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Sample records for regular magnetic clouds

  1. Solar reflection from a regular array of horizontally finite clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, J. A.; Harshvardhan, MR.

    1982-01-01

    The reflected flux from a regular array of 2- and 3-D clouds has been computed to estimate the effect of fractional cloud cover on albedos and the solar flux available to heat the earth's surface. The broken clouds are represented by a regular array of identical cuboids for the 3-D problem and equally spaced, infinitely long, bars for the 2-D problem. A diffusion approximation to the radiative transfer equation is used to compute the fluxes leaving each face of the cloud. Interaction between clouds is simulated by assuming diffuse exitance from the cloud faces and applying angle factors to obtain modified boundary conditions on each cloud face.

  2. Clustering, randomness, and regularity in cloud fields: 2. Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Lee, J.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1992-12-01

    During the last decade a major controversy has been brewing concerning the proper characterization of cumulus convection. The prevailing view has been that cumulus clouds form in clusters, in which cloud spacing is closer than that found for the overall cloud field and which maintains its identity over many cloud lifetimes. This "mutual protection hypothesis" of Randall and Huffman (1980) has been challenged by the "inhibition hypothesis" of Ramirez et al. (1990) which strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of cumuli must tend toward a regular distribution. A dilemma has resulted because observations have been reported to support both hypotheses. The present work reports a detailed analysis of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, and Skylab data. Both nearest-neighbor and point-to-cloud cumulative distribution function statistics are investigated. The results show unequivocally that when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distribution, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal. The strength of clustering is largest at cloud diameters of about 200-300 m, diminishing with increasing cloud diameter. In many cases, clusters of small clouds are found which are not closely associated with large clouds. As the small clouds are eliminated from consideration, the cloud field typically tends towards regularity. Thus it would appear that the "inhibition hypothesis" of Ramirez and Bras (1990) has been verified for the large clouds. However, these results are based upon the analysis of point processes. A more exact analysis also is made which takes into account the cloud size distributions. Since distinct clouds are by definition nonoverlapping, cloud size effects place a restriction upon the possible locations of clouds in the cloud field. The net effect of this analysis is that the large clouds appear to be randomly distributed, with only weak tendencies towards

  3. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  4. Clustering, randomness and regularity in cloud fields. I - Theoretical considerations. II - Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weger, R. C.; Lee, J.; Zhu, Tianri; Welch, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The current controversy existing in reference to the regularity vs. clustering in cloud fields is examined by means of analysis and simulation studies based upon nearest-neighbor cumulative distribution statistics. It is shown that the Poisson representation of random point processes is superior to pseudorandom-number-generated models and that pseudorandom-number-generated models bias the observed nearest-neighbor statistics towards regularity. Interpretation of this nearest-neighbor statistics is discussed for many cases of superpositions of clustering, randomness, and regularity. A detailed analysis is carried out of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, AVHRR, and Skylab data, showing that, when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distributions, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal.

  5. Clustering, randomness and regularity in cloud fields. I - Theoretical considerations. II - Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weger, R. C.; Lee, J.; Zhu, Tianri; Welch, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The current controversy existing in reference to the regularity vs. clustering in cloud fields is examined by means of analysis and simulation studies based upon nearest-neighbor cumulative distribution statistics. It is shown that the Poisson representation of random point processes is superior to pseudorandom-number-generated models and that pseudorandom-number-generated models bias the observed nearest-neighbor statistics towards regularity. Interpretation of this nearest-neighbor statistics is discussed for many cases of superpositions of clustering, randomness, and regularity. A detailed analysis is carried out of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, AVHRR, and Skylab data, showing that, when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distributions, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal.

  6. Clustering, randomness, and regularity in cloud fields. 4: Stratocumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Chou, J.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    To complete the analysis of the spatial distribution of boundary layer cloudiness, the present study focuses on nine stratocumulus Landsat scenes. The results indicate many similarities between stratocumulus and cumulus spatial distributions. Most notably, at full spatial resolution all scenes exhibit a decidedly clustered distribution. The strength of the clustering signal decreases with increasing cloud size; the clusters themselves consist of a few clouds (less than 10), occupy a small percentage of the cloud field area (less than 5%), contain between 20% and 60% of the cloud field population, and are randomly located within the scene. In contrast, stratocumulus in almost every respect are more strongly clustered than are cumulus cloud fields. For instance, stratocumulus clusters contain more clouds per cluster, occupy a larger percentage of the total area, and have a larger percentage of clouds participating in clusters than the corresponding cumulus examples. To investigate clustering at intermediate spatial scales, the local dimensionality statistic is introduced. Results obtained from this statistic provide the first direct evidence for regularity among large (more than 900 m in diameter) clouds in stratocumulus and cumulus cloud fields, in support of the inhibition hypothesis of Ramirez and Bras (1990). Also, the size compensated point-to-cloud cumulative distribution function statistic is found to be necessary to obtain a consistent description of stratocumulus cloud distributions. A hypothesis regarding the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for cloud clustering is presented. It is suggested that cloud clusters often arise from 4 to 10 triggering events localized within regions less than 2 km in diameter and randomly distributed within the cloud field. As the size of the cloud surpasses the scale of the triggering region, the clustering signal weakens and the larger cloud locations become more random.

  7. Regular Magnetic Black Hole Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The Bronnikov regular magnetic black hole as a gravitational lens is studied. In nonlinear electrodynamics, photons do not follow null geodesics of background geometry, but move along null geodesics of a corresponding effective geometry. To study the Bronnikov regular magnetic black hole gravitational lensing in the strong deflection limit, the corresponding effective geometry should be obtained firstly. This is the most important and key step. We obtain the deflection angle in the strong deflection limit, and further calculate the angular positions and magnifications of relativistic images as well as the time delay between different relativistic images. The influence of the magnetic charge on the black hole gravitational lensing is also discussed. Supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Education Department of Shannxi Province under Grant No 15JK1077, and the Doctorial Scientific Research Starting Fund of Shannxi University of Science and Technology under Grant No BJ12-02.

  8. Geometry of interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Chen, J.; Spicer, D. S.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are presented of the distortion of a magnetic flux rope that is being accelerated through ambient solar wind plasma. The flux rope magnetic field has an axial component parallel to the solar wind field and an azimuthal component, which lies in the simulation plane. As the flux rope moves through the solar wind plasma, vortices form on its trailing edge and couple strongly to its interior. If the flux rope azimuthal field is weak, it deforms into an elongated banana-like shape a few Alfven transit times. A strong azimuthal field component tends to inhibit this distortion. If the flux rope is taken to model a magnetic cloud, it is suggested that the shape of the cloud at 1 AU is determined by its distortion in the inner solar wind. Distortion timescales beyond 1 AU are estimated as many days. It is estimated that effective drag coefficients somewhat greater than unity are appropriate for modelling flux rope propagation.

  9. Solar activity, magnetic clouds, and geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    Associational aspects of magnetic clouds and solar activity, and of magnetic clouds and geomagentic storms are described. For example, recent research has shown associations to exist between the launch of magnetic clouds directed Earthward from the Sun and, in particular, two forms of solar activity: flare-related, type II metric radio bursts and disappearing filaments (prominences). Furthermore, recent research has shown an association to exist between the onset of magnetic clouds on Earth and the initiation of geomagnetic storms. Based on these findings, STIP Intervals XV-XIX are examined for possible occurrences of Earthward-directed magnetic clouds.

  10. CME Magnetic Structure and Magnetic Cloud Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Luhmann, J.

    2006-06-01

    An interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) is the counterpart of a coronal mass ejection by definition. However, the relationship between the magnetic structures of the CMEs and that of the situ observations of ICMEs is still quite far from clear, due to observational gaps and the state of our understanding of CMEs. Some studies suggested that the magnetic cloud (MC, a group of ICMEs with fluxrope signatures) magnetic polarity follows the solar large scale magnetic field, and others suggested it follows the local magnetic field of the CME source region. Recent studies found that the relationship is more complex. While solar cycle dependence of the magnetic signature of MCs is clearly evident, the polarity of the MCs does not reverse at the same time when the solar large scale field reverses around solar maximum, but begins to have mixed polarities, and the new polarity may only prevail at the midst of the declining phase. Interestingly, in an independent study of the magnetic topology at the CME source regions, we found a similar solar cycle dependence of the bipolar and quadrupolar topologie. In this work, the link between CMEs and ICMEs is made and the results will shed light on our understanding about the relationship between CME and ICME magnetic structures and how these structures are related to solar local and large scale magnetic fields.Acknowledgement: ATM/NSF-0451438, SRT/NASA-NNG06GE51G and CISM/NSF.

  11. Study of an expanding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakwacki, M. S.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.

    Magnetic Clouds (MCs) transport into the interplanetary medium the magnetic flux and helicity released in coronal mass ejections by the Sun. At 1 AU from the Sun, MCs are generally modelled as static flux ropes. However, the velocity profile of some MCs presents signatures of expansion. We analise here the magnetic structure of an expanding magnetic cloud observed by Wind spacecraft. We consider a dynamical model, based on a self-similar behaviour for the cloud radial velocity. We assume a free expansion for the cloud, and a cylindrical linear force free field (i.e., the Lundquist's field) as the initial condition for its magnetic configuration. We derive theoretical expressions for the magnetic flux across a surface perpendicular to the cloud axis, for the magnetic helicity and magnetic energy per unit length along the tube using the self-similar model. Finally, we compute these magntitudes with the fitted parameters. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  12. Magnetic clouds in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two interplanetary magnetic clouds, characterized by anomalous magnetic field directions and unusually high magnetic field strengths with a scale of the order of 0.25 AU, are identified and described. As the clouds moved past a spacecraft located in the solar wind near Earth, the magnetic field direction changed by rotating approximately 180 deg nearly parallel to a plane which was essentially perpendicular to the ecliptic. The configuration of the magnetic field in the clouds might be that of a tightly wound cylindrical helix or a series of closed circular loops. One of the magnetic clouds was in a cold stream preceded by a shock, and it caused both a geomagnetic storm and a depression in the galactic cosmic ray intensity. No stream, geomagnetic storm, or large cosmic ray decrease was associated with the other magnetic cloud.

  13. Interplanetary magnetic clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L. W.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are defined as regions with a radial dimension approximately 0.25 AU (at 1 AU) in which the magnetic field strength is high and the magnetic field direction changes appreciably by means of rotation of one component of B nearly parallel to a plane. The magnetic field geometry in such a magnetic cloud is consistent with that of a magnetic loop, but it cannot be determined uniquely. Forty-five clouds were identified in interplanetary data obtained near Earth between 1967 and 1978; at least one cloud passed the Earth every three months. Three classes of clouds were identified, corresponding to the association of a cloud with a shock, a stream interface, or a CME. There are approximately equal numbers of clouds in each class, and the three types of clouds might be different manifestations of a coronal transient. The magnetic pressure inside the clouds is higher than the ion pressure and the sum is higher than the pressure of the material outside of the cloud.

  14. Evolutionary Models of Cold, Magnetized, Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Ostriker, Eve; Stone, James M.

    2004-01-01

    We modeled the long-term and small-scale evolution of molecular clouds using direct 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This work followed up on previous research by our group under auspices of the ATP in which we studied the energetics of turbulent, magnetized clouds and their internal structure on intermediate scales. Our new work focused on both global and smallscale aspects of the evolution of turbulent, magnetized clouds, and in particular studied the response of turbulent proto-cloud material to passage through the Galactic spiral potential, and the dynamical collapse of turbulent, magnetized (supercritical) clouds into fragments to initiate the formation of a stellar cluster. Technical advances under this program include developing an adaptive-mesh MHD code as a successor to ZEUS (ATHENA) in order to follow cloud fragmentation, developing a shearing-sheet MHD code which includes self-gravity and externally-imposed gravity to follow the evolution of clouds in the Galactic potential, and developing radiative transfer models to evaluate the internal ionization of clumpy clouds exposed to external photoionizing UV and CR radiation. Gammie's work at UIUC focused on the radiative transfer aspects of this program.

  15. Evolutionary Models of Cold, Magnetized, Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Ostriker, Eve; Stone, James M.

    2004-01-01

    We modeled the long-term and small-scale evolution of molecular clouds using direct 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This work followed up on previous research by our group under auspices of the ATP in which we studied the energetics of turbulent, magnetized clouds and their internal structure on intermediate scales. Our new work focused on both global and smallscale aspects of the evolution of turbulent, magnetized clouds, and in particular studied the response of turbulent proto-cloud material to passage through the Galactic spiral potential, and the dynamical collapse of turbulent, magnetized (supercritical) clouds into fragments to initiate the formation of a stellar cluster. Technical advances under this program include developing an adaptive-mesh MHD code as a successor to ZEUS (ATHENA) in order to follow cloud fragmentation, developing a shearing-sheet MHD code which includes self-gravity and externally-imposed gravity to follow the evolution of clouds in the Galactic potential, and developing radiative transfer models to evaluate the internal ionization of clumpy clouds exposed to external photoionizing UV and CR radiation. Gammie's work at UIUC focused on the radiative transfer aspects of this program.

  16. Comment on the polarity of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Lee, L.-C.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    The initial description of magnetic clouds by Klein and Burlaga (1982) and the models that have been developed for their representation (e.g., by Goldstein, 1983) are examined. The results show that a definition of the cloud's polarity only in terms of the Bz component of the IMF is not always correct. It is suggested that, for the description polarities of quasi-transverse and quasi-parallel clouds, a combination of directions in the Bz and By components of the IMF should be used.

  17. Model of a rotating magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that magnetic clouds rotate while they propagate antisunward was investigated. Magnetic clouds are modeled as magnetic flux ropes which rotate rigidly about the axis of symmetry. An ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, in which the evolution of the magnetic structure is related to the time evolution of the angular frequency, is developed. A class of 'separable' magnetic fields is employed to reduce the problem to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the evolution function, and it is solved numerically. The corresponding effective potential gives rise to two modes of evolution--expansion and oscillation--depending on the energy and on the value of a dimensionless parameter, k. Parameter k depends on the gas pressure, the ratio of the magnetic field components, and the frequency of rotation. There is a critical value of k, k(sub c), above which the oscillatory regime disappears and the flux rope invariably expands, regardless of the energy. Below k(sub c) the energy determines whether the configuration is confined or unbounded. Rotation always helps expansion by lowering the potential barrier. A data example was studied and features which are interpreted as signatures of rotation are presented. The angular speed is comparable to the Alfven speed, and the core of the rotating cloud completes on average one full revolution every three days at 1 AU. The parameter k is calculated from observations, and it is found to be close to, but below, critical. Only three out of the nine clouds examined showed signatures of rotation. Theoretical analysis suggests that close to the Sun rotation effects may play a more important role in the evolution of magnetic clouds than 1 AU.

  18. Model of a rotating magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility that magnetic clouds rotate while they propagate antisunward was investigated. Magnetic clouds are modeled as magnetic flux ropes which rotate rigidly about the axis of symmetry. An ideal magnetohydrodynamic model, in which the evolution of the magnetic structure is related to the time evolution of the angular frequency, is developed. A class of 'separable' magnetic fields is employed to reduce the problem to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation for the evolution function, and it is solved numerically. The corresponding effective potential gives rise to two modes of evolution--expansion and oscillation--depending on the energy and on the value of a dimensionless parameter, k. Parameter k depends on the gas pressure, the ratio of the magnetic field components, and the frequency of rotation. There is a critical value of k, k(sub c), above which the oscillatory regime disappears and the flux rope invariably expands, regardless of the energy. Below k(sub c) the energy determines whether the configuration is confined or unbounded. Rotation always helps expansion by lowering the potential barrier. A data example was studied and features which are interpreted as signatures of rotation are presented. The angular speed is comparable to the Alfven speed, and the core of the rotating cloud completes on average one full revolution every three days at 1 AU. The parameter k is calculated from observations, and it is found to be close to, but below, critical. Only three out of the nine clouds examined showed signatures of rotation. Theoretical analysis suggests that close to the Sun rotation effects may play a more important role in the evolution of magnetic clouds than 1 AU.

  19. Clustered or regular cumulus cloud fields - The statistical character of observed and simulated cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1990-01-01

    The spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is assumed to be the result of the effects of convective activity on the thermodynamic environment. The effects can be parameterized in terms of a stabilization function representing the time rate of change of convective available potential energy. Using these results, a new inhibition hypothesis explaining the expected characteristics of the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds is postulated. This paper performs a verification of the inhibition hypothesis on real and simulated cloud fields. In order to do so, an objective measure of the spatial characteristics of cumulus clouds is introduced. Multiple cloud experiments are performed with a three-dimensional numerical cloud model. Skylab pictures of real cumuli are also used in the verification. Results of applying this measure to simulated and observed cumulus cloud fields confirm the inhibition hypothesis.

  20. Multi-spacecraft observation of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucas, A.; Dal Lago, A.; Schwenn, R.; Clua de Gonzalez, A. L.; Marsch, E.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2009-12-01

    During the time operation of the Helios mission, from 1974 to 1986, a large number of magnetic clouds was identified by the magnetic field and solar wind sensors onboard the probes. Among these magnetic clouds, some of them were identified by at least two probes, provided that IMP-8 and ISEE-3 were monitoring the dayside magnetosphere. The magnetic cloud observed on from DOY 029 to DOY 030/1977 by Helios 1, Helios 2, and IMP-8 represents a potential multi-spacecraft observed magnetic cloud. Despite the interaction with the high-speed stream that compressed the magnetic cloud, the minimum variance analysis technique showed the same direction of rotation of the magnetic field inside the magnetic cloud. This helped to associate the observation of the magnetic cloud at multi-spacecraft.

  1. A Study of Geoeffective Magnetic Clouds in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Alisson Dal

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are interplanetary structures whose origins are related to Coronal Mass Ejections (CUE). Their features are: strong magnetic field intensity (typically > 10nT (nano Tesla)), a large rotation in the magnetic field angle as the cloud crosses the spacecraft, low proton temperature and Beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) values (approximately 0.1). For a set of previously published magnetic cloud events and another set of clouds identified in the whole year of 1979 we present a study of plasma and magnetic field parameters. We have shown the existence of a relationship between the peak magnetic field strength and peak velocity value of the cloud, with a tendency that clouds which move at higher speeds also possess higher core magnetic field strengths. There is also an indication that this relationship is peculiar to magnetic clouds, whereas other types of non-cloud driver gas, or ICME , events do not seam to show a similar relationship. Both parameters, velocity and magnetic field strength, are related to Magnetic Storms. It is also addressed the interaction between magnetic clouds and other features in the interplanetary medium by calculating the Total Static Pressure, Magnetic plus Thermal, and the Dynamic Pressure relative to other structures surrounding the cloud, investigating their possible relation to magnetic cloud field enhancement. This work contributes to: (1) Space Weather Forecasting, through the calculation of the magnetic cloud field strengths by knowing their velocities (the latter can be remotely measured by sequences of coronograph images); (2) the study of the relation between magnetic clouds and magnetic storms; and (3) the study of the interaction between magnetic clouds and other interplanetary structures surrounding it.

  2. Magnetic Clouds Modeled As Interacting Toroidal Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Osherovich, V. A.

    Multiple loops can be seen in the solar corona before the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME), during the event and after the CME. We apply multi-toroidal con- figurations to model CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts U magnetic clouds. Such solutions found as MHD bounded states describe a single toroid (ground state) and multiple toroids (excited states), (Osherovich 1975; Osherovich and Lawrence 1982). We analyze noncircular cross section of such toroids and compare the compo- nents of the magnetic field vector with in situ observations in interplanetary magnetic clouds. The interaction of CMEs with the global coronal field will also be discussed. References Osherovich, V.A., Sooln Dann No 8, 1975. Osherovich, V.A. and J.K. Lawrence, Sol. Phys. 88, 117, 1983.

  3. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  4. Magnetic Support and Fragmentation of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, R. G.; Pudritz, R. E.

    1990-12-01

    Molecular clouds contain magnetic fields with energies comparable to their gravitational binding energies. In the dynamic environment of the interstellar medium, strong hydromagnetic waves are excited in this field on wavelengths longer than the ion-neutral mean free path. In a typical molecular cloud this length-scale, λmin, is of the order of 10-1 of the cloud size. On shorter length-scales the gas is without wave pressure support, and can flow down field lines. The joint effects of excess gravity and flux leakage causes a local dynamic collapse. We test our ideas with a detailed -body calculation in which we impose MHD waves on an initially uniform isothermal gas cloud. The effect of magnetic fields is included in our calculation by the frictional drag on the dominant, neutral population. In the absence of MHD waves the cloud fragments slightly while collapsing, then merges together at the centre into a single, pressure-supported, flattened object. We impose a spectrum of large amplitude Alfvén waves whose velocity amplitude varies as k-3/2, where k is the wavenumber. The initial background magnetic field is chosen to have an energy density slightly larger than the gravitational energy density. The damping is assumed to be balanced by a continuous external supply of wave energy. The simulation shows that the magnetic field and hydromagnetic waves provide sufficient support against gravity so that the cloud undergoes a global, isotropic contraction at a quarter the free-fall rate. The shortest wave present, λ≍λmin, sets the minimum fragment mass, for small Jeans masses. We follow the evolution of fragments having a minimum overdensity of 30 (corresponding to a mass m ≥ 0.4 × 10-3 Mcloud). The fragments appear quickly, and then agglomerate together, yielding an evolving mass spectrum that remains approximately a power law, dN/dm ∝ m-α, where a is 2.5 ± 0.5. Several specific tests of this theory are proposed: (i) that a short wavelength cut

  5. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, H.V. )

    1993-03-01

    A study has been made of energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3% in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the postshock region, although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower-energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds was studied. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3 percent in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the post-shock region although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events.

  7. Hierarchical Regularization of Polygons for Photogrammetric Point Clouds of Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Hu, H.; Zhu, Q.; Wu, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-05-01

    Despite the success of multi-view stereo (MVS) reconstruction from massive oblique images in city scale, only point clouds and triangulated meshes are available from existing MVS pipelines, which are topologically defect laden, free of semantical information and hard to edit and manipulate interactively in further applications. On the other hand, 2D polygons and polygonal models are still the industrial standard. However, extraction of the 2D polygons from MVS point clouds is still a non-trivial task, given the fact that the boundaries of the detected planes are zigzagged and regularities, such as parallel and orthogonal, cannot preserve. Aiming to solve these issues, this paper proposes a hierarchical polygon regularization method for the photogrammetric point clouds from existing MVS pipelines, which comprises of local and global levels. After boundary points extraction, e.g. using alpha shapes, the local level is used to consolidate the original points, by refining the orientation and position of the points using linear priors. The points are then grouped into local segments by forward searching. In the global level, regularities are enforced through a labeling process, which encourage the segments share the same label and the same label represents segments are parallel or orthogonal. This is formulated as Markov Random Field and solved efficiently. Preliminary results are made with point clouds from aerial oblique images and compared with two classical regularization methods, which have revealed that the proposed method are more powerful in abstracting a single building and is promising for further 3D polygonal model reconstruction and GIS applications.

  8. Numerical simulations of a shock interacting with multiple magnetized clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    We present 2D adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a shock interacting with groups of two or three cylindrical clouds. We study how the presence of a nearby cloud influences the dynamics of this interaction, and explore the resulting differences and similarities in the evolution of each cloud. The understanding gained from this small-scale study will help to interpret the behaviour of systems with many 10s or 100s of clouds. We observe a wide variety of behaviour in the interactions studied, which is dependent on the initial positions of the clouds and the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. We find (i) some clouds are stretched along their field lines, whereas others are confined by their field lines; (ii) upstream clouds may accelerate past downstream clouds (though magnetic tension can prevent this); (iii) clouds may also change their relative positions transverse to the direction of shock propagation as they `slingshot' past each other; (iv) downstream clouds may be offered some protection from the oncoming flow as a result of being in the lee of an upstream cloud; (v) the cycle of cloud compression and re-expansion is generally weaker when there are nearby neighbouring clouds; (vi) the plasma β in cloud material can vary rapidly as clouds collide with one another, but low values of β are always transitory. This work is relevant to studies of multiphase regions, where fast, low-density gas interacts with dense clouds, such as in circumstellar bubbles, supernova remnants, superbubbles and galactic winds.

  9. Regularized Biot-Savart Laws for Modeling Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Viacheslav; Downs, Cooper; Mikic, Zoran; Torok, Tibor; Linker, Jon A.

    2017-08-01

    Many existing models assume that magnetic flux ropes play a key role in solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is therefore important to develop efficient methods for constructing flux-rope configurations constrained by observed magnetic data and the initial morphology of CMEs. As our new step in this direction, we have derived and implemented a compact analytical form that represents the magnetic field of a thin flux rope with an axis of arbitrary shape and a circular cross-section. This form implies that the flux rope carries axial current I and axial flux F, so that the respective magnetic field is a curl of the sum of toroidal and poloidal vector potentials proportional to I and F, respectively. The vector potentials are expressed in terms of Biot-Savart laws whose kernels are regularized at the rope axis. We regularized them in such a way that for a straight-line axis the form provides a cylindrical force-free flux rope with a parabolic profile of the axial current density. So far, we set the shape of the rope axis by tracking the polarity inversion lines of observed magnetograms and estimating its height and other parameters of the rope from a calculated potential field above these lines. In spite of this heuristic approach, we were able to successfully construct pre-eruption configurations for the 2009 February13 and 2011 October 1 CME events. These applications demonstrate that our regularized Biot-Savart laws are indeed a very flexible and efficient method for energizing initial configurations in MHD simulations of CMEs. We discuss possible ways of optimizing the axis paths and other extensions of the method in order to make it more useful and robust.Research supported by NSF, NASA's HSR and LWS Programs, and AFOSR.

  10. Electron Cloud Trapping in Recycler Combined Function Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Nagaitsev, S.

    2016-10-04

    Electron cloud can lead to a fast instability in intense proton and positron beams in circular accelerators. In the Fermilab Recycler the electron cloud is confined within its combined function magnets. We show that the field of combined function magnets traps the electron cloud, present the results of analytical estimates of trapping, and compare them to numerical simulations of electron cloud formation. The electron cloud is located at the beam center and up to 1% of the particles can be trapped by the magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a Recycler combined function dipole this multiturn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The multi-turn build-up can be stopped by injection of a clearing bunch of 1010 p at any position in the ring.

  11. Magnetic clouds, helicity conservation, and intrinsic scale flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Rust, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic-scale flux-rope model for interplanetary magnetic clouds, incorporating conservation of magnetic helicity, flux and mass is found to adequately explain clouds' average thermodynamic and magnetic properties. In spite their continuous expansion as they balloon into interplanetary space, magnetic clouds maintain high temperatures. This is shown to be due to magnetic energy dissipation. The temperature of an expanding cloud is shown to pass through a maximum above its starting temperature if the initial plasma beta in the cloud is less than 2/3. Excess magnetic pressure inside the cloud is not an important driver of the expansion as it is almost balanced by the tension in the helical field lines. It is conservation of magnetic helicity and flux that requires that clouds expand radially as they move away from the Sun. Comparison with published data shows good agreement between measured cloud properties and theory. Parameters determined from theoretical fits to the data, when extended back to the Sun, are consistent with the origin of interplanetary magnetic clouds in solar filament eruptions. A possible extension of the heating mechanism discussed here to heating of the solar corona is discussed.

  12. Magnetic Clouds: Global and local expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulisano, Adriana; Demoulin, Pascal; Soledad Nakwacki, Ms Maria; Dasso, Sergio; Emilia Ruiz, Maria

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are magnetized objects forming flux ropes, which are expelled from the Sun and travel through the heliosphere, transporting important amounts of energy, mass, magnetic flux, and magnetic helicity from the Sun to the interplanetary medium. To know the detailed dynamical evolution of MCs is very useful to improve the knowledge of solar processes, for instance from linking a transient solar source with its interplanetary manifestation. During its travel, and mainly due to the decrease of the total (magnetic plus thermal) pressure in the surrounding solar wind, MCs are objects in expansion. However, the detailed magnetic structure and the dynamical evolution of MCs is still not fully known. Even the identification of their boundaries is an open question in some cases. In a previous work we have shown that from onepoint observations of the bulk velocity profile, it is possible to infer the 'local' expansion rate for a given MC, i.e., the expansion rate while the MC is observed by the spacecraft. By the another hand, and from the comparison of sizes for different MCs observed at different heliodistances, it is possible to quantify an 'average' expansion law (i.e., a global expansion). In this work, in order to study the variability of the 'local' expansion with respect to the 'average' expansion of MCs during their travel, we present results and a comparison between both approaches. We make a detailed study of one-point observations (magnetic and bulk velocity) using a set of MCs and we get the 'local' expansion rate for each studied event. We compare the obtained 'local' expansion rates with the 'average' expansion law, and also with the expansion rates for the stationary solar wind.

  13. Observations in the sheath region ahead of a magnetic cloud and in the dayside magnetosheath during magnetic cloud passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Erkaev, N. V.; Osherovich, V. A.; Biernat, H. K.; Fazakerley, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present magnetic field and particle (protons and electrons) observations in the sheath region behind an interplanetary shock driven by a magnetic cloud, and in the magnetic cloud itself. We also discuss observations in the dayside terrestrial magnetosheath during cloud passage. We find that the region ahead of the cloud is in pressure balance. Further, throughout its extent (greater than 0.06 AU), the magnetic field strength is anticorrelated with the plasma density, with the latter decreasing steadily as the cloud is approached. This behavior is indicative of magnetic forces influencing the flow topology and highlights a large-scale breakdown of predictions based solely on gas dynamical considerations. We also study density structures inside the cloud which result in an undulating dynamic pressure being applied to the magnetopause causing it to oscillate with amplitudes of approximately 1-3 Re and period approximately 2h.

  14. Effect of magnetic field on the rotating filamentary molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, P.; Kokabi, K.

    2017-04-01

    The Purpose of this work is to study the evolution of magnetized rotating filamentary molecular clouds. We consider cylindrical symmetric filamentary molecular clouds at an early stage of evolution. For the first time we consider the rotation of filamentary molecular in the presence of an axial and azimuthal magnetic field without any assumption of density and magnetic functions. We show that in addition to decreasing the radial collapse velocity, the rotational velocity is also affected by the magnetic field. The existence of rotation yields fragmentation of filaments. Moreover, we show that the magnetic field has a significant effect on the fragmentation of filamentary molecular clouds.

  15. Energetic ion and cosmic ray characteristics of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Beeck, J.; Marsden, R. G.; Tranquille, C.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Mckibben, R. B.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    The large interplanetary shock event of February 11, 1982, has yielded ISEE-3 energetic ion and magnetic field data as well as ground-based neutron-monitor cosmic-ray data. The timing and the onset of the Forbush decrease associated with this shock event coincide with the arrival at the earth of its magnetic cloud component; the duration of the decrease, similarly, corresponds to that of the cloud's passage past the earth. The large scattering mean free path readings suggest that while magnetic cloud ions can easily travel along magnetic field lines, they cannot travel across them, so that they cannot escape the cloud after entering it. Similarly, the cloud field lines prevented cosmic ray entrance, and could have prevented their reaching the earth. The cloud is therefore a major basis for the Forbush decrease.

  16. Energetic Particles Events inside Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Jose; Hidalgo, Miguel Angel; Blanco, Juan Jose; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier

    The effect of the magnetic topology of the Magnetic Clouds (MCs) over the energetic particle event (EPe) fluxes (0.5-100 MeV) have been simulated. In the data corresponding to the ion and electron fluxes, a depression after a strong maximum is observed when a EPe passes through a MC. Using our cross-section circular and elliptical MC models (Journal of Geophysical Research 107(1), doi:10.1029/2001JA900100 (2002) and Solar Physics 207(1), 187-198 (2002)) we have tried to explain that effect, understanding the importance of the topology of the MC. In sight of the results of the preliminary analysis we conclude that the magnitude of the magnetic field seems not to play a significant role but the helicoidal topology associated with topology of the MCs. This work has been supported by the Spanish Comisín Internacional de o Ciencia y Tecnoloǵ (CICYT), grant ESP2005-07290-C02-01 and ESP2006-08459. This work ıa is performed inside COST Action 724.

  17. Magnetic cloud induced magnetic storms: a lack of classical substorm expansion phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhou, X. Y.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper will be to examine a specific but important subset of magnetic storms, those that are caused by large southward, smoothly rotating magnetic fields: interplanetary magnetic clouds.

  18. Causes and consequences of magnetic cloud expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.

    2009-05-01

    Context: A magnetic cloud (MC) is a magnetic flux rope in the solar wind (SW), which, at 1 AU, is observed ~2-5 days after its expulsion from the Sun. The associated solar eruption is observed as a coronal mass ejection (CME). Aims: Both the in situ observations of plasma velocity distribution and the increase in their size with solar distance demonstrate that MCs are strongly expanding structures. The aim of this work is to find the main causes of this expansion and to derive a model to explain the plasma velocity profiles typically observed inside MCs. Methods: We model the flux rope evolution as a series of force-free field states with two extreme limits: (a) ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) and (b) minimization of the magnetic energy with conserved magnetic helicity. We consider cylindrical flux ropes to reduce the problem to the integration of ordinary differential equations. This allows us to explore a wide variety of magnetic fields at a broad range of distances to the Sun. Results: We demonstrate that the rapid decrease in the total SW pressure with solar distance is the main driver of the flux-rope radial expansion. Other effects, such as the internal over-pressure, the radial distribution, and the amount of twist within the flux rope have a much weaker influence on the expansion. We demonstrate that any force-free flux rope will have a self-similar expansion if its total boundary pressure evolves as the inverse of its length to the fourth power. With the total pressure gradient observed in the SW, the radial expansion of flux ropes is close to self-similar with a nearly linear radial velocity profile across the flux rope, as observed. Moreover, we show that the expansion rate is proportional to the radius and to the global velocity away from the Sun. Conclusions: The simple and universal law found for the radial expansion of flux ropes in the SW predicts the typical size, magnetic structure, and radial velocity of MCs at various solar distances.

  19. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients.

  20. A GLOBAL MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY MODEL FOR MAGNETIC CLOUDS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Hidalgo, M. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T. E-mail: teresa.nieves-chinchil-1@nasa.gov

    2012-04-01

    We present an analytical approach to the global magnetic field topology of magnetic clouds (MCs) that considers them like close magnetic structures with torus geometry and with a non-uniform (variable maximum radius) cross section along them. Following our previous approach to the problem of MCs (Hidalgo 2003, 2011), we establish an intrinsic coordinate system for that topology, and then we analytically solve the Maxwell equations in terms of it. The purpose of the present work is to present this model, which will lead us to understand in a more realistic way the physical mechanisms inside MCs. The model has a non-force-free character and also takes into account the time evolution of the cross sections of the MCs in their movement through the interplanetary medium. In this first paper, we obtain the expressions for the components of the magnetic field and the plasma current density imposing a large mean radius of the torus, and imposing a circular cross section with a variable maximum radius. Eventually, we fit the model to data related to four well-known MCs measurements at 1 AU, (three of them with circular cross sections and without expansion, as it is deduced from the experimental data). We compare the results of this toroidal model with those obtained with our previous cylindrical circular cross section model, also with a non-force-free character.

  1. Fragmentation of Filamentary Molecular Clouds Threaded by Perpendicular Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Kudoh, Takahiro; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2017-01-01

    Filamentary clouds are ubiquitously seen in the star forming regions and the fragmentation of them are thought to result in star formation. Some of them are threaded by magnetic field parallel to the cloud axis and some others are thread by perpendicular ones. The effects of the parallel magnetic field on fragmentation have been studied well. However we know little about the effects of the perpendicular magnetic field on fragmentation. A strong perpendicular magnetic field is likely to suspend the fragmentation. In order to assess this effect, we have performed a linear stability analysis of an isothermal filamentary cloud while taking account of a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the cloud axis. We have used the ideal MHD approximation in the stability analysis for simplicity. Then the analysis is formulated to be an eigenvalue problem in which each eigenmode has either a real frequency (stable) or a pure imaginary one (unstable). The growth rate of the instability as well as the eigenmode is obtained numerically as a function of the wavelength and magnetic field strength.The magnetic field suppresses gas motion perpendicular to it. Accordingly, the growth rate of an unstable eigenmode decreases monotonically as the magnetic field is strengthened. The wavelength of the most unstable mode is slightly increased by the magnetic field. When the plasma beta at the cloud center is slightly below 2, the fragmentation instability is completely suppressed. When the unstable mode is excited, only the magnetic field lines that thread the high region near the cloud axis move appreciably. We compare our analysis with those for magnetized sheet-like clouds.

  2. Study of the geoeffectiveness of interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin; Basurah, Hassan; Derouich, Moncef

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic clouds are mass ejections observed in the interplanetary space with specific field structures. These structures have been observed in the interplanetary data and through spacecraft in near-earth space. These magnetic clouds have north-south or south-north magnetic field orientations. Some of them are associated with shock/sheath region preceding them. Their speed is not the same; they move with different velocities in the interplanetary space. The magnetic clouds observed in the near-earth space have different field orientations, move with different speed, and different features are associated with them. As the field orientations in them, their speed and associated features are likely to influence the geo-effectiveness of magnetic clouds, we consider the magnetic clouds with distinct properties and study their relative geo-effectiveness. We also investigate the solar wind plasma/field parameters that play important role in influencing the geo-effectiveness of magnetic clouds. The implications of this study on the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling are also examined.

  3. Magnetic clouds between 2-4 AU: Voyager observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic clouds were observed in the solar wind between 2-4 AU. It was shown that they are stable enough to persist without major changes out to such distances. It is estimated that the clouds expand at a speed of the order of 45 km/s. The average Alfven speed at the front and rear boundaries is 104 km/s, the expansion speed is estimated to be nearly half of the Alfven speed, which is consistent with an earlier estimate of the expansion speed of clouds between the Sun and 1 AU. The magnetic field configuration is highly ordered and consistent with the passage of some kind of loop.

  4. Magnetic field dissipation and contraction of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takenori; Nishi, Ryoichi; Umebayashi, Toyoharu

    The magnetic flux phi of a cloud or a cloud core is 0.1 to one times the critical flux phicr which is proportional to its mass M. The phi/M (or equivalently phi/phicr) ratio for a cloud or a cloud core is several hundred to 105 times greater than the ratio for magnetic stars with mean surface field of one to 30 kG. The dissipation of magnetic fields in clouds is complicated because they contain various kinds of charged particles (electrons, ions, and grains) whose degree of freezing to field lines vary widely and whose relative abundance changes drastically as the cloud contracts. With a quite general formalism applicable to such wide range of physical situation, the field dissipation in clouds containing ice-mantled grains were investigated, and existence of a decoupling density ndec with the flux loss time tB is less than the free-fall time tf only at the cloud density nH less than ndec or tB approximately equals (10 - 500)tf(phicr/phi) 2 at nH much less than ndec at least for phi approximately equal (1 - 0.1) phicr was found. The value of ndec depends rather sensitively on the grain model and the minimum value found is four times 109 cu cm including the cases of grains without ice mantles.

  5. Automatic Extraction and Regularization of Building Outlines from Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bastian; Kada, Martin; Wichmann, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Building outlines are needed for various applications like urban planning, 3D city modelling and updating cadaster. Their automatic reconstruction, e.g. from airborne laser scanning data, as regularized shapes is therefore of high relevance. Today's airborne laser scanning technology can produce dense 3D point clouds with high accuracy, which makes it an eligible data source to reconstruct 2D building outlines or even 3D building models. In this paper, we propose an automatic building outline extraction and regularization method that implements a trade-off between enforcing strict shape restriction and allowing flexible angles using an energy minimization approach. The proposed procedure can be summarized for each building as follows: (1) an initial building outline is created from a given set of building points with the alpha shape algorithm; (2) a Hough transform is used to determine the main directions of the building and to extract line segments which are oriented accordingly; (3) the alpha shape boundary points are then repositioned to both follow these segments, but also to respect their original location, favoring long line segments and certain angles. The energy function that guides this trade-off is evaluated with the Viterbi algorithm.

  6. Self-similar evolution of interplanetary magnetic clouds and Ulysses measurements of the polytropic index inside the cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Berdichevsky, D.

    1997-01-01

    A self similar model for the expanding flux rope is developed for a magnetohydrodynamic model of interplanetary magnetic clouds. It is suggested that the dependence of the maximum magnetic field on the distance from the sun and the polytropic index gamma has the form B = r exp (-1/gamma), and that the ratio of the electron temperature to the proton temperature increases with distance from the sun. It is deduced that ion acoustic waves should be observed in the cloud. Both predictions were confirmed by Ulysses observations of a 1993 magnetic cloud. Measurements of gamma inside the cloud demonstrate sensitivity to the internal topology of the magnetic field in the cloud.

  7. Fast instability caused by electron cloud in combined function magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Antipov, S. A.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; ...

    2017-04-10

    One of the factors which may limit the intensity in the Fermilab Recycler is a fast transverse instability. It develops within a hundred turns and, in certain conditions, may lead to a beam loss. The high rate of the instability suggest that its cause is electron cloud. Here, we studied the phenomena by observing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, simulating numerically the build-up of the electron cloud, and developed an analytical model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function di-poles. We also found that beam motion can be stabilized by a clearingmore » bunch, which confirms the electron cloud nature of the instability. The clearing suggest electron cloud trapping in Recycler combined function mag-nets. Numerical simulations show that up to 1% of the particles can be trapped by the magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. Furthermore, in a Recycler combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated resulting instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and the mode fre-quency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulation in the PEI code. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.« less

  8. Fast Instability Caused by Electron Cloud in Combined Function Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. A.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Yang, M. J.

    2016-12-12

    One of the factors which may limit the intensity in the Fermilab Recycler is a fast transverse instability. It develops within a hundred turns and, in certain conditions, may lead to a beam loss. The high rate of the instability suggest that its cause is electron cloud. We studied the phenomena by observing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, simulating numerically the build-up of the electron cloud, and developed an analytical model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function di-poles. We found that beam motion can be stabilized by a clearing bunch, which confirms the electron cloud nature of the instability. The clearing suggest electron cloud trapping in Recycler combined function mag-nets. Numerical simulations show that up to 1% of the particles can be trapped by the magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a Recycler combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated resulting instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and the mode fre-quency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulation in the PEI code. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  9. Fast instability caused by electron cloud in combined function magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S. A.; Adamson, P.; Burov, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Yang, M.-J.

    2017-04-01

    One of the factors which may limit the intensity in the Fermilab Recycler is a fast transverse instability. It develops within a hundred turns and, in certain conditions, may lead to a beam loss. The high rate of the instability suggests that its cause is electron cloud. We studied the phenomena by observing the dynamics of stable and unstable beams, simulating numerically the buildup of the electron cloud, and developed an analytical model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. We found that beam motion can be stabilized by a clearing bunch, which confirms the electron cloud nature of the instability. The clearing suggest electron cloud trapping in Recycler combined function magnets. Numerical simulations show that up to 1% of the particles can be trapped by the magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud buildup is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a Recycler combined function dipole this multiturn accumulation allows the electron cloud to reach final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated resulting instability growth time of about 30 revolutions and the mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulation in the pei code. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  10. Compound streams, magnetic clouds, and major geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Klein, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Data from ISEE 3, Helios A, and Helios B were used to identify the components of two compound streams and to determine their configurations. In one case, ejecta containing a magnetic cloud associated with a disappearing quiescent filament were interacting with a corotating stream. In the second case, ejecta containing a magnetic cloud associated with a 2B flare were overtaking ejecta from a different source. Each of these compound streams produced an unusually large geomagnetic storm, on April 3, 1979, and on April 25, 1979, respectively. The largest geomagnetic storm in the period 1968-1986, which occurred on July 13, 1982, was associated with a compound stream. Thirty geomagnetic storms with A(p) greater than 90 occurred between 1972 and 1983, and there are interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data for 17 of these events. The data suggest that most large geomagnetic storms are associated with compound streams and/or magnetic clouds.

  11. Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnet, C.; Kuzhir, P.; Bossis, G.; Meunier, A.; Nave, S.; Zubarev, A.; Lomenech, C.; Bashtovoi, V.

    2014-03-01

    When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, the size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in detail. In experiments, a dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50 μm) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces—the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter α ≥2), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

  12. Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields.

