compare the baseline characteristics, including metabolic parameters, of the patients entered into the NBSR. A total of 161 surgeons from 137 UK bariatric surgery units entered 32,212 anonymized patient records. Of these patients, 76% were female, mean weight at preoperative clinic was 135.6 kg, body mass index was 48.8 kg/m(2), and 76.5 % had publicly funded National Health Service treatment. The 3 most common procedures were gastric bypass (55.3%), gastric banding (20.4%), and sleeve gastrectomy (20.2%), although the prevalence of these changed over time and was different between public and private sectors. The 2-year rate for diabetes improvement was 61.5%, but this varied with the duration of diabetes and baseline diabetic therapy. The data were similar to those from other large registries. Establishment of large national registries such as the NBSR has the potential to provide "real-world" information for quality assurance and the effect of metabolic and bariatric surgery on the whole operated population. PMID:27313193

  11. Connecting Communities to Health Research: Development of the Project CONNECT Minority Research Registry

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Kim, Mimi M.; Barber, Sharrelle; Odulana, Abedowale A.; Godley, Paul A.; Howard, Daniel L.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prevention and treatment standards are based on evidence obtained in behavioral and clinical research. However, racial and ethnic minorities remain relatively absent from the science that develops these standards. While investigators have successfully recruited participants for individual studies using tailored recruitment methods, these strategies require considerable time and resources. Research registries, typically developed around a disease or condition, serve as a promising model for a targeted recruitment method to increase minority participation in health research. This study assessed the tailored recruitment methods used to populate a health research registry targeting African-American community members. Methods We describe six recruitment methods applied between September 2004 and October 2008 to recruit members into a health research registry. Recruitment included direct (existing studies, public databases, community outreach) and indirect methods (radio, internet, and email) targeting the general population, local universities, and African American communities. We conducted retrospective analysis of the recruitment by method using descriptive statistics, frequencies, and chi-square statistics. Results During the recruitment period, 608 individuals enrolled in the research registry. The majority of enrollees were African American, female, and in good health. Direct and indirect methods were identified as successful strategies for subgroups. Findings suggest significant associations between recruitment methods and age, presence of existing health condition, prior research participation, and motivation to join the registry. Conclusions A health research registry can be a successful tool to increase minority awareness of research opportunities. Multi-pronged recruitment approaches are needed to reach diverse subpopulations. PMID:23340183

  12. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review.

    PubMed

    BenNasir, E; El Mistiri, M; McGowan, R; Katz, R V

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people.

  13. [What can we learn in future from the data of the German Arthroplasty Registry (EPRD) in comparison to other registries?].

    PubMed

    Jansson, V; Steinbrück, A; Hassenpflug, J

    2016-06-01

    The German Arthroplasty Registry (EPRD) was founded in 2010 and has been in full operation since 2014. Previous attempts at a systematic data collection of elective and non-elective knee and hip replacement in Germany failed mainly because of the long-term lack of funding. The EPRD is an interdisciplinary collaborative partnership between the German Association of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (DGOOC), all implant manufacturers of the German Medical Technology Association (BVMed), health insurers (AOK and the Association of Additional Healthcare Insurance) and hospitals (German Hospital Federation). As part of this cooperation a worldwide unique implant database has been set up, which includes all relevant components and a detailed description of implant specifications. This implant library enables a detailed evaluation of implant survival, revision rates and possible inferior implant performance of knee and hip replacements in Germany. At the end of 2015 the EPRD encompassed over 200,000 registered operations. Due to the high number of hip and knee arthroplasties in Germany with many different implants from different manufacturers there will be a rapid growth of data that are available for a national and also international comparison of the results. PMID:27160728

  14. [What can we learn in future from the data of the German Arthroplasty Registry (EPRD) in comparison to other registries?].

    PubMed

    Jansson, V; Steinbrück, A; Hassenpflug, J

    2016-06-01

    The German Arthroplasty Registry (EPRD) was founded in 2010 and has been in full operation since 2014. Previous attempts at a systematic data collection of elective and non-elective knee and hip replacement in Germany failed mainly because of the long-term lack of funding. The EPRD is an interdisciplinary collaborative partnership between the German Association of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (DGOOC), all implant manufacturers of the German Medical Technology Association (BVMed), health insurers (AOK and the Association of Additional Healthcare Insurance) and hospitals (German Hospital Federation). As part of this cooperation a worldwide unique implant database has been set up, which includes all relevant components and a detailed description of implant specifications. This implant library enables a detailed evaluation of implant survival, revision rates and possible inferior implant performance of knee and hip replacements in Germany. At the end of 2015 the EPRD encompassed over 200,000 registered operations. Due to the high number of hip and knee arthroplasties in Germany with many different implants from different manufacturers there will be a rapid growth of data that are available for a national and also international comparison of the results.

  15. [Post-authorization research, registries, and drug development].

    PubMed

    Patarnello, Francesca; Recchia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade regulators, payers and health care providers tried to react to three major problems in drug development and drug use in clinical practice: the pharmaceutical R&D productivity crisis, the immaturity of benefit-risk profile for several newly approved drugs and the overall impact on economic sustainability of reimbursing new high cost drugs in their systems. The potentiality of create a continuum between the evidence requirements relevant for registration, for reimbursement and for post authorization research is clear. All different parties involved, like regulators, HTA agencies, scientific communities and manufacturers, are working to improve the knowledge profile of new drugs in order to anticipate the patient access to innovation, limiting or preventing the clinical and economical risks deriving from an incomplete safety and effectiveness profile. The Italian example of "New Drugs AIFA Registries", with or without the application of risk sharing schemes (cost sharing, pay for performance, etc.), introduced a new process and increased the sensitivity on this topic. However this might probably represents only a partial answer to the problem of how to set up the governance of coverage with evidence, drug utilization monitoring, comparative effectiveness research, outcome research programs and may be how to link them to access, pricing and reimbursement. The step change in post authorization research could be to "integrate" different sources and stakeholders in a wider and continuous approach, in a well designed and inclusive "second generation" HTA approach, where all resources (competencies, data, funding) will concur to increase the evidence profile and reduce the risks, and where any "evidence generation approach" is really compliant with the standard and rules of best research practices.

  16. [Post-authorization research, registries, and drug development].

    PubMed

    Patarnello, Francesca; Recchia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade regulators, payers and health care providers tried to react to three major problems in drug development and drug use in clinical practice: the pharmaceutical R&D productivity crisis, the immaturity of benefit-risk profile for several newly approved drugs and the overall impact on economic sustainability of reimbursing new high cost drugs in their systems. The potentiality of create a continuum between the evidence requirements relevant for registration, for reimbursement and for post authorization research is clear. All different parties involved, like regulators, HTA agencies, scientific communities and manufacturers, are working to improve the knowledge profile of new drugs in order to anticipate the patient access to innovation, limiting or preventing the clinical and economical risks deriving from an incomplete safety and effectiveness profile. The Italian example of "New Drugs AIFA Registries", with or without the application of risk sharing schemes (cost sharing, pay for performance, etc.), introduced a new process and increased the sensitivity on this topic. However this might probably represents only a partial answer to the problem of how to set up the governance of coverage with evidence, drug utilization monitoring, comparative effectiveness research, outcome research programs and may be how to link them to access, pricing and reimbursement. The step change in post authorization research could be to "integrate" different sources and stakeholders in a wider and continuous approach, in a well designed and inclusive "second generation" HTA approach, where all resources (competencies, data, funding) will concur to increase the evidence profile and reduce the risks, and where any "evidence generation approach" is really compliant with the standard and rules of best research practices. PMID:23801233

  17. The International Collaboration for Autism Registry Epidemiology (iCARE): Multinational Registry-Based Investigations of Autism Risk Factors and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, Diana E.; Bresnahan, Michaeline; Carter, Kim W.; Francis, Richard W.; Gissler, Mika; Grønborg, Therese K.; Gross, Raz; Gunnes, Nina; Hornig, Mady; Hultman, Christina M.; Langridge, Amanda; Lauritsen, Marlene B.; Leonard, Helen; Parner, Erik T.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sandin, Sven; Sourander, Andre; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Suominen, Auli; Surén, Pål; Susser, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    The International Collaboration for Autism Registry Epidemiology (iCARE) is the first multinational research consortium (Australia, Denmark, Finland, Israel, Norway, Sweden, USA) to promote research in autism geographical and temporal heterogeneity, phenotype, family and life course patterns, and etiology. iCARE devised solutions to challenges in…

  18. Rationale for and design of the Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis–PRospective Outcomes (IPF-PRO) registry

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Emily C; Durheim, Michael T; Gamerman, Victoria; Garfinkel, Sandy; Anstrom, Kevin J; Palmer, Scott M; Conoscenti, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic interstitial lung disease characterised by progressive loss of lung function. Its clinical course is variable but ultimately fatal. There is a need for a multicentre patient registry incorporating longitudinal clinical data and biological samples to improve understanding of the natural history of IPF and contemporary practice patterns. Methods/design The Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis–PRospective Outcomes (IPF-PRO) registry is a national IPF registry in the USA. This registry will enrol approximately 300 patients with newly diagnosed IPF over 2 years at approximately 14 tertiary pulmonary care sites. Participants will be followed for 3–5 years and will receive usual care, as defined by their physician. Clinical data from the year prior to diagnosis will be collected from medical record review on enrolment. Subsequently, data on diagnostic evaluations, pulmonary function tests, physical examinations, laboratory data and clinical events will be collected at routine clinical visits and via a call centre. Participants will complete patient-reported outcome questionnaires at enrolment and then at approximately 6-month intervals. Blood samples for cellular, genetic and transcriptomic analyses will be collected at the same intervals. Results The first results from the IPF-PRO registry will be presented in 2015. Conclusions The IPF-PRO registry will improve understanding of the natural history of IPF, its impact on patients and current practice in the diagnosis and care of patients with IPF. The registry will establish a repository of biological samples from a well-characterised patient population for future research. Clinical trial number NCT01915511. PMID:26835134

  19. Design, set-up and utility of the UK facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patient registry.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Wood, Libby; Fernandez-Torron, Roberto; Williams, Maggie; Smith, Debbie; Lunt, Peter; Hudson, Judith; Norwood, Fiona; Orrell, Richard; Willis, Tracey; Hilton-Jones, David; Rafferty, Karen; Guglieri, Michela; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disease estimated to affect 1/15,000 people. Through basic research, remarkable progress has been made towards the development of targeted therapies. Patient identification, through registries or other means is essential for trial-readiness. The UK FSHD Patient Registry is a patient initiated registry that collects standardised and internationally agreed dataset of self-reported clinical details combined with professionally verified genetic information. It includes four additional questionnaires to capture patient reported outcomes related to pain, quality of life and scapular fixation. Between 2013 and 2015, 518 patients registered 243 males, 241 females with a mean age of 47.8 years. Most of the patients have FSHD type 1 (91.7 %), and weakness of the facial (59.2 %) was the most prevalent symptom at onset, followed by shoulder-girdle muscles (53.3 %) and distal (22.45 %) or proximal lower limb weakness (14.8 %). 85.57 % patients were ambulant or ambulant with assistance at the time of registration, 7.9 % report respiratory insufficiency. The registry has demonstrated utility with the recruitment of patients for a natural history study of infantile onset FSHD, and the longitudinal analysis of patient-related outcomes will provide much-needed baseline information to power future trials. The internationally agreed core dataset enables national registries to participate in a "Global FSHD registry". We suggest that the registry's ability to interoperate with other large datasets will be instrumental for sharing and exploiting data globally. PMID:27159994

  20. Contemporary registries on P2Y12 inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndromes in Europe: overview and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Jukema, J Wouter; Lettino, Maddalena; Widimský, Petr; Danchin, Nicolas; Bardaji, Alfredo; Barrabes, Jose A; Cequier, Angel; Claeys, Marc J; De Luca, Leonardo; Dörler, Jakob; Erlinge, David; Erne, Paul; Goldstein, Patrick; Koul, Sasha M; Lemesle, Gilles; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M; Montalescot, Gilles; Radovanovic, Dragana; Lopez-Sendón, Jose; Tousek, Petr; Weidinger, Franz; Weston, Clive F M; Zaman, Azfar; Zeymer, Uwe

    2015-10-01

    Patient registries that document real-world clinical experience play an important role in cardiology as they complement the data from randomized controlled trials, provide valuable information on drug use and clinical outcomes, and evaluate to what extent guidelines are followed in practice. The Platelet Inhibition Registry in ACS EvalUation Study (PIRAEUS) project is an initiative of registry holders who are managing national or international registries observing patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The aim of PIRAEUS is to systematically compare and combine available information/insights from various European ACS registries with a focus on P2Y12 inhibitors. The present publication introduces the 17 participating registries in a narrative and tabular form, and describes which ACS groups and which dual antiplatelet therapies were investigated. It sets the basis for upcoming publications that will focus on effectiveness and safety of the antiplatelets used. PMID:27532447

  1. [Up for Discussion: Using study registries for Oncology: StudyBox and the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS)].

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Christoph; Jena, Susanne; Kliemann, Denise; Antes, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Study registries serve various purposes. Primarily, they provide as complete an overview as possible on planned, ongoing and completed studies and are thus intended to contribute to transparency in research. As such, they are an instrument for identifying and reducing publication bias. Study registries can also help doctors and patients to identify suitable studies for them. The National Cancer Plan (NCP) calls for ensuring an efficient oncological treatment, which requires the knowledge derived from trials. Study registries can play an important role in their identification. This paper describes the purpose that study registries fulfil in oncology as well as their health policy rationale. It then discusses two registries relevant for oncology, i. e. StudyBox and the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS), against the backdrop of the National Cancer Plan and introduces the cooperation of the two registries.

  2. Clinical features of paediatric pulmonary hypertension: a registry study

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Rolf M F; Beghetti, Maurice; Humpl, Tilman; Raskob, Gary E; Ivy, D Dunbar; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Bonnet, Damien; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Barst, Robyn J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Paediatric pulmonary hypertension, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, and is insufficiently characterised in children. The Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry is a global, prospective study designed to provide information about demographics, treatment, and outcomes in paediatric pulmonary hypertension. Methods Consecutive patients aged 18 years or younger at diagnosis with pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary vascular resistance were enrolled in TOPP at 31 centres in 19 countries from Jan 31, 2008, to Feb 15, 2010. Patient and disease characteristics, including age at diagnosis and at enrolment, sex, ethnicity, presenting symptoms, pulmonary hypertension classification, comorbid disorders, medical and family history, haemodynamic indices, and functional class were recorded. Follow-up was decided by the patients’ physicians according to the individual’s health-care needs. Findings 362 of 456 consecutive patients had confirmed pulmonary hypertension (defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤12 mm Hg, and pulmonary vascular resistance index ≥3 WU/m32). 317 (88%) patients had pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which was idiopathic [IPAH] or familial [FPAH] in 182 (57%), and associated with other disorders in 135 (43%), of which 115 (85%) cases were associated with congenital heart disease. 42 patients (12%) had pulmonary hypertension associated with respiratory disease or hypoxaemia, with bronchopulmonary dysplasia most frequent. Finally, only three patients had either chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension or miscellaneous causes of pulmonary hypertension. Chromosomal anomalies, mainly trisomy 21, were reported in 47 (13%) of patients with confirmed disease. Median age at diagnosis was 7 years (IQR 3–12); 59% (268 of 456) were female. Although dyspnoea and fatigue were the most frequent symptoms, syncope

  3. National cancer registry to assess trends after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Okeanov, A E; Sosnovskaya, E Y; Priatkina, O P

    2004-10-30

    The National Cancer Registry has been operational in the Republic of Belarus since 1973: information on all new cases of malignant tumours is registered. The data are kept in a computer database and used for assessing the oncological status of the population, and for epidemiological studies. We compared findings before the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986 (Chernobyl) and findings between 1990 and 2000. The overall comparison on the changes in the incidence of cancer morbidity in Belarus is presented. The increase is statistically significant for all regions, but significantly greater in the most chronically radiation-contaminated region: the Gomel oblast. The paper presents a comparative analysis of the incidence of cancer morbidity in the population of two regions of Belarus, selected for the greatest difference in their radioactive contamination following Chernobyl. The highest contamination occurred in the Gomel region and is mainly due to high levels of radiocaesium (137Cs) in the soil and in the alimentary chain, especially in rural areas. A relatively low radioactive fallout was noticed in the Vitebsk region, considered here as the "control" area. We compare the situation before and after Chernobyl in the two regions. The overall cancer morbidity rate in all organs including colon, urinary bladder and thyroid, was significantly higher in the Gomel region than in Vitebsk. In populations living in two areas with high 137Cs contamination (oblast of Gomel and Mogilev), the peak incidence rates of breast cancer were already reached between the ages of 45-49 years, 15 years earlier than in the Vitebsk region. Belarussian "liquidators" who were mobilised to clean up the most contaminated territory and build the sarcophagus around the destroyed atomic plant, received the highest radiation doses. They had a significant excess of incidence of cancers of colon, urinary bladder, and thyroid gland, when compared with a corresponding adult population of the Vitebsk

  4. Tools and data services registry: a community effort to document bioinformatics resources.

    PubMed

    Ison, Jon; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Ménager, Hervé; Kalaš, Matúš; Rydza, Emil; Chmura, Piotr; Anthon, Christian; Beard, Niall; Berka, Karel; Bolser, Dan; Booth, Tim; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Brezovsky, Jan; Casadio, Rita; Cesareni, Gianni; Coppens, Frederik; Cornell, Michael; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Davidsen, Kristian; Vedova, Gianluca Della; Dogan, Tunca; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Emery, Laura; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Gatter, Thomas; Goldberg, Tatyana; Grosjean, Marie; Grüning, Björn; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ienasescu, Hans; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Jimenez, Rafael; Juty, Nick; Juvan, Peter; Koch, Maximilian; Laibe, Camille; Li, Jing-Woei; Licata, Luana; Mareuil, Fabien; Mičetić, Ivan; Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Moretti, Sebastien; Morris, Chris; Möller, Steffen; Nenadic, Aleksandra; Peterson, Hedi; Profiti, Giuseppe; Rice, Peter; Romano, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Saidi, Rabie; Schafferhans, Andrea; Schwämmle, Veit; Smith, Callum; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Stockinger, Heinz; Vařeková, Radka Svobodová; Tosatto, Silvio C E; de la Torre, Victor; Uva, Paolo; Via, Allegra; Yachdav, Guy; Zambelli, Federico; Vriend, Gert; Rost, Burkhard; Parkinson, Helen; Løngreen, Peter; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Life sciences are yielding huge data sets that underpin scientific discoveries fundamental to improvement in human health, agriculture and the environment. In support of these discoveries, a plethora of databases and tools are deployed, in technically complex and diverse implementations, across a spectrum of scientific disciplines. The corpus of documentation of these resources is fragmented across the Web, with much redundancy, and has lacked a common standard of information. The outcome is that scientists must often struggle to find, understand, compare and use the best resources for the task at hand.Here we present a community-driven curation effort, supported by ELIXIR-the European infrastructure for biological information-that aspires to a comprehensive and consistent registry of information about bioinformatics resources. The sustainable upkeep of this Tools and Data Services Registry is assured by a curation effort driven by and tailored to local needs, and shared amongst a network of engaged partners.As of November 2015, the registry includes 1785 resources, with depositions from 126 individual registrations including 52 institutional providers and 74 individuals. With community support, the registry can become a standard for dissemination of information about bioinformatics resources: we welcome everyone to join us in this common endeavour. The registry is freely available at https://bio.tools. PMID:26538599

  5. Transcatheter valve therapy registry is a model for medical device innovation and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Carroll, John D; Shuren, Jeff; Jensen, Tamara Syrek; Hernandez, John; Holmes, David; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Edwards, Fred H; Zuckerman, Bram D; Wood, Larry L; Kuntz, Richard E; Mack, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Heart valve diseases are increasingly prevalent, especially in people older than age seventy. Many of these elderly people have other comorbid conditions, making them poor candidates for surgical treatment of heart valve diseases. Since 2011 such patients have been eligible to receive new nonsurgical heart valve treatments approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and covered by Medicare. This article examines the Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry, which captures clinical information on all US patients undergoing new nonsurgical heart valve treatments. The registry has patient-level data from more than 27,000 patients treated with the novel devices. Patient- and procedure-related data are gathered from hospitals, patient-reported outcomes are assessed pre- and postprocedure, and longer-term data on mortality and repeat hospitalization are provided by linking the registry's data to Medicare patient data. The registry is a model of collaboration among professional societies, the FDA, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, hospitals, patients, and the medical device industry. It has been used to support Medicare coverage decisions, expand device indications, provide comprehensive device surveillance, and establish national quality benchmarks. Beyond having it serve as a collaborative model, future goals for the registry include shortening the FDA-approval timeline for devices, providing data for decision-making tools for patients, and public reporting of hospital performance. PMID:25646114

