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Sample records for regular magnetic clouds

  1. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  2. Enhanced Cloud Disruption by Magnetic Field Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gregori; Miniati; Ryu; Jones

    1999-12-20

    We present results from the first three-dimensional numerical simulations of moderately supersonic cloud motion through a tenuous, magnetized medium. We show that the interaction of the cloud with a magnetic field perpendicular to its motion has a great dynamical impact on the development of instabilities at the cloud surface. Even for initially spherical clouds, magnetic field lines become trapped in surface deformations and undergo stretching. The consequent field amplification that occurs there and, in particular, its variation across the cloud face then dramatically enhance the growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor unstable modes, hastening the cloud disruption.

  3. Study of an expanding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakwacki, M. S.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.

    Magnetic Clouds (MCs) transport into the interplanetary medium the magnetic flux and helicity released in coronal mass ejections by the Sun. At 1 AU from the Sun, MCs are generally modelled as static flux ropes. However, the velocity profile of some MCs presents signatures of expansion. We analise here the magnetic structure of an expanding magnetic cloud observed by Wind spacecraft. We consider a dynamical model, based on a self-similar behaviour for the cloud radial velocity. We assume a free expansion for the cloud, and a cylindrical linear force free field (i.e., the Lundquist's field) as the initial condition for its magnetic configuration. We derive theoretical expressions for the magnetic flux across a surface perpendicular to the cloud axis, for the magnetic helicity and magnetic energy per unit length along the tube using the self-similar model. Finally, we compute these magntitudes with the fitted parameters. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  4. Ionospheric Geo-effectiveness of Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T. J.; Knipp, D. J.; Lynch, B.; Zurbuchen, T.; McHarg, M. G.; Chun, F. K.

    2002-12-01

    We present an analysis of the geo-effectiveness of magnetic clouds and the disturbed solar wind surrounding them. Estimates of the ionospheric Joule heating rates based on two ground magnetic indices and estimates of auroral zone particle heating from polar satellites will be combined to provide a summary of the total geomagnetic heating during magnetic cloud passage. Preliminary estimates suggest that intervals of magnetic cloud passage experience about 50 percent greater heating rates than intervals associated with the more general class of interplanetary coronal mass ejection. Heating rates for magnetic clouds are about four times greater than heating rates estimated for intervals of background slow solar wind flow. Preliminary work also indicates that magnetic clouds lying in the ecliptic plane (leading or trailing fields oriented N-S or S-N) have heating rates about 50 percent greater than clouds with leading or trailing fields perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. We will provide hourly heating profiles for more than 50 magnetic clouds passing the earth during the rise and peak of solar cycle 23.

  5. Magnetic diffusion in clumpy molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, B. G.; Combes, F.

    1992-06-01

    Magnetic diffusion in a clumpy cloud is slower than in a uniform cloud with the same average density and field strength, by the square root of the clump filling factor, f. This implies that giant molecular clouds can maintain their supporting magnetic fields for at least 6/sq rt f free fall times, while allowing a moderate rate of star formation in the dense cores. The f dependence also implies that clouds or cloud cores larger than a thermal Jeans mass will lose their flux more slowly compared to the free-fall time than smaller cores because the larger regions have supersonic virialized motions, and this inevitably leads to small scale clumpy structure by nonlinear effects. Thus star formation may proceed rapidly via diffusion in uniform cores that have primarily thermal motions (large f), while the surrounding clumpy cloud can be supported by the field for a relatively long time (small f). The slower magnetic diffusion rate for clumpy clouds compared to uniform clouds also affects the local heating rate for neutral gas in a shock, giving more of a J-type than C-type structure by shortening the magnetic precursor and causing clump collisions at speeds exceeding the internal Alfven speed.

  6. Evolutionary Models of Cold, Magnetized, Interstellar Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Ostriker, Eve; Stone, James M.

    2004-01-01

    We modeled the long-term and small-scale evolution of molecular clouds using direct 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This work followed up on previous research by our group under auspices of the ATP in which we studied the energetics of turbulent, magnetized clouds and their internal structure on intermediate scales. Our new work focused on both global and smallscale aspects of the evolution of turbulent, magnetized clouds, and in particular studied the response of turbulent proto-cloud material to passage through the Galactic spiral potential, and the dynamical collapse of turbulent, magnetized (supercritical) clouds into fragments to initiate the formation of a stellar cluster. Technical advances under this program include developing an adaptive-mesh MHD code as a successor to ZEUS (ATHENA) in order to follow cloud fragmentation, developing a shearing-sheet MHD code which includes self-gravity and externally-imposed gravity to follow the evolution of clouds in the Galactic potential, and developing radiative transfer models to evaluate the internal ionization of clumpy clouds exposed to external photoionizing UV and CR radiation. Gammie's work at UIUC focused on the radiative transfer aspects of this program.

  7. Exploring Regularities for Improving FAÇADE Reconstruction from Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Gorte, B.; Zlatanova, S.

    2016-06-01

    (Semi)-automatic facade reconstruction from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds is often affected by both quality of point cloud itself and imperfectness of object recognition algorithms. In this paper, we employ regularities, which exist on façades, to mitigate these problems. For example, doors, windows and balconies often have orthogonal and parallel boundaries. Many windows are constructed with the same shape. They may be arranged at the same lines and distance intervals, so do different windows. By identifying regularities among objects with relatively poor quality, these can be applied to calibrate the objects and improve their quality. The paper focuses on the regularities among the windows, which is the majority of objects on the wall. Regularities are classified into three categories: within an individual window, among similar windows and among different windows. Nine cases are specified as a reference for exploration. A hierarchical clustering method is employed to identify and apply regularities in a feature space, where regularities can be identified from clusters. To find the corresponding features in the nine cases of regularities, two phases are distinguished for similar and different windows. In the first phase, ICP (iterative closest points) is used to identify groups of similar windows. The registered points and a number of transformation matrices are used to identify and apply regularities among similar windows. In the second phase, features are extracted from the boundaries of the different windows. When applying regularities by relocating windows, the connections, called chains, established among the similar windows in the first phase are preserved. To test the performance of the algorithms, two datasets from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds are used. Both show good effects on the reconstructed model, while still matching with original point cloud, preventing over or under-regularization.

  8. Magnetic clouds and force-free fields with constant alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic clouds observed at 1 AU are modeled as cylindrically symmetric, constant alpha force-free magnetic fields. The model satisfactorily explains the types of variations of the magnetic field direction that are observed as a magnetic cloud moves past a spacecraft in terms of the possible orientations of the axis of a magnetic cloud. The model also explains why the magnetic field strength is observed to be higher inside a magnetic cloud than near its boundaries. However, the model predicts that the magnetic field strength profile should be symmetric with respect to the axis of the magnetic cloud, whereas observations show that this is not generally the case.

  9. Comment on the polarity of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Lee, L.-C.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    The initial description of magnetic clouds by Klein and Burlaga (1982) and the models that have been developed for their representation (e.g., by Goldstein, 1983) are examined. The results show that a definition of the cloud's polarity only in terms of the Bz component of the IMF is not always correct. It is suggested that, for the description polarities of quasi-transverse and quasi-parallel clouds, a combination of directions in the Bz and By components of the IMF should be used.

  10. A regularization method for extrapolation of solar potential magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical basis of a Tikhonov regularization method for extrapolating the chromospheric-coronal magnetic field using photospheric vector magnetograms is discussed. The basic techniques show that the Cauchy initial value problem can be formulated for potential magnetic fields. The potential field analysis considers a set of linear, elliptic partial differential equations. It is found that, by introducing an appropriate smoothing of the initial data of the Cauchy potential problem, an approximate Fourier integral solution is found, and an upper bound to the error in the solution is derived. This specific regularization technique, which is a function of magnetograph measurement sensitivities, provides a method to extrapolate the potential magnetic field above an active region into the chromosphere and low corona.

  11. Solar Wind Quasi-invariant for Slow and Fast Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Alla; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir

    2012-04-01

    The solar wind quasi-invariant (QI) has been defined by Osherovich, Fainberg, and Stone ( Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 2597, 1999) as the ratio of magnetic energy density and the energy density of the solar wind flow. In the regular solar wind QI is a rather small number, since the energy of the flow is almost two orders of magnitude greater than the magnetic energy. However, in magnetic clouds, QI is the order of unity (less than 1) and thus magnetic clouds can be viewed as a great anomaly in comparison with its value in the background solar wind. We study the duration, extent, and amplitude of this anomaly for two groups of isolated magnetic clouds: slow clouds (360< v<450 km s-1) and fast clouds (450≤ v<720 km s-1). By applying the technique of superposition of epochs to 12 slow and 12 fast clouds from the catalog of Richardson and Cane ( Solar Phys. 264, 189, 2010), we create an average slow cloud and an average fast cloud observed at 1 AU. From our analysis of these average clouds, we obtain cloud boundaries in both time and space as well as differences in QI amplitude and other parameters characterizing the solar wind state. Interplanetary magnetic clouds are known to cause major magnetic storms at the Earth, especially those clouds which travel from the sun to the Earth at high speeds. Characterizing each magnetic cloud by its QI value and extent may help in understanding the role of those disturbances in producing geomagnetic activity.

  12. Influence of magnetic clouds on cosmic ray intensity variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    BADRUDDIN; Yadav, R. S.; Yadav, N. R.; Agrawal, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitor data has been analyzed to study the nature of galactic cosmic ray transient modulation associated with three types of interplanetary magnetic clouds - clouds associated with shocks, stream interfaces and cold magnetic enhancements.

  13. Ionospheric Current Systems Under Magnetic Cloud Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Rostoker, G.; Sun, W.; Du, A.; Lui, T.

    2005-12-01

    During magnetic clouds the solar wind has properties of low plasma beta, intense magnetic field, smooth north-south (or south-north) magnetic field polarity reversals, and a general absence of Alfven waves and discontinuities. The earth's magnetospheric and ionospheric convection velocities significantly increase during periods of southward IMF within magnetic clouds. At high latitudes, a two-cell convection pattern develops that can be quantitatively described by the DP2 equivalent current system. Under certain circumstances, "sawtooth" events occur featuring quasi-periodic substorm expansion phase activity in which westward electrojets (i.e., equivalent DP1 current) appear in the midnight sector in association with each substorm expansion phase. By studying the April 18, 2002 "sawtooth" event, we show how the DP2 and DP1 current systems develop during a smooth southward IMF interval within the magnetic cloud. With an absence of external triggering, the occurrence of quasi-periodic substorm expansion onsets suggests that this "sawtooth" event may be a result of magnetospheric self-regulation. We also discuss the corresponding energy transfer from the magnetotail where the tail magnetic field intensity is seen to vary quasi-periodically.

  14. A Study of Geoeffective Magnetic Clouds in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Alisson Dal

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are interplanetary structures whose origins are related to Coronal Mass Ejections (CUE). Their features are: strong magnetic field intensity (typically > 10nT (nano Tesla)), a large rotation in the magnetic field angle as the cloud crosses the spacecraft, low proton temperature and Beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) values (approximately 0.1). For a set of previously published magnetic cloud events and another set of clouds identified in the whole year of 1979 we present a study of plasma and magnetic field parameters. We have shown the existence of a relationship between the peak magnetic field strength and peak velocity value of the cloud, with a tendency that clouds which move at higher speeds also possess higher core magnetic field strengths. There is also an indication that this relationship is peculiar to magnetic clouds, whereas other types of non-cloud driver gas, or ICME , events do not seam to show a similar relationship. Both parameters, velocity and magnetic field strength, are related to Magnetic Storms. It is also addressed the interaction between magnetic clouds and other features in the interplanetary medium by calculating the Total Static Pressure, Magnetic plus Thermal, and the Dynamic Pressure relative to other structures surrounding the cloud, investigating their possible relation to magnetic cloud field enhancement. This work contributes to: (1) Space Weather Forecasting, through the calculation of the magnetic cloud field strengths by knowing their velocities (the latter can be remotely measured by sequences of coronograph images); (2) the study of the relation between magnetic clouds and magnetic storms; and (3) the study of the interaction between magnetic clouds and other interplanetary structures surrounding it.

  15. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  16. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds was studied. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3 percent in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the post-shock region although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events.

  17. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  18. Numerical simulations of a shock interacting with multiple magnetized clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    We present 2D adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a shock interacting with groups of two or three cylindrical clouds. We study how the presence of a nearby cloud influences the dynamics of this interaction, and explore the resulting differences and similarities in the evolution of each cloud. The understanding gained from this small-scale study will help to interpret the behaviour of systems with many 10s or 100s of clouds. We observe a wide variety of behaviour in the interactions studied, which is dependent on the initial positions of the clouds and the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. We find (i) some clouds are stretched along their field lines, whereas others are confined by their field lines; (ii) upstream clouds may accelerate past downstream clouds (though magnetic tension can prevent this); (iii) clouds may also change their relative positions transverse to the direction of shock propagation as they `slingshot' past each other; (iv) downstream clouds may be offered some protection from the oncoming flow as a result of being in the lee of an upstream cloud; (v) the cycle of cloud compression and re-expansion is generally weaker when there are nearby neighbouring clouds; (vi) the plasma β in cloud material can vary rapidly as clouds collide with one another, but low values of β are always transitory. This work is relevant to studies of multiphase regions, where fast, low-density gas interacts with dense clouds, such as in circumstellar bubbles, supernova remnants, superbubbles and galactic winds.

  19. Bias correction for magnetic resonance images via joint entropy regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Dong, Pei; Luo, Jianhua; Huang, Qiu; Feng, Dagan; Li, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Due to the imperfections of the radio frequency (RF) coil or object-dependent electrodynamic interactions, magnetic resonance (MR) images often suffer from a smooth and biologically meaningless bias field, which causes severe troubles for subsequent processing and quantitative analysis. To effectively restore the original signal, this paper simultaneously exploits the spatial and gradient features of the corrupted MR images for bias correction via the joint entropy regularization. With both isotropic and anisotropic total variation (TV) considered, two nonparametric bias correction algorithms have been proposed, namely IsoTVBiasC and AniTVBiasC. These two methods have been applied to simulated images under various noise levels and bias field corruption and also tested on real MR data. The test results show that the proposed two methods can effectively remove the bias field and also present comparable performance compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Magnetic clouds, helicity conservation, and intrinsic scale flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Rust, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic-scale flux-rope model for interplanetary magnetic clouds, incorporating conservation of magnetic helicity, flux and mass is found to adequately explain clouds' average thermodynamic and magnetic properties. In spite their continuous expansion as they balloon into interplanetary space, magnetic clouds maintain high temperatures. This is shown to be due to magnetic energy dissipation. The temperature of an expanding cloud is shown to pass through a maximum above its starting temperature if the initial plasma beta in the cloud is less than 2/3. Excess magnetic pressure inside the cloud is not an important driver of the expansion as it is almost balanced by the tension in the helical field lines. It is conservation of magnetic helicity and flux that requires that clouds expand radially as they move away from the Sun. Comparison with published data shows good agreement between measured cloud properties and theory. Parameters determined from theoretical fits to the data, when extended back to the Sun, are consistent with the origin of interplanetary magnetic clouds in solar filament eruptions. A possible extension of the heating mechanism discussed here to heating of the solar corona is discussed.

  1. Magnetic clouds, geomagnetic disturbances, and cosmic ray decreases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, G.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    Nineteen magnetic clouds are identified in the years from 1978 through 1982 and studied using superposed epoch analysis. The magnetic-field intensity, proton density and proton temperature are enhanced ahead of magnetic clouds that are preceded by shock, while strong magnetic-field intensity and low proton temperature are observed within the clouds. A relatively large (about 2.5 percent) decrease in cosmic-ray intensity is associated with magnetic clouds that are preceded by a shock, perhaps caused by the turbulent sheath behind an interplanetary shock ahead of the magnetic cloud, whereas only a small (0.5 percent) decrease in intensity is associated with the magnetic cloud itself. Magnetic clouds can produce geomagnetic activity with a decrease in Dst index of the order 100 gamma. The magnitude of the change in the Dst index for the case when southward fields arrive first is comparable to that for the case when northward fields arrive first, and the phase is such that geomagnetic activity is associated with southward fields.

  2. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-01-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking; six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear; proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients.

  3. Automatic Extraction and Regularization of Building Outlines from Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bastian; Kada, Martin; Wichmann, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Building outlines are needed for various applications like urban planning, 3D city modelling and updating cadaster. Their automatic reconstruction, e.g. from airborne laser scanning data, as regularized shapes is therefore of high relevance. Today's airborne laser scanning technology can produce dense 3D point clouds with high accuracy, which makes it an eligible data source to reconstruct 2D building outlines or even 3D building models. In this paper, we propose an automatic building outline extraction and regularization method that implements a trade-off between enforcing strict shape restriction and allowing flexible angles using an energy minimization approach. The proposed procedure can be summarized for each building as follows: (1) an initial building outline is created from a given set of building points with the alpha shape algorithm; (2) a Hough transform is used to determine the main directions of the building and to extract line segments which are oriented accordingly; (3) the alpha shape boundary points are then repositioned to both follow these segments, but also to respect their original location, favoring long line segments and certain angles. The energy function that guides this trade-off is evaluated with the Viterbi algorithm.

  4. Simulation of Electron Cloud Multipacting in Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A

    2004-01-27

    A simulation algorithm is based on a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the distribution function of an electron cloud density in a cylindrical vacuum chamber with solenoidal magnetic field. The algorithm takes into consideration space charge effects. This approach improves the simulation of multipacting effects as it is free of statistical fluctuations. Simulation studies were carried for the SLAC B-factory vacuum chamber for different bunch patterns and solenoidal field strength. Space charge and the magnetic field limit the maximum density of the electron cloud. Magnetic resonant damping of multipacting was found in special cases of positron beam parameters and magnetic field amplitude.

  5. Magnetized gas clouds can survive acceleration by a hot wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCourt, Michael; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Madigan, Ann-Marie; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-05-01

    We present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetized gas clouds accelerated by hot winds. We initialize gas clouds with tangled internal magnetic fields and show that this field suppresses the disruption of the cloud: rather than mixing into the hot wind as found in hydrodynamic simulations, cloud fragments end up comoving with the external medium and in pressure equilibrium with their surroundings. We also show that a magnetic field in the hot wind enhances the drag force on the cloud by a factor {˜ } (1+vA^2/v_{wind}^2), where vA is the Alfvén speed in the wind and vwind measures the relative speed between the cloud and the wind. We apply this result to gas clouds in several astrophysical contexts, including galaxy clusters, galactic winds, the Galactic Centre, and the outskirts of the Galactic halo. Our results can help explain the prevalence of cool gas in galactic winds and galactic haloes, and how this cool gas survives in spite of its interaction with hot wind/halo gas. We also predict that drag forces can lead to a deviation from Keplerian orbits for gas clouds in the galactic center.

  6. Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields.

    PubMed

    Magnet, C; Kuzhir, P; Bossis, G; Meunier, A; Nave, S; Zubarev, A; Lomenech, C; Bashtovoi, V

    2014-03-01

    When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, the size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in detail. In experiments, a dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50 μm) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces-the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter α≥2), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

  7. Self-similar evolution of interplanetary magnetic clouds and Ulysses measurements of the polytropic index inside the cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Berdichevsky, D.

    1997-01-01

    A self similar model for the expanding flux rope is developed for a magnetohydrodynamic model of interplanetary magnetic clouds. It is suggested that the dependence of the maximum magnetic field on the distance from the sun and the polytropic index gamma has the form B = r exp (-1/gamma), and that the ratio of the electron temperature to the proton temperature increases with distance from the sun. It is deduced that ion acoustic waves should be observed in the cloud. Both predictions were confirmed by Ulysses observations of a 1993 magnetic cloud. Measurements of gamma inside the cloud demonstrate sensitivity to the internal topology of the magnetic field in the cloud.

  8. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; del Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  9. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  10. MAGNETIZED GAS IN THE SMITH HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Mao, S. A.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report the first detection of magnetic fields associated with the Smith High Velocity Cloud. We use a catalog of Faraday rotation measures toward extragalactic radio sources behind the Smith Cloud, new H I observations from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, and a spectroscopic map of Hα from the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey. There are enhancements in rotation measure (RM) of ≈100 rad m{sup –2} which are generally well correlated with decelerated Hα emission. We estimate a lower limit on the line-of-sight component of the field of ≈8 μG along a decelerated filament; this is a lower limit due to our assumptions about the geometry. No RM excess is evident in sightlines dominated by H I or Hα at the velocity of the Smith Cloud. The smooth Hα morphology of the emission at the Smith Cloud velocity suggests photoionization by the Galactic ionizing radiation field as the dominant ionization mechanism, while the filamentary morphology and high (≈1 Rayleigh) Hα intensity of the lower-velocity magnetized ionized gas suggests an ionization process associated with shocks due to interaction with the Galactic interstellar medium. The presence of the magnetic field may contribute to the survival of high velocity clouds like the Smith Cloud as they move from the Galactic halo to the disk. We expect these data to provide a test for magnetohydrodynamic simulations of infalling gas.

  11. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  12. The magnetic field of cloud 3 in L204

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, Lauren R.; Clemens, D. P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The L204 dark cloud complex is a nearby filamentary structure in Ophiuchus North that has no signs of active star formation. Past studies show that L204 is interacting with the nearby runaway O star, ζ Oph, and hosts a magnetic field that is coherent across parsec-length scales. Near-infrared H-band (1.6 μm) linear polarization measurements were obtained for 3896 background stars across a 1° × 1.°5 region centered on the dense Cloud 3 in L204, using the Mimir near-infrared instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins Telescope. Analysis of these observations reveals both large-scale properties and small-scale changes in the magnetic field direction in Cloud 3. In the northern and western ζ Oph facing regions of the cloud, the magnetic field appears to be pushed up against the face of the cloud. This may indicate that the UV flux from ζ Oph has compressed the magnetic field on the western edge of L204. The plane-of-sky magnetic field strength is estimated to be ∼11-26 μG using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The polarimetry data also reveal that the polarization efficiency (PE ≡ P {sub H}/A {sub V}) steadily decreases with distance from ζ Oph (–0.09% ± 0.03% mag{sup –1} pc{sup –1}). Additionally, power-law fits of PE versus A {sub V} for localized samples of probe stars show steeper negative indices with distance from ζ Oph. Both findings highlight the importance of external illumination, here from ζ Oph, in aligning dust grains to embedded magnetic fields.

  13. RESOLVED MAGNETIC FIELD MAPPING OF A MOLECULAR CLOUD USING GPIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, Dan P. E-mail: pavelmi@bu.edu

    2012-08-20

    We present the first resolved map of plane-of-sky magnetic field strength for a quiescent molecular cloud. GRSMC 45.60+0.30 subtends 40 Multiplication-Sign 10 pc at a distance of 1.88 kpc, masses 16,000 M{sub Sun }, and exhibits no star formation. Near-infrared background starlight polarizations were obtained for the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey using the 1.8 m Perkins telescope and the Mimir instrument. The cloud area of 0.78 deg{sup 2} contains 2684 significant starlight polarizations for Two Micron All Sky Survey matched stars brighter than 12.5 mag in the H band. Polarizations are generally aligned with the cloud's major axis, showing an average position angle dispersion of 15 {+-} 2 Degree-Sign and polarization of 1.8 {+-} 0.6%. The polarizations were combined with Galactic Ring Survey {sup 13}CO spectroscopy and the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method to estimate plane-of-sky magnetic field strengths, with an angular resolution of 100 arcsec. The average plane-of-sky magnetic field strength across the cloud is 5.40 {+-} 0.04 {mu}G. The magnetic field strength map exhibits seven enhancements or 'magnetic cores'. These cores show an average magnetic field strength of 8.3 {+-} 0.9 {mu}G, radius of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 pc, intercore spacing of 5.7 {+-} 0.9 pc, and exclusively subcritical mass-to-flux ratios, implying their magnetic fields continue to suppress star formation. The magnetic field strength shows a power-law dependence on gas volume density, with slope 0.75 {+-} 0.02 for n{sub H{sub 2}} {>=}10 cm{sup -3}. This power-law index is identical to those in studies at higher densities, but disagrees with predictions for the densities probed here.

  14. A study of the electric field induced by magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Starting from our magnetic field model for magnetic clouds (MCs), which topologically considers them as cylinders with elliptical cross sections, we present a first attempt in the study of the electric field induced by the movements of magnetic clouds in the interplanetary medium and the expansions of their cross sections. These expansions are included in the model assuming linear time dependence in all the components of the plasma current density. In a previous paper we already determined the magnetic field and current density of our MCs model, and in its development we established that to get it physically consistent, the induced electric field has to be independent of time. In the present work we calculate the expressions for the components of this electric field and fit them to the corresponding experimental data determined from the measurements of the plasma velocity and magnetic field components through the expression $\\vec E$ = -$\\vec v$SW × $\\vec B$. To test the model, we have selected three intense and well-defined magnetic clouds observed in July 2000, November 2003, and May 2005. Until now we think it is one of the first attempts to incorporate this induced electric field in the context of analytical models for the study of MCs.