    PubMed

    Magnet, C; Kuzhir, P; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Nave, S; Zubarev, A; Lomenech, C; Bashtovoi, V

    2014-03-01

    When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, the size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in detail. In experiments, a dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50 μm) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces-the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter α≥2), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

  13. Shock interactions with magnetized interstellar clouds. 1: Steady shocks hitting nonradiative clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Mckee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    We study the interaction of a steady, planar shock with a nonradiative, spherical, interstellar cloud threaded by a uniform magnetic field. For strong shocks, the sonic Mach number scales out, so two parameters determine the evolution: the ratio of cloud to intercloud density, and the Alfven Mach number. We focus on the case with initial field parallel to the shock velocity, though we also present one model with field perpendicular to the velocity. Even with 100 zones per cloud radius, we find that the magnetic field structure converges only at early times. However, we can draw three conclusions from our work. First, our results suggest that the inclusion of a field in equipartition with the preshock medium can prevent the complete destruction of the cloud found in the field-free case recently considered by Klein, McKee, & Colella. Second, the interaction of the shock with the cloud can amplify the magnetic field in some regions up to equipartition with the post-shock thermal pressure. In the parallel-field case, the shock preferentially amplifies the parallel component of the field, creating a 'flux rope,' a linear structure of concentrated magnetic field. The flux rope dominates the volume of amplified field, so that laminar, rather than turbulent, amplification is dominant in this case. Third, the presence of the cloud enhances the production of X-ray and synchrotron emission. The X-ray emission peaks early, during the initial passage of the shock over the cloud, while the synchrotron emission peaks later, when the flow sweeps magnetic field onto the axis between the cloud and the main shock.

  14. Shock interactions with magnetized interstellar clouds. 1: Steady shocks hitting nonradiative clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1994-10-01

    We study the interaction of a steady, planar shock with a nonradiative, spherical, interstellar cloud threaded by a uniform magnetic field. For strong shocks, the sonic Mach number scales out, so two parameters determine the evolution: the ratio of cloud to intercloud density, and the Alfven Mach number. We focus on the case with initial field parallel to the shock velocity, though we also present one model with field perpendicular to the velocity. Even with 100 zones per cloud radius, we find that the magnetic field structure converges only at early times. However, we can draw three conclusions from our work. First, our results suggest that the inclusion of a field in equipartition with the preshock medium can prevent the complete destruction of the cloud found in the field-free case recently considered by Klein, McKee, & Colella. Second, the interaction of the shock with the cloud can amplify the magnetic field in some regions up to equipartition with the post-shock thermal pressure. In the parallel-field case, the shock preferentially amplifies the parallel component of the field, creating a 'flux rope,' a linear structure of concentrated magnetic field. The flux rope dominates the volume of amplified field, so that laminar, rather than turbulent, amplification is dominant in this case. Third, the presence of the cloud enhances the production of X-ray and synchrotron emission. The X-ray emission peaks early, during the initial passage of the shock over the cloud, while the synchrotron emission peaks later, when the flow sweeps magnetic field onto the axis between the cloud and the main shock.

  15. Shock interactions with magnetized interstellar clouds. 1: Steady shocks hitting nonradiative clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Mckee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    We study the interaction of a steady, planar shock with a nonradiative, spherical, interstellar cloud threaded by a uniform magnetic field. For strong shocks, the sonic Mach number scales out, so two parameters determine the evolution: the ratio of cloud to intercloud density, and the Alfven Mach number. We focus on the case with initial field parallel to the shock velocity, though we also present one model with field perpendicular to the velocity. Even with 100 zones per cloud radius, we find that the magnetic field structure converges only at early times. However, we can draw three conclusions from our work. First, our results suggest that the inclusion of a field in equipartition with the preshock medium can prevent the complete destruction of the cloud found in the field-free case recently considered by Klein, McKee, & Colella. Second, the interaction of the shock with the cloud can amplify the magnetic field in some regions up to equipartition with the post-shock thermal pressure. In the parallel-field case, the shock preferentially amplifies the parallel component of the field, creating a 'flux rope,' a linear structure of concentrated magnetic field. The flux rope dominates the volume of amplified field, so that laminar, rather than turbulent, amplification is dominant in this case. Third, the presence of the cloud enhances the production of X-ray and synchrotron emission. The X-ray emission peaks early, during the initial passage of the shock over the cloud, while the synchrotron emission peaks later, when the flow sweeps magnetic field onto the axis between the cloud and the main shock.

  16. Spiral structures and regularities in magnetic field variations and auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldstein, Y. I.; Gromova, L. I.; Förster, M.; Levitin, A. E.

    2012-02-01

    The conception of spiral shaped precipitation regions, where solar corpuscles penetrate the upper atmosphere, was introduced into geophysics by C. Störmer and K. Birkeland at the beginning of the last century. Later, in the course of the XX-th century, spiral distributions were disclosed and studied in various geophysical phenomena. Most attention was devoted to spiral shapes in the analysis of regularities pertaining to the geomagnetic activity and auroras. We review the historical succession of perceptions about the number and positions of spiral shapes, that characterize the spatial-temporal distribution of magnetic disturbances. We describe the processes in the upper atmosphere, which are responsible for the appearance of spiral patterns. We considered the zones of maximal aurora frequency and of maximal particle precipitation intensity, as offered in the literature, in their connection with the spirals. We discuss the current system model, that is closely related to the spirals and that appears to be the source for geomagnetic field variations during magnetospheric substorms and storms. The currents in ionosphere and magnetosphere constitute together with field-aligned (along the geomagnetic field lines) currents (FACs) a common 3-D current system. At ionospheric heights, the westward and eastward electrojets represent characteristic elements of the current system. The westward electrojet covers the longitudinal range from the morning to the evening hours, while the eastward electrojet ranges from afternoon to near-midnight hours. The polar electrojet is positioned in the dayside sector at cusp latitudes. All these electrojets map along the magnetic field lines to certain plasma structures in the near-Earth space. The first spiral distribution of auroras was found based on observations in Antarctica for the nighttime-evening sector (N-spiral), and later in the nighttime-evening (N-spiral) and morning (M-spiral) sectors both in the Northern and Southern

  17. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  18. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  19. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  20. Nonlinear Regularization for Per Voxel Estimation of Magnetic Susceptibility Distributions from MRI Field Maps

    PubMed Central

    Kressler, Bryan; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; Jiang, Quan; Wang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is an important physical property of tissues, and can be used as a contrast mechanism in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, targeting contrast agents by conjugation with signaling molecules and labeling stem cells with contrast agents have become feasible. These contrast agents are strongly paramagnetic, and the ability to quantify magnetic susceptibility could allow accurate measurement of signaling and cell localization. Presented here is a technique to estimate arbitrary magnetic susceptibility distributions by solving an ill-posed inversion problem from field maps obtained in an MRI scanner. Two regularization strategies are considered, conventional Tikhonov regularization, and a sparsity promoting nonlinear regularization using the ℓ1 norm. Proof of concept is demonstrated using numerical simulations, phantoms, and in a stroke model mouse. Initial experience indicates that the nonlinear regularization better suppresses noise and streaking artifacts common in susceptibility estimation. PMID:19502123

  1. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  2. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  3. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin P.; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-18

    Here we present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. Finally, we show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle

  4. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin P.; Leoncini, Xavier; ...

    2016-07-18

    Here we present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, themore » particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. Finally, we show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and

  5. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin P.; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-18

    Here we present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. Finally, we show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle

  6. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; Castillo-Negrete, Diego del; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-15

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  7. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; del Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  8. The Magnetic Field of Cloud 3 in L204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P.

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ~11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P H/A V) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (-0.09% ± 0.03% mag-1 pc-1). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A V for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  9. The magnetic field of cloud 3 in L204

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ∼11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P {sub H}/A {sub V}) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (–0.09% ± 0.03% mag{sup –1} pc{sup –1}). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A {sub V} for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  10. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L. E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  11. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  12. A Study of Magnetic Fields on Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs), which are located at periphery of HII regions, are considered to be potential sites for induced star formation by UV radiation from nearby massive stars. Many theorists have developed 2D/3D hydrodynamical models to understand dynamical evolution of such molecular clouds. Most simulations, however, did not always include the magnetic field effect, which is of importance in the astrophysics. This is because that there are few observation results examining the magnetic field configuration of BRCs in detail. In order to obtain information on magnetic field in and around BRCs, we have made near-infrared (JHKs) imaging polarimetry toward 24 BRCs showing strong interaction with HII region (Urquhart et al. 2009). We used the imaging polarimeter SIRPOL/SIRIUS (FOV ~7.7’ x 7.7’) mounted on IRSF 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory.We found that polarization vectors, i.e., magnetic fields inside the clouds, follow the curved bright rim just behind the bright rim for almost all of the observed BRCs. Our investigation into the relation between the ambient magnetic field direction and the UV radiation direction suggests a following tendency. In the case that the ambient magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of incident UV radiation, the clouds are likely to have bright rims with small curvatures. On the other hand, in the case that the ambient field is parallel to the UV radiation, they would have those with larger curvatures. In this presentation, we will present the physical quantities for these BRCs (i.e., magnetic field strength, the post shock pressure by the ionization front, etc.) as well as these morphological results.

  13. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Tan, J. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Carey, S. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  14. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978-1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope.

  15. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions - I. Spherical clouds in uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragán, W. E.; Parkin, E. R.; Federrath, C.; Crocker, R. M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, yet their formation, internal structure, and longevity have not been studied in detail. We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the characteristics, formation, and evolution of filaments arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and dense clouds. Here, we improve on previous simulations by utilizing sharper density contrasts and higher numerical resolutions. By following multiple density tracers, we find that material in the envelopes of the clouds is removed and deposited downstream to form filamentary tails, while the cores of the clouds serve as footpoints and late-stage outer layers of these tails. Aspect ratios ≳12, subsonic velocity dispersions ˜0.1-0.3 of the wind sound speed, and magnetic field amplifications ˜100 are found to be characteristic of these filaments. We also report the effects of different magnetic field strengths and orientations. The magnetic field strength regulates vorticity production: sinuous filamentary towers arise in non-magnetic environments, while strong magnetic fields inhibit small-scale perturbations at boundary layers making tails less turbulent. Magnetic field components aligned with the direction of the flow favour the formation of pressure-confined flux ropes inside the tails, whilst transverse components tend to form current sheets. Softening the equation of state to nearly isothermal leads to suppression of dynamical instabilities and further collimation of the tail. Towards the final stages of the evolution, we find that small cloudlets and distorted filaments survive the break-up of the clouds and become entrained in the winds, reaching velocities ˜0.1 of the wind speed.

  16. Origin of coronal mass ejection and magnetic cloud: Thermal or magnetic driven?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Gong-Liang; Wang, Chi; He, Shuang-Hua

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental problem in Solar-Terrestrial Physics is the origin of the solar transient plasma output, which includes the coronal mass ejection and its interplanetary manifestation, e.g. the magnetic cloud. The traditional blast wave model resulted from solar thermal pressure impulse has faced with challenge during recent years. In the MHD numerical simulation study of CME, the authors find that the basic feature of the asymmetrical event on 18 August 1980 can be reproduced neither by a thermal pressure nor by a speed increment. Also, the thermal pressure model fails in simulating the interplanetary structure with low thermal pressure and strong magnetic field strength, representative of a typical magnetic cloud. Instead, the numerical simulation results are in favor of the magnetic field expansion as the likely mechanism for both the asymmetrical CME event and magnetic cloud.

  17. Giant magnetocaloric effect, magnetization plateaux and jumps of the regular Ising polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strečka, Jozef; Karľová, Katarína; Madaras, Tomáš

    2015-06-01

    Magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of the antiferromagnetic Ising spin clusters with the shape of regular polyhedra (Platonic solids) are exactly examined within the framework of a simple graph-theoretical approach. While the Ising cube as the only unfrustrated (bipartite) spin cluster shows just one trivial plateau at zero magnetization, the other regular Ising polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron and dodecahedron) additionally display either one or two intermediate plateaux at fractional values of the saturation magnetization. The nature of highly degenerate ground states emergent at intermediate plateaux owing to a geometric frustration is clarified. It is evidenced that the regular Ising polyhedra exhibit a giant magnetocaloric effect in a vicinity of magnetization jumps, whereas the Ising octahedron and dodecahedron belong to the most prominent geometrically frustrated spin clusters that enable an efficient low-temperature refrigeration by the process of adiabatic demagnetization.

  18. Compound streams, magnetic clouds, and major geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L.F.; Behannon, K.W. ); Klein, L.W. )

    1987-06-01

    Data from ISEE 3, Helios A, and Helios B were used to identify the components of two compound streams and to determine their configurations. (A compound stream is a stream which has formed as a result of the interaction of two or more distinct fast flows.) In one case, ejecta containing a magnetic cloud associated with a disappearing quiescent filament were interacting with a corotating stream. In the second case, ejecta containing a magnetic cloud associated with a 2B flare were overtaking ejecta from a different source. Each of these compound streams produced an unusually large geomagnetic storm, on April 3, 1979, and on April 25, 1979, respectively. The largest geomagnetic storm in the period 1968-1986, which occurred on July 13, 1982, was associated with a compound stream. Thirty geomagnetic storms with Ap > 90 occurred between 1972 and 1983, and there are interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data for 17 of these events. The data suggest that most large geomagnetic storms are associated with compound streams and/or magnetic clouds.

  19. Impact of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds On The Earthss Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.

    We present data collected by Wind in March 2001 for magnetic clouds along with the Dst index and IMAGE/RPI sounder data in the magnetosphere. The normal state of the solar wind is characterized by a solar wind quasi-invariant (QI = (B2/8)/(v2/2) ) where B is the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field , v is the bulk solar wind speed and is the plasma density. While the yearly median QI follows sunspot num- bers with a 98 per cent correlation (Osherovich et al 1999), the arrival of a magnetic cloud increases QI by two orders of magnitude (Osherovich et al. 1997). Sounder stimulated resonances such as harmonics of the electron gyro frequency fce, electron plasma resonance fpe, Bernstein mode resonances Qn with frequencies above fpe and Dn resonances with frequencies below fpe are used to deduce the ratio between the electron gyro radius rce and the Debye radius rde. We suggest that the ratio rce/rde as a measure of the magnetospheric response to the magnetic cloud. We show that profiles of QI and rce/rde are similar and we find the delay time between the signal (QI) and the response (rce/rde). References: Osherovich, V.A., et al., Proc. 31st ESLAB Symp., ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Nether- lands, 171, 1997. Osherovich, V.A. , J. Fainberg and R.G. Stone, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26(16), 2597, 1999.

  20. 3D inversion of full magnetic gradient tensor data based on hybrid regularization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shuangxi; Zhang, Huai; Wang, Yanfei; Zhao, Lingling

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the magnetic tensor data can be directly measured due to the latest development of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based sensors, which can collect five unique magnetic gradients components (partial H_x/ partial x , partial H_x/ partial y , partial H_x/ partial z , partial H_y/ partial z ,partial H_z/ partial z ). More measurement date will bring more useful information of observed magnetic anomaly, however it still bear the computational instability problem because of the intrinsic ill-posed property in the magnetic inverse problem. Furthermore, most of research on magnetic regularization inversion only concentrate on total magnetic field or magnetic vector field, rather than the magnetic gradient tensor field. Therefore we introduce a novel 3D hybrid regularization method by MS-TV stabilizer for inversion of magnetic gradient tensor data, which is designed mainly based on the minimum support functional (MS) and total variation functional (TV), and the final regularization functional can be described as the following form: J(κ)&=1/2(G(κ)-d,wd(G(κ)-d))ΩP+α((1-λ)φpMS(κ)+λφβ TV(κ)) &=1/2(G(κ)-d,wd(G(κ)-d))ΩP +α(1-λ/2\\intΩQ(κ-κprior)2/(κ-κprior)2+e2dΩQ &+λ\\intΩQ√{|\

  1. A 3D Current Loop Model of Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    1992-05-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed to study magnetic clouds (Burlaga et al. 1981). In this model, magnetic clouds observed near 1 AU are treated as a consequence of eruptive solar current loops. It is shown that current loops intially in MHD equilibrium can be triggered to rise rapidly, propelling material of up to 10(16) g at up to ~ 1000 km s(-1) and dissipating ~ 10(32) erg of magnetic energy in tens of minutes. The initial rise profile is consistent with observed height-time profiles of erupting filaments (Kahler et al. 1988). Two triggering mechanisms for eruption are suggested: (1)subphotospheric energy storage and trigger and (2) in situ (coronal) energy storage and trigger. In the former, eruption occurs as a result of changes in the subphotospheric magnetic topology and subsequent relaxation to a new equilibrium. In the latter, the current loop can evolve to exceed a local maximum in the magnetic potential associated with the ambient magnetic fields. The former scenario leads to more energetic and longer-lasting eruption than the latter. Burlaga, L. F., Sittler, E., Mariani, F., and Schwenn, R. 1981, J. Geophys. Res., 86, 6673. Kahler, S. W., Moore, R. L., Kane, S. R., and Zirin, H. 1988, Ap. J., 328, 824.

  2. Magnetic Field Generation During the Collision of Narrow Plasma Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-ichi; Kazimura, Yoshihiro; Haruki, Takayuki

    1999-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the collision of narrow plasma clouds,whose transverse dimension is on the order of the electron skin depth.A 2D3V (two dimensions in space and three dimensions in velocity space)particle-in-cell (PIC) collisionless relativistic code is used toshow the generation of a quasi-staticmagnetic field during the collision of narrow plasma clouds both inelectron-ion and electron-positron (pair) plasmas. The localizedstrong magnetic fluxes result in the generation of the charge separationwith complicated structures, which may be sources of electromagneticas well as Langmuir waves. We also present one applicationof this process, which occurs during coalescence of magnetic islandsin a current sheet of pair plasmas.

  3. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    PubMed

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  4. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  5. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin ( e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  6. Fragmentation of a Filamentary Cloud Permeated by a Perpendicular Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Kudoh, Takahiro; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2017-10-01

    We examine the linear stability of an isothermal filamentary cloud permeated by a perpendicular magnetic field. Our model cloud is assumed to be supported by gas pressure against self-gravity in the unperturbed state. For simplicity, the density distribution is assumed to be symmetric around the axis. Also for simplicity, the initial magnetic field is assumed to be uniform, and turbulence is not taken into account. The perturbation equation is formulated to be an eigenvalue problem. The growth rate is obtained as a function of the wavenumber for fragmentation along the axis and the magnetic field strength. The growth rate depends critically on the outer boundary. If the displacement vanishes in regions very far from the cloud axis (fixed boundary), cloud fragmentation is suppressed by a moderate magnetic field, which means the plasma beta is below 1.67 on the cloud axis. If the displacement is constant along the magnetic field in regions very far from the cloud, the cloud is unstable even when the magnetic field is infinitely strong. The cloud is deformed by circulation in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The unstable mode is not likely to induce dynamical collapse, since it is excited even when the whole cloud is magnetically subcritical. For both boundary conditions, the magnetic field increases the wavelength of the most unstable mode. We find that the magnetic force suppresses compression perpendicular to the magnetic field especially in regions of low density.

  7. Magnetic Field of the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Shuji

    2016-10-01

    We have performed extensive near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ˜70-310 μG in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  8. Solar energetic particles as probes of the structures of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1990-01-01

    Two possible closed magnetic topologies are considered for clouds: an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the sun and a magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are used as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to clouds in many events indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun.

  9. Intense magnetic clouds and their interactions with ambient solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.-L.

    Structure characteristics of typical intense magnetic clouds are discussed for different conditions of ambient solar wind streams, with emphasis on the dynamic processes that govern the interaction between cloud and ambient stream. It is suggested that large magnetic pressure gradient forces at the expanding cloud boundaries are able to accelerate the stream ahead of cloud and decelerate that behind, building up double saw-tooth speed profiles and driving shocks.

  10. Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. Both models assume that the filamentary clouds are highly flattened. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. We show that these models reproduce the main features of the 2D equilibrium model of Tomisaka for a filamentary cloud threaded by a perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that the critical mass to flux ratio is M/Φ={{(2π \\sqrt{G})}-1}, where M, Φ and G denote the cloud mass, the total magnetic flux of the cloud, and the gravitational constant, respectively. This upper bound coincides with that for an axisymmetric cloud supported by poloidal magnetic fields. We apply the variational principle for studying the Jeans instability of the first model. Our model cloud is unstable against fragmentation as well as the filamentary clouds threaded by a longitudinal magnetic field. The fastest growing mode has a wavelength several times longer than the cloud diameter. The second model describes quasi-static evolution of a filamentary molecular cloud by ambipolar diffusion.

  11. On the Exchange of Kinetic and Magnetic Energy between Clouds and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1999-05-01

    We investigate, through two-dimensional MHD numerical simulations, the interaction of a uniform magnetic field oblique to a moving interstellar cloud. In particular we explore the transformation of cloud kinetic energy into magnetic energy as a result of field line stretching. Some previous simulations have emphasized the possible dynamical importance of a ``magnetic shield'' formed around clouds when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the cloud motion. It was not clear, however, how dependent those findings were on the assumed field configuration and cloud properties. To expand our understanding of this effect, we examine several new cases by varying the magnetic field orientation angle with respect to the cloud motion (θ), the cloud-background density contrast, and the cloud Mach number. We show that in two dimensions and with θ large enough, the magnetic field tension can become dominant in the dynamics of the motion of high density contrast, low Mach number clouds. In such a case, a significant fraction of the cloud's kinetic energy can be transformed into magnetic energy with the magnetic pressure at the cloud's nose exceeding the ram pressure of the impinging flow. We derive a characteristic timescale, τma, for this process of energy ``conversion.'' We find also that unless the cloud motion is highly aligned with the magnetic field, reconnection through tearing-mode instabilities in the cloud wake limits the formation of a strong flux-rope feature following the cloud. Finally we attempt to interpret some observed properties of the magnetic field in view of our results.

  12. An adaptive surface filter for airborne laser scanning point clouds by means of regularization and bending energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Han; Ding, Yulin; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Bo; Lin, Hui; Du, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yeting; Zhang, Yunsheng

    2014-06-01

    The filtering of point clouds is a ubiquitous task in the processing of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data; however, such filtering processes are difficult because of the complex configuration of the terrain features. The classical filtering algorithms rely on the cautious tuning of parameters to handle various landforms. To address the challenge posed by the bundling of different terrain features into a single dataset and to surmount the sensitivity of the parameters, in this study, we propose an adaptive surface filter (ASF) for the classification of ALS point clouds. Based on the principle that the threshold should vary in accordance to the terrain smoothness, the ASF embeds bending energy, which quantitatively depicts the local terrain structure to self-adapt the filter threshold automatically. The ASF employs a step factor to control the data pyramid scheme in which the processing window sizes are reduced progressively, and the ASF gradually interpolates thin plate spline surfaces toward the ground with regularization to handle noise. Using the progressive densification strategy, regularization and self-adaption, both performance improvement and resilience to parameter tuning are achieved. When tested against the benchmark datasets provided by ISPRS, the ASF performs the best in comparison with all other filtering methods, yielding an average total error of 2.85% when optimized and 3.67% when using the same parameter set.

  13. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  14. Colloidal domain lithography for regularly arranged artificial magnetic out-of-plane monodomains in Au/Co/Au layers.

    PubMed

    Kuświk, Piotr; Ehresmann, Arno; Tekielak, Maria; Szymański, Bogdan; Sveklo, Iosif; Mazalski, Piotr; Engel, Dieter; Kisielewski, Jan; Lengemann, Daniel; Urbaniak, Maciej; Schmidt, Christoph; Maziewski, Andrzej; Stobiecki, Feliks

    2011-03-04

    Regularly arranged magnetic out-of-plane patterns in continuous and flat films are promising for applications in data storage technology (bit patterned media) or transport of individual magnetic particles. Whereas topographic magnetic structures are fabricated by standard lithographical techniques, the fabrication of regularly arranged artificial domains in topographically flat films is difficult, since the free energy minimization determines the existence, shape, and regularity of domains. Here we show that keV He(+) ion bombardment of Au/Co/Au layer systems through a colloidal mask of hexagonally arranged spherical polystyrene beads enables magnetic patterning of regularly arranged cylindrical magnetic monodomains with out-of-plane magnetization embedded in a ferromagnetic matrix with easy-plane anisotropy. This colloidal domain lithography creates artificial domains via periodic lateral anisotropy variations induced by periodic defect density modulations. Magnetization reversal of the layer system observed by magnetic force microscopy shows individual disc switching indicating monodomain states.

  15. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-12-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  16. Solar cycle-dependent helicity transport by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-08-01

    Magnetic clouds observed with the Wind and ACE spacecraft are fit with the static, linear force-free cylinder model to obtain estimates of the chirality, fluxes, and magnetic helicity of each event. The fastest magnetic clouds (MCs) are shown to carry the most flux and helicity. We calculate the net cumulative helicity which measures the difference in right- and left-handed helicity contained in MCs over time. The net cumulative helicity does not average to zero; rather, a strong left-handed helicity bias develops over the solar cycle, dominated by the largest events of cycle 23: Bastille Day 2000 and 28 October 2003. The majority of MCs ("slow" events, < 500 km/s) have a net cumulative helicity profile that appears to be modulated by the solar activity cycle. This is far less evident for "fast" MC events ( ≥ 500 km/s), which were disproportionately left-handed over our data set. A brief discussion about the various solar sources of CME helicity and their implication for dynamo processes is included.

  17. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  18. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices. PMID:24356511

  19. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet.

    PubMed

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-12-20

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices.

  20. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices.

  1. Geospace Response to a Slow Moving Unipolar Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Matsuo, T.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The passage at Earth of a unipolar, southward-directed magnetic cloud on 28-29 May 2010 provided a unique opportunity to investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in response to a slow-moving transient in the solar wind and the subsequent higher speed flow. Despite more than 8 hours of IMF Bz < -10 nT, the Dst Index did not intensify below -100 nT. However, there was an extraordinary 16-hour stretch with the AE index exceeding 500 nT throughout. We use magnetic perturbation data from the constellation of more than 70 Iridium satellites forming the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) and from four satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program to map the large-scale field-aligned currents during this interval. Of particular interest are: 1) the prolonged interval of AE index greater than 500 nT and 2) the dayside response to a full rotation of the interplanetary east-west (IMF By) component while the IMF is southward. During the magnetic cloud passage we are able to isolate the IMF By response without the intervening effects of solar wind pressure pulses or other IMF discontinuities. In addition to the unusual storm features, we discuss the "observational error" characteristics of the space-based magnetic field measurements incorporated into the data assimilation algorithm used in the field-aligned current mapping The independent satellite measurements allow us to quantify the uncertainty in the mapping procedure. We report on the spatial and temporal uncertainties.

  2. ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS AS PROBES OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, D. V.; Kahler, S. W.; Tylka, A. J.

    2009-08-01

    We report, for the first time, the observation near the Earth of anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) particles throughout the interiors of interplanetary magnetic clouds (MCs) at the same intensity as outside the MCs. ACRs, accelerated in the outer heliosphere, have unique elemental abundances making their identity unambiguous as they probe these clouds from the outside. Thus, MCs, carried out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are seen to contain no structures that are magnetically closed to the penetration of ions with energies above a few MeV amu{sup -1}. As the MCs expand outward, they must fill their increasing volume with ACRs dynamically, to the same degree as neighboring 'open' field lines. These observations cast doubt on conventional ideas about the closed field topologies of MCs and the cross-field transport of energetic particles. The ACR observations conflict with some reports of significant exclusion from MCs of solar energetic particles (SEPs) of comparable energy and rigidity. A process that allows cross-field transport of ACRs may also allow similar transport of SEPs late in events, causing the large spatial extent and uniformity of SEPs in 'invariant spectral regions' extending far behind CME-driven shock waves.

  3. Energetic electrons associated with magnetic reconnection in the magnetic cloud boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wei, F S; Feng, X S; Zhang, S H; Zuo, P B; Sun, T R

    2010-11-05

    Here is reported in situ observation of energetic electrons (∼100-500 keV) associated with magnetic reconnection in the solar wind by the ACE and Wind spacecraft. The properties of this magnetic cloud driving reconnection and the associated energetic electron acceleration problem are discussed. Further analyses indicate that the electric field acceleration and Fermi-type mechanism are two fundamental elements in the electron acceleration processes and the trapping effect of the specific magnetic field configuration maintains the acceleration status that increases the totally gained energy.

  4. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  5. A Regularized Approach for Solving Magnetic Differential Equations and a Revised Iterative Equilibrium Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson

    2010-10-13

    A method for approximately solving magnetic differential equations is described. The approach is to include a small diffusion term to the equation, which regularizes the linear operator to be inverted. The extra term allows a "source-correction" term to be defned, which is generally required in order to satisfy the solvability conditions. The approach is described in the context of computing the pressure and parallel currents in the iterative approach for computing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. __________________________________________________

  6. Constraining regular and turbulent magnetic field strengths in M 51 via Faraday depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, C.; Haverkorn, M.; Fletcher, A.; Shukurov, A.

    2014-08-01

    We employ an analytical model that incorporates both wavelength-dependent and wavelength-independent depolarization to describe radio polarimetric observations of polarization at λλλ 3.5,6.2,20.5 cm in M 51 (NGC 5194). The aim is to constrain both the regular and turbulent magnetic field strengths in the disk and halo, modeled as a two- or three-layer magneto-ionic medium, via differential Faraday rotation and internal Faraday dispersion, along with wavelength-independent depolarization arising from turbulent magnetic fields. A reduced chi-squared analysis is used for the statistical comparison of predicted to observed polarization maps to determine the best-fit magnetic field configuration at each of four radial rings spanning 2.4 - 7.2 kpc in 1.2 kpc increments. We find that a two-layer modeling approach provides a better fit to the observations than a three-layer model, where the near and far sides of the halo are taken to be identical, although the resulting best-fit magnetic field strengths are comparable. This implies that all of the signal from the far halo is depolarized at these wavelengths. We find a total magnetic field in the disk of approximately 18 μG and a total magnetic field strength in the halo of ~4-6 μG. Both turbulent and regular magnetic field strengths in the disk exceed those in the halo by a factor of a few. About half of the turbulent magnetic field in the disk is anisotropic, but in the halo all turbulence is only isotropic.

  7. The Role of Magnetic Fields in Structuring Clouds and Forming Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Chen, C.-Y.; Fissel, L.; King, P.

    2017-06-01

    I will discuss the role of magnetic fields in structuring diffuse ISM and molecular clouds and in forming stars, with emphasis on the distribution of the relative orientation between the field direction as traced by dust polarization and cloud structures and the origin of the magnetically aligned striations.

  8. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  9. √Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-08-01

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. Both the models assume that the filamentary clouds are highly flattened. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. We show that these models reproduce the main features of the 2D equilibrium model of a filamentary cloud threaded by a perpendicular magnetic field. It is also shown that the critical mass to flux ratio is M/Φ = 1/(2 π√G ) , where M, Φ, and G denote the cloud mass, the total magnetic flux of the cloud, and the gravitational constant, respectively. This upper bound coincides with that for an axisymmetric cloud supported by poloidal magnetic fields. We apply the variational principle for studying the Jeans instability of the first model. Our model cloud is unstable against fragmentation as well as the filamentary clouds threaded by a longitudinal magnetic field. The fastest growing mode has a wavelength several times longer than the cloud diameter. This is because the first model is supercritical. The second model describes quasi-static evolution of a filamentary molecular cloud by ambipolar diffusion. The mass to flux ratio increases at the filament center and exceeds the critical value at a certain point. It is suggested that the filamentary cloud becomes unstable against fragmentation at the critical mass to flux ratio.

  10. Expansion of magnetic clouds in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulisano, A. M.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Rodriguez, L.

    2012-07-01

    Context. A large amount of magnetized plasma is frequently ejected from the Sun as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Some of these ejections are detected in the solar wind as magnetic clouds (MCs) that have flux rope signatures. Aims: Magnetic clouds are structures that typically expand in the inner heliosphere. We derive the expansion properties of MCs in the outer heliosphere from one to five astronomical units to compare them with those in the inner heliosphere. Methods: We analyze MCs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft using in situ magnetic field and plasma measurements. The MC boundaries are defined in the MC frame after defining the MC axis with a minimum variance method applied only to the flux rope structure. As in the inner heliosphere, a large fraction of the velocity profile within MCs is close to a linear function of time. This is indicative of a self-similar expansion and a MC size that locally follows a power-law of the solar distance with an exponent called ζ. We derive the value of ζ from the in situ velocity data. Results: We analyze separately the non-perturbed MCs (cases showing a linear velocity profile almost for the full event), and perturbed MCs (cases showing a strongly distorted velocity profile). We find that non-perturbed MCs expand with a similar non-dimensional expansion rate (ζ = 1.05 ± 0.34), i.e. slightly faster than at the solar distance and in the inner heliosphere (ζ = 0.91 ± 0.23). The subset of perturbed MCs expands, as in the inner heliosphere, at a significantly lower rate and with a larger dispersion (ζ = 0.28 ± 0.52) as expected from the temporal evolution found in numerical simulations. This local measure of the expansion also agrees with the distribution with distance of MC size, mean magnetic field, and plasma parameters. The MCs interacting with a strong field region, e.g. another MC, have the most variable expansion rate (ranging from compression to over-expansion).

  11. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  12. Magnetically charged regular black hole in a model of nonlinear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2015-11-15

    We obtain a magnetically charged regular black hole in general relativity. The source to the Einstein field equations is nonlinear electrodynamic field in a physically reasonable model of nonlinear electrodynamics (NED). “Physically” here means the NED model is constructed on the basis of three conditions: the Maxwell asymptotic in the weak electromagnetic field limit; the presence of vacuum birefringence phenomenon; and satisfying the weak energy condition (WEC). In addition, we analyze the thermodynamic properties of the regular black hole in two ways. According to the usual black hole thermodynamics, we calculate the heat capacity at constant charge, from which we know the smaller black hole is more stable. We also employ the horizon thermodynamics to discuss the thermodynamic quantities, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure.

  13. Periodic vortex pinning by regular structures in Nb thin films: magnetic vs. structural effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Maria Isabel; Jonsson-Akerman, B. Johan; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2001-03-01

    The defects present in a superconducting material can lead to a great variety of static and dynamic vortex phases. In particular, the interaction of the vortex lattice with regular arrays of pinning centers such as holes or magnetic dots gives rise to commensurability effects. These commensurability effects can be observed in the magnetoresistance and in the critical current dependence with the applied field. In recent years, experimental results have shown that there is a dependence of the periodic pinning effect on the properties of the vortex lattice (i.e. vortex-vortex interactions, elastic energy and vortex velocity) and also on the dots characteristics (i.e. dot size, distance between dots, magnetic character of the dot material, etc). However, there is not still a good understanding of the nature of the main pinning mechanisms by the magnetic dots. To clarify this important issue, we have studied and compared the periodic pinning effects in Nb films with rectangular arrays of Ni, Co and Fe dots, as well as the pinning effects in a Nb film deposited on a hole patterned substrate without any magnetic material. We will discuss the differences on pinning energies arising from magnetic effects as compared to structural effects of the superconducting film. This work was supported by NSF and DOE. M.I. Montero acknowledges postdoctoral fellowship by the Secretaria de Estado de Educacion y Universidades (Spain).

  14. Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays in a toroidal model of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The time dynamics of the particle distribution function in a magnetic cloud with the shape of a toroidal segment with the characteristic (forceless) structure of a magnetic field has been calculated. The shape of the cloud at the subsequent propagation in the interplanetary space has been determined by the kinematic model. The magnetic field of the cloud is calculated using the freezing-in condition. A significant effect of regions connecting the magnetic cloud with the Sun on the propagation of particles in the region of perturbation has been revealed. The calculation of the particle density and anisotropy of the intensity demonstrates reasonable agreement with the measurements. The results indicate the decisive role of the characteristic structure of the magnetic field in the time dynamics of the Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays.

  15. Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-14

    Clouds are common near the north polar caps throughout the spring and summer. The clouds typically cause a haze over the extensive dune fields. This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows the edge of the cloud front.

  16. An Alternative Method for Identifying Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-Gonzalez, A.; Mendes, O.; Calzadilla, A.; Domingues, M. O.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatio-temporal entropy (STE) analysis is used as an alternative mathematical tool to identify possible magnetic cloud (MC) candidates. We analyze Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) data using a time interval of only 10 days. We select a convenient data interval of 2500 records moving forward by 200 record steps until the end of the time series. For every data segment, the STE is calculated at each step. During an MC event, the STE reaches values close to zero. This extremely low value of STE is due to MC structure features. However, not all of the magnetic components in MCs have STE values close to zero at the same time. For this reason, we create a standardization index (the so-called Interplanetary Entropy, IE, index). This index is a worthwhile effort to develop new tools to help diagnose ICME structures. The IE was calculated using a time window of one year (1999), and it has a success rate of 70% over other identifiers of MCs. The unsuccessful cases (30%) are caused by small and weak MCs. The results show that the IE methodology identified 9 of 13 MCs, and emitted nine false alarm cases. In 1999, a total of 788 windows of 2500 values existed, meaning that the percentage of false alarms was 1.14%, which can be considered a good result. In addition, four time windows, each of 10 days, are studied, where the IE method was effective in finding MC candidates. As a novel result, two new MCs are identified in these time windows.

  17. Magnetic Clouds and Solar Sources in STEREO Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Lynch, B. J.; Kilpua, E. K.

    2012-12-01

    CMEs cause coronal and heliospheric disturbances. When a CME encounters the Earth, it disturbs the earth's electromagnetic environment, especially a Magnetic Cloud (MC) with enhanced, steady and long lasting southward field. The speed and the magnetic field magnitude of a MC are the two important properties to measure its geoeffectiveness. From year 2007 to 2011, the number of MC encounters with the Earth (ACE), STEREO-A and B is between four to 17 each year at each site. CMEs, during the same time, occur from about 200 to 800 each year. The number of CMEs each year increases with increasing solar activity, but the number of MCs per year appears not following any temporal trend and vary randomly at each observing point. The speed and the magnetic field strength of the MCs do vary with the solar activity level, i.e., faster and stronger MCs are received with rising activity. The polarity of MCs at ACE and STEREO all follows the solar cycle reversal consistent with previous findings. Out of the total about 30 MCs encountered the Earth, 12 MCs had associated flares, seven had filament eruptions, four had no solar disk activity, and seven were unclear. Seven MCs follow LASCO halo CMEs, 10 MCs follow LASCO partial halo CMEs, the rest 13 had no halo or partial halo CME preceeding them at the coronagraph. On the other side, there are total of 57 LASCO full halo CMEs during the five years, only seven of them encountered the earth as MCs. STEREO SECCHI coronagraph and HI images served critical roles in the determination of the CME source of a MC once the their separation from the Earth is significant. The propagation of CMEs through the heliosphere needs further study and understanding to improve our space weather forecast capability.

  18. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  19. Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T.; Koepke, M. E.

    2008-09-07

    The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

  20. DO THE LEGS OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS CONTAIN TWISTED FLUX-ROPE MAGNETIC FIELDS?

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, M. J.

    2016-02-20

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  1. Do the Legs of Magnetic Clouds Contain Twisted Flux-rope Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  2. Comparisons of Characteristics of Magnetic Clouds and Cloud-Like Structures During 1995-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Using eighteen years (1995 - 2012) of solar wind plasma and magnetic field data (observed by the Wind spacecraft), solar activity (e.g. sunspot number: SSN), and the geomagnetic activity index (Dst), we have identified 168 magnetic clouds (MCs) and 197 magnetic cloud - like structures (MCLs), and we have made relevant comparisons. The following features are found during seven different periods (TP: Total period during 1995 - 2012, P1 and P2: first and second half period during 1995 - 2003 and 2004 - 2012, Q1 and Q2: quiet periods during 1995 - 1997 and 2007 - 2009, A1 and A2: active periods during 1998 - 2006 and 2010 - 2012). (1) During the total period the yearly occurrence frequency is 9.3 for MCs and 10.9 for MCLs. (2) In the quiet periods Q1 > Q1 and Q2 > Q2, but in the active periods A1 < A1 and A2 < A2. (3) The minimum Bz (Bzmin) inside of a MC is well correlated with the intensity of geomagnetic activity, Dstmin (minimum Dst found within a storm event) for MCs (with a Pearson correlation coefficient, c.c. = 0.75, and the fitting function is Dstmin = 0.90+7.78Bzmin), but Bzmin for MCLs is not well correlated with the Dst index (c.c. = 0.56, and the fitting function is Dstmin = -9.40+ 4.58 Bzmin). (4) MCs play a major role in producing geomagnetic storms: the absolute value of the average Dstmin (MC = -70 nT) for MCs associated geomagnetic storms is two times stronger than that for MCLs (MCL = -35 nT), due to the difference in the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) strength. (5) The SSN is not correlated with MCs (TP, c.c. = 0.27), but is well associated with MCLs (TP, c.c. = 0.85). Note that the c.c. for SSN vs. P2 is higher than that for SSN vs. P2. (6) Averages of IMF, solar wind speed, and density inside of the MCs are higher than those inside of the MCLs. (7) The average of MC duration (approx. = 18.82 hours) is approx. = 20 % longer than the average of MCL

  3. Massive outflows driven by magnetic effects in star-forming clouds with high mass accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Yuko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Sakurai, Yuya; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The relation between the mass accretion rate on to the circumstellar disc and the rate of mass ejection by magnetically driven winds is investigated using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Using a spherical cloud core with a varying ratio of thermal to gravitational energy, which determines the mass accretion rate on to the disc, to define the initial conditions, the outflow propagation for approximately 104 yr after protostar formation is then calculated for several cloud cores. The mass ejection rate and accretion rate are comparable only when the magnetic energy of the initial cloud core is comparable to the gravitational energy. Consequently, in strongly magnetized clouds a higher mass accretion rate naturally produces both massive protostars and massive outflows. The simulated outflow mass, momentum, kinetic energy and momentum flux agree well with observations, indicating that massive stars form through the same mechanism as low-mass stars but require a significantly strong magnetic field to launch massive outflows.

  4. The dynamics of charged dust in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Hopkins, Philip F.; Squire, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of large, charged dust grains in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Massive dust grains behave as aerodynamic particles in primarily neutral dense gas, and thus are able to produce dramatic small-scale fluctuations in the dust-to-gas ratio. Hopkins & Lee directly simulated the dynamics of neutral dust grains in supersonic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, typical of GMCs, and showed that the dust-to-gas fluctuations can exceed factor ∼1000 on small scales, with important implications for star formation, stellar abundances and dust behaviour and growth. However, even in primarily neutral gas in GMCs, dust grains are negatively charged and Lorentz forces are non-negligible. Therefore, we extend our previous study by including the effects of Lorentz forces on charged grains (in addition to drag). For small-charged grains (sizes ≪ 0.1 μm), Lorentz forces suppress dust-to-gas ratio fluctuations, while for large grains (sizes ≳ 1 μm), Lorentz forces have essentially no effect, trends that are well explained with a simple theory of dust magnetization. In some special intermediate cases, Lorentz forces can enhance dust-gas segregation. Regardless, for the physically expected scaling of dust charge with grain size, we find the most important effects depend on grain size (via the drag equation) with Lorentz forces/charge as a second-order correction. We show that the dynamics we consider are determined by three dimensionless numbers in the limit of weak background magnetic fields: the turbulent Mach number, a dust drag parameter (proportional to grain size) and a dust Lorentz parameter (proportional to grain charge); these allow us to generalize our simulations to a wide range of conditions.

  5. Linking two consecutive nonmerging magnetic clouds with their solar sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Schmieder, B.; Cremades, H.; Cid, C.; Cerrato, Y.; Saiz, E.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Aran, A.; Menvielle, M.; Poedts, S.

    2009-02-01

    On 15 May 2005, a huge interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed near Earth. It triggered one of the most intense geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 23 (Dst peak = -263 nT). This structure has been associated with the two-ribbon flare, filament eruption, and coronal mass ejection originating in active region 10759 (NOAA number). We analyze here the sequence of events, from solar wind measurements (at 1 AU) and back to the Sun, to understand the origin and evolution of this geoeffective ICME. From a detailed observational study of in situ magnetic field observations and plasma parameters in the interplanetary (IP) medium and the use of appropriate models we propose an alternative interpretation of the IP observations, different to those discussed in previous studies. In our view, the IP structure is formed by two extremely close consecutive magnetic clouds (MCs) that preserve their identity during their propagation through the interplanetary medium. Consequently, we identify two solar events in Hα and EUV which occurred in the source region of the MCs. The timing between solar and IP events, as well as the orientation of the MC axes and their associated solar arcades are in good agreement. Additionally, interplanetary radio type II observations allow the tracking of the multiple structures through inner heliosphere and pin down the interaction region to be located midway between the Sun and the Earth. The chain of observations from the photosphere to interplanetary space is in agreement with this scenario. Our analysis allows the detection of the solar sources of the transients and explains the extremely fast changes of the solar wind due to the transport of two attached (though nonmerging) MCs which affect the magnetosphere.