  6. Comprehensive capture of cutaneous melanoma by the Ontario Cancer Registry: validation study using community pathology reports.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Rodrigo; Fung, Kinwah; Rochon, Paula; Chan, An-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is often managed outside hospital settings, creating the potential for underreporting to cancer registries. To our knowledge, completeness of melanoma capture in cancer registries has not been assessed using external data sources since the 1980s. We evaluated the melanoma capture rate from 1993 to 2009 in a provincial cancer registry. We identified all melanoma diagnoses in pathology reports from a major community laboratory in Ontario, Canada. Pathologically confirmed diagnoses were linked to Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) records using health insurance numbers. We calculated capture rates as the proportion of patients with melanoma confirmed by a pathology report, with a corresponding melanoma diagnosis in OCR. OCR captured 3,798 of 4,275 (88.8, 95 % confidence interval: 87.9, 89.8 %) invasive melanoma diagnoses over the 17-year period. Annual capture rates of 94 % or higher were found for over half the study period. Among all 29,133 melanoma diagnoses in OCR, 27.6 % were registered based on a pathology report alone, compared with 3.4 % for non-cutaneous malignancies. This suggests that comprehensive capture of melanoma cases by a provincial cancer registry is achievable using source data from community laboratories. There is a need for ongoing validation to ensure data remain accurate and complete to reliably inform clinical care, research, and policy. PMID:26537120

  7. Evaluation of participant recruitment methods to a rare disease online registry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly J; Mueller, Nancy L; Williams, Katherine; Gutmann, David H

    2014-07-01

    Internet communication advances provide new opportunities to assemble individuals with rare diseases to online patient registries from wide geographic areas for research. However, there is little published information on the efficacy of different recruitment methods. Here we describe recruitment patterns and the characteristics of individuals with the self-identified autosomal dominant genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) who participated in an online patient registry during the 1-year period from 1/1/2012 to 12/31/2012. We employed four main mechanisms to alert potential participants to the registry: (1) Facebook and Google advertising, (2) government and academic websites, (3) patient advocacy groups, and (4) healthcare providers. Participants reported how they first heard about the registry through an online questionnaire. During the 1-year period, 880 individuals participated in the registry from all 50 U.S. States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 39 countries. Facebook and Google were reported as referral sources by the highest number of participants (n=550, 72% Facebook), followed by healthcare providers (n=74), and government and academic websites (n=71). The mean participant age was 29±18 years and most participants reported White race (73%) and female sex (62%) irrespective of reported referral source. Internet advertising, especially through Facebook, resulted in efficient enrollment of large numbers of individuals with NF1. Our study demonstrates the potential utility of this approach to assemble individuals with a rare disease from across the world for research studies. PMID:24700441

  8. Tools and data services registry: a community effort to document bioinformatics resources

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Jon; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Ménager, Hervé; Kalaš, Matúš; Rydza, Emil; Chmura, Piotr; Anthon, Christian; Beard, Niall; Berka, Karel; Bolser, Dan; Booth, Tim; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Brezovsky, Jan; Casadio, Rita; Cesareni, Gianni; Coppens, Frederik; Cornell, Michael; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Davidsen, Kristian; Vedova, Gianluca Della; Dogan, Tunca; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Emery, Laura; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Gatter, Thomas; Goldberg, Tatyana; Grosjean, Marie; Grüning, Björn; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ienasescu, Hans; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Jimenez, Rafael; Juty, Nick; Juvan, Peter; Koch, Maximilian; Laibe, Camille; Li, Jing-Woei; Licata, Luana; Mareuil, Fabien; Mičetić, Ivan; Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Moretti, Sebastien; Morris, Chris; Möller, Steffen; Nenadic, Aleksandra; Peterson, Hedi; Profiti, Giuseppe; Rice, Peter; Romano, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Saidi, Rabie; Schafferhans, Andrea; Schwämmle, Veit; Smith, Callum; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Stockinger, Heinz; Vařeková, Radka Svobodová; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; de la Torre, Victor; Uva, Paolo; Via, Allegra; Yachdav, Guy; Zambelli, Federico; Vriend, Gert; Rost, Burkhard; Parkinson, Helen; Løngreen, Peter; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Life sciences are yielding huge data sets that underpin scientific discoveries fundamental to improvement in human health, agriculture and the environment. In support of these discoveries, a plethora of databases and tools are deployed, in technically complex and diverse implementations, across a spectrum of scientific disciplines. The corpus of documentation of these resources is fragmented across the Web, with much redundancy, and has lacked a common standard of information. The outcome is that scientists must often struggle to find, understand, compare and use the best resources for the task at hand. Here we present a community-driven curation effort, supported by ELIXIR—the European infrastructure for biological information—that aspires to a comprehensive and consistent registry of information about bioinformatics resources. The sustainable upkeep of this Tools and Data Services Registry is assured by a curation effort driven by and tailored to local needs, and shared amongst a network of engaged partners. As of November 2015, the registry includes 1785 resources, with depositions from 126 individual registrations including 52 institutional providers and 74 individuals. With community support, the registry can become a standard for dissemination of information about bioinformatics resources: we welcome everyone to join us in this common endeavour. The registry is freely available at https://bio.tools. PMID:26538599

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist use in men without a cancer registry diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-fang; Goodwin, James S; Shahinian, Vahakn B

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has become popular for virtually all stages of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that some men receive these agents after only a limited work-up for their cancer. Such cases may be missed by tumor registries, leading to underestimates of the total extent of GnRH agonist use. Methods We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 1993 through 2001 to identify GnRH agonist use in men with either a diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER, or with a diagnosis of prostate cancer based only on Medicare claims (from the 5% control sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in SEER areas without a registered diagnosis of cancer). The proportion of incident GnRH agonist users without a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer was calculated. Factors associated with lack of a registry diagnosis were examined in multivariable analyses. Results Of incident GnRH agonist users, 8.9% had no diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER. In a multivariable logistic regression model, lack of a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer in GnRH agonist users was significantly more likely with increasing comorbidity, whereas it was less likely in men who had undergone either inpatient admission or procedures such as radical prostatectomy, prostate biopsy, or transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusion Reliance solely on tumor registry data may underestimate the rate of GnRH agonist use in men with prostate cancer. PMID:18620606

  10. Tools and data services registry: a community effort to document bioinformatics resources.

    PubMed

    Ison, Jon; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Ménager, Hervé; Kalaš, Matúš; Rydza, Emil; Chmura, Piotr; Anthon, Christian; Beard, Niall; Berka, Karel; Bolser, Dan; Booth, Tim; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Brezovsky, Jan; Casadio, Rita; Cesareni, Gianni; Coppens, Frederik; Cornell, Michael; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Davidsen, Kristian; Vedova, Gianluca Della; Dogan, Tunca; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Emery, Laura; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Gatter, Thomas; Goldberg, Tatyana; Grosjean, Marie; Grüning, Björn; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ienasescu, Hans; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Jespersen, Martin Closter; Jimenez, Rafael; Juty, Nick; Juvan, Peter; Koch, Maximilian; Laibe, Camille; Li, Jing-Woei; Licata, Luana; Mareuil, Fabien; Mičetić, Ivan; Friborg, Rune Møllegaard; Moretti, Sebastien; Morris, Chris; Möller, Steffen; Nenadic, Aleksandra; Peterson, Hedi; Profiti, Giuseppe; Rice, Peter; Romano, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Saidi, Rabie; Schafferhans, Andrea; Schwämmle, Veit; Smith, Callum; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Stockinger, Heinz; Vařeková, Radka Svobodová; Tosatto, Silvio C E; de la Torre, Victor; Uva, Paolo; Via, Allegra; Yachdav, Guy; Zambelli, Federico; Vriend, Gert; Rost, Burkhard; Parkinson, Helen; Løngreen, Peter; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Life sciences are yielding huge data sets that underpin scientific discoveries fundamental to improvement in human health, agriculture and the environment. In support of these discoveries, a plethora of databases and tools are deployed, in technically complex and diverse implementations, across a spectrum of scientific disciplines. The corpus of documentation of these resources is fragmented across the Web, with much redundancy, and has lacked a common standard of information. The outcome is that scientists must often struggle to find, understand, compare and use the best resources for the task at hand.Here we present a community-driven curation effort, supported by ELIXIR-the European infrastructure for biological information-that aspires to a comprehensive and consistent registry of information about bioinformatics resources. The sustainable upkeep of this Tools and Data Services Registry is assured by a curation effort driven by and tailored to local needs, and shared amongst a network of engaged partners.As of November 2015, the registry includes 1785 resources, with depositions from 126 individual registrations including 52 institutional providers and 74 individuals. With community support, the registry can become a standard for dissemination of information about bioinformatics resources: we welcome everyone to join us in this common endeavour. The registry is freely available at https://bio.tools.

  11. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Majkut, S.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  12. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery: an update.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Julie A; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Poynter, Jeffrey A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-12-01

    The anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the wrong sinus of Valsalva with an interarterial, intramural, and/or intraconal course is a relatively rare congenital defect of the heart that may be associated with an increased risk of ischaemia of the myocardium and sudden death, notably in children and young adults. Data are limited regarding stratification of risk and long-term outcomes of these patients. In 2009, the Anomalous Coronary Artery Working Group formed the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Registry of Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery to obtain information on large numbers of young patients with anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery with the goal to better understand the natural and surgical history of this anomaly as well as to develop evidence-based treatment and management guidelines. In this report, we describe the data we have collected from the registry and the current state of the registry.

  13. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  14. [Pre-requisites, observations and benefits of the DGU trauma registry in Austria].

    PubMed

    Mattiassich, G; Litzlbauer, W; Ortmaier, R

    2016-07-01

    The trauma registry of the DGU was founded in 1992 with the objective of collecting data on severely injured patients. The purpose of this registry, in which Austrian trauma units have taken part since 1998, is to answer questions related to the field of trauma management. Using the example of the Linz Trauma Center (UKH Linz), which has actively participated since 2012, the authors would like to share their experiences of collecting data in order to motivate other departments to participate in the trauma registry. We would like to make suggestions regarding implementation methods for high-quality data acquisition.However, the availability of essential human resources must be guaranteed, since the recording of data from severely injured patients sometimes takes 60-90 min. Additionally, an automatic data acquisition method is currently unavailable for technical reasons. PMID:27277937

  15. Substrate stiffness-modulated registry phase correlations in cardiomyocytes map structural order to coherent beating.

    PubMed

    Dasbiswas, K; Majkut, S; Discher, D E; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-01-19

    Recent experiments show that both striation, an indication of the structural registry in muscle fibres, as well as the contractile strains produced by beating cardiac muscle cells can be optimized by substrate stiffness. Here we show theoretically how the substrate rigidity dependence of the registry data can be mapped onto that of the strain measurements. We express the elasticity-mediated structural registry as a phase-order parameter using a statistical physics approach that takes the noise and disorder inherent in biological systems into account. By assuming that structurally registered myofibrils also tend to beat in phase, we explain the observed dependence of both striation and strain measurements of cardiomyocytes on substrate stiffness in a unified manner. The agreement of our ideas with experiment suggests that the correlated beating of heart cells may be limited by the structural order of the myofibrils, which in turn is regulated by their elastic environment.

  16. Asian Cancer Registry Forum 2014 - regional cooperation for cancer registration: priorities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Moore, Malcolm A; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Bray, Freddie

    2014-01-01

    On February 6-7th, the Thai National Cancer Institute, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and its Mumbai Hub for Cancer Registration, together with the International Association of Cancer Registries and the APOCP/APJCP, jointly organized an Asian cancer registry forum to discuss regional cooperation for cancer registration. Held in the Grande Mercure Fortune Hotel, Bangkok, the meeting brought together leading scientists in cancer registration from South-East and North-East Asia as well as Australia, India and Iran and IARC itself, with coverage of various priorities and challenges of cancer registries regarding cancer control policy, operational parameters, assessment of survival and contributions to screening, for example. The current situation was highlighted and future directions and possible expansion of activities were discussed, with especial attention to the necessity for networks to help improve cancer registration across Asia and Africa.

  17. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry: A Sustainable Model for the Information Age?

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesiologists care for patients of all ages, with all conceivable comorbidities, in every kind of health care facility. This leads to a significant challenge in the collection of data to describe the specialty, and in the development of evidence-based performance measures for anesthesiologists. Whereas narrowly defined medical specialties have developed registries based on manual abstraction of clinical data from the medical record (e.g., cardiac surgery), this approach would be prohibitively expensive for anesthesiology, and is unlikely to generate statistically useful data when major adverse outcomes occur a handful of times in tens of thousands of cases. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) addressed this challenge in 2008 by funding a related organization, the Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI), to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). The technical development of this registry and the approach taken to define the specialty of anesthesiology and the performance of anesthesiologists may serve as a model for other specialty society efforts. PMID:25848607

  18. [Swiss registry for patients with cystic fibrosis: design, programming, implementation and first examples of use].

    PubMed

    Schöni-Affolter, F; Oswald, P; Wandt-Baumann, C; Kriemler, S; Schöni, M H

    2000-09-30

    The Swiss Registry for Cystic Fibrosis (SRCF) was designed to collect demographic, clinical and therapeutic data from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in Switzerland. It was designed, programmed and implemented for standalone application in Swiss cystic fibrosis centres. It is part of the European Registry for Cystic Fibrosis (ERCF), which has been implemented in Europe to collect data on the use and safety of dornase alpha (Pulmozyme) in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. At the time of first evaluation 245 cystic fibrosis patients are registered, their mean age is 13 years, and 17% are over 18. In larger databases in Germany or North America we observe comparable demographic data, similar degrees of severity and similar therapeutic approaches to those in Swiss cystic fibrosis patients. The aim of the Swiss Registry is to cover the maximum possible number of cystic fibrosis patients from this country.

  19. A distributed health data network analysis of survival outcomes: the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries perspective.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samprit; Cafri, Guy; Isaacs, Abby J; Graves, Stephen; Paxton, Elizabeth; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-12-17

    The International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries is a multinational initiative established by the United States Food and Drug Administration to develop a health data network aimed at providing a robust infrastructure to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on performance of medical devices. Through the International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries, individual data holders have complete control of their data and can choose to participate in studies of their choice. In this article, we present an overview of the data extraction process and the analytic strategy employed to answer several device performance-related questions in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. In the process, we discuss some nuances pertinent to International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries data that pose certain statistical challenges, and we briefly suggest strategies to be adopted to address them. PMID:25520413

  20. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  1. A Protocol for the Secure Linking of Registries for HPV Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    El Emam, Khaled; Samet, Saeed; Hu, Jun; Peyton, Liam; Earle, Craig; Jayaraman, Gayatri C.; Wong, Tom; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Dankar, Fida; Essex, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In order to monitor the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Canada the linkage of multiple data registries may be required. These registries may not always be managed by the same organization and, furthermore, privacy legislation or practices may restrict any data linkages of records that can actually be done among registries. The objective of this study was to develop a secure protocol for linking data from different registries and to allow on-going monitoring of HPV vaccine effectiveness. Methods A secure linking protocol, using commutative hash functions and secure multi-party computation techniques was developed. This protocol allows for the exact matching of records among registries and the computation of statistics on the linked data while meeting five practical requirements to ensure patient confidentiality and privacy. The statistics considered were: odds ratio and its confidence interval, chi-square test, and relative risk and its confidence interval. Additional statistics on contingency tables, such as other measures of association, can be added using the same principles presented. The computation time performance of this protocol was evaluated. Results The protocol has acceptable computation time and scales linearly with the size of the data set and the size of the contingency table. The worse case computation time for up to 100,000 patients returned by each query and a 16 cell contingency table is less than 4 hours for basic statistics, and the best case is under 3 hours. Discussion A computationally practical protocol for the secure linking of data from multiple registries has been demonstrated in the context of HPV vaccine initiative impact assessment. The basic protocol can be generalized to the surveillance of other conditions, diseases, or vaccination programs. PMID:22768321

  2. Registry-based outcome assessment in haemophilia: a scoping study to explore the available evidence.

    PubMed

    Osooli, M; Berntorp, E

    2016-06-01

    Haemophilia is a congenital disorder with bleeding episodes as its primary symptom. These episodes can result in negative outcomes including joint damage, loss of active days due to hospitalization and reduced quality of life. Effective treatment, however, can improve the outcome. Registries have been used as a valuable source of information regarding the monitoring of treatment and outcome. The two main aims of this exploratory study were to establish which haemophilia registries publish peer-reviewed outcome assessment research and then to extract, classify and report the treatment outcomes and their extent of use in the retrieved registries. Using relevant keywords, we searched PubMed and Web of Science databases for publications during the period 1990-2015. Retrieved references were screened in a stepwise process. Eligible papers were original full articles on haemophilia outcomes that used data from a computerized patient database. Descriptive results were summarized. Of 2352 references reviewed, 25 full texts were eligible for inclusion in the study. These papers were published by 11 registries ranging from local to international in coverage. It is still relatively rare for registries to produce peer-reviewed publications about outcomes, and most that currently do produce such papers are located in Europe and North America. More information is available on traditional outcomes such as comorbidities and arthropathy than on health-related quality of life or the social and developmental impact of haemophilia on patients. Inhibitors, HIV and viral hepatitis are amongst the most commonly reported comorbidities. Research has focused more on factor consumption and less on hospitalization or time lost at school or work due to haemophilia. Haemophilia registries, especially those at the national level, are valuable resources for the delivery of effective health care to patients. Validated outcome measurement instruments are essential for the production of reliable and

  3. A Patient Registry to Improve Patient Safety: Recording General Neurosurgery Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Stieglitz, Lennart; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Regli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To improve the transparency of the local health care system, treatment cost was recently referenced to disease related groups. Treatment quality must be legally documented in a patient registry, in particular for the highly specialized treatments provided by neurosurgery departments. Methods In 2013 we have installed a patient registry focused on cranial neurosurgery. Surgeries are characterized by indication, treatment, location and other specific neurosurgical parameters. Preoperative state and postoperative outcome are recorded prospectively using neurological and sociological scales. Complications are graded by their severity in a therapy-oriented complication score system (Clavien-Dindo-Grading system, CDG). Results are presented at the monthly clinical staff meeting. Results Data acquisition compatible with the clinic workflow permitted to include all eligible patients into the registry. Until December 2015, we have registered 2880 patients that were treated in 3959 surgeries and 8528 consultations. Since the registry is fully operational (August 2014), we have registered 325 complications on 1341 patient discharge forms (24%). In 64% of these complications, no or only pharmacological treatment was required. At discharge, there was a clear correlation of the severity of the complication and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, ρ = -0.3, slope -6 KPS percentage points per increment of CDG) and the length of stay (ρ = 0.4, slope 1.5 days per increment of CDG). Conclusions While the therapy-oriented complication scores correlate reasonably well with outcome and length of stay, they do not account for new deficits that cannot be treated. Outcome grading and complication severity grading thus serve a complimentary purpose. Overall, the registry serves to streamline and to complete information flow in the clinic, to identify complication rates and trends early for the internal quality monitoring and communication with patients. Conversely, the

  4. Trends in revision hip and knee arthroplasty observations after implementation of a regional joint replacement registry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jas; Politis, Angelos; Loucks, Lynda; Hedden, David R.; Bohm, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Background National joint replacement registries outside North America have been effective in reducing revision risk. However, there is little information on the role of smaller regional registries similar to those found in Canada or the United States. We sought to understand trends in total hip (THA) and knee (TKA) arthroplasty revision patterns after implementation of a regional registry. Methods We reviewed our regional joint replacement registry containing all 30 252 cases of primary and revision THA and TKA performed between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2013. Each revision case was stratified into early (< 2 yr), mid (2–10 yr) or late (> 10 yr), and we determined the primary reason for revision. Results The early revision rate for TKA dropped from 3.0% in 2005 to 1.3% in 2011 (R2 = 0.84, p = 0.003). Similarly, the early revision rate for THA dropped from 4.2% to 2.1% (R2 = 0.78, p = 0.008). Despite primary TKA and THA volumes increasing by 35.5% and 39.5%, respectively, there was no concomitant rise in revision volumes. The leading reasons for TKA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and stiffness. The leading reasons for THA revision were infection, instability, aseptic loosening and periprosthetic fracture. There were no discernible trends over time in reasons for early, mid-term or late revision for either TKA or THA. Conclusion After implementation of a regional joint replacement registry we observed a significant reduction in early revision rates. Further work investigating the mechanism by which registry reporting reduces early revision risk is warranted. PMID:27438053