  15. Magnetic flux rope versus the spheromak as models for interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic clouds form a subset of interplanetary ejecta with well-defined magnetic and thermodynamic properties. Observationally, it is well established that magnetic clouds expand as they propagate antisunward. The aim of this paper is to compare and contrast two models which have been proposed for the global magnetic field line topology of magnetic clouds: a magnetic flux tube geometry, on the one hand, and a spheromak geometry (including possible higher multiples), on the other. Traditionally, the magnetic structure of magnetic clouds has been modeled by force-free configurations. In a first step, we therefore analyze the ability of static force-free models to account for the asymmetries observed in the magnetic field profiles of magnetic clouds. For a cylindrical flux tube the magnetic field remains symmetric about closest approach to the magnetic axis on all spacecraft orbits intersecting it, whereas in a spheromak geometry one can have asymmetries in the magnetic field signatures along some spacecraft trajectories. The duration of typical magnetic cloud encounters at 1 AU (1 to 2 days) is comparable to their travel time from the Sun to 1 AU and thus magnetic clouds should be treated as strongly nonstationary objects. In a second step, therefore, we abandon the static approach and model magnetic clouds as self-similarly evolving MHD configurations. In our theory, the interaction of the expanding magnetic cloud with the ambient plasma is taken into account by a drag force proportional to the density and the velocity of expansion. Solving rigorously the full set of MHD equations, we demonstrate that the asymmetry in the magnetic signature may arise solely as a result of expansion. Using asymptotic solutions of the MHD equations, we least squares fit both theoretical models to interplanetary data. We find that while the central part of the magnetic cloud is adequately described by both models, the 'edges' of the cloud data are modeled better by the magnetic flux

  16. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L. E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  17. Collisions between Dark Matter Confined High Velocity Clouds and Magnetized Galactic Disks: The Smith Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 106M⊙ and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 108, or 1 × 109 M⊙. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 105 M⊙ in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  18. Magnetic cloud passage at Earth and associated substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to the study of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction by signal type, that is, by examining the effect in the magnetosphere of well defined interplanetary structures, is presented. Focus is on the response of the magnetosphere to interplanetary magnetic clouds. Among their properties are: the slow and smooth variation of the magnetic field vector, with fluctuation level well below common interplanetary values; the similarly well behaved bulk flow; the wide range of field and flow parameters; and the longevity of passage (1 to 2 days). If the magnetic cloud is oriented such that a long period of uninterruptedly northward pointing field is followed by a long interval of continuously southward pointing field, then the transition of the magnetosphere from a quiescent state (the 'ground state') to a very active state can be studied, the latter being sustained by continued forcing from the magnetic cloud. A synopsis of the main findings of a recent study in such an interaction is given, concentrating on the substorm activity attending the second part of cloud passage.

  19. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2015-09-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed cs in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with a Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for Pext. Our results correspond to Mcore=1.2cs4 (G3ρ0v02)-1/2 and Rcore=0.34 cs2 (Gρ0v02)-1/2 for ρ0 and v0 the large-scale mean density and velocity. For our parameter range, the median Mcore 0.1-1M⊙, but a very high pressure cloud could have lower characteristic core mass. We find cores and filaments form simultaneously, and filament column densities are a factor of 2 greater than the surrounding cloud when cores first collapse. We also show that cores identified in our simulations have physical properties comparable to those observed in the Perseus cloud. Superthermal cores in our models are generally also magnetically supercritical, suggesting that the same may be true in observed clouds.

  20. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Tan, J. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Carey, S. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  1. Dynamics of a toroidal magnetic cloud in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashets, E. P.; Vandas, M.

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge about the behavior of compact toroidal magnetic force-free objects in ambient magnetic field may help to better understand dynamical processes in association with coronal mass ejections and their interplanetary counterparts. The problem to find the diamagnetic force acting on a toroidal object in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is solved analytically. At first the drapery of the inhomogeneous magnetic field caused by an insertion of a toroid was found, and then the force acting on the toroid by this disturbed magnetic field was obtained. The problem is considered in purely toroidal coordinates. The obtained solution can be used for calculations of the repulsing diamagnetic force acting on isolated objects in the solar corona such as magnetic clouds of a toroidal shape and for the determination of their velocity profiles. Deformations of toroidal transients due to this melon seed force are not investigated here. Only the force acting on the toroid as a whole is taken in consideration.

  2. Filament formation in wind-cloud interactions - I. Spherical clouds in uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragán, W. E.; Parkin, E. R.; Federrath, C.; Crocker, R. M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, yet their formation, internal structure, and longevity have not been studied in detail. We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the characteristics, formation, and evolution of filaments arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and dense clouds. Here, we improve on previous simulations by utilizing sharper density contrasts and higher numerical resolutions. By following multiple density tracers, we find that material in the envelopes of the clouds is removed and deposited downstream to form filamentary tails, while the cores of the clouds serve as footpoints and late-stage outer layers of these tails. Aspect ratios ≳12, subsonic velocity dispersions ˜0.1-0.3 of the wind sound speed, and magnetic field amplifications ˜100 are found to be characteristic of these filaments. We also report the effects of different magnetic field strengths and orientations. The magnetic field strength regulates vorticity production: sinuous filamentary towers arise in non-magnetic environments, while strong magnetic fields inhibit small-scale perturbations at boundary layers making tails less turbulent. Magnetic field components aligned with the direction of the flow favour the formation of pressure-confined flux ropes inside the tails, whilst transverse components tend to form current sheets. Softening the equation of state to nearly isothermal leads to suppression of dynamical instabilities and further collimation of the tail. Towards the final stages of the evolution, we find that small cloudlets and distorted filaments survive the break-up of the clouds and become entrained in the winds, reaching velocities ˜0.1 of the wind speed.

  3. Calculation of the magnetic gradient tensor from total magnetic anomaly field based on regularized method in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gang; Zhang, Yingtang; Mi, Songlin; Fan, Hongbo; Li, Zhining

    2016-11-01

    To obtain accurate magnetic gradient tensor data, a fast and robust calculation method based on regularized method in frequency domain was proposed. Using the potential field theory, the transform formula in frequency domain was deduced in order to calculate the magnetic gradient tensor from the pre-existing total magnetic anomaly data. By analyzing the filter characteristics of the Vertical vector transform operator (VVTO) and Gradient tensor transform operator (GTTO), we proved that the conventional transform process was unstable which would zoom in the high-frequency part of the data in which measuring noise locate. Due to the existing unstable problem that led to a low signal-to-noise (SNR) for the calculated result, we introduced regularized method in this paper. By selecting the optimum regularization parameters of different transform phases using the C-norm approach, the high frequency noise was restrained and the SNR was improved effectively. Numerical analysis demonstrates that most value and characteristics of the calculated data by the proposed method compare favorably with reference magnetic gradient tensor data. In addition, calculated magnetic gradient tensor components form real aeromagnetic survey provided better resolution of the magnetic sources and original profile.

  4. MHD simulation of a propagation of loop-like and bubble-like magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandas, M.; Fischer, S.; Pelant, P.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Detman, T.

    1995-01-01

    Propagation and evolution of magnetic clouds in the ambient solar wind flow is studied self-consistently using ideal MHD equations in three dimensions. Magnetic clouds as ideal force-free objects (cylinders or spheres) are ejected near the Sun and followed beyond the Earth's orbit. We investigate the influence of various initial parameters like the injection velocity, magnetic field strength, magnetic helicity, orientation of the clouds' axis, etc., on their propagation and evolution. We demonstrate that the injection velocity and magnetic field strength have a major influence on propagation. Simulation results are compared with analytical solutions of magnetic cloud evolution.

  5. Magnetic clouds in the Earth's magnetosheath: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, Lucile; Fontaine, Dominique; Kilpua, Emilia; Escoubet, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are highly geoeffective solar wind transients. In the interplanetary space, they possess a well-defined magnetic structure, characterised by an enhanced and smoothly rotating magnetic field. We examine here whether their magnetic structure is modified when they encounter the outer regions of the geospace, namely the bow shock and the magnetosheath. Significant changes in the magnetic structure of MCs could in turn affect the level of geomagnetic activity they induce in the near-Earth's space. In this work, we study 82 MCs during which spacecraft observations are available simultaneously in the solar wind and in the magnetosheath. The observations inside the magnetosheath are related to the bow shock properties using a magnetosheath model (Turc et al., 2014, Ann. Geophys.). We find that the variation of an MC's magnetic field orientation from the solar wind to the magnetosheath is directly related to the encountered shock configuration. The angle between the magnetic field in the magnetosheath and that in the solar wind shows a very good correlation with the ΘBn angle (between the upstream magnetic field and the normal to the shock's surface) encountered at the bow shock's crossing. Because of its importance for the geoeffectivity, we examine how the magnetic field North-South (Bz) component is modified across the bow shock. In some cases, we find that Bz reverses in the magnetosheath. The conditions during which such reversals occur are investigated and their implications in terms of the MCs' geoeffectivity are discussed.

  6. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    PubMed

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  7. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  8. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices. PMID:24356511

  9. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin (e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  10. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin ( e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  11. Magnetic Field of the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Shuji

    2016-10-01

    We have performed extensive near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry toward the Vela C molecular cloud, which covers the five high-density sub-regions (North, Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, South-Ridge, and South-Nest) with distinct morphological characteristics. The obtained polarization vector map shows that three of these sub-regions have distinct plane-of-the-sky (POS) magnetic-field characteristics according to the morphological characteristics. (1) In the Centre-Ridge sub-region, a dominating ridge, the POS magnetic field is mostly perpendicular to the ridge. (2) In the Centre-Nest sub-region, a structure having a slightly extended nest of filaments, the POS magnetic field is nearly parallel to its global elongation. (3) In the South-Nest sub-region, which has a network of small filaments, the POS magnetic field appears to be chaotic. By applying the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method, we derived the POS magnetic field strength as ∼70–310 μG in the Centre-Ridge, Centre-Nest, and South-Ridge sub-regions. In the South-Nest sub-region, the dispersion of polarization angles is too large to apply the C-F method. Because the velocity dispersion in this sub-region is not greater than those in the other sub-regions, we suggest that the magnetic field in this sub-region is weaker than those in other sub-regions. We also discuss the relationship between the POS magnetic field (configuration and strength) and the cloud structure of each sub-region.

  12. Solar energetic particles as probes of the structures of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1990-01-01

    Two possible closed magnetic topologies are considered for clouds: an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the sun and a magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are used as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to clouds in many events indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun.

  13. Regular and chaotic dynamics of a chain of magnetic dipoles with moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Shutyi, A. M.

    2009-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamic modes of a chain of coupled spherical bodies having dipole magnetic moments that are excited by a homogeneous ac magnetic field are studied using numerical analysis. Bifurcation diagrams are constructed and used to find conditions for the presence of several types of regular, chaotic, and quasi-periodic oscillations. The effect of the coupling of dipoles on the excited dynamics of the system is revealed. The specific features of the Poincare time sections are considered for the cases of synchronous chaos with antiphase synchronization and asynchronous chaos. The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is calculated for the dynamic modes of an individual dipole.

  14. A Regularized Approach for Solving Magnetic Differential Equations and a Revised Iterative Equilibrium Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson

    2010-10-13

    A method for approximately solving magnetic differential equations is described. The approach is to include a small diffusion term to the equation, which regularizes the linear operator to be inverted. The extra term allows a "source-correction" term to be defned, which is generally required in order to satisfy the solvability conditions. The approach is described in the context of computing the pressure and parallel currents in the iterative approach for computing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria. __________________________________________________

  15. Identification of configuration and boundaries of interplanetary magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2006-07-01

    To study interplanetary magnetic clouds (IMCs), it is important to find their configurations and boundaries from the observed magnetic field data. This paper presents a novel method of identifying the configuration and boundaries of IMCs, wherein the interplanetary magnetic field data, which are measured in the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic (GSE) coordinate system, are converted into an IMC natural coordinate system that can more clearly display the configuration and boundaries of the IMC as a flux tube. The establishment of the natural coordinate system is based on the idea that the IMC is a flux rope with approximately constant α force-free field configuration. We also apply this method to analyze four IMCs observed by the Wind spacecraft. Two of them are identified as having the flux rope configuration lying in the ecliptic plane, and the other two are flux ropes vertical to the ecliptic plane. The results demonstrate that our method can work well for real IMCs.

  16. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  17. The alignment of molecular cloud magnetic fields with the spiral arms in M33.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-bai; Henning, Thomas

    2011-11-24

    The formation of molecular clouds, which serve as stellar nurseries in galaxies, is poorly understood. A class of cloud formation models suggests that a large-scale galactic magnetic field is irrelevant at the scale of individual clouds, because the turbulence and rotation of a cloud may randomize the orientation of its magnetic field. Alternatively, galactic fields could be strong enough to impose their direction upon individual clouds, thereby regulating cloud accumulation and fragmentation, and affecting the rate and efficiency of star formation. Our location in the disk of the Galaxy makes an assessment of the situation difficult. Here we report observations of the magnetic field orientation of six giant molecular cloud complexes in the nearby, almost face-on, galaxy M33. The fields are aligned with the spiral arms, suggesting that the large-scale field in M33 anchors the clouds.

  18. The alignment of molecular cloud magnetic fields with the spiral arms in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Bai; Henning, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The formation of molecular clouds, which serve as stellar nurseries in galaxies, is poorly understood. A class of cloud formation models suggests that a large-scale galactic magnetic field is irrelevant at the scale of individual clouds, because the turbulence and rotation of a cloud may randomize the orientation of its magnetic field. Alternatively, galactic fields could be strong enough to impose their direction upon individual clouds, thereby regulating cloud accumulation and fragmentation, and affecting the rate and efficiency of star formation. Our location in the disk of the Galaxy makes an assessment of the situation difficult. Here we report observations of the magnetic field orientation of six giant molecular cloud complexes in the nearby, almost face-on, galaxy M33. The fields are aligned with the spiral arms, suggesting that the large-scale field in M33 anchors the clouds.

  19. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetic Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or super bubbles propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using the 3-D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, we modeled and studied the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds have already formed in the process of the Galactic fountain and start to fall from the stationary state. We considered various magnetic field configurations of the Galactic halo given the current uncertainties. We also investigated how the evolution of the gas clouds is affected by the different initial masses of the gas clouds. A gas cloud is more likely to reach close to the Galactic plane and maintain its original shape if the cloud's initial density is high and if the component of the magnetic field that is parallel to the cloud's motion is strong while the component that is perpendicular is weak. With more realistic magnetic field configurations (combinations of parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields, and nonuniform magnetic field strength), the gas cloud falls down along the magnetic field lines with the morphology as a result of the combined effect of the parallel and perpendicular magnetic field lines. Among the various morphologies that developed during the dynamical evolution, a worm or filament shaped cloud is formed when the perpendicular component of the magnetic field is strong and dominant. Comparing the cloud morphologies and column densities from our simulations with those of observations (such as high and intermediate velocity clouds, HVCs and IVCs) would provide better information about the magnetic field of the Galactic halo together with the mass of the cloud.

  20. Geospace Response to a Slow Moving Unipolar Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Matsuo, T.; Kilcommons, L. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The passage at Earth of a unipolar, southward-directed magnetic cloud on 28-29 May 2010 provided a unique opportunity to investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in response to a slow-moving transient in the solar wind and the subsequent higher speed flow. Despite more than 8 hours of IMF Bz < -10 nT, the Dst Index did not intensify below -100 nT. However, there was an extraordinary 16-hour stretch with the AE index exceeding 500 nT throughout. We use magnetic perturbation data from the constellation of more than 70 Iridium satellites forming the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) and from four satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program to map the large-scale field-aligned currents during this interval. Of particular interest are: 1) the prolonged interval of AE index greater than 500 nT and 2) the dayside response to a full rotation of the interplanetary east-west (IMF By) component while the IMF is southward. During the magnetic cloud passage we are able to isolate the IMF By response without the intervening effects of solar wind pressure pulses or other IMF discontinuities. In addition to the unusual storm features, we discuss the "observational error" characteristics of the space-based magnetic field measurements incorporated into the data assimilation algorithm used in the field-aligned current mapping The independent satellite measurements allow us to quantify the uncertainty in the mapping procedure. We report on the spatial and temporal uncertainties.

  1. Magnetically charged regular black hole in a model of nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2015-11-01

    We obtain a magnetically charged regular black hole in general relativity. The source to the Einstein field equations is nonlinear electrodynamic field in a physically reasonable model of nonlinear electrodynamics (NED). "Physically" here means the NED model is constructed on the basis of three conditions: the Maxwell asymptotic in the weak electromagnetic field limit; the presence of vacuum birefringence phenomenon; and satisfying the weak energy condition (WEC). In addition, we analyze the thermodynamic properties of the regular black hole in two ways. According to the usual black hole thermodynamics, we calculate the heat capacity at constant charge, from which we know the smaller black hole is more stable. We also employ the horizon thermodynamics to discuss the thermodynamic quantities, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure.

  2. Energetic Electrons Associated with Magnetic Reconnection in the Magnetic Cloud Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, S. H.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Zuo, P. B.; Sun, T. R.

    2010-11-05

    Here is reported in situ observation of energetic electrons ({approx}100-500 keV) associated with magnetic reconnection in the solar wind by the ACE and Wind spacecraft. The properties of this magnetic cloud driving reconnection and the associated energetic electron acceleration problem are discussed. Further analyses indicate that the electric field acceleration and Fermi-type mechanism are two fundamental elements in the electron acceleration processes and the trapping effect of the specific magnetic field configuration maintains the acceleration status that increases the totally gained energy.

  3. Collapse of Rotating Magnetized Molecular Cloud Cores and Mass Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2002-08-01

    The collapse of rotating magnetized molecular cloud cores is studied with axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Because of the change of the equation of state of the interstellar gas, molecular cloud cores experience several phases during the collapse. In the earliest isothermal runaway collapse (n<~1010 H2 cm-3), a pseudodisk is formed, and it continues to contract until an opaque core is formed at the center. In this disk, a number of MHD fast and slow shock pairs appear whose wave fronts are parallel to the disk. We assume that the interstellar gas obeys a polytropic equation of state with the exponent of Γ>1 above the critical density at which the core becomes optically thick against the thermal radiation from dusts ncr~1010 cm-3. After the equation of state becomes hard, an adiabatic quasi-static core forms at the center (the first core), which is separated from the isothermal contracting pseudodisk by the accretion shock front facing radially outward. By the effect of the magnetic tension, the angular momentum is transferred from the disk midplane to the surface. The gas with an excess angular momentum near the surface is finally ejected, which explains the molecular bipolar outflow. Two types of outflows are found. When the poloidal magnetic field is strong (its energy is comparable to the thermal one), a U-shaped outflow is formed, in which gas is mainly outflowing through a region whose shape looks like a capital letter U at a finite distance from the rotation axis. The gas is accelerated by the centrifugal force and the magnetic pressure gradient of the toroidal component. The other is a turbulent outflow in which magnetic field lines and velocity fields seem to be randomly oriented. In this case, globally the gas moves out almost perpendicularly from the disk, and the outflow looks like a capital letter I. In this case, although the gas is launched by the centrifugal force, the magnetic force working along the poloidal field lines plays an

  4. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  5. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  6. Solar energetic particles inside magnetic clouds observed with the Wind spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Mason, G. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    Solar energetic particles can be used to probe the structure of magnetic clouds. Since impulsive flare particles are accelerated within active regions, their presence inside a magnetic cloud implies that the cloud's magnetic field connects to an active region at the sun. We report on the fluxes and composition of low energy ions inside 13 magnetic clouds observed with instrumentation on the Wind spacecraft from November 1994 to February 1997. The STEP subsystem of the EPACT experiment on Wind resolves ³He and 4He and the most abundant heavy ion species from ∼20 keV/nucleon to ∼1 MeV/nucleon. Using STEP, we are able to measure the energetic particle composition in an energy range previously unexplored in the context of magnetic clouds. We find that when STEP measured significant ion fluxes inside a cloud, they were most likely from impulsive solar flares; this was the case in 4 events. We find that the 1/10/97 magnetic cloud decreased the interplanetary fluxes of ∼100 keV/nucleon ions by a factor of ∼10² this was probably because the cloud disconnected Wind from the interplanetary particle source beyond 1 AU. In contrast, we observed particles from several impulsive solar flares inside the 10/18/95 event with fluxes ∼10³ higher than the fluxes measured inside the 1/10/97 cloud.

  7. Turbulent Flows within Self-gravitating Magnetized Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, D. S.; Crutcher, R. M.; Pouquet, A.

    2001-08-01

    Self-gravitating magnetized flows are explored numerically in slab geometry. In this approximation, the derivatives are computed only in one dimension but all three components of vector fields are retained. This is done for a range of fiducial values for the interstellar medium at the scale of molecular clouds. The overall characteristic scale of the turbulence, its Mach number, and the initial ratio of longitudinal to transverse turbulent velocities, as well as the extent of the initial density bulges within the fluid, are the main parameters of the study. Simulations have been performed with and without ambipolar drift. No external forcing is included. Velocity, density, and magnetic perturbations develop self-consistently to comparable levels in all cases. This includes those cases where the medium is initially static. However, a fully random flow produces substantially more density contrast with nested substructures. Collapse eventually occurs after typically three free-fall times. The magnetic field slows down the collapse as expected. For higher Mach numbers, the collapse is faster, and yet the peak densities reached in the final collapsed objects are lower. We have also modeled the effects of ambipolar drift in the presence of cosmic ray ionization and far-ultraviolet ionization. Because the turbulent timescales are shorter than the ambipolar drift timescales, we find that ambipolar drift does not play a significant role in gravitational collapse in a turbulent medium of the type modeled in our simulations.

  8. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach. PMID:27176392

  9. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  10. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}regular flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  11. TRANSITION FROM REGULAR TO CHAOTIC CIRCULATION IN MAGNETIZED CORONAE NEAR COMPACT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopacek, O.; Karas, V.; Kovar, J.; StuchlIk, Z.

    2010-10-20

    Accretion onto black holes and compact stars brings material in a zone of strong gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We study dynamical properties of motion of electrically charged particles forming a highly diluted medium (a corona) in the regime of strong gravity and large-scale (ordered) magnetic field. We start our work from a system that allows regular motion, then we focus on the onset of chaos. To this end, we investigate the case of a rotating black hole immersed in a weak, asymptotically uniform magnetic field. We also consider a magnetic star, approximated by the Schwarzschild metric and a test magnetic field of a rotating dipole. These are two model examples of systems permitting energetically bound, off-equatorial motion of matter confined to the halo lobes that encircle the central body. Our approach allows us to address the question of whether the spin parameter of the black hole plays any major role in determining the degree of the chaoticness. To characterize the motion, we construct the recurrence plots (RPs) and we compare them with Poincare surfaces of section. We describe the RPs in terms of the recurrence quantification analysis, which allows us to identify the transition between different dynamical regimes. We demonstrate that this new technique is able to detect the chaos onset very efficiently and provide its quantitative measure. The chaos typically occurs when the conserved energy is raised to a sufficiently high level that allows the particles to traverse the equatorial plane. We find that the role of the black hole spin in setting the chaos is more complicated than initially thought.

  12. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  13. Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T.; Koepke, M. E.

    2008-09-07

    The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

  14. The Evolution of Gas Clouds Falling in the Magnetized Galactic Halo: High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs) Originated in the Galactic Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Raley, Elizabeth A.

    2009-07-01

    In the Galactic fountain scenario, supernovae and/or stellar winds propel material into the Galactic halo. As the material cools, it condenses into clouds. By using FLASH three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we model and study the dynamical evolution of these gas clouds after they form and begin to fall toward the Galactic plane. In our simulations, we assume that the gas clouds form at a height of z = 5 kpc above the Galactic midplane, then begin to fall from rest. We investigate how the cloud's evolution, dynamics, and interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by the initial mass of the cloud. We find that clouds with sufficiently large initial densities (n >= 0.1 H atoms cm-3) accelerate sufficiently and maintain sufficiently large column densities as to be observed and identified as high-velocity clouds (HVCs) even if the ISM is weakly magnetized (1.3 μG). However, the ISM can provide noticeable resistance to the motion of a low-density cloud (n <= 0.01 H atoms cm-3) thus making it more probable that a low-density cloud will attain the speed of an intermediate-velocity cloud rather than the speed of an HVC. We also investigate the effects of various possible magnetic field configurations. As expected, the ISM's resistance is greatest when the magnetic field is strong and perpendicular to the motion of the cloud. The trajectory of the cloud is guided by the magnetic field lines in cases where the magnetic field is oriented diagonal to the Galactic plane. The model cloud simulations show that the interactions between the cloud and the ISM can be understood via analogy to the shock tube problem which involves shock and rarefaction waves. We also discuss accelerated ambient gas, streamers of material ablated from the clouds, and the cloud's evolution from a sphere-shaped to a disk- or cigar-shaped object.