  6. On the behavior of the Dst geomagnetic index in the vicinity of magnetic cloud passages at earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The geomagnetic response to magnetic clouds is investigated for the 34 magnetic clouds observed between 1973 and 1982, according to cloud type: southward turning clouds as compared to northward turning clouds (a southward turning cloud is one whose Bz near cloud onset at earth is directed northward, while a northward turning cloud is one whose initial Bz is directed southward). While, on average, the most negative Dst value associated with interplanetary magnetic clouds is the one for northward turning clouds, the difference in the depths of decrease (onset Dst value minus the most negative Dst value during cloud passage) for the two cloud types does not appear to be statistically important; hence, northward turning and southward turning clouds have depths of decrease of comparable size, differing primarily in the time of most negative Dst occurrence. For northward turning clouds, the most negative Dst value usually occurs within 12 hours of cloud onset at earth, while for southward turning clouds it is delayed until after 12 hours from cloud onset.

  7. Propagation Characteristics of CMEs Associated Magnetic Clouds and Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Roksoon; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.; Moon, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of magnetic cloud (MC) and ejecta (EJ) associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the assumption that all CMEs have a flux rope structure. For this, we used 54 CMEs and their interplanetary counter parts (interplanetary CMEs: ICMEs) that constitute the list of events used by the NASA/LWS Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) on CME flux ropes. We considered the location, angular width, speed, and direction parameter, D, that quantifies the propagation direction of a CME. For the 54 CDAW events, we found several properties of the CMEs as follows: (1) the average value of D for the 23 MCs (0.62) is larger than that for the 31 EJs (0.49), which indicates that the MC-associated CMEs propagate more directly to the Earth than the EJ-associated CMEs; (2) comparison between the direction parameter and the source location shows that the majority of the MC-associated CMEs are ejected along the radial direction, while many of the EJ-associated CMEs are ejected non-radially; (3) the mean speed of MC-associated CMEs (946 km/s) is faster than that of EJ-associated CMEs (771 km/s). For seven very fast CMEs (> 1500 km/s), all CMEs with large D (> 0.4) are associated with MCs and the CMEs with small D are associated with EJs. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the CME trajectory essentially decides the observed ICME structure.

  8. Topology and Dynamics of the 12 December 1980 Magnetic Cloud Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-pacheco, J.; Cid, C.; Blanco, J. J.; Sequeiros, J.

    2003-03-01

    In this work we have performed an analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma parameters associated with the 12th December 1980 shock-magnetic cloud event. The study was complemented by including a detailed analysis of the energetic particles fluxes, spectral indexes and directional information. Locally, the magnetic cloud had a latitude of 48°, longitude of 220° and a radius of 0.15 AU. The maximum approach of the ISEE-3 spacecraft to the magnetic cloud axis was 0.047 AU. Moreover, our results suggest that, when encountered by the spacecraft, the magnetic cloud was expanding at a rate of roughly r1/r0=1.5 (r1 is the final radius and r0 the initial one) and that it had been expanding during 59 hr. We have also found evidence which indicates that the particle injection inside the cloud depended on the particle energy and pitch angle. These features also suggest that the energetic particle bi-directional fluxes could not be produced by mirroring in the magnetic cloud feet. Instead we think that these fluxes could be generated by the intrinsic properties of the injection mechanism.

  9. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 < 1. This anti-correlation and small polytropic gamma-values is interpreted in the context of the presence of highly non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  10. Some Peculiar Properties of Magnetic Clouds as Observed by the WIND Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdichevsky, D.; Lepping, R. P.; Szabo, A.; Burlaga, L. F.; Thompson, B. J.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinburg, J. T.; Mariani, F.

    1999-01-01

    We aimed at understanding the common characteristics of magnetic clouds, relevant to solar-interplanetary connections, but exceptional ones were noted and are stressed here through a short compendium. The study is based on analyses of 28 good or better events (Out of 33 candidates) as identified in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. These cloud intervals are provided by WIND-MFI's Website under the URL (http://lepmfi.gsfc.nasa.gov/mfi/mag_cloud_publ.html#table). The period covered is from early 1995 to November 1998. A force free, cylindrically symmetric, magnetic field model has been applied to the field data in usually 1-hour averaged form for the cloud analyses. Some of the findings are: (1) one small duration event turned out to have an approximately normal size which was due to a distant almost "skimming" passage by the spacecraft; (2) One truly small event was observed, where 10 min averages had to be used in the model fitting; it had an excellent model fit and the usual properties of a magnetic cloud, except it possessed a small axial magnetic flux; (3) One cloud ha a dual axial-field-polarity, in the sense that the "core" had one polarity and the annular region around it had an opposite polarity. This event also satisfied the model and with a ve3ry good chi-squared value. Some others show a hint of this dual polarity; (4) The temporal distribution of occurrence clouds over the 4 years show a dip in 1996; (5) About 50 % of the clouds had upstream shocks; any others had upstream pressure pulses; (6) The overall average speed (390 km/s) of the best 28 events is less than the normally quoted for the average solar wind speed (420 km/s) The average of central cloud speed to the upstream solar wind speed was not much greater than one (1.08), even though many of these clouds were drivers of interplanetary shocks. Cloud expansion is partly the reason for the existence of upstream shocks; (7) The cloud axes often (about 50 % of the time) revealed reasonable

  11. Magnetic fields in massive cloud cores - Comparison of MILLIPOL and IRAS results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Brian D.; Clemens, Dan P.; Barvainis, Richard; Leach, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    The MILLIPOL polarimeter has been used to obtain 30-arcsec resolution 1300-micron data toward 10 cloud cores; the seven that were detected are associated with compact H II regions in massive molecular clouds. Cloud-core axis ratios and position angles were derived by examining the morphologies of IRAS-traced dust opacity structures. The MILLIPOL-detected cloud cores exhibit 1.5-3.2 core axis ratio values. The magnetic field is found to be generally perpendicular to the core dust distributions.

  12. Simultaneous observations of solar MeV particles in a magnetic cloud and in the earth's northern tail lobe - Implications for the global field line topology of magnetic clouds and for the entry of solar particles into the magnetosphere during cloud passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Osherovich, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft observations of magnetic fields and flow anisotropies of solar energetic protons and electrons during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud show various particle signature differences at the two spacecraft. These differences are interpretable in terms of the magnetic line topology of the cloud, the connectivity of the cloud field lines to the solar surface, and the interconnection between the magnetic fields of the magnetic clouds and of the earth. These observations are consistent with a magnetic cloud model in which these mesoscale configurations are curved magnetic flux ropes attached at both ends to the sun's surface, extending out to 1 AU.

  13. Collapse and Fragmentation of Molecular Cloud Cores. VIII. Magnetically Supported Infinite Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2005-03-01

    The collapse and fragmentation of initially sheetlike, magnetic molecular clouds is calculated in three dimensions with a gravitational, radiative hydrodynamics code. The code includes a crude representation of magnetic field effects and ambipolar diffusion through the magnetic pressure and magnetic tension approximations and a simple parameterization based on previous magnetohydrodynamic calculations, respectively. The computational volume is a spherical portion of an initially isothermal, infinite sheet of self-gravitating gas, symmetric about its midplane, with the portion of the cloud exterior to the spherical volume represented through its effect on the gravitational potential inside the spherical volume. The gas layer is initially in hydrostatic equilibrium, but with a mass equal to or greater than the critical mass (~1 Msolar) for the growth of gravitational instability. The magnetic field pressure acts to further stabilize the initial cloud. Over 106 active grid points are employed in the models, sufficient to resolve the Jeans length and so avoid artificial fragmentation. The parameters varied are the ratio of the ambipolar diffusion time to the midplane free fall time (10 or 20), the cloud's reference magnetic field strength (100 or 200 μG, corresponding to initially magnetically supercritical or subcritical clouds, respectively), the ratio of rotational to gravitational energy of the sheet (0.0 or 0.01), and the form of the initial density perturbation applied to the infinite sheet. Three types of outcomes are observed: formation of one or two protostars near the edge of the spherical volume, formation of a protostar near (but not at) the center of the cloud, or formation of a rotating ring near the center of the cloud, which appears likely to fragment into two or more protostars. Flow speeds of ~0.1 km s-1 are generated as the sheet begins to break up into collapsing protostars. The forming protostars are separated by distances approximately equal to

  14. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kirk, Helen

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ∼ 2-4 pc and densities of n ∼ 400-1000 cm-3 with Alfvén Mach numbers near unity. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyse the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DISPERSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that our simulated clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic field depends on the virial parameter. Sub-virial clumps undergo strong gravitational collapse and magnetic field lines are dragged with the accretion flow. We see evidence of filament-aligned flow and accretion flow on to the filament in the sub-virial cloud. Magnetic fields oriented more parallel in the sub-virial cloud and more perpendicular in the denser, marginally bound cloud. Radiative feedback from a 16 M⊙ star forming in a cluster in one of our simulation's ultimately results in the destruction of the main filament, the formation of an H II region, and the sweeping up of magnetic fields within an expanding shell at the edges of the H II region.

  15. Geo-effectiveness and radial dependence of magnetic cloud erosion by magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, Benoit; Ruffenach, Alexis; Rouillard, Alexis P.; Kajdic, Primoz; Manchester, Ward B.; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    flux erosion by magnetic reconnection occurs at the front of at least some magnetic clouds (MCs). We first investigate how erosion influences the geo-effectiveness of MCs in a general sense and using a south-north magnetic polarity MC observed on 18-20 October 1995. Although the magnetic shear at its front may not be known during propagation, measurements at 1 AU show signatures of local reconnection. Using a standard MC model, an empirical model of the geomagnetic response (Dst), and an observational estimate of the magnetic flux erosion, we find that the strength of the observed ensuing storm was ~30% lower than if no erosion had occurred. We then discuss the interplay between adiabatic compression and magnetic erosion at the front of MCs. We conclude that the most geo-effective configuration for a south-north polarity MC is to be preceded by a solar wind with southward IMF. This stems not only from the formation of a geo-effective sheath ahead of it but also from the adiabatic compression and reduced (or lack thereof) magnetic erosion which constructively conspire for the structure to be more geo-effective. Finally, assuming simple semiempirical and theoretical Alfvén speed profiles expected from expansion to 1 AU, we provide first-order estimates of the erosion process radial evolution. We find that the expected reconnection rates during propagation allow for significant erosion, on the order of those reported. Calculations also suggest that most of the erosion should occur in the inner heliosphere, and up to ~50% may yet occur beyond Mercury's orbit.

  16. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  17. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  18. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  19. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  20. TRANSITION FROM REGULAR TO CHAOTIC CIRCULATION IN MAGNETIZED CORONAE NEAR COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopacek, O.; Karas, V.; Kovar, J.; StuchlIk, Z.

    2010-10-20

    Accretion onto black holes and compact stars brings material in a zone of strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We study dynamical properties of motion of electrically charged particles forming a highly diluted medium (a corona) in the regime of strong gravity and large-scale (ordered) magnetic field. We start our work from a system that allows regular motion, then we focus on the onset of chaos. To this end, we investigate the case of a rotating black hole immersed in a weak, asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We also consider a magnetic star, approximated by the Schwarzschild metric and a test magnetic field of a rotating dipole. These are two model examples of systems permitting energetically bound, off-equatorial motion of matter confined to the halo lobes that encircle the central body. Our approach allows us to address the question of whether the spin parameter of the black hole plays any major role in determining the degree of the chaoticness. To characterize the motion, we construct the recurrence plots (RPs) and we compare them with Poincare surfaces of section. We describe the RPs in terms of the recurrence quantification analysis, which allows us to identify the transition between different dynamical regimes. We demonstrate that this new technique is able to detect the chaos onset very efficiently and provide its quantitative measure. The chaos typically occurs when the conserved energy is raised to a sufficiently high level that allows the particles to traverse the equatorial plane. We find that the role of the black hole spin in setting the chaos is more complicated than initially thought.

  1. Torus-Shaped Dust Clouds in Magnetized Anodic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, I.; Reichstein, T.; Greiner, F.; Piel, A.

    2008-09-07

    The generation of a torus-shaped dust cloud in an anodic plasma is decribed. The confined dust particles perfom a rotational motion around the torus major axis. The structure of the cloud in dependence of the external parameters are observed and the rotation velocity of the particles was measured and compared with a simple estimate.

  2. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect in the proximity of magnetization steps and jumps of spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg regular polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KarǏová, Katarína; Strečka, Jozef; Richter, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    The magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg clusters in the shape of regular polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, cube, icosahedron and dodecahedron) are examined using the exact diagonalization method. It is demonstrated that a quantum (xy) part of the XXZ exchange interaction is a primary cause for the presence of additional intermediate magnetization plateaux and steps, which are totally absent in the limiting Ising case. The only exception to this rule is the spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg tetrahedron, which shows just a quantitative shift of the level-crossing fields related to two magnetization steps. It is shown that spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg regular polyhedra exhibit an enhanced magnetocaloric effect in the proximity of magnetization steps and jumps, which are accompanied with a rapid drop (rise) of temperature just above (below) the level-crossing field when the magnetic field is removed adiabatically.

  3. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect in the proximity of magnetization steps and jumps of spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg regular polyhedra.

    PubMed

    KarǏová, Katarína; Strečka, Jozef; Richter, Johannes

    2017-03-29

    The magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg clusters in the shape of regular polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, cube, icosahedron and dodecahedron) are examined using the exact diagonalization method. It is demonstrated that a quantum (xy) part of the XXZ exchange interaction is a primary cause for the presence of additional intermediate magnetization plateaux and steps, which are totally absent in the limiting Ising case. The only exception to this rule is the spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg tetrahedron, which shows just a quantitative shift of the level-crossing fields related to two magnetization steps. It is shown that spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg regular polyhedra exhibit an enhanced magnetocaloric effect in the proximity of magnetization steps and jumps, which are accompanied with a rapid drop (rise) of temperature just above (below) the level-crossing field when the magnetic field is removed adiabatically.

  4. Propagation Characteristics of CMEs Associated with Magnetic Clouds and Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, R.-S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of magnetic cloud (MC) and ejecta (EJ) associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the assumption that all CMEs have a flux rope structure. For this, we used 54 CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts (interplanetary CMEs: ICMEs) that constitute the list of events used by the NASA/LWS Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) on CME flux ropes. We considered the location, angular width, and speed as well as the direction parameter, D. The direction parameter quantifies the degree of asymmetry of the CME shape in coronagraph images, and shows how closely the CME propagation is directed to Earth. For the 54 CDAW events, we found the following properties of the CMEs: i) the average value of D for the 23 MCs (0.62) is larger than that for the 31 EJs (0.49), which indicates that the MC-associated CMEs propagate more directly toward the Earth than the EJ-associated CMEs; ii) comparison between the direction parameter and the source location shows that the majority of the MC-associated CMEs are ejected along the radial direction, while many of the EJ-associated CMEs are ejected non-radially; iii) the mean speed of MC-associated CMEs (946 km s-1) is faster than that of EJ-associated CMEs (771 km s-1). For seven very fast CMEs (≥ 1500 km s-1), all CMEs with large D (≥ 0.4) are associated with MCs and the CMEs with small D are associated with EJs. From the statistical analysis of CME parameters, we found the superiority of the direction parameter. Based on these results, we suggest that the CME trajectory essentially determines the observed ICME structure.

  5. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  6. Magnetized High Velocity Clouds in the Galactic Halo: A New Distance Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønnow, Asger; Tepper-García, Thor; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-08-01

    High velocity gas that does not conform to Galactic rotation is observed throughout the Galaxy’s halo. One component of this gas, H i high velocity clouds (HVCs), have attracted attention since their discovery in the 1960s and remain controversial in terms of their origins, largely due to the lack of reliable distance estimates. The recent discovery of enhanced magnetic fields toward HVCs has encouraged us to explore their connection to cloud evolution, kinematics, and survival as they fall through the magnetized Galactic halo. For a reasonable model of the halo magnetic field, most infalling clouds see transverse rather than radial field lines. We find that significant compression (and thereby amplification) of the ambient magnetic field occurs in front of the cloud and in the tail of material stripped from the cloud. The compressed transverse field attenuates hydrodynamical instabilities. This delays cloud destruction, though not indefinitely. The observed {\\boldsymbol{B}} field compression is related to the cloud’s distance from the Galactic plane. As a result, the observed rotation measure provides useful distance information on a cloud’s location.

  7. MAGNETIZATION OF CLOUD CORES AND ENVELOPES AND OTHER OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF RECONNECTION DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Esquivel, A.; Crutcher, R.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observational results for magnetic fields in molecular clouds reviewed by Crutcher seem to be inconsistent with the predictions of the ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation. These include the measured decrease in mass to flux ratio between envelopes and cores, the failure to detect any self-gravitating magnetically subcritical clouds, the determination of the flat probability distribution function (PDF) of the total magnetic field strengths implying that there are many clouds with very weak magnetic fields, and the observed scaling B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 2/3} that implies gravitational contraction with weak magnetic fields. We consider the problem of magnetic field evolution in turbulent molecular clouds and discuss the process of magnetic field diffusion mediated by magnetic reconnection. For this process that we termed 'reconnection diffusion', we provide a simple physical model and explain that this process is inevitable in view of the present-day understanding of MHD turbulence. We address the issue of the expected magnetization of cores and envelopes in the process of star formation and show that reconnection diffusion provides an efficient removal of magnetic flux that depends only on the properties of MHD turbulence in the core and the envelope. We show that as the amplitude of turbulence as well as the scale of turbulent motions decrease from the envelope to the core of the cloud, the diffusion of the magnetic field is faster in the envelope. As a result, the magnetic flux trapped during the collapse in the envelope is being released faster than the flux trapped in the core, resulting in much weaker fields in envelopes than in cores, as observed. We provide simple semi-analytical model calculations which support this conclusion and qualitatively agree with the observational results. Magnetic reconnection is also consistent with the lack of subcritical self-gravitating clouds, with the observed flat PDF of field strengths, and with the

  8. The effect of the magnetic topology of the Magnetic Clouds over the Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J.; Hidalgo, M.; Blanco, J.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.

    2007-12-01

    We have simulated the effect of the magnetic topology of the Magnetic Clouds (MCs) over the solar energetic particle event (SEPe) fluxes (0.5-100 MeV) provided by solar flares. When a SEPe passes through a MC a characteristic behaviour in the data corresponding to the ion and electron fluxes is observed: a depression after a strong maximum of the flux. Using our cross-section circular and elliptical MC models we have tried to explain that effect, understanding the importance of the topology of the MC. In sight of the results of the preliminary analysis we conclude that the magnitude of the magnetic field seems not to play a significant role but the helicoidal topology associated with topology of the MCs. This work has been supported by the Spanish Comisión Internacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CICYT), grant ESP2005-07290-C02-01 and ESP2006-08459. This work is performed inside COST Action 724.

  9. A study of the starless dark cloud LDN 1570: Distance, dust properties, and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, C.; Maheswar, G.; Pandey, A. K.; Jose, J.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We aim to map the magnetic field geometry and to study the dust properties of the starless cloud, L1570, using multi-wavelength optical polarimetry and photometry of the stars projected on the cloud. Methods: The direction of the magnetic field component parallel to the plane of the sky of a cloud can be obtained using polarimetry of the stars projected on and located behind the cloud. It is believed that the unpolarized light from the stars background to the cloud undergoes selective extinction while passing through non-spherical dust grains that are aligned with their minor axes parallel to the cloud magnetic field. The emerging light becomes partially plane polarized. The observed polarization vectors trace the direction of the projected magnetic field of the cloud. We made R-band imaging polarimetry of the stars projected on a cloud, L1570, to trace the magnetic field orientation. We also made multi-wavelength polarimetric and photometric observations to constrain the properties of dust in L1570. Results: We estimated a distance of 394 ± 70 pc to the cloud using 2MASS JHKs colors. Using the values of the Serkowski parameters, σ1, overlineɛ, λmax, and the position of the stars on the near-infrared color-color diagram, we identified 13 stars that could possibly have intrinsic polarization and/or rotation in their polarization angles. One star, 2MASS J06075075+1934177, which is a B4Ve spectral type, shows diffuse interstellar bands in the spectrum in addition to the Hα line in emission. There is an indication for slightly bigger dust grains toward L1570 on the basis of the dust grain size-indicators such as λmax and RV values. The magnetic field lines are found to be parallel to the cloud structures seen in the 250 μm images (also in the 8 μm and 12 μm shadow images) of L1570. Based on the magnetic field geometry, the cloud structure, and the complex velocity structure, we conclude that L1570 is in the process of formation due to the converging flow

  10. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  11. Radial Evolution of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER, STEREO, and Venus Express Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-07-01

    The Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions will provide observations of magnetic clouds closer to the Sun than ever before, and it will be good preparation for these missions to make full use of the most recent in situ data sets from the inner heliosphere—namely, those provided by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and Venus Express—for magnetic cloud studies. We present observations of the same magnetic cloud made by MESSENGER at Mercury and later by Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-B (STEREO-B), while the spacecraft were radially aligned in 2011 November. Few such radial observations of magnetic clouds have been previously reported. Estimates of the solar wind speed at MESSENGER are also presented, calculated through the application of a previously established technique. The cloud's flux rope has been analyzed using force-free fitting; the rope diameter increased from 0.18 to 0.41 AU (corresponding to an {r}{{H}}0.94 dependence on heliocentric distance, rH), and the axial magnetic field strength dropped from 46.0 to 8.7 nT (an {r}{{H}}-1.84 dependence) between the spacecraft, clear indications of an expanding structure. The axial magnetic flux was ˜0.50 nT AU2 at both spacecraft, suggesting that the rope underwent no significant erosion through magnetic reconnection between MESSENGER and STEREO-B. Further, we estimate the change in the cloud's angular width by assuming helicity conservation. It has also been found that the rope axis rotated by 30° between the spacecraft to lie close to the solar equatorial plane at STEREO-B. Such a rotation, if it is a common feature of coronal mass ejection propagation, would have important implications for space weather forecasting.

  12. Evidence in Magnetic Clouds for Systematic Open Flux Transport on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Kahler, S. W.; Gosling, J. T.; Lepping, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    Most magnetic clouds encountered by spacecraft at 1 AU display a mix of unidirectional suprathermal electrons signaling open field lines and counterstreaming electrons signaling loops connected to the Sun at both ends. Assuming the open fields were originally loops that underwent interchange reconnection with open fields at the Sun, we determine the sense of connectedness of the open fields found in 72 of 97 magnetic clouds identified by the Wind spacecraft in order to obtain information on the location and sense of the reconnection and resulting flux transport at the Sun. The true polarity of the open fields in each magnetic cloud was determined from the direction of the suprathermal electron flow relative to the magnetic field direction. Results indicate that the polarity of all open fields within a given magnetic cloud is the same 89% of the time, implying that interchange reconnection at the Sun most often occurs in only one leg of a flux rope loop, thus transporting open flux in a single direction, from a coronal hole near that leg to the foot point of the opposite leg. This pattern is consistent with the view that interchange reconnection in coronal mass ejections systematically transports an amount of open flux sufficient to reverse the polarity of the heliospheric field through the course of the solar cycle. Using the same electron data, we also find that the fields encountered in magnetic clouds are only a third as likely to be locally inverted as not. While one might expect inversions to be equally as common as not in flux rope coils, consideration of the geometry of spacecraft trajectories relative to the modeled magnetic cloud axes leads us to conclude that the result is reasonable.

  13. Magnetic field and plasma wave observations in a plasma cloud at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Scarf, F. L.; Brace, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Pioneer Venus magnetic field and plasma wave data are examined in a particularly clear example of a plasma cloud above the Venus ionosphere. The magnetic configuration is suggestive of acceleration of the plasma cloud by magnetic tension. If the plasma is at rest at the subsolar point, it could be accelerated to approximately 90 km/sec by the observed stress at the location of the measurement. This far exceeds the escape velocity and suggests that plasma clouds do form a significant loss mechanism for the Venus ionosphere but does not necessarily indicate that the plasma cloud is detached from the ionosphere proper. The plasma cloud is accompanied by strong plasma wave activity and is significantly hotter than the ionospheric plasma encountered later on the same pass. A loss rate of the order of 2 x 10 to the 25th ions/sec is estimated during this event. The geometry suggested by these observations is one of a ridge of dense cold plasma starting in the subsolar regions and flowing over the poles of the planet. Thus, these plasma clouds may be the planetary analog of cometary tail rays.

  14. The resolved magnetic fields of the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Clemens, Dan P.

    2015-03-01

    Marchwinski et al. (2012) mapped the magnetic field strength across the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30 (shown in Figure 1 subtending 40x10 pc at a distance of 1.88 kpc) with the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method CF; Chandrasekhar & Fermi 1953) using near-infrared starlight polarimetry from the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (Clemens et al. 2012a, b) and gas properties from the Galactic Ring Survey (Jackson et al. 2006). The large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the gas-traced `spine' of the cloud. Seven `magnetic cores' with high magnetic field strength were identified and are coincident with peaks in the gas column density. Calculation of the mass-to-flux ratio (Crutcher 1999) shows that these cores are exclusively magnetically subcritical and that magnetostatic pressure can support them against gravitational collapse.

  15. The application of a priori structural information based regularization in image reconstruction in magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Yin, W.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a non-invasive contactless modality that could be capable of imaging the conductivity distribution of biological tissues. In this paper we consider the possibility of using absolute MIT voltage measurements for monitoring the progress of a peripheral hemorrhagic stroke in a human brain. The pathology is modelled as a local blood accumulation in the white matter. The solution of the MIT inverse problem is nonlinear and ill-posed and hence requires the use of a regularisation method. In this paper, we describe the construction and present the performance of a regularisation matrix based on a priori structural information of the head tissues obtained from a very recent MRI scan. The method takes the MRI scan as an initial state of the stroke and constructs a learning set containing the possible conductivity distributions of the current state of the stroke. This data is used to calculate an approximation of the covariance matrix and then a subspace is constructed using principal component analysis (PCA). It is shown by simulations the method is capable of producing a representative reconstruction of a stroke compared to smoothing Tikhonov regularization in a simplified model of the head.

  16. Rotation of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER and STEREO-B Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic clouds are a magnetically well ordered subset of CMEs observed in interplanetary space. We report observations of the same magnetic cloud made by the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury (then at 0.44 AU) and later by STEREO-B at 1.09 AU, while the two spacecraft were radially aligned in November 2011. Observation with two radially aligned spacecraft allows sampling of approximately the same region of a magnetic cloud, and so allows any evolution that may have occurred within that region during propagation between the two spacecraft to be determined. The flux rope within the November 2011 cloud has been analysed using force-free fitting and minimum variance analysis: it has been estimated that the rope axis rotated from an inclination of approximately 25° relative to the solar equatorial plane at MESSENGER to lie within a few degrees of the plane at STEREO-B. We investigate the hypothesis that this rotation and alignment with the solar equatorial plane is driven by interactions of the cloud with the heliospheric current sheet.

  17. AN IMPRINT OF MOLECULAR CLOUD MAGNETIZATION IN THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE DUST POLARIZED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, J. D.; Netterfield, C. B.; Fissel, L. M.; Hennebelle, P.; Martin, P. G.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.

    2013-09-10

    We describe a morphological imprint of magnetization found when considering the relative orientation of the magnetic field direction with respect to the density structures in simulated turbulent molecular clouds. This imprint was found using the Histogram of Relative Orientations (HRO), a new technique that utilizes the gradient to characterize the directionality of density and column density structures on multiple scales. We present results of the HRO analysis in three models of molecular clouds in which the initial magnetic field strength is varied, but an identical initial turbulent velocity field is introduced, which subsequently decays. The HRO analysis was applied to the simulated data cubes and mock-observations of the simulations produced by integrating the data cube along particular lines of sight. In the three-dimensional analysis we describe the relative orientation of the magnetic field B with respect to the density structures, showing that: (1) the magnetic field shows a preferential orientation parallel to most of the density structures in the three simulated cubes, (2) the relative orientation changes from parallel to perpendicular in regions with density over a critical density n{sub T} in the highest magnetization case, and (3) the change of relative orientation is largest for the highest magnetization and decreases in lower magnetization cases. This change in the relative orientation is also present in the projected maps. In conjunction with simulations, HROs can be used to establish a link between the observed morphology in polarization maps and the physics included in simulations of molecular clouds.

  18. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  19. Torus-shaped dust clouds trapped in a magnetized anodic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, Iris; Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander

    2008-10-15

    Dust particles confined in a magnetized anodic plasma can form a torus-shaped cloud with a dust-free region (void) in the center. Most of the dust particles perform a rotational motion about the major axis of the torus. The torus-shaped dust cloud and the velocity of the particles are studied by varying the external plasma parameters like magnetic field strength and rf-power of the source plasma. Two-dimensional potential contours are measured with an emissive probe. The results are used to discuss the force balance between electric field force and ion drag acting on the dust particles that determines the void size.

  20. Magnetic field geometry of an unusual cometary cloud Gal 110-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neha, S.; Maheswar, G.; Soam, A.; Lee, C. W.; Tej, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We carried out optical polarimetry of an isolated cloud, Gal 110-13, to map the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field geometry. The main aim of the study is to understand the most plausible mechanism responsible for the unusual cometary shape of the cloud in the context of its magnetic field geometry. Methods: When unpolarized starlight passes through the intervening interstellar dust grains that are aligned with their short axes parallel to the local magnetic field, it gets linearly polarized. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field component can therefore be traced by doing polarization measurements of background stars projected on clouds. Because the light in the optical wavelength range is most efficiently polarized by the dust grains typically found in the outer layers of the molecular clouds, optical polarimetry enables us to trace the magnetic field geometry of the outer layers of the clouds. Results: We made R-band polarization measurements of 207 stars in the direction of Gal 110-13. The distance of Gal 110-13 was determined as ~450 ± 80 pc using our polarization and 2MASS near-infrared data. The foreground interstellar contribution was removed from the observed polarization values by observing a number of stars located in the vicinity of Gal 110-13 which has Hipparcos parallax measurements. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field lines are found to be well ordered and aligned with the elongated structure of Gal 110-13. Using structure function analysis, we estimated the strength of the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field as ~25 μG. Conclusions: Based on our results and comparing them with those from simulations, we conclude that compression by the ionization fronts from 10 Lac is the most plausible cause of the comet-like morphology of Gal 110-13 and of the initiation of subsequent star formation.

  1. VLBA Provides Best Detail Yet of Star-Forming Cloud's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    Astronomers have used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to do a very detailed map of the magnetic field within a star-forming cloud, an achievement that will help scientists unravel the mysterious first steps of the stellar birth process. "This study provides new and important data needed by theorists to understand how magnetic fields affect the early stages of star formation," said Anuj Sarma, an astronomer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Sarma worked with Thomas Troland of the University of Kentucky and Jonathan Romney of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. Their research results were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Stars are formed when gas in giant interstellar clouds collapses gravitationally. Magnetic fields are believed to support such gas clouds, helping them resist gravitational collapse, so the beginning stages of star formation arise from a complex interplay of the magnetic fields and gravity that is not yet well understood. "In order to understand how star formation gets started, we need to know in detail the structure of the magnetic fields in a star-forming cloud," Sarma said. "Our observations with the VLBA have provided one more big step in this direction," he added. The astronomers studied a cloud of molecular gas more than 5,000 light- years from Earth in a spiral arm of our own Milky Way Galaxy. The cloud, known as W3 IRS5, contains seven newly-formed stars. In addition, it contains a number of regions, somewhat smaller than the diameter of Earth's orbit, in which water vapor molecules act to amplify, or strengthen, radio emission. Such regions, called masers, are a radio- wave parallel to lasers, which amplify light. The scientists used the VLBA to make a detailed study of the radio waves coming from these maser regions in the gas cloud. They detected a phenomenon called the Zeeman effect, in which a very precise frequency

  2. Structure and Stability of Filamentary Clouds Supported by Lateral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Tomisakar, Kohji

    We have constructed two types of analytical models for an isothermal filamentary cloud supported mainly by magnetic tension. The first one describes an isolated cloud while the second considers filamentary clouds spaced periodically. The filamentary clouds are assumed to be highly flattened in both the models. The former is proved to be the asymptotic limit of the latter in which each filamentary cloud is much thinner than the distance to the neighboring filaments. These models show that the mass to flux ratio is crucial for the magnetohydrodynamical equilibrium. The upper bound for the line density, i.e., the mass per unit length, is proportional to the magnetic flux. The mass to flux ratio is slightly larger than the critical value, ( )-1, in the first model and lower in the second model. The first model is unstable against fragmentation and the wavelength of the fastest growing mode is several times longer than the cloud diameter. The second model is likely to be unstable only when the mass to flux ratio is supercritical.

  3. ON THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN MAGNETIC CLOUDS AND INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: WRITHE VERSUS TWIST

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, N.; Roussev, I. I.; Lugaz, N.; Moestl, C.; Jacobs, C.; Poedts, S.; Farrugia, C. J. E-mail: nlugaz@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2011-09-10

    In this study, we test the flux rope paradigm by performing a 'blind' reconstruction of the magnetic field structure of a simulated interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME). The ICME is the result of a magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulation and does not exhibit much magnetic twist, but appears to have some characteristics of a magnetic cloud, due to a writhe in the magnetic field lines. We use the Grad-Shafranov technique with simulated spacecraft measurements at two different distances and compare the reconstructed magnetic field with that of the ICME in the simulation. While the reconstructed magnetic field is similar to the simulated one as seen in two dimensions, it yields a helically twisted magnetic field in three dimensions. To further verify the results, we perform the reconstruction at three different position angles at every distance point, and all results are found to be in agreement. This work demonstrates that the current paradigm of associating magnetic clouds with flux ropes may have to be revised.

  4. Analysis of 20 magnetic clouds at 1 AU during a solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulisano, A. M.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.

    We study 20 magnetic clouds, observed in situ by the spacecraft Wind, at the Lagrangian point L1, from 22 August, 1995, to 7 November, 1997. In previous works, assuming a cylindrical symmetry for the local magnetic configuration and a satellite trajectory crossing the axis of the cloud, we obtained their orientations using a minimum variance analysis. In this work we compute the orientations and magnetic configurations using a non-linear simultaneous fit of the geometric and physical parameters for a linear force-free model, including the possibility of a not null impact parameter. We quantify global magnitudes such as the relative magnetic helicity per unit length and compare the values found with both methods (minimum variance and the simultaneous fit). FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. The Wind magnetic cloud and events of October 18-20, 1995: Interplanetary properties and as triggers for geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Szabo, A.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Mish, W. H.; Vassiliadis, D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Farrugia, C. J.; Janoo, L.; Mariani, F.

    1997-07-01

    Late on October 18, 1995, a magnetic cloud arrived at the Wind spacecraft ~175RE upstream of the Earth. The cloud had an intense interplanetary magnetic field that varied slowly in direction, from being strongly southward to strongly northward during its ~30hours duration, and a low proton temperature throughout. From a linear force free field model the cloud was shown to have a flux rope magnetic field line geometry, an estimated diameter of about 0.27 AU, and an axis that was aligned with the Y axis (GSE) within about 25°. A corotating stream, in which large amplitude Alfven waves of about 0.5 hour period were observed, was overtaking the cloud and intensifying the fields in the rear of the cloud. The prolonged southward magnetic field observed in the early part of the cloud produced a geomagnetic storm of Kp=7- and considerable auroral activity late on October 18. About 8 hours in front of the cloud an interplanetary shock occurred. About three-fourths the way into the cloud another apparent interplanetary shock was observed. It had an unusual propagation direction, differing by only 21° from alignment with the cloud axis. It may have been the result of the interaction with the postcloud stream, compressing the cloud, or was possibly due to an independent solar event. It is shown that the front and rear boundaries of the cloud and the upstream driven shock had surface normals in good agreement with the cloud axis in the ecliptic plane. The integrated Poynting flux into the magnetosphere, which correlated well with geomagnetic indices, jumped abruptly to a high value upon entry into the magnetic cloud, slowly decreased to zero near its middle, and again reached substantial but sporadic values in the cloud-stream interface region. This report aims to support a variety of ISTP studies ranging from the solar origins of these events to resulting magnetospheric responses.

  6. Trapping of Electron Cloud LLC/Cesrta Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D [1]. One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in CESRTA and ILC quadrupole and sextupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with a long lifetime in a quadrupole and sextupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism. We study the effects of magnet strength, bunch current, ante-chamber effect, bunch spacing effect and secondary emission yield (SEY) in great detail. The development of an electron cloud in magnets is the main concern where a weak solenoid field is not effective. Quadrupole and sextupole magnets have mirror field configurations which may trap electrons by the mirror field trapping mechanism [2]. Fig.1 shows the orbit of a trapped electron in a quadrupole magnet. The electron makes gyration motion (called transverse motion) and also moves along the field line (called longitudinal motion). At the mirror point (middle of the field line), there is a maximum longitudinal energy and minimum transverse energy. When the electron moves away from the mirror point, its longitudinal energy reduces and the transverse energy increases as the magnetic field increases. If the magnetic field is strong enough, the longitudinal energy becomes zero at one point and then the electron is turned back by the strong field. Note that the electrons are trapped in the region near the middle of the field lines. Although all quadrupole and sextupole magnets can trap electrons in principle, the trapping

  7. Magnetically Dominated Parallel Interstellar Filaments in the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fábio P.; Busquet, Gemma; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Girart, Josep Miquel; Zhang, Qizhou

    2016-12-01

    The infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506 (IRDC G14.2) displays a remarkable complex of parallel dense molecular filaments projected on the plane of the sky. Previous studies of dust emission and molecular lines have speculated whether magnetic fields could have played an important role in the formation of such elongated structures, which are hosts to numerous young stellar sources. In this work we have conducted a vast polarimetric survey at optical and near-infrared wavelengths in order to study the morphology of magnetic field lines in IRDC G14.2 through the observation of background stars. The orientation of interstellar polarization, which traces magnetic field lines, is perpendicular to most of the filamentary features within the cloud. Additionally, the larger-scale molecular cloud as a whole exhibits an elongated shape also perpendicular to magnetic fields. Estimates of magnetic field strengths indicate values in the range 320-550 μG, which allow sub-alfvénic conditions, but do not prevent the gravitational collapse of hub-filament structures, which in general are close to the critical state. These characteristics suggest that magnetic fields played the main role in regulating the collapse from large to small scales, leading to the formation of series of parallel elongated structures. The morphology is also consistent with numerical simulations that show how gravitational instabilities develop when subjected to strong magnetic fields. Finally, the results corroborate the hypothesis that strong support from internal magnetic fields might explain why the cloud seems to be contracting on a timescale 2-3 times longer than what is expected from a free-fall collapse. Based on observations collected at Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCT, Brazil).

  8. Grain Alignment and the Magnetic Field Geometry in the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Terry Jay

    2003-06-01

    We present measurements of the interstellar polarization at 1.65 μm of stars shining through the filamentary dark cloud GF 9. Unlike many dark clouds, the interstellar polarization through GF 9 increases significantly with increasing extinction through the cloud. We find the magnetic field geometry in GF 9-core is very smooth, in agreement with results from far-infrared polarimetry by Clemens, Kraemer, & Ciardi (published in 1999). Our much more limited results for GF 9-filament are consistent with a disordered field, also in agreement with the far-infrared polarimetry. Comparison of the near-infrared and far-infrared position angles suggests that there is a moderate rotation in the projected magnetic field direction from the exterior to the interior of GF 9-core.

  9. Typical and Unusual Properties of Magnetic Clouds during the WIND Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D.; Szabo, A.; Burlaga, L. F.; Thompson, B. J.; Mariani, F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.

    1999-01-01

    A list of 33 magnetic clouds as identified in WIND magnetic field and plasma data has been compiled. The intervals for these events are provided as part of NASA/GSFC, WIND-MFI's Website under the URL http://lepmfi.qsfc.nasa.gov/mfi/mag_cloud publ.html#table The period covered in this study is from early 1995 to November 1998 which primarily occurs in the quiet part of the solar cycle. A force free, cylindrically symmetric, magnetic field model has been applied to the field data in 1-hour averaged form for all of these events (except one small event where 10 min avg's were used) and the resulting fit-parameters examined. Each event was provided a semi-quantitatively determined quality factor (excellent, good or poor). A set of 28 good or better cases, spanning a surprisingly large range of values for its various properties, was used for further analysis. These properties are, for example, durations, attitudes, sizes, asymmetries, axial field strengths, speeds, and relative impact parameters. They will be displayed and analyzed, along with some related derived quantities, with emphasis on typical vs unusual properties and on the magnetic fields magnetic clouds' relationships to the Sun and to upstream interplanetary shocks, where possible. For example, it is remarkable how narrowly distributed the speeds of these clouds are, and the overall average speed (390 techniques km/s) is less than that normally quoted for the average solar wind speed (420 km/s) despite the fact that many of these clouds are d"drivers" of interplanetary shocks. On average, a cloud appears to be a little less symmetric when the spacecraft is able to pass close to the cloud's axis as compared to a farther out passage. The average longitude and latitude (in GSE) of the axes of the clouds are 85 degrees and 8 degrees, respectively, with standard deviations near 40 degrees. Also, the half=yearly averaged axial magnetic flux has approximately tripled. almost monotonically, from about 6 to 17 X 10

  10. Fast Transverse Beam Instability Caused by Electron Cloud Trapped in Combined Function Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Electron cloud instabilities affect the performance of many circular high-intensity particle accelerators. They usually have a fast growth rate and might lead to an increase of the transverse emittance and beam loss. A peculiar example of such an instability is observed in the Fermilab Recycler proton storage ring. Although this instability might pose a challenge for future intensity upgrades, its nature had not been completely understood. The phenomena has been studied experimentally by comparing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, numerically by simulating the build-up of the electron cloud and its interaction with the beam, and analytically by constructing a model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. Stabilization of the beam by a clearing bunch reveals that the instability is caused by the electron cloud, trapped in beam optics magnets. Measurements of microwave propagation confirm the presence of the cloud in the combined function dipoles. Numerical simulations show that up to 10$^{-2}$ of the particles can be trapped by their magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated fast instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and low mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulations. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  11. An interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms: Fast forward shock overtaking preceding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Ye, P. Z.; Wang, S.; Xue, X. H.

    2003-07-01

    In the event that occurred during October 3-6, 2000, at least one magnetosonic wave and one fast forward shock advanced into the preceding magnetic cloud (MC). By using the field and plasma data from the ACE and WIND spacecraft, we analyze the evolution of this event, including the characteristics and changes of the magnetic fields and plasma. At the rear part of the cloud, a large southward magnetic field is caused by a shock compression. The shock intensified a preexisting southward magnetic field. This increased the geoeffectiveness of this event and produced an intense geomagnetic storm with Dst = -175 nT. We also describe another event with a shock overtaking a MC on Nov. 6, 2001. A great geomagnetic storm of intensity Dst = 292 nT resulted. These observations are used to argue that shock compression of magnetic cloud fields is an important interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms. Our analyses suggest that the geoeffectiveness is related to the direction of preexisting magnetic fields, the intensity of overtaking shock, and the amount of shock penetration into the preceding MC.

  12. Magnetic Clouds Observed at 1 Au During the Period 2000-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Sequeiros, J.

    2005-11-01

    In this work we have performed a systematic study of all the magnetic clouds identified in the time interval 2000-2003. The study shows that the non force-free model of Hidalgo is a good approximation to the magnetic topology of the MCs in the interplanetary medium. This conclusion is reached based on the good fits obtained with the model for most of the clouds, in spite of the variety of profiles found in the magnetic field strength and in every of its components. The model incorporates the distortion and expansion of the cross-section of the MCs. We have compared, when available, the results obtained with those in literature. The unique published global study of the MCs at the same time interval has been provided by Lepping using the circular cross-section model of Burlaga, and the results are available in his web page. From all the parameters he obtained, only the longitude, φ, the latitude, θ, and the distance of maximum approach of the spacecraft to the cloud axis, y 0, may be compared with those obtained by Hidalgo's model. As we show, the main discrepancy between both models refers to the longitude values. Concerning the comparison with other models of literature, only the Bastille day and October 2003 magnetic clouds have been studied by other authors.