  5. The 2008 ERA–EDTA Registry Annual Report—a précis

    PubMed Central

    Stel, Vianda S.; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W.M.; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study provides a summary of the 2008 ERA–EDTA Registry Report (this report is available at www.era-edta-reg.org). Methods. The data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) were available from 55 national and regional registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Datasets with individual patient data were received from 36 registries, whereas 19 registries contributed data in aggregated form. We presented incidence and prevalence of RRT, and transplant rates. Survival analysis was solely based on individual patient records. Results. In 2008, the overall incidence rate of RRT for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among all registries reporting to the ERA–EDTA Registry was 122 per million population (pmp), and the prevalence was 644 pmp. Incidence rates varied from 264 pmp in Turkey to 15 pmp in Ukraine. The mean age of patients starting RRT in 2008 ranged from 69 years in Dutch-speaking Belgium to 44 years in Ukraine. The highest prevalence of RRT for ESRD was reported by Portugal (1408 pmp) and the lowest by Ukraine (89 pmp). The prevalence of haemodialysis on 31 December 2008 ranged from 66 pmp (Ukraine) to 875 pmp (Portugal) and the prevalence of peritoneal dialysis from 8 pmp (Montenegro) to 115 pmp (Denmark). In Norway, 70% of the patients on RRT on 31 December 2008 were living with a functioning graft (572 pmp). In 2008, the number of transplants performed pmp was highest in Spain (Catalonia) (64 pmp), whereas the highest transplant rates with living-donor kidneys were reported from the Netherlands (25 pmp) and Norway (21 pmp). In the cohort 1999–2003, the unadjusted 1-, 2- and 5-year survival of patients on RRT was 80.8% (95% CI: 80.6–81.0), 69.1% (95% CI: 68.9–69.3) and 46.1% (95% CI: 45.9–46.3), respectively. PMID:21245934

  6. Development, Implementation, and Use of a Local and Global Clinical Registry for Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Cooper, Benjamin T; Lunsford, L Dade; Silverman, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    Physicians are being challenged to obtain data for outcomes research and measures of quality practice in medicine. We developed a prospective data collection system (registry) that provides data points across all elements of a neurosurgical stereotactic radiosurgery practice. The registry architecture is scalable and suitable for any aspect of neurosurgical practice. Our purpose was to outline the challenges in creating systems for high quality data acquisition and describe experiences in initial testing and use. Over a two year period, a multicenter team working with software engineers developed a comprehensive radiosurgery registry based on a MS-Sequel® server platform. Three neurosurgeons at one center were responsible for final editing. Alpha testing began in September 2012 and server-based beta testing began in February 2013. The major elements included demographics, disease-based items (47 categories for different brain tumors, vascular malformations, and functional disorders) with relevant clinical grading systems, treatment-based items (imaging, physics, clinical), and follow-up data (clinical, imaging, subsequent therapeutics). Nine hundred patients were entered into the registry at one test center, with new entries and follow-up data entered daily at the point of contact. With experience, the mean time for one new entry was 6 minutes. Mean time for one follow-up entry was 45 seconds. The system was made secure for individual use and amenable for both data entry and research. Analytics used different filters to create customized outcomes charts as selected by the user (e.g., survival, neurologic function, complications). A local or multicenter prospective data collection registry was created for use across 47 clinical indications for stereotactic cranial radiosurgery. Further refinement of fields and logic is ongoing. The system is reliable, robust, and allows use of rapid analytical tools. Large medical registries will become widely used for collection

  7. Inhibitors in haemophilia: what have we learned from registries? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Osooli, M; Berntorp, E

    2015-01-01

    Congenital haemophilia A and B are genetic disorders affecting factor VIII and factor IX production, respectively. Factor replacement is the only effective treatment for these deficiencies, but a patient's immune system can develop inhibitory antibodies which bind and interfere with the function of the replaced factor in a variety of ways. The main treatment goal for patients with inhibitors is to induce immune tolerance to the injected factor. If not successful, a different treatment termed bypass therapy is needed to treat bleeds. The goal of this review is to demonstrate the usefulness of haemophilia registries as information sources to supplement available evidence regarding predictors of inhibitor development and immune tolerance induction (ITI) outcomes. In this systematic review, relevant keywords were used to search online academic databases during February 2014. Inclusion criteria were original publication and data obtained from a haemophilia or ITI registry with a minimum of 30 patients. A data collection form was created to extract information from selected manuscripts. Titles, abstracts and then full texts were screened to determine the eligibility of reports for this review. Eleven manuscripts from nine registries were determined eligible and included in the study. Registries have reported on some core variables, but are inconsistent in reporting less practiced predicting variables. Variables that may affect inhibitor and ITI outcomes were each divided into two categories: patient characteristics (such as age and family history) and treatment-related variables (including exposure days, treatment duration and dose). It is recommended that, in addition to exploratory hypothesis testing, a minimum set of variables should be collected and reported by registries. International collaboration and well-designed prospective registries are of major importance to advance this field in order to determine inhibitor risks and ITI outcomes and facilitate the

  8. Development, Implementation, and Use of a Local and Global Clinical Registry for Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Cooper, Benjamin T; Lunsford, L Dade; Silverman, Joshua

    2015-06-01

    Physicians are being challenged to obtain data for outcomes research and measures of quality practice in medicine. We developed a prospective data collection system (registry) that provides data points across all elements of a neurosurgical stereotactic radiosurgery practice. The registry architecture is scalable and suitable for any aspect of neurosurgical practice. Our purpose was to outline the challenges in creating systems for high quality data acquisition and describe experiences in initial testing and use. Over a two year period, a multicenter team working with software engineers developed a comprehensive radiosurgery registry based on a MS-Sequel® server platform. Three neurosurgeons at one center were responsible for final editing. Alpha testing began in September 2012 and server-based beta testing began in February 2013. The major elements included demographics, disease-based items (47 categories for different brain tumors, vascular malformations, and functional disorders) with relevant clinical grading systems, treatment-based items (imaging, physics, clinical), and follow-up data (clinical, imaging, subsequent therapeutics). Nine hundred patients were entered into the registry at one test center, with new entries and follow-up data entered daily at the point of contact. With experience, the mean time for one new entry was 6 minutes. Mean time for one follow-up entry was 45 seconds. The system was made secure for individual use and amenable for both data entry and research. Analytics used different filters to create customized outcomes charts as selected by the user (e.g., survival, neurologic function, complications). A local or multicenter prospective data collection registry was created for use across 47 clinical indications for stereotactic cranial radiosurgery. Further refinement of fields and logic is ongoing. The system is reliable, robust, and allows use of rapid analytical tools. Large medical registries will become widely used for collection

  9. A registry for the collection of data in cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Arslan, E; Baggiani, A; Burdo, S; Cassandro, E; Cuda, D; Dinelli, E; Filipo, R; Mancini, P; Martini, A; Quaranta, A; Quaranta, N; Turchetti, G; Forli, F

    2011-10-01

    The need to optimize the use of all the information that modern technological tools have made available to the physician ENT/audiologist has increasingly emerged within the Italian scientific community. Towards this purpose, it is necessary to create a registry of the patients using cochlear implants (CIs). This registry will include a homogeneous summary of the information deriving from multiple sources related to daily clinical practice, in order to assess auditory benefits, safety and reliability in patients with cochlear implants, and organization over the national territory. The primary objectives relative to the above-mentioned analysis are to assess the impact of the use of cochlear implants on patient health, to ensure traceability of the devices currently used, monitoring their safety and reliability over time, to guarantee access of the technique in clinical and organizational conditions that can allow the best possible benefits. The aspects concerning implementation of the registry were discussed extensively during the first meetings of the Working Group (WG). In particular, owing to the complexity and high costs related mainly to the development of the technological aspects and the need to involve technological partners external to the WG, and to respect current privacy laws, the WG members decided that the project should be limited to proposal of a paper registry to be implemented at a later stage, possibly within the framework of successive research projects. During meetings, the WG members discussed various aspects of implementation of the registry, and in particular the scientific features connected to objectives, inclusion criteria, and structure of the forms needed for data collection and organizational aspects. A registry is proposed herein.

  10. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services. PMID:23778694

  11. Use of patient registries and administrative datasets for the study of pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Gulack, Brian C; Adibe, Obinna O; Tracy, Elizabeth T; Kreissman, Susan G; Routh, Jonathan C

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of data from large administrative databases and patient registries is increasingly being used to study childhood cancer care, although the value of these data sources remains unclear to many clinicians. Interpretation of large databases requires a thorough understanding of how the dataset was designed, how data were collected, and how to assess data quality. This review will detail the role of administrative databases and registry databases for the study of childhood cancer, tools to maximize information from these datasets, and recommendations to improve the use of these databases for the study of pediatric oncology.

  12. SpineData – a Danish clinical registry of people with chronic back pain

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher; Albert, Hanne B; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Manniche, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Background Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData) in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results Started in 2011, the database by early 2015 contained information on more than 36,300 baseline episodes of patient care, plus the available 6-month and 12-month follow-up data for these episodes. The baseline questionnaire completion rate has been 93%; 79% of people were presenting with low back pain as their main complaint, 6% with mid-back pain, and 15% with neck pain. Collectively, across the body regions and measurement time points, there are approximately 1,980 patient-related variables in the database across a broad range of biopsychosocial factors. To date, 36 research projects have used data from the SpineData registry, including collaborations with researchers from Denmark, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Brazil. Conclusion We described the aims, development, structure, and content of the SpineData registry, and what is known about any attrition bias and cluster effects in the data. For epidemiology research, these data can be linked, at an individual patient level, to the Danish population-based registries and the national spinal surgery registry. SpineData also has potential for the

  13. A reference data model of a metadata registry preserving semantics and representations of data elements.

    PubMed

    Löpprich, Martin; Jones, Jennifer; Meinecke, Marie-Claire; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Knaup, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Integration and analysis of clinical data collected in multiple data sources over a long period of time is a major challenge even when data warehouses and metadata registries are used. Since most metadata registries focus on describing data elements to establish domain consistent data definition and providing item libraries, hierarchical and temporal dependencies cannot be mapped. Therefore we developed and validated a reference data model, based on ISO/IEC 11179, which allows revision and branching control of conceptually similar data elements with heterogeneous definitions and representations.

  14. Cancer incidence in Ghana, 2012: evidence from a population-based cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on cancers is a challenge in most developing countries. Population-based cancer registries are also not common in developing countries despite the usefulness of such registries in informing cancer prevention and control programmes. The availability of population-based data on cancers in Africa varies across different countries. In Ghana, data and research on cancer have focussed on specific cancers and have been hospital-based with no reference population. The Kumasi Cancer Registry was established as the first population-based cancer registry in Ghana in 2012 to provide information on cancer cases seen in the city of Kumasi. Methods This paper reviews data from the Kumasi Cancer Registry for the year 2012. The reference geographic area for the registry is the city of Kumasi as designated by the 2010 Ghana Population and Housing Census. Data was from all clinical departments of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Pathology Laboratory Results, Death Certificates and the Kumasi South Regional Hospital. Data was abstracted and entered into Canreg 5 database. Analysis was conducted using Canreg 5, Microsoft Excel and Epi Info Version 7.1.2.0. Results The majority of cancers were recorded among females accounting for 69.6% of all cases. The mean age at diagnosis for all cases was 51.6 years. Among males, the mean age at diagnosis was 48.4 compared with 53.0 years for females. The commonest cancers among males were cancers of the Liver (21.1%), Prostate (13.2%), Lung (5.3%) and Stomach (5.3%). Among females, the commonest cancers were cancers of the Breast (33.9%), Cervix (29.4%), Ovary (11.3%) and Endometrium (4.5%). Histology of the primary tumour was the basis of diagnosis in 74% of cases with clinical and other investigations accounting for 17% and 9% respectively. The estimated cancer incidence Age Adjusted Standardised Rate for males was 10.9/100,000 and 22.4/100, 000 for females. Conclusion This first attempt at population-based cancer

  15. Metadata registry and management system based on ISO 11179 for cancer clinical trials information system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim*, Ju Han

    2006-01-01

    Standardized management of data elements (DEs) for Case Report Form (CRF) is crucial in Clinical Trials Information System (CTIS). Traditional CTISs utilize organization-specific definitions and storage methods for Des and CRFs. We developed metadata-based DE management system for clinical trials, Clinical and Histopathological Metadata Registry (CHMR), using international standard for metadata registry (ISO 11179) for the management of cancer clinical trials information. CHMR was evaluated in cancer clinical trials with 1625 DEs extracted from the College of American Pathologists Cancer Protocols for 20 major cancers. PMID:17238675

  16. Implementation of an Interleukin-2 National Registry: an opportunity to improve cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael K; Kaufman, Howard L; Daniels, Gregory A; McDermott, David F; Aung, Sandra; Lowder, James N; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer registries have proven valuable with respect to validating therapeutic safety and drug efficacy, uncovering real-world implementation practices, and their evolution over time. Modern cancer therapeutics are approved as single agents oftentimes compared to the least active approved standard agent in randomized trials. However, the burgeoning diversity and number of drugs introduces a complexity that quickly outstrips the knowledge provided by these pivotal trials. This gap in information is particularly relevant when survival is the primary therapeutic endpoint. In addition, the inherent complexity of the immune response will make registries a particularly important tool in expeditiously understanding solid tumor immunotherapy and patient outcomes. PMID:25031835

  17. Integrated image data and medical record management for rare disease registries. A general framework and its instantiation to theGerman Calciphylaxis Registry.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Thomas M; Haak, Daniel; Brandenburg, Vincent; Deserno, Verena; Classen, Christoph; Specht, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Especially for investigator-initiated research at universities and academic institutions, Internet-based rare disease registries (RDR) are required that integrate electronic data capture (EDC) with automatic image analysis or manual image annotation. We propose a modular framework merging alpha-numerical and binary data capture. In concordance with the Office of Rare Diseases Research recommendations, a requirement analysis was performed based on several RDR databases currently hosted at Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Germany. With respect to the study management tool that is already successfully operating at the Clinical Trial Center Aachen, the Google Web Toolkit was chosen with Hibernate and Gilead connecting a MySQL database management system. Image and signal data integration and processing is supported by Apache Commons FileUpload-Library and ImageJ-based Java code, respectively. As a proof of concept, the framework is instantiated to the German Calciphylaxis Registry. The framework is composed of five mandatory core modules: (1) Data Core, (2) EDC, (3) Access Control, (4) Audit Trail, and (5) Terminology as well as six optional modules: (6) Binary Large Object (BLOB), (7) BLOB Analysis, (8) Standard Operation Procedure, (9) Communication, (10) Pseudonymization, and (11) Biorepository. Modules 1-7 are implemented in the German Calciphylaxis Registry. The proposed RDR framework is easily instantiated and directly integrates image management and analysis. As open source software, it may assist improved data collection and analysis of rare diseases in near future. PMID:24865858

  18. Integrated image data and medical record management for rare disease registries. A general framework and its instantiation to theGerman Calciphylaxis Registry.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Thomas M; Haak, Daniel; Brandenburg, Vincent; Deserno, Verena; Classen, Christoph; Specht, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Especially for investigator-initiated research at universities and academic institutions, Internet-based rare disease registries (RDR) are required that integrate electronic data capture (EDC) with automatic image analysis or manual image annotation. We propose a modular framework merging alpha-numerical and binary data capture. In concordance with the Office of Rare Diseases Research recommendations, a requirement analysis was performed based on several RDR databases currently hosted at Uniklinik RWTH Aachen, Germany. With respect to the study management tool that is already successfully operating at the Clinical Trial Center Aachen, the Google Web Toolkit was chosen with Hibernate and Gilead connecting a MySQL database management system. Image and signal data integration and processing is supported by Apache Commons FileUpload-Library and ImageJ-based Java code, respectively. As a proof of concept, the framework is instantiated to the German Calciphylaxis Registry. The framework is composed of five mandatory core modules: (1) Data Core, (2) EDC, (3) Access Control, (4) Audit Trail, and (5) Terminology as well as six optional modules: (6) Binary Large Object (BLOB), (7) BLOB Analysis, (8) Standard Operation Procedure, (9) Communication, (10) Pseudonymization, and (11) Biorepository. Modules 1-7 are implemented in the German Calciphylaxis Registry. The proposed RDR framework is easily instantiated and directly integrates image management and analysis. As open source software, it may assist improved data collection and analysis of rare diseases in near future.

  19. 33 CFR 187.313 - Must a State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? 187.313 Section 187.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL IDENTIFICATION..., Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? (a) A State must honor a title issued by another...

  20. 33 CFR 187.313 - Must a State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? 187.313 Section 187.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL IDENTIFICATION..., Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? (a) A State must honor a title issued by another...

  1. 33 CFR 187.313 - Must a State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? 187.313 Section 187.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL IDENTIFICATION..., Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? (a) A State must honor a title issued by another...

  2. 33 CFR 187.313 - Must a State honor a prior State title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... title, Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? 187.313 Section 187.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY VESSEL IDENTIFICATION..., Coast Guard documentation, and foreign registry? (a) A State must honor a title issued by another...

  3. 46 CFR 221.15 - Approval for transfer of registry or operation under authority of a foreign country or for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (1) The Maritime Administrator hereby grants approval for the Transfer to foreign registry and flag... tons or more. (1) Applications for approval of Transfer to foreign registry and flag or Operation Under... App. U.S.C. 1242). If the vessel is under the flag of a country that is a member of the North...

  4. Verification of Parent-Report of Child Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis to a Web-Based Autism Registry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Amy M.; Rosenberg, Rebecca E.; Anderson, Connie; Law, J. Kiely; Marvin, Alison R.; Law, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing interest in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research requires increasingly large samples to uncover epidemiologic trends; such a large dataset is available in a national, web-based autism registry, the Interactive Autism Network (IAN). The objective of this study was to verify parent-report of professional ASD diagnosis to the registry's…

  5. Completeness of the dog registry and estimation of the dog population size in a densely populated area of Rome.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Antonino; Sala, Marcello; Panetta, Valentina; Battisti, Sabrina; Meoli, Roberta; Rombolà, Pasquale; Spallucci, Valentina; Eleni, Claudia; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In most European countries, registration and identification of dogs is compulsory. In Italy, the national dog registry is composed of regional dog registries. Although dog registries have been established for many years, the issue related to completeness of data has not been addressed so far. The objective of this study was twofold: first to assess the completeness of data of the dog registry through telephone interview of a sample of dog owners drawn from the dog registry, then to estimate the total owned dog population in 4 boroughs of Rome. For the second objective, a capture-recapture method was applied using data from the dog registry and data from a face-to-face questionnaire submitted to people waiting in the sitting room of 5 points of access for booking and payment of primary and specialist care. Different scenarios are proposed to verify the assumptions of the estimation procedure and potential biases are discussed. The completeness of data of the dog registry was 88.9% (95% CI: 85.8-91.9%) and the owned-dog population was estimated at 26,244 dogs (95% CI: 24,110-28,383). The dog registry is an important source of information especially when it is properly updated and completeness of data is known.

  6. 48 CFR 252.211-7007 - Reporting of Government-Furnished Equipment in the DoD Item Unique Identification (IUID) Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... payments; (6) Intellectual property or software; or (7) Real property. (d) Procedures for establishing UIIs...) Procedures for updating the DoD IUID Registry. The Contractor shall update the DoD IUID Registry at...

  7. Registry of Communication Research: An Identification of Selected Communication Research Projects in the Academic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elbert J., Ed.

    This Registry is designed to be a single-source reference to aid in determining the kinds of communication research in process, where it is being conducted, and by whom. The projects are categorized by one or more primary areas of communication and then as to the most applicable basic form of communication. Basic areas of communication research…

  8. 49 CFR 191.22 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators. 191.22 Section 191.22 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  9. 49 CFR 191.22 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators. 191.22 Section 191.22 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  10. 49 CFR 191.22 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators. 191.22 Section 191.22 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  11. 49 CFR 191.22 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG operators. 191.22 Section 191.22 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  12. 49 CFR 195.64 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators. 195.64 Section 195.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  13. 49 CFR 195.64 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators. 195.64 Section 195.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  14. 49 CFR 195.64 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators. 195.64 Section 195.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  15. 49 CFR 195.64 - National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National Registry of Pipeline and LNG Operators. 195.64 Section 195.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  16. Evidence Clearinghouses and Registries: Methods for Locating and Including Studies in Evidence Syntheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Lisa; LaSota, Robin; Yeide, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to report about study identification practices across evidence-based registries and clearinghouses in social policy fields, which serve as a resource for scientific, evidence-based decision-making about practices about desired outcomes in these social policy fields. The information retrieval procedures of the…

  17. 75 FR 38683 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; FAR Case 2008-035, Registry of Disaster Response Contractors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... officers to take advantage of commercially available market research methods to identify capabilities to..., contracting officers are required to consult the registry during market research and acquisition planning. The interim rule was published in the Federal Register on October 14, 2009 (74 FR 52847). The public...

  18. A federated semantic metadata registry framework for enabling interoperability across clinical research and care domains.