  15. Magnetized color superconducting cold quark matter within the SU(2 ) f NJL model: A novel regularization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, P.; Grunfeld, A. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of intense magnetic fields on the behavior of color superconducting cold quark matter is investigated using an SU(2 ) f Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model for which a novel regulation scheme is introduced. In such a scheme the contributions which are explicitly dependent on the magnetic field turn out to be finite and, thus, do not require to be regularized. As a result of this, nonphysical oscillations that might arise in the alternative regularization schemes previously used in the literature are naturally removed. In this way, a clearer interpretation of the physical oscillations is possible. The sensitivity of our results to the model parametrization is analyzed.

  16. A study of magnetic clouds observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of a recently compiled list of magnetic clouds observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft. Despite their planetary focus, both spacecraft spent significant amounts of time in the solar wind, allowing transient solar wind structures such as magnetic clouds to be observed. The clouds were observed at a range of heliocentric distances (at 0.72 AU by Venus Express, and from 1 to 0.3 AU by MESSENGER) over the course of a significant fraction of a solar cycle (2006 to 2013 by Venus Express, and 2007 to 2012 by MESSENGER). Neither spacecraft carried a dedicated solar wind plasma instrument, and so the clouds have been identified using magnetic field data only: a coherent rotation of the magnetic field direction lasting for at least four hours that coincides with a field strength above that of the ambient solar wind were the primary identification criteria. The approximate orientations of the magnetic clouds relative to the solar equatorial plane have been found. We consider the frequency distribution of these orientations, and their dependence on heliocentric distance and the solar magnetic field configuration. We also use these observations, in conjunction with observations at 1 AU, to estimate the likelihood that two spacecraft will encounter the same magnetic cloud as a function of the spacecraft's azimuthal separation.

  17. Comparisons of Characteristics of Magnetic Clouds and Cloud-Like Structures During 1995 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2015-04-01

    Using eighteen years (1995 - 2012) of solar wind plasma and magnetic field data (observed by the Wind spacecraft), solar activity ( e.g. sunspot number: SSN), and the geomagnetic-activity index (Dst), we have identified 168 magnetic clouds (MCs) and 197 magnetic-cloud-like structures (MCLs), and we have made relevant comparisons. The following features are found during seven different periods (TP: total period during 1995 - 2012, P1 and P2: first and second half-period during 1995 - 2003 and 2004 - 2012, Q1 and Q2: quiet periods during 1995 - 1997 and 2007 - 2009, A1 and A2: active periods during 1998 - 2006 and 2010 - 2012). (1) During the total period, the yearly occurrence frequency is 9.3 for MCs and 10.9 for MCLs. (2) In the quiet periods < N MCs>Q1 > < N MCLs>Q1 and < N MCs>Q2 > < N MCLs>Q2, but in the active periods < N MCs>A1 < < N MCLs>A1 and < N MCs>A2 < < N MCLs>A2. (3) The minimum Bz ( Bz min) inside of an MC is well correlated with the intensity of geomagnetic activity, Dstmin (minimum Dst found within a storm event) for MCs (with a Pearson correlation coefficient, , and the fitting function is Dstmin=0.90+7.78 Bz min), but Bz min for MCLs is not well correlated with the Dst index (, and the fitting function is Dstmin=-9.40+4.58 Bz min). (4) MCs play a major role in producing geomagnetic storms: the absolute value of the average Dstmin (MC=-70 nT) for MCs associated geomagnetic storms is twice as strong as that for MCLs (MCL=-35 nT) because of the difference in the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) strength. (5) The SSN is uncorrelated with MCs (< N MCs>TP, ), but is well associated with MCLs (< N MCLs>TP, ). Note that the c.c. for SSN vs. < N MCs>P2 is higher than that for SSN vs. < N MCLs>P2. (6) Averages of IMF, solar wind speed, and density inside of the MCs are higher than those inside of the MCLs. (7) The average of MC duration (≈ 18.82 hours) is ≈ 20 % longer than the average of MCL duration (≈ 15.69 hours). (8) There are

  18. Comparisons of Characteristics of Magnetic Clouds and Cloud-Like Structures During 1995-2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Lepping, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Using eighteen years (1995 - 2012) of solar wind plasma and magnetic field data (observed by the Wind spacecraft), solar activity (e.g. sunspot number: SSN), and the geomagnetic activity index (Dst), we have identified 168 magnetic clouds (MCs) and 197 magnetic cloud - like structures (MCLs), and we have made relevant comparisons. The following features are found during seven different periods (TP: Total period during 1995 - 2012, P1 and P2: first and second half period during 1995 - 2003 and 2004 - 2012, Q1 and Q2: quiet periods during 1995 - 1997 and 2007 - 2009, A1 and A2: active periods during 1998 - 2006 and 2010 - 2012). (1) During the total period the yearly occurrence frequency is 9.3 for MCs and 10.9 for MCLs. (2) In the quiet periods Q1 > Q1 and Q2 > Q2, but in the active periods A1 < A1 and A2 < A2. (3) The minimum Bz (Bzmin) inside of a MC is well correlated with the intensity of geomagnetic activity, Dstmin (minimum Dst found within a storm event) for MCs (with a Pearson correlation coefficient, c.c. = 0.75, and the fitting function is Dstmin = 0.90+7.78Bzmin), but Bzmin for MCLs is not well correlated with the Dst index (c.c. = 0.56, and the fitting function is Dstmin = -9.40+ 4.58 Bzmin). (4) MCs play a major role in producing geomagnetic storms: the absolute value of the average Dstmin (MC = -70 nT) for MCs associated geomagnetic storms is two times stronger than that for MCLs (MCL = -35 nT), due to the difference in the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) strength. (5) The SSN is not correlated with MCs (TP, c.c. = 0.27), but is well associated with MCLs (TP, c.c. = 0.85). Note that the c.c. for SSN vs. P2 is higher than that for SSN vs. P2. (6) Averages of IMF, solar wind speed, and density inside of the MCs are higher than those inside of the MCLs. (7) The average of MC duration (approx. = 18.82 hours) is approx. = 20 % longer than the average of MCL

  19. On the behavior of the Dst geomagnetic index in the vicinity of magnetic cloud passages at earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The geomagnetic response to magnetic clouds is investigated for the 34 magnetic clouds observed between 1973 and 1982, according to cloud type: southward turning clouds as compared to northward turning clouds (a southward turning cloud is one whose Bz near cloud onset at earth is directed northward, while a northward turning cloud is one whose initial Bz is directed southward). While, on average, the most negative Dst value associated with interplanetary magnetic clouds is the one for northward turning clouds, the difference in the depths of decrease (onset Dst value minus the most negative Dst value during cloud passage) for the two cloud types does not appear to be statistically important; hence, northward turning and southward turning clouds have depths of decrease of comparable size, differing primarily in the time of most negative Dst occurrence. For northward turning clouds, the most negative Dst value usually occurs within 12 hours of cloud onset at earth, while for southward turning clouds it is delayed until after 12 hours from cloud onset.

  20. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 < 1. This anti-correlation and small polytropic gamma-values is interpreted in the context of the presence of highly non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  1. Geometry of the 20 November 2003 magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marubashi, Katsuhide; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Yong-Deuk; Park, Sung-Hong

    2012-01-01

    This study is an attempt to find a coherent interpretation of the link between the 20 November 2003 magnetic cloud (MC) and its solar source. Most previous studies agree on the orientation of the MC, but the orientation is nearly perpendicular to the axis of the post-eruption arcade (PEA) or the orientation of the neutral line in the solar source region. We first determine the geometry of this MC by fitting methods with both torus and cylinder models. Three possible geometries are obtained, which can reproduce the observed magnetic field variations associated with the MC, one from the cylinder fit and two from the torus fit. The cylinder fit gives the MC orientation with a tilt of a large angle (˜60°) from the ecliptic plane and nearly perpendicular to the PEA axis, being similar to those from previous studies. In contrast, two torus fit results give the MC axis with tilt angles less than 20° from the ecliptic plane. The two torus results correspond to the spacecraft encounter with the eastern flank of the flux rope loop (model A) and the western flank of the loop (model B), respectively. In either case, the orientation of the loop around the apex is nearly parallel to the PEA as observed by the SOHO/extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope instrument in the most plausible solar source region of a halo coronal mass ejection (CME), which appeared in the field of view of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 at 08:50 UT, 18 November 2003. The magnetic helicity of the PEA region is positive in agreement with the helicity of the MC. The 3-D reconstruction from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager data shows that the main part of the ejected plasma expands mainly to the west of the Sun-Earth line. Thus, we reach the most straightforward interpretation of the link between the MC and its solar source as follows. The MC was created in association with the launch of the CME that was first observed by the LASCO C2 at 08:50 UT, 18 November 2003, and propagated

  2. Simultaneous observations of solar MeV particles in a magnetic cloud and in the earth's northern tail lobe - Implications for the global field line topology of magnetic clouds and for the entry of solar particles into the magnetosphere during cloud passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Osherovich, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft observations of magnetic fields and flow anisotropies of solar energetic protons and electrons during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud show various particle signature differences at the two spacecraft. These differences are interpretable in terms of the magnetic line topology of the cloud, the connectivity of the cloud field lines to the solar surface, and the interconnection between the magnetic fields of the magnetic clouds and of the earth. These observations are consistent with a magnetic cloud model in which these mesoscale configurations are curved magnetic flux ropes attached at both ends to the sun's surface, extending out to 1 AU.

  3. Collision of the Smith Cloud and its dark matter halo with the magnetized Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The Smith Cloud is a massive High Velocity Cloud (HVC) that may have passed through the Milky Way disk in the recent past. Previous studies using hydrodynamic simulations suggest that a dark matter halo may have provided the confinement neccessary for the Smith Cloud to survive passage through the Galactic corona and disk. However, the models of the Galaxy that were used in these studies did not include a magnetic field, while magnetic fields are known to have confining properties. Other studies have shown that the Galactic magnetic field can inhibit mass exchange between the corona and the disk due to magnetic field compression. We extend upon these studies via FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations to consider the effects of a Galactic magnetic field on an infalling, dark matter confined HVC.

  4. Geo-effectiveness and radial dependence of magnetic cloud erosion by magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, Benoit; Ruffenach, Alexis; Rouillard, Alexis P.; Kajdic, Primoz; Manchester, Ward B.; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    flux erosion by magnetic reconnection occurs at the front of at least some magnetic clouds (MCs). We first investigate how erosion influences the geo-effectiveness of MCs in a general sense and using a south-north magnetic polarity MC observed on 18-20 October 1995. Although the magnetic shear at its front may not be known during propagation, measurements at 1 AU show signatures of local reconnection. Using a standard MC model, an empirical model of the geomagnetic response (Dst), and an observational estimate of the magnetic flux erosion, we find that the strength of the observed ensuing storm was ~30% lower than if no erosion had occurred. We then discuss the interplay between adiabatic compression and magnetic erosion at the front of MCs. We conclude that the most geo-effective configuration for a south-north polarity MC is to be preceded by a solar wind with southward IMF. This stems not only from the formation of a geo-effective sheath ahead of it but also from the adiabatic compression and reduced (or lack thereof) magnetic erosion which constructively conspire for the structure to be more geo-effective. Finally, assuming simple semiempirical and theoretical Alfvén speed profiles expected from expansion to 1 AU, we provide first-order estimates of the erosion process radial evolution. We find that the expected reconnection rates during propagation allow for significant erosion, on the order of those reported. Calculations also suggest that most of the erosion should occur in the inner heliosphere, and up to ~50% may yet occur beyond Mercury's orbit.

  5. The application of a priori structural information based regularization in image reconstruction in magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Yin, W.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a non-invasive contactless modality that could be capable of imaging the conductivity distribution of biological tissues. In this paper we consider the possibility of using absolute MIT voltage measurements for monitoring the progress of a peripheral hemorrhagic stroke in a human brain. The pathology is modelled as a local blood accumulation in the white matter. The solution of the MIT inverse problem is nonlinear and ill-posed and hence requires the use of a regularisation method. In this paper, we describe the construction and present the performance of a regularisation matrix based on a priori structural information of the head tissues obtained from a very recent MRI scan. The method takes the MRI scan as an initial state of the stroke and constructs a learning set containing the possible conductivity distributions of the current state of the stroke. This data is used to calculate an approximation of the covariance matrix and then a subspace is constructed using principal component analysis (PCA). It is shown by simulations the method is capable of producing a representative reconstruction of a stroke compared to smoothing Tikhonov regularization in a simplified model of the head.

  6. A numerical study of the effects of ambipolar diffusion on the collapse of magnetic gas clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.; Scott, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of isothermal, nonrotating magnetic gas clouds have been calculated numerically, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion. The fractional ionization in the clouds is approximated by a power-law function of the gas density, f = K/n to the q-power, where K and q are adjustable parameters. Eleven numerical experiments were run, and the results indicate that the asymptotic character of collapse is determined mainly by the value of q and is largely independent of the other parameters characterizing a cloud (e.g., K, cloud mass). In particular, there is nearly a one-to-one correspondence between q and the slope, x, of the central magnetic field strength-gas density relationship. If q is no more than 0.8, a cloud collapses asymptotically, as though the magnetic field were 'frozen' to the neutral matter. The magnetic field strength at the center of a collapsing cloud is strongly amplified during collapse even for values of q of about 1, despite extremely low values of fractional ionization. A discussion of the theoretical basis for this unexpected behavior is given. Possible implications of our results for the problems of magnetic braking of rotating protostars and star formation in general are also presented.

  7. Torus-Shaped Dust Clouds in Magnetized Anodic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, I.; Reichstein, T.; Greiner, F.; Piel, A.

    2008-09-07

    The generation of a torus-shaped dust cloud in an anodic plasma is decribed. The confined dust particles perfom a rotational motion around the torus major axis. The structure of the cloud in dependence of the external parameters are observed and the rotation velocity of the particles was measured and compared with a simple estimate.

  8. The magnetic evolution of the Taurus molecular clouds. I - Large-scale properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Mark H.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Snell, Ronald L.; Schloerb, F. P.; Strom, Stephen E.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Strom, Karen M.

    1987-10-01

    Finely sampled maps of the (C-13)O J = 1-0 emission from five dark clouds within the Taurus molecular cloud complex were made, and polarization measurements of the optical emission were obtained from background and embedded stars to determine the direction of the interstellar magnetic field towards these regions. The clouds are found to have flattened morphologies with the direction of their minor axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field, as expected if the lateral contraction of the gas is inhibited by magnetic pressures. In addition, each cloud appears to be rotating about an axis parallel to the magnetic field direction as predicted by detailed calculations of the magnetic braking process. It is believed that the magnetic field has played a significant part in the evolution of these regions, which are characterized by mean densities of about 1000-5000/cu cm. In addition, the clouds are determined to be in virial equilibrium based on the extent and mean line-width of (C-13)O J = 1-0 emission and the masses derived from molecular hydrogen column densities.

  9. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  10. A study of an expanding interplanatary magnetic cloud and its interaction with the earth's magnetosphere - The interplanetary aspect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Osherovich, V. A.; Richardson, I. G.; Freeman, M. P.; Lepping, R. P.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution interplanetary magnetic field and plasma measurements of an interplanetary magnetic cloud and its interaction with the earth's magnetosphere on January 14/15, 1988 are interpreted and discussed. It is argued that the data are consistent with the theoretical model of magnetic clouds as flux ropes of local straight cylindrical geometry. The data also suggest that this cloud is aligned with its axis in the ecliptic plane and pointing in the east-west direction. Evidence consisting of the intensity and directional distribution of energetic particle in the magnetic cloud argues in favor of the connectedness of the magnetic field lines to the sun's surface. The intensities of about 0.5 MeV ions is rapidly enhanced and the particles stream in a collimated beam along the magnetic field preferentially from the west of the sun. The particles travel form a flare site along the cloud magnetic field lines, which are thus presumably still attached to the sun.

  11. Role of the magnetosheath in the interaction of magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique; Turc, Lucile; Savoini, Philippe; Modolo, Ronan

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic clouds are among the most geoeffective solar events capable to trigger strong magnetic storms in the terrestrial magnetosphere. However, their characteristics and those of the surrounding media are not always capable to explain their high level of geoeffectivity. From observations and simulations, we investigate here the role of the bow shock and of the magnetosheath. Conjugated observations upstream (ACE) and downstream (CLUSTER) of the bow shock show that the magnetic clouds' magnetic structure in the magnetosheath can strongly depart from their pristine structure upstream of the bow shock. This modification depends on the shock configuration (quasi-perpendicular, quasi-parallel). We also discuss this question from hybrid simulations of the interaction of magnetic clouds with the bow shock. We show that this interaction may produce unexpected characteristics in the magnetosheath, such as asymmetric distributions of magnetic field, density, temperature, velocity. They thus lead to interactions with the magnetosphere which were not expected from the pristine characteristics of the magnetic clouds in the solar wind upstream of bow shock. We here discuss the effects of such an asymmetric magnetosheath on key parameters for the interaction with the magnetopause (reconnection, instabilities), responsible in turn for the development of geomagnetic activity inside the magnetosphere.

  12. A study of the starless dark cloud LDN 1570: Distance, dust properties, and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, C.; Maheswar, G.; Pandey, A. K.; Jose, J.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We aim to map the magnetic field geometry and to study the dust properties of the starless cloud, L1570, using multi-wavelength optical polarimetry and photometry of the stars projected on the cloud. Methods: The direction of the magnetic field component parallel to the plane of the sky of a cloud can be obtained using polarimetry of the stars projected on and located behind the cloud. It is believed that the unpolarized light from the stars background to the cloud undergoes selective extinction while passing through non-spherical dust grains that are aligned with their minor axes parallel to the cloud magnetic field. The emerging light becomes partially plane polarized. The observed polarization vectors trace the direction of the projected magnetic field of the cloud. We made R-band imaging polarimetry of the stars projected on a cloud, L1570, to trace the magnetic field orientation. We also made multi-wavelength polarimetric and photometric observations to constrain the properties of dust in L1570. Results: We estimated a distance of 394 ± 70 pc to the cloud using 2MASS JHKs colors. Using the values of the Serkowski parameters, σ1, overlineɛ, λmax, and the position of the stars on the near-infrared color-color diagram, we identified 13 stars that could possibly have intrinsic polarization and/or rotation in their polarization angles. One star, 2MASS J06075075+1934177, which is a B4Ve spectral type, shows diffuse interstellar bands in the spectrum in addition to the Hα line in emission. There is an indication for slightly bigger dust grains toward L1570 on the basis of the dust grain size-indicators such as λmax and RV values. The magnetic field lines are found to be parallel to the cloud structures seen in the 250 μm images (also in the 8 μm and 12 μm shadow images) of L1570. Based on the magnetic field geometry, the cloud structure, and the complex velocity structure, we conclude that L1570 is in the process of formation due to the converging flow

  13. The Bastille Day Magnetic Clouds and Upstream Shocks: Near Earth Interplanetary Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Kasper, J.; Desch, M. D.; Wu, C.-C.; Reames, D. V.; Singer, H. J.; Singer, H. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The energetic charged particle, interplanetary magnetic field, and plasma characteristics of the 'Bastille Day' shock and ejecta/magnetic cloud events at 1 AU occurring over the days 14-16 July 2000 are described. Profiles of MeV (WIND/LEMT) energetic ions help to organize the overall sequence of events from the solar source to 1 AU. Stressed are analyses of an outstanding magnetic cloud (MC2) starting late on 15 July and its upstream shock about 4 hours earlier in WIND magnetic field and plasma data. Also analyzed is a less certain, but likely, magnetic cloud (MC1) occurring early on 15 July; this was separated from MC2 by its upstream shock and many heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings. Other HCS crossings occurred throughout the 3-day period. Overall this dramatic series of interplanetary events caused a large multi-phase magnetic storm with min Dst lower than -300 nT. The very fast solar wind speed (greater than or equal to 1100 km/s) in and around the front of MC2 (for near average densities) was responsible for a very high solar wind ram pressure driving in the front of the magnetosphere to geocentric distances estimated to be as low as approx. 5 R(sub E), much lower than the geosynchronous orbit radius. This was consistent with magnetic field observations from two GOES satellites which indicated they were in the magnetosheath for extended times. A static force free field model is used to fit the two magnetic cloud profiles providing estimates of the clouds' physical and geometrical properties. MC2 was much larger than MCI, but their axes were nearly antiparallel, and their magnetic fields had the same left-handed helicity. MC2's axis and its upstream shock normal were very close to being perpendicular to each other, as might be expected if the cloud were driving the shock at the time of observation. The estimated axial magnetic flux carried by MC2 was 52 x 10(exp 20) Mx, which is about 5 times the typical magnetic flux estimated for other magnetic

  14. Dst prediction for a period of high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, H.; Sakurai, T.

    We examine geomagnetic effects for high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds and their relationship to solar sources. It is well known that Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field plays an important role for estimation of Dst from solar wind parameters (Burton et al.1975). However, magnetic clouds frequently carry high-density plasmas, which are interpreted as the remnants of filament. In order to clarify their geomagnetic effects, we try to estimate Dst by adopting different methods introducing effects of solar wind parameters. In our estimation the most important point is laid on the sense of Dst variation rather than its magnitude. The most suitable estimation is obtained by setting up a threshold for plasma density, in which for a case of plasma density greater than 20 /cc the Fenrich and Luhmann (1998)'s formula should be used, while in the other cases the Burton's formula are adopted. In both estimations the O'Brien and McPherron (2000)'s ring current decay time is employed. Furthermore, we examine the solar origin corresponding to the magnetic clouds and then compared characteristic signatures of the magnetic cloud with those observed on the solar surface. As a result, we confirm that the magnetic structure of interplanetary flux rope is in good agreement with the structures of the magnetic neutral line near disappearing filaments and heliospheric current sheet (HCS). On the basis of these studies, we suggest that for the geomagnetic disturbance forecast, the effect of high-density plasmas carried with magnetic clouds should be taken into account of as well as that of interplanetary magnetic field.

  15. Radial Evolution of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER, STEREO, and Venus Express Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-07-01

    The Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions will provide observations of magnetic clouds closer to the Sun than ever before, and it will be good preparation for these missions to make full use of the most recent in situ data sets from the inner heliosphere—namely, those provided by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and Venus Express—for magnetic cloud studies. We present observations of the same magnetic cloud made by MESSENGER at Mercury and later by Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-B (STEREO-B), while the spacecraft were radially aligned in 2011 November. Few such radial observations of magnetic clouds have been previously reported. Estimates of the solar wind speed at MESSENGER are also presented, calculated through the application of a previously established technique. The cloudʼs flux rope has been analyzed using force-free fitting; the rope diameter increased from 0.18 to 0.41 AU (corresponding to an {r}{{H}}0.94 dependence on heliocentric distance, rH), and the axial magnetic field strength dropped from 46.0 to 8.7 nT (an {r}{{H}}-1.84 dependence) between the spacecraft, clear indications of an expanding structure. The axial magnetic flux was ∼0.50 nT AU2 at both spacecraft, suggesting that the rope underwent no significant erosion through magnetic reconnection between MESSENGER and STEREO-B. Further, we estimate the change in the cloudʼs angular width by assuming helicity conservation. It has also been found that the rope axis rotated by 30° between the spacecraft to lie close to the solar equatorial plane at STEREO-B. Such a rotation, if it is a common feature of coronal mass ejection propagation, would have important implications for space weather forecasting.

  16. Evidence in Magnetic Clouds for Systematic Open Flux Transport on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Kahler, S. W.; Gosling, J. T.; Lepping, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    Most magnetic clouds encountered by spacecraft at 1 AU display a mix of unidirectional suprathermal electrons signaling open field lines and counterstreaming electrons signaling loops connected to the Sun at both ends. Assuming the open fields were originally loops that underwent interchange reconnection with open fields at the Sun, we determine the sense of connectedness of the open fields found in 72 of 97 magnetic clouds identified by the Wind spacecraft in order to obtain information on the location and sense of the reconnection and resulting flux transport at the Sun. The true polarity of the open fields in each magnetic cloud was determined from the direction of the suprathermal electron flow relative to the magnetic field direction. Results indicate that the polarity of all open fields within a given magnetic cloud is the same 89% of the time, implying that interchange reconnection at the Sun most often occurs in only one leg of a flux rope loop, thus transporting open flux in a single direction, from a coronal hole near that leg to the foot point of the opposite leg. This pattern is consistent with the view that interchange reconnection in coronal mass ejections systematically transports an amount of open flux sufficient to reverse the polarity of the heliospheric field through the course of the solar cycle. Using the same electron data, we also find that the fields encountered in magnetic clouds are only a third as likely to be locally inverted as not. While one might expect inversions to be equally as common as not in flux rope coils, consideration of the geometry of spacecraft trajectories relative to the modeled magnetic cloud axes leads us to conclude that the result is reasonable.