  13. LONG-LIVED MAGNETIC-TENSION-DRIVEN MODES IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Shantanu; Dapp, Wolf B. E-mail: wdapp@uwo.c

    2010-06-10

    We calculate and analyze the longevity of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes that occur in the plane of a magnetic thin sheet. Initial turbulent conditions applied to a magnetically subcritical cloud are shown to lead to relatively rapid energy decay if ambipolar diffusion is introduced at a level corresponding to partial ionization primarily by cosmic rays. However, in the flux-freezing limit, as may be applicable to photoionized molecular cloud envelopes, the turbulence persists at 'nonlinear' levels in comparison with the isothermal sound speed c {sub s}, with one-dimensional rms material motions in the range of {approx} 2 c {sub s}-5 c {sub s} for cloud sizes in the range of {approx} 2 pc-16 pc. These fluctuations persist indefinitely, maintaining a significant portion of the initial turbulent kinetic energy. We find the analytic explanation for these persistent fluctuations. They are magnetic-tension-driven modes associated with the interaction of the sheet with the external magnetic field. The phase speed of such modes is quite large, allowing residual motions to persist without dissipation in the flux-freezing limit, even as they are nonlinear with respect to the sound speed. We speculate that long-lived large-scale MHD modes such as these may provide the key to understanding observed supersonic motions in molecular clouds.

  14. TRACING THE MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY OF THE LUPUS I MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, G. A. P.; Alves, F. O. E-mail: falves@mpe.mpg.de

    2015-07-01

    Deep R-band CCD linear polarimetry collected for fields with lines of sight toward the Lupus I molecular cloud is used to investigate the properties of the magnetic field within this molecular cloud. The observed sample contains about 7000 stars, almost 2000 of them with a polarization signal-to-noise ratio larger than 5. These data cover almost the entire main molecular cloud and also sample two diffuse infrared patches in the neighborhood of Lupus I. The large-scale pattern of the plane-of-sky projection of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the main axis of Lupus I, but parallel to the two diffuse infrared patches. A detailed analysis of our polarization data combined with the Herschel/SPIRE 350 μm dust emission map shows that the principal filament of Lupus I is constituted by three main clumps that are acted on by magnetic fields that have different large-scale structural properties. These differences may be the reason for the observed distribution of pre- and protostellar objects along the molecular cloud and the cloud’s apparent evolutionary stage. On the other hand, assuming that the magnetic field is composed of large-scale and turbulent components, we find that the latter is rather similar in all three clumps. The estimated plane-of-sky component of the large-scale magnetic field ranges from about 70 to 200 μG in these clumps. The intensity increases toward the Galactic plane. The mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is much smaller than unity, implying that Lupus I is magnetically supported on large scales.

  15. Tracing the Magnetic Field Morphology of the Lupus I Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, G. A. P.; Alves, F. O.

    2015-07-01

    Deep R-band CCD linear polarimetry collected for fields with lines of sight toward the Lupus I molecular cloud is used to investigate the properties of the magnetic field within this molecular cloud. The observed sample contains about 7000 stars, almost 2000 of them with a polarization signal-to-noise ratio larger than 5. These data cover almost the entire main molecular cloud and also sample two diffuse infrared patches in the neighborhood of Lupus I. The large-scale pattern of the plane-of-sky projection of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the main axis of Lupus I, but parallel to the two diffuse infrared patches. A detailed analysis of our polarization data combined with the Herschel/SPIRE 350 μm dust emission map shows that the principal filament of Lupus I is constituted by three main clumps that are acted on by magnetic fields that have different large-scale structural properties. These differences may be the reason for the observed distribution of pre- and protostellar objects along the molecular cloud and the cloud’s apparent evolutionary stage. On the other hand, assuming that the magnetic field is composed of large-scale and turbulent components, we find that the latter is rather similar in all three clumps. The estimated plane-of-sky component of the large-scale magnetic field ranges from about 70 to 200 μG in these clumps. The intensity increases toward the Galactic plane. The mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is much smaller than unity, implying that Lupus I is magnetically supported on large scales. Based on observations collected at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCTI, Brazil).

  16. Quantification of pulmonary microcirculation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of four regularization methods.

    PubMed

    Salehi Ravesh, M; Brix, G; Laun, F B; Kuder, T A; Puderbach, M; Ley-Zaporozhan, J; Ley, S; Fieselmann, A; Herrmann, M F; Schranz, W; Semmler, W; Risse, F

    2013-01-01

    Tissue microcirculation can be quantified by a deconvolution analysis of concentration-time curves measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. However, deconvolution is an ill-posed problem, which requires regularization of the solutions. In this work, four algebraic deconvolution/regularization methods were evaluated: truncated singular value decomposition and generalized Tikhonov regularization (GTR) in combination with the L-curve criterion, a modified LCC (GTR-MLCC), and a response function model that takes a-priori knowledge into account. To this end, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data sets were simulated by an established physiologically reference model for different signal-to-noise ratios and measured on a 1.5-T system in the lung of 10 healthy volunteers and 20 patients. Analysis of both the simulated and measured dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging datasets revealed that GTR in combination with the L-curve criterion does not yield reliable and clinically useful results. The three other deconvolution/regularization algorithms resulted in almost identical microcirculatory parameter estimates for signal-to-noise ratios > 10. At low signal-to-noise ratios levels (<10) typically occurring in pathological lung regions, GTR in combination with a modified L-curve criterion approximates the true response function much more accurately than truncated singular value decomposition and GTR in combination with response function model with a difference in accuracy of up to 76%. In conclusion, GTR in combination with a modified L-curve criterion is recommended for the deconvolution of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging curves measured in the lung parenchyma of patients with highly heterogeneous signal-to-noise ratios. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Magnetic Models of Circumstellar Clouds around Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.; Townsend, R.; Ud-Doula, A.

    2008-08-01

    This talk reviewed recent efforts to develop dynamical models for the effects of a surface dipole field on radiatively driven wind outflows. One particular project applies magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of a Magnetically Confined Wind Shock (MCWS) model (originally developed by Babel & Montmerle 1997) to explain X-ray emission observed by Rosat (Gagné et al. 1997) from the magnetic O7V star θ^{1 Ori C.

  18. Kerr/CFT correspondence in a 4D extremal rotating regular black hole with a non-linear magnetic monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2017-08-01

    We carry out the Kerr/CFT correspondence in a four-dimensional extremal rotating regular black hole with a non-linear magnetic monopole (NLMM). One problem in this study would be whether our geometry can be a solution or not. We search for the way making our rotating geometry into a solution based on the fact that the Schwarzschild regular geometry can be a solution. However, in the attempt to extend the Schwarzschild case that we can naturally consider, it turns out that it is impossible to construct a model in which our geometry can be a exact solution. We manage this problem by making use of the fact that our geometry can be a solution approximately in the whole space-time except for the black hole's core region. As a next problem, it turns out that the equation to obtain the horizon radii is given by a fifth-order equation due to the regularization effect. We overcome this problem by treating the regularization effect perturbatively. As a result, we can obtain the near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry with the correction of the regularization effect. Once obtaining the NHEK geometry, we can obtain the central charge and the Frolov-Thorne temperature in the dual CFT. Using these, we compute its entropy through the Cardy formula, which agrees with the one computed from the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  19. STEREO Observations of an SEP Event Injected Into Both Loop Legs of a Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresing, N.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Hidalgo, M. A. U.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.

    2015-12-01

    On 7 Nov 2013 STEREO B was embedded in a magnetic-cloud (MC) like structure when an SEP event occurred reaching both STEREO spacecraft. The bi-drectional near relativistic electron distribution observed by STEREO B reveals such timing and relative intensity characteristics suggesting that the SEPs were injected separately into both loop legs of the MC. Observations by the Nancay Radioheliograph (NRH) of two distinct radio sources at the same time further support the above scenario. In order to derive the 3D morphology and average speed of the CME close to the Sun, we use the graduated cylindrical shell model (GCS) which is applied to the white-light coronagraph observations by the STEREO spacecraft and SOHO. Furthermore, a global magnetic topology model for magnetic clouds is applied to the in-situ measurements of the magnetic field. Both models suggest that the MC is strongly inclined with respect to the ecliptic yielding a north/south orientation. The energetic electron observations are used to probe the structure of the magnetic cloud: We determine the electron path lengths along both loop legs of the structure to infer the amount of field line twist inside the MC. The resulting path lengths are around 50% longer than the estimated lengths of the loop legs of the MC itself suggesting that the amount of field line winding is moderate.

  20. Solutions for the equilibrium of static isothermal gas clouds with poloidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baureis, P.; Ebert, R.; Schmitz, F.

    1989-11-01

    A family of semi-analytical solutions for the equilibrium of magnetic self-gravitating gas clouds is presented. The configurations are isothermal and axially symmetric; the frozen-in magnetic field is poloidal. Formulating the equilibrium equations of such gas clouds in spherical polar coordinates, a separation of these equations provides simple representative solutions. The radial part of the density distribution is given by the characteristic inverse square of the radial coordinate. The angular parts are governed by a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which is solved numerically. The nonmagnetic limit is the isothermal gas sphere with infinite central density. With increasing field strength the configurations flatten. Besides the isothermal sound velocity the value of the magnetic field in the midplane is a free continuous parameter. In the limit of extremely strong fields a thin disk forms. The existence of bounded solutions is discussed, and the models are compared with configurations presented by other authors.

  1. The magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud revealed through Faraday rotation.

    PubMed

    Gaensler, B M; Haverkorn, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Dickey, J M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Dickel, J R; Wolleben, M

    2005-03-11

    We have measured the Faraday rotation toward a large sample of polarized radio sources behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to determine the structure of this galaxy's magnetic field. The magnetic field of the LMC consists of a coherent axisymmetric spiral of field strength approximately 1 microgauss. Strong fluctuations in the magnetic field are also seen on small (<0.5 parsec) and large (approximately 100 parsecs) scales. The large bursts of recent star formation and supernova activity in the LMC argue against standard dynamo theory, adding to the growing evidence for rapid field amplification in galaxies.

  2. Coronal mass ejections, magnetic clouds, and relativistic magnetospheric electron events: ISTP

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S.G.; Blake, J.B.; Selesnick, R.S.; Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Spence, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    The role of high-speed solar wind streams in driving relativistic electron acceleration within the Earth{close_quote}s magnetosphere during solar activity minimum conditions has been well documented. The rising phase of the new solar activity cycle (cycle 23) commenced in 1996, and there have recently been a number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and related {open_quotes}magnetic clouds{close_quotes} at 1 AU. As these CME/cloud systems interact with the Earth{close_quote}s magnetosphere, some events produce substantial enhancements in the magnetospheric energetic particle population while others do not. This paper compares and contrasts relativistic electron signatures observed by the POLAR, SAMPEX, Highly Elliptical Orbit, and geostationary orbit spacecraft during two magnetic cloud events: May 27{endash}29, 1996, and January 10{endash}11, 1997. Sequences were observed in each case in which the interplanetary magnetic field was first strongly southward and then rotated northward. In both cases, there were large solar wind density enhancements toward the end of the cloud passage at 1 AU. Strong energetic electron acceleration was observed in the January event, but not in the May event. The relative geoeffectiveness for these two cases is assessed, and it is concluded that large induced electric fields ({partial_derivative}B/{partial_derivative}t) caused in situ acceleration of electrons throughout the outer radiation zone during the January 1997 event. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  3. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    DOE PAGES

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain themore » $$\\pi BB'$$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.« less

  4. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain the $\\pi BB'$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.

  5. Solar Energetic Electron Probes of Magnetic Cloud Field Line Lengths (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-02

    observations with STEREO spacecraft separations on the order of the MC radius R0 are now beginning and appear to confirm the basic flux rope model [Liu et...electron travel distances Le with the model field line lengths, we first let R0 be the radius of the cylindrical cross section of theMC at 1 AU and... radius of the circular magnetic cloud cross section as a function of the distance from the Sun along the cloud axis l as R lð Þ ¼ R0 sin 2 l L0 : ð2Þ

  6. Protostar Formation in Magnetic Molecular Clouds beyond Ion Detachment. II. Typical Axisymmetric Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2007-05-01

    We follow the ambipolar-diffusion-driven formation and evolution of a fragment in a magnetically supported molecular cloud, until a hydrostatic protostellar core forms at its center. This problem was formulated in Paper I. We determine the density, velocity, and magnetic field as functions of space and time, and the contribution of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation. The issue of whether the magnetic field ever decouples from the (neutral) matter is also addressed. We also find that the electrons do not decouple from the field lines before thermal ionization becomes important and recouples the magnetic field to the neutral matter. Ohmic dissipation becomes more effective than ambipolar diffusion as a flux reduction mechanism only at the highest densities (a few × 1012 cm-3). In the high-density central parts of the core, the magnetic field acquires an almost spatially uniform structure, with a value that, at the end of the calculation (nn~5×1014 cm-3), is found to be in excellent agreement with meteoritic measurements of magnetic fields in the protosolar nebula. Outside the hydrostatic protostellar core, a concentration of magnetic flux (a ``magnetic wall'') forms, which gives rise to a magnetic shock. This magnetic shock is the precursor of the repeated shocks previously found by Tassis & Mouschovias, which cause spasmodic accretion onto the hydrostatic core at later times.

  7. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-11-17

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  8. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects. PMID:27873931

  9. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    SciTech Connect

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Yaeko; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ∼90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ∼30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  10. Kinetic modeling of charged particle cloud expansion and emission in magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarjov, Maxim G.; Gunko, Yuri F.

    1995-02-01

    The kinetic theory of unsteady charged-partitle fluxes in electric and magnetic fields is dealt with. An attempt is made to extend the results of Narasimha ( J. Fluid Meth.12, 294-305, 1962) and Burgan et al. ( J. Plasma Phys.29, 139-142. 1983). These authors studied the neutral and electron gas expansion into a vacuum, respectively. Burgan et al. ( J. Plasma Phys.29, 139-142. 1953) considered the Vlasov equation, coupled self-consistently with the Poisson equation. The magnetic field effects were omitted. Gunko and Ponomarjov ( Vestnik St-Petersburg State Univ. Ser. 1, No. 2. 89-94, 1993; Astron. Nachr.316(1), 17-21, 1995) carried out an analysis of the magnetic field effect for a special case of particle emission. A general method is proposed for simulating the charged-particle cloud expansion and the emission from sources in both electric and magnetic fields based on the kinetic approach. It consists of the representation of any cloud or emission source by the superposition of point-like clouds or sources with the corresponding initial particle distribution. As examples, the expansion of the following spatial domains filled by charged particles are analyzed : the semi-space, the plane layer of finite thickness, the circular cylinder, and the spherically symmetric cloud. In all the cases considered, Maxwell initial velocity distribution has been used for homogeneous magnetic and electric fields. It is found that in the case of the spherical cloud expansion, the cloud configuration at large times tends to an ellipsoid whose major axis expands along the magnetic field. Obtained results support the suggestion that this method has addressed the problem of plasma-cloud expansion into a uniform magnetic. field, with emphasis on the dynamics of lower density parts which appear to be highly structured in the form of field aligned striations (Davis et al., Planet. Space Sci.22, 67-78, 1974). Different specific situations for a small charged-particle source is considered

  11. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995 - 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-06-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995 - 2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In ˜ 80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in ˜ 10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in ˜ 90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Electron Cloud Containment in a Nonuniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dense clouds of electrons were generated and studied in an axisymmetric, nonuniform magnetic field created by a short solenoid. The operation of the experiment was similar to that of a low-pressure (approximately 0.000001 Torr) magnetron discharge. Discharge current characteristics are presented as a function of pressure, magnetic field strength, voltage, and cathode end-plate location. The rotation of the electron cloud is determined from the frequency of diocotron waves. In the space charge saturated regime of operation, the cloud is found to rotate as a solid body with frequency close to V sub a/phi sub a where V sub a is the anode voltage and phi suba is the total magnetic flux. This result indicates that, in regions where electrons are present, the magnetic field lines are electrostatic equipotentials (E bar, B bar = 0). Equilibrium electron density distributions suggested by this conditions are integrated with respect to total ionizing power and are found consistent with measured discharge currents.

  13. The effects of magnetic fields in cold clouds in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Jafelice, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Large masses of absorbing material are inferred to exist in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies from the excess X-ray absorption in the spectra of some X-ray clusters. The absorbing material is probably in the form of cold clouds pressure-confined by the surrounding, hot, X-ray-emitting gas. The cold clouds could remain relatively static until they are destroyed by evaporation or ablation, or give rise to star formation. If the final fate of the clouds is stars, the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars formed over the whole cooling-flow region (r~ 100 kpc) should be biased to low masses, to avoid a very luminous, blue halo for the central galaxy of the cooling flow. However, there is evidence for bright star formation in the innermost (r<= 10 kpc) regions of some cooling flows, and, therefore, the biasing of the IMF towards low masses should not occur or should be less important at smaller radii. The consideration of magnetic fields may shed light on these two points. If magnetic fields are present, the magnetic critical mass should be considered, besides the Jeans mass, in establishing a natural mass-scale for star formation. When this new mass-scale is taken into account, we obtain the right variation of the biasing of the IMF with the radius in addition to inhibition of high-mass star formation at large radii. We also demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is a more efficient mechanism than ambipolar diffusion to remove magnetic fields in cold clouds.

  14. Low Virial Parameters in Molecular Clouds: Implications for High-mass Star Formation and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2013-12-01

    Whether or not molecular clouds and embedded cloud fragments are stable against collapse is of utmost importance for the study of the star formation process. Only "supercritical" cloud fragments are able to collapse and form stars. The virial parameter α = M vir/M, which compares the virial mass to the actual mass, provides one way to gauge stability against collapse. Supercritical cloud fragments are characterized by α <~ 2, as indicated by a comprehensive stability analysis considering perturbations in pressure and density gradients. Past research has suggested that virial parameters α >~ 2 prevail in clouds. This would suggest that collapse toward star formation is a gradual and relatively slow process and that magnetic fields are not needed to explain the observed cloud structure. Here, we review a range of very recent observational studies that derive virial parameters Lt2 and compile a catalog of 1325 virial parameter estimates. Low values of α are in particular observed for regions of high-mass star formation (HMSF). These observations may argue for a more rapid and violent evolution during collapse. This would enable "competitive accretion" in HMSF, constrain some models of "monolithic collapse," and might explain the absence of high-mass starless cores. Alternatively, the data could point at the presence of significant magnetic fields ~1 mG at high gas densities. We examine to what extent the derived observational properties might be biased by observational or theoretical uncertainties. For a wide range of reasonable parameters, our conclusions appear to be robust with respect to such biases.

  15. Correlation of electron path lengths observed in the highly wound outer region of magnetic clouds with the slab fraction of magnetic turbulence in the dissipation range

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, Xi; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua

    2014-05-10

    Three magnetic cloud events, in which solar impulsive electron events occurred in their outer region, are employed to investigate the difference of path lengths L {sub 0eIII} traveled by non-relativistic electrons from their release site near the Sun to the observer at 1 AU, where L {sub 0eIII} = v {sub l} × (t {sub l} – t {sub III}), v {sub l} and t {sub l} being the velocity and arrival time of electrons in the lowest energy channel (∼27 keV) of the Wind/3DP/SST sensor, respectively, and t {sub III} being the onset time of type III radio bursts. The deduced L {sub 0eIII} value ranges from 1.3 to 3.3 AU. Since a negligible interplanetary scattering level can be seen in both L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU and ∼1.2 AU events, the difference in L {sub 0eIII} could be linked to the turbulence geometry (slab or two-dimensional) in the solar wind. By using the Wind/MFI magnetic field data with a time resolution of 92 ms, we examine the turbulence geometry in the dissipation range. In our examination, ∼6 minutes of sampled subintervals are used in order to improve time resolution. We have found that, in the transverse turbulence, the observed slab fraction is increased with an increasing L {sub 0eIII} value, reaching ∼100% in the L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU event. Our observation implies that when only the slab spectral component exists, magnetic flux tubes (magnetic surfaces) are closed and regular for a very long distance along the transport route of particles.

  16. Correlation of Electron Path Lengths Observed in the Highly Wound Outer Region of Magnetic Clouds with the Slab Fraction of Magnetic Turbulence in the Dissipation Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Shao, Xi; Wang, Linghua

    2014-05-01

    Three magnetic cloud events, in which solar impulsive electron events occurred in their outer region, are employed to investigate the difference of path lengths L 0eIII traveled by non-relativistic electrons from their release site near the Sun to the observer at 1 AU, where L 0eIII = v l × (t l - t III), v l and t l being the velocity and arrival time of electrons in the lowest energy channel (~27 keV) of the Wind/3DP/SST sensor, respectively, and t III being the onset time of type III radio bursts. The deduced L 0eIII value ranges from 1.3 to 3.3 AU. Since a negligible interplanetary scattering level can be seen in both L 0eIII > 3 AU and ~1.2 AU events, the difference in L 0eIII could be linked to the turbulence geometry (slab or two-dimensional) in the solar wind. By using the Wind/MFI magnetic field data with a time resolution of 92 ms, we examine the turbulence geometry in the dissipation range. In our examination, ~6 minutes of sampled subintervals are used in order to improve time resolution. We have found that, in the transverse turbulence, the observed slab fraction is increased with an increasing L 0eIII value, reaching ~100% in the L 0eIII > 3 AU event. Our observation implies that when only the slab spectral component exists, magnetic flux tubes (magnetic surfaces) are closed and regular for a very long distance along the transport route of particles.

  17. Fantastic Striations and Where to Find Them: The Origin of Magnetically Aligned Striations in Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Li, Zhi-Yun; King, Patrick K.; Fissel, Laura M.

    2017-10-01

    Thin, magnetically aligned striations of relatively moderate contrast with the background are commonly observed in both atomic and molecular clouds. They are also prominent in MHD simulations with turbulent converging shocks. The simulated striations develop within a dense, stagnated sheet in the midplane of the post-shock region where magnetically induced converging flows collide. We show analytically that the secondary flows are an inevitable consequence of the jump conditions of oblique MHD shocks. They produce the stagnated, sheet-like sub-layer through a secondary shock when, roughly speaking, the Alfvénic speed in the primary converging flows is supersonic, a condition that is relatively easy to satisfy in interstellar clouds. The dense sub-layer is naturally threaded by a strong magnetic field that lies close to the plane of the sub-layer. The substantial magnetic field makes the sheet highly anisotropic, which is the key to the striation formation. Specifically, perturbations of the primary inflow that vary spatially perpendicular to the magnetic field can easily roll up the sheet around the field lines without bending them, creating corrugations that appear as magnetically aligned striations in column density maps. On the other hand, perturbations that vary spatially along the field lines curve the sub-layer and alter its orientation relative to the magnetic field locally, seeding special locations that become slanted overdense filaments and prestellar cores through enhanced mass accumulation along field lines. In our scenario, the dense sub-layer, which is unique to magnetized oblique shocks, is the birthplace for both magnetically aligned diffuse striations and massive star-forming structures.

  18. Effects of interplanetary magnetic clouds, interaction regions, and high-speed streams on the transient modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Y. P.; Badruddin

    2007-02-01

    Interplanetary manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with specific plasma and field properties, called ``interplanetary magnetic clouds,'' have been observed in the heliosphere since the mid-1960s. Depending on their associated features, a set of observed magnetic clouds identified at 1 AU were grouped in four different classes using data over 4 decades: (1) interplanetary magnetic clouds moving with the ambient solar wind (MC structure), (2) magnetic clouds moving faster than the ambient solar wind and forming a shock/sheath structure of compressed plasma and field ahead of it (SMC structure), (3) magnetic clouds ``pushed'' by the high-speed streams from behind, forming an interaction region between the two (MIH structure), and (4) shock-associated magnetic clouds followed by high-speed streams (SMH structure). This classification into different groups led us to study the role, effect, and the relative importance of (1) closed field magnetic cloud structure with low field variance, (2) interplanetary shock and magnetically turbulent sheath region, (3) interaction region with large field variance, and (4) the high-speed solar wind stream coming from the open field regions, in modulating the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). MC structures are responsible for transient decrease with fast recovery. SMC structures are responsible for fast decrease and slow recovery, MIH structures produce depression with slow decrease and slow recovery, and SMH structures are responsible for fast decrease with very slow recovery. Simultaneous variations of GCR intensity, solar plasma velocity, interplanetary magnetic field strength, and its variance led us to study the relative effectiveness of different structures as well as interplanetary plasma/field parameters. Possible role of the magnetic field, its topology, field turbulence, and the high-speed streams in influencing the amplitude and time profile of resulting decreases in GCR intensity have also been discussed.

  19. Magnetic fields in molecular clouds: Limitations of the analysis of Zeeman observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, R.; Wolf, S.; Reissl, S.; Ober, F.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Observations of Zeeman split spectral lines represent an important approach to derive the structure and strength of magnetic fields in molecular clouds. In contrast to the uncertainty of the spectral line observation itself, the uncertainty of the analysis method to derive the magnetic field strength from these observations has so far not been well characterized. Aims: We investigate the impact of several physical quantities on the uncertainty of the analysis method, which is used to derive the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic field strength from Zeeman split spectral lines. These quantities are the density, temperature, velocity, and magnetic field strength. Methods: We simulated the Zeeman splitting of the 1665 MHz OH line with the 3D radiative transfer (RT) extension ZRAD. This extension is based on the line RT code Mol3D and has been developed for the POLArized RadIation Simulator POLARIS. Results: Observations of the OH Zeeman effect in typical molecular clouds are not significantly affected by the uncertainty of the analysis method. However, some observations obtained a magnetic field strength of more than 300 μG, which may result in an uncertainty of the analysis method of > 10%. We derived an approximation to quantify the range of parameters in which the analysis method works accurately enough and provide factors to convert our results to other spectral lines and species as well. We applied these conversion factors to CN and found that observations of the CN Zeeman effect in typical molecular clouds are not significantly affected by the uncertainty of the analysis method. In addition, we found that the density has almost no impact on the uncertainty of the analysis method, unless it reaches values higher than those typically found in molecular clouds (nH ≫ 107 cm-3). Furthermore, the uncertainty of the analysis method increases if both the gas velocity and magnetic field show significant variations along the LOS. However, this increase should be

  20. Energetic Particles inside Magnetic Clouds: a tentative search for their origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier

    During solar activity cycle 21st maximum, the instrumentation aboard ISEE-3 spacecraft observed many ener getic particles events, several of them associated with Magnetic Clouds (MCs). In this paper, we focus our study on the December 19th 1980 event, which was related with an MC that showed one of the most intense magnetic field strength ever observed. We have studied the energetic particle (36 keV - 1,6 MeV) spectra and directional distribution evolutions just before, inside and after the MC passage, with the aim of finding the origin of the energetic particles detected inside the MC.

  1. Magnetic field in molecular cloud cores: Limits on field strengths and linewidths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary observations by others indicate that the magnetic field strength in dense molecular cloud cores is on the order of 30 micro G, much closer to the background field strength than to the flux-freezing prediction for this density. This result implies that some process must exist to decrease the magnetic field strength in these regions to much less than its flux-frozen value, e.g., ambipolar diffusion. At these moderate field strengths, magnetohydrodynamic waves in the cores provide a good explanation of observed supra-thermal molecular linewidths.

  2. Injection of solar energetic particles into both loop legs of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Each of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft carries a Solar Electron and Proton Telescope (SEPT) which measures electrons and protons. Anisotropy observations are provided in four viewing directions: along the nominal magnetic field Parker spiral in the ecliptic towards the Sun (SUN) and away from the Sun (Anti-Sun/ASUN), and towards the north (NORTH) and south (SOUTH). The solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 7 November 2013 was observed by both STEREO spacecraft, which were longitudinally separated by 68° at that time. While STEREO A observed the expected characteristics of an SEP event at a well-connected position, STEREO B detected a very anisotropic bi-directional distribution of near-relativistic electrons and was situated inside a magnetic-cloud-like structure during the early phase of the event. Aims: We examine the source of the bi-directional SEP distribution at STEREO B. On the one hand this distribution could be caused by a double injection into both loop legs of the magnetic cloud (MC). On the other hand, a mirroring scenario where the incident beam is reflected in the opposite loop leg could be the reason. Furthermore, the energetic electron observations are used to probe the magnetic structure inside the magnetic cloud. Methods: We investigate in situ plasma and magnetic field observations and show that STEREO B was embedded in an MC-like structure ejected three days earlier on 4 November from the same active region. We apply a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model to the coronagraph observations from three viewpoints as well as the Global Magnetic Cloud (GMC) model to the in situ measurements at STEREO B to determine the orientation and topology of the MC close to the Sun and at 1 AU. We also estimate the path lengths of the electrons propagating through the MC to estimate the amount of magnetic field line winding inside the structure. Results: The relative intensity and timing of the energetic electron

  3. A simple model of Forbush decreases caused by sheathless magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbovic, Mateja; Vrsnak, Bojan; Calogovic, Jasa; Sudar, Davor; Heber, Bernd; Wallmann, Carsten; Galsdorf, Dennis; Herbst, Konstantin; Kuhl, Patrick; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Mostl, Christian; Dalla, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    A simple model has been derived that qualitatively describes short-term galactic cosmic ray (CR) decreases, i.e. Forbush decreases (FDs) caused by magnetic clouds (MCs) that drive no sheath region. The model is based on the interaction of the MC and CRs where the time profile of the CRs during the passage of the MC can be represented by the radial profile of trapped particles within a cylindrical 2D region, when a constant magnetic field is switched on. The model predicts that the number of CRs will decrease towards the center of the MC. The profile and its amplitude depend on the magnetic field strength and spatial extent of the MC. Although the model is based on basic electrodynamics only, it has the potential to forecast the amplitude as function of particle energy, and MC radius and magnetic field strength. We test the model on a sample of events using in situ magnetic cloud measurements from ACE and WIND satellites as well as CR measurements by EPHIN detector onboard SOHO satellite. This work has been supported in part by Croatian Science Foundation under the project 6212 "Solar and Stellar Variability" and by MZOS/DAAD bilateral project CORAMOD.

  4. Mapping Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds with the CN Zeeman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The role of magnetic fields in star formation remains controversial. Observations of the Zeeman effect provide the only available technique for directly measuring the strengths of magnetic fields in molecular clouds. We have mapped the Zeeman effect toward the massive star forming complex W3OH in the CN N=2-1 transition at 226 GHz with both the IRAM 30-m telescope and the CARMA array and have combined these data to produce a fully spatially sampled map of the magnetic field along the line of sight, with approximately 4 arcsec resolution. These are both the first CN Zeeman maps and the first detections of the Zeeman effect in the CN N=2-1 transition. We will present this map and discuss the astrophysical implications. This work may be considered to be a pathfinder for future similar ALMA observations, which have the potential to advance considerably our understanding of the role of magnetic fields in the star formation process.

  5. Comparing Herschel dust emission structures, magnetic fields observed by Planck, and dynamics: high-latitude star forming cloud L1642

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The nearby high-latitude cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. This cloud is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642, and also combine these with dynamic information from molecular line observations. The high-resolution Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data reveal an ordered magnetic field that pervades the cloud and is aligned with the surrounding low density striations. We show that there is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic fields revealed by Planck polarization data at 10' resolution. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. We see a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 2x10^21 cm-2. We conclude that Planck polarization data revealing the large scale magnetic field orientation can be very useful even when comparing to the finest structures in higher resolution data, e.g. Herschel at ~18" resolution.

  6. Simulation of Magnetic Cloud Erosion and Deformation During Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; Kozyra, J. U.; Lepri, S. T.; Lavraud, B.; Jackson, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    We examine a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation describing a very fast interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) propagating from the solar corona to 1 AU. In conjunction with it's high speed, the ICME evolves in ways that give it a unique appearance at 1AU that does not resemble a typical ICME. First, as the ICME decelerates in the solar wind, filament material at the back of the flux rope pushes its way forward through the flux rope. Second, diverging nonradial flows in front of the filament transport azimuthal flux of the rope to the sides of the ICME. Third, the magnetic flux rope reconnects with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). As a consequence of these processes, the flux rope partially unravels and appears to evolve to an entirely open configuration near its nose. At the same time, filament material at the base of the flux rope moves forward and comes in direct contact with the shocked plasma in the CME sheath. We find evidence such remarkable behavior has occurred when we examine a very fast CME that erupted from the Sun on 2005 January 20. In situ observations of this event near 1 AU show very dense cold material impacting the Earth following immediately behind the CME sheath. Charge state analysis shows this dense plasma is filament material, and the analysis of SMEI data provides the trajectory of this dense plasma from the Sun. Consistent with the simulation, we find the azimuthal flux (Bz) to be entirely unbalanced giving the appearance that the flux rope has completely eroded on the anti-sunward side.

  7. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  8. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:26793269

  9. Fitting a toroidal force-free field to multispacecraft observations of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Matsuoka, Ayako

    2010-10-01

    A torus-type flux rope model with an arbitrary aspect ratio was applied to an interplanetary magnetic cloud observed by ACE and Nozomi on 16-18 April 1999, when Nozomi was 0.2 AU downstream of ACE in the solar wind within 3° of heliocentric longitude. The large and small radii of the torus, the direction of the symmetric axis, and the crossing points of the spacecraft were determined so that they would minimize the sum of the square of the difference between the model field and the hourly averages of the observed field. Self-similar expansion of the flux rope was assumed in proportion with the heliocentric distance. The best fit model had large and small radii of 0.16 and 0.09 AU, respectively. Both spacecraft passed through the northern part of the torus. Difference in the magnetic field observed by the two spacecraft was explained by the difference in their paths through the magnetic cloud. The model fit was consistent with the direction of the vector normal to the preceding planar magnetic structures. The chirality of the flux rope was positive (left handed), suggesting that the solar source was on the Northern Hemisphere. Assuming a probable association with the filament disappearance observed on 13 April 1999 at N16 E00, it is inferred that the filament had traveled in interplanetary space across the ecliptic plane. It was also found that nearly the same fitting result was obtained using a single-spacecraft observation in the case of a torus-shaped magnetic cloud with a small aspect ratio.

  10. Energetic secondary electrons and the nonthermal galactic radio background - A probe of the magnetic field in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A previous analysis of the manifestations of charged-pion-decay secondary electrons in interstellar cloud material is extended to include those contributions to the Galactic radio and soft gamma-ray backgrounds that are directly attributable to energetic secondaries. The equilibrium distribution of secondary electrons in dense interstellar clouds is calculated, synchrotron emissivity from isolated interstellar clouds is examined, and it is shown how the value of the magnetic field in these clouds may be determined by observing the radio emission in their directions. The contribution that such clouds make to the integrated radio background is evaluated, and the Galactic distribution of bremsstrahlung gamma rays that arise from interactions of secondary electrons with thermal material in dense clouds is computed. The results indicate that a magnetic field of no more than 80 microgauss is characteristic of dense clouds and that the integrated synchrotron radiation from secondary electrons in interstellar clouds will contribute a significant fraction of the nonthermal brightness along the Galactic equator even if the mean cloud field is as low as 35 microgauss.

  11. Energetic secondary electrons and the nonthermal galactic radio background - A probe of the magnetic field in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A previous analysis of the manifestations of charged-pion-decay secondary electrons in interstellar cloud material is extended to include those contributions to the Galactic radio and soft gamma-ray backgrounds that are directly attributable to energetic secondaries. The equilibrium distribution of secondary electrons in dense interstellar clouds is calculated, synchrotron emissivity from isolated interstellar clouds is examined, and it is shown how the value of the magnetic field in these clouds may be determined by observing the radio emission in their directions. The contribution that such clouds make to the integrated radio background is evaluated, and the Galactic distribution of bremsstrahlung gamma rays that arise from interactions of secondary electrons with thermal material in dense clouds is computed. The results indicate that a magnetic field of no more than 80 microgauss is characteristic of dense clouds and that the integrated synchrotron radiation from secondary electrons in interstellar clouds will contribute a significant fraction of the nonthermal brightness along the Galactic equator even if the mean cloud field is as low as 35 microgauss.

  12. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-03-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disc formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima et al. demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the buildup of a rotationally supported disc. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disc without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio (μ) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disc is nearly constant in their models. In this paper, we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of μ in the inner regions where the disc is built up. We demonstrate that turbulence-induced reconnection diffusion of the magnetic field happens in the initial stages of the disc formation in the turbulent envelope material that is accreting. Our analysis is suggestive that reconnection diffusion is present in both sets of simulations and provides a simple solution for the `magnetic braking catastrophe' which is discussed in the literature in relation to the formation of protostellar accretion discs.

  13. The deformation of flux tubes in the solar wind with applications to the structure of magnetic clouds and CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Chen, James; Spicer, D. S.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the distortion of a magnetic flux tube, accelerated through ambient solar wind plasma, are presented. Vortices form on the trailing edge of the flux tube, and couple strongly to its interior. If the flux tube azimuthal field is weak, it deforms into an elongated banana-like shape after a few Alfven transit times. A significant azimuthal field component inhibits this distortion. In the case of magnetic clouds in the solar wind, it is suggested that the shape observed at 1 AU was determined by distortion of the cloud in the inner heliosphere. Distortion of the cloud beyond 1 AU takes many days. It is estimated that effective drag coefficients slightly greater than unity are appropriate for modeling flux tube propagation. Synthetic magnetic field profiles as would be seen by a spacecraft traversing the cloud are presented.

  14. The role of high frequency oscillations in the penetration of plasma clouds across magnetic boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtig, Tomas; Brenning, Nils; Raadu, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments are reported where a collissionfree plasma cloud penetrates a magnetic barrier by self-polarization. Three closely related effects, all fundamental for the penetration mechanism, are studied quantitatively: (1) anomalous fast magnetic field penetration (two orders of magnitude faster than classical) (2) anomalous fast electron transport (three orders of magnitude faster than classical and two orders of magnitude faster than Bohm diffusion), and (3) the ion energy budget as ions enter the potential structure set up by the self-polarized plasma cloud. It is concluded that all three phenomena are closely related and that they are mediated by highly nonlinear oscillations in the lower hybrid range, driven by a strong diamagnetic current loop which is set up in the plasma in the penetration process. The fast magnetic field penetration occurs as a consequence of the anomalous resistivity caused by the wave field and the fast electron transport across magnetic field lines is caused by the correlation between electric field and density oscillations in the wave field. It is also found that ions do not lose energy in proportion to the potential 'hill' they have to climb, rather they are transported against the dc potential structure by the same correlation that is responsible for the electron transport. The results obtained through direct measurements are compared to particle in cell simulations that reproduce most aspects of the high frequency wave field.

  15. Disc Formation in Turbulent Cloud Cores: Circumventing the Magnetic Braking Catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Daniel; Banerjee, Robi; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    We present collapse simulations of strongly magnetised, 100 M⊙, turbulent cloud cores. Around the protostars formed during the collapse Keplerian discs with typical sizes of up to 100 AU build up in contrast to previous simulations neglecting turbulence. Analysing the condensations in which the discs form, we show that the magnetic flux loss is not sufficient to explain the build-up of Keplerian discs. The average magnetic field is strongly inclined to the disc which might reduce the magnetic braking efficiency. However, the main reason for the reduced magnetic braking efficiency is the highly disordered magnetic field in the surroundings of the discs. Furthermore, due to the lack of a coherently rotating structure in the turbulent environment of the disc no toroidal magnetic field necessary for angular momentum extraction can build up. Simultaneously the angular momentum inflow remains high due to local shear flows created by the turbulent motions. We suggest that the "magnetic braking catastrophe" is an artefact of the idealised non-turbulent initial conditions and that turbulence provides a natural mechanism to circumvent this problem.

  16. Passive shimming of a superconducting magnet using the L1-norm regularized least square algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xia; Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Wang, Qiuliang; Li, Yi; Zhu, Xuchen; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The uniformity of the static magnetic field B0 is of prime importance for an MRI system. The passive shimming technique is usually applied to improve the uniformity of the static field by optimizing the layout of a series of steel shims. The steel pieces are fixed in the drawers in the inner bore of the superconducting magnet, and produce a magnetizing field in the imaging region to compensate for the inhomogeneity of the B0 field. In practice, the total mass of steel used for shimming should be minimized, in addition to the field uniformity requirement. This is because the presence of steel shims may introduce a thermal stability problem. The passive shimming procedure is typically realized using the linear programming (LP) method. The LP approach however, is generally slow and also has difficulty balancing the field quality and the total amount of steel for shimming. In this paper, we have developed a new algorithm that is better able to balance the dual constraints of field uniformity and the total mass of the shims. The least square method is used to minimize the magnetic field inhomogeneity over the imaging surface with the total mass of steel being controlled by an L1-norm based constraint. The proposed algorithm has been tested with practical field data, and the results show that, with similar computational cost and mass of shim material, the new algorithm achieves superior field uniformity (43% better for the test case) compared with the conventional linear programming approach.

  17. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-01

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. The focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.

  18. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions acceleratedmore » by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.« less

  19. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.

  20. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-15

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. The focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.

  1. [Regularized inhomogeneity correction method for phased array image in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Pei, Xiaomin; Luo, Weitao; Dai, Jianpin

    2011-10-01

    Phased array coils (multiple receiver coil systems) have been extensively used for acquisition of MR images owing to their ability of increasing SNR, extending field-of-view (FOV), and reducing acquisition time. But the SOS algorithm,which is main method for phased array image reconstruction,will cause inhomogeneity in reconstructed image. A regularized least square method for phased array image combination is proposed in this paper. In the method, an additional reference scan is performed in advance. By using the reference scan, coil sensitivity map can be acquired, and image reconstructed from reference scan can be used as reference data in the regulation term. Experiments showed that the image uniformity was greatly improved by this method with scanning phantom and volunteer.

  2. On the magnetic fields of Be/X-ray pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Mereghetti, S.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the possibility of explaining the properties of the Be/X-ray pulsars observed in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) within the magnetic levitation accretion scenario. This implies that their X-ray emission is powered by a wind-fed accretion on to a neutron star (NS) which captures matter from a magnetized stellar wind. The NS in this case is accreting matter from a non-Keplerian magnetically levitating disc which is surrounding its magnetosphere. This allows us to explain the observed periods of the pulsars in terms of spin equilibrium without the need of invoking dipole magnetic fields outside the usual range ˜1011-1013 G inferred from cyclotron features of Galactic high-mass X-ray binaries. We find that the equilibrium period of a NS, under certain conditions, depends strongly on the magnetization of the stellar wind of its massive companion and, correspondingly, on the magnetic field of the massive companion itself. This may help to explain why similar NSs in binaries with similar properties rotate with different periods yielding a large scatter of periods of the accretion-powered pulsar observed in SMC and our galaxy.

  3. Numerical Study of Erosion, Heating, and Acceleration of the Magnetic Cloud as Impacted by Fast Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shoudi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Liping; Wang, Linghua

    2017-06-01

    The impact of an overtaking fast shock on a magnetic cloud (MC) is a pivotal process in CME-CME (CME: coronal mass ejection) interactions and CME-SIR (SIR: stream interaction region) interactions. MC with a strong and rotating magnetic field is usually deemed a crucial part of CMEs. To study the impact of a fast shock on an MC, we perform a 2.5 dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation. Two cases are run in this study: without and with impact by fast shock. In the former case, the MC expands gradually from its initial state and drives a relatively slow magnetic reconnection with the ambient magnetic field. Analyses of forces near the core of the MC as a whole body indicates that the solar gravity is quite small compared to the Lorentz force and the pressure gradient force. In the second run, a fast shock propagates, relative to the background plasma, at a speed twice that of the perpendicular fast magnetosonic speed, catches up with and takes over the MC. Due to the penetration of the fast shock, the MC is highly compressed and heated, with the temperature growth rate enhanced by a factor of about 10 and the velocity increased to about half of the shock speed. The magnetic reconnection with ambient magnetic field is also sped up by a factor of two to four in reconnection rate as a result of the enhanced density of the current sheet, which is squeezed by the forward motion of the shocked MC.