    PubMed

    Sinaci, A Anil; Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce B

    2013-10-01

    In order to enable secondary use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) by bridging the interoperability gap between clinical care and research domains, in this paper, a unified methodology and the supporting framework is introduced which brings together the power of metadata registries (MDR) and semantic web technologies. We introduce a federated semantic metadata registry framework by extending the ISO/IEC 11179 standard, and enable integration of data element registries through Linked Open Data (LOD) principles where each Common Data Element (CDE) can be uniquely referenced, queried and processed to enable the syntactic and semantic interoperability. Each CDE and their components are maintained as LOD resources enabling semantic links with other CDEs, terminology systems and with implementation dependent content models; hence facilitating semantic search, much effective reuse and semantic interoperability across different application domains. There are several important efforts addressing the semantic interoperability in healthcare domain such as IHE DEX profile proposal, CDISC SHARE and CDISC2RDF. Our architecture complements these by providing a framework to interlink existing data element registries and repositories for multiplying their potential for semantic interoperability to a greater extent. Open source implementation of the federated semantic MDR framework presented in this paper is the core of the semantic interoperability layer of the SALUS project which enables the execution of the post marketing safety analysis studies on top of existing EHR systems. PMID:23751263

  19. Towards Networked Knowledge: The Learning Registry, an Infrastructure for Sharing Online Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ashley; Hobson, Joe; Bienkowski, Marie; Midgley, Steve; Currier, Sarah; Campbell, Lorna M.; Novoselova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an open-source, open-data digital infrastructure for sharing information about open educational resources (OERs) across disparate systems and platforms. The Learning Registry, which began as a project funded by the U.S. Departments of Education and Defense, currently has an active international community…

  20. Establishment of electronic chart-based stroke registry system in a medical system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chang, Chien-Hung; Chang, Yeu-Jhy; Chang, Ku-Chou; Chung, Jacky

    2011-08-01

    To establish a prospective, real-time, self-sustainable stroke registry system, we incorporated a registry with an electronic chart to create an electronic chart-based stroke registry system in November 2006. The International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision code (430-437) was used to auto-enroll stroke patients admitted to neurology departments. Clinical information was written by doctors, nursing information was recorded by nurses, and basic patient information was entered by administrative departments. Numerical data and the date and time of any studies were auto-downloaded from the hospital computer. In total, 212 items were auto-downloaded, including basic patient information, laboratory blood test and examination results, and the date and time of imaging and special intervention. The stroke scales (121 items, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel index, and modified Rankin scale) were designed to be auto-adjusted to reduce incompatibility. The 95 items with pull-down options were used to specify the contents. This registry system can be time-, labor- and money-saving with secured data accuracy.

  1. A federated semantic metadata registry framework for enabling interoperability across clinical research and care domains.

    PubMed

    Sinaci, A Anil; Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce B

    2013-10-01

    In order to enable secondary use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) by bridging the interoperability gap between clinical care and research domains, in this paper, a unified methodology and the supporting framework is introduced which brings together the power of metadata registries (MDR) and semantic web technologies. We introduce a federated semantic metadata registry framework by extending the ISO/IEC 11179 standard, and enable integration of data element registries through Linked Open Data (LOD) principles where each Common Data Element (CDE) can be uniquely referenced, queried and processed to enable the syntactic and semantic interoperability. Each CDE and their components are maintained as LOD resources enabling semantic links with other CDEs, terminology systems and with implementation dependent content models; hence facilitating semantic search, much effective reuse and semantic interoperability across different application domains. There are several important efforts addressing the semantic interoperability in healthcare domain such as IHE DEX profile proposal, CDISC SHARE and CDISC2RDF. Our architecture complements these by providing a framework to interlink existing data element registries and repositories for multiplying their potential for semantic interoperability to a greater extent. Open source implementation of the federated semantic MDR framework presented in this paper is the core of the semantic interoperability layer of the SALUS project which enables the execution of the post marketing safety analysis studies on top of existing EHR systems.

  2. Search of CA Registry (1.25 Million Compounds) With the Topological Screens System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Margaret; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The TSS (Topological Screens System) for substructure search was applied to the CAS Registry file making it searchable on-line. The TSS screens and the use of the screen indexes are described. Statistics on screen assignment are provided, and the strengths and weaknesses of the system are discussed. (Author/NH)

  3. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The October 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on the hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored and used at KSC.

  4. Closure of varicella-zoster virus-containing vaccines pregnancy registry - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Willis, English D; Marko, Ann; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Bialek, Stephanie R; Dana, Adrian

    2014-08-22

    Vaccines that contain live attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) (Varivax, ProQuad, and Zostavax [all products of Merck & Co., Inc.]) are contraindicated during pregnancy. To monitor the pregnancy outcomes of women inadvertently vaccinated with VZV-containing vaccines immediately before or during pregnancy, Merck and CDC established the Merck/CDC Pregnancy Registry for VZV-Containing Vaccines in 1995. This report updates previously published summaries of registry data, provides the rationale for the closure of the registry, and describes plans for continued monitoring of the safety of these vaccines when inadvertently administered to pregnant women or immediately before pregnancy. From inception of the registry in 1995 through March 2012, no cases of congenital varicella syndrome and no increased prevalence of other birth defects have been detected among women vaccinated within 3 months before or during pregnancy. Although a small risk for congenital varicella syndrome cannot be ruled out, the number of exposures being registered each year (approximately two varicella-susceptible women exposed during the high-risk period for congenital varicella syndrome) is now too low to improve on the current estimate of the risk.

  5. 27 CFR 29.55 - Registry of stills and distilling apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distilling apparatus. 29.55 Section 29.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Registry of stills and distilling apparatus. (a) General. Every person having possession, custody, or control of any still or distilling apparatus set up shall, immediately on its being set up, register...

  6. 27 CFR 29.55 - Registry of stills and distilling apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... distilling apparatus. 29.55 Section 29.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Registry of stills and distilling apparatus. (a) General. Every person having possession, custody, or control of any still or distilling apparatus set up shall, immediately on its being set up, register...

  7. 49 CFR 390.113 - Reasons for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Medical Examiners, as described in § 390.111. (b) FMCSA finds that there are errors, omissions, or other... Certified Medical Examiners. 390.113 Section 390.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Certified Medical Examiners § 390.113 Reasons for removal from the National Registry of Certified...

  8. 49 CFR 390.113 - Reasons for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Medical Examiners, as described in § 390.111. (b) FMCSA finds that there are errors, omissions, or other... Certified Medical Examiners. 390.113 Section 390.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Certified Medical Examiners § 390.113 Reasons for removal from the National Registry of Certified...

  9. Clinical Trial Registries Are of Minimal Use for Identifying Selective Outcome and Analysis Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Fu, Rongwei; Ogden, Lauren A.; Viswanathan, Meera S.; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine selective outcome reporting (SOR) and selective analysis reporting (SAR) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to explore the usefulness of trial registries for identifying SOR and SAR. Study Design and Setting: We selected one "index outcome" for each of three comparative effectiveness reviews…

  10. The relational clinical database: a possible solution to the star wars in registry systems.

    PubMed

    Michels, D K; Zamieroski, M

    1990-12-01

    In summary, having data from other service areas available in a relational clinical database could resolve many of the problems existing in today's registry systems. Uniting sophisticated information systems into a centralized database system could definitely be a corporate asset in managing the bottom line.

  11. National joint registry data underestimates the burden of prosthetic joint infection

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon; Zhu, Mark; Ravi, Saiprasad; Luey, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Joint registries are powerful tools for tracking outcomes following joint arthroplasty. However recent literature has exposed deficiencies in data accuracy when reporting re-operations for prosthetic joint infections (PJI), particularly when no components are changed. The aim of this study was to compare accuracy of data from the New Zealand Joint Registry (NZJR) to a multi-centre audit of hospital records to establish the rate of capture for PJI reoperations. Methods: We followed 4009 patients undergoing total knee or hip arthroplasty performed at the three tertiary referral hospitals from January 2006 to December 2008 for two years. The reoperation rate for PJIs was extracted from the NZJR. In addition, an audit of hospital records for the same patients was carried out to identify reoperations for PJI. The audit data was then compared to the NZJR data. Results: The NZJR reported a reoperation rate of 0.67% for PJI within two years of the primary arthroplasty compared to 1.1% from the audit of hospital records, giving the NZJR a sensitivity of 63%. Only 36% of washout only procedures and 58% of modular exchange procedures were captured. Surgeons were more likely to report PJIs to NZJR if they performed the primary procedure. Conclusion: National joint registry data significantly underestimates the rate of reoperation for PJI. Strategies for improving data accuracy may include revising the registry forms to include reoperation without change of components and frequent validation of national data with other databases.

  12. 78 FR 66042 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Section 3 Business Registry Pilot..., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street...

  13. [The contribution of clinical cancer registries to benefit assessments: Requirements and first results].

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Gerken, Michael; Benz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Following the adoption of the Cancer Screening and Registry Act (KFRG) to advance the development of the early detection of cancer and to promote quality assurance through Clinical Cancer Registries according to Sect. 65c SGB V, the question is raised as to what extent population-based clinical cancer registries may contribute not only to direct patient treatment benefits, but also to the requirements of health research and to other issues such as, for example, the evaluation of the benefit of new pharmaceutical products. Efforts to improve a nationwide quality management for oncology have so far not been successful in the development of comprehensive documentation at all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they must be accompanied by valid trans-sectorial documentation and evaluation of clinical data. The need for specific real-life outcomes (effectiveness) of specific therapies has led to calls for data from outside randomised clinical trials (efficacy). First results are demonstrated in the present article. PMID:27320026

  14. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Late-Onset Smoking in the Vietnam Era Twin Registry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenen, Karestan C.; Hitsman, Brian; Lyons, Michael J.; Stroud, Laura; Niaura, Raymond; McCaffery, Jeanne; Goldberg, Jack; Eisen, Seth A.; True, William; Tsuang, Ming

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have consistently reported associations between smoking and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study analyzed diagnostic interview data on 6,744 members of the Vietnam Era Twin Registry to clarify the PTSD-smoking relation and to examine whether genetic liability for smoking moderated this relation.…

  15. 28 CFR 51.32 - Establishment and maintenance of registry of interested individuals and groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of interested individuals and groups. 51.32 Section 51.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS... interested individuals and groups. The Attorney General shall establish and maintain a Registry of...

  16. 78 FR 1825 - Notice of Establishment of an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Stakeholder Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Establishment of an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Stakeholder Registry AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION..., Acting Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. BILLING CODE 3410-34-P...

  17. [Performance of record linkage for cancer registry data linked with mammography screening data].

    PubMed

    Giersiepen, K; Bachteler, T; Gramlich, T; Reiher, J; Schubert, B; Novopashenny, I; Schnell, R

    2010-07-01

    The evaluation of the German Mammography Screening Program requires record linkage with data from cancer registries in order to measure the number of false-negative mammograms and interval cancers. This study aims at evaluating the performance of the established linkage method based on identifiers encrypted by the standard procedure of the German cancer registries. In addition, the results are compared with an alternative method based on plain text identifiers. A total of 16,572 records from the Bremen Mammography Screening Pilot Study were linked with data from the Bremen Cancer Registry. Based on a gold standard set of matching record pairs, homonym and synonym errors were determined. Given the customary threshold value in cancer registries, the plain text method showed a lower rate of synonym errors (2.1-5.1%) and a lower rate of homonym errors (0.01-0.15%). As 10.4 million women are invited to take part biennially in screening, the corresponding figures would be 3,237 homonym errors for the standard procedure and 294 using the plain text method provided equivalent conditions. The 11-fold increase in the homonym error rate documents the trade-off for better data protection using encrypted data. PMID:20652484

  18. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Volume 1; Manufacturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The April 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  19. Nonspecific Mental Retardation in British Columbia as Ascertained through a Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Diana S.; Baird, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Findings from the British Columbia Health Surveillance Registry revealed information about the age specific prevalence of mental retardation with no known etiology; association of mild and profound retardation with microcephalus, hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, or epilepsy; and survival rates. (Author/CL)

  20. Self Instructional Manual for Tumor Registrars: Book 1, Objectives and Functions of a Tumor Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Cancer Inst. (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The programed text is designed to provide tumor registrars with a means of learning the procedures for abstracting charts of cancer patients and for carrying out the other functions of a tumor registry. It was developed as an adjunct to on-the-job training for use without direct instructor supervision. Directions and suggestions for using the…

  1. Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The January 1998 revision of the Index of Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  2. 78 FR 44625 - Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... June 5, 2013 (78 FR 33894), and posting the draft questionnaire that was the subject of that notice, on... 5, 2013, VA published a notice in the Federal Register (78 FR 33894) (FR Doc. 2013-13224) announcing... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard...

  3. [Leather dust and systematic research on occupational tumors: the national and regional registry TUNS].

    PubMed

    Mensi, Carolina; Sieno, Claudia; Consonni, Dario; Riboldi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The sinonasal cancer (SNC) are a rare tumors characterized by high occupational etiologic fraction. For this reason their incidence and etiology can be actively monitored by a dedicated cancer registry. The National Registry of these tumours is situated at the Italian Institute for Occupational Safety and Prevention (ISPESL) and is based on Regional Operating Centres (ROCs). In Lombardy Region the ROC has been established at the end of 2007 with the purpose to make a systematic surveillance and therefore to support in the most suitable way the scientific research and the prevention actions in the high risk working sectors. The aims of this surveillance are: to estimate the regional incidence of SNC, to define different sources of occupational and environmental exposure both known (wood, leather, nickel, chromium) and unknown. The registry collects all the new incident cases of epithelial SNC occurring in residents in Lombardy Region since 01.01.2008. The regional Registry is managed according to National Guidelines. Until January 2010 we received 596 cases of suspected SNC; only 91 (15%) of these were actually incident cases according to the inclusion criteria of the Registry, and they were preferentially adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma. In 2008 the regional age-standardized incidence rate of SNC for males and females, respectively, is 0.8 and 0.5 per 100,000. Occupational or environmental exposure to wood or leather dust is ascertained in over the 50% of cases. The occupational exposure to leather dust was duo to work in shoe factories. Our preliminary findings confirm that occupational exposure to wood and leather dusts are the more relevant risk factors for SNC. The study of occupational sectors and job activity in cases without such exposure could suggest new etiologic hypothesis.

  4. Challenges and future directions of the T1D Exchange Clinic Network and registry.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kellee M; Xing, Dongyuan; Tamborlane, William V; Bergenstal, Richard M; Beck, Roy W

    2013-07-01

    The T1D Exchange Clinic Network consists of 67 clinics throughout the United States. Among the more than 100,000 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who receive care at these centers, more than 26,000 have been enrolled in a registry. The registry includes participants over a wide age range, from age <1 to 93 years, and consists of both those newly diagnosed (more than 3000 diagnosed <1 year from the time of enrollment) and those with long-standing diabetes (more than 1000 with T1DM for at least 40 years). Data on diabetes history, insulin administration, diabetes management, monitoring, complications, medical conditions, medications, and laboratory results are collected at enrollment and annually through participant completion of Web-based questionnaires and data extraction from medical records. The clinic registry has provided a rich data set to address important clinical and public health issues, including important observations regarding the current state of treatment of T1DM in diabetes centers in the United States. Challenges encountered during the establishment of the clinic registry include establishment of criteria for a diagnosis of presumed autoimmune T1DM, standardization of data collected across clinics, data quality, and understanding of potential bias. Collecting the data and maximizing data quality has required considerable effort. Even with these efforts, certain data elements are difficult to capture in a meaningful way. A standard T1DM module used by all electronic health records could be developed based on the data collection instruments developed for the T1D Exchange clinic registry.

  5. Childhood diabetes in the Nordic countries: a comparison of quality registries.

    PubMed

    Hanberger, Lena; Birkebaek, Niels; Bjarnason, Ragnar; Drivvoll, Ann Kristin; Johansen, Anders; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Thorsson, Arni V; Samuelsson, Ulf

    2014-07-01

    In 2008 a Nordic collaboration was established between the quality registries in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden to improve quality of care for children with diabetes. This study aimed to describe those registries and confirm that the registry variables are comparable. Selected variables were used to demonstrate outcome measurements. The organization of the registries and methodology are described. Cross-sectional data for patients between birth and 14.9 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus in 2009 (n = 6523) from 89 centers were analyzed. Variables were age, gender, and diabetic ketoacidosis at onset, together with age, gender, HbA1c, insulin regimen, and severe hypoglycemia at follow-up in 2009. All 4 registries use a standardized registration at the onset of diabetes and at follow-up, conducted at the local pediatric diabetes centers. Methods for measuring HbA1c varied as did methods of registration for factors such as hypoglycemia. No differences were found between the outcomes of the clinical variables at onset. Significant variations were found at follow-up for mean HbA1c, the proportion of children with HbA1c < 57 mmol/mol (NGSP/DCCT 7.4%), (range 15-31%), the proportion with insulin pumps (range 34-55%), and the numbers with severe hypoglycemia (range 5.6-8.3/100 patient years). In this large unselected population from 4 Nordic countries, a high proportion did not reach their treatment target, indicating a need to improve the quality of pediatric diabetes care. International collaboration is needed to develop and harmonize quality indicators and offers possibilities to study large geographic populations, identify problems, and share knowledge. PMID:24876421

  6. United Kingdom Carotid Artery Stent Registry: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Goode, S. D. Cleveland, T. J.; Gaines, P. A.

    2013-10-15

    Background: Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has evolved to treat carotid artery disease with the intention of prevent stroke. The British Society of Interventional Radiologists developed a voluntary registry to monitor the practice of this novel procedure. We present the data from the United Kingdom (UK) CAS registry for short and long-term outcomes for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods: The UK CAS registry collected data from 1998 to 2010 from 31 hospitals across the UK for 1,154 patients. All interventions were enrolled in the registry for both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Initial entry forms were completed for each patient entered with data including indications, demographic data, CAS data (including stents and protection device details) and 30-day outcomes. Complications were documented. Follow-up data were collected at yearly intervals. Results: Nine hundred fifty-three (83 %) symptomatic and 201 (17 %) asymptomatic patients were enrolled into the registry. The 30-day all stroke and death rates for symptomatic patients were 5.5 and 2.2 % for those with asymptomatic disease. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.7 % for symptomatic and 0.6 % for asymptomatic patients. For symptomatic patients undergoing CAS, the 7-year all-cause mortality rate was 22.2 % and for asymptomatic patients 18.1 %. The 7-year all-cause mortality and disabling stroke rates were 25.3 and 19.4 %, respectively. Conclusion: These data indicate that outside of the tight constraints of a randomised trial, CAS provides effective prophylaxis against stroke and death.

  7. Ethical issues involved in establishing a registry for familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Godard, B; Knoppers, B M; Glass, K; Grenon, M; Bouchard, R; Bouvier, M; Goulet, J; Gauvreau, D

    1994-01-01

    In January 1992, the IMAGE Project extended the establishment of its registry of familial Alzheimer cases to all areas of the province of Quebec, for collection of epidemiological and clinical data, as well as biological samples. The aim is to study genetic transmission patterns of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to provide a sampling framework for further etiologic and risk factor studies. The IMAGE registry already includes data of a population-based study in the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean area; the project to collect data on familial AD (FAD) cases across the province of Quebec is known as the ALGENE Initiative. The registry is thus a collection of "AD families" for both familial and sporadic cases. The establishment of the registry involves several steps in the field work: recruitment and selection of families; collection of information on family medical history; selection of informative families and genetic testing for AD/FAD by linkage analysis. As AD is not homogeneous in its etiology and since we do not know if, in the event that genetics is involved in AD whether or not penetrance of the gene(s) is high, we must be aware of the "genetic horizons" of AD in collecting and conserving data on families of cases, and in the genetic testing for AD/FAD by linkage analysis. Families who choose genetic testing must be aware of the implications of our undertaking, assured of the confidentiality of the test and, at the same time, they must understand its limitations. The experimental nature of our research project raises ethical dilemmas. This article examines these initial considerations of the field work involved in developing a registry pertaining to genetic testing for AD/FAD by linkage analysis and offers some preliminary observations on the experience of the first year of this project.

  8. If you build a rare disease registry, will they enroll and will they use it? Methods and data from the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Kissel, John T.; Luebbe, Elizabeth A.; Martens, William B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Sanders, Donald B.; Tawil, Rabi; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Registries are becoming increasingly important for rare diseases as experimental therapies develop. This report describes the methodology behind the National Registry of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) Patients and Family Members to facilitate the development of other rare disease registries. We also highlight data about the pathophysiology and select burdens of DM and FSHD reported at baseline and longitudinally. Methods The Registry consists of de-identified, patient reported information collected at baseline and annually and information from review of medical records. Investigators can use the Registry to analyze de-identified data and to facilitate recruitment into clinical studies. Results To date, the Registry has enrolled 1611 members, facilitated 24 studies, and collected data annually for up to 8 years. Genetic test results were obtained in 56.2% of enrollees. Approximately one-third of members used assistive devices and another one-third reported psychological problems at baseline. Wheelchair use was reported for both short and long distances by 7.0% of DM and 18.1% of FSHD members. Approximately 60% of members reported their employment was affected by their disease. Conclusions Strengths of the Registry include large sample sizes, stringent review of clinical and molecular data, annually updated information, and regular interactions between patients and investigators. Registry data provide new insights into the burdens of DM and FSHD, such as, psychological problems and reduced employment. Opportunities abound for investigators to utilize Registry resources to assess the impact of these and other burdens on health care costs, progression of symptoms, and quality of life. PMID:22155025

  9. Insights from the early experience of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry.

    PubMed

    Rumsfeld, John S; Holmes, David R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Edwards, Fred H; Jacques, Louis B; Mack, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The current system for postmarket surveillance of medical devices in the United States is limited. To help change this paradigm for transcatheter valve therapies (TVTs), starting with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology partnered to form the TVT Registry program in close collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The goal of the TVT Registry is to measure and improve quality of care and patient outcomes in clinical practice and to have a pivotal role in the scientific evidence and surveillance for medical devices. Challenges were faced in the early experience of the registry included developing multistakeholder partnerships, data collection requirements, and the use of the registry for pre- and post-market device evaluations. In addressing these challenges, the TVT Registry demonstrates that it is feasible for professional societies to assume a pivotal role in pre- and/or post-market studies, leveraging a clinical registry infrastructure. Sharing the TVT Registry experience may help other professional societies and stakeholders better anticipate and plan for these challenges. PMID:25703888

  10. Acromegaly according to the Danish National Registry of Patients: how valid are ICD diagnoses and how do patterns of registration affect the accuracy of registry data?