  17. Dynamics of small dust clouds trapped in a magnetized anodic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, Iris; Piel, Alexander; Trottenberg, Thomas; Koepke, Mark E.

    2007-12-15

    Small dust clouds, which are confined in an anodic plasma, are studied with respect to their structure and their response to modulation of the anode bias. The dust cloud is displaced from the center of the discharge by a process similar to the void mechanism in radio-frequency discharges under microgravity. The top layers of the dust cloud are in a crystalline state and the cloud performs a slow rotation about the magnetic field direction. For modulation frequencies below 15 Hz, a sloshing and stretching motion in the confining potential well is found. Spontaneously excited dust density waves are observed when the dust cloud exceeds a minimum size. The waves are characterized by sickle-shaped wave fronts. No standing waves were found. The wave dispersion shows an influence of the boundedness of the system in terms of a frequency cutoff.

  18. The Dynamics and Radiative Properties of Clouds in Magnetized Accretion Disk Outflows in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, J.; Kartje, J. F.; Konigl, A.

    1996-05-01

    We have embarked on a general analysis of multi-component outflows from magnetized accretion disks in AGNs. In this scenario, dense diamagnetic clouds are embedded in a centrifugally driven wind and are uplifted from the disk surface by the dynamical drag of the wind as well as by the ``melon seed'' magnetic pressure gradient force. We follow the motion of the clouds above the disk surface, taking account of the radiation pressure force exerted by the central continuum. We consider both line and continuum radiation and investigate the effects of differing spectral energy distributions and degrees of emission isotropy on the cloud dynamics (comparing, e.g., the isotropic, thermal emission from QSOs with the beamed, nonthermal emission from a relativistic jet in BL Lac objects). We study the evolution of the clouds as they accelerate through the wind, considering possible sources of confinement (including magnetic stresses of the ambient field and hydrodynamic ram pressure), and estimating the cloud lifetimes against disruptive processes such as evaporation and dynamical instabilities. We also evaluate the impact of radiation pressure on the wind itself, via the force on dust grains in the wind and through the momentum transferred by the clouds. We examine the spectral signatures of accelerated clouds in the context of this dynamical scheme. Using the calculated velocity and ionization structure of the clouds throughout the flow, we compute absorption line profiles in the AGN continuum spectrum as a function of viewing angle through the wind. We apply our results to the interpretation of the observed optical/UV spectra from BALQSOs, and of the broad EUV and X-ray absorption features detected in a number of BL Lac objects. We also consider possible applications to other AGNs in which radiative acceleration of clouds has been inferred (e.g., ``warm absorber'' sources).

  19. Magnetic cloud erosion by magnetic reconnection: occurrence statistics, radial evolution and geo-effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, B.; Ruffenach, A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Sauvaud, J.; Rouillard, A.; Foullon, C.; Owens, M. J.; Savani, N.; Kajdic, P.; Manchester, W.; Lugaz, N.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results regarding the occurrence statistics of magnetic flux erosion due to magnetic reconnection at the front of all magnetic clouds (MC) observed near Earth during solar cycle 23. We show that the process commonly occurs. It often occurs in large amounts, and at both the front and back boundaries of MCs. The statistics of reconnection jets at these boundaries confirms the significance of the process even up to 1 AU. Indeed, we also estimate the radial evolution of this process based on simple models. We conclude that most of the erosion occurs within Mercury's orbit, but up to 50% of the erosion seen at 1 AU may occur beyond Mercury's orbit. Using a standard MC model and an empirical model of the Dst index we also study the impact of this process on MC geo-effectiveness. We conclude that the most geo-effective configuration for a south-north polarity MC is to be preceded by a slow solar wind with southward IMF. This stems not only from the formation of a geo-effective sheath region with southward IMF ahead of it, but also from the fact that adiabatic compression and reduced (or lack thereof) magnetic erosion constructively conspire for the structure to be more geo-effective. Future missions such as Bepi-Colombo, Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will be able to further quantify this process and determine its radial dependence. Multi-spacecraft observations would be particularly useful for understanding the large-scale 3D topology changes associated with this process.

  20. The resolved magnetic fields of the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Clemens, Dan P.

    2015-03-01

    Marchwinski et al. (2012) mapped the magnetic field strength across the quiescent cloud GRSMC 45.60+0.30 (shown in Figure 1 subtending 40x10 pc at a distance of 1.88 kpc) with the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method CF; Chandrasekhar & Fermi 1953) using near-infrared starlight polarimetry from the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (Clemens et al. 2012a, b) and gas properties from the Galactic Ring Survey (Jackson et al. 2006). The large-scale magnetic field is oriented parallel to the gas-traced `spine' of the cloud. Seven `magnetic cores' with high magnetic field strength were identified and are coincident with peaks in the gas column density. Calculation of the mass-to-flux ratio (Crutcher 1999) shows that these cores are exclusively magnetically subcritical and that magnetostatic pressure can support them against gravitational collapse.

  1. Near-IR Imaging Polarimetry toward a Bright-rimmed Cloud: Magnetic Field in SFO 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Sato, Yaeko; Kwon, Jungmi; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK s) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ~90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ~30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  2. Magnetic field geometry of an unusual cometary cloud Gal 110-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neha, S.; Maheswar, G.; Soam, A.; Lee, C. W.; Tej, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We carried out optical polarimetry of an isolated cloud, Gal 110-13, to map the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field geometry. The main aim of the study is to understand the most plausible mechanism responsible for the unusual cometary shape of the cloud in the context of its magnetic field geometry. Methods: When unpolarized starlight passes through the intervening interstellar dust grains that are aligned with their short axes parallel to the local magnetic field, it gets linearly polarized. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field component can therefore be traced by doing polarization measurements of background stars projected on clouds. Because the light in the optical wavelength range is most efficiently polarized by the dust grains typically found in the outer layers of the molecular clouds, optical polarimetry enables us to trace the magnetic field geometry of the outer layers of the clouds. Results: We made R-band polarization measurements of 207 stars in the direction of Gal 110-13. The distance of Gal 110-13 was determined as ~450 ± 80 pc using our polarization and 2MASS near-infrared data. The foreground interstellar contribution was removed from the observed polarization values by observing a number of stars located in the vicinity of Gal 110-13 which has Hipparcos parallax measurements. The plane-of-the-sky magnetic field lines are found to be well ordered and aligned with the elongated structure of Gal 110-13. Using structure function analysis, we estimated the strength of the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field as ~25 μG. Conclusions: Based on our results and comparing them with those from simulations, we conclude that compression by the ionization fronts from 10 Lac is the most plausible cause of the comet-like morphology of Gal 110-13 and of the initiation of subsequent star formation.

  3. Magnetic braking, ambipolar diffusion, cloud cores, and star formation - Natural length scales and protostellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1991-05-01

    Magnetic braking is essential for cloud contraction and star formation. Ambipolar diffusion is unavoidable in self-gravitating, magnetic clouds and leads to single-stage (as opposed to hierarchical) fragmentation (or core formation) and protostar formation. Magnetic forces dominate thermal-pressure and centrifugal forces over scales comparable to molecular cloud radii. Magnetic support of molecular clouds and the imperfect collisional coupling between charged and neutral particles introduce a critical magnetic length scale (λM,cr = 0.62υAτff) and an Alfvén length scale ((λA = πυAτni), respectively, in the problem which together with a critical thermal length scale (λT,cr = 1.09Caτff) explain naturally the formation of fragments (or cores) in otherwise quiescent clouds and determine the sizes and masses of these fragments during the subsequent stages of contraction. (The quantity υA is the Alfvén speed, τni the mean neutral-ion collision time, Ca the adiabatic speed of sound, and τff the free4all time scale.) Numerical calculations based on new adaptive-grid techniques follow the formation of fragments by ambipolar diffusion and their subsequent collapse up to an enhancement in central density above its initial equilibrium value by a factor ≃106 with excellent spatial resolution. The results confirm the existence and relevance of the three length scales and extend the analytical understanding of fragmentation and star formation derived from them. The ultimately bimodal opposition to gravity (by magnetic forces in the envelope and by thermal-pressure forces in the core) introduces a break in the slope of the log pn -log r profile. The relation Bc ∞ pkc between the magnetic field strength and the gas density in cloud cores holds with K = 0.4 - 0.5 even in the presence of ambipolar diffusion up to densities ˜109 cm-3 for a wide variety of clouds. The value K ≃ ½ is fairly typical. At the late stages of evolution, for example, at a central density

  4. Analysis of 20 magnetic clouds at 1 AU during a solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulisano, A. M.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.

    We study 20 magnetic clouds, observed in situ by the spacecraft Wind, at the Lagrangian point L1, from 22 August, 1995, to 7 November, 1997. In previous works, assuming a cylindrical symmetry for the local magnetic configuration and a satellite trajectory crossing the axis of the cloud, we obtained their orientations using a minimum variance analysis. In this work we compute the orientations and magnetic configurations using a non-linear simultaneous fit of the geometric and physical parameters for a linear force-free model, including the possibility of a not null impact parameter. We quantify global magnitudes such as the relative magnetic helicity per unit length and compare the values found with both methods (minimum variance and the simultaneous fit). FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. Trapping of Electron Cloud LLC/Cesrta Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D [1]. One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in CESRTA and ILC quadrupole and sextupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with a long lifetime in a quadrupole and sextupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism. We study the effects of magnet strength, bunch current, ante-chamber effect, bunch spacing effect and secondary emission yield (SEY) in great detail. The development of an electron cloud in magnets is the main concern where a weak solenoid field is not effective. Quadrupole and sextupole magnets have mirror field configurations which may trap electrons by the mirror field trapping mechanism [2]. Fig.1 shows the orbit of a trapped electron in a quadrupole magnet. The electron makes gyration motion (called transverse motion) and also moves along the field line (called longitudinal motion). At the mirror point (middle of the field line), there is a maximum longitudinal energy and minimum transverse energy. When the electron moves away from the mirror point, its longitudinal energy reduces and the transverse energy increases as the magnetic field increases. If the magnetic field is strong enough, the longitudinal energy becomes zero at one point and then the electron is turned back by the strong field. Note that the electrons are trapped in the region near the middle of the field lines. Although all quadrupole and sextupole magnets can trap electrons in principle, the trapping

  6. Energetic ion observations in the magnetic cloud of 14-15 January 1988 and their implications for the magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1991-01-01

    On 14-15 January 1988, a magnetic cloud with a local field topology consistent with an east-west aligned cylindrical flux-rope and which formed the driver of an interplanetary shock passed the earth. Using 0.5-4 MeV/n ion data from the instrument on IMP 8, the paper addresses the question of whether or not magnetic field lines within the magnetic cloud were connected to the sun. An impulsive solar particle event was detected inside the magnetic cloud strongly suggesting that the field lines were rooted at the sun.

  7. LONG-LIVED MAGNETIC-TENSION-DRIVEN MODES IN A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Shantanu; Dapp, Wolf B. E-mail: wdapp@uwo.c

    2010-06-10

    We calculate and analyze the longevity of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes that occur in the plane of a magnetic thin sheet. Initial turbulent conditions applied to a magnetically subcritical cloud are shown to lead to relatively rapid energy decay if ambipolar diffusion is introduced at a level corresponding to partial ionization primarily by cosmic rays. However, in the flux-freezing limit, as may be applicable to photoionized molecular cloud envelopes, the turbulence persists at 'nonlinear' levels in comparison with the isothermal sound speed c {sub s}, with one-dimensional rms material motions in the range of {approx} 2 c {sub s}-5 c {sub s} for cloud sizes in the range of {approx} 2 pc-16 pc. These fluctuations persist indefinitely, maintaining a significant portion of the initial turbulent kinetic energy. We find the analytic explanation for these persistent fluctuations. They are magnetic-tension-driven modes associated with the interaction of the sheet with the external magnetic field. The phase speed of such modes is quite large, allowing residual motions to persist without dissipation in the flux-freezing limit, even as they are nonlinear with respect to the sound speed. We speculate that long-lived large-scale MHD modes such as these may provide the key to understanding observed supersonic motions in molecular clouds.

  8. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  9. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium structure and mass of filamentary isothermal cloud threaded by lateral magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2014-04-10

    Herschel observations have recently revealed that interstellar molecular clouds consist of many filaments. Polarization observations in optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that the magnetic field often runs perpendicular to the filament. In this article, we study the magnetohydrostatic configuration of isothermal gas in which the thermal pressure and the Lorentz force are balanced against the self-gravity, and the magnetic field is globally perpendicular to the axis of the filament. The model is controlled by three parameters: center-to-surface density ratio (ρ {sub c}/ρ {sub s}), plasma β of surrounding interstellar gas (β{sub 0}), and the radius of the hypothetical parent cloud normalized by the scale-height (R{sub 0}{sup ′}), although there remains freedom in how the mass is distributed against the magnetic flux (mass loading). In the case where R{sub 0}{sup ′} is small enough, the magnetic field plays a role in confining the gas. However, the magnetic field generally has the effect of supporting the cloud. There is a maximum line-mass (mass per unit length) above which the cloud is not supported against gravity. Compared with the maximum line-mass of a nonmagnetized cloud (2c{sub s}{sup 2}/G, where c{sub s} and G represent, respectively, the isothermal sound speed and the gravitational constant), that of the magnetized filament is larger than the nonmagnetized one. The maximum line-mass is numerically obtained as λ{sub max}≃0.24Φ{sub cl}/G{sup 1/2}+1.66c{sub s}{sup 2}/G, where Φ{sub cl} represents one half of the magnetic flux threading the filament per unit length. The maximum mass of the filamentary cloud is shown to be significantly affected by the magnetic field when the magnetic flux per unit length exceeds Φ{sub cl} ≳ 3 pc μG (c{sub s} /190 m s{sup –1}){sup 2}.

  10. TRACING THE MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY OF THE LUPUS I MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, G. A. P.; Alves, F. O. E-mail: falves@mpe.mpg.de

    2015-07-01

    Deep R-band CCD linear polarimetry collected for fields with lines of sight toward the Lupus I molecular cloud is used to investigate the properties of the magnetic field within this molecular cloud. The observed sample contains about 7000 stars, almost 2000 of them with a polarization signal-to-noise ratio larger than 5. These data cover almost the entire main molecular cloud and also sample two diffuse infrared patches in the neighborhood of Lupus I. The large-scale pattern of the plane-of-sky projection of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the main axis of Lupus I, but parallel to the two diffuse infrared patches. A detailed analysis of our polarization data combined with the Herschel/SPIRE 350 μm dust emission map shows that the principal filament of Lupus I is constituted by three main clumps that are acted on by magnetic fields that have different large-scale structural properties. These differences may be the reason for the observed distribution of pre- and protostellar objects along the molecular cloud and the cloud’s apparent evolutionary stage. On the other hand, assuming that the magnetic field is composed of large-scale and turbulent components, we find that the latter is rather similar in all three clumps. The estimated plane-of-sky component of the large-scale magnetic field ranges from about 70 to 200 μG in these clumps. The intensity increases toward the Galactic plane. The mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is much smaller than unity, implying that Lupus I is magnetically supported on large scales.

  11. Tracing the Magnetic Field Morphology of the Lupus I Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, G. A. P.; Alves, F. O.

    2015-07-01

    Deep R-band CCD linear polarimetry collected for fields with lines of sight toward the Lupus I molecular cloud is used to investigate the properties of the magnetic field within this molecular cloud. The observed sample contains about 7000 stars, almost 2000 of them with a polarization signal-to-noise ratio larger than 5. These data cover almost the entire main molecular cloud and also sample two diffuse infrared patches in the neighborhood of Lupus I. The large-scale pattern of the plane-of-sky projection of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the main axis of Lupus I, but parallel to the two diffuse infrared patches. A detailed analysis of our polarization data combined with the Herschel/SPIRE 350 μm dust emission map shows that the principal filament of Lupus I is constituted by three main clumps that are acted on by magnetic fields that have different large-scale structural properties. These differences may be the reason for the observed distribution of pre- and protostellar objects along the molecular cloud and the cloud’s apparent evolutionary stage. On the other hand, assuming that the magnetic field is composed of large-scale and turbulent components, we find that the latter is rather similar in all three clumps. The estimated plane-of-sky component of the large-scale magnetic field ranges from about 70 to 200 μG in these clumps. The intensity increases toward the Galactic plane. The mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is much smaller than unity, implying that Lupus I is magnetically supported on large scales. Based on observations collected at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCTI, Brazil).

  12. STEREO Observations of an SEP Event Injected Into Both Loop Legs of a Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresing, N.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Hidalgo, M. A. U.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.

    2015-12-01

    On 7 Nov 2013 STEREO B was embedded in a magnetic-cloud (MC) like structure when an SEP event occurred reaching both STEREO spacecraft. The bi-drectional near relativistic electron distribution observed by STEREO B reveals such timing and relative intensity characteristics suggesting that the SEPs were injected separately into both loop legs of the MC. Observations by the Nancay Radioheliograph (NRH) of two distinct radio sources at the same time further support the above scenario. In order to derive the 3D morphology and average speed of the CME close to the Sun, we use the graduated cylindrical shell model (GCS) which is applied to the white-light coronagraph observations by the STEREO spacecraft and SOHO. Furthermore, a global magnetic topology model for magnetic clouds is applied to the in-situ measurements of the magnetic field. Both models suggest that the MC is strongly inclined with respect to the ecliptic yielding a north/south orientation. The energetic electron observations are used to probe the structure of the magnetic cloud: We determine the electron path lengths along both loop legs of the structure to infer the amount of field line twist inside the MC. The resulting path lengths are around 50% longer than the estimated lengths of the loop legs of the MC itself suggesting that the amount of field line winding is moderate.

  13. Virial theorem analysis of the structure and stability of magnetized clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1990-01-01

    The tensor virial theorem is used to analyze the structure and stability of self-gravitating, magnetized spheroids surrounded by a low-density medium with pressure and magnetic field. Analytical expressions are developed for the effect of a weak field and calculate critical states when the effect of the field is arbitrarily strong, comparing the results with full magnetohydrostatic calculations. This analysis suggests that a magnetic field may prevent gravitational collapse but may also be destabilizing, depending on its degree of concentration within the cloud.

  14. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:26793269

  15. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  16. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    DOE PAGES

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain themore » $$\\pi BB'$$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.« less

  17. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain the $\\pi BB'$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.

  18. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    SciTech Connect

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji; Miao, Jingqi; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi; Sato, Yaeko; Watanabe, Makoto; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagayama, Takahiro; Sato, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ∼90 μG, is stronger than that far inside, ∼30 μG. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Electron Cloud Containment in a Nonuniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dense clouds of electrons were generated and studied in an axisymmetric, nonuniform magnetic field created by a short solenoid. The operation of the experiment was similar to that of a low-pressure (approximately 0.000001 Torr) magnetron discharge. Discharge current characteristics are presented as a function of pressure, magnetic field strength, voltage, and cathode end-plate location. The rotation of the electron cloud is determined from the frequency of diocotron waves. In the space charge saturated regime of operation, the cloud is found to rotate as a solid body with frequency close to V sub a/phi sub a where V sub a is the anode voltage and phi suba is the total magnetic flux. This result indicates that, in regions where electrons are present, the magnetic field lines are electrostatic equipotentials (E bar, B bar = 0). Equilibrium electron density distributions suggested by this conditions are integrated with respect to total ionizing power and are found consistent with measured discharge currents.

  20. Matching dust emission structures and magnetic field in high-latitude cloud L1642: comparing Herschel and Planck maps★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, J.; Montier, L.; Montillaud, J.; Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Clark, S. E.; Berné, O.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Collins, D. C.

    2016-08-01

    The nearby cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. It is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g. of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642. The high-resolution (˜20 arcsec) Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central clump, and low-density striations. The Planck polarization data (at 10 arcmin resolution) reveal an ordered magnetic field pervading the cloud and aligned with the surrounding striations. There is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large-scale magnetic field. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. CO rotational emission confirms that the striations are connected with the main clumps and likely to contain material either falling into or flowing out of the clumps. There is a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 1.6 × 1021 cm-2. Comparing the Herschel maps with the Planck polarization maps shows the close connection between the magnetic field and cloud structure even in the finest details of the cloud.

  1. Matching dust emission structures and magnetic field in high-latitude cloud L1642: comparing Herschel and Planck maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, J.; Montier, L.; Montillaud, J.; Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Clark, S. E.; Berné, O.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Collins, D. C.

    2016-08-01

    The nearby cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. It is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g. of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642. The high-resolution (˜20 arcsec) Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central clump, and low-density striations. The Planck polarization data (at 10 arcmin resolution) reveal an ordered magnetic field pervading the cloud and aligned with the surrounding striations. There is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large-scale magnetic field. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. CO rotational emission confirms that the striations are connected with the main clumps and likely to contain material either falling into or flowing out of the clumps. There is a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 1.6 × 1021 cm-2. Comparing the Herschel maps with the Planck polarization maps shows the close connection between the magnetic field and cloud structure even in the finest details of the cloud.

  2. The effects of magnetic fields in cold clouds in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Jafelice, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Large masses of absorbing material are inferred to exist in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies from the excess X-ray absorption in the spectra of some X-ray clusters. The absorbing material is probably in the form of cold clouds pressure-confined by the surrounding, hot, X-ray-emitting gas. The cold clouds could remain relatively static until they are destroyed by evaporation or ablation, or give rise to star formation. If the final fate of the clouds is stars, the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars formed over the whole cooling-flow region (r~ 100 kpc) should be biased to low masses, to avoid a very luminous, blue halo for the central galaxy of the cooling flow. However, there is evidence for bright star formation in the innermost (r<= 10 kpc) regions of some cooling flows, and, therefore, the biasing of the IMF towards low masses should not occur or should be less important at smaller radii. The consideration of magnetic fields may shed light on these two points. If magnetic fields are present, the magnetic critical mass should be considered, besides the Jeans mass, in establishing a natural mass-scale for star formation. When this new mass-scale is taken into account, we obtain the right variation of the biasing of the IMF with the radius in addition to inhibition of high-mass star formation at large radii. We also demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is a more efficient mechanism than ambipolar diffusion to remove magnetic fields in cold clouds.

  3. Passive shimming of a superconducting magnet using the L1-norm regularized least square algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xia; Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Wang, Qiuliang; Li, Yi; Zhu, Xuchen; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The uniformity of the static magnetic field B0 is of prime importance for an MRI system. The passive shimming technique is usually applied to improve the uniformity of the static field by optimizing the layout of a series of steel shims. The steel pieces are fixed in the drawers in the inner bore of the superconducting magnet, and produce a magnetizing field in the imaging region to compensate for the inhomogeneity of the B0 field. In practice, the total mass of steel used for shimming should be minimized, in addition to the field uniformity requirement. This is because the presence of steel shims may introduce a thermal stability problem. The passive shimming procedure is typically realized using the linear programming (LP) method. The LP approach however, is generally slow and also has difficulty balancing the field quality and the total amount of steel for shimming. In this paper, we have developed a new algorithm that is better able to balance the dual constraints of field uniformity and the total mass of the shims. The least square method is used to minimize the magnetic field inhomogeneity over the imaging surface with the total mass of steel being controlled by an L1-norm based constraint. The proposed algorithm has been tested with practical field data, and the results show that, with similar computational cost and mass of shim material, the new algorithm achieves superior field uniformity (43% better for the test case) compared with the conventional linear programming approach.