  4. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ☉}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 μG, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  5. Standard map in magnetized relativistic systems: Fixed points and regular acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, M. C. de; Steffens, F. M.; Pakter, R.; Rizzato, F. B.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the concept of a standard map for the interaction of relativistic particles and electrostatic waves of arbitrary amplitudes, under the action of external magnetic fields. The map is adequate for physical settings where waves and particles interact impulsively, and allows for a series of analytical result to be exactly obtained. Unlike the traditional form of the standard map, the present map is nonlinear in the wave amplitude and displays a series of peculiar properties. Among these properties we discuss the relation involving fixed points of the maps and accelerator regimes.

  6. Enhancement of Solar Energetic Particles During a Shock Magnetic Cloud Interacting Complex Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2008-11-01

    The behavior of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in a shock magnetic cloud interacting complex structure observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft on 5 November 2001 is analyzed. A strong shock causing magnetic field strength and solar wind speed increases of about 41 nT and 300 km s-1, respectively, propagated within a preceding magnetic cloud (MC). It is found that an extraordinary SEP enhancement appeared at the high-energy (≥10 MeV) proton intensities and extended over and only over the entire period of the shock MC structure passing through the spacecraft. Such SEP behavior is much different from the usual picture that the SEPs are depressed in MCs. The comparison of this event with other top SEP events of solar cycle 23 (2000 Bastille Day and 2003 Halloween events) shows that such an enhancement resulted from the effects of the shock MC complex structure leading to the highest ≥10 MeV proton intensity of solar cycle 23. Our analysis suggests that the relatively isolated magnetic field configuration of MCs combined with an embedded strong shock could significantly enhance the SEP intensity; SEPs are accelerated by the shock and confined into the MC. Further, we find that the SEP enhancement at lower energies happened not only within the shock MC structure but also after it, probably owing to the presence of a following MC-like structure. This is consistent with the picture that SEP fluxes could be enhanced in the magnetic topology between two MCs, which was proposed based on numerical simulations by Kallenrode and Cliver ( Proc. 27th ICRC 8, 3318, 2001b).

  7. Electron Cloud Generation And Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Browman, A.A.; Ledford, J.E.; Borden, M.J.; O'Hara, J.F.; McCrady, R.C.; Rybarcyk, L.J.; Spickermann, T.; Zaugg, T.J.; Pivi, M.T.F.; /SLAC

    2007-11-14

    A diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies with this diagnostic show that the electron flux striking the wall in the quadrupole is comparable to or larger than in an adjacent drift. In addition, the trapped electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of diagnostic, was larger than expected and decayed very slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a significant fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  8. Motion robust magnetic susceptibility and field inhomogeneity estimation using regularized image restoration techniques for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Desmond Teck Beng; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Kim, Boklye

    2008-01-01

    In functional MRI, head motion may cause dynamic nonlinear field-inhomogeneity changes, especially with large out-of-plane rotations. This may lead to dynamic geometric distortion or blurring in the time series, which may reduce activation detection accuracy. The use of image registration to estimate dynamic field inhomogeneity maps from a static field map is not sufficient in the presence of such rotations. This paper introduces a retrospective approach to estimate magnetic susceptibility induced field maps of an object in motion, given a static susceptibility induced field map and the associated object motion parameters. It estimates a susceptibility map from a static field map using regularized image restoration techniques, and applies rigid body motion to the former. The dynamic field map is then computed using susceptibility voxel convolution. The method addresses field map changes due to out-of-plane rotations during time series acquisition and does not involve real time field map acquisitions.

  9. Spatial distribution of auroral precipitation during storms caused by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagodkina, O. I.; Despirak, I. V.; Vorobjev, V. G.

    2012-03-01

    The global pattern of auroral precipitation and dynamics of precipitation boundaries during three different intensity magnetic storms driven by magnetic clouds were investigated. For the aim of the research, the empirical model (http://pgia.ru/lang/en/webapps/) in which the boundary locations of the auroral precipitation depend on the geomagnetic activity expressed by the AL- and Dst indices was used. The locations of the boundaries derived from DMSP F10-F15 spacecraft observations were compared to those obtained in the model and displayed reasonable agreement. We find a significant displacement to the lower latitudes of the diffuse auroral zone (DAZ) and auroral oval precipitation (AOP) region with the increase of magnetic activity. The planetary pattern of auroral precipitation indicated different dawn-dusk widening of the DAZ and AOP region (asymmetry) during both main and recovery phases of magnetic storms. Differences in the dawn-dusk widening (i.e., asymmetry) of the DAZ and AOP zone during magnetic storms appear to be sensitive to Dst, where the DAZ widens in the morning only, while the AOP widens in the evening under all Dst intensities, and widens significantly in the morning also for Dst<-100 nT. The average energy of precipitating electrons in both MLT sectors and both zones was estimated and compared with DMSP spacecraft data.

  10. Comparison of Magnetic Properties in a Magnetic Cloud and Its Solar Source on 2013 April 11-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Möstl, C.; Amerstorfer, T.; Mishra, W.; Farrugia, C.; Leitner, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the Sun-Earth connection of coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), we studied the solar active region (AR) and the magnetic properties of magnetic cloud (MC) event during 2013 April 14-15. We use in situ observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer and source AR measurements from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The MCs magnetic structure is reconstructed from the Grad-Shafranov method, which reveals a northern component of the axial field with left handed helicity. The MC invariant axis is highly inclined to the ecliptic plane pointing northward and is rotated by 117° with respect to the source region PIL. The net axial flux and current in the MC are comparatively higher than from the source region. Linear force-free alpha distribution (10-7-10-6 m-1) at the sigmoid leg matches the range of twist number in the MC of 1-2 au MFR. The MFR is nonlinear force-free with decreasing twist from the axis (9 turns/au) toward the edge. Therefore, a Gold-Hoyle (GH) configuration, assuming a constant twist, is more consistent with the MC structure than the Lundquist configuration of increasing twist from the axis to boundary. As an indication of that, the GH configuration yields a better fitting to the global trend of in situ magnetic field components, in terms of rms, than the Lundquist model. These cylindrical configurations improved the MC fitting results when the effect of self-similar expansion of MFR was considered. For such twisting behavior, this study suggests an alternative fitting procedure to better characterize the MC magnetic structure and its source region links.

  11. Magnetic cloud models with bent and oblate cross-section boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Magnetic clouds (MCs) are formed by magnetic flux ropes that are ejected from the Sun as coronal mass ejections. These structures generally have low plasma beta and travel through the interplanetary medium interacting with the surrounding solar wind. Thus, the dynamical evolution of the internal magnetic structure of a MC is a consequence of both the conditions of its environment and of its own dynamical laws, which are mainly dominated by magnetic forces. Aims: With in-situ observations the magnetic field is only measured along the trajectory of the spacecraft across the MC. Therefore, a magnetic model is needed to reconstruct the magnetic configuration of the encountered MC. The main aim of the present work is to extend the widely used cylindrical model to arbitrary cross-section shapes. Methods: The flux rope boundary is parametrized to account for a broad range of shapes. Then, the internal structure of the flux rope is computed by expressing the magnetic field as a series of modes of a linear force-free field. Results: We analyze the magnetic field profile along straight cuts through the flux rope, in order to simulate the spacecraft crossing through a MC. We find that the magnetic field orientation is only weakly affected by the shape of the MC boundary. Therefore, the MC axis can approximately be found by the typical methods previously used (e.g., minimum variance). The boundary shape affects the magnetic field strength most. The measurement of how much the field strength peaks along the crossing provides an estimation of the aspect ratio of the flux-rope cross-section. The asymmetry of the field strength between the front and the back of the MC, after correcting for the time evolution (i.e., its aging during the observation of the MC), provides an estimation of the cross-section global bending. A flat or/and bent cross-section requires a large anisotropy of the total pressure imposed at the MC boundary by the surrounding medium. Conclusions: The

  12. Anomalous magnetosheath properties during Earth passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Erkaev, N.V.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1995-10-01

    In this work the authors present a model for the behavior of the magnetosheath during the passage of the earth thru an interplanetary magnetic cloud. They study the variation of plasma flow and field values as a result of this encounter. The unique feature of such encounters is that they present substantial changes in the solar wind conditions along the bow shock and magnetopause for periods of 1 to 2 days. The mach number upstream of the bow shock can be as low as 3, compared to normal value of 8 to 10. The mach number and magnetic shear across the magnetopause have a major impact on the magnetosheath properties. The authors use the encounter of January 14-15, 1988, as a basis for their model, and apply ideal MHD equations, by means of a boundary layer technique, to study changes in field and plasma flow patterns.

  13. Magnetic Cloud Bz solar cycle variation and the space weather implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jian, L.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between magnetic cloud (MC) polarity and the solar magnetic field polarity cycle is extended up to the present. In spite of the weak solar polar fields, the related complications of helmet streamer belt and source surface neutral line over the recent solar cycle, the MC polarity solar cycle variation pattern continues to be true. A trend related to the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24are longer periods of N-S polarity MCs. The MC polarity patterns at the STEREO sites generally reflect that at L1. Combining the MC events at three observing points (L1 and STEREO A&B) provides a larger data sample, and the normalized result reenforce and clarify the MC polarity trend. We conclude with some discussions regarding source regions and space weather implications.

  14. The Structure of Discontinuities in the Magnetic Cloud Boundary Layers Observed by WIND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Wei, F.; Feng, X.; Zuo, P. B.

    We analyze 45 MC magnetic cloud boundary layer events and the structure of discontinuities within between 1995 2-2003 8 that the magnetic field and plasma data were observed by WIND We suggest that 1 the MC boundary layers often consist of several kinds of discontinuities which have more complicated structure than those of shocks It indicates that they have different form mechanism 2 The quantity of RDs rotation discontinuities is larger than the quantity of TDs tangential discontinuities in the BLs boundary layers Complicated nonlinear Alfven waves was one of the causes that produced this kind of RDs 3 The existence of complicated structure of discontinuities has close relationship with complicated dynamics effects in BLs The initial results indicate that the discontinuities are important structures in the MC boundary layers It provides evidences for analyzing the form mechanism of MC boundary layers

  15. Effects of a magnetic cloud simultaneously observed on the equatorial ionosphere in midday and midnight sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Chandra, H.; Das, A. C.; Sridharan, R.; Reinisch, B. W.; Ahmed, Khurshid

    2012-04-01

    An impact of a magnetic cloud on the Earth's magnetosphere occurred at 1636 UT on 25 June, 1998, associated with a sudden increase of the solar wind density and velocity, as well as a sudden increase of the zenithal component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF- B z). Following the impact of the magnetic cloud, IMF- B z was northward (10 nT) and remained steadily strong (about 15 nT) for the next six hours. IMF- B z turned southward at 2330 UT on 25 June, 1998, and remained strongly southward (-15 nT) for the next four hours. During the positive phase of IMF- B z, both the Auroral index and ring current index SYM/H remained steadily low indicating complete isolation of the Earth's magnetosphere from the solar wind and no significant changes were observed in the equatorial ionosphere. After the southward turning, the steady southward IMF- B z permitted solar wind energy to penetrate the magnetosphere and caused the generation of a magnetic storm associated with strong auroral electrojet activity ( A E index). Strong southward IMF- B z corresponds to the dawn-dusk interplanetary electric field (eastward on the dayside and westward on the night side). The ionograms at Jicamarca (night side) showed strong spread- F and at Thumba (dayside) showed an absence of equatorial type of sporadic- E, indicating a dusk-to-dawn electric field. Thus, the observations point to an electric field opposite in direction to that expected by the prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field. An abnormally-large Auroral index ( A E) associated with the start of the storm suggests that the cause of the equatorial electric field changes is due to the disturbance dynamo effect.

  16. Magnetic field morphology in nearby molecular clouds as revealed by starlight and submillimetre polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. D.; Alves, F.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Falgarone, E.; Franco, G. A. P.; Guillet, V.; Hennebelle, P.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.

    2016-12-01

    Within four nearby (d < 160 pc) molecular clouds, we statistically evaluated the structure of the interstellar magnetic field, projected on the plane of the sky and integrated along the line of sight, as inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz and from the optical and near-infrared polarization of background starlight. We compared the dispersion of the field orientation directly in vicinities with an area equivalent to that subtended by the Planck effective beam at 353 GHz (10') and using the second-order structure functions of the field orientation angles. We found that the average dispersion of the starlight-inferred field orientations within 10'-diameter vicinities is less than 20°, and that at these scales the mean field orientation is on average within 5° of that inferred from the submillimetre polarization observations in the considered regions. We also found that the dispersion of starlight polarization orientations and the polarization fractions within these vicinities are well reproduced by a Gaussian model of the turbulent structure of the magnetic field, in agreement with the findings reported by the Planck Collaboration at scales ℓ > 10' and for comparable column densities. At scales ℓ > 10', we found differences of up to 14.̊7 between the second-order structure functions obtained from starlight and submillimetre polarization observations in the same positions in the plane of the sky, but comparison with a Gaussian model of the turbulent structure of the magnetic field indicates that these differences are small and are consistent with the difference in angular resolution between both techniques. The differences between the second-order structure functions calculated with each technique suggests that the increase in the angular resolution obtained with the starlight polarization observations does not introduce significant corrections to the dispersion of polarization orientations used in the

  17. Kinetic and Structural Evolution of Self-gravitating, Magnetized Clouds: 2.5-dimensional Simulations of Decaying Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Stone, James M.

    1999-03-01

    The molecular component of the Galaxy is comprised of turbulent, magnetized clouds, many of which are self-gravitating and form stars. To develop an understanding of how these clouds' kinetic and structural evolution may depend on their level of turbulence, mean magnetization, and degree of self-gravity, we perform a survey of direct numerical MHD simulations in which three parameters are independently varied. Our simulations consist of solutions to the time-dependent MHD equations on a two-dimensional grid with periodic boundary conditions; an additional ``half'' dimension is also incorporated as dependent variables in the third Cartesian direction. Two of our survey parameters, the mean magnetization parameter β≡c2sound/v2Alfven and the Jeans number nJ≡Lcloud/LJeans, allow us to model clouds that either meet or fail conditions for magneto-Jeans stability and magnetic criticality. Our third survey parameter, the sonic Mach number M≡σvelocity/csound, allows us to initiate turbulence of either sub- or super-Alfvénic amplitude; we employ an isothermal equation of state throughout. We evaluate the times for each cloud model to become gravitationally bound and measure each model's kinetic energy loss over the fluid-flow crossing time. We compare the evolution of density and magnetic field structural morphology and quantify the differences in the density contrast generated by internal stresses for models of differing mean magnetization. We find that the values of β and nJ, but not the initial Mach number M, determine the time for cloud gravitational binding and collapse: for mean cloud density nH2=100 cm-3, unmagnetized models collapse after ~5 Myr, and magnetically supercritical models generally collapse after 5-10 Myr (although the smallest magneto-Jeans stable clouds survive gravitational collapse until t~15 Myr), while magnetically subcritical clouds remain uncollapsed over the entire simulations; these cloud collapse times scale with the mean density as

  18. Spatially regularized estimation for the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Julia C; Gertheiss, Jan; Schmid, Volker J

    2014-03-15

    Competing compartment models of different complexities have been used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data. We present a spatial elastic net approach that allows to estimate the number of compartments for each voxel such that the model complexity is not fixed a priori. A multi-compartment approach is considered, which is translated into a restricted least square model selection problem. This is done by using a set of basis functions for a given set of candidate rate constants. The form of the basis functions is derived from a kinetic model and thus describes the contribution of a specific compartment. Using a spatial elastic net estimator, we chose a sparse set of basis functions per voxel, and hence, rate constants of compartments. The spatial penalty takes into account the voxel structure of an image and performs better than a penalty treating voxels independently. The proposed estimation method is evaluated for simulated images and applied to an in vivo dataset. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  20. Mixed micelle cloud point-magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of doxazosin and alfuzosin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nannan; Wu, Hao; Chang, Yafen; Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Lizhen; Du, Liming; Fu, Yunlong

    2015-01-05

    Mixed micelle cloud point extraction (MM-CPE) combined with magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction (MD-μ-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for the extraction of doxazosin (DOX) and alfuzosin (ALF) prior to fluorescence analysis. The mixed micelle anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and non-ionic polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenylether was used as the extraction solvent in MM-CPE, and diatomite bonding Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles were used as the adsorbent in MD-μ-SPE. The method was based on MM-CPE of DOX and ALF in the surfactant-rich phase. Magnetic materials were used to retrieve the surfactant-rich phase, which easily separated from the aqueous phase under magnetic field. At optimum conditions, a linear relationship between DOX and ALF was obtained in the range of 5-300 ng mL(-1), and the limits of detection were 0.21 and 0.16 ng mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the drugs in pharmaceutical preparations, urine samples, and plasma samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  2. Circular-cylindrical flux-rope analytical model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Linton, Mark; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Savani, Neel P.; Szabo, Adam; Farrugia, Charlie; Yu, Wenyuan

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds ( MCs). The model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2000) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation.The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in-situ observations. Four Earth directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic fi eld and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of theplasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical.

  3. The collective gyration of a heavy ion cloud in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenning, N.; Swenson, C.; Kelley, M. C.; Providakes, J.; Torbert, R.

    1990-01-01

    In both the ionospheric barium injection experiments CRIT 1 and CRIT 2, a long duration oscillation was seen with a frequency close to the gyro frequency of barium and a time duration of about one second. A model for the phenomena which was proposed for the CRIT 1 experiment is compared to the results from CRIT 2 which made a much more complete set of measurements. The model follows the motion of a low Beta ion cloud through a larger ambient plasma. The internal field of the model is close to antiparallel to the injection direction v sub i but slightly tilted towards the self polarization direction E sub p = -V sub i by B. As the ions move across the magnetic field, the space charge is continuously neutralized by magnetic field aligned electron currents from the ambient ionosphere, drawn by the divergence in the perpendicular electric field. These currents give a perturbation of the magnetic field related to the electric field perturbation by Delta E/Delta B approximately equal to V sub A. The model predictions agree quite well with the observed vector directions, field strengths, and decay times of the electric and magnetic fields in CRIT 2. The possibility to extend the model to the active region, where the ions are produces in this type of self-ionizing injection experiments, is discussed.

  4. Mixed micelle cloud point-magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of doxazosin and alfuzosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nannan; Wu, Hao; Chang, Yafen; Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Lizhen; Du, Liming; Fu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Mixed micelle cloud point extraction (MM-CPE) combined with magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction (MD-μ-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for the extraction of doxazosin (DOX) and alfuzosin (ALF) prior to fluorescence analysis. The mixed micelle anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and non-ionic polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenylether was used as the extraction solvent in MM-CPE, and diatomite bonding Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were used as the adsorbent in MD-μ-SPE. The method was based on MM-CPE of DOX and ALF in the surfactant-rich phase. Magnetic materials were used to retrieve the surfactant-rich phase, which easily separated from the aqueous phase under magnetic field. At optimum conditions, a linear relationship between DOX and ALF was obtained in the range of 5-300 ng mL-1, and the limits of detection were 0.21 and 0.16 ng mL-1, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the drugs in pharmaceutical preparations, urine samples, and plasma samples.

  5. THE STAR FORMATION RATE OF TURBULENT MAGNETIZED CLOUDS: COMPARING THEORY, SIMULATIONS, AND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-20

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)-the Krumholz and McKee (KM), Padoan and Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle and Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC-all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter {alpha}{sub vir}; (2) sonic Mach number M; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma {beta}=2M{sub A}{sup 2}/M{sup 2} with the Alfven Mach number M{sub A}. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} and Mach numbers M=3-50 and M{sub A}=1-{infinity}, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between M=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and {alpha}{sub vir} {approx} 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for M=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvenic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies {epsilon} = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  6. The Star Formation Rate of Turbulent Magnetized Clouds: Comparing Theory, Simulations, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The role of turbulence and magnetic fields is studied for star formation in molecular clouds. We derive and compare six theoretical models for the star formation rate (SFR)—the Krumholz & McKee (KM), Padoan & Nordlund (PN), and Hennebelle & Chabrier (HC) models, and three multi-freefall versions of these, suggested by HC—all based on integrals over the log-normal distribution of turbulent gas. We extend all theories to include magnetic fields and show that the SFR depends on four basic parameters: (1) virial parameter αvir (2) sonic Mach number {M}; (3) turbulent forcing parameter b, which is a measure for the fraction of energy driven in compressive modes; and (4) plasma \\beta =2 {M}_A^2/ {M}^2 with the Alfvén Mach number {M}_A. We compare all six theories with MHD simulations, covering cloud masses of 300 to 4 × 106 M ⊙ and Mach numbers {M}=3-50 and {M}_A=1-∞, with solenoidal (b = 1/3), mixed (b = 0.4), and compressive turbulent (b = 1) forcings. We find that the SFR increases by a factor of four between {M}=5 and 50 for compressive turbulent forcing and αvir ~ 1. Comparing forcing parameters, we see that the SFR is more than 10 times higher with compressive than solenoidal forcing for {M}=10 simulations. The SFR and fragmentation are both reduced by a factor of two in strongly magnetized, trans-Alfvénic turbulence compared to hydrodynamic turbulence. All simulations are fit simultaneously by the multi-freefall KM and multi-freefall PN theories within a factor of two over two orders of magnitude in SFR. The simulated SFRs cover the range and correlation of SFR column density with gas column density observed in Galactic clouds, and agree well for star formation efficiencies SFE = 1%-10% and local efficiencies epsilon = 0.3-0.7 due to feedback. We conclude that the SFR is primarily controlled by interstellar turbulence, with a secondary effect coming from magnetic fields.

  7. RELATIONSHIPs among Geomagnetic storms, interplanetary shocks, magnetic clouds, and SUNSPOT NUMBER during 1995-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.; Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    During 1995-2012 Wind recorded 168 magnetic clouds (MCs), 197 magnetic cloud-like structures (MCLs), and 358 interplanetary (IP) shocks. Ninety four MCs and 56 MCLs had upstream shock waves. The following features are found: (i) Averages of solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), duration (<Δt>), strength of Bzmin, and intensity of the associated geomagnetic storm/activity (Dstmin) for MCs with upstream shock waves (MCSHOCK) are higher (or stronger) than those averages for the MCs without upstream shock waves (MCNO-SHOCK). (ii) The <Δt> of MCSHOCK events (≈19.6 hr) is 9% longer than that for MCNO-SHOCK events (≈17.9 hr). (iii) For the MCSHOCK events, the average duration of the sheath (<ΔtSHEATH>) is 12.1 hrs. These findings could be very useful for space weather predictions, i.e. IP shocks driven by MCs are expected to arrive at Wind (or at 1 AU) about ~12 hours ahead of the front of the MCs on average. (iv) The occurrence frequency of IP shocks is well associated with sunspot number (SSN). The average intensity of geomagnetic storms measured by for MCSHOCK and MCNOSHOCK events is -102 and -31 nT, respectively. The is -78, -70, and -35 nT for the 358 IP shocks, 168 MCs, and 197 MCLs, respectively. These results imply that IP shocks, when they occur with MCs/MCLs, must play an important role in the strength of geomagnetic storms. We speculate as to why this is so. Yearly occurrence frequencies of MCSHOCK and IP shocks are well correlated with solar activity (e.g., SSN). Choosing the right Dstmin estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  8. Ring current activity during the early Bz<0 phase of the January 1997 magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Foster, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    The passage at Earth of the January 10-11, 1997, magnetic cloud induced a storm of moderate geomagnetic activity with Dst index reaching minimum values of about -83 nT. We study ring current formation during the early Bz negative phase of this magnetic cloud, using energetic particle data from three instruments on the Polar spacecraft and geosynchronous plasma data from the LANL spacecraft. We use our kinetic drift-loss model to simulate the evolution of ring current H+, He+, and O+ ion distributions and associated aeronomical effects during this period. The results from two Volland-Stern type magnetospheric electric field model formulations are compared: (1) Kp-dependent and (2) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) dependent. We demonstrate that while both electric field models reproduce well the main trends of ring current formation and decay during the storm, the IMF-dependent model reproduces the rapidity of the main storm growth phase and its strength better. Comparing model results during the main phase of the storm with HYDRA, TIMAS, and CAMMICE data we find that the model reproduces very well the ring current distributions near dawn. The formation of the nose event, i.e., the rise of the 10-30 keV energy particles near dusk due to abruptly increased convection is, however, overestimated by the model. We compute plasmaspheric heating through Coulomb collisions as the storm evolves and find that maximum heating occurs initially on the nightside near L~3.5 and subsequently moves earthward to L~2.75, in agreement with Millstone Hill radar observations of midlatitude electron temperature enhancement on January 10. However, the magnitude of the energy transferred to plasmaspheric electrons through Coulomb collisions appears to be not sufficient to yield the observed elevated electron temperature at ~0830 UT, suggesting that additional energy sources should be considered during this event.

  9. Comparison of Magnetic Field Structures on Different Scales in and around the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, F.; Bastien, P.

    2006-10-01

    New visible polarization data combined with existing IR and FIR polarization data are used to study how the magnetic field threading the filamentary molecular cloud GF 9 connects to larger structures in its general environment. When visible and NIR polarization data are combined, no evidence is found for a plateau in the polarization above extinction AV~1.3, as seen in dark clouds in Taurus. This lack of saturation effect suggests that even in the denser parts of GF 9 magnetic fields can be probed. The visible polarization is smooth and has a well-defined orientation. In the core region, the IR and FIR data are also well defined, but each with a different direction. A multiscale analysis of the magnetic field shows that on the scale of a few times the mean radial dimension of the molecular cloud, it is as if the magnetic field were ``blind'' to the spatial distribution of the filaments, while on smaller scales in the core region, multiwavelength polarimetry shows a rotation of the magnetic field lines in these denser phases. Finally, the Chandrasekhar and Fermi method is used to evaluate the magnetic field strength, indicating that the core region is approximately magnetically critical. A global interpretation suggests that in the core region an original poloidal field could have been twisted by a rotating elongated (core+envelope) structure. There is no evidence for turbulence, and ambipolar diffusion does not seem to be effective at the present time.

  10. Magnetic fields in the Perseus Spiral Arm and in Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoq, Sadia

    2017-04-01

    The magnetic (B) field is ubiquitous throughout the Milky Way. Several fundamental questions about the B-field in the cool, star-forming interstellar medium (ISM) remain unanswered. In this dissertation, near-infrared (NIR) polarimetric observations are used to study the large-scale Galactic B-field in the cool ISM in a spiral arm and to determine the role of B-fields in the formation of Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs). NIR polarimetry of 31 star clusters, located in and around the Perseus spiral arm, were obtained to determine the orientation of the plane-of-sky B-field in the outer Galaxy, and whether the presence of a spiral arm influenced B-field properties. Cluster distances, which provide upper limits to the B-field probed by observations, were estimated by developing a maximum likelihood method to fit theoretical stellar isochrones to stars in cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Using the distance estimates, the cluster locations relative to the Perseus arm were found. The cluster polarization percentages and orientations were compared between clusters foreground to the arm and clusters inside or behind the arm. The cluster polarization orientations are predominantly parallel to the Galactic plane. Clusters inside and behind the arm have larger polarization percentages, likely a result of more polarizing material along the line of sight. The cluster polarization data were also compared to optical, inner Galaxy NIR, and Planck submm polarimetry data, and showed agreement with all three data sets. The polarimetric properties of one IRDC, G28.23, were determined using deep NIR observations. The polarization orientations relative to the cloud major axis were found to change directions with distance from the cloud axis. The B-field strength was estimated to be 10 to 100microG. Despite these large inferred B-field strengths, the B-field was found not to be the dominant force in the formation of the IRDC, though the B-field morphology was influenced by the cloud

  11. Average Magnetic Field Magnitude Profiles of Wind Magnetic Clouds as a Function of Closest Approach to the Clouds' Axes and Comparison to Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Wu, C.-C.

    2017-02-01

    We examine the average magnetic field magnitude (| B | ≡ B) within magnetic clouds (MCs) observed by the Wind spacecraft from 1995 to July 2015 to understand the difference between this B and the ideal B-profiles expected from using the static, constant-α, force-free, cylindrically symmetric model for MCs of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957, 1990, denoted here as the LJB model). We classify all MCs according to an assigned quality, Q0 (= 1, 2, 3, for excellent, good, and poor). There are a total of 209 MCs and 124 when only Q0 = 1, 2 cases are considered. The average normalized field with respect to the closest approach (CA) is stressed, where we separate cases into four CA sets centered at 12.5 %, 37.5 %, 62.5 %, and 87.5 % of the average radius; the averaging is done on a percentage-duration basis to treat all cases the same. Normalized B means that before averaging, the B for each MC at each point is divided by the LJB model-estimated B for the MC axis, B0. The actual averages for the 209 and 124 MC sets are compared to the LJB model, after an adjustment for MC expansion ( e.g. Lepping et al. in Ann. Geophys. 26, 1919, 2008). This provides four separate difference-relationships, each fitted with a quadratic ( Quad) curve of very small σ. Interpreting these Quad formulae should provide a comprehensive view of the variation in normalized B throughout the average MC, where we expect external front and rear compression to be part of its explanation. These formulae are also being considered for modifying the LJB model. This modification will be used in a scheme for forecasting the timing and magnitude of magnetic storms caused by MCs. Extensive testing of the Quad formulae shows that the formulae are quite useful in correcting individual MC B-profiles, especially for the first {≈ }1/3 of these MCs. However, the use of this type of B correction constitutes a (slight) violation of the force-free assumption used in the original LJB MC model.

  12. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE STRUCTURES OF BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Shang, Hsien; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko

    2013-03-20

    The bright-rimmed cloud SFO 22 was observed with the 45 m telescope of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0), {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0), and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) lines, where well-developed head-tail structure and small line widths were found. Such features were predicted by radiation-driven implosion models, suggesting that SFO 22 may be in a quasi-stationary equilibrium state. We compare the observed properties with those from numerical models of a photoevaporating cloud, which include effects of magnetic pressure and heating due to strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from an exciting star. The magnetic pressure may play a more important role in the density structures of bright-rimmed clouds than the thermal pressure that is enhanced by the FUV radiation. The FUV radiation can heat the cloud surface to near 30 K; however, its effect is not enough to reproduce the observed density structure of SFO 22. An initial magnetic field of 5 {mu}G in our numerical models produces the best agreement with the observations, and its direction can affect the structures of bright-rimmed clouds.

  13. Effects of Magnetic Field and Far-ultraviolet Radiation on the Structures of Bright-rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Shang, Hsien; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko

    2013-03-01

    The bright-rimmed cloud SFO 22 was observed with the 45 m telescope of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in the 12CO (J = 1-0), 13CO (J = 1-0), and C18O (J = 1-0) lines, where well-developed head-tail structure and small line widths were found. Such features were predicted by radiation-driven implosion models, suggesting that SFO 22 may be in a quasi-stationary equilibrium state. We compare the observed properties with those from numerical models of a photoevaporating cloud, which include effects of magnetic pressure and heating due to strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from an exciting star. The magnetic pressure may play a more important role in the density structures of bright-rimmed clouds than the thermal pressure that is enhanced by the FUV radiation. The FUV radiation can heat the cloud surface to near 30 K however, its effect is not enough to reproduce the observed density structure of SFO 22. An initial magnetic field of 5 μG in our numerical models produces the best agreement with the observations, and its direction can affect the structures of bright-rimmed clouds.

  14. Initial Response of the Aurora to the January 10, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.; Elsen, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    On January 10th, 1997, a magnetic cloud originating at the Sun was incident on the Earth. The initial disturbance to the magnetosphere, as reflected in the intensification of the aurora, was measured by the Ultraviolet Imager on the Polar Spacecraft. The first activation of the aurora at local noon occurred within minutes of the arrival of the shock. The subsequent evolution of the aurora over the next 18 minutes shows that the magnetic disturbance proceeds from local noon, symmetrically around the dawn and dusk flanks to local midnight. The substorm onset was observed to occur 174 minutes after the initial brightening of the aurora and 78 minutes after the southward turning of the IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field). During the intervening time, significant polar cap precipitation is observed. The polar cap precipitation begins at the poleward edge of the oval in the post midnight region and develops to form several complex transpolar structures. The polar cap precipitation subsides and quiet conditions are observed for 40 minutes prior to the onset of the substorm. During this event we have observed several unusual unique auroral forms develop that are different from the standard substorm models. We will present interpretation of the development of the pre-substorm events in light of the interplanetary conditions.

  15. A model for the behaviour of the Solar Energetic Particle Events inside Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J.; Hidalgo, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The modulation effects of the solar ejecta over the solar energetic particle event SEPe fluxes (0,5-100 MeV) provided by solar flares have recently been highlighted. Especially important is the behaviour of these fluxes inside MCs where, in spite of the low magnetic field intensities of these interplanetary structures (about 30 nT), a decrease in the population of the energetic particles is observed. In the present work it is shown a simple theoretical model we have developed to analyse the behaviour of those fluxes inside the magnetic clouds (MCs) using, as a starting point, our previous magnetic field model for MCs. The experimental data from ACE, GOES, SAMPEX, SOHO, Ulysses and WIND satellites are presented, both from MC coincident with SEPe and not coincident. This work has been supported by the Spanish Comisión Internacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CICYT), grant ESP2005-07290-C02-01 and ESP2006-08459 and Madrid Autonomous Community / University of Alcala grant CAM-UAH 2005/007. This work is performed inside COST Action 724.

  16. Replicating magneto-inertial fusion compression by colliding a magnetized plasma jet with a heavy gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Amelia; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The Caltech plasma jet experiment is arranged to have a neutral gas cloud in the path of a magnetized plasma jet. When a hydrogen jet collides with an argon gas cloud, the jet is compressed as argon is much heavier than hydrogen. The compression is equivalent to the Magnetized Inertial Fusion situation of a heavy liner compressing a low-density, magnetized plasma, providing an inexpensive analog for non-destructive studies of the plasma compression physics. The strategy is to measure density, magnetic field and temperature in and around the compression region over a range of parameters both with and without the neutral gas cloud in the path of the jet, with the ultimate goal of determining an equation of state characterizing the observed behavior. Initial density and magnetic field measurements have been made and temperature measurements are about to begin. To complement the experimental measurements, 3D numerical MHD simulation is being performed based on a code used previously to model the magnetized plasma jet experiment. In addition, plans are underway to do modeling using a hybrid code.

  17. Relativistic nuclear magnetic resonance J-coupling with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and the zeroth-order regular approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Timothy F. G. Yates, Jonathan R.

    2014-06-21

    We present a method for the first-principles calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) J-coupling in extended systems using state-of-the-art ultrasoft pseudopotentials and including scalar-relativistic effects. The use of ultrasoft pseudopotentials is allowed by extending the projector augmented wave (PAW) method of Joyce et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204107 (2007)]. We benchmark it against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for small molecules containing light elements, with good agreement. Scalar-relativistic effects are included at the zeroth-order regular approximation level of theory and benchmarked against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for a number of small molecules containing the heavy row six elements W, Pt, Hg, Tl, and Pb, with good agreement. Finally, {sup 1}J(P-Ag) and {sup 2}J(P-Ag-P) couplings are calculated in some larger molecular crystals and compared against solid-state NMR experiments. Some remarks are also made as to improving the numerical stability of dipole perturbations using PAW.

  18. Relativistic nuclear magnetic resonance J-coupling with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and the zeroth-order regular approximation.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy F G; Yates, Jonathan R

    2014-06-21

    We present a method for the first-principles calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) J-coupling in extended systems using state-of-the-art ultrasoft pseudopotentials and including scalar-relativistic effects. The use of ultrasoft pseudopotentials is allowed by extending the projector augmented wave (PAW) method of Joyce et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204107 (2007)]. We benchmark it against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for small molecules containing light elements, with good agreement. Scalar-relativistic effects are included at the zeroth-order regular approximation level of theory and benchmarked against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for a number of small molecules containing the heavy row six elements W, Pt, Hg, Tl, and Pb, with good agreement. Finally, (1)J(P-Ag) and (2)J(P-Ag-P) couplings are calculated in some larger molecular crystals and compared against solid-state NMR experiments. Some remarks are also made as to improving the numerical stability of dipole perturbations using PAW.

  19. Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from NH≈ 1021 to1023 cm-2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called "histogram of relative orientations". Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.

  20. Planck intermediate results: XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate in this paper statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range frommore » NH≈ 1021 to1023 cm-2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called “histogram of relative orientations”. Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. Finally, we compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.« less

  1. THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF MAGNETIZED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES: A TWO-DIMENSIONAL-THREE-DIMENSIONAL COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Sami; Csengeri, Timea; Audit, Edouard; Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 4096{sup 3} grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH{sub 3} (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t{sub ff,cl}), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to {approx}6 per unit t{sub ff,cl}. A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j{sub 3D}) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j{sub 2D}) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of {approx}8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j{sub 3D}/j{sub 2D} of the cores peaks at around {approx}0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our

  2. Cosmic rays modulation of the cloud effects on the radiative flux in the Southern Hemisphere Magnetic Anomaly region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. E.; Silva, L.

    Aerosols are thought to cool the planet s surface through increase scattering and cloud cover and re-radiation of solar energy to space Clouds play an important role in the Earth s radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation Climate models have some representation of direct aerosol effects in them but none have yet fully included the indirect effects A correlation between a global average of low cloud cover and the flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays GCRs incident in the atmosphere has been observed recently The ionizing potential of Earth bound cosmic ray is modulated by the state of the heliosphere which depends on the solar activity 5 Here we show that in the southern Pacific Ocean the cloud effects on the net radiative flux in the atmosphere depends on the intensity of the Earth s magnetic field In the inner region of the Southern Hemisphere Magnetic Anomaly SHMA it is observed a cooling effect of approximately 18 W m 2 while in the outer region it is observed a heating effect of approximately 20 W m 2 The variability in the inner region of SHMA of the net radiative flux is correlated to GCRs flux observed in Huancayo Peru r 0 73 It is observed that correlation decrease as the intensity of the Earth s magnetic field intensity increase The observations are in agreement with the robust mechanism proposed by Brian Tinsley to explain the cloud formation due to GCRs atmospheric ionization The representation of GCRs induced cloud formation process in Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General

  3. Testing for Helical Magnetic Fields in the Orion Molecular Cloud Integral-Shaped Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Lauren; Clemens, Dan P.

    2014-06-01

    The Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC) is one of the closest and most well-studied regions of ongoing star formation. Within the OMC, the Integral-Shaped Filament (ISF) is a long, filamentary structure of gas and dust that stretches over 7 pc and is itself comprised of many smaller filaments. Radial density profiles of the ISF indicate that these filamentary structures may be supported by helical magnetic fields (Johnstone & Bally 1999). To test for the presence of helical fields, we have collected deep near-infrared (NIR) H-band (1.6 μm) and K-band (2.2 μm) linear polarimetry of background starlight for a grid of six 10x10 arcmin fields of view fully spanning the ISF. NIR polarizations from scattered light and young stellar objects, which do not trace the magnetic field, are identified by examining the ratio of percent polarization in H-band to K-band. The data were collected using the Mimir NIR instrument on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope located outside of Flagstaff, AZ. This work is partially supported by NSF grant AST 09-07790.

  4. Relationships Among Geomagnetic Storms, Interplanetary Shocks, Magnetic Clouds, and Sunspot Number During 1995 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    During 1995 - 2012, the Wind spacecraft has recorded 168 magnetic clouds (MCs), 197 magnetic cloud-like structures (MCLs), and 358 interplanetary (IP) shocks. Ninety-four MCs and 56 MCLs had upstream shock waves. The following features are found: i) The averages of the solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), duration (< Δ t >), the minimum of B_{min}, and intensity of the associated geomagnetic storm/activity (Dst_{min}) for MCs with upstream shock waves (MC_{shock}) are higher (or stronger) than those averages for the MCs without upstream shock waves (MC_{no-shock}). ii) The average < Δ t > of MC_{shock} events ({≈} 19.8 h) is 9 % longer than that for MC_{no-shock} events ({≈} 17.6 h). iii) For the MC_{shock} events, the average duration of the sheath (<Δ t_{sheath}>) is 12.1 h. These findings could be very useful for space weather predictions, i.e. IP shocks driven by MCs are expected to arrive at Wind (or at 1 AU) about 12 h ahead of the front of the MCs on average. iv) The occurrence frequency of IP shocks is well associated with sunspot number (SSN). The average intensity of geomagnetic storms measured by < Dst_{min}> for MC_{shock} and MC_{no-shock} events is -102 and -31 nT, respectively. The average values < {Dst}_{min} > are -78, -70, and -35 nT for the 358 IP shocks, 168 MCs, and 197 MCLs, respectively. These results imply that IP shocks, when they occur with MCs/MCLs, must play an important role in the strength of geomagnetic storms. We speculate about the reason for this. Yearly occurrence frequencies of MC_{shock} and IP shocks are well correlated with solar activity ( e.g., SSN). Choosing the correct Dst_{min} estimating formula for predicting the intensity of MC-associated geomagnetic storms is crucial for space weather predictions.

  5. Swift J045106.8-694803: a highly magnetized neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klus, H.; Bartlett, E. S.; Bird, A. J.; Coe, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Udalski, A.

    2013-02-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetized neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high-mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of -5.01 ± 0.06 s yr-1, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh & Lamb accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 ± 0.20.7) × 1014 G. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra have been used to classify the optical counterpart of Swift J045106.8-694803 as a B0-1 III-V star and a possible orbital period of 21.631 ± 0.005 d has been found from Massive Compact Halo Object (MACHO) optical photometry.

  6. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  7. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Energy Characterization of Precipitating Electrons for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The January 10-11, 1997 magnetic cloud event provided a rare opportunity to study auroral energy deposition under varying but intense IMF conditions. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observed the aurora[ precipitation during the first encounter of the cloud with Earth's magnetosphere and during several subsequent substorm events. The UVI has the unique capability of measuring the energy flux and characteristic energy of the precipitating electrons through the use of narrow band filters that distinguish short and long wavelength molecular nitrogen emissions. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the precipitating electron energy will be discussed beginning with the inception of the event at the Earth early January 1 Oth and continuing through the subsidence of auroral activity on January 11th.

  9. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. II. Consideration of perturbations in the metric operator.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Ootani, Y; Fukui, H

    2007-05-07

    A previous relativistic shielding calculation theory based on the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component approach is improved by the inclusion of the magnetic interaction term contained in the metric operator. In order to consider effects of the metric perturbation, the self-consistent perturbation theory is used for the case of perturbation-dependent overlap integrals. The calculation results show that the second-order regular approximation results obtained for the isotropic shielding constants of halogen nuclei are well improved by the inclusion of the metric perturbation to reproduce the fully relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock results. However, it is shown that the metric perturbation hardly or does not affect the anisotropy of the halogen shielding tensors and the proton magnetic shieldings.

  10. Geomagnetic modulation of clouds effects in the Southern Hemisphere Magnetic Anomaly through lower atmosphere cosmic ray effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; da Silva, Ligia Alves

    2006-07-01

    The study of the physical processes that drive the variability of the Earth's climate system is one of the most fascinating and challenging topics of research today. Perhaps the largest uncertainties in our ability to predict climate change are the cloud formation process and the interaction of clouds with radiation. Here we show that in the southern Pacific Ocean cloud effects on the net radiative flux in the atmosphere are related to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through lower atmosphere cosmic ray effects. In the inner region of the Southern Hemisphere Magnetic Anomaly (SHMA) it is observed a cooling effect of approximately 18 W/m2 while in the outer region it is observed a heating effect of approximately 20 W/m2. The variability in the inner region of the SHMA of the net radiative flux is correlated to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) flux observed in Huancayo, Peru (r = 0.73). It is also observed in the correlation map that the correlation increases in the inner region of the SHMA. The geomagnetic modulation of cloud effects in the net radiative flux in the atmosphere in the SHMA is, therefore, unambiguously due to GCRs and/or highly energetic solar proton particles effects.