    PubMed Central

    Dal, Jakob; Skou, Nikolaj; Nielsen, Eigil Husted; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Pedersen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of acromegaly is uncertain, since population-based studies are few. In the absence of a specific acromegaly registry, the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) becomes a potential source of data for studying the epidemiology of acromegaly, by linking all hospital discharge diagnoses to the personal identification numbers of individual Danish inhabitants. The validity of the DNRP with respect to acromegaly, however, remains to be tested. The aim of this study was to validate the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for acromegaly (ICD-8: 25300, 25301. ICD-10: E22.0) as used in the DNRP, and to assess the influence of various registration patterns on the accuracy of registry data. Methods We identified patients registered with ICD codes for the diagnosis of acromegaly or other pituitary disorders during the period 1991–2009. Data on the institutional origin of each registration and the number of relevant DNRP registrations were recorded, and systematic patient chart reviews were performed to confirm the diagnosis. Results In total, 110 cases of acromegaly were confirmed, compared with 275 registered cases, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 40%. When restricting the search to the regional highly specialized department of endocrinology, the PPV increased to 53% with no loss of cases with confirmed acromegaly. With a requirement of at least one, two, or three DNRP registrations, the PPV increased, but with a concurrent loss of confirmed cases. Conclusion The DNRP seems to be a useful source for identifying new cases of acromegaly, especially when restricting the search to a relevant regional highly specialized department. The PPV of DNRP data used for this purpose can be increased by including only cases with several registrations. A similar approach may be successfully applied to other rare diseases in which continuity of care is provided by highly specialized departments. PMID:25210475

  11. A population-based registry as a source of health indicators for rare diseases: the ten-year experience of the Veneto Region’s rare diseases registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although rare diseases have become a major public health issue, there is a paucity of population-based data on rare diseases. The aim of this epidemiological study was to provide descriptive figures referring to a sizable group of unrelated rare diseases. Methods Data from the rare diseases registry established in the Veneto Region of north-east Italy (population 4,900,000), referring to the years from 2002 to 2012, were analyzed. The registry is based on a web-based system accessed by different users. Cases are enrolled by two different sources: clinicians working at Centers of expertise officially designated to diagnose and care patients with rare diseases and health professionals working in the local health districts. Deaths of patients are monitored by Death Registry. Results So far, 19,547 patients with rare diseases have been registered, and 23% of them are pediatric cases. The overall raw prevalence of the rare diseases monitored in the population under study is 33.09 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 32.56-33.62), whilst the overall incidence is 3.85 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 3.67-4.03). The most commonly-recorded diagnoses belong to the following nosological groups: congenital malformations (Prevalence: 5.45/10,000), hematological diseases (4.83/10,000), ocular disorders (4.47/10,000), diseases of the nervous system (3.51/10,000), and metabolic disorders (2,95/10,000). Most of the deaths in the study population occur among pediatric patients with congenital malformations, and among adult cases with neurological diseases. Rare diseases of the central nervous system carry the highest fatality rate (71.36/1,000). Rare diseases explain 4.2% of general population Years of Life Lost (YLLs), comparing to 1.2% attributable to infectious diseases and 2.6% to diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Our estimates of the burden of rare diseases at population level confirm that these conditions are a relevant public health issue. Our snapshot of their epidemiology

  12. The 2008 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report-a précis.

    PubMed

    Stel, Vianda S; van de Luijtgaarden, Moniek W M; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J

    2011-02-01

    Background. This study provides a summary of the 2008 ERA-EDTA Registry Report (this report is available at www.era-edta-reg.org).Methods. The data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) were available from 55 national and regional registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Datasets with individual patient data were received from 36 registries, whereas 19 registries contributed data in aggregated form. We presented incidence and prevalence of RRT, and transplant rates. Survival analysis was solely based on individual patient records.Results. In 2008, the overall incidence rate of RRT for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among all registries reporting to the ERA-EDTA Registry was 122 per million population (pmp), and the prevalence was 644 pmp. Incidence rates varied from 264 pmp in Turkey to 15 pmp in Ukraine. The mean age of patients starting RRT in 2008 ranged from 69 years in Dutch-speaking Belgium to 44 years in Ukraine. The highest prevalence of RRT for ESRD was reported by Portugal (1408 pmp) and the lowest by Ukraine (89 pmp). The prevalence of haemodialysis on 31 December 2008 ranged from 66 pmp (Ukraine) to 875 pmp (Portugal) and the prevalence of peritoneal dialysis from 8 pmp (Montenegro) to 115 pmp (Denmark). In Norway, 70% of the patients on RRT on 31 December 2008 were living with a functioning graft (572 pmp). In 2008, the number of transplants performed pmp was highest in Spain (Catalonia) (64 pmp), whereas the highest transplant rates with living-donor kidneys were reported from the Netherlands (25 pmp) and Norway (21 pmp). In the cohort 1999-2003, the unadjusted 1-, 2- and 5-year survival of patients on RRT was 80.8% (95% CI: 80.6-81.0), 69.1% (95% CI: 68.9-69.3) and 46.1% (95% CI: 45.9-46.3), respectively.

  13. Evolution of Web Services in EOSDIS: Search and Order Metadata Registry (ECHO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Lowe, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    During 2005 through 2008, NASA defined and implemented a major evolutionary change in it Earth Observing system Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to modernize its capabilities. This implementation was based on a vision for 2015 developed during 2005. The EOSDIS 2015 Vision emphasizes increased end-to-end data system efficiency and operability; increased data usability; improved support for end users; and decreased operations costs. One key feature of the Evolution plan was achieving higher operational maturity (ingest, reconciliation, search and order, performance, error handling) for the NASA s Earth Observing System Clearinghouse (ECHO). The ECHO system is an operational metadata registry through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA's Earth science data and services. ECHO contains metadata for 2,726 data collections comprising over 87 million individual data granules and 34 million browse images, consisting of NASA s EOSDIS Data Centers and the United States Geological Survey's Landsat Project holdings. ECHO is a middleware component based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The system is comprised of a set of infrastructure services that enable the fundamental SOA functions: publish, discover, and access Earth science resources. It also provides additional services such as user management, data access control, and order management. The ECHO system has a data registry and a services registry. The data registry enables organizations to publish EOS and other Earth-science related data holdings to a common metadata model. These holdings are described through metadata in terms of datasets (types of data) and granules (specific data items of those types). ECHO also supports browse images, which provide a visual representation of the data. The published metadata can be mapped to and from existing standards (e.g., FGDC, ISO 19115). With ECHO, users can find the metadata stored in the data registry and then access the data either

  14. A global patient outcomes registry: Cochlear paediatric implanted recipient observational study (Cochlear™ P-IROS)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data concerning the long-term outcomes, educational placement and quality of life of children implanted with hearing devices from large and representative samples of the population. To address this concern, a large, prospective, multicentre, multinational patient-outcomes registry for paediatric recipients of implantable hearing devices was developed. The benefits of this registry, its approach and methodology are described. Methods/Design The Cochlear™ Paediatric Implanted Recipient Observational Study (Cochlear P-IROS) is a prospective international patient-outcomes registry for children who are implanted in routine clinical practice with one or more hearing devices. The study aims to collect data on patient comorbidities, device use, auditory performance, quality of life and health-related utilities, across different types of implantable hearing devices from a range of manufacturers. Patients will be evaluated with a set of standardised and non-standardised questionnaires prior to initial device activation (baseline) and at six-monthly follow-up intervals up to 24 months and annually thereafter. The Cochlear P-IROS utilises a secure web interface to administer electronic case report forms to clinicians and families of implanted children. The web interface is currently available in five languages: English, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin and Russian. The interface also provides printable versions of the case report forms translated into 22 local languages for collection of data prior to entry online; additional languages may be added, as required. Participation in the Cochlear P-IROS registry is investigator-driven and voluntary. To date, the Cochlear P-IROS has recruited implant clinics across Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Turkey and Vietnam. The registry also aims to recruit multiple clinics in Cuba, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea and Russia. Discussion The use of a registry such as

  15. [Influence of the pelvic trauma registry of the DGU on treatment of pelvic ring fractures].

    PubMed

    Holstein, J H; Stuby, F M; Herath, S C; Culemann, U; Aghayev, E; Pohlemann, T

    2016-06-01

    Fractures of the pelvic ring are comparatively rare with an incidence of 2-8 % of all fractures depending on the study in question. The severity of pelvic ring fractures can be very different ranging from simple and mostly "harmless" type A fractures up to life-threatening complex type C fractures. Although it was previously postulated that high-energy trauma was necessary to induce a pelvic ring fracture, over the past decades it became more and more evident, not least from data in the pelvic trauma registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), that low-energy minor trauma can also cause pelvic ring fractures of osteoporotic bone and in a rapidly increasing population of geriatric patients insufficiency fractures of the pelvic ring are nowadays observed with no preceding trauma.Even in large trauma centers the number of patients with pelvic ring fractures is mostly insufficient to perform valid and sufficiently powerful monocentric studies on epidemiological, diagnostic or therapeutic issues. For this reason, in 1991 the first and still the only registry worldwide for the documentation and evaluation of pelvic ring fractures was introduced by the Working Group Pelvis (AG Becken) of the DGU. Originally, the main objectives of the documentation were epidemiological and diagnostic issues; however, in the course of time it developed into an increasingly expanding dataset with comprehensive parameters on injury patterns, operative and conservative therapy regimens and short-term and long-term outcome of patients. Originally starting with 10 institutions, in the meantime more than 30 hospitals in Germany and other European countries participate in the documentation of data. In the third phase of the registry alone, which was started in 2004, data from approximately 15,000 patients with pelvic ring and acetabular fractures were documented. In addition to the scientific impact of the pelvic trauma registry, which is reflected in the numerous national and

  16. Study protocol of a multicenter registry of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting biologic therapy in Japan: Tsurumai Biologics Communication Registry (TBCR) study.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Toshihisa; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hisato; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Takagi, Hideki; Yabe, Yuichiro; Kato, Takefumi; Ito, Takayasu; Terabe, Kenya; Fukaya, Naoki; Kanayama, Yasuhide; Shioura, Tomone; Funahashi, Koji; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Kato, Daizo; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Fujibayashi, Takayoshi; Kojima, Masayo; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-06-01

    Biologic agents have proven to be effective against rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies. However, limited follow-up periods and strict criteria for recruitment might lead to an underestimation of adverse events. To document the long-term course of patients with RA treated with biologics in clinical settings, we established the Tsurumai Biologics Communication Registry (TBCR). First, we retrospectively collected data of patients registered for any biologic PMS study or clinical trial at participating institutes. Thus far, thirteen institutes have joined the registry and 860 patients have been identified. Comparing baseline characteristics by age and initiation year of biologics, young patients had significantly less joint damage and dysfunction and a higher dose of concomitant methotrexate (MTX) compared to older patients. Older age and functional class were significantly related to the incidence of adverse events that resulted in discontinuation of the 1st biologic treatment. The TBCR is in its initial stages, and information on all patients newly starting biologic therapy at participating institutes is being collected prospectively. Differences in baseline characteristics by age and initiation year of biologics need to be carefully evaluated in order to report on drug-related survival and long-term prognosis, using follow-up data in the near future. PMID:21892671

  17. The scientific achievements of the decades in Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Kuk; Jeong, Myung Ho; Lee, Seung Hun; Sim, Doo Sun; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Young Jo

    2014-11-01

    The Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) was the first nationwide registry data collection designed to track outcomes of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These studies reflect the current therapeutic approaches and management for AMI in Korea. The results of KAMIR could help clinicians to predict the prognosis of their patients and identify better diagnostic and treatment tools to improve the quality of care. The KAMIR score was proposed to be a predictor of the prognosis of AMI patients. Triple antiplatelet therapy, consisting of aspirin, clopidogrel and cilostazol, was effective at preventing major adverse clinical outcomes. Drug-eluting stents were effective and safe in AMI patients with no increased risk of stent thrombosis. Statin therapy was effective in Korean AMI patients, including those with very low levels of low density cholesterol. The present review summarizes the 10-year scientific achievements of KAMIR from admission to outpatient care during long-term clinical follow-up.

  18. non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and occupation in Sweden: a registry based analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Linet, M S; Malker, H S; McLaughlin, J K; Weiner, J A; Blot, W J; Ericsson, J L; Fraumeni, J F

    1993-01-01

    Incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in different employment categories was evaluated from the Swedish Cancer-Environment Registry, which links cancer incidence during 1961 to 1979 with occupational information from the 1960 census. New associations were found for men employed in shoemaking and shoe repair, porcelain and earthenware industries, education, and other white collar occupations. Several findings supported associations found in other countries, including excesses among woodworkers, furniture makers, electric power plant workers, farmers, dairy workers, lorry drivers, and other land transport workers. Risks were not increased among chemists, chemical or rubber manufacturing workers, or petrochemical refinery workers. Caution must be used in drawing causal inferences from these linked registry data because information on exposure and duration of employment is not available. Nevertheless, this study has suggested new clues to possible occupational determinants of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:8431395

  19. Primary immunodeficiency disorders in the developing world: data from a hospital-based registry in India.

    PubMed

    Chinnabhandar, Vasant; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Kaul, Dinesh; Verma, I C; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2014-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are under-reported from the developing world. We present data regarding diagnosis and outcome from a hospital-based registry in India. Forty-seven patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Majority were males. Subgroups were disorders of immune dysregulation-29%, B&T-cell abnormalities-28%, predominant antibody deficiencies-23%, other well-defined immunodeficiencies-15%, and phagocyte disorders-4%. Molecular diagnosis was attempted in 12 and was positive in seven. Overall 24 children died. Only three out of 28 children needing stem cell transplant (SCT) underwent the same. Registry data highlights that molecular diagnosis and SCT are a rarity for children with PIDs in the developing world and mortality is high.

  20. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry: Improving the care of Canadian infants with biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Alison E; Schreiber, Richard A; Yanchar, Natalie; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of end-stage liver disease and liver cirrhosis in children, and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the paediatric population. There is no cure for biliary atresia; however, timely diagnosis and early infant age at surgical intervention using the Kasai portoenterostomy optimize the prognosis. Late referral is a significant problem in Canada and elsewhere. There is also a lack of standardized care practices among treating centres in this country. Biliary atresia registries currently exist across Europe, Asia and the United States. They have provided important evidence-based information to initiate changes to biliary atresia care in their countries with improvements in outcome. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry was initiated in 2013 for the purpose of identifying best standards of care, enhancing public education, facilitating knowledge translation and advocating for novel national public health policy programs to improve the outcomes of Canadian infants with biliary atresia. PMID:27398049

  1. [Trauma registries: a health priority, a strategic project for the SEMICYUC].

    PubMed

    Chico Fernández, M; García Fuentes, C; Guerrero López, F

    2013-05-01

    The most efficient approach to traumatologic disease is prevention, but physicians also must supervise care of the victims. An operational and effective trauma registry requires financial support, adequate software, a well-defined population, personnel committed to training, and a detailed process for data collection, reporting, validation and the maintenance of confidentiality. Above all, however, motivation is required. Registries can offer many benefits in relation to these highly prevalent disorders, with an impact in terms of health promotion and even advantages in the form of cost reductions, as well as relief from the suffering caused by trauma (mortality, disability)-contributing to improve the efficiency and quality of critical trauma care. The SEMICYUC has demonstrated its ability to establish and maintain records of national interest, and this should become a priority project.

  2. [The possibility of registering in the Spanish Civil Registry children born abroad from surrogate mothers].

    PubMed

    De Barrón Arniches, Paloma

    2009-01-01

    In the Spanish Civil Registry it is now possible to register "natural" children of a homosexual marriage born overseas through surrogate pregnancy. And this is despite article 10.1 of the current Spanish law regarding assisted human reproduction techniques, which declares fully null and void contracts renouncing maternal relationship, and orders imperatively that in these cases, the relationship of children is determined by birth. This article analyses and formulates a criticism regarding the Resolution of the Office of Registries and Notaries, of February 18, 2009, insisting on some relevant issues such as legal security and greater interest of the minor, in the context of the analysis of the facts of the case and the arguments put forward in the resolution.

  3. [Could the Quebec Tumor Registry be used to identify risks of occupational cancers?].

    PubMed

    De Guire, L; Armstrong, B; Case, B; Cyr, D

    1989-01-01

    Many countries have used their tumor registries to conduct studies on cancer and occupation. In the past, the Quebec Tumor Registry (QTR) has collected information on occupation of cases. The form currently in use has a space to include this information but it is not mandatory to do so. Among male cases of naso-sinusal, pleural and ocular cancer, diagnosed between 1975 and 1979, and aged 16 to 64, 72% had information on occupation. The occupation registered at the QTR and the occupation given by the case himself during epidemiological studies on bladder cancer and leukemia are respectively the same in 64% and 69% of cases. The association between mesothelioma and work in asbestos related industries was not found in the present study. Explanations and recommendations are given.

  4. Part I: The NGRI Registry: initial analyses of data collected on Connecticut insanity acquittees.

    PubMed

    Zonana, H V; Wells, J A; Getz, M A; Buchanan, J

    1990-01-01

    The NGRI Registry is a comprehensive census database collected by the Law and Psychiatry Division of the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. This longitudinal database was compiled following a systematic search of all available docket books from the superior courts and mental health records from the state hospitals in Connecticut beginning in January 1970. Detailed life span information is available for 364 insanity acquittees identified during the search. Comparative analyses with four other locales suggested that there were regional differences in diagnoses of and crimes committed by the acquittees. These initial analyses demonstrate the promise of this registry becoming one tool for collaborative research on issues relevant to law and mental health.

  5. Applicability of the Poisson distribution to model the data of the German Children's Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Westermeier, T; Michaelis, J

    1995-03-01

    Since 1980 the German Children's Cancer Registry has documented all childhood malignancies in the Federal Republic of Germany. Various statistical procedures have been proposed to identify municipalities or other geographic units with increased numbers of malignancies. Usually the Poisson distribution, which requires the malignancies to be distributed homogeneously and uncorrelated, is applied. Other discrete statistical distributions (so-called cluster distributions) like the generalized or compound Poisson distributions are applicable more generally. In this paper we present a first explorative approach to the question of whether it is necessary to use one of these cluster distributions to model the data of the German Children's Cancer Registry. In conclusion, we find no indication that the Poisson approach is insufficient. PMID:7604164

  6. The European disorder of sex development registry: a virtual research environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S F; Rodie, M; Jiang, J; Sinnott, R O

    2010-09-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a rare group of conditions which require further research. Effective research into understanding the aetiology, as well as long-term outcome of these rare conditions, requires multicentre collaboration often across national boundaries. The EU-funded EuroDSD programme (www.eurodsd.eu) is one such collaboration involving clinical centres and clinical and genetic experts across Europe. At the heart of the EuroDSD collaboration is a European DSD registry and a targeted virtual research environment (VRE) that supports the sharing of DSD data. Security, ethics and information governance are cornerstones of this infrastructure. This paper describes the infrastructure that has been developed, the inherent challenges in security, availability and dependability that must be overcome for the enterprise to succeed and provides a sample of the data that are stored in the registry along with a summary analysis of the current data sets. PMID:20501980

  7. Evaluating the Joint Theater Trauma Registry as a data source to benchmark casualty care.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T; Bridges, Elizabeth; Bibb, Sandra C

    2012-05-01

    Just as data from civilian trauma registries have been used to benchmark and evaluate civilian trauma care, data contained within the Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR) present a unique opportunity to benchmark combat care. Using the iterative steps of the benchmarking process, we evaluated data in the JTTR for suitability and established benchmarks for 24-hour mortality in casualties with polytrauma and a moderate or severe blunt traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mortality at 24 hours was greatest in those with polytrauma and a severe blunt TBI. No mortality was seen in casualties with polytrauma and a moderate blunt TBI. Secondary insults after TBI, especially hypothermia and hypoxemia, increased the odds of 24-hour mortality. Data contained in the JTTR were found to be suitable for establishing benchmarks. JTTR data may be useful in establishing benchmarks for other outcomes and types of combat injuries.