  4. Passive shimming of a superconducting magnet using the L1-norm regularized least square algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xia; Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Wang, Qiuliang; Li, Yi; Zhu, Xuchen; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The uniformity of the static magnetic field B0 is of prime importance for an MRI system. The passive shimming technique is usually applied to improve the uniformity of the static field by optimizing the layout of a series of steel shims. The steel pieces are fixed in the drawers in the inner bore of the superconducting magnet, and produce a magnetizing field in the imaging region to compensate for the inhomogeneity of the B0 field. In practice, the total mass of steel used for shimming should be minimized, in addition to the field uniformity requirement. This is because the presence of steel shims may introduce a thermal stability problem. The passive shimming procedure is typically realized using the linear programming (LP) method. The LP approach however, is generally slow and also has difficulty balancing the field quality and the total amount of steel for shimming. In this paper, we have developed a new algorithm that is better able to balance the dual constraints of field uniformity and the total mass of the shims. The least square method is used to minimize the magnetic field inhomogeneity over the imaging surface with the total mass of steel being controlled by an L1-norm based constraint. The proposed algorithm has been tested with practical field data, and the results show that, with similar computational cost and mass of shim material, the new algorithm achieves superior field uniformity (43% better for the test case) compared with the conventional linear programming approach. PMID:26784397

  5. Passive shimming of a superconducting magnet using the L1-norm regularized least square algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xia; Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Wang, Qiuliang; Li, Yi; Zhu, Xuchen; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    The uniformity of the static magnetic field B0 is of prime importance for an MRI system. The passive shimming technique is usually applied to improve the uniformity of the static field by optimizing the layout of a series of steel shims. The steel pieces are fixed in the drawers in the inner bore of the superconducting magnet, and produce a magnetizing field in the imaging region to compensate for the inhomogeneity of the B0 field. In practice, the total mass of steel used for shimming should be minimized, in addition to the field uniformity requirement. This is because the presence of steel shims may introduce a thermal stability problem. The passive shimming procedure is typically realized using the linear programming (LP) method. The LP approach however, is generally slow and also has difficulty balancing the field quality and the total amount of steel for shimming. In this paper, we have developed a new algorithm that is better able to balance the dual constraints of field uniformity and the total mass of the shims. The least square method is used to minimize the magnetic field inhomogeneity over the imaging surface with the total mass of steel being controlled by an L1-norm based constraint. The proposed algorithm has been tested with practical field data, and the results show that, with similar computational cost and mass of shim material, the new algorithm achieves superior field uniformity (43% better for the test case) compared with the conventional linear programming approach.

  6. Correlation of electron path lengths observed in the highly wound outer region of magnetic clouds with the slab fraction of magnetic turbulence in the dissipation range

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, Xi; Reames, Donald V.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Linghua

    2014-05-10

    Three magnetic cloud events, in which solar impulsive electron events occurred in their outer region, are employed to investigate the difference of path lengths L {sub 0eIII} traveled by non-relativistic electrons from their release site near the Sun to the observer at 1 AU, where L {sub 0eIII} = v {sub l} × (t {sub l} – t {sub III}), v {sub l} and t {sub l} being the velocity and arrival time of electrons in the lowest energy channel (∼27 keV) of the Wind/3DP/SST sensor, respectively, and t {sub III} being the onset time of type III radio bursts. The deduced L {sub 0eIII} value ranges from 1.3 to 3.3 AU. Since a negligible interplanetary scattering level can be seen in both L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU and ∼1.2 AU events, the difference in L {sub 0eIII} could be linked to the turbulence geometry (slab or two-dimensional) in the solar wind. By using the Wind/MFI magnetic field data with a time resolution of 92 ms, we examine the turbulence geometry in the dissipation range. In our examination, ∼6 minutes of sampled subintervals are used in order to improve time resolution. We have found that, in the transverse turbulence, the observed slab fraction is increased with an increasing L {sub 0eIII} value, reaching ∼100% in the L {sub 0eIII} > 3 AU event. Our observation implies that when only the slab spectral component exists, magnetic flux tubes (magnetic surfaces) are closed and regular for a very long distance along the transport route of particles.

  7. A Radio and Optical Polarization Study of the Magnetic Field in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Stanimirovic, S.; Haverkorn, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Dickey, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), carried out using radio Faraday rotation and optical starlight polarization data. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) across the SMC indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field is directed uniformly away from us with a strength 0.19 {+-} 0.06 {mu}G. Applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method to starlight polarization data yields an ordered magnetic field in the plane of the sky of strength 1.6 {+-} 0.4 {mu}G oriented at a position angle 4deg {+-} 12deg , measured counterclockwise from the great circle on the sky joining the SMC to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We construct a three-dimensional magnetic field model of the SMC, under the assumption that the RMs and starlight polarization probe the same underlying large-scale field. The vector defining the overall orientation of the SMC magnetic field shows a potential alignment with the vector joining the center of the SMC to the center of the LMC, suggesting the possibility of a 'pan-Magellanic' magnetic field. A cosmic-ray-driven dynamo is the most viable explanation of the observed field geometry, but has difficulties accounting for the observed unidirectional field lines. A study of Faraday rotation through the Magellanic Bridge is needed to further test the pan-Magellanic field hypothesis.

  8. Calculating the dynamics of a charged gas cloud in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysikov, Iu. I.

    1981-02-01

    The dynamics of a spinning ellipsoidal gas cloud in a longitudinal magnetic field are investigated for the case where the particles possess a small charge. The particle gas is regarded as the ideal, and the process of expansion (contraction) is considered adiabatic. It is shown that in the approach of Ovsiannikov (1956) a system of primary integrals exists that greatly simplifies the task. An exact solution is found for certain simple cases.

  9. Injection of solar energetic particles into both loop legs of a magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Klassen, A.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Each of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft carries a Solar Electron and Proton Telescope (SEPT) which measures electrons and protons. Anisotropy observations are provided in four viewing directions: along the nominal magnetic field Parker spiral in the ecliptic towards the Sun (SUN) and away from the Sun (Anti-Sun/ASUN), and towards the north (NORTH) and south (SOUTH). The solar energetic particle (SEP) event on 7 November 2013 was observed by both STEREO spacecraft, which were longitudinally separated by 68° at that time. While STEREO A observed the expected characteristics of an SEP event at a well-connected position, STEREO B detected a very anisotropic bi-directional distribution of near-relativistic electrons and was situated inside a magnetic-cloud-like structure during the early phase of the event. Aims: We examine the source of the bi-directional SEP distribution at STEREO B. On the one hand this distribution could be caused by a double injection into both loop legs of the magnetic cloud (MC). On the other hand, a mirroring scenario where the incident beam is reflected in the opposite loop leg could be the reason. Furthermore, the energetic electron observations are used to probe the magnetic structure inside the magnetic cloud. Methods: We investigate in situ plasma and magnetic field observations and show that STEREO B was embedded in an MC-like structure ejected three days earlier on 4 November from the same active region. We apply a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model to the coronagraph observations from three viewpoints as well as the Global Magnetic Cloud (GMC) model to the in situ measurements at STEREO B to determine the orientation and topology of the MC close to the Sun and at 1 AU. We also estimate the path lengths of the electrons propagating through the MC to estimate the amount of magnetic field line winding inside the structure. Results: The relative intensity and timing of the energetic electron

  10. Energy Deposition in Magnetic Cloud and High Speed Stream Driven Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Turner, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    The solar wind couples a large amount of energy into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system; this energy is released in the form of geomagnetic storms. While the precise mechanism for this coupling and release is yet unclear, it is well established that different solar wind conditions create different responses within the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We are examining the impact of high speed stream-driven and magnetic cloud-driven storms on the global redistribution of energy throughout the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Data are used from ACE, WIND, and ground magnetometers. We estimate the energy input and output for multiple geomagnetic storms spanning from1995 to 1998. The comparison of storms reveals high speed stream-driven storms deposit less energy per second, but over longer durations. The comparison further reveals magnetic cloud-driven storms have deeper Dst* depressions but with shorter durations. Our results suggest magnetic cloud-driven storms with similar input parameters as high speed stream-driven storms produce an overall lower energy deposition.

  11. A simple model of Forbush decreases caused by sheathless magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbovic, Mateja; Vrsnak, Bojan; Calogovic, Jasa; Sudar, Davor; Heber, Bernd; Wallmann, Carsten; Galsdorf, Dennis; Herbst, Konstantin; Kuhl, Patrick; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Mostl, Christian; Dalla, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    A simple model has been derived that qualitatively describes short-term galactic cosmic ray (CR) decreases, i.e. Forbush decreases (FDs) caused by magnetic clouds (MCs) that drive no sheath region. The model is based on the interaction of the MC and CRs where the time profile of the CRs during the passage of the MC can be represented by the radial profile of trapped particles within a cylindrical 2D region, when a constant magnetic field is switched on. The model predicts that the number of CRs will decrease towards the center of the MC. The profile and its amplitude depend on the magnetic field strength and spatial extent of the MC. Although the model is based on basic electrodynamics only, it has the potential to forecast the amplitude as function of particle energy, and MC radius and magnetic field strength. We test the model on a sample of events using in situ magnetic cloud measurements from ACE and WIND satellites as well as CR measurements by EPHIN detector onboard SOHO satellite. This work has been supported in part by Croatian Science Foundation under the project 6212 "Solar and Stellar Variability" and by MZOS/DAAD bilateral project CORAMOD.

  12. Standard map in magnetized relativistic systems: fixed points and regular acceleration.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, M C; Steffens, F M; Pakter, R; Rizzato, F B

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the concept of a standard map for the interaction of relativistic particles and electrostatic waves of arbitrary amplitudes, under the action of external magnetic fields. The map is adequate for physical settings where waves and particles interact impulsively, and allows for a series of analytical result to be exactly obtained. Unlike the traditional form of the standard map, the present map is nonlinear in the wave amplitude and displays a series of peculiar properties. Among these properties we discuss the relation involving fixed points of the maps and accelerator regimes.

  13. Comparing Herschel dust emission structures, magnetic fields observed by Planck, and dynamics: high-latitude star forming cloud L1642

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The nearby high-latitude cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. This cloud is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642, and also combine these with dynamic information from molecular line observations. The high-resolution Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data reveal an ordered magnetic field that pervades the cloud and is aligned with the surrounding low density striations. We show that there is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic fields revealed by Planck polarization data at 10' resolution. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. We see a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 2x10^21 cm-2. We conclude that Planck polarization data revealing the large scale magnetic field orientation can be very useful even when comparing to the finest structures in higher resolution data, e.g. Herschel at ~18" resolution.

  14. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-03-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disc formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima et al. demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the buildup of a rotationally supported disc. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disc without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio (μ) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disc is nearly constant in their models. In this paper, we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of μ in the inner regions where the disc is built up. We demonstrate that turbulence-induced reconnection diffusion of the magnetic field happens in the initial stages of the disc formation in the turbulent envelope material that is accreting. Our analysis is suggestive that reconnection diffusion is present in both sets of simulations and provides a simple solution for the `magnetic braking catastrophe' which is discussed in the literature in relation to the formation of protostellar accretion discs.

  15. The Role of Magnetic Braking and Ambipolar Diffusion in the Formation of Interstellar Cloud Cores and Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu

    The means by which parent molecular clouds give birth to stars constitutes a fundamental unsolved problem in astrophysics. Magnetic fields, which dominate thermal -pressure as a source of support against self-gravity in interstellar molecular clouds, are an important regulator of star-formation. We study the formation and contraction of fragments (or cores) in isothermal, rotating, magnetic molecular clouds. Initial states are exact equilibria with magnetic, centrifugal, and thermal-pressure forces balancing self-gravity. The full nonlinear two-fluid MHD equations for a flattened disk are solved numerically to obtain the cloud's evolution. The evolution of the model clouds is initiated entirely by the onset of magnetic braking (the transport of angular momentum by torsional Alfven waves) and ambipolar diffusion (the relative drift between neutral and charged particles). A core forms and ultimately evolves much more rapidly than the surrounding cloud. A core-envelope separation is demonstrated, and the final mass and angular momentum of the core is determined. Predictions are made for the spatial profiles of important physical quantities, e.g., angular velocity, density, magnetic field. A full parameter study is conducted.

  16. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  17. Optical and Magnetic Resonance Studies of Regio-Regular and Regio-Random Poly (3-hexylthiophene)/PCBM Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukic-Markosian, Golda; Zhang, Ye; Singh, Sanjeev; Vardeny, Valy

    2010-03-01

    Regio-regular (RR) P3HT has been successfully used as donor polymer in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells based on blends with fullerene acceptors; with power conversion efficiencies of over 6%. However, when regio-random (RR-a) P3HT is used as donor polymer in the blend, the power conversion efficiency drops to less than 0.5%. We have used various optical and magnetic resonance techniques to elucidate the charge photogeneration in the two polymer/fullerene blends. Using tunneling electron microscopy we conclude that phase separation takes place in blends based on RR P3HT but not in blends based on RR-a P3HT. Photoluminescence spectrum shows a prominent band in RR-a P3HT blend at 1.32 eV, indicating the dominance of charge transfer exciton recombination. Photoinduced absorption shows higher localization of polarons in RRa-P3HT blend, with a distinct PA band due to negative polaron on PCBM molecules. Photoinduced absorption detected magnetic resonance resolves the contributions of RR-a P3HT and PCBM as two resonances indicating positive polarons on the polymer and negative polaron on the fullerene. A model based on our experimental results will be discussed.

  18. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions accelerated by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.

  19. Rigid-body rotation of an electron cloud in divergent magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-07-10

    For a given voltage across a divergent poloidal magnetic field, two electric potential distributions, each supported by a rigid-rotor electron cloud rotating with a different frequency, are found analytically. The two rotation frequencies correspond to the slow and fast rotation frequencies known in uniform plasma. Due to the centrifugal force, the equipotential surfaces, that correspond to the two electric potential distributions, diverge more than the magnetic surfaces do, the equipotential surfaces in the fast mode diverge largely in particular. The departure of the equipotential surfaces from the magnetic field surfaces may have a significant focusing effect on the ions acceleratedmore » by the electric field. Furthermore, the focusing effect could be important for laboratory plasma accelerators as well as for collimation of astrophysical jets.« less

  20. Magnetic Braking, Ambipolar Diffusion, and the Formation of Cloud Cores and Protostars. II. A Parameter Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    1995-10-01

    The formulation of the problem of the formation of protostellar cores in self-gravitating, magnetically supported, rotating, isothermal model molecular clouds was presented in a previous paper, where detailed numerical simulations for two different model clouds were also discussed. In this paper, we study the effect of varying five dimensionless free parameters: the ratio ˜p of external density and central density in a reference state (which is related simply to an initial equilibrium state), the initial radial length scale l˜ref of the column density of the cloud, the central angular velocity of the reference state ˜Ωc,ref, the central neutral-ion collision time in the reference state ˜τni,ref (which is inversely proportional to the collapse retardation factor Vff ≡ τff/τni) and the exponent k in the relation between the ion and neutral densities ni ∝ nkn. In addition to the models previously presented, seven more models are investigated here. Different values (1/1000 to 1/100) of the initial magnetic-braking efficiency parameter ˜p(>0) do not significantly affect the evolution; magnetic braking remains effective during the quasistatic phase and ineffective during the (dynamic) collapse of the magnetically and thermally supercritical core. The initially very effective magnetic braking also means that the solution is insensitive to values of ˜Ωc,ref. Different values of l˜ref yield qualitatively similar evolution, with smaller cloud sizes leading to slightly smaller core sizes. Increasing the value of τni,ref leads to a more rapid evolution and larger, more rapidly rotating cores. A smaller k leads to relatively more rapid evolution in the core and a better core-envelope separation. We also give an analytical explanation of the previously presented result, that the gravitational field acting on an infalling mass shell in the central region of a nonhomologously contracting thin disk increases as 1/r3m, where rm is the Lagrangian radius of the shell.

  1. Particle tracks in a cloud chamber: historical photographs as a context for studying magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2012-11-01

    We present a sequence of experiments aimed at exploring magnetic force. The activity sequence was organized into three main phases, each starting from an experiment. The first phase aimed to help students understand the direction and magnitude of the magnetic force experienced by current-carrying wires located in a homogeneous magnetic field; the second referred to the study of magnetic force acting on electrons emitted by a cathode and moving through a homogeneous magnetic field; finally, students were asked to analyse the sub-nuclear particle tracks in cloud and streamer chambers in real experiments, based on the experience they acquired during previous work with digital photographs. The activity sequence was designed for students on introductory physics courses or in advanced high-school classes and was implemented in five high-school classes (approximately 100 students). Our results compared with those reported in the literature indicate that students' understanding of the direction and magnitude of magnetic force improved markedly and that some typical difficulties were overcome.

  2. On the magnetic fields of Be/X-ray pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Mereghetti, S.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the possibility of explaining the properties of the Be/X-ray pulsars observed in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) within the magnetic levitation accretion scenario. This implies that their X-ray emission is powered by a wind-fed accretion on to a neutron star (NS) which captures matter from a magnetized stellar wind. The NS in this case is accreting matter from a non-Keplerian magnetically levitating disc which is surrounding its magnetosphere. This allows us to explain the observed periods of the pulsars in terms of spin equilibrium without the need of invoking dipole magnetic fields outside the usual range ˜1011-1013 G inferred from cyclotron features of Galactic high-mass X-ray binaries. We find that the equilibrium period of a NS, under certain conditions, depends strongly on the magnetization of the stellar wind of its massive companion and, correspondingly, on the magnetic field of the massive companion itself. This may help to explain why similar NSs in binaries with similar properties rotate with different periods yielding a large scatter of periods of the accretion-powered pulsar observed in SMC and our galaxy.

  3. Collapse and fragmentation of magnetic molecular cloud cores with the Enzo AMR MHD code. II. Prolate and oblate cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of a large suite of three-dimensional models of the collapse of magnetic molecular cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.2 in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics approximation. The cloud cores are initially either prolate or oblate, centrally condensed clouds with masses of 1.73 or 2.73 M {sub ☉}, respectively. The radial density profiles are Gaussian, with central densities 20 times higher than boundary densities. A barotropic equation of state is used to represent the transition from low density isothermal phases, to high density optically thick phases. The initial magnetic field strength ranges from 6.3 to 100 μG, corresponding to clouds that are strongly to marginally supercritical, respectively, in terms of the mass to magnetic flux ratio. The magnetic field is initially uniform and aligned with the clouds' rotation axes, with initial ratios of rotational to gravitational energy ranging from 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Two significantly different outcomes for collapse result: (1) formation of single protostars with spiral arms, and (2) fragmentation into multiple protostar systems. The transition between these two outcomes depends primarily on the initial magnetic field strength, with fragmentation occurring for mass to flux ratios greater than about 14 times the critical ratio for prolate clouds. Oblate clouds typically fragment into several times more clumps than prolate clouds. Multiple, rather than binary, system formation is the general rule in either case, suggesting that binary stars are primarily the result of the orbital dissolution of multiple protostar systems.

  4. Comparison of Magnetic Properties in a Magnetic Cloud and Its Solar Source on 2013 April 11–14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Möstl, C.; Amerstorfer, T.; Mishra, W.; Farrugia, C.; Leitner, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the Sun–Earth connection of coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), we studied the solar active region (AR) and the magnetic properties of magnetic cloud (MC) event during 2013 April 14–15. We use in situ observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer and source AR measurements from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The MCs magnetic structure is reconstructed from the Grad–Shafranov method, which reveals a northern component of the axial field with left handed helicity. The MC invariant axis is highly inclined to the ecliptic plane pointing northward and is rotated by 117° with respect to the source region PIL. The net axial flux and current in the MC are comparatively higher than from the source region. Linear force-free alpha distribution (10‑7–10‑6 m‑1) at the sigmoid leg matches the range of twist number in the MC of 1–2 au MFR. The MFR is nonlinear force-free with decreasing twist from the axis (9 turns/au) toward the edge. Therefore, a Gold–Hoyle (GH) configuration, assuming a constant twist, is more consistent with the MC structure than the Lundquist configuration of increasing twist from the axis to boundary. As an indication of that, the GH configuration yields a better fitting to the global trend of in situ magnetic field components, in terms of rms, than the Lundquist model. These cylindrical configurations improved the MC fitting results when the effect of self-similar expansion of MFR was considered. For such twisting behavior, this study suggests an alternative fitting procedure to better characterize the MC magnetic structure and its source region links.

  5. Comparison of Magnetic Properties in a Magnetic Cloud and Its Solar Source on 2013 April 11-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Möstl, C.; Amerstorfer, T.; Mishra, W.; Farrugia, C.; Leitner, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the Sun-Earth connection of coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), we studied the solar active region (AR) and the magnetic properties of magnetic cloud (MC) event during 2013 April 14-15. We use in situ observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer and source AR measurements from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The MCs magnetic structure is reconstructed from the Grad-Shafranov method, which reveals a northern component of the axial field with left handed helicity. The MC invariant axis is highly inclined to the ecliptic plane pointing northward and is rotated by 117° with respect to the source region PIL. The net axial flux and current in the MC are comparatively higher than from the source region. Linear force-free alpha distribution (10-7-10-6 m-1) at the sigmoid leg matches the range of twist number in the MC of 1-2 au MFR. The MFR is nonlinear force-free with decreasing twist from the axis (9 turns/au) toward the edge. Therefore, a Gold-Hoyle (GH) configuration, assuming a constant twist, is more consistent with the MC structure than the Lundquist configuration of increasing twist from the axis to boundary. As an indication of that, the GH configuration yields a better fitting to the global trend of in situ magnetic field components, in terms of rms, than the Lundquist model. These cylindrical configurations improved the MC fitting results when the effect of self-similar expansion of MFR was considered. For such twisting behavior, this study suggests an alternative fitting procedure to better characterize the MC magnetic structure and its source region links.

  6. Use of incident and reflected solar particle beams to trace the topology of magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, O.; Tan, L.; Reames, D.; Ng, C.; Wang, L.; Dorrian, G.

    2012-04-01

    Occasionally, large solar energetic particle (SEP) events occur inside magnetic clouds (MCs). In this work the onset time analysis, the peak intensity analysis, and the decay phase analysis of SEPs are used to investigate two large SEP events inside MCs: the 1998 May 2 and 2002 April 21 events. The onset time analysis of non-relativistic electrons and ~MeVnucleon-1 heavy ions exhibits the stability of the magnetic loop structure during a period of a few hours in the events examined. The joint analysis of pitch-angle distributions (PADs) and peak intensities of electrons indicates that in the April event the reflected particles with nearly zero pitch-angle at 1 AU could reach the vicinity of the Sun, implying that the magnetic loop was a magnetic bottle connected to the Sun with both legs. In contrast, in the May event the magnetic mirror was formed by a compressed field enhancement behind the interplanetary shock driven by a preceding coronal mass ejection, being consistent with its open field line topology. We have also measured the anisotropy characteristic of SEPs in the solar wind frame. At the MC boundary the PADs of both non-relativistic electrons and ~MeVnucleon-1 heavy ions are nearly isotropic, suggesting a diffusive transport environment of SEPs there. This work has received funding from the European Commission FP7 Project COMESEP (263252)

  7. Relativistic nuclear magnetic resonance J-coupling with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and the zeroth-order regular approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Timothy F. G. Yates, Jonathan R.

    2014-06-21

    We present a method for the first-principles calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) J-coupling in extended systems using state-of-the-art ultrasoft pseudopotentials and including scalar-relativistic effects. The use of ultrasoft pseudopotentials is allowed by extending the projector augmented wave (PAW) method of Joyce et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204107 (2007)]. We benchmark it against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for small molecules containing light elements, with good agreement. Scalar-relativistic effects are included at the zeroth-order regular approximation level of theory and benchmarked against existing local-orbital quantum chemical calculations and experiments for a number of small molecules containing the heavy row six elements W, Pt, Hg, Tl, and Pb, with good agreement. Finally, {sup 1}J(P-Ag) and {sup 2}J(P-Ag-P) couplings are calculated in some larger molecular crystals and compared against solid-state NMR experiments. Some remarks are also made as to improving the numerical stability of dipole perturbations using PAW.

  8. Multipoint observations and simulation of the effects of Earth's bow shock on magnetic clouds' structure and geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique; Turc, Lucile; Savoini, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic clouds represent a sub-class of coronal mass ejection (CME) capable to trigger very strong storms in the terrestrial environment. Their magnetic structure can be described as a flux rope and statistical studies show a dependence of their geoeffectiveness on the orientation of this flux rope relative to the terrestrial magnetic field. However, this primary dependence does not fully explain by itself the storm triggering and strength. Other effects as the cloud's sheath or events on its leading or trailing edges have been discussed. We investigate here the role of the bow shock that magnetic clouds cross before interacting with the magnetosphere. From observations in the solar wind upstream of the bow shock (ACE) and downstream (CLUSTER), we show that the bow show may strongly modify the cloud's magnetic structure and even cause the reversal of the IMF Bz component: this is crucial for the development of geomagnetic activity inside the magnetosphere. We show that this modification is related to the shock configuration (quasi-parallel, quasi-perpendicular) and we derive the upstream conditions leading to strong downstream distortions. In addition, we run hybrid simulations to analyze the different plasma behaviours in both configurations. In particular we discuss the results concerning the distribution of dynamical, thermal and magnetic pressures and the associated forces.