  11. A Scheme for finding the Front Boundary of an Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, Ronald P.; Narock, Thomas W.; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2006-01-01

    We developed a scheme for finding the front boundary of an interplanetary magnetic cloud (MC) based on criteria that depend on the possible existence of any one or all of six specific solar wind features. The features that the program looks for, within +/- 2 hours of a preliminarily determined time for the front boundary, estimated either by visual inspection or by an automatic MC identification scheme, are: (1) a sufficiently large directional discontinuity in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), (2) existence of a magnetic hole, (3) a significant proton plasma beta drop, (4) a significant proton temperature drop, (5) a marked increase in the IMF's intensity, and (6) a significant decrease in a normalized root-mean-square deviation (RMS)of the magnetic field - where the scheme was tested using 5, 10, 15, and 20 minute averages of the relevant physical quantities, in order to find the optimum average (and RMS) to use. Other criteria, besides these six, were examined and dismissed as not reliable, e.g., plasma speed. The scheme was developed specifically for aiding in forecasting the strength and timing of a geomagnetic storm due to the passage of an interplanetary MC in real-time, but can be used in post ground-data collection for imposition of consistency in choosing a MC's front boundary. The scheme has been extensively tested, first using 80 bona fide MCs over about 9 years of WIND data, and also for 121 MC-like structures as defined by a program that automatically identifies such structures over the same period. Optimum limits for various parameters in the scheme were found by statistical studies of the WIND MCs. The resulting limits can be user-adjusted for other data sets, if desired. Final testing of the 80 MCs showed that for 50 percent of the events the boundary estimates occurred within +/-10 minutes of visually determined times, 80 percent occurred within +/-30 minutes, and 91 percent occur within +/-60 minutes, and three or more individual boundary

  12. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma jet/cloud streaming across a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasma jets/clouds in magnetic field configurations typical for the terrestrial magnetotail and frontside magnetosheath is a topic of interest for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. The presence of high-speed jets in the frontside magnetosheath has been recently proved experimentally by Cluster and THEMIS spacecrafts. There is increasing evidence that the bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail have jet-like features. In the present paper we use fully electromagnetic 3D explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the interaction of a localized three-dimensional plasma element/jet/cloud with a transverse magnetic field. We consider a plasma jet/cloud that moves in vacuum and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field. Ampère and Faraday's laws are used to compute the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields on a three-dimensional spatial grid having a step-size of the order of the Debye length and using a time-step that resolves the plasma frequency. The initial magnetic field inside the simulation domain is uniform and the plasma bulk velocity at the beginning of the simulation is normal to the magnetic field direction. The total time scale of the simulation is of the order of few ion Larmor periods. Space and time variations of the plasma parameters and of the electromagnetic field are analyzed and discussed. We emphasize non-MHD effects like the energy-dispersion signatures at the edges of the plasma element, similar to results previously reported by Voitcu and Echim (2012) using test-kinetic simulations. Acknowledgments: Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  13. Propagation and Evolution of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds: Global Simulations and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Ben-Nun, M.; Linker, J.; Torok, T.; Lionello, R.; Downs, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we explore the evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and fast magnetic clouds (MCs) in particular. We address three specific issues. First, What are the large-scale forces acting on ejecta as they travel from the Sun to 1 AU through a realistic ambient solar wind, and how does they affect the large-scale structure of the event? Second, what are the dominant waves/shocks associated with fast ICMEs? And third, how are the properties of ICMEs different during cycle 24 than during the previous cycle? To accomplish these objectives, we employ a variety of numerical approaches, including global resistive MHD models that incorporate realistic energy transport processes. We also compare and contrast model results with both remote solar and in-situ measurements of ICMEs at 1 AU and elsewhere, including the so-called ``Bastille Day'' event of July 14, 2000, and the more recent ``extreme ICME'' observed by STEREO-A on July 23, 2012.

  14. A STEREO Survey of Magnetic Cloud Coronal Mass Ejections Observed at Earth in 2008-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G.; Socker, Dennis G.

    2017-04-01

    We identify coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with magnetic clouds (MCs) observed near Earth by the Wind spacecraft from 2008 to mid-2012, a time period when the two STEREO spacecraft were well positioned to study Earth-directed CMEs. We find 31 out of 48 Wind MCs during this period can be clearly connected with a CME that is trackable in STEREO imagery all the way from the Sun to near 1 au. For these events, we perform full 3D reconstructions of the CME structure and kinematics, assuming a flux rope (FR) morphology for the CME shape, considering the full complement of STEREO and SOHO imaging constraints. We find that the FR orientations and sizes inferred from imaging are not well correlated with MC orientations and sizes inferred from the Wind data. However, velocities within the MC region are reproduced reasonably well by the image-based reconstruction. Our kinematic measurements are used to provide simple prescriptions for predicting CME arrival times at Earth, provided for a range of distances from the Sun where CME velocity measurements might be made. Finally, we discuss the differences in the morphology and kinematics of CME FRs associated with different surface phenomena (flares, filament eruptions, or no surface activity).

  15. The Role of Viscosity in Causing the Plasma Poloidal Motion in Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ake; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Jiajia; Zhou, Zhenjun; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Quanhao

    2017-08-01

    An interesting phenomenon, plasma poloidal motion, has been found in many magnetic clouds (MCs), and viscosity has been proposed as a possible mechanism. However, it is not clear how significant the role of viscosity is in generating such motion. In this paper, we conduct a statistical study of the MCs detected by the Wind spacecraft during 1995-2012. It is found that, for 19% of all the studied MCs (186), the poloidal velocities of the MC plasma near the MC boundaries are well correlated with those of the corresponding ambient solar wind plasma. A non-monotonic increase from inner to outer MCs suggests that the viscosity does play a role, albeit weak, on the poloidal motion in the MC statistically. The possible dependence on the solar wind parameters is then studied in detail for the nine selected crossings, which represent the viscosity characteristic. There is an evident negative correlation between the viscosity and the density, a weak negative correlation between the viscosity and the turbulence strength, and no clear correlation between the viscosity and the temperature.

  16. Selection Effects in Identifying Magnetic Clouds and the Importance of the Closest Approach Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2010-01-01

    This study is motivated by the unusually low number of magnetic clouds (MCs) that are strictly identified within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), as observed at 1 AU; this is usually estimated to be around 30% or lower. But a looser definition of MCs may significantly increase this percentage. Another motivation is the unexpected shape of the occurrence distribution of the observers' "closest approach distances" (measured from a MC's axis, and called CA) which drops off somewhat rapidly as |CA| (in % of MC radius) approaches 100%, based on earlier studies. We suggest, for various geometrical and physical reasons, that the |CA|-distribution should be somewhere between a uniform one and the one actually observed, and therefore the 30% estimate should be higher. So we ask, When there is a failure to identify a MC within an ICME, is it occasionally due to a large |CA| passage, making MC identification more difficult, i.e., is it due to an event selection effect? In attempting to answer this question we examine WIND data to obtain an accurate distribution of the number of MCs vs. |CA| distance, whether the event is ICME-related or not, where initially a large number of cases (N=98) are considered. This gives a frequence distribution that is far from uniform, confirming earlier studies. This along with the fact that there are many ICME identification-parameters that do not depend on |CA| suggest that, indeed an MC event selection effect may explain at least part of the low ratio of (No. MCs)/(No. ICMEs). We also show that there is an acceptable geometrical and physical consistency in the relationships for both average "normalized" magnetic field intensity change and field direction change vs. |CA| within a MC, suggesting that our estimates of |CA|, B(sub 0) (magnetic field intensity on the axis), and choice of a proper "cloud coordinate" system (all needed in the analysis) are acceptably accurate. Therefore the MC fitting model (Lepping et al., 1990) is

  17. Reconnection Remnants in the Magnetic Cloud of October 18-19, 1995: A Shock, Monochromatic Wave, Heat Flux Dropout and Energetic Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, A.; Farrell, W.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Fitzenreiter, R.; Thompson, B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Ho, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the WIND spacecraft observed particle and field signatures on October 18-19, 1995 due to reconnection near the footpoints of a magnetic cloud (i.e., between 1 and 5 solar radii). These signatures include: (1) an internal shock traveling approximately along the axis of the magnetic cloud, (2) a simple compression of the magnetic field consistent with the footpoint magnetic fields being thrust outwards at speeds much greater than the solar wind speed, (3) an electron heat flux dropout occurring within minutes of the shock indicating a topological change resulting from disconnection from the solar surface, (4) a very cold 5 keV proton beam and (5) an associated monochromatic wave. We expect that, given observations of enough magnetic clouds, Wind and other spacecraft will see signatures similar to the ones reported here indicating reconnection. However, these observations require the spacecraft to be fortuitously positioned to observe the passing shock and other signatures and will therefore be associated with only a small fraction of magnetic clouds. Consistent with this, a few magnetic clouds observed by Wind have been found to possess internal shock waves.

  18. Effect of surface conductivity on the peak magnetic field radiated by first return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyahla, Lori J.; Lopez, Raul E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of surface conductivity on the peak magnetic field radiated by the first return stroke in cloud-to-ground lightning was investigated by comparing the peak magnetic fields from return strokes that struck water with those that struck land. The data were obtained from a network of three gated, wideband magnetic direction finders (DFs) at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 1985. Two geographical areas that were equidistant from two of the direction finders were compared where the flash distances ranged from approximately 40 to 60 km. An unbiased data set was obtained by correcting site errors, equalizing differences in sensor gain, eliminating directional biases in DF triggering, and keeping differences in signal attenuation over the two surfaces to a minimum. When a statistical analysis was performed on the frequency distributions of the signal amplitudes, there was no statistically significant difference in the peak amplitudes of first return strokes over land (lambda = 8.2 x 10(exp -3) mho/m) and over water (lambda = 4 mho/m). Therefore we infer that the conductivity of the underlying surface does not significantly affect the magnitude of the peak magnetic field, and hence the peak current, in the first return stroke of a cloud-to-ground lightning flash.

  19. Magnetic fields in molecular clouds: The BLASTPol and BLAST-TNG experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flight from Antarctica in 2012. The data reduction and analysis efforts over the three years following the flight have produced a number of important scientific results. The next-generation BLAST instrument (BLAST-TNG) will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5 m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and more than 3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in the same three bands as BLASTpol at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid helium cooled cryostat will have a 28-day hold time and will utilize a closed-cycle 3He refrigerator to cool the detector arrays to 270 mK. This will enable a detailed mapping of more targets with higher polarization resolution than any other submillimeter experiment to date. My thesis describes the 2012 instrument and results while also outlining the motivation for BLAST-TNG and the instrumental design and initial testing.

  20. Arrival time of solar eruptive CMEs associated with ICMEs of magnetic cloud and ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Syed Ibrahim, M.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kasro Lourdhina, K.; Dharanya, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is an eruptive event in which magnetic plasma is ejected from the Sun into space through the solar corona. We considered a set of 51 Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) listed by Kim et al. (Solar Phys. 184:77, 2013) from Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW, Gopalswamy et al. in Astrophys. J. 710:1111, 2010). Among the 51 events, 22 events are classified as Magnetic Clouds (MC) and 29 events are classified as Ejecta (EJ) where the MC and EJ are subsets of ICMEs. We have analyzed the physical properties of CMEs and ICMEs associated with MC and EJ, and correlated them with the CME's transit time/arrival time from the Sun to the Earth. Main aims of the present study are to examine (a) dependence of transit time on the properties of CMEs and ICMEs, and (b) differences between MC and EJ. It is found that CME's initial speed decides the transit time which is in support of the known results in literature. Apart from this, some important results from the present study are: (i) transit time predicted using an empirical relation obtained in the present work is found comparable with the observations (correlation coefficient=0.70). (ii) The transit time of MC and EJ-associated CMEs ranges from 20 to 120 hours and IP acceleration lies between -10 m/s2 to 5 m/s2. (iii) There are certain differences between MC and EJ such as: (a) Ejecta takes slightly more time to travel and only 30 % of them are accelerated in the interplanetary medium. Whereas, MC takes less time to travel and nearly 50 % of them are accelerated, (b) The correlations of IP acceleration and speed with transit time are higher for MC than that of EJ, (c) A weak relationship between the deflection and transit time is found for MC, but it is absent in the case of EJ and (d) Only EJ-type CMEs have wider range of direction parameter and acceleration. Further, we checked the solar wind speed as another parameter has any influence on CME acceleration and it shows that there

  1. Characterization of a double flux-rope magnetic cloud observed by ACE spacecraft on August 19-21, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda González, A.; Mendes, O.; Domingues Oliveira, M.; Moestl, C.; Farrugia, C. J.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-05-01

    Investigations have studied MC cases of double flux rope configuration with apparent asymmetry. Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique allows deriving the local magnetic structure from data of a single spacecraft. The results obtained show two cylindrical flux ropes next to each other, where a single X point forms between them. In all possible combinations of two bipolar MCs, the magnetic field between them is antiparallel in eight cases SWN-SWN, SWN-SEN, SEN-SWN, SEN-SEN, NWS-NWS, NWS-NES, NES-NWS, NES-NWS. If clouds are under magnetic coupling, reconnection evidences are expected from the interaction between them. In this work, we examine the event that occurred at Aug. 19-21, 1998 using solar wind measurements collected by ACE. In Fig. 1 a) presents the recovered cross-section of the two bipolar MCs (SEN-SWN). The black contour lines show the transverse magnetic field lines (calculated as the contours of the magnetic potential function A(x,y)), and the colors show the axial magnetic field Bz distribution. The yellow arrows along y=0 denote measured transverse magnetic field vectors, direction and magnitude measurements at ACE utilized as initial input into the numerical solver. The green arrows are residual velocities in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE. The spacecraft crosses the X point and observes the exact moment of the magnetic reconnection, from 0.13 to 0.15 AU in x axis. In the opposite corners of the X point, the magnetic fields are antiparallel (see yellow arrows in this region). The residual velocity (green arrow in y=0) in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE is perpendicular to the magnetic field line in the reconnection region. In principle, it is possible to adjust a two-dimension model considering the most common separator reconnection, in which four separate magnetic domains exchange magnetic field lines. In Fig. 1 b), the cross-section through four magnetic domains undergoing separator reconnection is represented. The green array in the top

  2. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  3. Magnetospheric Response to the Arrival of the Shock Wave in Front of the Magnetic Cloud of January 10, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, M.; Huddleston, M. M.; Burch, J. L.; Dempsey, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Chandler, M. O.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Collin, H. L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1999-01-01

    We are Studying the magnetic cloud event of January 6 - 11, 1997. Specifically, we have investigated the response of the magnetosphere to the shock wave in front of the magnetic cloud on January 10, 1997 using data from WIND, GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft as well as ground magnetometer data. The WIND spacecraft, which was located as about 104 Re upstream from the Earth (85.1, -55.2, -22.1) Re(sub GSM), observed the arrival of the shock wave front at 0050 UT. Geotail was located at the equatorial magnetopause (approx. 8.7 Re, 10.7 MLT, -7.46 MLAT), while POLAR was located in the northern dawn sector above the auroral zone at 8.4 Re, 6.1 MLT and 61.1 MLAT. A magnetic signature was nearly simultaneously observed at about 0104 UT at the POLAR and Geotail spacecraft. The Geotail spacecraft entered from the magnetosphere into the magnetosheath. Particle density increases were observed on WIND and Geotail, but not on POLAR. Two instruments on the Polar spacecraft (TIDE and TIMAS) actually observed a slight reduction in energy, density and temperature. The UV aurora shows a dawnside intensification. The shock wave did not cause an auroral substorm and therefore was not geoeffective.

  4. The magnetic field in Lynds 1457: multiband photopolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B G; Wannier, P G

    1995-04-10

    We have performed multiband photopolarimetry toward stars behind the molecular cloud L1457 (MBM 12). This cloud is the nearest known molecular cloud (65 pc) and is thought to be contained within the local "hot bubble." The polarization shows a regular structure, indicating that the cloud is threaded by an ordered magnetic field. The wavelength dependence of the polarization seems to indicate that the grains in L1457 have higher indices of refraction than normal for interstellar clouds. However, the wavelength of maximum polarization indicates that their size distribution is close to normal.

  5. The (non-)variability of magnetic chemically peculiar candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Mikulášek, Z.; Poleski, R.; Krtička, J.; Netopil, M.; Zejda, M.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The galactic magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars of the upper main sequence are well known as periodic spectral and light variables. The observed variability is obviously caused by the uneven distribution of overabundant chemical elements on the surfaces of rigidly rotating stars. The mechanism causing the clustering of some chemical elements into disparate structures on mCP stars has not been fully understood up to now. The observations of light changes of mCP candidates recently revealed in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) should provide us with information about their rotational periods and about the distribution of optically active elements on mCP stars born in other galaxies. Aims: We queried for photometry at the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-III survey of published mCP candidates selected because of the presence of the characteristic λ5200 Å flux depression. In total, the intersection of both sources resulted in twelve stars. For these objects and two control stars, we searched for a periodic variability. Methods: We performed our own and standard periodogram time series analyses of all available data. The final results are, amongst others, the frequency of the maximum peak and the bootstrap probability of its reality. Results: We detected that only two mCP candidates, 190.1 1581 and 190.1 15527, may show some weak rotationally modulated light variations with periods of 1.23 and 0.49 days; however, the 49% and 32% probabilities of their reality are not very satisfying. The variability of the other 10 mCP candidates is too low to be detectable by their V and I OGLE photometry. Conclusions: The relatively low amplitude variability of the studied LMC mCP candidates sample can be explained by the absence of photometric spots of overabundant optically active chemical elements. The unexpected LMC mCPs behaviour is probably caused by different conditions during the star formation in the LMC and the Galaxy. Figures 11-22 are

  6. Formation of H i Clouds in Shock-compressed Interstellar Medium: Physical Origin of Angular Correlation between Filamentary Structure and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations of the neutral Galactic interstellar medium showed that filamentary structures of H i clouds are aligned with the interstellar magnetic field. Many interesting applications are proposed based on the alignment, such as measurement of magnetic field strength through the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method and removal of foreground dust emissions for the detection of inflationary polarized emission in the cosmic microwave background radiation. However, the physical origin of the alignment remains to be explained. To understand the mechanism, we examine the formation of H i clouds triggered by shock compression of the diffuse warm neutral medium using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that the shock-compressed medium of density n˜ 1 cm-3 evolves into H i clouds with n˜ 50 cm-3 via thermal instability consistent with previous studies. We apply a machine vision transformation developed by Clark et al. to the simulated column density structures to measure angle correlation between filamentary structures of H i clouds and magnetic field. We find that the orientation of H i filaments depends on the environmental turbulent velocity field, particularly on the strength of shear strain in the direction of the magnetic field, which is controlled by the angle between the shock propagation direction and upstream magnetic field. When the strain along the magnetic field is weak, filamentary components of H i clouds lie perpendicular to the magnetic field. However, the filaments have come to align with the magnetic field, if we enhance the turbulent strain along the magnetic field or if we set turbulence in the preshock medium.

  7. The Fraction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections That Are Magnetic Clouds: Evidence for a Solar Cycle Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    "Magnetic clouds" (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized by enhanced magnetic fields with an organized rotation in direction, and low plasma beta. Though intensely studied, MCs only constitute a fraction of all the ICMEs that are detected in the solar wind. A comprehensive survey of ICMEs in the near- Earth solar wind during the ascending, maximum and early declining phases of solar cycle 23 in 1996 - 2003 shows that the MC fraction varies with the phase of the solar cycle, from approximately 100% (though with low statistics) at solar minimum to approximately 15% at solar maximum. A similar trend is evident in near-Earth observations during solar cycles 20 - 21, while Helios 1/2 spacecraft observations at 0.3 - 1.0 AU show a weaker trend and larger MC fraction.

  8. Hybrid density functional calculations of nuclear magnetic shieldings using Slater-type orbitals and the zeroth-order regular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Ziegler, Tom; Lenthe, Erik Van

    We report the implementation of an algorithm for the calculation of the exact Hartree-Fock exchange with Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Similar to the article of Watson et al., J Chem Phys, 2003, 119, 6475, it is based on the fitting of each atomic orbital pair. However, our algorithm avoids the evaluation of three-center two-electron integrals and, as a result, makes it possible to carry out hybrid DFT calculations for larger size molecules and compounds with heavy elements. For the first time, the NMR chemical shifts of transition metal complexes have been calculated with STOs and hybrid density functionals. To take into account the relativistic effects, we have employed the zeroth-order regular approximation.

  9. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010 - 2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-08-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type ( i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust ( Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are

  10. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010-2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga (J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type (i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust (Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are seen

  11. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010-2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga (J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type (i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust (Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are seen

  12. Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mark Talmage

    2004-05-01

    Cloud formation is crucial to the heritage of modern physics, and there is a rich literature on this important topic. In 1927, Charles T.R. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for applications of the cloud chamber.2 Wilson was inspired to study cloud formation after working at a meteorological observatory on top of the highest mountain in Scotland, Ben Nevis, and testified near the end of his life, "The whole of my scientific work undoubtedly developed from the experiments I was led to make by what I saw during my fortnight on Ben Nevis in September 1894."3 To form clouds, Wilson used the sudden expansion of humid air.4 Any structure the cloud may have is spoiled by turbulence in the sudden expansion, but in 1912 Wilson got ion tracks to show up by using strobe photography of the chamber immediately upon expansion.5 In the interim, Millikan's study in 1909 of the formation of cloud droplets around individual ions was the first in which the electron charge was isolated. This study led to his famous oil drop experiment.6 To Millikan, as to Wilson, meteorology and physics were professionally indistinct. With his meteorological physics expertise, in WWI Millikan commanded perhaps the first meteorological observation and forecasting team essential to military operation in history.7 But even during peacetime meteorology is so much of a concern to everyone that a regular news segment is dedicated to it. Weather is the universal conversation topic, and life on land could not exist as we know it without clouds. One wonders then, why cloud formation is never covered in physics texts.

  13. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case.

    PubMed

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-14

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  14. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  15. Krein regularization of QED

    SciTech Connect

    Forghan, B. Takook, M.V.; Zarei, A.

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, the electron self-energy, photon self-energy and vertex functions are explicitly calculated in Krein space quantization including quantum metric fluctuation. The results are automatically regularized or finite. The magnetic anomaly and Lamb shift are also calculated in the one loop approximation in this method. Finally, the obtained results are compared to conventional QED results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Krein regularization yields finite values for photon and electron self-energies and vertex function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic anomaly is calculated and is exactly the same as the conventional result. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Lamb shift is calculated and is approximately the same as in Hilbert space.

  16. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  17. Planck intermediate results: XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-09

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate in this paper statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from NH≈ 1021 to1023 cm-2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called “histogram of relative orientations”. Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. Finally, we compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.

  18. Time-Aligned Averaging and Comparison of Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Produced by In-Cloud Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, J. L.; Cummer, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Time-aligned epoch averaging is a powerful tool for analyzing small-magnitude features of similar lightning events which would normally be below the sensor operational noise levels. Through averaging, the noise level of the averaged signal decreases as the square root of the number of events. Previous work has demonstrated the value of averaging on magnetic field emissions from cloud-to-ground events, with a reduction from a single-event noise level of roughly 30 picotesla to an averaged noise level of only 40 femtotesla. Noise levels at this point allow for the detection of averaged lightning currents of just a few tens of amps at a distance of 1000 kilometers, making clear the charge motion and current in even relatively weak processes such as downward leader motion and continuing current in negative CG flashes. In this work, we apply time-aligned averaging procedures to a range of in-cloud (IC) flashes and processes in an effort to reveal fine details involved in events including narrow bipolar events, upward IC leaders, terrestrial gamma flashes, and others.

  19. The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

  20. The Earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing: Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P. ); Freeman, M.P. ); Takahashi, K. )

    1993-05-01

    This is the third of three papers dealing with the interaction of an interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere in Jan 1988. Here the authors report on substorm observations made during this time period. They sampled information from six spacecraft and a larger number of ground based systems to serve as signals for the initiation of substorm behavior. They relate the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma conditions to the time of observation of substorm initiation. Current models tie substorm occurrence to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere. The IMF B[sub y] and B[sub z] components varied slowly over a range of 20 nT on both sides of zero during this observation period. During the period of northward IMF the magnetosphere was quiescent, but during the period of southward IMF a large magnetic storm was initiated. During this interval substorms were observed roughly every 50 minutes.

  1. Ionisation in turbulent magnetic molecular clouds. I. Effect on density and mass-to-flux ratio structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu; Caselli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Context. Previous studies show that the physical structures and kinematics of a region depend significantly on the ionisation fraction. These studies have only considered these effects in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations with microturbulence. The next logical step is to explore the effects of turbulence on ionised magnetic molecular clouds and then compare model predictions with observations to assess the importance of turbulence in the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds. Aims: In this paper, we extend our previous studies of the effect of ionisation fractions on star formation to clouds that include both non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics and turbulence. We aim to quantify the importance of a treatment of the ionisation fraction in turbulent magnetised media and investigate the effect of the turbulence on shaping the clouds and filaments before star formation sets in. In particular, here we investigate how the structure, mass and width of filamentary structures depend on the amount of turbulence in ionised media and the initial mass-to-flux ratio. Methods: To determine the effects of turbulence and mass-to-flux ratio on the evolution of non-ideal magnetised clouds with varying ionisation profiles, we have run two sets of simulations. The first set assumes different initial turbulent Mach values for a fixed initial mass-to-flux ratio. The second set assumes different initial mass-to-flux ratio values for a fixed initial turbulent Mach number. Both sets explore the effect of using one of two ionisation profiles: step-like (SL) or cosmic ray only (CR-only). We compare the resulting density and mass-to-flux ratio structures both qualitatively and quantitatively via filament and core masses and filament fitting techniques (Gaussian and Plummer profiles). Results: We find that even with almost no turbulence, filamentary structure still exists although at lower density contours. Comparison of simulations shows that for turbulent Mach numbers above 2, there is

  2. Magnetospheric Response to the Arrival of the Shock Wave in Front of the Magnetic Cloud Event of January 10,1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, M.; Huddleston, M.; Burch, J. L.; Dempsey, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Chandler, M. O.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Collins, H. L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the magnetic cloud event of January 6-11, 1997. Specifically, we have investigated the response of the magnetosphere to the shock wave in front of the magnetic cloud on January 10, 1997 using data from WIND, GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft as well as ground magnetometer data. The WIND spacecraft, which was located at about 100 Re upstream from the Earth, observed the arrival of the shock wave front at 005OUT. Geotail was located at the equatorial magnetopause (approx. 8.7 Re), while POLAR was located in the northern dawn sector at 8.4 Re, 6.1 MLT and 61.1 MLAT. A magnetic signature was nearly simultaneously observed at about 0104 UT at the POLAR and Geotail spacecraft. Particle density increases were observed on WIND and Geotail, but not on POLAR. The UV aurora shows an asymmetrical dawn-dusk intensification and presubstorm activity. The significance of these findings will be discussed.

  3. VELOCITY ANISOTROPY AS A DIAGNOSTIC OF THE MAGNETIZATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A. E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-10-20

    We use a set of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of fully developed (driven) turbulence to study the anisotropy in the velocity field that is induced by the presence of the magnetic field. In our models, we study turbulence characterized by sonic Mach numbers M{sub s} from 0.7 to 7.5 and Alfven Mach numbers from 0.4 to 7.7. These are used to produce synthetic observations (centroid maps) that are then analyzed. To study the effect of large-scale density fluctuations and of white noise, we have modified the density fields and obtained new centroid maps, which are analyzed. We show that restricting the range of scales at which the anisotropy is measured makes the method robust against such fluctuations. We show that the anisotropy in the structure function of the maps reveals the direction of the magnetic field for M{sub A} {approx}< 1.5, regardless of the sonic Mach number. We find that the degree of anisotropy can be used to determine the degree of magnetization (i.e., M{sub A} ) for M{sub A} {approx}< 1.5. To do this, one needs an additional measure of the sonic Mach number and an estimate of the line of sight magnetic field, both feasible by other techniques, offering a new opportunity to study the magnetization state of the interstellar medium.

  4. Estimation of Reconnection Flux Using Post-eruption Arcades and Its Relevance to Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.

    2017-04-01

    We report on a new method to compute the flare reconnection (RC) flux from post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and the underlying photospheric magnetic fields. In previous works, the RC flux has been computed using the cumulative flare ribbon area. Here we obtain the RC flux as the flux in half of the area underlying the PEA in EUV imaged after the flare maximum. We apply this method to a set of 21 eruptions that originated near the solar disk center in Solar Cycle 23. We find that the RC flux from the arcade method (Φ_{rA}) has excellent agreement with the flux from the flare-ribbon method (Φ_{rR}) according to Φ_{rA} = 1.24(Φ_{rR})^{0.99}. We also find Φ_{rA} to be correlated with the poloidal flux (ΦP) of the associated magnetic cloud at 1 AU: ΦP = 1.20(Φ_{rA})^{0.85}. This relation is nearly identical to that obtained by Qiu et al. ( Astrophys. J. 659, 758, 2007) using a set of only 9 eruptions. Our result supports the idea that flare reconnection results in the formation of the flux rope and PEA as a common process.

  5. Induced core formation time in subcritical magnetic clouds by large-scale trans-Alfvénic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfvén speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation time is about three times shorter than that with no turbulence, when the turbulent speed is comparable to the Alfvén speed.

  6. Estimation of Reconnection Flux Using Post-Eruption Arcades and Its Relevance to Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new method to compute the flare reconnection (RC) flux from post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and the underlying photospheric magnetic fields. In previous works, the RC flux has been computed using the cumulative flare ribbon area. Here we obtain the RC flux as the flux in half of the area underlying the PEA in EUV imaged after the flare maximum. We apply this method to a set of 21 eruptions that originated near the solar disk center in Solar Cycle 23. We find that the RC flux from the arcade method ((Phi)rA) has excellent agreement with the flux from the flare-ribbon method ((Phi)rR) according to (Phi)rA = 1.24((Phi)rR)(sup 0.99). We also find (Phi)rA to be correlated with the poloidal flux ((Phi)P) of the associated magnetic cloud at 1 AU: (Phi)P = 1.20((Phi)rA)(sup 0.85). This relation is nearly identical to that obtained by Qiu et al. (Astrophys. J. 659, 758, 2007) using a set of only 9 eruptions. Our result supports the idea that flare reconnection results in the formation of the flux rope and PEA as a common process.

  7. Spectral Variations of Of?p Oblique Magnetic Rotator Candidates in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Nazé, Yaël; Wade, Gregg A.; Bagnulo, Stefano; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Howarth, Ian D.; Evans, Christopher J.; Sota, Alfredo

    2015-10-01

    Optical spectroscopic monitoring has been conducted of two O stars in the SMC and one in the LMC, the spectral characteristics of which place them in the Of?p category, which has been established in the Galaxy to consist of oblique magnetic rotators. All of these Magellanic stars show systematic spectral variations typical of the Of?p class, further strengthening their magnetic candidacy to the point of virtual certainty. The spectral variations are related to photometric variations derived from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data by Nazé et al. in a parallel study, which yields rotational periods for two of them. Now circular spectropolarimetry is required to measure their fields, and ultraviolet spectroscopy to further characterize their low-metallicity, magnetically confined winds, in support of hydrodynamical analyses.

  8. SPECTRAL VARIATIONS OF Of?p OBLIQUE MAGNETIC ROTATOR CANDIDATES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Nazé, Yaël; Wade, Gregg A.; Bagnulo, Stefano; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Apellániz, Jesús Maíz; Howarth, Ian D.; Evans, Christopher J.; Sota, Alfredo E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl E-mail: wade-g@rmc.ca E-mail: rbarba@dfuls.cl E-mail: idh@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2015-10-15

    Optical spectroscopic monitoring has been conducted of two O stars in the SMC and one in the LMC, the spectral characteristics of which place them in the Of?p category, which has been established in the Galaxy to consist of oblique magnetic rotators. All of these Magellanic stars show systematic spectral variations typical of the Of?p class, further strengthening their magnetic candidacy to the point of virtual certainty. The spectral variations are related to photometric variations derived from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data by Nazé et al. in a parallel study, which yields rotational periods for two of them. Now circular spectropolarimetry is required to measure their fields, and ultraviolet spectroscopy to further characterize their low-metallicity, magnetically confined winds, in support of hydrodynamical analyses.

  9. Modeling Formation of Clouds of Heavy Elements in the Magnetic Atmospheres of Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, G.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic A and B main-sequence stars present strange inhomogeneous distributions of metals on their surface. These stars constitute the well-known group of chemically peculiar magnetic stars (ApBp stars). The atmospheres of these stars are known to be strongly affected by atomic diffusion, and a new generation of modeling tools is appearing to take into account the complexity of physical processes in play. In this talk, I will present recent results of 3D numerical modeling of abundance distributions in these atmospheres.

  10. Chandra Observations of a Young Embedded Magnetic B Star in the p Ophiuchus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Imanishi, Kensuke

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the analysis of two Chandra X-ray observations of the young magnetic B star rho Ophiuchus S1. X-ray emission from the star was detected in both observations. The average flux is almost the same in both, but during each observation the flux shows significant time variations by a factor of two on timescales of 20-40 ksec. Each spectrum can be fit by either an absorbed power law model with a photon index of approx. -3 or a thin-thermal plasma model with a temperature of approx. 2 keV and an extremely low metal abundance (approx. less than 0.1 solar). The spectrum of the first observation has an apparent line feature at about 6.8 keV, which likely corresponds to highly ionized iron K alpha. In contrast, the spectrum of the second observation shows an anomalous edge absorption component at E approx. 1 keV. The continuum emission and log (L(sub X)/L(sub bol)) approx. -6 are similar to those of young intermediate-mass stars (Herbig Ae/Be stars) although the presence of the magnetic field inferred from the detection of non-thermal radio emission has drawn an analogy between rho Ophiuchus S1 and magnetic chemically peculiar (MCP) stars. If the X-ray emission is thermal, the highest plasma temperature observed is too high to be explained by the conventional theories of magnetic stars, and favors some kind of magnetic dynamo activity, while if the emission is nonthermal, it might be related to mass infall. The 6.8 keV line and 4 keV edge features are marginal but they give important information near the stellar body if they are real. Their physical interpretation is discussed.

  11. Formation of Massive Molecular Cloud Cores by Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-01

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  12. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  13. Deuterium fractionation and H2D+ evolution in turbulent and magnetized cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körtgen, Bastian; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Giannetti, Andrea; Banerjee, Robi

    2017-08-01

    High-mass stars are expected to form from dense prestellar cores. Their precise formation conditions are widely discussed, including their virial condition, which results in slow collapse for supervirial cores with strong support by turbulence or magnetic fields, or fast collapse for subvirial sources. To disentangle their formation processes, measurements of the deuterium fractions are frequently employed to approximately estimate the ages of these cores and to obtain constraints on their dynamical evolution. We here present 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations including for the first time an accurate non-equilibrium chemical network with 21 gas-phase species plus dust grains and 213 reactions. With this network we model the deuteration process in fully depleted prestellar cores in great detail and determine its response to variations in the initial conditions. We explore the dependence on the initial gas column density, the turbulent Mach number, the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio and the distribution of the magnetic field, as well as the initial ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of H2. We find qualitatively good agreement with recent observations of deuterium fractions in quiescent sources. Our results show that deuteration is rather efficient, even when assuming a conservative OPR of 3 and highly subvirial initial conditions, leading to large deuterium fractions already within roughly a free-fall time. We discuss the implications of our results and give an outlook to relevant future investigations.

  14. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  15. Experimental Results of the Solar Energetic Particle Evens Inside Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J.; Hidalgo, M. A.

    2006-08-01

    The modulation effects of the solar ejecta over the solar energetic particle evens (0.5-100 MeV) have recently been highlighted. Especially important is the behaviour of these fluxes inside MCs where, in spite of the low magnetic field intensities of these interplanetary structures (about 30 nT), a decrease in the population of the energetic particles is observed. The experimental data from ACE, SAMPEX, SOHO, Ulysses and WIND satellites are presented, both from MC coincident with Solar particles evens (left figure) and not coincident (right figure). A simple model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. This work is performed inside COST Action 724.

  16. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  17. Erratum to "Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23-Paper 1" [J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 70(2-4) (2008) 245-253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the figures (Fig. 4) in "Solar sources and geospace consequences of interplanetary magnetic Clouds observed during solar cycle 23 -- Paper 1" by Gopalswamy et al. (2008, JASTP, Vol. 70, Issues 2-4, February 2008, pp. 245-253) is incorrect because of a software error in t he routine that was used to make the plot. The source positions of various magnetic cloud (MC) types are therefore not plotted correctly.

  18. A comparison of outer electron radiation belt dropouts during solar wind stream interface and magnetic cloud driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjobi, O.; Sivakumar, V.; Mtumela, Z.

    2017-06-01

    Energetic electrons are trapped in the Earth's radiation belts which occupy a toroidal region between 3 and 7 \\hbox {R}E above the Earth's surface. Rapid loss of electrons from the radiation belts is known as dropouts. The source and loss mechanisms regulating the radiation belts population are not yet understood entirely, particularly during geomagnetic storm times. Nevertheless, the dominant loss mechanism may require an event based study to be better observed. Utilizing multiple data sources from the year 1997-2007, this study identifies radiation belt electron dropouts which are ultimately triggered when solar wind stream interfaces (SI) arrived at Earth, or when magnetic clouds (MC) arrived. Using superposed epoch analysis (SEA) technique, a synthesis of multiple observations is performed to reveal loss mechanism which might, perhaps, be a major contributor to radiation belt losses under SI and MC driven storms. Results show an abrupt slower decaying precipitation of electron peak (about 3000 counts/sec) on SI arrival within 5.05 < L < 6.05, which persist till 0.5 day before gradual recovery. This pattern is interpreted as an indication of depleted electrons from bounce lost cone via precipitating mechanism known as relativistic electron microburst. On the other hand, MC shows a pancake precipitating peak extending to lower L (Plasmapause); indicating a combination of electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves as the contributing mechanisms.

  19. Anomalous short-term increases in the galactic cosmic ray intensity: Are they related to the interplanetary magnetic cloud-like structures?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-one short-term increases (time duration 24 hours and amplitude up to 5%) in the galactic cosmic ray intensity, occurring inside Forbush decreases events, have been identified over the period 1966 - 1977. These increases are highly anisotropic and occur after the compression region following the shock; the interplanetary medium is characterized by intense ( 10 nT) and higly fluctuating magnetic field B, high velocity, low density and temperature (flare ejecta piston?). These B-fluctuations seem to be ordered variations which could be representative of magnetic clouds. Also the large cosmic ray increase occurring on 17-18 September 1979, belongs to this category of events.

  20. OBSERVATIONAL DETERMINATION OF THE TURBULENT AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION SCALE AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hezareh, Talayeh; Houde, Martin; McCoey, Carolyn; Li Huabai

    2010-09-01

    We study the correlation of the velocity dispersion of the coexisting molecules H{sup 13}CN and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} and the turbulent energy dissipation scale in the DR21(OH) star-forming region. The downshift of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} spectrum relative to H{sup 13}CN is consistent with the presence of ambipolar diffusion at dissipation length scales that helps the process of turbulent energy dissipation, but at a different cutoff for ions compared with the neutrals. We use our observational data to calculate a turbulent ambipolar diffusion length scale L' {approx_equal} 17 mpc and a strength of B{sub pos} {approx_equal} 1.7 mG for the plane of the sky component of the magnetic field in DR21(OH).

  1. In Search of an Imprint of Magnetization in the Balloon-Borne Observations of the Polarized Dust Emission From Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Juan Diego

    The observation of the polarization of thermal emission from dust grains is a key method in the study of the role of the magnetic fields in the star formation process. This dissertation introduces BLASTPol, a submillimeter telescope for polarization designed for mapping dust polarization in scales ranging from pre-stellar cores to sections of molecular clouds and the Histogram of Relative Orientations (HRO), a new statistical tool for the analysis of the polarization maps. The observations of BLASTPol were possible thanks to a novel light-weight carbon fibre sunshield structure and the detailed thermal modeling of the balloon-borne platform. The carbon fibre structure is based on the construction technique developed for the Spider gondola which integrates detailed Finite Element Analysis with the use of composite materials and adhesive joints. The thermal model uses 3D Computer Assisted Design allowing unprecedented control of the sun avoidance limits and detailed modeling of the gondola components. BLASTPol made observations of the Lupus I and Vela C molecular clouds, the Carina Nebula, and the Puppis Cloud Complex in two balloon-borne flights over Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. The construction of polarization maps from the BLASTPol10 observations was affected by multiple pathologies in the data. However, the preliminary maps indicate the need of a statistical tool which allows relating these observations to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations motivating the development of HRO. Most of the problems in the BLASTPol10 data were successfully addressed in BLASTPol12 and the construction of polarization maps of the observed regions is currently in progress. The HRO is a statistical tool which assesses the relative orientation between the magnetic field and the density structures. This tool was characterized by using simulated molecular clouds with different magnetization indicating that: 1. There is an imprint of the magnetization level in the relative orientation of

  2. Comparison of magnetic field observations of an average magnetic cloud with a simple force free model: the importance of field compression and expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Narock, T. W.; Chen, H.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the ability of the cylindrically symmetric force-free magnetic cloud (MC) fitting model of Lepping et al. (1990) to faithfully reproduce actual magnetic field observations by examining two quantities: (1) a difference angle, called β, i.e., the angle between the direction of the observed magnetic field (Bobs) and the derived force free model field (Bmod) and (2) the difference in magnitudes between the observed and modeled fields, i.e., ΔB(=|Bobs|-|Bmod|), and a normalized ΔB (i.e., ΔB/) is also examined, all for a judiciously chosen set of 50 WIND interplanetary MCs, based on quality considerations. These three quantities are developed as a percent of MC duration and averaged over this set of MCs to obtain average profiles. It is found that, although <ΔB> and its normalize version are significantly enhanced (from a broad central average value) early in an average MC (and to a lesser extent also late in the MC), the angle <β> is small (less than 8°) and approximately constant all throughout the MC. The field intensity enhancements are due mainly to interaction of the MC with the surrounding solar wind plasma causing field compression at front and rear. For example, for a typical MC, ΔB/ is: 0.21±0.27 very early in the MC, -0.11±0.10 at the center (and -0.085±0.12 averaged over the full "central region," i.e., for 30% to 80% of duration), and 0.05±0.29 very late in the MC, showing a double sign change as we travel from front to center to back, in the MC. When individual MCs are examined we find that over 80% of them possess field enhancements within several to many hours of the front boundary, but only about 30% show such enhancements at their rear portions. The enhancement of the MC's front field is also due to MC expansion, but this is usually a lesser effect compared to compression. It is expected that this compression is manifested as significant distortion to the MC's cross-section from the ideal circle, first suggested by Crooker et

  3. Yearly Comparison of Magnetic Cloud Parameters, Sunspot Number, and Interplanetary Quantities for the First 18 Years of the Wind Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2015-02-01

    In the scalar part of this study, we determine various statistical relationships between estimated magnetic cloud (MC) model fit-parameters and sunspot number (SSN) for the interval defined by the Wind mission, i.e., early 1995 until the end of 2012, all in terms of yearly averages. The MC-fitting model used is that of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957 - 11965, 1990). We also statistically compare the MC fit-parameters and other derived MC quantities [ e.g., axial magnetic flux (ΦO) and total axial current density ( J O)] with some associated ambient interplanetary quantities (including the interplanetary magnetic field ( B IMF), proton number density ( N P), and others). Some of the main findings are that the minimum SSN is nearly simultaneous with the minimum in the number of MCs per year ( N MC), which occurs in 2008. There are various fluctuations in N MC and the MC model-fit quality ( Q') throughout the mission, but the last four years (2009 - 2012) are markedly different from the others; Q' is low and N MC is large over these four years. N MC is especially large for 2012. The linear correlation coefficient (c.c.≈0.75) between the SSN and each of the three quantities J O, MC diameter (2 R O), and B IMF, is moderately high, but none of the MC parameters track the SSN well in the sense defined in this article. However, there is good statistical tracking among the following: MC axial field, B IMF, 2 R O, average MC speed ( V MC), and yearly average solar wind speed ( V SW) with relatively high c.c.s among most of these. From the start of the mission until late 2005, J O gradually increases, with a slight violation in 2003, but then a dramatic decrease (by more than a factor of five) occurs to an almost steady and low value of ≈ 3 μA km-2 until the end of the interval of interest, i.e., lasting for at least seven years. This tends to split the overall 18-year interval into two phases with a separator at

  4. The Magnetic Field of the L1544 Starless Dark Cloud, Traced Using Near-Infrared Background Starlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Goldsmith, Paul; Tassis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    What roles do interstellar magnetic fields play in star formation processes? We have studied the B-field of L1544, a dark cloud with a starless dense core showing active gas infall, and located only 140 pc away in Taurus, via deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging polarimetry with the Mimir instrument. We find the B-field orientations in the plane of the sky change significantly at L1544, mimicking its shape and extent. The elongated spine of L1544 is also where the dispersion of NIR linear polarization position angles is smallest, suggesting strengthening of the B-field. Archival WISE, SCUPOL, Herschel, and Planck data were analyzed to characterize dust extinction and emission across L1544 and the field around it. Three-dimensional modeling, constrained through matching two-dimensional integrated model properties to observed dust distributions, led us to develop maps of effective gas mass densities and non-thermal gas velocity dispersions. These were combined with the NIR polarimetry, under the Chandrasekhar & Fermi (1953) approach, to yield a map of B-field strength across the entire 400 sq-arcmin region surveyed. The trends of B-field strength with gas volume density, mass-to-flux ratio with radius, and plane-of-sky B-field strengths with Zeeman-traced line-of-sight B-field strengths were found and compared to previous published work to establish the role of B-fields in L1544. We find field strengths in the 3 - 30 uG range, quite similar to the OH Zeeman values found by Crutcher et al. (2009) for L1544.This work was partially supported by grants to Boston University from NSF (AST-0907790, 1412269) and NASA (NNX15AE51G).