  8. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry: an epidemiologic and perioperative description of the first 2000 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels; Kraemer, Otto; Hölmich, Per; Winge, Søren; Lund, Bent; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DHAR. We describe the use of various Patient Related Outcome Measures related to non-arthritic hip patients. The 2000 procedures consisted of 56% females and 44% males. Mean age 37.5 years, mean surgical time was 86.5 min and mean traction time 50.5 min. The most frequently performed procedure was CAM and Pincer resection in 93.5% of the cases. Labral refixation or repair was done in 70.3% of the cases. The most common type of acetabular chondral damage was grade II lesions (36.6%). Grade III and IV changes were seen in 36.1% of the cases. The preoperative iHOT12 was 45 (mean) based on all 12 items. EQ-5D was 0.65 and HAGOS sub-scores were 51 (pain), 49 (symptoms), 53 (ADL), 35 (sport), 20 (physical activity) and 29, respectively. We conclude that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy report considerable pain, loss of function, reduced level of activity and reduced quality-of-life prior to surgery. The problems with development and maintaining a large clinical registry are described and further studies are needed to validate data completeness. We consider the development of a national clinical registry for hip arthroscopy as a successful way of developing and maintaining a valuable clinical and scientific tool. PMID:27583150

  9. The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS): first annual report.

    PubMed

    de By, Theo M M H; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan; Bushnaq, Hasan; Krabatsch, Thomas; Gustafsson, Finn; Leprince, Pascal; Martinelli, Luigi; Meyns, Bart; Morshuis, Michiel; Netuka, Ivan; Potapov, Evgenij; Zittermann, Armin; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-05-01

    The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS) was founded on 10 December 2009 with the initiative of Roland Hetzer (Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin, Germany) and Jan Gummert (Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany) with 15 other founding international members. It aims to promote scientific research to improve care of end-stage heart failure patients with ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart as long-term mechanical circulatory support. Likewise, the organization aims to provide and maintain a registry of device implantation data and long-term follow-up of patients with mechanical circulatory support. Hence, EUROMACS affiliated itself with Dendrite Clinical Systems Ltd to offer its members a software tool that allows input and analysis of patient clinical data on a daily basis. EUROMACS facilitates further scientific studies by offering research groups access to any available data wherein patients and centres are anonymized. Furthermore, EUROMACS aims to stimulate cooperation with clinical and research institutions and with peer associations involved to further its aims. EUROMACS is the only European-based Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support with rapid increase in institutional and individual membership. Because of the expeditious data input, the European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgeons saw the need to optimize the data availability and the significance of the registry to improve care of patients with mechanical circulatory support and its potential contribution to scientific intents; hence, the beginning of their alliance in 2012. This first annual report is designed to provide an overview of EUROMACS' structure, its activities, a first data collection and an insight to its scientific contributions. PMID:25820161

  10. Predicting outcome in traumatic brain injury: Sharing experience of pilot traumatic brain injury registry

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ranabir; Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Agrawal, Amit; Menon, Geetha R.; Galwankar, Sagar; Mohan, P. Rama; Kumar, S. Satish; Subrahmanyam, B. V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A reliable prediction of outcome for the victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on admission is possible from concurrent data analysis from any systematic real-time registry. Objective: To determine the clinical relevance of the findings from our TBI registry to develop prognostic futuristic models with readily available traditional and novel predictors. Materials and Methods: Prospectively collected data using predesigned pro forma were analyzed from the first phase of a trauma registry from a South Indian Trauma Centre, compatible with computerized management system at electronic data entry and web data entry interface on demographics, clinical, management, and discharge status. Statistical Analysis: On univariate analysis, the variables with P < 0.15 were chosen for binary logistic model. On regression model, variables were selected with test of coefficient 0.001 and with Nagelkerke R2 with alpha error of 5%. Results: From 337 cases, predominantly males from rural areas in their productive age, road traffic injuries accounted for two-thirds cases, one-fourths occurred during postmonsoon while two-wheeler was the most common prerequisite. Fifty percent of patients had moderate to severe brain injury; the most common finding was unconsciousness followed by vomiting, ear bleed, seizures, and traumatic amnesia. Fifteen percent required intracranial surgery. Patients with severe Glasgow coma scale score were 4.5 times likely to have the fatal outcome (P = 0.003). Other important clinical variables accountable for fatal outcomes were oral bleeds and cervical spine injury while imperative socio-demographic risk correlates were age and seasons. Conclusion: TBI registry helped us finding predictors of clinical relevance for the outcomes in victims of TBI in search of prognostic futuristic models in TBI victims. PMID:27722114

  11. Publication bias: the case for an international registry of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simes, R J

    1986-10-01

    A problem in evaluating different therapies from a review of clinical trials is that the published clinical trial literature may be biased in favor of positive or promising results. In this report, a model is proposed for reviewing clinical trial results which is free from publication bias based on the selection of trials registered in advance in a registry. The value of a registry is illustrated by comparing a review of published clinical trials located by a literature search with a review of registered trials contained in a cancer trials registry. Two therapeutic questions are examined: the survival impact of initial alkylating agent (AA) v combination chemotherapy (CC) in advanced ovarian cancer, and the survival impact of AA/prednisone v CC in multiple myeloma. In advanced ovarian cancer, a pooled analysis of published clinical trials demonstrates a significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (median survival ratio of CC to AA, 1.16; P = .02). However, no significant difference in survival is demonstrated based on a pooled analysis of registered trials (median survival ratio, 1.05; P = .25). For multiple myeloma, a pooled analysis of published trials also demonstrates a significant survival advantage for CC (median survival ratio, 1.26; P = 04), especially for poor risk patients (ratio, 1.66; P = .002). A pooled analysis of registered trials also shows a survival benefit for patients receiving combination chemotherapy (all patients, P = .06; poor risk, P = .03), but the estimated magnitude of the benefit is reduced (all patients: ratio, 1.11; poor risk: ratio, 1.22). These examples illustrate an approach to reviewing the clinical trial literature, which is free from publication bias, and demonstrate the value and importance of an international registry of all clinical trials.

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Children With Juvenile Dermatomyositis: The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Hoeltzel, Mark F.; Wahezi, Dawn M.; Becker, Mara L.; Kessler, Elizabeth A.; Schmeling, Heinrike; Carrasco, Ruy; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Reed, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate aspects of juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), including disease characteristics and treatment, through a national multicenter registry. Methods Subjects meeting the modified Bohan and Peter criteria for definite juvenile DM were analyzed from the cross-sectional Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry between 2010 and 2012 from 55 US pediatric rheumatology centers. Demographics, disease characteristics, diagnostic assessments, and medication exposure data were collected at enrollment. Results A total of 384 subjects met the criteria for analysis. At enrollment, the median Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score was 51 (interquartile range [IQR] 46–52), the median Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire score was 0 (IQR 0–0.5), and the median physician and subject global assessment scores were 1 (IQR 0–2) and 1 (IQR 0–3), respectively, out of a maximum of 10. Of the diagnostic assessments, magnetic resonance imaging was more likely than electromyography or muscle biopsy to show abnormalities. A total of 329 subjects had ≥2 diagnostic studies performed, and >34% of these subjects reported ≥1 negative study. Ninety-five percent had been treated with corticosteroids and 92% with methotrexate, suggesting that these medications were almost universally prescribed for juvenile DM in the US. Conclusion In 2 years, the ongoing CARRA Registry has collected clinical data on 384 children with juvenile DM and has the potential to become one of the largest juvenile DM cohorts in the world. More research is needed about prognostic factors in juvenile DM, and differences in therapy based on manifestations of disease need to be explored by practitioners. This registry provides the infrastructure needed to advance clinical and translational research and represents a major step toward improving outcomes of children with juvenile DM. PMID:23983017

  13. Renal replacement therapy in Europe: a summary of the 2012 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report

    PubMed Central

    Pippias, Maria; Stel, Vianda S.; Abad Diez, José Maria; Afentakis, Nikolaos; Herrero-Calvo, Jose Antonio; Arias, Manuel; Tomilina, Natalia; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Čala, Svjetlana; Caskey, Fergus J.; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Cernevskis, Harijs; Collart, Frederic; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón; García Bazaga, Maria de los Ángeles; De Meester, Johan; Díaz, Joan Manuel; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Ferrer Alamar, Manuel; Finne, Patrik; Garneata, Liliana; Golan, Eliezer; González Fernández, Raquel; Gutiérrez Avila, Gonzalo; Heaf, James; Hoitsma, Andries; Kantaria, Nino; Kolesnyk, Mykola; Kramar, Reinhard; Kramer, Anneke; Lassalle, Mathilde; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Lopot, Frantisek; Macário, Fernando; Magaz, Angela; Martín-Escobar, Eduardo; Metcalfe, Wendy; Noordzij, Marlies; Palsson, Runolfur; Pechter, Ülle; Prütz, Karl G.; Ratkovic, Marina; Resić, Halima; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Santiuste de Pablos, Carmen; Spustová, Viera; Süleymanlar, Gültekin; Van Stralen, Karlijn; Thereska, Nestor; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This article summarizes the 2012 European Renal Association—European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org) with a specific focus on older patients (defined as ≥65 years). Methods Data provided by 45 national or regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the Mediterranean Sea were used. Individual patient level data were received from 31 renal registries, whereas 14 renal registries contributed data in an aggregated form. The incidence, prevalence and survival probabilities of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) and renal transplantation rates for 2012 are presented. Results In 2012, the overall unadjusted incidence rate of patients with ESRD receiving RRT was 109.6 per million population (pmp) (n = 69 035), ranging from 219.9 pmp in Portugal to 24.2 pmp in Montenegro. The proportion of incident patients ≥75 years varied from 15 to 44% between countries. The overall unadjusted prevalence on 31 December 2012 was 716.7 pmp (n = 451 270), ranging from 1670.2 pmp in Portugal to 146.7 pmp in the Ukraine. The proportion of prevalent patients ≥75 years varied from 11 to 32% between countries. The overall renal transplantation rate in 2012 was 28.3 pmp (n = 15 673), with the highest rate seen in the Spanish region of Catalonia. The proportion of patients ≥65 years receiving a transplant ranged from 0 to 35%. Five-year adjusted survival for all RRT patients was 59.7% (95% confidence interval, CI: 59.3–60.0) which fell to 39.3% (95% CI: 38.7–39.9) in patients 65–74 years and 21.3% (95% CI: 20.8–21.9) in patients ≥75 years. PMID:26034584

  14. A Community-Based Hip Fracture Registry: Population, Methods, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Inacio, Maria C S; Weiss, Jennifer M; Miric, Alex; Hunt, Jessica J; Zohman, Gary L; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fracture is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. A large integrated health care system developed a registry to characterize its current patient population with hip fractures. This report describes the population, methods used, and outcomes of patients registered during the initial three years (2009–2011). Methods: Cases of hip fracture recorded from January 2009 through December 2011 were ascertained using the Kaiser Permanente Hip Fracture Registry. The registry collects information on patient, procedure, surgeon, facility, and surgical outcomes. Outcomes monitored included length of stay, readmissions, mortality, revisions, surgical site infections, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, pressure ulcers, dislocations, and myocardial infarction. Results: The population (N = 12,562) was predominantly white (77.8%), women (68.6%), and older (71.6% aged ≥ 75 years), and 32% had at least 5 comorbidities. The average length of follow-up was 1.1 years (standard deviation = 0.9). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%) and anemia (29.4%). Femoral neck fractures (54.6%) were the most common fracture type. Hemiarthroplasty was the most common procedure (33.1%). Most fractures were treated by medium-volume (10 to 29 cases per year) surgeons (68.4%) at high-volume (≥ 130 cases per year) facilities (63.0%). The 90-day readmission rate was 22.1%, and the mortality rate was 12.3%. The most common postoperative complications were pneumonia (11.4%) and pressure ulcers (2.9%). There were 2.2 revisions per 100 observation years. Conclusion: A hip fracture registry provides important information regarding patient characteristics, intraoperative practices, and postoperative outcomes, which can be analyzed, interpreted, and used to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26057682

  15. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Markel, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from October 1994 through September 1995.

  16. Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry: an epidemiologic and perioperative description of the first 2000 procedures.

    PubMed

    Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Maagaard, Niels; Kraemer, Otto; Hölmich, Per; Winge, Søren; Lund, Bent; Lind, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Danish Hip Arthroscopy Registry (DHAR) was initiated in 2012 as a web-based prospective registry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and report the epidemiologic and perioperative data of the first 2000 procedures in a Danish hip arthroscopy population and to describe the development of DHAR. We describe the use of various Patient Related Outcome Measures related to non-arthritic hip patients. The 2000 procedures consisted of 56% females and 44% males. Mean age 37.5 years, mean surgical time was 86.5 min and mean traction time 50.5 min. The most frequently performed procedure was CAM and Pincer resection in 93.5% of the cases. Labral refixation or repair was done in 70.3% of the cases. The most common type of acetabular chondral damage was grade II lesions (36.6%). Grade III and IV changes were seen in 36.1% of the cases. The preoperative iHOT12 was 45 (mean) based on all 12 items. EQ-5D was 0.65 and HAGOS sub-scores were 51 (pain), 49 (symptoms), 53 (ADL), 35 (sport), 20 (physical activity) and 29, respectively. We conclude that patients undergoing hip arthroscopy report considerable pain, loss of function, reduced level of activity and reduced quality-of-life prior to surgery. The problems with development and maintaining a large clinical registry are described and further studies are needed to validate data completeness. We consider the development of a national clinical registry for hip arthroscopy as a successful way of developing and maintaining a valuable clinical and scientific tool. PMID:27583150

  17. Rationale and design of the African group A streptococcal infection registry: the AFROStrep study

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dylan D; Engel, Mark E; Whitelaw, Andrew; Alemseged, Abdissa; Sadoh, Wilson E; Ali, Sulafa K M; Sow, Samba O; Dale, James; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS), a Gram-positive bacterium, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes, causes pyoderma, pharyngitis and invasive disease. Repeated GAS infections may lead to autoimmune diseases such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Invasive GAS (iGAS) disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The burden of GAS infections is, however, unknown in Africa because of lack of surveillance systems. Methods and analysis The African group A streptococcal infection registry (the AFROStrep study) is a collaborative multicentre study of clinical, microbiological, epidemiological and molecular characteristics for GAS infection in Africa. The AFROStrep registry comprises two components: (1) active surveillance of GAS pharyngitis cases from sentinel primary care centres (non-iGAS) and (2) passive surveillance of iGAS disease from microbiology laboratories. Isolates will also be subjected to DNA isolation to allow for characterisation by molecular methods and cryopreservation for long-term storage. The AFROStrep study seeks to collect comprehensive data on GAS isolates in Africa. The biorepository will serve as a platform for vaccine development in Africa. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for the AFROStrep registry has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Cape Town (HREC/REF: R006/2015). Each recruiting site will seek ethics approval from their local ethics’ committee. All participants will be required to provide consent for inclusion into the registry as well as for the storage of isolates and molecular investigations to be conducted thereon. Strict confidentiality will be applied throughout. Findings and updates will be disseminated to collaborators, researchers, health planners and colleagues through peer-reviewed journal articles, conference publications and proceedings. PMID:26916694

  18. The Latin American DILI Registry Experience: A Successful Ongoing Collaborative Strategic Initiative.

    PubMed

    Bessone, Fernando; Hernandez, Nelia; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J

    2016-02-29

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but well recognized serious adverse reaction. Pre-marketing studies may not detect liver injury, and DILI becomes very often apparent after the drug is launched to the market. Specific biomarkers for DILI prediction or diagnosis are not available. Toxic liver reactions present with a wide spectrum of phenotypes and severity, and our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying idiosyncratic reactions and individual susceptibility is still limited. To overcome these limitations, country-based registries and multicenter research networks have been created in Europe and North America. Reliable epidemiological data on DILI in Latin America (LA), a region with a large variety of ethnic groups, were however lacking. Fortunately, a LA network of DILI was set up in 2011, with the support of the Spanish DILI Registry from the University of Malaga. The primary aim of the Latin DILI Network (LATINDILIN) Registry was to prospectively identify bona fide DILI cases and to collect biological samples to study genetic biomarkers. Physicians involved in the project must complete a structured report form describing the DILI case presentation and follow-up which is submitted to a Coordinator Center in each country, where it is further assessed for completeness. During the last four years, several LA countries (Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia) have joined the network and committed with this project. At that point, to identify both our strengths and weaknesses was a very important issue. In this review, we will describe how the LATINDILI Registry was created. The aims and methods to achieve these objectives will be discussed in depth. Additionally, both the difficulties we have faced and the strategies to solve them will be also pinpointed. Finally, we will report on our preliminary results, and discuss ideas to expand and to keep running this network.

  19. The Latin American DILI Registry Experience: A Successful Ongoing Collaborative Strategic Initiative.

    PubMed

    Bessone, Fernando; Hernandez, Nelia; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but well recognized serious adverse reaction. Pre-marketing studies may not detect liver injury, and DILI becomes very often apparent after the drug is launched to the market. Specific biomarkers for DILI prediction or diagnosis are not available. Toxic liver reactions present with a wide spectrum of phenotypes and severity, and our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying idiosyncratic reactions and individual susceptibility is still limited. To overcome these limitations, country-based registries and multicenter research networks have been created in Europe and North America. Reliable epidemiological data on DILI in Latin America (LA), a region with a large variety of ethnic groups, were however lacking. Fortunately, a LA network of DILI was set up in 2011, with the support of the Spanish DILI Registry from the University of Malaga. The primary aim of the Latin DILI Network (LATINDILIN) Registry was to prospectively identify bona fide DILI cases and to collect biological samples to study genetic biomarkers. Physicians involved in the project must complete a structured report form describing the DILI case presentation and follow-up which is submitted to a Coordinator Center in each country, where it is further assessed for completeness. During the last four years, several LA countries (Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia) have joined the network and committed with this project. At that point, to identify both our strengths and weaknesses was a very important issue. In this review, we will describe how the LATINDILI Registry was created. The aims and methods to achieve these objectives will be discussed in depth. Additionally, both the difficulties we have faced and the strategies to solve them will be also pinpointed. Finally, we will report on our preliminary results, and discuss ideas to expand and to keep running this network. PMID:26938524

  20. The Danish National Patient Registry: a review of content, data quality, and research potential

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Morten; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Sandegaard, Jakob Lynge; Ehrenstein, Vera; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Background The Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) is one of the world’s oldest nationwide hospital registries and is used extensively for research. Many studies have validated algorithms for identifying health events in the DNPR, but the reports are fragmented and no overview exists. Objectives To review the content, data quality, and research potential of the DNPR. Methods We examined the setting, history, aims, content, and classification systems of the DNPR. We searched PubMed and the Danish Medical Journal to create a bibliography of validation studies. We included also studies that were referenced in retrieved papers or known to us beforehand. Methodological considerations related to DNPR data were reviewed. Results During 1977–2012, the DNPR registered 8,085,603 persons, accounting for 7,268,857 inpatient, 5,953,405 outpatient, and 5,097,300 emergency department contacts. The DNPR provides nationwide longitudinal registration of detailed administrative and clinical data. It has recorded information on all patients discharged from Danish nonpsychiatric hospitals since 1977 and on psychiatric inpatients and emergency department and outpatient specialty clinic contacts since 1995. For each patient contact, one primary and optional secondary diagnoses are recorded according to the International Classification of Diseases. The DNPR provides a data source to identify diseases, examinations, certain in-hospital medical treatments, and surgical procedures. Long-term temporal trends in hospitalization and treatment rates can be studied. The positive predictive values of diseases and treatments vary widely (<15%–100%). The DNPR data are linkable at the patient level with data from other Danish administrative registries, clinical registries, randomized controlled trials, population surveys, and epidemiologic field studies – enabling researchers to reconstruct individual life and health trajectories for an entire population. Conclusion The DNPR is a valuable

  1. Positive predictive value of the infant respiratory distress syndrome diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Olsen, Morten; Christian, Fynbo Christiansen

    2013-01-01

    Background Infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) is the most common respiratory disease in preterm infants, and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Valid data on IRDS are important in clinical epidemiological research. Objectives The objective of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value (PPV) of the IRDS diagnosis registered in the population-based Danish National Patient Registry according to the International Classification of Diseases, 8th and 10th revisions. Methods Between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008, we randomly selected three patients per year, 96 in total, who were registered with an IRDS diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry and living in the northern part of Denmark. Data on the infants included information on the presence of predefined clinical symptoms. We defined IRDS as the presence of at least two of four clinical symptoms (tachypnea, retractions or nasal flaring, grunting, and central cyanosis), which had to be present for more than 30 minutes. Using medical record review as the reference standard, we computed the positive predictive value of the registered IRDS diagnosis including 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We located the medical record for 90 of the 96 patients (94%), and found an overall PPV of the IRDS diagnosis of 81% (95% CI 72%–88%). This did not vary substantially between primary and secondary diagnoses. The PPV was higher, at 89% (95% CI 80%–95%), for preterm infants born before 37 weeks of gestation. Conclusion The PPV of the IRDS diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry is reasonable when compared with symptoms described in the corresponding medical records. The Danish National Patient Registry is a useful data source for studies of IRDS, particularly if restricted to preterm infants. Nonetheless, the potential impact of misclassification of the IRDS diagnosis must be considered. PMID:23976865

  2. Evaluation of algorithms for registry-based detection of acute myocardial infarction following percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Egholm, Gro; Madsen, Morten; Thim, Troels; Schmidt, Morten; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Maeng, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Registry-based monitoring of the safety and efficacy of interventions in patients with ischemic heart disease requires validated algorithms. Objective We aimed to evaluate algorithms to identify acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Danish National Patient Registry following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods Patients enrolled in clinical drug-eluting stent studies at the Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2006 to August 2012 were included. These patients were evaluated for ischemic events, including AMI, during follow-up using an end point committee adjudication of AMI as reference standard. Results Of 5,719 included patients, 285 patients suffered AMI within a mean follow-up time of 3 years after stent implantation. An AMI discharge diagnosis (primary or secondary) from any acute or elective admission had a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 93%, and a positive predictive value of 42%. Restriction to acute admissions decreased the sensitivity to 94% but increased the specificity to 98% and the positive predictive value to 73%. Further restriction to include only AMI as primary diagnosis from acute admissions decreased the sensitivity further to 82%, but increased the specificity to 99% and the positive predictive value to 81%. Restriction to patients admitted to hospitals with a coronary angiography catheterization laboratory increased the positive predictive value to 87%. Conclusion Algorithms utilizing additional information from the Danish National Patient Registry yield different sensitivities, specificities, and predictive values in registry-based detection of AMI following PCI. We were able to identify AMI following PCI with moderate-to-high validity. However, the choice of algorithm will depend on the specific study purpose. PMID:27799822

  3. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report February 1, 2000--January 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2001-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 2000 through January 2001.