  9. Electron Cloud Generation and Trapping in a Quadrupole Magnet at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, Robert J.; Browman, Andrew A.; Ledford, John E.; Borden, Michael J.; O'Hara, James F.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Spickermann, Thomas; Zaugg, Thomas J.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Recent beam physics studies on the two-stream e-p instability at the LANL proton storage ring (PSR) have focused on the role of the electron cloud generated in quadrupole magnets where primary electrons, which seed beam-induced multipacting, are expected to be largest due to grazing angle losses from the beam halo. A new diagnostic to measure electron cloud formation and trapping in a quadrupole magnet has been developed, installed, and successfully tested at PSR. Beam studies using this diagnostic show that the 'prompt' electron flux striking the wall in a quadrupole is comparable to the prompt signal in the adjacent drift space. In addition, the 'swept' electron signal, obtained using the sweeping feature of the diagnostic after the beam was extracted from the ring, was larger than expected and decayed slowly with an exponential time constant of 50 to 100 {micro}s. Other measurements include the cumulative energy spectra of prompt electrons and the variation of both prompt and swept electron signals with beam intensity. Experimental results were also obtained which suggest that a good fraction of the electrons observed in the adjacent drift space for the typical beam conditions in the 2006 run cycle were seeded by electrons ejected from the quadrupole.

  10. A Circular-cylindrical Flux-rope Analytical Model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M. G.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Vourlidas, A.; Savani, N. P.; Szabo, A.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds (MCs). Our model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation. The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in situ observations. Four Earth-directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic field and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, the Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of the plasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical. An extension of our current modeling framework to account for such non-circular CMEs will be presented in a forthcoming publication.

  11. Circular-cylindrical flux-rope analytical model for Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Linton, Mark; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Savani, Neel P.; Szabo, Adam; Farrugia, Charlie; Yu, Wenyuan

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds ( MCs). The model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2000) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation.The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in-situ observations. Four Earth directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic fi eld and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of theplasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical.

  12. Mixed micelle cloud point-magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of doxazosin and alfuzosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nannan; Wu, Hao; Chang, Yafen; Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Lizhen; Du, Liming; Fu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Mixed micelle cloud point extraction (MM-CPE) combined with magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction (MD-μ-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for the extraction of doxazosin (DOX) and alfuzosin (ALF) prior to fluorescence analysis. The mixed micelle anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and non-ionic polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenylether was used as the extraction solvent in MM-CPE, and diatomite bonding Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were used as the adsorbent in MD-μ-SPE. The method was based on MM-CPE of DOX and ALF in the surfactant-rich phase. Magnetic materials were used to retrieve the surfactant-rich phase, which easily separated from the aqueous phase under magnetic field. At optimum conditions, a linear relationship between DOX and ALF was obtained in the range of 5-300 ng mL-1, and the limits of detection were 0.21 and 0.16 ng mL-1, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the drugs in pharmaceutical preparations, urine samples, and plasma samples.

  13. Mixed micelle cloud point-magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction of doxazosin and alfuzosin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nannan; Wu, Hao; Chang, Yafen; Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Lizhen; Du, Liming; Fu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Mixed micelle cloud point extraction (MM-CPE) combined with magnetic dispersive μ-solid phase extraction (MD-μ-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for the extraction of doxazosin (DOX) and alfuzosin (ALF) prior to fluorescence analysis. The mixed micelle anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and non-ionic polyoxyethylene(7.5)nonylphenylether was used as the extraction solvent in MM-CPE, and diatomite bonding Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles were used as the adsorbent in MD-μ-SPE. The method was based on MM-CPE of DOX and ALF in the surfactant-rich phase. Magnetic materials were used to retrieve the surfactant-rich phase, which easily separated from the aqueous phase under magnetic field. At optimum conditions, a linear relationship between DOX and ALF was obtained in the range of 5-300 ng mL(-1), and the limits of detection were 0.21 and 0.16 ng mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the drugs in pharmaceutical preparations, urine samples, and plasma samples.

  14. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  15. The collective gyration of a heavy ion cloud in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenning, N.; Swenson, C.; Kelley, M. C.; Providakes, J.; Torbert, R.

    1990-01-01

    In both the ionospheric barium injection experiments CRIT 1 and CRIT 2, a long duration oscillation was seen with a frequency close to the gyro frequency of barium and a time duration of about one second. A model for the phenomena which was proposed for the CRIT 1 experiment is compared to the results from CRIT 2 which made a much more complete set of measurements. The model follows the motion of a low Beta ion cloud through a larger ambient plasma. The internal field of the model is close to antiparallel to the injection direction v sub i but slightly tilted towards the self polarization direction E sub p = -V sub i by B. As the ions move across the magnetic field, the space charge is continuously neutralized by magnetic field aligned electron currents from the ambient ionosphere, drawn by the divergence in the perpendicular electric field. These currents give a perturbation of the magnetic field related to the electric field perturbation by Delta E/Delta B approximately equal to V sub A. The model predictions agree quite well with the observed vector directions, field strengths, and decay times of the electric and magnetic fields in CRIT 2. The possibility to extend the model to the active region, where the ions are produces in this type of self-ionizing injection experiments, is discussed.

  16. Comparison of Magnetic Field Structures on Different Scales in and around the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, F.; Bastien, P.

    2006-10-01

    New visible polarization data combined with existing IR and FIR polarization data are used to study how the magnetic field threading the filamentary molecular cloud GF 9 connects to larger structures in its general environment. When visible and NIR polarization data are combined, no evidence is found for a plateau in the polarization above extinction AV~1.3, as seen in dark clouds in Taurus. This lack of saturation effect suggests that even in the denser parts of GF 9 magnetic fields can be probed. The visible polarization is smooth and has a well-defined orientation. In the core region, the IR and FIR data are also well defined, but each with a different direction. A multiscale analysis of the magnetic field shows that on the scale of a few times the mean radial dimension of the molecular cloud, it is as if the magnetic field were ``blind'' to the spatial distribution of the filaments, while on smaller scales in the core region, multiwavelength polarimetry shows a rotation of the magnetic field lines in these denser phases. Finally, the Chandrasekhar and Fermi method is used to evaluate the magnetic field strength, indicating that the core region is approximately magnetically critical. A global interpretation suggests that in the core region an original poloidal field could have been twisted by a rotating elongated (core+envelope) structure. There is no evidence for turbulence, and ambipolar diffusion does not seem to be effective at the present time.

  17. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE STRUCTURES OF BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Kazutaka; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Shang, Hsien; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko

    2013-03-20

    The bright-rimmed cloud SFO 22 was observed with the 45 m telescope of Nobeyama Radio Observatory in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0), {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0), and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) lines, where well-developed head-tail structure and small line widths were found. Such features were predicted by radiation-driven implosion models, suggesting that SFO 22 may be in a quasi-stationary equilibrium state. We compare the observed properties with those from numerical models of a photoevaporating cloud, which include effects of magnetic pressure and heating due to strong far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from an exciting star. The magnetic pressure may play a more important role in the density structures of bright-rimmed clouds than the thermal pressure that is enhanced by the FUV radiation. The FUV radiation can heat the cloud surface to near 30 K; however, its effect is not enough to reproduce the observed density structure of SFO 22. An initial magnetic field of 5 {mu}G in our numerical models produces the best agreement with the observations, and its direction can affect the structures of bright-rimmed clouds.

  18. 3D hybrid simulations of the interaction of a magnetic cloud with a bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Fontaine, D.; Savoini, P.; Modolo, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of a magnetic cloud (MC) with a planetary bow shock using hybrid simulations. It is the first time to our knowledge that this interaction is studied using kinetic simulations which include self-consistently both the ion foreshock and the shock wave dynamics. We show that when the shock is in a quasi-perpendicular configuration, the MC's magnetic structure in the magnetosheath remains similar to that in the solar wind, whereas it is strongly altered downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The latter can result in a reversal of the magnetic field north-south component in some parts of the magnetosheath. We also investigate how the MC affects in turn the outer parts of the planetary environment, i.e., from the foreshock to the magnetopause. We find the following: (i) The decrease of the Alfvén Mach number at the MC's arrival causes an attenuation of the foreshock region because of the weakening of the bow shock. (ii) The foreshock moves along the bow shock's surface, following the rotation of the MC's magnetic field. (iii) Owing to the low plasma beta, asymmetric flows arise inside the magnetosheath, due to the magnetic tension force which accelerates the particles in some parts of the magnetosheath and slows them down in others. (iv) The quasi-parallel region forms a depression in the shock's surface. Other deformations of the magnetopause and the bow shock are also highlighted. All these effects can contribute to significantly modify the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling during MC events.

  19. A model for the behaviour of the Solar Energetic Particle Events inside Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J.; Hidalgo, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The modulation effects of the solar ejecta over the solar energetic particle event SEPe fluxes (0,5-100 MeV) provided by solar flares have recently been highlighted. Especially important is the behaviour of these fluxes inside MCs where, in spite of the low magnetic field intensities of these interplanetary structures (about 30 nT), a decrease in the population of the energetic particles is observed. In the present work it is shown a simple theoretical model we have developed to analyse the behaviour of those fluxes inside the magnetic clouds (MCs) using, as a starting point, our previous magnetic field model for MCs. The experimental data from ACE, GOES, SAMPEX, SOHO, Ulysses and WIND satellites are presented, both from MC coincident with SEPe and not coincident. This work has been supported by the Spanish Comisión Internacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CICYT), grant ESP2005-07290-C02-01 and ESP2006-08459 and Madrid Autonomous Community / University of Alcala grant CAM-UAH 2005/007. This work is performed inside COST Action 724.

  20. Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould belt molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The selected regions, covering several degrees in size, are analysed at an effective angular resolution of 10' FWHM, thus sampling physical scales from 0.4 to 40 pc in the nearest cloud. The column densities in the selected regions range from NH≈ 1021 to1023 cm-2, and hence they correspond to the bulk of the molecular clouds. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analysed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called "histogram of relative orientations". Throughout this study, we assume that the polarized emission observed by Planck at 353 GHz is representative of the projected morphology of the magnetic field in each region, i.e., we assume a constant dust grain alignment efficiency, independent of the local environment. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation to mostly perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from other methods and discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.

  1. The Angular Momentum of Magnetized Molecular Cloud Cores: A Two-dimensional-Three-dimensional Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Sami; Hennebelle, Patrick; Pineda, Jaime E.; Csengeri, Timea; Bontemps, Sylvain; Audit, Edouard; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the rotational properties of magnetized and self-gravitating dense molecular cloud (MC) cores formed in a set of two very high resolution three-dimensional (3D) MC simulations with decaying turbulence. The simulations have been performed using the adaptative mesh refinement code RAMSES with an effective resolution of 40963 grid cells. One simulation represents a mildly magnetically supercritical cloud and the other a strongly magnetically supercritical cloud. We identify dense cores at a number of selected epochs in the simulations at two density thresholds which roughly mimic the excitation densities of the NH3 (J - K) = (1,1) transition and the N2H+ (1-0) emission line. A noticeable global difference between the two simulations is the core formation efficiency (CFE) of the high-density cores. In the strongly supercritical simulations, the CFE is 33% per unit free-fall time of the cloud (t ff,cl), whereas in the mildly supercritical simulations this value goes down to ~6 per unit t ff,cl. A comparison of the intrinsic specific angular momentum (j 3D) distributions of the cores with the specific angular momentum derived using synthetic two-dimensional (2D) velocity maps of the cores (j 2D) shows that the synthetic observations tend to overestimate the true value of the specific angular momentum by a factor of ~8-10. We find that the distribution of the ratio j 3D/j 2D of the cores peaks at around ~0.1. The origin of this discrepancy lies in the fact that contrary to the intrinsic determination of j which sums up the individual gas parcels' contributions to the angular momentum, the determination of the specific angular momentum using the standard observational procedure which is based on a measurement on the global velocity gradient under the hypothesis of uniform rotation smoothes out the complex fluctuations present in the 3D velocity field. Our results may well provide a natural explanation for the discrepancy by a

  2. The Structure of Magnetic Clouds in the Inner Heliosphere: An Approach Through Grad-Shafranov Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Farrugia, C. J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Moestl, C.; Qiu, J.; Sonnerup, B. U.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic Clouds (MCs), as a subset of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), are commonly observed in space. They have been extensively studied with respect to their origin at the Sun, their propagation, and their structures in the inner heliosphere between Sun and Earth. A method, based on the in-situ spacecraft measurements across such structures and the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation, has been developed and widely used to derive their 2.5D cross-section from the single-spacecraft magnetic field and plasma data. We provide a brief review of the GS reconstruction of MC structures and its applications to various spacecraft mission data and Sun-Solar System Connection science. We then report the recent progress on the application of GS method to the MC structures by examining the effect of (1) inclusion of electron temperature (pressure), since Te is often >> Tp in these configurations, and (2) a locally torus-shape geometry of the MC flux rope, as opposed to the commonly assumed straight-cylinder geometry. Case studies will be presented to illustrate our results.

  3. Reflected solar wind ions and downward accelerated ionospheric ions during the January 1997 magnetic cloud event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, D. L.; Burch, J. L.; Huddleston, M. M.; Pollock, C. J.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Wüest, M.; Moore, T. E.; Shelley, E. G.

    On January 11, 1997, at 03:40:00 UT, while Polar was traveling up the dusk flank toward apogee, two ion instruments, TIDE and TIMAS, detected upflowing H+ with an energy/pitch-angle dispersion resembling an ionospheric reflection of freshly injected solar wind ions. In the same region of space, TIDE and TIMAS observed cold beams of O+ and H+ traveling down the field line with equal bulk velocities. We interpret these ion signatures as concurrent observations of mirrored solar wind ions and downward accelerated ionospheric ions. By 03:42:00, an energy/pitch-angle dispersion of downward moving ions at very low energies was clearly evident in the TIDE data. This additional signature is interpreted as an indication of reconnection on the same field line in the southern hemisphere. We explain this unique combination of plasma distributions in terms of high-latitude reconnection and magnetic field line convection during northward-IMF conditions associated with the January 1997 magnetic cloud event.

  4. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  5. Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity Response to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections/Magnetic Clouds in 1995-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the response of the galactic cosmic ray (CGR) intensity to the passage of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and their associated shocks that passed the Earth during 1995-2009, a period that encompasses the whole of Solar Cycle 23. In approx.80% of cases, the GCR intensity decreased during the passage of these structures, i.e., a "Forbush decrease" occurred, while in approx.10% there was no significant change. In the remaining cases, the GCR intensity increased. Where there was an intensity decrease, minimum intensity was observed inside the ICME in approx.90% of these events. The observations confirm the role of both post-shock regions and ICMEs in the generation of these decreases, consistent with many previous studies, but contrary to the conclusion of Reames, Kahler, and Tylka (Astrophys. 1. Lett. 700, L199, 2009) who, from examining a subset of ICMEs with flux-rope-like magnetic fields (magnetic clouds) argued that these are "open structures" that allow free access of particles including GCRs to their interior. In fact, we find that magnetic clouds are more likely to participate in the deepest GCR decreases than ICMEs that are not magnetic clouds.

  6. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma jet/cloud streaming across a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of collisionless plasma jets/clouds in magnetic field configurations typical for the terrestrial magnetotail and frontside magnetosheath is a topic of interest for understanding the physics of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. The presence of high-speed jets in the frontside magnetosheath has been recently proved experimentally by Cluster and THEMIS spacecrafts. There is increasing evidence that the bursty bulk flows in the magnetotail have jet-like features. In the present paper we use fully electromagnetic 3D explicit particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate the interaction of a localized three-dimensional plasma element/jet/cloud with a transverse magnetic field. We consider a plasma jet/cloud that moves in vacuum and perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field. Ampère and Faraday's laws are used to compute the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields on a three-dimensional spatial grid having a step-size of the order of the Debye length and using a time-step that resolves the plasma frequency. The initial magnetic field inside the simulation domain is uniform and the plasma bulk velocity at the beginning of the simulation is normal to the magnetic field direction. The total time scale of the simulation is of the order of few ion Larmor periods. Space and time variations of the plasma parameters and of the electromagnetic field are analyzed and discussed. We emphasize non-MHD effects like the energy-dispersion signatures at the edges of the plasma element, similar to results previously reported by Voitcu and Echim (2012) using test-kinetic simulations. Acknowledgments: Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418.

  7. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists' visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists' scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists' visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists' visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  8. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  9. Propagation and Evolution of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds: Global Simulations and Comparisons with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, P.; Ben-Nun, M.; Linker, J.; Torok, T.; Lionello, R.; Downs, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we explore the evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and fast magnetic clouds (MCs) in particular. We address three specific issues. First, What are the large-scale forces acting on ejecta as they travel from the Sun to 1 AU through a realistic ambient solar wind, and how does they affect the large-scale structure of the event? Second, what are the dominant waves/shocks associated with fast ICMEs? And third, how are the properties of ICMEs different during cycle 24 than during the previous cycle? To accomplish these objectives, we employ a variety of numerical approaches, including global resistive MHD models that incorporate realistic energy transport processes. We also compare and contrast model results with both remote solar and in-situ measurements of ICMEs at 1 AU and elsewhere, including the so-called ``Bastille Day'' event of July 14, 2000, and the more recent ``extreme ICME'' observed by STEREO-A on July 23, 2012.

  10. Interaction between an interplanetary magnetic cloud and the Earth's magnetosphere: Motions of the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.; Lepping, R. P.

    2000-06-01

    An interplanetary magnetic cloud (IMC) is an important solar-terrestrial connection event. It is an ideal object for the study of solar-terrestrial relations and space weather because the Earth's space environment can be affected considerably during an IMC passage. An IMC was observed to pass the Earth during October 18-20, 1995. Wind recorded its interplanetary characteristics at ~175RE upstream of the Earth's bow shock, and ~45 min later, Geotail, being near the nominal location of the dawn bow shock, detected IMC-related multiple bow shock crossings. Using simultaneous measurements from Wind and Geotail, we analyzed, with a semiempirical bow shock model with two parameters, the bow shock motion caused by the interaction of the IMC with the magnetosphere during the passage. We also compared the bow shock motion predicted by the model, and hence the predicted Geotail bow shock crossings, with Geotail observations of the actual crossings. The results showed that the observed multiple bow shock crossings, which were obviously due to temporal variations of the upstream solar wind, can be well explained by the model-predicted bow shock motion.

  11. Dust Properties and Magnetic Fields in MSX Infrared-Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S. J.; Feldman, P. A.; Redman, R. O.; Egan, M. P.; Mizuno, D.; Kuchar, T.; Price, S.

    1999-12-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) are a population of a few thousand molecular cores that have been identified by their substantial mid-infrared (8-25 μ m) extinctions in the MSX Galactic Plane survey images (Egan et al. 1998, ApJL, 494, L199). Subsequent observations have revealed IRDCs to contain cold (T < 15 K), dense (n 106 cm-3) molecular gas (Carey et al. 1998, ApJ, 508, 721). The IRDCs are distributed along spiral arms and are located near but do not contain star formation tracers such as HII regions and H2O maser emission. Continuum maps at 450 and 850 μ m taken with SCUBA on the JCMT reveal bright knots of emission within the envelope of emission associated with the IRDCs. Many IRDCs are filamentary in nature. The bright emission knots have HCO+ and CO line profiles indicative of outflow and/or infall with several sources exhibiting the blue-red asymmetry characteristic of infall. The IRDCs appear to be large, cold molecular cores in the earliest stages of star formation. We present a detailed comparison of the extinction at 8 μ m derived from the soon-to-be released MSX Galactic Plane survey images ( 18'' resolution) to the 450/850 μ m emission (14'' resolution). The morphologies of the submillimeter emission and mid-infrared extinction are in good agreement. From the comparison, we will determine the dust column density and constrain dust temperature and emissivity. In addition, we present very recent polarimetric imaging of IRDCs at 850 μ m. A relatively high degree of polarization at 850 μ m is seen, suggesting that a well-ordered magnetic field may be present within most IRDCs. In general, the magnetic fields thread the filaments with a more complicated structure near the embedded sources. We will examine the structure of the magnetic field and the star formation properties of IRDCs using the mid-infrared and submillimeter images, submillimeter polarimetry and CO and HCO+ line maps.

  12. Selection Effects in Identifying Magnetic Clouds and the Importance of the Closest Approach Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2010-01-01

    This study is motivated by the unusually low number of magnetic clouds (MCs) that are strictly identified within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), as observed at 1 AU; this is usually estimated to be around 30% or lower. But a looser definition of MCs may significantly increase this percentage. Another motivation is the unexpected shape of the occurrence distribution of the observers' "closest approach distances" (measured from a MC's axis, and called CA) which drops off somewhat rapidly as |CA| (in % of MC radius) approaches 100%, based on earlier studies. We suggest, for various geometrical and physical reasons, that the |CA|-distribution should be somewhere between a uniform one and the one actually observed, and therefore the 30% estimate should be higher. So we ask, When there is a failure to identify a MC within an ICME, is it occasionally due to a large |CA| passage, making MC identification more difficult, i.e., is it due to an event selection effect? In attempting to answer this question we examine WIND data to obtain an accurate distribution of the number of MCs vs. |CA| distance, whether the event is ICME-related or not, where initially a large number of cases (N=98) are considered. This gives a frequence distribution that is far from uniform, confirming earlier studies. This along with the fact that there are many ICME identification-parameters that do not depend on |CA| suggest that, indeed an MC event selection effect may explain at least part of the low ratio of (No. MCs)/(No. ICMEs). We also show that there is an acceptable geometrical and physical consistency in the relationships for both average "normalized" magnetic field intensity change and field direction change vs. |CA| within a MC, suggesting that our estimates of |CA|, B(sub 0) (magnetic field intensity on the axis), and choice of a proper "cloud coordinate" system (all needed in the analysis) are acceptably accurate. Therefore the MC fitting model (Lepping et al., 1990) is

  13. Selection effects in identifying magnetic clouds and the importance of the closest approach parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.

    2010-08-01

    This study is motivated by the unusually low number of magnetic clouds (MCs) that are strictly identified within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), as observed at 1 AU; this is usually estimated to be around 30% or lower. But a looser definition of MCs may significantly increase this percentage. Another motivation is the unexpected shape of the occurrence distribution of the observers' "closest approach distances" (measured from a MC's axis, and called CA) which drops off somewhat rapidly as |CA| (in % of MC radius) approaches 100%, based on earlier studies. We suggest, for various geometrical and physical reasons, that the |CA|-distribution should be somewhere between a uniform one and the one actually observed, and therefore the 30% estimate should be higher. So we ask, When there is a failure to identify a MC within an ICME, is it occasionally due to a large |CA| passage, making MC identification more difficult, i.e., is it due to an event selection effect? In attempting to answer this question we examine WIND data to obtain an accurate distribution of the number of MCs vs. |CA| distance, whether the event is ICME-related or not, where initially a large number of cases (N=98) are considered. This gives a frequence distribution that is far from uniform, confirming earlier studies. This along with the fact that there are many ICME identification-parameters that do not depend on |CA| suggest that, indeed an MC event selection effect may explain at least part of the low ratio of (No. MCs)/(No. ICMEs). We also show that there is an acceptable geometrical and physical consistency in the relationships for both average "normalized" magnetic field intensity change and field direction change vs. |CA| within a MC, suggesting that our estimates of |CA|, BO (magnetic field intensity on the axis), and choice of a proper "cloud coordinate" system (all needed in the analysis) are acceptably accurate. Therefore, the MC fitting model (Lepping et al., 1990) is adequate

  14. Reconnection Remnants in the Magnetic Cloud of October 18-19, 1995: A Shock, Monochromatic Wave, Heat Flux Dropout and Energetic Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, A.; Farrell, W.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Fitzenreiter, R.; Thompson, B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Ho, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the WIND spacecraft observed particle and field signatures on October 18-19, 1995 due to reconnection near the footpoints of a magnetic cloud (i.e., between 1 and 5 solar radii). These signatures include: (1) an internal shock traveling approximately along the axis of the magnetic cloud, (2) a simple compression of the magnetic field consistent with the footpoint magnetic fields being thrust outwards at speeds much greater than the solar wind speed, (3) an electron heat flux dropout occurring within minutes of the shock indicating a topological change resulting from disconnection from the solar surface, (4) a very cold 5 keV proton beam and (5) an associated monochromatic wave. We expect that, given observations of enough magnetic clouds, Wind and other spacecraft will see signatures similar to the ones reported here indicating reconnection. However, these observations require the spacecraft to be fortuitously positioned to observe the passing shock and other signatures and will therefore be associated with only a small fraction of magnetic clouds. Consistent with this, a few magnetic clouds observed by Wind have been found to possess internal shock waves.