  5. Main Cause of the Poloidal Plasma Motion Inside a Magnetic Cloud Inferred from Multiple-Spacecraft Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ake; Wang, Yuming; Chi, Yutian; Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Although the dynamical evolution of magnetic clouds (MCs) has been one of the foci of interplanetary physics for decades, only few studies focus on the internal properties of large-scale MCs. Recent work by Wang et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 120, 1543, 2015) suggested the existence of the poloidal plasma motion in MCs. However, the main cause of this motion is not clear. In order to find it, we identify and reconstruct the MC observed by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)-A, Wind, and STEREO-B spacecraft during 19 - 20 November 2007 with the aid of the velocity-modified cylindrical force-free flux-rope model. We analyze the plasma velocity in the plane perpendicular to the MC axis. It is found that there was evident poloidal motion at Wind and STEREO-B, but this was not clear at STEREO-A, which suggests a local cause rather than a global cause for the poloidal plasma motion inside the MC. The rotational directions of the solar wind and MC plasma at the two sides of the MC boundary are found to be consistent, and the values of the rotational speeds of the solar wind and MC plasma at the three spacecraft show a rough correlation. All of these results illustrate that the interaction with ambient solar wind through viscosity might be one of the local causes of the poloidal motion. Additionally, we propose another possible local cause: the existence of a pressure gradient in the MC. The significant difference in the total pressure at the three spacecraft suggests that this speculation is perhaps correct.

  6. The Link between Turbulence, Magnetic Fields, Filaments, and Star Formation in the Central Molecular Zone Cloud G0.253+0.016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, C.; Rathborne, J. M.; Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Bally, J.; Contreras, Y.; Crocker, R. M.; Garay, G.; Jackson, J. M.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Star formation is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. However, the turbulence and magnetic fields in molecular clouds near the Galactic center may differ substantially compared to spiral-arm clouds. Here we determine the physical parameters of the central molecular zone (CMZ) cloud G0.253+0.016, its turbulence, magnetic field, and filamentary structure. Using column density maps based on dust-continuum emission observations with ALMA+Herschel, we identify filaments and show that at least one dense core is located along them. We measure the filament width {W}{fil}=0.17+/- 0.08 {pc} and the sonic scale {λ }{sonic}=0.15+/- 0.11 {pc} of the turbulence, and find {W}{fil}≈ {λ }{sonic}. A strong velocity gradient is seen in the HNCO intensity-weighted velocity maps obtained with ALMA+Mopra. The gradient is likely caused by large-scale shearing of G0.253+0.016, producing a wide double-peaked velocity probability distribution function (PDF). After subtracting the gradient to isolate the turbulent motions, we find a nearly Gaussian velocity PDF typical for turbulence. We measure the total and turbulent velocity dispersion, 8.8+/- 0.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and 3.9+/- 0.1 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively. Using magnetohydrodynamical turbulence simulations, we find that G0.253+0.016's turbulent magnetic field {B}{turb}=130+/- 50 μ {{G}} is only ≲ 1/10 of the ordered field component. Combining these measurements, we reconstruct the dominant turbulence driving mode in G0.253+0.016 and find a driving parameter of b=0.22+/- 0.12, indicating solenoidal (divergence-free) driving. We compare this to spiral-arm clouds, which typically have a significant compressive (curl-free) driving component (b\\gt 0.4). Motivated by previous reports of strong shearing motions in the CMZ, we speculate that shear causes the solenoidal driving in G0.253+0.016 and show that this reduces the star-formation rate by a factor of 6.9 compared to typical nearby

  7. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, ... chest pa and lateral Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  8. Magnetic Clouds at/near the 2007 - 2009 Solar Minimum: Frequency of Occurrence and Some Unusual Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping. R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) have been identified for the period 2007 2009 (at/near the recent solar minimum) from Wind data, then confirmed through MC parameter fitting using a force-free model. A dramatic increase in the frequency of occurrence of these events took place from the two early years of 2007 (with five MCs) and 2008 (one MC) compared to 2009 (12 MCs). This pattern approximately mirrors the occurrence-frequency profile that was observed over a three-year interval 12 years earlier, with eight events in 1995, four in 1996, and 17 in 1997, but decreased overall by a factor of 0.62 in number. However, the average estimated axial field strength taken over all of the 18 events of 2007 - 2009 (called the "recent period" here) was only 11.0 nT, whereas |BO| for the 29 events of 1995 - 1997 (called the "earlier period" ) was 16.5 nT. This 33% average drop in |BO| is more or less consistent with the decreased three-year average interplanetary magnetic field intensity between these two periods, which shows a 23% drop. In the earlier period, the MCs were clearly of mixed types but predominantly of the South-to-North type, whereas those in the recent period are almost exclusively the North-to-South type; this change is consistent with global solar field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust (Geophys. Monogr. Ser. 99, 139, 1997). As we have argued in earlier work (Lepping and Wu, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A10103, 2007), this change should make it possible to carry out (accurate short-term) magnetic storm forecasting by predicting the latter part of an MC from the earlier part, using a good MC parameter-fitting model with real-time data from a spacecraft at L1, for example. The recent set s average duration is 15.2 hours, which is a 27% decrease compared to that of the earlier set, which had an average duration of 20.9 hours. In fact, all physical aspects of the recent MC set are shown to drop with respect to the earlier set; e.g., as well as the average internal magnetic field

  9. Magnetic Clouds at/near the 2007 - 2009 Solar Minimum: Frequency of Occurrence and Some Unusual Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) have been identified for the period 2007 - 2009 (at/near the recent solar minimum) from Wind data, then confirmed through MC parameter fitting using a force-free model. A dramatic increase in the frequency of occurrence of these events took place from the two early years of 2007 (with five MCs) and 2008 (one MC) compared to 2009 (12 MCs). This pattern approximately mirrors the occurrence-frequency profile that was observed over a three-year interval 12 years earlier, with eight events in 1995, four in 1996, and 17 in 1997, but decreased overall by a factor of 0.62 in number. However, the average estimated axial field strength [<| B O|>] taken over all of the 18 events of 2007 - 2009 (called the “recent period” here) was only 11.0 nT, whereas <| B O|> for the 29 events of 1995 - 1997 (called the “earlier period”) was 16.5 nT. This 33% average drop in <| B O|> is more or less consistent with the decreased three-year average interplanetary magnetic field intensity between these two periods, which shows a 23% drop. In the earlier period, the MCs were clearly of mixed types but predominantly of the South-to-North type, whereas those in the recent period are almost exclusively the North-to-South type; this change is consistent with global solar field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust ( Geophys. Monogr. Ser. 99, 139, 1997). As we have argued in earlier work (Lepping and Wu, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A10103, 2007), this change should make it possible to carry out (accurate short-term) magnetic storm forecasting by predicting the latter part of an MC from the earlier part, using a good MC parameter-fitting model with real-time data from a spacecraft at L1, for example. The recent set’s average duration is 15.2 hours, which is a 27% decrease compared to that of the earlier set, which had an average duration of 20.9 hours. In fact, all physical aspects of the recent MC set are shown to drop with respect to the earlier set; e.g., as well as the

  10. Multi-Spacecraft Study of the 21 January 2005 ICME. Evidence of Current Sheet Substructure Near the Periphery of a Strongly Expanding, Fast Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foullon, C.; Owen, C. J.; Dasso, S.; Green, L. M.; Dandouras, I.; Elliott, H. A.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Crooker, N. U.

    2007-08-01

    We examine the near-Earth Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) apparently related to the intense Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event of 20 January 2005. Our purpose is to contribute to the understanding of the macroscopic structure, evolution and dynamics of the solar corona and heliosphere. Using Cluster, ACE and Wind data in the solar wind, and Geotail data in the magnetosheath, we perform a multi-spacecraft analysis of the ICME-driven shock, post-shock magnetic discontinuities and ejecta. Traversals by the well-separated near-Earth spacecraft provide a coherent picture of the ICME geometry. Following the shock, the ICME sequence starts with a hot pileup, i.e., a sheath, followed by a fast ejecta characterised by a non-compressive density enhancement (NCDE), which is caused essentially by an enrichment in helium. The plasma and magnetic observations of the ejecta are consistent with the outskirts of a structure in strong expansion, consisting of nested magnetic loops still connected to the Sun. Within the leading edge of the ejecta, we establish the presence of a tilted current sheet substructure. An analysis of the observations suggests that the tilted current sheet is draped within the overlying cloud canopy, ahead of a magnetic cloud-like structure. The flux rope interpretation of this structure near L1, confirmed by observations of the corresponding magnetic cloud, provided by Ulysses at 5.3 AU and away from the Sun - Earth line, indicates that the bulk of the cloud is in the northwest sector as seen from the Earth, with its axis nearly perpendicular to the ecliptic. This is consistent with the primary direction of travel of the fast halo CME observed at the Sun. Moreover, the NCDE and helium enrichment are consistent with the position near the streamer belt of the flaring active region NOAA 10720 associated with the CME. However, differences between interplanetary and solar observations indicate a large rotation of the erupting filament and overlying

  11. Fitting a torus-type flux rope model to the multi-spacecraft observation of the magnetic cloud on April 16-18, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Tomoko

    A torus-type flux rope model applied to an interplanetary magnetic cloud was tested by the magnetic field observations by ACE spacecraft on April 16-17, 1999, and by NOZOMI spacecraft on April 17-18, 1999, which was 0.2 AU downstream of ACE within 3 degrees of heliocentric longitude. At the passage of the magnetic cloud, the Bz component was positive at NOZOMI while negative at ACE. On the basis of a single observation by ACE, the magnetic cloud was once fitted to a torus-shaped flux rope model through which the spacecraft passed at the southern tip (Ishibashi and Marubashi, 2004), however, the model did not reproduce the NOZOMI observation. Therefore, an attempt was made to fit a torus-shaped flux rope to the simultaneous observations by NOZOMI and ACE. An analytical solution of force-free magnetic fields inside a troid with an arbitrary aspect ratio (Romashets and Vandas, 2003) was employed as a model flux rope. The parameters to fit are the large radius R0 , the small radius r0 , the attitude of the troid (the direction of the symmetric axis of the troid), the ‘impact parameter', which is the minimum distance between the center of the cross section of the torus and ACE, and the position of the closest approach (the toroidal angle measured from the top of the torus). They were determined so that the sum of the square of the difference between the model field and the hourly averages of the observed field normalized by the magnitude would be minimized. The start time of the observation (within 1 hour) was also adjusted so that it would minimize the difference. The direction of the troidal field is determined so that it reproduces the radial component of the magnetic field observed in the magnetic cloud. The chirality was chosen so that it reproduces the observations. Self expansion of the flux rope is assumed in proportion to the heliocentric distance of the center of the torus. The bulk velocity of the plasma of each part of the torus was also calculated in

  12. Mesoscale cloud phenomena observed by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of certain mesoscale cloud features - jet cirrus, eddies/vortices, cloud banding, and wave clouds - were collected from LANDSAT imagery and placed into Mason's four groups of causes of cloud formation based on the mechanism of vertical motion which produces condensation. These groups are as follows: (1) layer clouds formed by widespread regular ascent; (2) layer clouds caused by irregular stirring motions; (3) convective clouds; and (4) clouds formed by orographic disturbances. These mechanisms explain general cloud formation. Once formed, other forces may play a role in the deformation of a cloud or cloud mass into unusual and unique meso- and microscale patterns. Each example presented is followed by a brief discussion describing the synoptic situation, and some inference into the formation and occurrence of the more salient features. No major attempt was made to discuss in detail the meteorological and topographic interplay producing these mesoscale features.

  13. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of regular alternating μ-bpm/di-μ-X copper(II) chains (bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine; X = OH, F).

    PubMed

    Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2012-04-02

    The preparation and X-ray crystal structure of four 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm)-containing copper(II) complexes of formula {[Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(4)(μ-OH)(2)][Mn(H(2)O)(6)](SO(4))(2)}(n) (1), {[Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(4)(μ-OH)(2)]SiF(6)}(n) (2), {Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(2)(μ-F)(2)F(2)}(n) (3), and [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(2)F(NO(3))][Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(3)F]NO(3)·2H(2)O (4) are reported. The structures of 1-3 consist of chains of copper(II) ions with regular alternation of bis-bidentate bpm and di-μ-hydroxo (1 and 2) or di-μ-fluoro (3) groups, the electroneutrality being achieved by either hexaaqua manganese(II) cations plus uncoordinated sulfate anions (1), uncoordinated hexafluorosilicate anions (2), or terminally bound fluoride ligands (3). Each copper(II) ion in 1-4 is six-coordinated in elongated octahedral surroundings. 1 and 2 show identical, linear chain motifs with two bpm-nitrogen atoms and two hydroxo groups building the equatorial plane at each copper(II) ion and the axial position being filled by water molecules. In the case of 3, the axial sites at the copper atom are occupied by a bpm-nitrogen atom and a bis-monodentate fluoride anion, producing a "step-like" chain motif. The values of the angle at the hydroxo and fluoro bridges are 94.11(6) (1), 94.75(4) (2), and 101.43(4)° (3). In each case, the copper-copper separation through the bis-bidentate bpm [5.428(1) (1), 5.449(1) (2), and 5.9250(4) Å (3)] is considerably longer than that through the di-μ-hydroxo [2.8320(4) (1) and 2.824(1) Å (2)] or di-μ-fluoro [3.3027(4) Å (3)] bridges. Compound 4 is a mononuclear species whose structure is made up of neutral [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(2)F(NO(3))] units, [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(3)F](+) cations, uncoordinated nitrate anions, and crystallization water molecules, giving rise to a pseudo-helical, one-dimensional (1D) supramolecular motif. The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated in the temperature range 1.9-300 K. Relatively large, alternating antiferro- [J = -149 (1) and

  14. Artist's Rendering of Multiple Whirlpools in a Sodium Gas Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image depicts the formation of multiple whirlpools in a sodium gas cloud. Scientists who cooled the cloud and made it spin created the whirlpools in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory, as part of NASA-funded research. This process is similar to a phenomenon called starquakes that appear as glitches in the rotation of pulsars in space. MIT's Wolgang Ketterle and his colleagues, who conducted the research under a grant from the Biological and Physical Research Program through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., cooled the sodium gas to less than one millionth of a degree above absolute zero (-273 Celsius or -460 Fahrenheit). At such extreme cold, the gas cloud converts to a peculiar form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, as predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Bose of India in 1927. No physical container can hold such ultra-cold matter, so Ketterle's team used magnets to keep the cloud in place. They then used a laser beam to make the gas cloud spin, a process Ketterle compares to stroking a ping-pong ball with a feather until it starts spirning. The spinning sodium gas cloud, whose volume was one- millionth of a cubic centimeter, much smaller than a raindrop, developed a regular pattern of more than 100 whirlpools.

  15. Artist's Rendering of Multiple Whirlpools in a Sodium Gas Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image depicts the formation of multiple whirlpools in a sodium gas cloud. Scientists who cooled the cloud and made it spin created the whirlpools in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory, as part of NASA-funded research. This process is similar to a phenomenon called starquakes that appear as glitches in the rotation of pulsars in space. MIT's Wolgang Ketterle and his colleagues, who conducted the research under a grant from the Biological and Physical Research Program through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., cooled the sodium gas to less than one millionth of a degree above absolute zero (-273 Celsius or -460 Fahrenheit). At such extreme cold, the gas cloud converts to a peculiar form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, as predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Bose of India in 1927. No physical container can hold such ultra-cold matter, so Ketterle's team used magnets to keep the cloud in place. They then used a laser beam to make the gas cloud spin, a process Ketterle compares to stroking a ping-pong ball with a feather until it starts spirning. The spinning sodium gas cloud, whose volume was one- millionth of a cubic centimeter, much smaller than a raindrop, developed a regular pattern of more than 100 whirlpools.

  16. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  17. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  18. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. IV. Unusual Magnetic Cloud and Overall Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Belov, A. V.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic superstorm of 20 November 2003 with Dst=-422 nT, one of the most intense in history, is not well understood. The superstorm was caused by a moderate solar eruptive event on 18 November, comprehensively studied in our preceding Papers I - III. The analysis has shown a number of unusual and extremely complex features, which presumably led to the formation of an isolated right-handed magnetic-field configuration. Here we analyze the interplanetary disturbance responsible for the 20 November superstorm, compare some of its properties with the extreme 28 - 29 October event, and reveal a compact size of the magnetic cloud (MC) and its disconnection from the Sun. Most likely, the MC had a spheromak configuration and expanded in a narrow angle of ≤ 14∘. A very strong magnetic field in the MC up to 56 nT was due to the unusually weak expansion of the disconnected spheromak in an enhanced-density environment constituted by the tails of the preceding ICMEs. Additional circumstances favoring the superstorm were i) the exact impact of the spheromak on the Earth's magnetosphere and ii) the almost exact southward orientation of the magnetic field, corresponding to the original orientation in its probable source region near the solar disk center.

  19. Iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Buccini, Alessandro; Donatelli, Marco; Serra-Capizzano, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Fractional Tikhonov regularization methods have been recently proposed to reduce the oversmoothing property of the Tikhonov regularization in standard form, in order to preserve the details of the approximated solution. Their regularization and convergence properties have been previously investigated showing that they are of optimal order. This paper provides saturation and converse results on their convergence rates. Using the same iterative refinement strategy of iterated Tikhonov regularization, new iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are introduced. We show that these iterated methods are of optimal order and overcome the previous saturation results. Furthermore, nonstationary iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are investigated, establishing their convergence rate under general conditions on the iteration parameters. Numerical results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed regularization iterations.

  20. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  1. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  2. Plasma Clouds and Snowplows: Bulk Plasma Escape from Mars Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 10(exp 7)/sq cm/s can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  3. Plasma Clouds and Snowplows: Bulk Plasma Escape from Mars Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 10(exp 7)/sq cm/s can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  4. Sparsity regularization in dynamic elastography.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, M; Sahebjavaher, R S; Salcudean, S E; Rohling, R

    2012-10-07

    We consider the inverse problem of continuum mechanics with the tissue deformation described by a mixed displacement-pressure finite element formulation. The mixed formulation is used to model nearly incompressible materials by simultaneously solving for both elasticity and pressure distributions. To improve numerical conditioning, a common solution to this problem is to use regularization to constrain the solutions of the inverse problem. We present a sparsity regularization technique that uses the discrete cosine transform to transform the elasticity and pressure fields to a sparse domain in which a smaller number of unknowns is required to represent the original field. We evaluate the approach by solving the dynamic elastography problem for synthetic data using such a mixed finite element technique, assuming time harmonic motion, and linear, isotropic and elastic behavior for the tissue. We compare our simulation results to those obtained using the more common Tikhonov regularization. We show that the sparsity regularization is less dependent on boundary conditions, less influenced by noise, requires no parameter tuning and is computationally faster. The algorithm has been tested on magnetic resonance elastography data captured from a CIRS elastography phantom with similar results as the simulation.

  5. Observations of the Magnetic Fields Inside and Outside the Milky Way, Starting with Globules (~ 1 parsec), Filaments, Clouds, Superbubbles, Spiral Arms, Galaxies, Superclusters, and Ending with the Cosmological Universe's Background Surface (at ~ 8 Teraparsecs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallee, Jacques P.

    The observational study of galactic magnetic fields dates back to 1949; an excellent review of the early 30 years has been made by Verschuur (1979). I review here the developments since then and the current state of our observational knowledge on the magnetic fields inside and outside the Milky Way galaxy, for objects with sizes greater than 1 parsec (=3.2 light-years; =3.1x10**16 m). Included are the medium-scale magnetic fields in the isolated globules, dusty elongated clouds and narrow filaments, large interstellar superbubbles, and the large-scale magnetic fields in the spiral arms in our Galaxy and in objects outside our Galaxy out to cosmological distances. The large-scale magnetic fields can act as guides to the low density gas in its motion in the rarefied areas of the interstellar medium, and as tracers of the past dynamical histories of galaxies in motion, linking galactic dynamics with galactic dynamos. Medium-scale magnetic fields can play a support role, supporting clouds against outside pressures or against collapse due to self-gravity. Small-scale magnetic fields play a significant role on smaller-scale phenomena: propagation of cosmic-rays, shock waves, cosmic dust orientation, star formation (althought there is little detailed discussion here of magnetic fields on star formation and objects with sizes < 1 parsec).

  6. QUANTIFYING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM LARGE-SCALE CLOUD TO COLLAPSING CORE: SELF-SIMILARITY, MASS-TO-FLUX RATIO, AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Dust polarization observational results are analyzed for the high-mass star formation region W51 from the largest parent cloud ({approx}2 pc, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) to the large-scale envelope ({approx}0.5 pc, BIMA array) down to the collapsing core e2 ({approx}60 mpc, Submillimeter Array). Magnetic field and dust emission gradient orientations reveal a correlation which becomes increasingly more tight with higher resolution. The previously developed polarization-intensity-gradient method is applied in order to quantify the magnetic field significance. This technique provides a way to estimate the local magnetic field force compared to gravity without the need of any mass or field strength measurements, solely making use of measured angles which reflect the geometrical imprint of the various forces. All three data sets clearly show regions with distinct features in the field-to-gravity force ratio. Azimuthally averaged radial profiles of this force ratio reveal a transition from a field dominance at larger distances to a gravity dominance closer to the emission peaks. Normalizing these profiles to a characteristic core scale points toward self-similarity. Furthermore, the polarization-intensity-gradient method is linked to the mass-to-flux ratio, providing a new approach to estimate the latter one without mass and field strength inputs. A transition from a magnetically supercritical to a subcritical state as a function of distance from the emission peak is found for the e2 core. Finally, based on the measured radius-dependent field-to-gravity force ratio we derive a modified star formation efficiency with a diluted gravity force. Compared to a standard (free-fall) efficiency, the observed field is capable of reducing the efficiency down to 10% or less.

  7. Using a magnetized plasma jet colliding with a heavy gas cloud to investigate MIF adiabatic heating and compression mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul; Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Chai, Kil-Byoung; Greig, Amelia; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized inertial fusion (MIF) is based on having an imploding liner adiabatically compress a magnetized plasma to the density and temperature required for thermonuclear fusion. The goal of the Caltech research program is to determine the scaling of the temperature and density increase when an actual experimental plasma is adiabatically compressed. The plasma parameters will be more modest than a fusion-grade configuration, but in compensation, the shot repetition rate will be much higher and the experiments will be non-destructive. The non-destructive feature results from having a high-speed magnetized plasma jet impact a localized heavy gas. From the point of view of an observer in the frame of the magnetized plasma jet, it will look as if the heavy gas is impacting and compressing the magnetized plasma and so, except for some geometrical differences, the configuration is equivalent to a liner impacting and compressing a stationary magnetized plasma. The experiment will be modeled by 3D numerical MHD and PIC codes. (as of approximately September 15).

  8. The role of the exchange-correlation response kernel and scaling corrections in relativistic density functional nuclear magnetic shielding calculations with the zeroth-order regular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-09-01

    The relativistic NMR module of the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package, which is frequently utilised in studies of heavy atom NMR chemical shifts, is extended to calculate a hitherto neglected term from the response of the exchange-correlation (XC) potential. The term vanishes in the absence of spin-orbit coupling. Further, corrections to the shielding arising from scaling factors in the zeroth-order regular approximation (zora) relativistic framework are investigated. The XC response markedly improves calculated proton chemical shifts for hydrogen halides. Mercury chemical shifts for mercury dihalides are also noticeably altered. Contributions from density-gradient dependent terms in the response kernel contribute about 30-40%. New fully relativistic density functional theory (DFT) benchmark data are compared with zora and literature reference values. In line with previous work, it is found that absolute shielding constants for Hg are not accurately predicted with zora. However, chemical shifts agree well with fully relativistic calculations. The application of 'scaled-zora' scaling factors deteriorates the shielding constants and is therefore not recommended. The scaling hardly affects chemical shifts. zora calculations are not suitable for absolute shielding of heavy atoms but they can be used safely for chemical shifts in most application scenarios.

  9. Scalar Relativistic Computations of Nuclear Magnetic Shielding and g-Shifts with the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation and Range-Separated Hybrid Density Functionals.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Fredy; Govind, Niranjan; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-10-11

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR chemical shifts and molecular g tensors with Gaussian-type orbitals are implemented via second-order energy derivatives within the scalar relativistic zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) framework. Nonhybrid functionals, standard (global) hybrids, and range-separated (Coulomb-attenuated, long-range corrected) hybrid functionals are tested. Origin invariance of the results is ensured by use of gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) basis functions. The new implementation in the NWChem quantum chemistry package is verified by calculations of nuclear shielding constants for the heavy atoms in HX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At) and H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po) and (125)Te chemical shifts in a number of tellurium compounds. The basis set and functional dependence of g-shifts is investigated for 14 radicals with light and heavy atoms. The problem of accurately predicting (19)F NMR shielding in UF6-nCln, n = 1-6, is revisited. The results are sensitive to approximations in the density functionals, indicating a delicate balance of DFT self-interaction vs correlation. For the uranium halides, the range-separated functionals are not clearly superior to global hybrids.

  10. Electromagnetic scattering in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solakiewicz, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Techniques used to explain the nature of the optical effects of clouds on the light produced by lightning include a Monte Carlo simulation, an equivalent medium approach, and methods based on Boltzmann transport theory. A cuboidal cloud has been considered using transform methods and a diffusion approximation. Many simplifying assumptions have been used by authors to make this problem tractable. In this report, the cloud will have a spherical shape and its interior will consist of a uniform distribution of identical spherical water droplets. The source will be modeled as a Hertz dipole, electric or magnetic, inside or outside the cloud. An impulsive source is used. Superposition may be employed to obtain a sinusoid within an envelope which describes a lightning event. The problem is investigated by transforming to the frequency domain, obtaining Green's functions, and then using the Cagniard-DeHoop method to symbolically recover the time domain solution.

  11. Neptune Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-14

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence NASA Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot GDS.

  12. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  13. Optical/near-infrared polarization survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic fields, dense cloud fragmentations, and anomalous dust grain sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Reis, Wilson; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G. E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: roman@dfuls.cl

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak A{sub V} between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region.

  14. Optical/Near-infrared Polarization Survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic Fields, Dense Cloud Fragmentations, and Anomalous Dust Grain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Reis, Wilson; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak AV between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region. Based on observations collected at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (CTIO, Chile) and Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCT, Brazil).

  15. Magnetic Field Morphology Studied by Multi-scale Polarimetry in and around the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, F.; Bastien, P.

    2011-11-01

    We present a summary of results obtained by Poidevin & Bastien (2006) in the GF-9 core region. Multi-scale analysis is used and suggests that an original poloidal magnetic field could have been twisted by a rotating elongated (core+envelope) structure.

  16. Non-equilibrium ionization around clouds evaporating in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballet, J.; Luciani, J. F.; Mora, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is of prime importance for global models of the interstellar medium to know whether dense clouds do or do not evaporate in the hot coronal gas. The rate of mass exchanges between phases depends very much on that. McKee and Ostriker's model, for instance, assumes that evaporation is important enough to control the expansion of supernova remnants, and that mass loss obeys the law derived by Cowie and McKee. In fact, the geometry of the magnetic field is nearly unknown, and it might totally inhibit evaporation, if the clouds are not regularly connected to the hot gas. Up to now, the only test of the theory is the U.V. observation (by the Copernicus and IUE satellites) of absorption lines of ions such as OVI or NV, that exist at temperatures of a few 100,000 K typical of transition layers around evaporating clouds. Other means of testing the theory are discussed.

  17. A cylindrical shell model of the NASA-MPE barium ion cloud experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, A. D.; Prak, J. W. L.; Jenkins, A. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A computer model is developed using infinitely long concentric cylindrical shells to represent the neutral atoms, ions and electrons in the barium cloud. The neutral shells are given a distribution of positions and velocities whose parameters are chosen to be consistent with the dynamics of the release. From this distribution, the ion and electron shells are generated at random using the observed time constant for photoionization. The ion and electron shells thus formed are followed using self-consistent equations of motion. Various averages which could be compared with observation of the actual cloud are calculated at regular time intervals. An unexpected result is the predicted very early return of the magnetic field within the cloud to its ambient value.

  18. Dimensional Regularization is Generic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    The absence of the quadratic divergence in the Higgs sector of the Standard Model in the dimensional regularization is usually regarded to be an exceptional property of a specific regularization. To understand what is going on in the dimensional regularization, we illustrate how to reproduce the results of the dimensional regularization for the λϕ4 theory in the more conventional regularization such as the higher derivative regularization; the basic postulate involved is that the quadratically divergent induced mass, which is independent of the scale change of the physical mass, is kinematical and unphysical. This is consistent with the derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation, which is a comparison of two theories with slightly different masses, for the λϕ4 theory without encountering the quadratic divergence. In this sense the dimensional regularization may be said to be generic in a bottom-up approach starting with a successful low energy theory. We also define a modified version of the mass independent renormalization for a scalar field which leads to the homogeneous renormalization group equation. Implications of the present analysis on the Standard Model at high energies and the presence or absence of SUSY at LHC energies are briey discussed.

  19. Send in the Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-02

    Floating high above the hydrocarbon lakes, wispy clouds have finally started to return to Titan's northern latitudes Clouds like these disappeared from Titan's (3,200 miles or 5,150 kilometers across) northern reaches for several years (from about 2010 to 2014). Now they have returned, but in far smaller numbers than expected. Since clouds can quickly appear and disappear, Cassini scientists regularly monitor the large moon, in the hopes of observing cloud activity. They are especially interested in comparing these observations to predictions of how cloud cover should change with Saturn's seasons. Titan's clear skies are not what researchers expected. This view looks toward the Saturn-facing side of Titan. North on Titan is up and rotated 3 degrees to the left. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Oct. 29, 2016 using a spectral filter that preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 545,000 miles (878,000 kilometers) from Titan. Image scale is 3 miles (5 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20516

  20. Investigating Plasma Motion of Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU through a Velocity-modified Cylindrical Force-free Flux Rope Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, R.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Due to the very low value of Can't connect to bucket.int.confex.com:4201 (Connection refused) LWP::Protocol::http::Socket: connect: Connection refused at /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.8.8/LWP/Protocol/http.pm line 51. in MCs, they are believed to be in a nearly force-free state and therefore are able to be modeled by a cylindrical force-free flux rope. However, the force-free state only describes the magnetic field topology but not the plasma motion of a MC. For a MC propagating in interplanetary space, the global plasma motion has three possible components: linear propagating motion of a MC away from the Sun, expanding motion and circular motion with respect to the axis of the MC. By assuming the quasi-steady evolution and self-similar expansion, we introduced the three-component motion into the cylindrical force-free flux rope model, and developed a velocity-modified model. Then we applied the model to 73 MCs observed by Wind spacecraft to investigate the properties of the plasma motion of MCs. It is found that (1) some MCs did not propagate along the Sun-Earth line, suggesting the direct evidence of the CME's deflected propagation and/or rotation in interplanetary space, (2) the expansion speed is correlated with the radial propagation speed and 62%/17% of MCs underwent a under/over-expansion at 1 AU, and (3) the circular motion does exists though it is only on the order of 10 km s-1. These findings advance our understanding of the MC's properties at 1 AU as well as the dynamic evolution of CMEs from the Sun to interplanetary space.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope and HI Imaging of Strong Ram Pressure Stripping in the Coma Spiral NGC 4921: Dense Cloud Decoupling and Evidence for Magnetic Binding in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Abramson, Anne; Bravo-Alfaro, Hector

    2015-08-01

    Remarkable dust extinction features in the deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) V and I images of the face-on Coma cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4921 show in unprecedented ways how ram pressure strips the ISM from the disk of a spiral galaxy. New VLA HI maps show a truncated and highly asymmetric HI disk with a compressed HI distribution in the NW, providing evidence for ram pressure acting from the NW. Where the HI distribution is truncated in the NW region, HST images show a well-defined, continuous front of dust that extends over 90° and 20 kpc. This dust front separates the dusty from dust-free regions of the galaxy, and we interpret it as galaxy ISM swept up near the leading side of the ICM-ISM interaction. We identify and characterize 100 pc-1 kpc scale substructure within this dust front caused by ram pressure, including head-tail filaments, C-shaped filaments, and long smooth dust fronts. The morphology of these features strongly suggests that dense gas clouds partially decouple from surrounding lower density gas during stripping, but decoupling is inhibited, possibly by magnetic fields that link and bind distant parts of the ISM.

  2. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE AND HI IMAGING OF STRONG RAM PRESSURE STRIPPING IN THE COMA SPIRAL NGC 4921: DENSE CLOUD DECOUPLING AND EVIDENCE FOR MAGNETIC BINDING IN THE ISM

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Abramson, Anne; Bravo-Alfaro, Hector

    2015-08-15

    Remarkable dust extinction features in the deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) V and I images of the face-on Coma cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4921 show in unprecedented ways how ram pressure strips the ISM from the disk of a spiral galaxy. New VLA HI maps show a truncated and highly asymmetric HI disk with a compressed HI distribution in the NW, providing evidence for ram pressure acting from the NW. Where the HI distribution is truncated in the NW region, HST images show a well-defined, continuous front of dust that extends over 90° and 20 kpc. This dust front separates the dusty from dust-free regions of the galaxy, and we interpret it as galaxy ISM swept up near the leading side of the ICM–ISM interaction. We identify and characterize 100 pc–1 kpc scale substructure within this dust front caused by ram pressure, including head–tail filaments, C-shaped filaments, and long smooth dust fronts. The morphology of these features strongly suggests that dense gas clouds partially decouple from surrounding lower density gas during stripping, but decoupling is inhibited, possibly by magnetic fields that link and bind distant parts of the ISM.

  3. Investigating plasma motion of magnetic clouds at 1 AU through a velocity-modified cylindrical force-free flux rope model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui; Wang, S.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and usually modeled by a flux rope. By assuming the quasi-steady evolution and self-similar expansion, we introduce three types of global motion into a cylindrical force-free flux rope model and developed a new velocity-modified model for MCs. The three types of the global motion are the linear propagating motion away from the Sun, the expanding, and the poloidal motion with respect to the axis of the MC. The model is applied to 72 MCs observed by Wind spacecraft to investigate the properties of the plasma motion of MCs. First, we find that some MCs had a significant propagation velocity perpendicular to the radial direction, suggesting the direct evidence of the CME's deflected propagation and/or rotation in interplanetary space. Second, we confirm the previous results that the expansion speed is correlated with the radial propagation speed and most MCs did not expand self-similarly at 1 AU. In our statistics, about 62%/17% of MCs underwent a underexpansion/overexpansion at 1 AU and the expansion rate is about 0.6 on average. Third, most interestingly, we find that a significant poloidal motion did exist in some MCs. Three speculations about the cause of the poloidal motion are therefore proposed. These findings advance our understanding of the MC's properties at 1 AU and the dynamic evolution of CMEs from the Sun to interplanetary space.

  4. From clouds to cores to envelopes to disks: a multi-scale view of magnetized star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles; Plambeck, R. L.; TADPOL survey Team

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields are thought to play an important role in the formation of stars. However, that importance has been called into question by previous observations showing misalignment between protostellar outflows and magnetic fields (B-fields), as well as inconsistency in field morphology between 10,000 and 1000 AU scales. To investigate these inconsistencies, we used the 1.3 mm full-Stokes polarimeter — which I tested, installed, and calibrated for CARMA, a mm-wave interferometer — to map dust polarization with ~2.5" resolution toward 29 star-forming cores and 8 star-forming regions as part of the TADPOL survey. We find that a subset of the sources have consistent B-field orientations between the large 20") scales measured by single-dish submm bolometers and the small scales measured by CARMA. Those same sources also tend to have higher fractional polarizations (measured by CARMA), presumably because the B-fields are less twisted by dynamic effects. However, even in these sources, which seem to have retained the memory of the global B-field direction, the fields in the cores are misaligned with the disks and outflows in the central protostars — a key result of the TADPOL survey. Furthermore, the cores with lower polarization fractions tend to have B-fields that are perpendicular to outflows, which suggests that in these sources the B-fields have lost the memory of the larger-scale global field, and have been wrapped up by core rotation. This is an important result for disk formation theory, as it suggests that field misalignment may indeed be the solution to the magnetic braking catastrophe. Finally, we find that all sources exhibit the so-called “polarization hole” effect, where the polarization drops significantly near the total intensity peak. When this effect was seen in low-resolution single-dish maps, it was attributed to the averaging of unresolved structure in the plane of the sky. However, the higher resolution maps we present here resolve these

  5. Sparsity regularized image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hero, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Most image reconstruction problems are under-determined: there are far more pixels to be resolved than there are measurements available. This means that the image space has more degrees of freedom than the measurement space. To make headway in such under-determined image reconstruction problems one must either incorporate domain knowledge or regularize. Domain knowledge restricts the size of the image space while regularization introduces bias, e.g., by forcing the reconstructed image to be smooth or have limited support. Both approaches are equivalent and can be interpreted as making the image sparse in some domain. This paper will provide a selective overview of some of the principal methods of sparsity regularized image reconstruction.

  6. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  7. Regularized Structural Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Jacobucci, Ross; Grimm, Kevin J; McArdle, John J

    A new method is proposed that extends the use of regularization in both lasso and ridge regression to structural equation models. The method is termed regularized structural equation modeling (RegSEM). RegSEM penalizes specific parameters in structural equation models, with the goal of creating easier to understand and simpler models. Although regularization has gained wide adoption in regression, very little has transferred to models with latent variables. By adding penalties to specific parameters in a structural equation model, researchers have a high level of flexibility in reducing model complexity, overcoming poor fitting models, and the creation of models that are more likely to generalize to new samples. The proposed method was evaluated through a simulation study, two illustrative examples involving a measurement model, and one empirical example involving the structural part of the model to demonstrate RegSEM's utility.

  8. Synchronization of Regular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caucal, Didier

    Functional graph grammars are finite devices which generate the class of regular automata. We recall the notion of synchronization by grammars, and for any given grammar we consider the class of languages recognized by automata generated by all its synchronized grammars. The synchronization is an automaton-related notion: all grammars generating the same automaton synchronize the same languages. When the synchronizing automaton is unambiguous, the class of its synchronized languages forms an effective boolean algebra lying between the classes of regular languages and unambiguous context-free languages. We additionally provide sufficient conditions for such classes to be closed under concatenation and its iteration.

  9. Manifold Regularized Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding

    2017-01-27

    This paper introduces a novel manifold regularized reinforcement learning scheme for continuous Markov decision processes. Smooth feature representations for value function approximation can be automatically learned using the unsupervised manifold regularization method. The learned features are data-driven, and can be adapted to the geometry of the state space. Furthermore, the scheme provides a direct basis representation extension for novel samples during policy learning and control. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on two benchmark control tasks, i.e., the inverted pendulum and the energy storage problem. Simulation results illustrate the concepts of the proposed scheme and show that it can obtain excellent performance.

  10. Comparison of Cloud Properties from CALIPSO-CloudSat and Geostationary Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.; Minnis, P.; Chang, F.; Winker, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Spangenberg, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud properties are being derived in near-real time from geostationary satellite imager data for a variety of weather and climate applications and research. Assessment of the uncertainties in each of the derived cloud parameters is essential for confident use of the products. Determination of cloud amount, cloud top height, and cloud layering is especially important for using these real -time products for applications such as aircraft icing condition diagnosis and numerical weather prediction model assimilation. Furthermore, the distribution of clouds as a function of altitude has become a central component of efforts to evaluate climate model cloud simulations. Validation of those parameters has been difficult except over limited areas where ground-based active sensors, such as cloud radars or lidars, have been available on a regular basis. Retrievals of cloud properties are sensitive to the surface background, time of day, and the clouds themselves. Thus, it is essential to assess the geostationary satellite retrievals over a variety of locations. The availability of cloud radar data from CloudSat and lidar data from CALIPSO make it possible to perform those assessments over each geostationary domain at 0130 and 1330 LT. In this paper, CloudSat and CALIPSO data are matched with contemporaneous Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), and Meteosat-8 data. Unlike comparisons with cloud products derived from A-Train imagers, this study considers comparisons of nadir active sensor data with off-nadir retrievals. These matched data are used to determine the uncertainties in cloud-top heights and cloud amounts derived from the geostationary satellite data using the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud retrieval algorithms. The CERES multi-layer cloud detection method is also evaluated to determine its accuracy and limitations in the off-nadir mode. The results will be useful for

  11. An enhanced neighborhood similar pixel interpolator approach for removing thick clouds in landsat images

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thick cloud contaminations in Landsat images limit their regular usage for land applications. A few methods have been developed to remove thick clouds using additional cloud-free images. Unfortunately, the cloud-free composition image produced by existing methods commonly lacks from the desired spat...

  12. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  13. Arctic Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image Stratus clouds are common in the Arctic during the summer months, and are important modulators of ... from MISR's two most obliquely forward-viewing cameras. The cold, stable air causes the clouds to persist in stratified layers, and this ...

  14. Cloud Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-12

    Eucalyptus Systems • Provides an open-source application that can be used to implement a cloud computing environment on a datacenter • Trying to establish an...edgeplatform.html • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2): http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/ • Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3): http://aws.amazon.com/s3/ • Eucalyptus

  15. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  16. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... their delicate appearance, thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals called cirrus may contribute to global warming. Some scientists ... minutes after MISR imaged the cloud from space. At the same time, another NASA high-altitude jet, the WB-57, flew right through the ...

  17. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  18. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  19. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  20. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  1. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  2. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  3. Seeking a Regularity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    This autoinstructional unit deals with the phenomena of regularity in chemical behavior. The prerequisites suggested are two other autoinstructional lessons (Experiments 1 and 2) identified in the Del Mod System as SE 018 020 and SE 018 023. The equipment needed is listed and 45 minutes is the suggested time allotment. The Student Guide includes…

  4. Yearly Comparisons of Magnetic Cloud Parameters to Sun Spot Number and to Each Other for the First 18 Years of the Wind Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    We determine various statistical relationships between estimated magnetic cloud (MC) model-fit parameters and sun spot number (SSN), and to each other, for the interval defined by the Wind mission, i.e., early 1995 until the end of 2012, all in terms of yearly averages giving 18 averages each. The MC fitting model used is that of Lepping et al. (1990, JGR, 95, pp.11957-11965). The study is split between a scalar part (most of the study) and a vector part. The scalar MC 'fit parameters,' which include some quantities derived from the actual fit-parameters, are: Bo (axial magnetic field strength), 2Ro (diameter of the MC), V_MC (average measured speed of the plasma in the MC), Φo (axial magnetic flux), Jo (axial current density), I_T (total axial current), N_MC (total number of MCs in a given year), ΔT (duration of the MC), Qo (estimated 'quality' of the fitting procedure, formula dependent). These are MC-model dependent, but the last three are only very weakly so. These MC quantities are compared statistically with some associated (scalar) ambient interplanetary (IP) quantities (e.g., Bo compared with B_IMF (IP field intensity), Bo with V_SW (solar wind speed), etc.). Other IP quantities considered are: Tp (solar wind proton temperature) and Np (solar wind proton density). Some of the major findings are the following. The minimum SSN is nearly simultaneous with the minimum in N_MC, which occurs in 2008. There are various fluctuations in N_MC and Qo throughout the mission, but the last four years (2009 - 2012) are markedly different from the others; fit-quality (Qo) is low (meaning high Qo number), and N_MC is large over these four years. N_MC is especially large for 2012. Noticeable is the moderately good linear correlation (i.e., around c.c. of ≈ 0.75) between SSN and the quantities Jo, 2Ro, and B_IMF, but no MC parameter 'tracks' well with SSN. ('Tracking' is measured by examining the normalize difference between any two quantities, where the normalization is

  5. On the characteristics -extensions, orientation, density, magnetic field- of magnetic clouds/ejecta immediately following its driving part of the -SEP causing- strong-shock surface region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    With multi-spacecraft identification of large solar energetic particles (SEP) -events starting 24 September 1977, 1 January and 23 September 1978, 26 March and 24 April, 1979- driven shocks we make a distinction between the shock driving part of the ejecta and its trailing region. We base our study on the analysis of plasma ions -H+, and He++-, and magnetic field observations. Here, we focus on the unique features of the trailing part, i.e., the region of the ejecta immediately behind a leading front moving very close to its driven shock. (I.e., the portion of the shock-surface labeled shock nose.) A shock nose that in an earlier presentation we have shown that generates in the upstream solar wind the unusual disturbance characteristics commonly observed at/near the stagnation point of the so much studied strong Earth's bow-shock, approximately centered in-front of the Earth, along the Sun-Earth line. These events, considered for illustrative purposes here, belong to the era of the HELIO-A, and HELIO-B spacecraft, and the dataset is further complemented with data from the ICE 3, VOYAGER 1, and 2, IMP-8 missions.