  4. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  5. The Latin American DILI Registry Experience: A Successful Ongoing Collaborative Strategic Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bessone, Fernando; Hernandez, Nelia; Lucena, M. Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare but well recognized serious adverse reaction. Pre-marketing studies may not detect liver injury, and DILI becomes very often apparent after the drug is launched to the market. Specific biomarkers for DILI prediction or diagnosis are not available. Toxic liver reactions present with a wide spectrum of phenotypes and severity, and our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying idiosyncratic reactions and individual susceptibility is still limited. To overcome these limitations, country-based registries and multicenter research networks have been created in Europe and North America. Reliable epidemiological data on DILI in Latin America (LA), a region with a large variety of ethnic groups, were however lacking. Fortunately, a LA network of DILI was set up in 2011, with the support of the Spanish DILI Registry from the University of Malaga. The primary aim of the Latin DILI Network (LATINDILIN) Registry was to prospectively identify bona fide DILI cases and to collect biological samples to study genetic biomarkers. Physicians involved in the project must complete a structured report form describing the DILI case presentation and follow-up which is submitted to a Coordinator Center in each country, where it is further assessed for completeness. During the last four years, several LA countries (Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela and Colombia) have joined the network and committed with this project. At that point, to identify both our strengths and weaknesses was a very important issue. In this review, we will describe how the LATINDILI Registry was created. The aims and methods to achieve these objectives will be discussed in depth. Additionally, both the difficulties we have faced and the strategies to solve them will be also pinpointed. Finally, we will report on our preliminary results, and discuss ideas to expand and to keep running this network. PMID:26938524

  6. The Québec BCG Vaccination Registry (1956–1992): assessing data quality and linkage with administrative health databases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination registries have undoubtedly proven useful for estimating vaccination coverage as well as examining vaccine safety and effectiveness. However, their use for population health research is often limited. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Vaccination Registry for the Canadian province of Québec comprises some 4 million vaccination records (1926-1992). This registry represents a unique opportunity to study potential associations between BCG vaccination and various health outcomes. So far, such studies have been hampered by the absence of a computerized version of the registry. We determined the completeness and accuracy of the recently computerized BCG Vaccination Registry, as well as examined its linkability with demographic and administrative medical databases. Methods Two systematically selected verification samples, each representing ~0.1% of the registry, were used to ascertain accuracy and completeness of the electronic BCG Vaccination Registry. Agreement between the paper [listings (n = 4,987 records) and vaccination certificates (n = 4,709 records)] and electronic formats was determined along several nominal and BCG-related variables. Linkage feasibility with the Birth Registry (probabilistic approach) and provincial Healthcare Registration File (deterministic approach) was examined using nominal identifiers for a random sample of 3,500 individuals born from 1961 to 1974 and BCG vaccinated between 1970 and 1974. Results Exact agreement was observed for 99.6% and 81.5% of records upon comparing, respectively, the paper listings and vaccination certificates to their corresponding computerized records. The proportion of successful linkage was 77% with the Birth Registry, 70% with the Healthcare Registration File, 57% with both, and varied by birth year. Conclusions Computerization of this Registry yielded excellent results. The registry was complete and accurate, and linkage with administrative databases was highly feasible. This

  7. Evidence for a need to mandate kidney transplant living donor registries.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mahmoud; Ragheb, Ahmed; Hassan, Abubaker; Shoker, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Kidney disease is a global public health problem of growing proportions. Currently the best treatment for end-stage renal failure is transplantation. Living organ donation remains a complex ethical, moral and medical issue. It is based on a premise that kidney donation is associated with short-term minimal risks to harm the donor, and is outweighed by the definite advantages to the recipient. A growing number of patients with end-stage renal disease and shortage of kidney donors poses a pressing need to expand the criteria needed to accept kidney donors. The current donor registries are structured and are driven to expand donor pool. As living kidney donation is not without risks, more attention should be given to protect the donor health. After kidney donation, mild to moderate renal insufficiency may occur. Renal insufficiency, even mild, is associated with increased risks of hypertension, proteinuria and cardiovascular morbidity. We, therefore, foresee a need to mandate the establishment of renal transplant donor registries at all transplanting programs as a prerequisite to protect the long-term well being of kidney donors. These registries can collect the database necessary to develop standards of practice and guidelines for future kidney donation. PMID:18549448

  8. Existing data sources for clinical epidemiology: the Danish National Pathology Registry and Data Bank

    PubMed Central

    Erichsen, Rune; Lash, Timothy L; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen J; Bjerregaard, Beth; Vyberg, Mogens; Pedersen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic histological and cytological specimens are routinely stored in pathology department archives. These biobanks are a valuable research resource for many diseases, particularly if they can be linked to high quality population-based health registries, allowing large retrospective epidemiological studies to be carried out. Such studies are of significant importance, for example in the search for novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers in the era of personalized medicine. Denmark has a wealth of highly-regarded population-based registries that are ideally suited to conduct this type of epidemiological research. We describe two recent additions to these databases: the Danish National Pathology Registry (DNPR) and its underlying national online registration database, the Danish Pathology Data Bank (DPDB). The DNPR and the DPDB contain detailed nationwide records of all pathology specimens analyzed in Denmark since 1997, and an incomplete but nonetheless valuable record of specimens from some pathology departments dating back to the 1970s. The data are of high quality and completeness and are sufficient to allow precise and efficient localization of the specimens. We describe the relatively uncomplicated procedures required to use these pathology databases in clinical research and to gain access to the archived specimens. PMID:20865103

  9. Linking a population biobank with national health registries-the estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Leitsalu, Liis; Alavere, Helene; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Leego, Erkki; Metspalu, Andres

    2015-04-16

    The Estonian population-based biobank, with 52,000 participants' genetic and health data, is the largest epidemiological cohort in the Baltic region. Participants were recruited through a network of medical professionals throughout Estonia (population 1.34 million). Unique legislation as well as a broad consent form give the Estonian Genome Center, a research institute of the University of Tartu, permission to re-contact participants and to retrieve participants' data from national registries and databases. In addition to two re-contacting projects to update the health data of participants, extensive clinical characterizations have been retrieved from national registries and hospital databases regularly since 2010. Acquiring data from electronic health records and registries has provided a means to update and enhance the database of the Genome Center in a timely manner and at low cost. The resulting database allows a wide spectrum of genomic and epidemiological research to be conducted with the aim of benefitting public health. Future plans include linking the genome center database with the national health information system through X-road and exchanging data in real time, as well as using the genetic data and the technical infrastructure available for piloting personalized medicine in Estonia.

  10. I Brazilian Registry of Heart Failure - Clinical Aspects, Care Quality and Hospitalization Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Denilson Campos; de Souza, João David; Bacal, Fernando; Rohde, Luiz Eduardo Paim; Bernardez-Pereira, Sabrina; Berwanger, Otavio; Almeida, Dirceu Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalization in adults in Brazil. However, most of the available data is limited to unicenter registries. The BREATHE registry is the first to include a large sample of hospitalized patients with decompensated HF from different regions in Brazil. Objective Describe the clinical characteristics, treatment and prognosis of hospitalized patients admitted with acute HF. Methods Observational registry study with longitudinal follow-up. The eligibility criteria included patients older than 18 years with a definitive diagnosis of HF, admitted to public or private hospitals. Assessed outcomes included the causes of decompensation, use of medications, care quality indicators, hemodynamic profile and intrahospital events. Results A total of 1,263 patients (64±16 years, 60% women) were included from 51 centers from different regions in Brazil. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (70.8%), dyslipidemia (36.7%) and diabetes (34%). Around 40% of the patients had normal left ventricular systolic function and most were admitted with a wet-warm clinical-hemodynamic profile. Vasodilators and intravenous inotropes were used in less than 15% of the studied cohort. Care quality indicators based on hospital discharge recommendations were reached in less than 65% of the patients. Intrahospital mortality affected 12.6% of all patients included. Conclusion The BREATHE study demonstrated the high intrahospital mortality of patients admitted with acute HF in Brazil, in addition to the low rate of prescription of drugs based on evidence. PMID:26131698

  11. The CIRSE Retrievable IVC Filter Registry: Retrieval Success Rates in Practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Valenti, D; de Gregorio, M A; Minocha, J; Rimon, U; Pellerin, O

    2015-12-01

    CIRSE established a registry of retrievable filter use with the primary aim of determining the success of IVC Filter retrieval and associated complications. Secondary endpoints included filter indications, imaging strategies before retrieval, filter dwell times, and anticoagulation status. A web-based electronic registry was hosted between 01/12/2010 and 30/06/2012. Data entry occurred at the date of IVC filter retrieval and included items such as filter type, indication for filter insertion, access route, dwell time, retrieval success, complications, reasons for failed retrieval, and anticoagulation status. 671 filter retrievals were entered (male:female 333:295, mean age 55, median 57). Retrieval data were not entered in 43/671 leaving 628 patients for analysis. The 4 commonest retrievable filters used were the Celect in 182 patients, the OPTEASE in 161, ALN in 120, and Gunther Tulip in 98. Filters were inserted for absolute indications 40%, relative indications in 31%, and prophylactic in 24%, with 5% missing. Mean filter dwell time was 90 days. Filters were successfully retrieved in 576/628 patients (92%). The mean dwell time for successful retrievals was 85 days versus 145 days for unsuccessful retrievals (p = 0.001). Major complications occurred in 2 patients (0.03%). In summary, the CIRSE retrievable filter registry demonstrates a retrieval rate of 92% across a range of filter types, with a low major complication rate, reflecting current practice. There is an increase in trend of retrievable filter use for relative and prophylactic indications. PMID:25933644

  12. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    PubMed

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. PMID:27163154

  13. Internal disinhibition predicts 5‐year weight regain in the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. G.; Niemeier, H.; Wing, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Maintenance of weight loss remains elusive for most individuals. One potential innovative target is internal disinhibition (ID) or the tendency to eat in response to negative thoughts, feelings or physical sensations. Individuals high on ID do worse on average in standard behavioural treatment programmes, and recent studies suggest that disinhibition could play a significant role in weight regain. Purpose The purpose of the current study was to examine whether ID was associated with weight change over 5 years of follow‐up in the National Weight Control Registry, a registry of individuals who have successfully lost weight and maintained it. Methods From the National Weight Control Registry, 5,320 participants were examined across 5 years. Weight data were gathered annually. The disinhibition subscale of the Eating Inventory was used to calculate internal disinhibition and External Disinhibition (ED) and was collected at baseline, year 1, year 3 and year 5. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the weight loss maintained across follow‐up years 1 to 5 using ID and ED as baseline and prospective predictors. Results Internal disinhibition predicted weight regain in all analyses. ED interacted with ID, such that individuals who were high on ID showed greater weight regain if they were also higher on ED. Conclusions The ID scale could be a useful screening measure for risk of weight regain, given its brevity. Improved psychological coping could be a useful target for maintenance or booster interventions.

  14. Feasibility of creating a National ALS Registry using administrative data in the United States

    PubMed Central

    KAYE, WENDY E.; SANCHEZ, MARCHELLE; WU, JENNIFER

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty about the incidence and prevalence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as the role of the environment in the etiology of ALS, supports the need for a surveillance system/registry for this disease. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of using existing administrative data to identify cases of ALS. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) funded four pilot projects at tertiary care facilities for ALS, HMOs, and state based organizations. Data from Medicare, Medicaid, the Veterans Health Administration, and Veterans Benefits Administration were matched to data available from site-specific administrative and clinical databases for a five-year time-period (1 January 2001–31 December 2005). Review of information in the medical records by a neurologist was considered the gold standard for determining an ALS case. We developed an algorithm using variables from the administrative data that identified true cases of ALS (verified by a neurologist). Individuals could be categorized into ALS, possible ALS, and not ALS. The best algorithm had sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 85%. We concluded that administrative data can be used to develop a surveillance system/ registry for ALS. These methods can be explored for creating surveillance systems for other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24597459

  15. Classification system for the Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Case Registry and its application.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Camperlengo, Lena; Ludvigsen, Rebecca; Cottengim, Carri; Anderson, Robert N; Andrew, Thomas; Covington, Theresa; Hauck, Fern R; Kemp, James; MacDorman, Marian

    2014-07-01

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) accounted for 1 in 3 postneonatal deaths in 2010. Sudden infant death syndrome and accidental sleep-related suffocation are among the most frequently reported types of SUID. The causes of these SUID usually are not obvious before a medico-legal investigation and may remain unexplained even after investigation. Lack of consistent investigation practices and an autopsy marker make it difficult to distinguish sudden infant death syndrome from other SUID. Standardized categories might assist in differentiating SUID subtypes and allow for more accurate monitoring of the magnitude of SUID, as well as an enhanced ability to characterize the highest risk groups. To capture information about the extent to which cases are thoroughly investigated and how factors like unsafe sleep may contribute to deaths, CDC created a multistate SUID Case Registry in 2009. As part of the registry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a classification system that recognizes the uncertainty about how suffocation or asphyxiation may contribute to death and that accounts for unknown and incomplete information about the death scene and autopsy. This report describes the classification system, including its definitions and decision-making algorithm, and applies the system to 436 US SUID cases that occurred in 2011 and were reported to the registry. These categories, although not replacing official cause-of-death determinations, allow local and state programs to track SUID subtypes, creating a valuable tool to identify gaps in investigation and inform SUID reduction strategies. PMID:24913798

  16. Electronic end-of-life care registry: the Utah ePOLST initiative.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Taillac, Peter; Nangle, Barry; Henry, Maureen; Houston, Janice; Talebreza, Shaida; Finch, Leisa; Brunker, Cherie; Rajeev, Deepthi; Smith, Heidi J; North, Christie

    2013-01-01

    As a patient's end-of-life approaches, it is typical for the disease to be the focus of treatment instead of the dying patient. There is limited congruence between the care preferred by patients and the treatment actually delivered to patients during their end-of-life. The Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment Paradigm has been endorsed or is in development in all but three states and the District of Columbia in an effort to ensure that patients are provided with adequate opportunities to specify their end-of-life care preferences. However, most states are using paper forms to document these preferences which may be inaccessible when needed. We have developed an electronic end-of-life care registry that allows authorized users to store and retrieve information pertaining to patients' end-of-life care preferences. In this paper, we describe (a) the requirements identified for the registry from the users' perspective and (b) the design and development of the electronic registry. PMID:24551342

  17. Electronic End-of-Life Care Registry: the Utah ePOLST Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Taillac, Peter; Nangle, Barry; Henry, Maureen; Houston, Janice; Talebreza, Shaida; Finch, Leisa; Brunker, Cherie; Rajeev, Deepthi; Smith, Heidi J.; North, Christie

    2013-01-01

    As a patient’s end-of-life approaches, it is typical for the disease to be the focus of treatment instead of the dying patient. There is limited congruence between the care preferred by patients and the treatment actually delivered to patients during their end-of-life. The Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment Paradigm has been endorsed or is in development in all but three states and the District of Columbia in an effort to ensure that patients are provided with adequate opportunities to specify their end-of-life care preferences. However, most states are using paper forms to document these preferences which may be inaccessible when needed. We have developed an electronic end-of-life care registry that allows authorized users to store and retrieve information pertaining to patients’ end-of-life care preferences. In this paper, we describe (a) the requirements identified for the registry from the users’ perspective and (b) the design and development of the electronic registry. PMID:24551342

  18. Cancer Registries and Monitoring the Impact of Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: The Potential Role

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Mona; Goodman, Marc T.; Datta, S. Deblina; Chen, Vivien W.; Wingo, Phyllis A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent US Food and Drug Administration licensure of a prophylactic vaccine against oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, the first of its kind, poses unique challenges in postmarketing vaccine surveillance, especially in measuring vaccine effectiveness against biologic endpoints of HPV infection. Historically, the national system of population-based cancer registries in the US has provided high-quality data on cancer incidence and mortality for the most important biologic endpoints, namely, anogenital cancers and some oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancers. There also has been some data collection on cancer precursors; however, this activity has been inconsistent and of lower priority. Because effectiveness against HPV-associated cancers will not be measurable for several decades, strengthening and possibly expanding the capacity of registries to collect precancer data, which are earlier manifestations of infection, must be considered. Collecting type-specific data on HPV-associated precancers and cancers. While keeping in mind the current limitations of registry operations, they discuss resources that may be needed to implement and sustain these types of activities. PMID:18980287

  19. United States transuranium and uranium registries. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.; Ehrhart, S.M.

    1997-04-01

    This Annual Report covers the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996, and includes both scientific and administrative activities. As of September 30, 1996, the Registries had a total of 886 registrants of whom 350 were deceased and 292 classified as active. An anticipated funding cut of approximately 35% for the period beginning October 1, 1996, necessitated some staff cuts, but it is anticipated that the Registries core research will be maintained albeit at a somewhat slower pace. The Registries received approximately 60 public information requests or inquiries ranging over a wide range of topics, about a third of which came from the media or official agencies, including Congress. Specific noteworthy inquiries were received from the President`s Advisory Committee on the Gulf War Veterans with regard to uranium biokinetics and toxicity, and from the County of Los Angeles and the State of California with regard to the management and dosimetry of two separate instances of acute accidental intakes of {sup 241}Am.

  20. Using a statistical process control chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data.

    PubMed

    Myles, Zachary M; German, Robert R; Wilson, Reda J; Wu, Manxia

    2011-01-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts may be used to detect acute variations in the data while simultaneously evaluating unforeseen aberrations that may warrant further investigation by the data user. Using cancer stage data captured by the Summary Stage 2000 (SS2000) variable, we sought to present a brief report highlighting the utility of the SPC chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data. Using a county-level caseload for the diagnosis period of 2001-2004 (n=25,648), we found the overall variation of the SS2000 variable to be in control during diagnosis years of 2001 and 2002, exceeded the lower control limit (LCL) in 2003, and exceeded the upper control limit (UCL) in 2004; in situ/localized stages were in control throughout the diagnosis period, regional stage exceeded UCL in 2004, and distant stage exceeded the LCL in 2001 and the UCL in 2004. Our application of the SPC chart with cancer registry data illustrates that the SPC chart may serve as a readily available and timely tool for identifying areas of concern during the data collection and quality assessment of central cancer registry data. PMID:22223059

  1. The EMBARC European Bronchiectasis Registry: protocol for an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Stefano; Polverino, Eva; Vendrell, Montserrat; Crichton, Megan; Loebinger, Michael; Dimakou, Katerina; Clifton, Ian; van der Eerden, Menno; Rohde, Gernot; Murris-Espin, Marlene; Masefield, Sarah; Gerada, Eleanor; Shteinberg, Michal; Ringshausen, Felix; Haworth, Charles; Boersma, Wim; Rademacher, Jessica; Hill, Adam T.; Aksamit, Timothy; O'Donnell, Anne; Morgan, Lucy; Milenkovic, Branislava; Tramma, Leandro; Neves, Joao; Menendez, Rosario; Paggiaro, Perluigi; Botnaru, Victor; Skrgat, Sabina; Wilson, Robert; Goeminne, Pieter; De Soyza, Anthony; Welte, Tobias; Torres, Antoni; Elborn, J. Stuart; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the most neglected diseases in respiratory medicine. There are no approved therapies and few large-scale, representative epidemiological studies. The EMBARC (European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration) registry is a prospective, pan-European observational study of patients with bronchiectasis. The inclusion criterion is a primary clinical diagnosis of bronchiectasis consisting of: 1) a clinical history consistent with bronchiectasis; and 2) computed tomography demonstrating bronchiectasis. Core exclusion criteria are: 1) bronchiectasis due to known cystic fibrosis; 2) age <18 years; and 3) patients who are unable or unwilling to provide informed consent. The study aims to enrol 1000 patients by April 2016 across at least 20 European countries, and 10 000 patients by March 2020. Patients will undergo a comprehensive baseline assessment and will be followed up annually for up to 5 years with the goal of providing high-quality longitudinal data on outcomes, treatment patterns and quality of life. Data from the registry will be available in the form of annual reports. and will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. The European Bronchiectasis Registry aims to make a major contribution to understanding the natural history of the disease, as well as guiding evidence-based decision making and facilitating large randomised controlled trials. PMID:27730179

  2. Comparing the effectiveness of a clinical registry and a clinical data warehouse for supporting clinical trial recruitment: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-11-13

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost.