  15. Effect of surface conductivity on the peak magnetic field radiated by first return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyahla, Lori J.; Lopez, Raul E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of surface conductivity on the peak magnetic field radiated by the first return stroke in cloud-to-ground lightning was investigated by comparing the peak magnetic fields from return strokes that struck water with those that struck land. The data were obtained from a network of three gated, wideband magnetic direction finders (DFs) at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 1985. Two geographical areas that were equidistant from two of the direction finders were compared where the flash distances ranged from approximately 40 to 60 km. An unbiased data set was obtained by correcting site errors, equalizing differences in sensor gain, eliminating directional biases in DF triggering, and keeping differences in signal attenuation over the two surfaces to a minimum. When a statistical analysis was performed on the frequency distributions of the signal amplitudes, there was no statistically significant difference in the peak amplitudes of first return strokes over land (lambda = 8.2 x 10(exp -3) mho/m) and over water (lambda = 4 mho/m). Therefore we infer that the conductivity of the underlying surface does not significantly affect the magnitude of the peak magnetic field, and hence the peak current, in the first return stroke of a cloud-to-ground lightning flash.

  16. Low-frequency waves within isolated magnetic clouds and complex structures: STEREO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Tapia, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2015-04-01

    Complex Structures (CSs) formed by the interaction of magnetic cloud (MC)-like structures with other transients (e.g., another MC, a stream interaction region, or a fast stream of solar wind) were frequently observed in the interplanetary space by STEREO spacecraft during the solar minimum 23 and the rising phase of the solar cycle 24. Here we report the presence of low-frequency waves (LFWs) inside some isolated MCs (IMCs) and inside the CSs observed by STEREO during such period (2007-2011). It is important to study in detail the properties of waves in space plasmas since particle distribution functions can be modified by wave-particle interactions. We compare wave characteristics within IMCs with those waves observed inside CSs. Both left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH), near-circularly polarized, transverse and almost parallel-propagating LFWs (around the proton cyclotron frequency) were sporadically observed inside both IMCs and CSs. In contrast, compressive mirror-mode waves (MMs) were observed only within CSs. We studied local plasma conditions inside the IMCs and CSs to gain insight about wave origin: most of the MMs within CSs were observed in regions with enhanced plasma beta (β>1) the majority of the LH waves were found in low beta plasmas (β<1), and the RH waves were predominantly observed at moderate betas (0.4<β≤2). These observations are in agreement with linear kinetic theory predictions for the growth of the mirror, the LH ion cyclotron, and the RH ion firehose instability, respectively. It is possible that the waves were generated locally inside the IMCs and CSs via temperature anisotropies. The plasma beta enhancements that were frequently observed inside the CSs may be the result of compressions and heating taking place inside the interacting structures.

  17. Characterization of a double flux-rope magnetic cloud observed by ACE spacecraft on August 19-21, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda González, A.; Mendes, O.; Domingues Oliveira, M.; Moestl, C.; Farrugia, C. J.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-05-01

    Investigations have studied MC cases of double flux rope configuration with apparent asymmetry. Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique allows deriving the local magnetic structure from data of a single spacecraft. The results obtained show two cylindrical flux ropes next to each other, where a single X point forms between them. In all possible combinations of two bipolar MCs, the magnetic field between them is antiparallel in eight cases SWN-SWN, SWN-SEN, SEN-SWN, SEN-SEN, NWS-NWS, NWS-NES, NES-NWS, NES-NWS. If clouds are under magnetic coupling, reconnection evidences are expected from the interaction between them. In this work, we examine the event that occurred at Aug. 19-21, 1998 using solar wind measurements collected by ACE. In Fig. 1 a) presents the recovered cross-section of the two bipolar MCs (SEN-SWN). The black contour lines show the transverse magnetic field lines (calculated as the contours of the magnetic potential function A(x,y)), and the colors show the axial magnetic field Bz distribution. The yellow arrows along y=0 denote measured transverse magnetic field vectors, direction and magnitude measurements at ACE utilized as initial input into the numerical solver. The green arrows are residual velocities in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE. The spacecraft crosses the X point and observes the exact moment of the magnetic reconnection, from 0.13 to 0.15 AU in x axis. In the opposite corners of the X point, the magnetic fields are antiparallel (see yellow arrows in this region). The residual velocity (green arrow in y=0) in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE is perpendicular to the magnetic field line in the reconnection region. In principle, it is possible to adjust a two-dimension model considering the most common separator reconnection, in which four separate magnetic domains exchange magnetic field lines. In Fig. 1 b), the cross-section through four magnetic domains undergoing separator reconnection is represented. The green array in the top

  18. The magnetic field in Lynds 1457: multiband photopolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B G; Wannier, P G

    1995-04-10

    We have performed multiband photopolarimetry toward stars behind the molecular cloud L1457 (MBM 12). This cloud is the nearest known molecular cloud (65 pc) and is thought to be contained within the local "hot bubble." The polarization shows a regular structure, indicating that the cloud is threaded by an ordered magnetic field. The wavelength dependence of the polarization seems to indicate that the grains in L1457 have higher indices of refraction than normal for interstellar clouds. However, the wavelength of maximum polarization indicates that their size distribution is close to normal.

  19. The (non-)variability of magnetic chemically peculiar candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Mikulášek, Z.; Poleski, R.; Krtička, J.; Netopil, M.; Zejda, M.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The galactic magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars of the upper main sequence are well known as periodic spectral and light variables. The observed variability is obviously caused by the uneven distribution of overabundant chemical elements on the surfaces of rigidly rotating stars. The mechanism causing the clustering of some chemical elements into disparate structures on mCP stars has not been fully understood up to now. The observations of light changes of mCP candidates recently revealed in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) should provide us with information about their rotational periods and about the distribution of optically active elements on mCP stars born in other galaxies. Aims: We queried for photometry at the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-III survey of published mCP candidates selected because of the presence of the characteristic λ5200 Å flux depression. In total, the intersection of both sources resulted in twelve stars. For these objects and two control stars, we searched for a periodic variability. Methods: We performed our own and standard periodogram time series analyses of all available data. The final results are, amongst others, the frequency of the maximum peak and the bootstrap probability of its reality. Results: We detected that only two mCP candidates, 190.1 1581 and 190.1 15527, may show some weak rotationally modulated light variations with periods of 1.23 and 0.49 days; however, the 49% and 32% probabilities of their reality are not very satisfying. The variability of the other 10 mCP candidates is too low to be detectable by their V and I OGLE photometry. Conclusions: The relatively low amplitude variability of the studied LMC mCP candidates sample can be explained by the absence of photometric spots of overabundant optically active chemical elements. The unexpected LMC mCPs behaviour is probably caused by different conditions during the star formation in the LMC and the Galaxy. Figures 11-22 are

  20. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  1. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010-2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga (J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type (i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust (Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are seen

  2. Wind Magnetic Clouds for 2010 - 2012: Model Parameter Fittings, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Earlier Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2015-08-01

    We fitted the parameters of magnetic clouds (MCs) as identified in the Wind spacecraft data from early 2010 to the end of 2012 using the model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 1195, 1990). The interval contains 48 MCs and 39 magnetic cloud-like (MCL) events. This work is a continuation of MC model fittings of the earlier Wind sets, including those in a recent publication, which covers 2007 to 2009. This period (2010 - 2012) mainly covers the maximum portion of Solar Cycle 24. Between the previous and current interval, we document 5.7 years of MCs observations. For this interval, the occurrence frequency of MCs markedly increased in the last third of the time. In addition, over approximately the last six years, the MC type ( i.e. the profile of the magnetic-field direction within an MC, such as North-to-South, South-to-North, all South) dramatically evolved to mainly North-to-South types when compared to earlier years. Furthermore, this evolution of MC type is consistent with global solar magnetic-field changes predicted by Bothmer and Rust ( Coronal Mass Ejections, 139, 1997). Model fit parameters for the MCs are listed for 2010 - 2012. For the 5.7 year interval, the observed MCs are found to be slower, weaker in estimated axial magnetic-field intensity, and shorter in duration than those of the earlier 12.3 years, yielding much lower axial magnetic-field fluxes. For about the first half of this 5.7 year period, i.e. up to the end of 2009, there were very few associated MC-driven shock waves (distinctly fewer than the long-term average of about 50 % of MCs). But since 2010, such driven shocks have increased markedly, reflecting similar statistics as the long-term averages. We estimate that 56 % of the total observed MCs have upstream shocks when the full interval of 1995 - 2012 is considered. However, only 28 % of the total number of MCLs have driven shocks over the same period. Some interplanetary shocks during the 2010 - 2012 interval are

  3. Ring current activity during the early Bz<0 phase of the January 1997 magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Foster, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    The passage at Earth of the January 10-11, 1997, magnetic cloud induced a storm of moderate geomagnetic activity with Dst index reaching minimum values of about -83 nT. We study ring current formation during the early Bz negative phase of this magnetic cloud, using energetic particle data from three instruments on the Polar spacecraft and geosynchronous plasma data from the LANL spacecraft. We use our kinetic drift-loss model to simulate the evolution of ring current H+, He+, and O+ ion distributions and associated aeronomical effects during this period. The results from two Volland-Stern type magnetospheric electric field model formulations are compared: (1) Kp-dependent and (2) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) dependent. We demonstrate that while both electric field models reproduce well the main trends of ring current formation and decay during the storm, the IMF-dependent model reproduces the rapidity of the main storm growth phase and its strength better. Comparing model results during the main phase of the storm with HYDRA, TIMAS, and CAMMICE data we find that the model reproduces very well the ring current distributions near dawn. The formation of the nose event, i.e., the rise of the 10-30 keV energy particles near dusk due to abruptly increased convection is, however, overestimated by the model. We compute plasmaspheric heating through Coulomb collisions as the storm evolves and find that maximum heating occurs initially on the nightside near L~3.5 and subsequently moves earthward to L~2.75, in agreement with Millstone Hill radar observations of midlatitude electron temperature enhancement on January 10. However, the magnitude of the energy transferred to plasmaspheric electrons through Coulomb collisions appears to be not sufficient to yield the observed elevated electron temperature at ~0830 UT, suggesting that additional energy sources should be considered during this event.

  4. The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

  5. Galactic cosmic ray decreases associated with non-interacting magnetic clouds in the 23 rd solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) intensity decreases are related to the passage of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). These phenomena are also known as Forbush Decreases (FDs). The deepest FDs are associated with the passage of Magnetic Clouds (MCs). In this preliminary study we select ``non-interacting'' MCs associated with FDs observed from ground Neutron Monitors in the period 1996-2009, with the aim of reducing the complexity and the number of parameters involved in the GCR-MC interactions. We introduce a method to determine properties of the ``ejecta component'' of the FD. We analyze properties of the ejecta component in combination with properties of MCs. From the resulting selection of events, we find that those FDs containing ejecta components show stronger correlations with MC parameters than our total sample of events.

  6. Differences in generation of magnetic storms driven by magnetic clouds, ejecta, sheath region before ICME and CIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the efficiency of main phase storm generation by different solar wind (SW) streams when using 12 functions coupling (FC) various interplanetary parameters with magnetospheric state. By using our Catalog of Solar Wind Phenomena [Yermolaev et al., 2009] created on the basis of the OMNI database for 1976-2000, we selected the magnetic storms with Dst ≤ -50 nT for which interplanetary sources were following: MC (10 storms); Ejecta (31 storms); Sheath (21 storms); CIRs (31magnetic storms). To compare the interplanetary drivers we estimate an efficiency of magnetic storm generation by type of solar wind stream with using 12 coupling functions. We obtained that in average Sheath has more large efficiency of the magnetic storm generation and MC has more low efficiency in agreement with our previous results which show that by using a modification of formula by Burton et al. [1975] for connection of interplanetary conditions with Dst and Dst* indices the efficiency of storm generation by Sheath and CIR was ~50% higher than generation by ICME [Nikolaeva et al., 2013; 2015]. The most part of FCs has sufficiently high correlation coefficients. In particular the highest values of coefficients (~ 0.5 up to 0.63) are observed for Sheath- driven storms. In a small part of FCs with low coefficients it is necessary to increase the number of magnetic storms to increase the statistical significance of results. The reliability of the obtained data and possible reasons of divergences for various FCs and various SW types require further researches. The authors are grateful for the opportunity to use the OMNI database. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 16-02-00125, and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S., Y. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2013), Modeling of Dst-index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind, Cosmic

  7. Induced core formation time in subcritical magnetic clouds by large-scale trans-Alfvénic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfvén speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation time is about three times shorter than that with no turbulence, when the turbulent speed is comparable to the Alfvén speed.

  8. A Statistical Study of the Average Iron Charge State Distributions inside Magnetic Clouds for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhong, Z.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, L.; Hu, Q.; Li, G.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterparts of coronal magnetic flux ropes. They can provide valuable information regarding flux rope characteristics at their eruption stage in the corona, which is unable to be explored in situ at present. In this paper, we make a comprehensive survey of the average iron charge-state (< Q> {Fe}) distributions inside 96 MCs for solar cycle 23 using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data. Since the < Q> {Fe} in the solar wind are typically around 9+ to 11+, the Fe charge state is defined as being high when the < Q> {Fe} is larger than 12+, which implies the existence of a considerable amount of Fe ions with high charge states (e.g., ≥16+). The statistical results show that the < Q> {Fe} distributions of 92 (˜96%) MCs can be classified into four groups with different characteristics. In group A (11 MCs), the < Q> {Fe} shows a bi-modal distribution with both peaks being higher than 12+. Group B (4 MCs) presents a unimodal distribution of < Q> {Fe}, with its peak being higher than 12+. In groups C (29 MCs) and D (48 MCs), the < Q> {Fe} remains higher and lower than 12+ throughout ACE’s passage through the MC, respectively. Possible explanations of these distributions are discussed.

  9. SPECTRAL VARIATIONS OF Of?p OBLIQUE MAGNETIC ROTATOR CANDIDATES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Nazé, Yaël; Wade, Gregg A.; Bagnulo, Stefano; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Apellániz, Jesús Maíz; Howarth, Ian D.; Evans, Christopher J.; Sota, Alfredo E-mail: nmorrell@lco.cl E-mail: wade-g@rmc.ca E-mail: rbarba@dfuls.cl E-mail: idh@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2015-10-15

    Optical spectroscopic monitoring has been conducted of two O stars in the SMC and one in the LMC, the spectral characteristics of which place them in the Of?p category, which has been established in the Galaxy to consist of oblique magnetic rotators. All of these Magellanic stars show systematic spectral variations typical of the Of?p class, further strengthening their magnetic candidacy to the point of virtual certainty. The spectral variations are related to photometric variations derived from Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data by Nazé et al. in a parallel study, which yields rotational periods for two of them. Now circular spectropolarimetry is required to measure their fields, and ultraviolet spectroscopy to further characterize their low-metallicity, magnetically confined winds, in support of hydrodynamical analyses.

  10. Dispersion of Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds. IV. Analysis of Interferometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houde, Martin; Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Hildebrand, Roger H.

    2016-03-01

    We expand on the dispersion analysis of polarimetry maps toward applications to interferometry data. We show how the filtering of low spatial frequencies can be accounted for within the idealized Gaussian turbulence model, initially introduced for single-dish data analysis, to recover reliable estimates for correlation lengths of magnetized turbulence, as well as magnetic field strengths (plane-of-the-sky component) using the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. We apply our updated technique to TADPOL/CARMA data obtained on W3(OH), W3 Main, and DR21(OH). For W3(OH), our analysis yields a turbulence correlation length δ ≃ 19 mpc, a ratio of turbulent-to-total magnetic energy < {B}{{t}}2> /< {B}2> ≃ 0.58, and a magnetic field strength {B}0˜ 1.1 {mG}; for W3 Main δ ≃ 22 mpc, < {B}{{t}}2> /< {B}2> ≃ 0.74, and {B}0˜ 0.7 {mG}; while for DR21(OH) δ ≃ 12 mpc, < {B}{{t}}2> /< {B}2> ≃ 0.70, and {B}0˜ 1.2 {mG}.

  11. Chandra Observations of a Young Embedded Magnetic B Star in the p Ophiuchus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Imanishi, Kensuke

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the analysis of two Chandra X-ray observations of the young magnetic B star rho Ophiuchus S1. X-ray emission from the star was detected in both observations. The average flux is almost the same in both, but during each observation the flux shows significant time variations by a factor of two on timescales of 20-40 ksec. Each spectrum can be fit by either an absorbed power law model with a photon index of approx. -3 or a thin-thermal plasma model with a temperature of approx. 2 keV and an extremely low metal abundance (approx. less than 0.1 solar). The spectrum of the first observation has an apparent line feature at about 6.8 keV, which likely corresponds to highly ionized iron K alpha. In contrast, the spectrum of the second observation shows an anomalous edge absorption component at E approx. 1 keV. The continuum emission and log (L(sub X)/L(sub bol)) approx. -6 are similar to those of young intermediate-mass stars (Herbig Ae/Be stars) although the presence of the magnetic field inferred from the detection of non-thermal radio emission has drawn an analogy between rho Ophiuchus S1 and magnetic chemically peculiar (MCP) stars. If the X-ray emission is thermal, the highest plasma temperature observed is too high to be explained by the conventional theories of magnetic stars, and favors some kind of magnetic dynamo activity, while if the emission is nonthermal, it might be related to mass infall. The 6.8 keV line and 4 keV edge features are marginal but they give important information near the stellar body if they are real. Their physical interpretation is discussed.

  12. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  13. Change of Magnetic Field-gas Alignment at the Gravity-driven Alfvénic Transition in Molecular Clouds: Implications for Dust Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Che-Yu; King, Patrick K.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-10-01

    Diffuse striations in molecular clouds are preferentially aligned with local magnetic fields, whereas dense filaments tend to be perpendicular to them. When and why this transition occurs remain uncertain. To explore the physics behind this transition, we compute the histogram of relative orientation (HRO) between the density gradient and the magnetic field in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of prestellar core formation in shock-compressed regions within giant molecular clouds. We find that, in the magnetically dominated (sub-Alfvénic) post-shock region, the gas structure is preferentially aligned with the local magnetic field. For overdense sub-regions with super-Alfvénic gas, their elongation becomes preferentially perpendicular to the local magnetic field. The transition occurs when self-gravitating gas gains enough kinetic energy from the gravitational acceleration to overcome the magnetic support against the cross-field contraction, which results in a power-law increase of the field strength with density. Similar results can be drawn from HROs in projected two-dimensional maps with integrated column densities and synthetic polarized dust emission. We quantitatively analyze our simulated polarization properties, and interpret the reduced polarization fraction at high column densities as the result of increased distortion of magnetic field directions in trans- or super-Alfvénic gas. Furthermore, we introduce measures of the inclination and tangledness of the magnetic field along the line of sight as the controlling factors of the polarization fraction. Observations of the polarization fraction and angle dispersion can therefore be utilized in studying local magnetic field morphology in star-forming regions.

  14. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  15. Transport and entry of plasma clouds/jets across transverse magnetic discontinuities: Three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we use three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the interaction of a small Larmor radius plasma cloud/jet with a transverse nonuniform magnetic field typical to a tangential discontinuity in a parallel geometry. The simulation setup corresponds to an idealized, yet relevant, magnetospheric configuration likely to be observed at the magnetopause during northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The numerical simulations are adapted to study the kinetic effects and their role on the transport and entry of localized plasma jets similar to those identified inside the Earth's magnetosheath propagating toward the magnetopause. The simulations reveal the formation of a perpendicular polarization electric field inside the main bulk of the plasma cloud that enables its forward transport and entry across the transverse magnetic field. The jet is able to penetrate the transition region when the height of the magnetic barrier does not exceed a certain critical threshold. Otherwise, the forward transport along the injection direction is stopped before full penetration of the magnetopause. Moreover, the jet is pushed back and simultaneously deflected in the perpendicular plane to the magnetic field. Our simulations evidence physical processes advocated previously by the theoretical model of impulsive penetration and revealed in laboratory experiments.

  16. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of regular alternating μ-bpm/di-μ-X copper(II) chains (bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine; X = OH, F).

    PubMed

    Marino, Nadia; Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Cano, Joan; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The preparation and X-ray crystal structure of four 2,2'-bipyrimidine (bpm)-containing copper(II) complexes of formula {[Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(4)(μ-OH)(2)][Mn(H(2)O)(6)](SO(4))(2)}(n) (1), {[Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(4)(μ-OH)(2)]SiF(6)}(n) (2), {Cu(2)(μ-bpm)(H(2)O)(2)(μ-F)(2)F(2)}(n) (3), and [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(2)F(NO(3))][Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(3)F]NO(3)·2H(2)O (4) are reported. The structures of 1-3 consist of chains of copper(II) ions with regular alternation of bis-bidentate bpm and di-μ-hydroxo (1 and 2) or di-μ-fluoro (3) groups, the electroneutrality being achieved by either hexaaqua manganese(II) cations plus uncoordinated sulfate anions (1), uncoordinated hexafluorosilicate anions (2), or terminally bound fluoride ligands (3). Each copper(II) ion in 1-4 is six-coordinated in elongated octahedral surroundings. 1 and 2 show identical, linear chain motifs with two bpm-nitrogen atoms and two hydroxo groups building the equatorial plane at each copper(II) ion and the axial position being filled by water molecules. In the case of 3, the axial sites at the copper atom are occupied by a bpm-nitrogen atom and a bis-monodentate fluoride anion, producing a "step-like" chain motif. The values of the angle at the hydroxo and fluoro bridges are 94.11(6) (1), 94.75(4) (2), and 101.43(4)° (3). In each case, the copper-copper separation through the bis-bidentate bpm [5.428(1) (1), 5.449(1) (2), and 5.9250(4) Å (3)] is considerably longer than that through the di-μ-hydroxo [2.8320(4) (1) and 2.824(1) Å (2)] or di-μ-fluoro [3.3027(4) Å (3)] bridges. Compound 4 is a mononuclear species whose structure is made up of neutral [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(2)F(NO(3))] units, [Cu(bpm)(H(2)O)(3)F](+) cations, uncoordinated nitrate anions, and crystallization water molecules, giving rise to a pseudo-helical, one-dimensional (1D) supramolecular motif. The magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated in the temperature range 1.9-300 K. Relatively large, alternating antiferro- [J = -149 (1) and

  17. Yearly Comparison of Magnetic Cloud Parameters, Sunspot Number, and Interplanetary Quantities for the First 18 Years of the Wind Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2015-02-01

    In the scalar part of this study, we determine various statistical relationships between estimated magnetic cloud (MC) model fit-parameters and sunspot number (SSN) for the interval defined by the Wind mission, i.e., early 1995 until the end of 2012, all in terms of yearly averages. The MC-fitting model used is that of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957 - 11965, 1990). We also statistically compare the MC fit-parameters and other derived MC quantities [ e.g., axial magnetic flux (ΦO) and total axial current density ( J O)] with some associated ambient interplanetary quantities (including the interplanetary magnetic field ( B IMF), proton number density ( N P), and others). Some of the main findings are that the minimum SSN is nearly simultaneous with the minimum in the number of MCs per year ( N MC), which occurs in 2008. There are various fluctuations in N MC and the MC model-fit quality ( Q') throughout the mission, but the last four years (2009 - 2012) are markedly different from the others; Q' is low and N MC is large over these four years. N MC is especially large for 2012. The linear correlation coefficient (c.c.≈0.75) between the SSN and each of the three quantities J O, MC diameter (2 R O), and B IMF, is moderately high, but none of the MC parameters track the SSN well in the sense defined in this article. However, there is good statistical tracking among the following: MC axial field, B IMF, 2 R O, average MC speed ( V MC), and yearly average solar wind speed ( V SW) with relatively high c.c.s among most of these. From the start of the mission until late 2005, J O gradually increases, with a slight violation in 2003, but then a dramatic decrease (by more than a factor of five) occurs to an almost steady and low value of ≈ 3 μA km-2 until the end of the interval of interest, i.e., lasting for at least seven years. This tends to split the overall 18-year interval into two phases with a separator at

  18. The Magnetic Field of the L1544 Starless Dark Cloud, Traced Using Near-Infrared Background Starlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Goldsmith, Paul; Tassis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    What roles do interstellar magnetic fields play in star formation processes? We have studied the B-field of L1544, a dark cloud with a starless dense core showing active gas infall, and located only 140 pc away in Taurus, via deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging polarimetry with the Mimir instrument. We find the B-field orientations in the plane of the sky change significantly at L1544, mimicking its shape and extent. The elongated spine of L1544 is also where the dispersion of NIR linear polarization position angles is smallest, suggesting strengthening of the B-field. Archival WISE, SCUPOL, Herschel, and Planck data were analyzed to characterize dust extinction and emission across L1544 and the field around it. Three-dimensional modeling, constrained through matching two-dimensional integrated model properties to observed dust distributions, led us to develop maps of effective gas mass densities and non-thermal gas velocity dispersions. These were combined with the NIR polarimetry, under the Chandrasekhar & Fermi (1953) approach, to yield a map of B-field strength across the entire 400 sq-arcmin region surveyed. The trends of B-field strength with gas volume density, mass-to-flux ratio with radius, and plane-of-sky B-field strengths with Zeeman-traced line-of-sight B-field strengths were found and compared to previous published work to establish the role of B-fields in L1544. We find field strengths in the 3 - 30 uG range, quite similar to the OH Zeeman values found by Crutcher et al. (2009) for L1544.This work was partially supported by grants to Boston University from NSF (AST-0907790, 1412269) and NASA (NNX15AE51G).