  6. Screaming Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  7. Revealing a spiral-shaped molecular cloud in our galaxy: Cloud fragmentation under rotation and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl

    2017-02-01

    The dynamical processes that control star formation in molecular clouds are not well understood, and in particular, it is unclear if rotation plays a major role in cloud evolution. We investigate the importance of rotation in cloud evolution by studying the kinematic structure of a spiral-shaped Galactic molecular cloud G052.24+00.74. The cloud belongs to a large filament, and is stretching over 100 pc above the Galactic disk midplane. The spiral-shaped morphology of the cloud suggests that the cloud is rotating. We have analysed the kinematic structure of the cloud, and study the fragmentation and star formation. We find that the cloud exhibits a regular velocity pattern along west-east direction - a velocity shift of 10km s-1 at a scale of 30 pc. The kinematic structure of the cloud can be reasonably explained by a model that assumes rotational support. Similarly to our Galaxy, the cloud rotates with a prograde motion. We use the formalism of Toomre (1964) to study the cloud's stability, and find that it is unstable and should fragment. The separation of clumps can be consistently reproduced assuming gravitational instability, suggesting that fragmentation is determined by the interplay between rotation and gravity. Star formation occurs in massive, gravitational bound clumps. Our analysis provides a first example in which the fragmentation of a cloud is regulated by the interplay between rotation and gravity.

  8. Measured electric and magnetic fields from an unusual cloud-to-ground lightning flash containing two positive strokes followed by four negative strokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerauld, J. E.; Uman, M. A.; Rakov, V. A.; Rambo, K. J.; Jordan, D. M.; Schnetzer, G. H.

    2009-10-01

    We present electric and magnetic fields measured at multiple stations between about 300 and 800 m of a cloud-to-ground "bipolar" lightning flash containing two initial positive strokes, separated in time by 53 ms and striking ground at two locations separated by about 800 m, followed by four negative strokes that traversed the same path as the second positive stroke. The leader electric field durations for the positive first, positive second, and negative third strokes were about 120 ms, 35 ms, and 1 ms, respectively. The first-stroke leader electric field changes measured at five stations ranged from about +16 to +35 kV/m, the second stroke +8 to +13 kV/m, and the third stroke -0.9 to -1.8 kV/m (atmospheric electricity sign convention). The microsecond-scale return stroke waveforms of the first and second (positive) strokes exhibited a similar "slow-front/fast-transition" to those observed for close negative first strokes. The peak rate-of-change of the positive first stroke electric field normalized to 100 km was about 20 V m-1μs-1, similar to the values observed for close negative first strokes. The positive second stroke was followed by a long continuing current of duration at least 400 ms, while the positive first stroke had a total current duration of only about 1 ms. All four negative strokes were followed by long continuing current, with durations ranging from about 70 ms to about 230 ms. The overall flash duration was about 1.5 s.

  9. Cloud point-dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of hydrophobic organic compounds onto highly hydrophobic core-shell Fe₂O₃@C magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Zhu, Qing; Pan, Qinmin; Chisvert, Alberto

    2012-08-17

    A novel two-step extraction technique combining cloud point extraction (CPE) with dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE) is presented in this work for the first time. The method involves initial extraction of the target analytes by CPE in the micelles of a non-ionic surfactant medium; then highly hydrophobic polysiloxane-coated core-shell Fe(2)O(3)@C magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used to retrieve the micellar phase. In that manner, the micellar phase containing the analytes is the target of the D-μ-SPE step rather than the analytes directly. MNPs are then collected by the application of an adscititious magnetic field overcoming the need for specific steps associated with CPE such as centrifugation to separate the surfactant-rich phase, refrigeration of the condensed micellar phase to reduce its viscosity or appropriate apparatus that enable direct sampling of the surfactant-rich phase. A noteworthy feature of the method is the introduction of highly oleophilic MNPs, which afford rapid and quantitative mass transfer of the surfactant phase, as opposed to other more conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles. In that manner, fast and reproducible extraction is accomplished, lending improved analytical features compared to conventional CPE, such as reduced analysis time and relative inertness to surfactant concentration and equilibration temperature. The analytes were recovered from the surface of MNPs by ultrasound-assisted back-extraction in a water-immiscible organic solvent where analytes are readily partitioned but the surfactant has limited solubility, thus minimizing its interference during chromatographic detection. As an analytical demonstration, different UV absorbing chemicals with various physico-chemical properties were used as model organic compounds for optimizing the parameters associated with this novel two-step extraction approach. The proposed method, combining two different and efficient techniques, offers satisfactory analytical

  10. Regularized Hamiltonians and Spinfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele

    2012-05-01

    We review a recent proposal for the regularization of the scalar constraint of General Relativity in the context of LQG. The resulting constraint presents strengths and weaknesses compared to Thiemann's prescription. The main improvement is that it can generate the 1-4 Pachner moves and its matrix elements contain 15j Wigner symbols, it is therefore compatible with the spinfoam formalism: the drawback is that Thiemann anomaly free proof is spoiled because the nodes that the constraint creates have volume.

  11. Regularizing portfolio optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Susanne; Kondor, Imre

    2010-07-01

    The optimization of large portfolios displays an inherent instability due to estimation error. This poses a fundamental problem, because solutions that are not stable under sample fluctuations may look optimal for a given sample, but are, in effect, very far from optimal with respect to the average risk. In this paper, we approach the problem from the point of view of statistical learning theory. The occurrence of the instability is intimately related to over-fitting, which can be avoided using known regularization methods. We show how regularized portfolio optimization with the expected shortfall as a risk measure is related to support vector regression. The budget constraint dictates a modification. We present the resulting optimization problem and discuss the solution. The L2 norm of the weight vector is used as a regularizer, which corresponds to a diversification 'pressure'. This means that diversification, besides counteracting downward fluctuations in some assets by upward fluctuations in others, is also crucial because it improves the stability of the solution. The approach we provide here allows for the simultaneous treatment of optimization and diversification in one framework that enables the investor to trade off between the two, depending on the size of the available dataset.

  12. Shadow of rotating regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Amir, Muhammed; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the shadows cast by the different types of rotating regular black holes viz. Ayón-Beato-García (ABG), Hayward, and Bardeen. These black holes have in addition to the total mass (M ) and rotation parameter (a ), different parameters as electric charge (Q ), deviation parameter (g ), and magnetic charge (g*). Interestingly, the size of the shadow is affected by these parameters in addition to the rotation parameter. We found that the radius of the shadow in each case decreases monotonically, and the distortion parameter increases when the values of these parameters increase. A comparison with the standard Kerr case is also investigated. We have also studied the influence of the plasma environment around regular black holes to discuss its shadow. The presence of the plasma affects the apparent size of the regular black hole's shadow to be increased due to two effects: (i) gravitational redshift of the photons and (ii) radial dependence of plasma density.

  13. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, VA. Image ...

  14. Polar Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-27

    With the changing of seasons comes changes in weather. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows clouds in the north polar region. The surface is just barely visible in part of the image.

  15. Deep Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-27

    Bright puffs and ribbons of cloud drift lazily through Saturn's murky skies. In contrast to the bold red, orange and white clouds of Jupiter, Saturn's clouds are overlain by a thick layer of haze. The visible cloud tops on Saturn are deeper in its atmosphere due to the planet's cooler temperatures. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 18 degrees above the ringplane. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view. The images were acquired with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 15, 2008 at a distance of approximately 1.5 million kilometers (906,000 miles) from Saturn. Image scale is 84 kilometers (52 miles) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA09910

  16. Curious Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-13

    Saturn atmosphere produces beautiful and sometimes perplexing features. Is the bright feature below center a rare crossing of a feature from a zone to a belt, or is it an illusion created by different cloud layers at different levels?

  17. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  18. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  19. Strongly Regular Graphs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    The theory of strongly regular graphs was introduced by Bose r7 1 in 1963, in connection with partial geometries and 2 class association schemes. One...non adjacent vertices is constant and equal to ~. We shall denote by ~(p) (reap.r(p)) the set of vertices adjacent (resp.non adjacent) to a vertex p...is the complement of .2’ if the set of vertices of ~ is the set of vertices of .2’ and if two vertices in .2’ are adjacent if and only if they were

  20. Flexible sparse regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Dirk A.; Resmerita, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The seminal paper of Daubechies, Defrise, DeMol made clear that {{\\ell }}p spaces with p\\in [1,2) and p-powers of the corresponding norms are appropriate settings for dealing with reconstruction of sparse solutions of ill-posed problems by regularization. It seems that the case p = 1 provides the best results in most of the situations compared to the cases p\\in (1,2). An extensive literature gives great credit also to using {{\\ell }}p spaces with p\\in (0,1) together with the corresponding quasi-norms, although one has to tackle challenging numerical problems raised by the non-convexity of the quasi-norms. In any of these settings, either superlinear, linear or sublinear, the question of how to choose the exponent p has been not only a numerical issue, but also a philosophical one. In this work we introduce a more flexible way of sparse regularization by varying exponents. We introduce the corresponding functional analytic framework, that leaves the setting of normed spaces but works with so-called F-norms. One curious result is that there are F-norms which generate the ℓ 1 space, but they are strictly convex, while the ℓ 1-norm is just convex.

  1. Regularized versus non-regularized statistical reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, N. V.

    2011-08-01

    An important feature of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) is the stochastic property of real clinical data. Statistical algorithms such as ordered subset-expectation maximization (OSEM) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) are a direct consequence of the stochastic nature of the data. The principal difference between these two algorithms is that OSEM is a non-regularized approach, while the MAP is a regularized algorithm. From the theoretical point of view, reconstruction problems belong to the class of ill-posed problems and should be considered using regularization. Regularization introduces an additional unknown regularization parameter into the reconstruction procedure as compared with non-regularized algorithms. However, a comparison of non-regularized OSEM and regularized MAP algorithms with fixed regularization parameters has shown very minor difference between reconstructions. This problem is analyzed in the present paper. To improve the reconstruction quality, a method of local regularization is proposed based on the spatially adaptive regularization parameter. The MAP algorithm with local regularization was tested in reconstruction of the Hoffman brain phantom.

  2. Neptune's clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  3. CLOUD CHEMISTRY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.

    2001-03-01

    Clouds present substantial concentrations of liquid-phase water, which can potentially serve as a medium for dissolution and reaction of atmospheric gases. The important precursors of acid deposition, SO{sub 2} and nitrogen oxides NO and NO{sub 2} are only sparingly soluble in clouds without further oxidation to sulfuric and nitric acids. In the case of SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and to lesser extent ozone, are identified as important processes leading to this oxidation, and methods have been described by which to evaluate the rates of these reactions. The limited solubility of the nitrogen oxides precludes significant aqueous-phase reaction of these species, but gas-phase reactions in clouds can be important especially at night.

  4. Mainstreaming the Regular Classroom Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Michael

    The paper presents activities, suggested by regular classroom teachers, to help prepare the regular classroom student for mainstreaming. The author points out that regular classroom children need a vehicle in which curiosity, concern, interest, fear, attitudes and feelings can be fully explored, where prejudices can be dispelled, and where the…

  5. Our World: Cool Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Learn how clouds are formed and watch an experiment to make a cloud using liquid nitrogen. Find out how scientists classify clouds according to their altitude and how clouds reflect and absorb ligh...

  6. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events ...

  7. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Cloud vortices

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-02

    Cloud vortices off Heard Island, south Indian Ocean. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of sea ice off Heard Island on Nov 2, 2015 at 5:02 AM EST (09:20 UTC). Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  9. Ensemble manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Geng, Bo; Tao, Dacheng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Linjun; Hua, Xian-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    We propose an automatic approximation of the intrinsic manifold for general semi-supervised learning (SSL) problems. Unfortunately, it is not trivial to define an optimization function to obtain optimal hyperparameters. Usually, cross validation is applied, but it does not necessarily scale up. Other problems derive from the suboptimality incurred by discrete grid search and the overfitting. Therefore, we develop an ensemble manifold regularization (EMR) framework to approximate the intrinsic manifold by combining several initial guesses. Algorithmically, we designed EMR carefully so it 1) learns both the composite manifold and the semi-supervised learner jointly, 2) is fully automatic for learning the intrinsic manifold hyperparameters implicitly, 3) is conditionally optimal for intrinsic manifold approximation under a mild and reasonable assumption, and 4) is scalable for a large number of candidate manifold hyperparameters, from both time and space perspectives. Furthermore, we prove the convergence property of EMR to the deterministic matrix at rate root-n. Extensive experiments over both synthetic and real data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  10. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  11. Fast Image Reconstruction with L2-Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Fan, Audrey P.; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We introduce L2-regularized reconstruction algorithms with closed-form solutions that achieve dramatic computational speed-up relative to state of the art L1- and L2-based iterative algorithms while maintaining similar image quality for various applications in MRI reconstruction. Materials and Methods We compare fast L2-based methods to state of the art algorithms employing iterative L1- and L2-regularization in numerical phantom and in vivo data in three applications; 1) Fast Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSD), 2) Lipid artifact suppression in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI), and 3) Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI). In all cases, proposed L2-based methods are compared with the state of the art algorithms, and two to three orders of magnitude speed up is demonstrated with similar reconstruction quality. Results The closed-form solution developed for regularized QSM allows processing of a 3D volume under 5 seconds, the proposed lipid suppression algorithm takes under 1 second to reconstruct single-slice MRSI data, while the PCA based DSI algorithm estimates diffusion propagators from undersampled q-space for a single slice under 30 seconds, all running in Matlab using a standard workstation. Conclusion For the applications considered herein, closed-form L2-regularization can be a faster alternative to its iterative counterpart or L1-based iterative algorithms, without compromising image quality. PMID:24395184

  12. A stochastic cloud model for cloud and ozone retrievals from UV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Schüssler, Olena; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2016-11-01

    The new generation of satellite instruments provides measurements in and around the Oxygen A-band on a global basis and with a relatively high spatial resolution. These data are commonly used for the determination of cloud properties. A stochastic model and radiative transfer model, previously developed by the authors, is used as the forward model component in retrievals of cloud parameters and ozone total and partial columns. The cloud retrieval algorithm combines local and global optimization routines, and yields a retrieval accuracy of about 1% and a fast computational time. Retrieved parameters are the cloud optical thickness and the cloud-top height. It was found that the use of the independent pixel approximation instead of the stochastic cloud model leads to large errors in the retrieved cloud parameters, as well as, in the retrieved ozone height resolved partial columns. The latter can be reduced by using the stochastic cloud model to compute the optimal value of the regularization parameter in the framework of Tikhonov regularization.

  13. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  14. Tracking magnetogram proper motions by multiscale regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.

    1995-01-01

    Long uninterrupted sequences of solar magnetograms from the global oscillations network group (GONG) network and from the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO) satellite will provide the opportunity to study the proper motions of magnetic features. The possible use of multiscale regularization, a scale-recursive estimation technique which begins with a prior model of how state variables and their statistical properties propagate over scale. Short magnetogram sequences are analyzed with the multiscale regularization algorithm as applied to optical flow. This algorithm is found to be efficient, provides results for all the spatial scales spanned by the data and provides error estimates for the solutions. It is found that the algorithm is less sensitive to evolutionary changes than correlation tracking.

  15. Ionospheric plasma cloud dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the thermospheric neutral wind and ionospheric drift made at Eglin AFB, Florida and Kwajalein Atoll are discussed. The neutral wind measurements at Eglin had little variation over a period of four years for moderate magnetic activity (Kp 4); the ionospheric drifts are small. Evidence is presented that indicates that increased magnetic activity has a significant effect on the neutral wind magnitude and direction at this midlatitude station. The neutral wind at dusk near the equator is generally small although in one case out of seven it was significantly larger. It is described how observations of large barium releases can be used to infer the degree of electrodynamic coupling of ion clouds to the background ionosphere. Evidence is presented that indicates that large barium releases are coupled to the conjugate ionosphere at midlatitudes.

  16. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  17. On regular rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, R.; Fayos, F.

    2017-01-01

    Different proposals for regular rotating black hole spacetimes have appeared recently in the literature. However, a rigorous analysis and proof of the regularity of this kind of spacetimes is still lacking. In this note we analyze rotating Kerr-like black hole spacetimes and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the regularity of all their second order scalar invariants polynomial in the Riemann tensor. We also show that the regularity is linked to a violation of the weak energy conditions around the core of the rotating black hole.

  18. Regular polygons in taxicab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    A polygon of n sides will be called regular in taxicab geometry if it has n equal angles and n sides of equal taxicab length. This paper will show that there are no regular taxicab triangles and no regular taxicab pentagons. The sets of taxicab rectangles and taxicab squares will be shown to be the same, respectively, as the sets of Euclidean rectangles and Euclidean squares. A method of construction for a regular taxicab 2n-gon for any n will be demonstrated.

  19. Linear regularity and [phi]-regularity of nonconvex sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kung Fu; Zang, Rui

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we discuss some sufficient conditions for the linear regularity and bounded linear regularity (and their variations) of finitely many closed (not necessarily convex) sets in a normed vector space. The accompanying necessary conditions are also given in the setting of Asplund spaces.

  20. Southern Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03026 Southern Clouds

    This image shows a system of clouds just off the margin of the South Polar cap. Taken during the summer season, these clouds contain both water-ice and dust.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.2S, Longitude 57.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration

  3. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  4. 76 FR 3629 - Regular Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board Regular Meeting SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the regular meeting of the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board (Board). Date and Time: The...

  5. Trajectory optimization using regularized variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewallen, J. M.; Szebehely, V.; Tapley, B. D.

    1969-01-01

    Regularized equations for a particular optimal trajectory are compared with unregularized equations with respect to computational characteristics, using perturbation type numerical optimization. In the case of the three dimensional, low thrust, Earth-Jupiter rendezvous, the regularized equations yield a significant reduction in computer time.

  6. 75 FR 76006 - Regular Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Board (Board). Date and Time: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean, Virginia, on December 9, 2010, from 12:30 p.m. until such time as the Board concludes... CORPORATION Regular Meeting AGENCY: Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board. ACTION: Regular meeting...

  7. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  8. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  9. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  10. Quantum Ergodicity on Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Nalini

    2017-07-01

    We give three different proofs of the main result of Anantharaman and Le Masson (Duke Math J 164(4):723-765, 2015), establishing quantum ergodicity—a form of delocalization—for eigenfunctions of the laplacian on large regular graphs of fixed degree. These three proofs are much shorter than the original one, quite different from one another, and we feel that each of the four proofs sheds a different light on the problem. The goal of this exploration is to find a proof that could be adapted for other models of interest in mathematical physics, such as the Anderson model on large regular graphs, regular graphs with weighted edges, or possibly certain models of non-regular graphs. A source of optimism in this direction is that we are able to extend the last proof to the case of anisotropic random walks on large regular graphs.

  11. The evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the structure and evolution of molecular clouds is reviewed, with particular emphasis given to the relationship with star formation. The basic hypothesis is that magnetic fields are the primary agents for supporting molecular clouds, although damped Alfven waves may play an important role in the direction parallel to the field lines. This picture naturally leads to a conception of 'bimodal star formation'. It is proposed that high-mass stars form from the overall gravitational collapse of a supercritical cloud, whereas low-mass stars form from small individual cores that slowly condense by ambipolar diffusion from a more extended envelope until they pass the brink of graviational instability and begin to collapse dynamically from 'inside-out'. The evidence that the infall stage of protostellar evolution is terminated by the development of a powerful stellar wind is reviewed.

  12. The evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Lizano, Susana

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the structure and evolution of molecular clouds is reviewed, with particular emphasis given to the relationship with star formation. The basic hypothesis is that magnetic fields are the primary agents for supporting molecular clouds, although damped Alfven waves may play an important role in the direction parallel to the field lines. This picture naturally leads to a conception of 'bimodal star formation'. It is proposed that high-mass stars form from the overall gravitational collapse of a supercritical cloud, whereas low-mass stars form from small individual cores that slowly condense by ambipolar diffusion from a more extended envelope until they pass the brink of graviational instability and begin to collapse dynamically from 'inside-out'. The evidence that the infall stage of protostellar evolution is terminated by the development of a powerful stellar wind is reviewed.

  13. Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  14. Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  15. Mapping Titan Cloud Coverage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-21

    This graphic, constructed from data obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft, shows the percentage of cloud coverage across the surface of Saturn moon Titan. The color scale from black to yellow signifies no cloud coverage to complete cloud coverage.

  16. A two micron polarization survey toward dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, M.; Sato, S.; Gatley, I.; Hough, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    A near infrared (2.2 micron) polarization survey of about 190 sources was conducted toward nearby dark clouds. The sample includes both background field stars and embedded young stellar objects. The aim is to determine the magnetic field structure in the densest regions of the dark clouds and study the role of magnetic fields in various phases of star formation processes, and to study the grain alignment efficiency in the dark cloud cores. From the polarization of background field stars and intrinsically unpolarized embedded sources, the magnetic field structure was determined in these clouds. From the intrinsic polarization of young stellar objects, the spatial distribution was determined of circumstellar dust around young stars. Combining the perpendicularity between the disks and magnetic fields with perpendicularity between the cloud elongation and magnetic fields, it is concluded that the magnetic fields might have dominated nearly all aspects of cloud dynamics, from the initial collapse of the clouds right through to the formation of disks/tori around young stars in these low to intermediate mass star forming clouds of the Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Perseus.

  17. Venus ionospheric 'clouds' - Relationship to the magnetosheath field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic field control of Venus plasma 'clouds' relative to the planet has been analyzed by rotating the observed locations of the clouds into a coordinate system in which all of the transverse upstream magnetic fields were aligned. The results indicate that clouds are scattered around the periphery of the planet in the terminator plane. There is no evidence of a concentration of clouds where the magnetosheath magnetic field is most strongly 'draped'. On the other hand, statistics show that the change in the orientation of the transverse upstream magnetic field between the inbound and outbound bow shock crossings, for the orbits where clouds are seen is about 30 deg greater than the average upstream change at Venus over the same time intervals.

  18. Venus ionospheric 'clouds' - Relationship to the magnetosheath field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic field control of Venus plasma 'clouds' relative to the planet has been analyzed by rotating the observed locations of the clouds into a coordinate system in which all of the transverse upstream magnetic fields were aligned. The results indicate that clouds are scattered around the periphery of the planet in the terminator plane. There is no evidence of a concentration of clouds where the magnetosheath magnetic field is most strongly 'draped'. On the other hand, statistics show that the change in the orientation of the transverse upstream magnetic field between the inbound and outbound bow shock crossings, for the orbits where clouds are seen is about 30 deg greater than the average upstream change at Venus over the same time intervals.

  19. Rotating regular black hole solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    Based on the Newman-Janis algorithm, the Ayón-Beato-García spacetime metric [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5056 (1998)] of the regular spherically symmetric, static, and charged black hole has been converted into rotational form. It is shown that the derived solution for rotating a regular black hole is regular and the critical value of the electric charge for which two horizons merge into one sufficiently decreases in the presence of the nonvanishing rotation parameter a of the black hole.

  20. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  2. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  3. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  4. First constraints on the magnetic field strength in extra-Galactic stars: FORS2 observations of Of?p stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnulo, S.; Nazé, Y.; Howarth, I. D.; Morrell, N.; Vink, J. S.; Wade, G. A.; Walborn, N.; Romaniello, M.; Barbá, R.

    2017-05-01

    Massive O-type stars play a dominant role in our Universe, but many of their properties remain poorly constrained. In the last decade magnetic fields have been detected in all Galactic members of the distinctive Of?p class, opening the door to a better knowledge of all O-type stars. With the aim of extending the study of magnetic massive stars to nearby galaxies, to better understand the role of metallicity in the formation of their magnetic fields and magnetospheres, and to broaden our knowledge of the role of magnetic fields in massive star evolution, we carried out spectropolarimetry of five extra-Galactic Of?p stars, and of a couple of dozen neighbouring stars. We were able to measure magnetic fields with typical error bars from 0.2 to 1.0 kG, depending on the apparent magnitude and on weather conditions. No magnetic field was firmly detected in any of our measurements, but we were able to estimate upper limits on the field values of our target stars. One of our targets, 2dFS 936, exhibited an unexpected strengthening of emission lines. We confirm the unusual behaviour of BI 57, which exhibits a 787 d period with two photometric peaks and one spectroscopic maximum. The observed strengthening of the emission lines of 2dFS 936, and the lack of detection of a strong magnetic field in a star with such strong emission lines is at odd with expectations. Together with the unusual periodic behaviour of BI 57, it represents a challenge for the current models of Of?p stars. The limited precision that we obtained in our field measurements (in most cases as a consequence of poor weather) has led to field-strength upper limits that are substantially larger than those typically measured in Galactic magnetic O stars. Further higher precision observations and monitoring are clearly required.

  5. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARTRAND, RICK

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  6. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Shangping, Ren; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Timm, Steven; Bernabeu, Gerard; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin; Noh, Seo-Young

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  7. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2013-06-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the "large p small n" setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required.

  8. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197

  9. Filamentary structure in the Orion molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.; Bally, J.; Langer, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    A large scale 13CO map (containing 33,000 spectra) of the giant molecular cloud located in the southern part of Orion is presented which contains the Orion Nebula, NGC1977, and the LI641 dark cloud complex. The overall structure of the cloud is filamentary, with individual features having a length up to 40 times their width. This morphology may result from the effects of star formation in the region or embedded magnetic fields in the cloud. We suggest a simple picture for the evolution of the Orion-A cloud and the formation of the major filament. A rotating proto-cloud (counter rotating with respect to the galaxy) contians a b-field aligned with the galaxtic plane. The northern protion of this cloud collapsed first, perhaps triggered by the pressure of the Ori I OB association. The magnetic field combined with the anisotropic pressure produced by the OB-association breaks the symmetry of the pancake instability, a filament rather than a disc is produced. The growth of instabilities in the filament formed sub-condensations which are recent sites of star formation.

  10. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  11. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  12. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  13. Reviewing Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Lopez, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    The star formation process involves a wide range of spatial scales, densities and temperatures. Herschel observations of the cold and low density molecular gas extending tens of parsecs, that constitutes the bulk of the molecular clouds of the Milky Way, have shown a network of dense structures in the shape of filaments. These filaments supposedly condense into higher density clumps to form individual stars or stellar clusters. The study of the kinematics of the filaments through single-dish observations suggests the presence of gas flows along the filaments, oscillatory motions due to gravity infall, and the existence of substructure inside filaments that may be threaded by twisted fibers. A few molecular clouds have been mapped with interferometric resolutions bringing more insight into the filament structure. Compression due to large-scale supersonic flows is the preferred mechanism to explain filament formation although the exact nature of the filaments, their origin and evolution are still not well understood. Determining the turbulence drivers behind the origin of the filaments, the relative importance of turbulence, gravity and magnetic fields on regulating the filament structure and evolution, and providing detailed insight on the substructure inside the filaments are among the current open questions in this research area.

  14. POLARIZATION STRUCTURE OF FILAMENTARY CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-07-01

    Filaments are considered to be basic structures, and molecular clouds consist of filaments. Filaments are often observed as extending in the direction perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field. The structure of filaments has been studied based on a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium model. Here we simulate the expected polarization pattern for isothermal magnetohydrostatic filaments. The filament exhibits a polarization pattern in which the magnetic field is apparently perpendicular to the filament when observed from the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. When the line of sight is parallel to the global magnetic field, the observed polarization pattern is dependent on the center-to-surface density ratio for the filament and the concentration of the gas mass toward the central magnetic flux tube. Filaments with low center-to-surface density ratios have an insignificant degree of polarization when observed from the direction parallel to the global magnetic field. However, models with a large center-to-surface density ratio have polarization patterns that indicate that the filament is perpendicularly threaded by the magnetic field. When mass is heavily concentrated at the central magnetic flux tube, which can be realized by the ambipolar diffusion process, the polarization pattern is similar to that expected for a low center-to-surface density contrast.

  15. Stabilization functions of unforced cumulus clouds - Their nature and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and the spatial distribution of cumuli within an unforced cumulus cloud field are investigated. The thermodynamic effects of convection are quantified as functions of changes of convective available potential energy (CAPE) induced by the convective overturning, and the time rate of change of CAPE is parameterized in terms of a kernel of influence or stabilization function. A three-dimensional cloud model is used to infer and quantify stabilization functions by performing single-cloud experiments. On the basis of the results obtained, a new hypothesis with respect to the spatial distribution of cumuli is postulated, which states that, under completely homogeneous external conditions and assuming a spatially random distribution of cloud-triggering mechanisms, the spatial distribution of cumuli in the resulting cloud field must be regular, as opposed to either random or clustered, because cumulus clouds tend to reduce the available energy for convection, thereby inhibiting further convection nearby.

  16. The Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marochnik, Leonid S.; Mukhin, Lev M.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    1991-01-01

    Views of the large-scale structure of the solar system, consisting of the Sun, the nine planets and their satellites, changed when Oort demonstrated that a gigantic cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) is located on the periphery of the solar system. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the Oort cloud's mass; (2) Hill's cloud mass; (3) angular momentum distribution in the solar system; and (4) the cometary cloud around other stars.

  17. Jovian clouds and haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Friedson, A. James; Banfield, Don; Ragent, Boris; Taylor, Fred W.

    Tropospheric clouds: thermochemical equilibrium theory and cloud microphysical theory, condensate cloud microphysics, tropospheric cloud and haze distribution - observations, results from the Galileo probe experiments, Galileo NIMS observations and results, Galileo SSE observations and results, recent analyses of ground-based and HST data; Tropospheric clouds and haze: optical and physical properties: partical composition, particle optical properties, size and shape, chromophores; Stratospheric haze: particle distribution, optical properties, size and shape, particle formation.

  18. Word regularity affects orthographic learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Chen; Castles, Anne; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2012-01-01

    Share's self-teaching hypothesis proposes that orthographic representations are acquired via phonological decoding. A key, yet untested, prediction of this theory is that there should be an effect of word regularity on the number and quality of word-specific orthographic representations that children acquire. Thirty-four Grade 2 children were exposed to the sound and meaning of eight novel words and were then presented with those words in written form in short stories. Half the words were assigned regular pronunciations and half irregular pronunciations. Lexical decision and spelling tasks conducted 10 days later revealed that the children's orthographic representations of the regular words appeared to be stronger and more extensive than those of the irregular words.

  19. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Heavy water ice clouds almost completely obscure the surface in Vastitas Borealis.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 69.5, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  1. Pellet cloud characterisation, scaling and estimation of the material- and temperature distribution inside the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseh, G.; Kocsis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Plöckl, B.; Szepesi, T.; Veres, G.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    Using spatially calibrated images of fast visible cameras, a database was established containing pellet cloud images and the related pellet- and plasma parameters. Using this database, two scalings were derived for the cloud size along the magnetic field lines as a function of pellet speed and ablation rate (first case) and pellet speed, pellet volume, plasma temperature and plasma density (second case). Using the images—based on the number of radiation maxima—the four main cloud shapes were also categorized. The isotope effect (the effect of hydrogen pellets in hydrogen or helium plasma) was also investigated with particular attention devoted to the cloud characteristics. Finally, a synthetic diagnostic—which simulates the measurement system and produces a synthetic pellet cloud image based on the output of the pellet cloud simulation—was developed to reveal the underlying density- and temperature distributions of the observed pellet cloud images. Using this synthetic diagnostic, one of the main identified cloud shapes was reconstructed. Our goal is to derive a scaling law for the toroidal extension of the pellet cloud at different pellet- and plasma conditions, to give a more reliable input for the pellet ELM triggering simulations and using these two results—a better understanding of the pellet-caused pressure perturbation.

  2. Pion Cloud and the Sea of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2009-05-01

    I review recent progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon sea and the role of the nucleon's pion cloud. In particular, I discuss the consequences of the pion cloud for the d-bar - u-bar asymmetry in the proton, the neutron's electric form factor, and the proton's electric to magnetic form factor ratio.

  3. On the hydrodynamic interaction of shock waves with interstellar clouds. 1: Nonradiative shocks in small clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Richard I.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Colella, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is inhomogeneous, with clouds of various temperatures and densities embedded in a tenuous intercloud medium. Shocks propagating through the ISM can ablate or destroy the clouds, at the same time significantly altering the properties of the intercloud medium. This paper presents a comprehensive numerical study of the simplest case of the interaction between a shock wave and a spherical cloud, in which the shock far from the cloud is steady and planar, and in which radiative losses, thermal conduction, magnetic fields, and gravitational forces are all neglected. As a result, the problem is completely specified by two numbers: the Mach number of the shock, M, and the ratio of the density of the cloud to that of the intercloud medium, Chi. For strong shocks we show that the dependence on M scales out, so the primary independent parameter is Chi. Variations from this simple case are also considered: the potential effect of radiative losses is assessed by calculations in which the ratio of specific heats in the cloud is 1.1 instead of 5/3; the effect of the initial shape of the cloud is studied by using a cylindrical cloud instead of a spherical one; and the role of the initial shock is determined by considering the case of a cloud embedded in a wind. Local adaptive mesh refinement techniques with a second-order, two-fluid, two-dimensional Godunov hydrodynamic scheme are used to address these problems, allowing heretofore unobtainable numerical resolution. Convergence studies to be described in a subsequent paper demonstrate that about 100 zones per cloud radius are needed for accurate results; previous calculations have generally used about a third of this number. The results of the calculations are analyzed in terms of global quantities which provide an overall description of te shocked cloud: the size and shape of the cloud, the mean density, the mean pressure, the mean velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the total circulation.

  4. On the hydrodynamic interaction of shock waves with interstellar clouds. 1: Nonradiative shocks in small clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Richard I.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Colella, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is inhomogeneous, with clouds of various temperatures and densities embedded in a tenuous intercloud medium. Shocks propagating through the ISM can ablate or destroy the clouds, at the same time significantly altering the properties of the intercloud medium. This paper presents a comprehensive numerical study of the simplest case of the interaction between a shock wave and a spherical cloud, in which the shock far from the cloud is steady and planar, and in which radiative losses, thermal conduction, magnetic fields, and gravitational forces are all neglected. As a result, the problem is completely specified by two numbers: the Mach number of the shock, M, and the ratio of the density of the cloud to that of the intercloud medium, Chi. For strong shocks we show that the dependence on M scales out, so the primary independent parameter is Chi. Variations from this simple case are also considered: the potential effect of radiative losses is assessed by calculations in which the ratio of specific heats in the cloud is 1.1 instead of 5/3; the effect of the initial shape of the cloud is studied by using a cylindrical cloud instead of a spherical one; and the role of the initial shock is determined by considering the case of a cloud embedded in a wind. Local adaptive mesh refinement techniques with a second-order, two-fluid, two-dimensional Godunov hydrodynamic scheme are used to address these problems, allowing heretofore unobtainable numerical resolution. Convergence studies to be described in a subsequent paper demonstrate that about 100 zones per cloud radius are needed for accurate results; previous calculations have generally used about a third of this number. The results of the calculations are analyzed in terms of global quantities which provide an overall description of te shocked cloud: the size and shape of the cloud, the mean density, the mean pressure, the mean velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the total circulation.

  5. Resource Guide for Regular Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampert, George J.

    The resource guide for regular teachers provides policies and procedures of the Flour Bluff (Texas) school district regarding special education of handicapped students. Individual sections provide guidelines for the following areas: the referral process; individual assessment; participation on student evaluation and placement committee; special…

  6. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  7. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  8. Giftedness in the Regular Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Anne

    This paper presents a rationale for serving gifted students in the regular classroom and offers guidelines for recognizing students who are gifted in the seven types of intelligence proposed by Howard Gardner. Stressed is the importance of creating in the classroom a community of learners that allows all children to actively explore ideas and…

  9. Rotations of the Regular Polyhedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, MaryClara; Soto-Johnson, Hortensia

    2006-01-01

    The study of the rotational symmetries of the regular polyhedra is important in the classroom for many reasons. Besides giving the students an opportunity to visualize in three dimensions, it is also an opportunity to relate two-dimensional and three-dimensional concepts. For example, rotations in R[superscript 2] require a point and an angle of…

  10. Regularization of Localized Degradation Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-28

    order to assess the regularization properties of non-classical micropolar Cosserat continua which feature non-symmetric stress and strain tensors because...of the presence of couple-stresses and micro-curvatures. It was shown that micropolar media may only exhibit localized failure in the form of tensile

  11. Research on cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Lingsong; Su, Wei; Wang, Can; Zhang, Changfan

    2015-02-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as cloud storage, cloud push, mobile computing allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud service. Combined with the thought of cloud computing, this paper presents a cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system. This system mainly consists of three parts: signal acquisition client, web server deployed on the cloud service, and remote client. This system is a special website developed using asp.net and Flex RIA technology, which solves the selective contradiction between two monitoring modes, B/S and C/S. This platform supplies customer condition monitoring and data analysis service by Internet, which was deployed on the cloud server. Signal acquisition device is responsible for data (sensor data, audio, video, etc.) collection and pushes the monitoring data to the cloud storage database regularly. Data acquisition equipment in this system is only conditioned with the function of data collection and network function such as smartphone and smart sensor. This system's scale can adjust dynamically according to the amount of applications and users, so it won't cause waste of resources. As a representative case study, we developed a prototype system based on Ali cloud service using the rotor test rig as the research object. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system architecture is feasible.

  12. On the virial theorem for turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian, rather than Lagrangian, form of the virial theorem is derived for a turbulent, magnetized cloud embedded in a steady, turbulent, low-density intercloud medium. The role of turbulent pressure in cloud confinement is clarified, and it is shown that, in the absence of a magnetic field, a cloud can be at a somewhat lower pressure than the intercloud medium. Simple forms for the magnetic term in the virial equation are obtained. Radiation pressure is considered; its effects are relatively small under average conditions in the interstellar medium. Under typical conditions, external pressure and magnetic fields are shown to have a relatively small effect on virial estimates of the mass of self-gravitating clouds.

  13. On the virial theorem for turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian, rather than Lagrangian, form of the virial theorem is derived for a turbulent, magnetized cloud embedded in a steady, turbulent, low-density intercloud medium. The role of turbulent pressure in cloud confinement is clarified, and it is shown that, in the absence of a magnetic field, a cloud can be at a somewhat lower pressure than the intercloud medium. Simple forms for the magnetic term in the virial equation are obtained. Radiation pressure is considered; its effects are relatively small under average conditions in the interstellar medium. Under typical conditions, external pressure and magnetic fields are shown to have a relatively small effect on virial estimates of the mass of self-gravitating clouds.

  14. Limits to Cloud Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, James A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    1-kilometer AVHRR observations of ship tracks in low-level clouds off the west coast of the U S. were used to determine limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases in anthropogenic aerosols. Hundreds of tracks were analyzed to determine whether the changes in droplet radii, visible optical depths, and cloud top altitudes that result from the influx of particles from underlying ships were consistent with expectations based on simple models for the indirect effect of aerosols. The models predict substantial increases in sunlight reflected by polluted clouds due to the increases in droplet numbers and cloud liquid water that result from the elevated particle concentrations. Contrary to the model predictions, the analysis of ship tracks revealed a 15-20% reduction in liquid water for the polluted clouds. Studies performed with a large-eddy cloud simulation model suggested that the shortfall in cloud liquid water found in the satellite observations might be attributed to the restriction that the 1-kilometer pixels be completely covered by either polluted or unpolluted cloud. The simulation model revealed that a substantial fraction of the indirect effect is caused by a horizontal redistribution of cloud water in the polluted clouds. Cloud-free gaps in polluted clouds fill in with cloud water while the cloud-free gaps in the surrounding unpolluted clouds remain cloud-free. By limiting the analysis to only overcast pixels, the current study failed to account for the gap-filling predicted by the simulation model. This finding and an analysis of the spatial variability of marine stratus suggest new ways to analyze ship tracks to determine the limit to which particle pollution will alter the amount of sunlight reflected by clouds.

  15. Temporal regularity in speech perception: Is regularity beneficial or deleterious?

    PubMed

    Geiser, Eveline; Shattuck-Hufnagel, Stefanie

    2012-04-01

    Speech rhythm has been proposed to be of crucial importance for correct speech perception and language learning. This study investigated the influence of speech rhythm in second language processing. German pseudo-sentences were presented to participants in two conditions: 'naturally regular speech rhythm' and an 'emphasized regular rhythm'. Nine expert English speakers with 3.5±1.6 years of German training repeated each sentence after hearing it once over headphones. Responses were transcribed using the International Phonetic Alphabet and analyzed for the number of correct, false and missing consonants as well as for consonant additions. The over-all number of correct reproductions of consonants did not differ between the two experimental conditions. However, speech rhythmicization significantly affected the serial position curve of correctly reproduced syllables. The results of this pilot study are consistent with the view that speech rhythm is important for speech perception.

  16. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  17. Construction of regular black holes in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Wang, Xiaobao

    2016-12-01

    We present a general procedure for constructing exact black hole solutions with electric or magnetic charges in general relativity coupled to a nonlinear electrodynamics. We obtain a variety of two-parameter family spherically symmetric black hole solutions. In particular, the singularity at the center of the space-time can be canceled in the parameter space and the black hole solutions become regular everywhere in space-time. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics. We also generalize the procedure to include a cosmological constant and construct regular black hole solutions that are asymptotic to anti-de Sitter space-time.

  18. Gamma rays from giant molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; Kanbach, Gottfried

    1990-01-01

    Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) are massive, bounded, cool, dense regions containing mostly H2, but also H I, CO, and other molecules. These clouds occupy less than 1 percent of the galactic volume, but are a substantial part of the interstellar mass. They are irradiated by the high energy cosmic rays which are possibly modulated by the matter and magnetic fields within the clouds. The product of cosmic-ray flux and matter density is traced by the emission of high energy gamma-rays. A spherical cloud model is considered and the gamma ray flux from several GMCs within 1 kpc of the sun which should be detectable by the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) instrument on GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory).

  19. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  20. Localizing the Frequency x Regularity Word Reading Interaction in the Cerebral Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Sarty, Gordon E.; Borowsky, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to combine behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to advance our knowledge of where the Frequency x Regularity interaction on word naming is located in the cerebral cortex. Participants named high and low frequency, regular and exception words in a behavioural lab (Experiment 1) and during an fMRI…

  1. Localizing the Frequency x Regularity Word Reading Interaction in the Cerebral Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Sarty, Gordon E.; Borowsky, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to combine behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to advance our knowledge of where the Frequency x Regularity interaction on word naming is located in the cerebral cortex. Participants named high and low frequency, regular and exception words in a behavioural lab (Experiment 1) and during an fMRI…

  2. Regular Motions of Resonant Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se revisan resultados analiticos relativos a soluciones regulares del problema asteroidal eliptico promediados en la vecindad de una resonancia con jupiten Mencionamos Ia ley de estructura para libradores de alta excentricidad, la estabilidad de los centros de liberaci6n, las perturbaciones forzadas por la excentricidad de jupiter y las 6rbitas de corotaci6n. ABSTRAC This paper reviews analytical results concerning the regular solutions of the elliptic asteroidal problem averaged in the neighbourhood of a resonance with jupiter. We mention the law of structure for high-eccentricity librators, the stability of the libration centers, the perturbations forced by the eccentricity ofjupiter and the corotation orbits. Key words: ASThROIDS

  3. Energy functions