  3. Paediatric trauma and trauma care in Flanders (Belgium). Methodology and first descriptive results of the PENTA registry.

    PubMed

    Van de Voorde, Patrick; Sabbe, Marc; Calle, Paul; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Tsonaka, Roula; Christiaens, Daphne; Vantomme, Anneleen; De Jaeger, Annick; Matthys, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Paediatric injury surveillance and prevention are definite priorities for the European, Belgian, and Flemish authorities. Current available data for Flanders (Belgium) are fragmentary and out-of-date. The PENTA registry (PaEdiatric Network around TraumA) was therefore set up to obtain recent population-based data on trauma and trauma care in children and youngsters in Flanders. Data were collected prospectively in a representative sample (n = 18) of Flemish emergency departments (ED). All children (age 0-17 years) who presented at the ED in 2005 or died prehospital due to trauma were included. The registry was split into two levels. The basic A registry ('all' trauma) consisted of 30 variables, and the more exhaustive B registry ('severe trauma', defined as length of hospitalisation >48 hours, including all nonsurvivors) collected data on 291 variables. The incidence for paediatric trauma presenting at Flemish ED was approximately 119/1000/year. Further data were collected in a random sample of 7,879 cases (21.9% of 35,900 eligible patients). Of all cases, 0.8% were considered 'severe' and included in the B registry. In conclusion, the 'burden' of injury in Flanders is still enormous. PENTA provides the first population-based data about the circumstances and the extent of injury in children and youngsters for the Flemish region. In this article we present in detail the surplus value of the methods used, the difficulties encountered, and the most relevant epidemiological findings from the registry. PMID:18202851

  4. United States transuranium and uranium registries - 25 years of growth, research, and service. Annual report, April 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Toohey, R.E.; Russell, J.J.; Filipy, R.E.; Dietert, S.E.; Hunacek, M.M.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Registries originated in 1968 as the National Plutonium Registry with the name changed to the United States Transuranium Registry the following year to reflect a broader concern with the heavier actinides as well. Initially, the scientific effort of the USTR was directed towards study of the distribution and dose of plutonium and americium in occupationally exposed persons, and to assessment of the effects of exposure to the transuranium elements on health. This latter role was reassessed during the 1970`s when it was recognized that the biased cohort of the USTR was inappropriate for epidemiologic analysis. In 1978, the administratively separate but parallel United States Uranium Registry was created to carry out similar work among persons exposed to uranium and its decay products. A seven member scientific advisory committee provided guidance and scientific oversight. In 1992, the two Registries were administratively combined and transferred from the purview of a Department of Energy contractor to Washington State University under the provisions of a grant. Scientific results for the first twenty-five years of the Registries are summarized, including the 1985 publication of the analysis of the first whole body donor. Current scientific work in progress is summarized along with administrative activities for the period.

  5. When the business of nursing was the nursing business: the private duty registry system, 1900-1940.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jean C

    2012-05-31

    In the initial decades of the 20th century, most nurses worked in the private sector as private duty nurses dependent on their own resources for securing and obtaining employment with individual patients. To organize and systematize the ways in which nurses sought jobs, a structure of private duty registries, agencies which connected nurses with patients, was established via professional nurse associations. This article describes the origins of the private duty nurse labor market as the main employment field for early nurses and ways in which the private duty registry system connected nurses and patients. The impact of professional nurses associations and two registries, (New York and Chicago) illustrates how the business of nursing was carried out, including registry formation, operation, and administration. Private duty nurses are compelling examples of a previous generation of nurse entrepreneurs. The discussion identifies problems and challenges of private nursing practice via registries, including the decline and legacy of this innovative nurse role. The story of early 20th century nurse owned and operated registries provides an early and critical historical illustration of the realization of nurse power, entrepreneurship, and control over professional practice that we still learn from today.

  6. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  7. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  8. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  9. Meeting the Privacy Requirements for the Development of a Multi-Centre Patient Registry in Canada: The Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Thorogood, Nancy P.; Joshi, Phalgun B.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Craven, B. Catharine; Linassi, Gary; Fourney, Daryl R.; Kwon, Brian K.; Bailey, Christopher S.; Tsai, Eve C.; Drew, Brian M.; Ahn, Henry; Tsui, Deborah; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2013-01-01

    Privacy legislation addresses concerns regarding the privacy of personal information; however, its interpretation by research ethics boards has resulted in significant challenges to the collection, management, use and disclosure of personal health information for multi-centre research studies. This paper describes the strategy used to develop the national Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) in accordance with privacy statutes and benchmarked against best practices. An analysis of the regional and national privacy legislation was conducted to determine the requirements for each of the 31 local RHSCIR sites and the national RHSCIR office. A national privacy and security framework was created for RHSCIR that includes a governance structure, standard operating procedures, training processes, physical and technical security and privacy impact assessments. The framework meets a high-water mark in ensuring privacy and security of personal health information nationally and may assist in the development of other national or international research initiatives. PMID:23968640

  10. Towards better implementation of cancer screening in Europe through improved monitoring and evaluation and greater engagement of cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Ahti; Lönnberg, Stefan; Ponti, Antonio; Suonio, Eero; Villain, Patricia; Coebergh, Jan Willem; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Proposals to improve implementation, monitoring and evaluation of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening programmes have been developed in a European project involving scientists and professionals experienced in cancer registration (EUROCOURSE). They call for a clear and more active role for cancer registries through better interfaces with cancer screening programmes and adapting data contents of cancer registries for evaluation purposes. Cancer registries are recognised as essential for adequate evaluation of cancer screening programmes, but they are not involved in screening evaluation in several European countries. This is a key barrier to improving the effectiveness of programmes across Europe. The variation in Europe in the implementation of cancer screening offers a unique opportunity to learn from best practices in collaboration between cancer registries and screening programmes. Population-based cancer registries have experience and tools in collecting and analysing relevant data, e.g. for diagnostic and therapeutic determinants of mortality. In order to accelerate improvements in cancer control we argue that cancer registries should take co-responsibility in promoting effective screening evaluation in Europe. Additional investments are vital to further development of infrastructures and activities for screening evaluation and monitoring in the national settings and also at the pan-European level. The EUROCOURSE project also aimed to harmonise implementation of the European quality assurance guidelines for cancer screening programmes across Europe through standardising routine data collection and analysis, and definitions for key performance indicators for screening registers. Data linkage between cancer and screening registers and other repositories of demographic data and cause of death and where available clinical registers is key to implementing the European screening standards and thereby reducing the burden of disease through early detection

  11. Towards better implementation of cancer screening in Europe through improved monitoring and evaluation and greater engagement of cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Ahti; Lönnberg, Stefan; Ponti, Antonio; Suonio, Eero; Villain, Patricia; Coebergh, Jan Willem; von Karsa, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Proposals to improve implementation, monitoring and evaluation of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening programmes have been developed in a European project involving scientists and professionals experienced in cancer registration (EUROCOURSE). They call for a clear and more active role for cancer registries through better interfaces with cancer screening programmes and adapting data contents of cancer registries for evaluation purposes. Cancer registries are recognised as essential for adequate evaluation of cancer screening programmes, but they are not involved in screening evaluation in several European countries. This is a key barrier to improving the effectiveness of programmes across Europe. The variation in Europe in the implementation of cancer screening offers a unique opportunity to learn from best practices in collaboration between cancer registries and screening programmes. Population-based cancer registries have experience and tools in collecting and analysing relevant data, e.g. for diagnostic and therapeutic determinants of mortality. In order to accelerate improvements in cancer control we argue that cancer registries should take co-responsibility in promoting effective screening evaluation in Europe. Additional investments are vital to further development of infrastructures and activities for screening evaluation and monitoring in the national settings and also at the pan-European level. The EUROCOURSE project also aimed to harmonise implementation of the European quality assurance guidelines for cancer screening programmes across Europe through standardising routine data collection and analysis, and definitions for key performance indicators for screening registers. Data linkage between cancer and screening registers and other repositories of demographic data and cause of death and where available clinical registers is key to implementing the European screening standards and thereby reducing the burden of disease through early detection

  12. Re-using the DataCite Metadata Store as DOI registration proxy and IGSN registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Ulbricht, D.

    2012-12-01

    Currently a lot of work is done to stimulate the reuse of data. In joint efforts research institutions establish infrastructure to facilitate the publication of scientific datasets. To create a citable reference, these datasets must be tagged with persistent identifiers (DOIs) and described with metadata. As most data in the geosciences are derived from samples, it is crucial to be able to uniquely identify the samples from which a set of data were derived. Incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names are major obstacles for synthesis studies and re-use of data. Access to samples for re-analysis and re-appraisal is limited due to the lack of a central catalogue that allows finding a sample's archiving location. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) [1] provides solutions to the questions of unique sample identification and discovery. Use of the IGSN in digital data systems allows building linkages between the digital representation of samples in sample registries, e.g. SESAR [2], and their related data in the literature and in web accessible digital data repositories. DataCite recently decided to publish their metadata store (DataCite MDS) and accompanying software online [3]. The DataCite software allows registration of handles, deposition of metadata in an XML format, it offers a search interface, and is able to disseminate metadata via OAI-PMH. Its, REST interface allows an easy integration into institutional data work flows. For our applications at GFZ Potsdam we modified the DataCite MDS software for reuse it in two different contexts: as the DOIDB web service for data publications and as the IGSN registry web service for the registration of geological samples. The DOIDB acts as a proxy service to the DataCite Metadata Store and uses its REST-Interface for registration of DataCite DOI and associated DOI metadata. Metadata can be deposited in the DataCite or NASA DIF schema. Both schemata can be disseminated via OAI

  13. Breast Cancer Challenges and Screening in China: Lessons From Current Registry Data and Population Screening Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing-Kun; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Xin-Na; Yang, Hua-Bing; Li, Yu-Chen; Wu, Jiang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background. As one of its responses to the increasing global burden of breast cancer (BC), China has deployed a national registration and BC screening campaign. The present report describes these programs and the initial results of these national BC control strategies, highlighting the challenges to be considered. Materials and Methods. The primary BC incidence and prevalence data were obtained from the Chinese National Central Cancer Registry. MapInfo software was used to map the geographic distribution and variation. The time trends were estimated by the annual percentage of change from 2003 to 2009. The description of the screening plans and preliminary results were provided by the Ministry of Health. Results. Chinese cancer registries were primarily developed and activated in the East and Coastal regions of China, with only 12.5% of the registries located in West China. Geographic variation was noted, with the incidence of BC higher in North China than in South China and in urban areas compared with rural areas. Of great interest, these registries reported that the overall BC incidence has been increasing in China, with an earlier age of onset compared with Western countries and a peak incidence rate at age 50. In response to this increasing incidence and early age of onset, BC screening programs assessed 1.46 million women aged 35–59 years, using clinical breast examinations and ultrasound as primary screening tools between 2009 and 2011. The diagnostic rate for this screening program was only 48.0/105 with 440 cases of early stage BC. Early stage BC was detected in nearly 70% of screened patients. Subsequently, a second-generation screening program was conducted that included older women aged 35–64 years and an additional 6 million women were screened. Conclusion. The cancer registration system in China has been uneven, with a greater focus on East rather than West China. The data from these registries demonstrate regional variation, an increasing BC

  14. Design and Rationale of Gulf locals with Acute Coronary Syndrome Events (Gulf Coast) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zubaid, Mohammad; Thani, Khalid Bin; Rashed, Wafa; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Alrawahi, Najib; Ridha, Mustafa; Akbar, Mousa; Alenezi, Fahad; Alhamdan, Rashed; Almahmeed, Wael; Ouda, Hussam; Al-Mulla, Arif; Baslaib, Fahad; Shehab, Abdulla; Alnuaimi, Abdulla; Amin, Haitham; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the risk profile, management and one-year outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Gulf region of the Middle East. Subjects and Methods: The Gulf locals with acute coronary syndrome events (Gulf COAST) registry is a prospective, multinational, longitudinal, observational, cohort-based registry of consecutive citizens, from the Gulf region of the Middle East, admitted from January 2012 to January 2013 to 29 hospitals with a diagnosis of ACS. Data entered online included patient demographics, cardiovascular risk profiles, past medical history, physical findings on admission, in-hospital diagnostic tests and therapeutic management, as well as one year outcomes. Results: 3188 patients were recruited. The mean age was 60.4 ± 12.6years (range: 22-112), 2104 (66%) were males and 1084 (34%) females. The discharge diagnosis was ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in 741 (23.2%), new-onset left bundle branch block myocardial infarction (LBBBMI) in 30 (0.9%), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in 1486 (46.6%) and unstable angina in 931 (29.2%). At hospital presentation, 2105 (66%), 1779 (55.8%), 1703 (53.4%) and 740 (23.2%) had history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and active smoking, respectively. Conclusion: Patients with ACS in our region are young with very high risk profile. The Gulf COAST registry is an example of successful regional collaboration and will provide information on contemporary management of ACS in the region. PMID:25328551

  15. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world’s population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  16. Latin American Dialysis and Transplant Registry: Experience and contributions to end-stage renal disease epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Ana Maria; Rosa-Diez, Guillermo Javier; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, 634387 million people (9% of the world's population) resided in Latin America (LA), with half of those populating Brazil and Mexico. The LA Dialysis and Transplant Registry was initiated in 1991, with the aim of collecting data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) from the 20 LA-affiliated countries. Since then, the Registry has revealed a trend of increasing prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease on RRT, which is ongoing and is correlated with gross national income, life expectancy at birth, and percentage of population that is older than 65 years. In addition, the rate of kidney transplantation has increased yearly, with > 70% being performed from deceased donors. According to the numbers reported for 2013, the rates of prevalence, incidence and transplantation were (in patients per million population) 669, 149 and 19.4, respectively. Hemodialysis was the treatment of choice (90%), and 43% of the patients undergoing this treatment was located in Brazil; in contrast, peritoneal dialysis prevailed in Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala. To date, the Registry remains the only source of RRT data available to healthcare authorities in many LA countries. It not only serves to promote knowledge regarding epidemiology of end-stage renal disease and the related RRT but also for training of nephrologists and renal researchers, to improve understanding and clinical application of dialysis and transplantation services. In LA, accessibility to RRT is still limited and it remains necessary to develop effective programs that will reduce risk factors, promote early diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease, and strengthen transplantation programs. PMID:27648403

  17. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR): De-identified Case Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) is a research program studying actinide elements deposited within the human body û in persons with measurable, documented exposures to those elements. The Registries are operated by the Washington State University (WSU) College of Pharmacy, with administrative offices and laboratory facilities in Richland, Washington. The Registries are funded by a grant from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health Studies. The mission of the USTUR is to study the uptake, translocation and retention (biokinetics) and tissue dosimetry of uranium, plutonium, americium, and other actinides in occupationally exposed humans (workers), over their whole lifetime (from exposure through full lifespan), and to serve as a national and international resource for testing and improving the application of excreta monitoring and other contemporary bioassay data to predict tissue dose rates measured at autopsy. These studies are fundamental to evaluating and improving the reliability of, and confidence in, both prospective and retrospective assessments of tissue doses and risks from intakes of actinide materials through inhalation, ingestion, or contaminated wounds. Narrative, de-identified case summaries can be viewed by case number for whole body donations, partial body donations, and special studies. Possible intakes, health physics data, autopsy and pathology findings, and tissue analysis data are described. Radiochemistry data such as wet weight, ashed weight, and measured activity are reported, along with health physics data such as urine and fecal analysis results. USTUR autopsy cases are coded using the International Classisfication of Diseases (ICD) versions 9 and 10. Pathology data can be searched by these codes and viewed by relation to death and severity. [Taken from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/AboutUs/overview.html and from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/Mission/index.html and from http://www.ustur.wsu.edu/DeidentifiedData/database.html

  18. Novel Associations in Disorders of Sex Development: Findings From the I-DSD Registry

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathryn; Bryce, Jillian; Jiang, Jipu; Rodie, Martina; Sinnott, Richard; Alkhawari, Mona; Arlt, Wiebke; Audi, Laura; Balsamo, Antonio; Bertelloni, Silvano; Cools, Martine; Darendeliler, Feyza; Drop, Stenvert; Ellaithi, Mona; Guran, Tulay; Hiort, Olaf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Hughes, Ieuan; Krone, Nils; Lisa, Lidka; Morel, Yves; Soder, Olle; Wieacker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Context: The focus of care in disorders of sex development (DSD) is often directed to issues related to sex and gender development. In addition, the molecular etiology remains unclear in the majority of cases. Objective: To report the range of associated conditions identified in the international DSD (I-DSD) Registry. Design, Setting, and Patients: Anonymized data were extracted from the I-DSD Registry for diagnosis, karyotype, sex of rearing, genetic investigations, and associated anomalies. If necessary, clarification was sought from the reporting clinician. Results: Of 649 accessible cases, associated conditions occurred in 168 (26%); 103 (61%) cases had one condition, 31 (18%) had two conditions, 20 (12%) had three conditions, and 14 (8%) had four or more conditions. Karyotypes with most frequently reported associations included 45,X with 6 of 8 affected cases (75%), 45,X/46,XY with 19 of 42 cases (45%), 46,XY with 112 of 460 cases (24%), and 46,XX with 27 of 121 cases (22%). In the 112 cases of 46,XY DSD, the commonest conditions included small for gestational age in 26 (23%), cardiac anomalies in 22 (20%), and central nervous system disorders in 22 (20%), whereas in the 27 cases of 46,XX DSD, skeletal and renal anomalies were commonest at 12 (44%) and 8 (30%), respectively. Of 170 cases of suspected androgen insensitivity syndrome, 19 (11%) had reported anomalies and 9 of these had confirmed androgen receptor mutations. Conclusions: Over a quarter of the cases in the I-DSD Registry have an additional condition. These associations can direct investigators toward novel genetic etiology and also highlight the need for more holistic care of the affected person. PMID:24302751

  19. Towards a Global Service Registry for the World-Wide LHC Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Laurence; Alandes Pradillo, Maria; Di Girolamo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    The World-Wide LHC Computing Grid encompasses a set of heterogeneous information systems; from central portals such as the Open Science Grid's Information Management System and the Grid Operations Centre Database, to the WLCG information system, where the information sources are the Grid services themselves. Providing a consistent view of the information, which involves synchronising all these informations systems, is a challenging activity that has lead the LHC virtual organisations to create their own configuration databases. This experience, whereby each virtual organisation's configuration database interfaces with multiple information systems, has resulted in the duplication of effort, especially relating to the use of manual checks for the handling of inconsistencies. The Global Service Registry aims to address this issue by providing a centralised service that aggregates information from multiple information systems. It shows both information on registered resources (i.e. what should be there) and available resources (i.e. what is there). The main purpose is to simplify the synchronisation of the virtual organisation's own configuration databases, which are used for job submission and data management, through the provision of a single interface for obtaining all the information. By centralising the information, automated consistency and validation checks can be performed to improve the overall quality of information provided. Although internally the GLUE 2.0 information model is used for the purpose of integration, the Global Service Registry in not dependent on any particular information model for ingestion or dissemination. The intention is to allow the virtual organisation's configuration databases to be decoupled from the underlying information systems in a transparent way and hence simplify any possible future migration due to the evolution of those systems. This paper presents the Global Service Registry architecture, its advantages compared to the

  20. Preliminary Results of National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry Risk Factor Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The National ALS Registry is made up of two components to capture amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases: national administrative databases (Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Health Administration and Veterans Benefits Administration) and self-identified cases captured by the Registry’s web portal. This study describes self-reported characteristics of U.S. adults with ALS using the data collected by the National ALS Registry web portal risk factor surveys only from October 19, 2010 through December 31, 2013. Objective To describe findings from the National ALS Registry’s web portal risk factor surveys. Measurements The prevalence of select risk factors among adults with ALS was determined by calculating the frequencies of select risk factors—smoking and alcohol (non, current and former) histories, military service and occupational history, and family history of neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s and/or Parkinson’s. Results Nearly half of survey respondents were ever smokers compared with nearly 41% of adults nationally. Most respondents were ever drinkers which is comparable to national estimates. The majority were light drinkers. Nearly one-quarter of survey respondents were veterans compared with roughly 9% of US adults nationally. Most respondents were retired or disabled. The industries in which respondents were employed for the longest time were Professional and Scientific and Technical Services. When family history of neurodegenerative diseases in first degree relatives was evaluated against our comparison group, the rates of ALS were similar, but were higher for Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and any neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions The National ALS Registry web portal, to our knowledge, is the largest, most geographically diverse collection of risk factor data about adults living with ALS. Various characteristics were consistent with other published studies on ALS risk factors and will allow