  19. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  20. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  1. Mesoscale cloud phenomena observed by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of certain mesoscale cloud features - jet cirrus, eddies/vortices, cloud banding, and wave clouds - were collected from LANDSAT imagery and placed into Mason's four groups of causes of cloud formation based on the mechanism of vertical motion which produces condensation. These groups are as follows: (1) layer clouds formed by widespread regular ascent; (2) layer clouds caused by irregular stirring motions; (3) convective clouds; and (4) clouds formed by orographic disturbances. These mechanisms explain general cloud formation. Once formed, other forces may play a role in the deformation of a cloud or cloud mass into unusual and unique meso- and microscale patterns. Each example presented is followed by a brief discussion describing the synoptic situation, and some inference into the formation and occurrence of the more salient features. No major attempt was made to discuss in detail the meteorological and topographic interplay producing these mesoscale features.

  2. Artist's Rendering of Multiple Whirlpools in a Sodium Gas Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image depicts the formation of multiple whirlpools in a sodium gas cloud. Scientists who cooled the cloud and made it spin created the whirlpools in a Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory, as part of NASA-funded research. This process is similar to a phenomenon called starquakes that appear as glitches in the rotation of pulsars in space. MIT's Wolgang Ketterle and his colleagues, who conducted the research under a grant from the Biological and Physical Research Program through NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., cooled the sodium gas to less than one millionth of a degree above absolute zero (-273 Celsius or -460 Fahrenheit). At such extreme cold, the gas cloud converts to a peculiar form of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate, as predicted by Albert Einstein and Satyendra Bose of India in 1927. No physical container can hold such ultra-cold matter, so Ketterle's team used magnets to keep the cloud in place. They then used a laser beam to make the gas cloud spin, a process Ketterle compares to stroking a ping-pong ball with a feather until it starts spirning. The spinning sodium gas cloud, whose volume was one- millionth of a cubic centimeter, much smaller than a raindrop, developed a regular pattern of more than 100 whirlpools.

  3. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... of Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

  4. REGULAR VERSUS DIFFUSIVE PHOTOSPHERIC FLUX CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2011-04-20

    Observations of photospheric flux cancellation on the Sun imply that cancellation can be a diffusive rather than regular process. A criterion is derived, which quantifies the parameter range in which diffusive photospheric cancellation should occur. Numerical estimates show that regular cancellation models should be expected to give a quantitatively accurate description of photospheric cancellation. The estimates rely on a recently suggested scaling for a turbulent magnetic diffusivity, which is consistent with the diffusivity measurements on spatial scales varying by almost two orders of magnitude. Application of the turbulent diffusivity to large-scale dispersal of the photospheric magnetic flux is discussed.

  5. Dimensional regularization is generic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    The absence of the quadratic divergence in the Higgs sector of the Standard Model in the dimensional regularization is usually regarded to be an exceptional property of a specific regularization. To understand what is going on in the dimensional regularization, we illustrate how to reproduce the results of the dimensional regularization for the λϕ4 theory in the more conventional regularization such as the higher derivative regularization; the basic postulate involved is that the quadratically divergent induced mass, which is independent of the scale change of the physical mass, is kinematical and unphysical. This is consistent with the derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation, which is a comparison of two theories with slightly different masses, for the λϕ4 theory without encountering the quadratic divergence. In this sense the dimensional regularization may be said to be generic in a bottom-up approach starting with a successful low energy theory. We also define a modified version of the mass independent renormalization for a scalar field which leads to the homogeneous renormalization group equation. Implications of the present analysis on the Standard Model at high energies and the presence or absence of SUSY at LHC energies are briefly discussed.

  6. Regular gravitational lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragon, Norbert

    1992-02-01

    The Einstein action with vanishing cosmological constant is for appropriate field content the unique local action which is regular at the fixed point of affine coordinate transformations. Imposing this regularity requirement one excludes also Wess-Zumino counterterms which trade gravitational anomalies for Lorentz anomalies. One has to expect dilatational and SL (D) anomalies. If these anomalies are absent and if the regularity of the quantum vertex functional can be controlled then Einstein gravity is renormalizable. On leave of absence from Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hannover, W-3000 Hannover 1, FRG.

  7. Plasma clouds and snowplows: Bulk plasma escape from Mars observed by MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  8. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  9. QUANTIFYING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM LARGE-SCALE CLOUD TO COLLAPSING CORE: SELF-SIMILARITY, MASS-TO-FLUX RATIO, AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2012-03-01

    Dust polarization observational results are analyzed for the high-mass star formation region W51 from the largest parent cloud ({approx}2 pc, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) to the large-scale envelope ({approx}0.5 pc, BIMA array) down to the collapsing core e2 ({approx}60 mpc, Submillimeter Array). Magnetic field and dust emission gradient orientations reveal a correlation which becomes increasingly more tight with higher resolution. The previously developed polarization-intensity-gradient method is applied in order to quantify the magnetic field significance. This technique provides a way to estimate the local magnetic field force compared to gravity without the need of any mass or field strength measurements, solely making use of measured angles which reflect the geometrical imprint of the various forces. All three data sets clearly show regions with distinct features in the field-to-gravity force ratio. Azimuthally averaged radial profiles of this force ratio reveal a transition from a field dominance at larger distances to a gravity dominance closer to the emission peaks. Normalizing these profiles to a characteristic core scale points toward self-similarity. Furthermore, the polarization-intensity-gradient method is linked to the mass-to-flux ratio, providing a new approach to estimate the latter one without mass and field strength inputs. A transition from a magnetically supercritical to a subcritical state as a function of distance from the emission peak is found for the e2 core. Finally, based on the measured radius-dependent field-to-gravity force ratio we derive a modified star formation efficiency with a diluted gravity force. Compared to a standard (free-fall) efficiency, the observed field is capable of reducing the efficiency down to 10% or less.

  10. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  11. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    PubMed

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone. PMID:27513219

  12. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    PubMed

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of broad line region clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Martin; Schartmann, Marc; Burkert, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Hydrodynamic stability has been a longstanding issue for the cloud model of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei. We argue that the clouds may be gravitationally bound to the supermassive black hole. If true, stabilization by thermal pressure alone becomes even more difficult. We further argue that if magnetic fields are present in such clouds at a level that could affect the stability properties, they need to be strong enough to compete with the radiation pressure on the cloud. This would imply magnetic field values of a few gauss for a sample of active galactic nuclei we draw from the literature. We then investigate the effect of several magnetic configurations on cloud stability in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For a purely azimuthal magnetic field which provides the dominant pressure support, the cloud first gets compressed by the opposing radiative and gravitational forces. The pressure inside the cloud then increases, and it expands vertically. Kelvin-Helmholtz and column density instabilities lead to a filamentary fragmentation of the cloud. This radiative dispersion continues until the cloud is shredded down to the resolution level. For a helical magnetic field configuration, a much more stable cloud core survives with a stationary density histogram which takes the form of a power law. Our simulated clouds develop sub-Alfvénic internal motions on the level of a few hundred km s-1.

  14. Optical/near-infrared polarization survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic fields, dense cloud fragmentations, and anomalous dust grain sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Reis, Wilson; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G. E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: roman@dfuls.cl

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak A{sub V} between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region.

  15. Seeking a Regularity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    This autoinstructional unit deals with the phenomena of regularity in chemical behavior. The prerequisites suggested are two other autoinstructional lessons (Experiments 1 and 2) identified in the Del Mod System as SE 018 020 and SE 018 023. The equipment needed is listed and 45 minutes is the suggested time allotment. The Student Guide includes…

  16. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  17. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... their delicate appearance, thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals called cirrus may contribute to global warming. Some scientists ... July 9, 2002 - Thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals over the Caribbean Sea. project:  MISR ...

  18. Electron cloud in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Simulations of the Fermilab Booster reveal a substantial electron-cloud buildup both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, when the second-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is discussed.

  19. Regularizing portfolio optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Susanne; Kondor, Imre

    2010-07-01

    The optimization of large portfolios displays an inherent instability due to estimation error. This poses a fundamental problem, because solutions that are not stable under sample fluctuations may look optimal for a given sample, but are, in effect, very far from optimal with respect to the average risk. In this paper, we approach the problem from the point of view of statistical learning theory. The occurrence of the instability is intimately related to over-fitting, which can be avoided using known regularization methods. We show how regularized portfolio optimization with the expected shortfall as a risk measure is related to support vector regression. The budget constraint dictates a modification. We present the resulting optimization problem and discuss the solution. The L2 norm of the weight vector is used as a regularizer, which corresponds to a diversification 'pressure'. This means that diversification, besides counteracting downward fluctuations in some assets by upward fluctuations in others, is also crucial because it improves the stability of the solution. The approach we provide here allows for the simultaneous treatment of optimization and diversification in one framework that enables the investor to trade off between the two, depending on the size of the available dataset.

  20. Shadow of rotating regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Amir, Muhammed; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the shadows cast by the different types of rotating regular black holes viz. Ayón-Beato-García (ABG), Hayward, and Bardeen. These black holes have in addition to the total mass (M ) and rotation parameter (a ), different parameters as electric charge (Q ), deviation parameter (g ), and magnetic charge (g*). Interestingly, the size of the shadow is affected by these parameters in addition to the rotation parameter. We found that the radius of the shadow in each case decreases monotonically, and the distortion parameter increases when the values of these parameters increase. A comparison with the standard Kerr case is also investigated. We have also studied the influence of the plasma environment around regular black holes to discuss its shadow. The presence of the plasma affects the apparent size of the regular black hole's shadow to be increased due to two effects: (i) gravitational redshift of the photons and (ii) radial dependence of plasma density.

  1. Higher-Order Global Regularity of an Inviscid Voigt-Regularization of the Three-Dimensional Inviscid Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, Adam; Titi, Edriss S.

    2014-03-01

    We prove existence, uniqueness, and higher-order global regularity of strong solutions to a particular Voigt-regularization of the three-dimensional inviscid resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Specifically, the coupling of a resistive magnetic field to the Euler-Voigt model is introduced to form an inviscid regularization of the inviscid resistive MHD system. The results hold in both the whole space and in the context of periodic boundary conditions. Weak solutions for this regularized model are also considered, and proven to exist globally in time, but the question of uniqueness for weak solutions is still open. Furthermore, we show that the solutions of the Voigt regularized system converge, as the regularization parameter , to strong solutions of the original inviscid resistive MHD, on the corresponding time interval of existence of the latter. Moreover, we also establish a new criterion for blow-up of solutions to the original MHD system inspired by this Voigt regularization.

  2. Higher-Order Global Regularity of an Inviscid Voigt-Regularization of the Three-Dimensional Inviscid Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, Adam; Titi, Edriss S.

    2013-05-01

    We prove existence, uniqueness, and higher-order global regularity of strong solutions to a particular Voigt-regularization of the three-dimensional inviscid resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Specifically, the coupling of a resistive magnetic field to the Euler-Voigt model is introduced to form an inviscid regularization of the inviscid resistive MHD system. The results hold in both the whole space {{R}^3} and in the context of periodic boundary conditions. Weak solutions for this regularized model are also considered, and proven to exist globally in time, but the question of uniqueness for weak solutions is still open. Furthermore, we show that the solutions of the Voigt regularized system converge, as the regularization parameter {α → 0}, to strong solutions of the original inviscid resistive MHD, on the corresponding time interval of existence of the latter. Moreover, we also establish a new criterion for blow-up of solutions to the original MHD system inspired by this Voigt regularization.

  3. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE AND HI IMAGING OF STRONG RAM PRESSURE STRIPPING IN THE COMA SPIRAL NGC 4921: DENSE CLOUD DECOUPLING AND EVIDENCE FOR MAGNETIC BINDING IN THE ISM

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Abramson, Anne; Bravo-Alfaro, Hector

    2015-08-15

    Remarkable dust extinction features in the deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) V and I images of the face-on Coma cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4921 show in unprecedented ways how ram pressure strips the ISM from the disk of a spiral galaxy. New VLA HI maps show a truncated and highly asymmetric HI disk with a compressed HI distribution in the NW, providing evidence for ram pressure acting from the NW. Where the HI distribution is truncated in the NW region, HST images show a well-defined, continuous front of dust that extends over 90° and 20 kpc. This dust front separates the dusty from dust-free regions of the galaxy, and we interpret it as galaxy ISM swept up near the leading side of the ICM–ISM interaction. We identify and characterize 100 pc–1 kpc scale substructure within this dust front caused by ram pressure, including head–tail filaments, C-shaped filaments, and long smooth dust fronts. The morphology of these features strongly suggests that dense gas clouds partially decouple from surrounding lower density gas during stripping, but decoupling is inhibited, possibly by magnetic fields that link and bind distant parts of the ISM.

  4. Testing Magnetic Star Formation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas; Troland, Thomas H.

    2009-02-01

    Zeeman observations of molecular clouds yield the line-of-sight component B LOS of the magnetic vector B, which makes it possible to test the two major extreme-case theories of what drives star formation—ambipolar diffusion or turbulence. However, only one of the three components of B is measurable, so tests have been statistical rather than direct, and they have not been definitive. We report here observations of the Zeeman effect in the 18 cm lines of OH in the envelope regions surrounding four molecular cloud cores toward which detections of B LOS have been achieved in the same lines, and evaluate the ratio of mass-to-magnetic flux, M/Φ, between the cloud core and envelope. This relative M/Φ measurement reduces uncertainties in previous studies, such as the angle between B and the line of sight and the value of [OH/H]. Our result is that for all four clouds, the ratios R of the core to the envelope values of M/Φ are less than 1. Stated another way, the ratios R' of the core to the total cloud M/Φ are less than 1. The extreme case or idealized (no turbulence) ambipolar diffusion theory of core formation requires the ratio of the central to total M/Φ to be approximately equal to the inverse of the original subcritical M/Φ, or R' > 1. The probability that all four of our clouds have R' > 1 is 3 × 10-7 our results are therefore significantly in contradiction with the hypothesis that these four cores were formed by ambipolar diffusion. Highly super-Alfvénic turbulent simulations yield a wide range of relative M/Φ, but favor a ratio R < 1, as we observe. Our experiment is limited to four clouds, and we can only directly test the predictions of the extreme-case "idealized" models of ambipolar-diffusion driven star formation, which have a regular magnetic field morphology. Nonetheless, our experimental results are not consistent with the "idealized" strong field, ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation. Comparisons of our results with more realistic

  5. Regularized versus non-regularized statistical reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, N. V.

    2011-08-01

    An important feature of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) is the stochastic property of real clinical data. Statistical algorithms such as ordered subset-expectation maximization (OSEM) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) are a direct consequence of the stochastic nature of the data. The principal difference between these two algorithms is that OSEM is a non-regularized approach, while the MAP is a regularized algorithm. From the theoretical point of view, reconstruction problems belong to the class of ill-posed problems and should be considered using regularization. Regularization introduces an additional unknown regularization parameter into the reconstruction procedure as compared with non-regularized algorithms. However, a comparison of non-regularized OSEM and regularized MAP algorithms with fixed regularization parameters has shown very minor difference between reconstructions. This problem is analyzed in the present paper. To improve the reconstruction quality, a method of local regularization is proposed based on the spatially adaptive regularization parameter. The MAP algorithm with local regularization was tested in reconstruction of the Hoffman brain phantom.

  6. An enhanced neighborhood similar pixel interpolator approach for removing thick clouds in landsat images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thick cloud contaminations in Landsat images limit their regular usage for land applications. A few methods have been developed to remove thick clouds using additional cloud-free images. Unfortunately, the cloud-free composition image produced by existing methods commonly lacks from the desired spat...

  7. Yearly Comparisons of Magnetic Cloud Parameters to Sun Spot Number and to Each Other for the First 18 Years of the Wind Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    We determine various statistical relationships between estimated magnetic cloud (MC) model-fit parameters and sun spot number (SSN), and to each other, for the interval defined by the Wind mission, i.e., early 1995 until the end of 2012, all in terms of yearly averages giving 18 averages each. The MC fitting model used is that of Lepping et al. (1990, JGR, 95, pp.11957-11965). The study is split between a scalar part (most of the study) and a vector part. The scalar MC 'fit parameters,' which include some quantities derived from the actual fit-parameters, are: Bo (axial magnetic field strength), 2Ro (diameter of the MC), V_MC (average measured speed of the plasma in the MC), Φo (axial magnetic flux), Jo (axial current density), I_T (total axial current), N_MC (total number of MCs in a given year), ΔT (duration of the MC), Qo (estimated 'quality' of the fitting procedure, formula dependent). These are MC-model dependent, but the last three are only very weakly so. These MC quantities are compared statistically with some associated (scalar) ambient interplanetary (IP) quantities (e.g., Bo compared with B_IMF (IP field intensity), Bo with V_SW (solar wind speed), etc.). Other IP quantities considered are: Tp (solar wind proton temperature) and Np (solar wind proton density). Some of the major findings are the following. The minimum SSN is nearly simultaneous with the minimum in N_MC, which occurs in 2008. There are various fluctuations in N_MC and Qo throughout the mission, but the last four years (2009 - 2012) are markedly different from the others; fit-quality (Qo) is low (meaning high Qo number), and N_MC is large over these four years. N_MC is especially large for 2012. Noticeable is the moderately good linear correlation (i.e., around c.c. of ≈ 0.75) between SSN and the quantities Jo, 2Ro, and B_IMF, but no MC parameter 'tracks' well with SSN. ('Tracking' is measured by examining the normalize difference between any two quantities, where the normalization is

  8. Mainstreaming the Regular Classroom Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Michael

    The paper presents activities, suggested by regular classroom teachers, to help prepare the regular classroom student for mainstreaming. The author points out that regular classroom children need a vehicle in which curiosity, concern, interest, fear, attitudes and feelings can be fully explored, where prejudices can be dispelled, and where the…

  9. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  10. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  11. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  12. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  13. Arctic Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image Stratus clouds are common in the Arctic during the summer months, and are important modulators of ... from MISR's two most obliquely forward-viewing cameras. The cold, stable air causes the clouds to persist in stratified layers, and this ...

  14. Gas clouds in galactic bulges

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, W.G.; Murray, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model is defined for the orbits of gas clouds moving through a low-density, hot resisting medium in a spiral galactic bulge. The model includes a virial equation that accounts for internal and magnetic energy, external self-pressure, self-gravity and tidal and differential shear stresses, and a criterion for assessing the Rayleigh-Taylor stability of clouds moving within a confining medium. Results are discussed from use of the model to predict the orbital decay efficiency of clouds at different radii moving in a galactic bulge similar to that of the Galaxy. 52 references.

  15. Tracking magnetogram proper motions by multiscale regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.

    1995-01-01

    Long uninterrupted sequences of solar magnetograms from the global oscillations network group (GONG) network and from the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO) satellite will provide the opportunity to study the proper motions of magnetic features. The possible use of multiscale regularization, a scale-recursive estimation technique which begins with a prior model of how state variables and their statistical properties propagate over scale. Short magnetogram sequences are analyzed with the multiscale regularization algorithm as applied to optical flow. This algorithm is found to be efficient, provides results for all the spatial scales spanned by the data and provides error estimates for the solutions. It is found that the algorithm is less sensitive to evolutionary changes than correlation tracking.

  16. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... title:  Multi-layer Clouds Over the South Indian Ocean     View Larger Image ... a noticeable cyclonic circulation over the Southern Indian Ocean, to the north of Enderbyland, East Antarctica. The image at left was ...

  17. Noctilucent clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadsden, M.

    An assessment of spacecraft, sounding rocket and ground level observational data on the noctilucent clouds which appear during summertime, at high latitudes, near the top of the mesosphere shows that these data are not sufficiently unambiguous and clear to permit conclusions as to the nature of the clouds. Although they seem to be ice particles nucleated at very low temperatures and pressures by either meteoric smoke or atmospheric ions, the very existence of the clouds poses the problem of how so much water vapor could be present at such a great height. An attempt is made to predict the microscopic behavior of the cloud particles through consideration of the relative importance of radiometer effects, radiation balance, Brownian movement, electric polarization, and the influence of Coulomb attraction on the growth of large clustered ions.

  18. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  19. Regularization in radio tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Ramakrishnan; Martin, Richard; Anderson, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    This paper demonstrates methods to select and apply regularization to the linear least-squares model formulation of the radio tomographic imaging (RTI) problem. Typically, the RTI inverse problem of image reconstruction is ill-conditioned due to the extremely small singular values of the weight matrix which relates the link signal strengths to the voxel locations of the obstruction. Regularization is included to offset the non-invertible nature of the weight matrix by adding a regularization term such as the matrix approximation of derivatives in each dimension based on the difference operator. This operation yields a smooth least-squares solution for the measured data by suppressing the high energy or noise terms in the derivative of the image. Traditionally, a scalar weighting factor of the regularization matrix is identified by trial and error (adhoc) to yield the best fit of the solution to the data without either excessive smoothing or ringing oscillations at the boundaries of the obstruction. This paper proposes new scalar and vector regularization methods that are automatically computed based on the weight matrix. Evidence of the effectiveness of these methods compared to the preset scalar regularization method is presented for stationary and moving obstructions in an RTI wireless sensor network. The variation of the mean square reconstruction error as a function of the scalar regularization is calculated for known obstructions in the network. The vector regularization procedure based on selective updates to the singular values of the weight matrix attains the lowest mean square error.

  20. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  1. Nonconvex Regularization in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuia, Devis; Flamary, Remi; Barlaud, Michel

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of different regularizers and their implications in high dimensional image classification and sparse linear unmixing. Although kernelization or sparse methods are globally accepted solutions for processing data in high dimensions, we present here a study on the impact of the form of regularization used and its parametrization. We consider regularization via traditional squared (2) and sparsity-promoting (1) norms, as well as more unconventional nonconvex regularizers (p and Log Sum Penalty). We compare their properties and advantages on several classification and linear unmixing tasks and provide advices on the choice of the best regularizer for the problem at hand. Finally, we also provide a fully functional toolbox for the community.

  2. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  3. Neptune's clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  4. CLOUD CHEMISTRY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.

    2001-03-01

    Clouds present substantial concentrations of liquid-phase water, which can potentially serve as a medium for dissolution and reaction of atmospheric gases. The important precursors of acid deposition, SO{sub 2} and nitrogen oxides NO and NO{sub 2} are only sparingly soluble in clouds without further oxidation to sulfuric and nitric acids. In the case of SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and to lesser extent ozone, are identified as important processes leading to this oxidation, and methods have been described by which to evaluate the rates of these reactions. The limited solubility of the nitrogen oxides precludes significant aqueous-phase reaction of these species, but gas-phase reactions in clouds can be important especially at night.

  5. Gathering clouds.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Many physicians are finding their heads in a "cloud" as they ponder adopting or upgrading an electronic health record (EHR). That doesn't mean they're not in touch with reality. It means they now can choose new web-based systems, also known as cloud-based EHRs, that allow them to pay a monthly subscription fee to access an EHR rather than purchase it. They don't have to buy an expensive server with its associated hardware and software; a computer with an Internet connection will do. PMID:22714732

  6. Gathering clouds.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Many physicians are finding their heads in a "cloud" as they ponder adopting or upgrading an electronic health record (EHR). That doesn't mean they're not in touch with reality. It means they now can choose new web-based systems, also known as cloud-based EHRs, that allow them to pay a monthly subscription fee to access an EHR rather than purchase it. They don't have to buy an expensive server with its associated hardware and software; a computer with an Internet connection will do.

  7. Our World: Cool Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how clouds are formed and watch an experiment to make a cloud using liquid nitrogen. Find out how scientists classify clouds according to their altitude and how clouds reflect and absorb ligh...

  8. Rotating regular black hole solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    Based on the Newman-Janis algorithm, the Ayón-Beato-García spacetime metric [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5056 (1998)] of the regular spherically symmetric, static, and charged black hole has been converted into rotational form. It is shown that the derived solution for rotating a regular black hole is regular and the critical value of the electric charge for which two horizons merge into one sufficiently decreases in the presence of the nonvanishing rotation parameter a of the black hole.

  9. The origin of ferromagnetic interaction between bound magnetic polarons in diluted magnetic semiconductors: A minimal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarski, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the role of various interaction mechanisms contributing to the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) molecule Hamiltonian with the purpose of gaining an insight into the origin of the ferromagnetic interaction between BMPs. Explicitly, it appears that the BMP molecule Hamiltonian without interatomic direct exchange interaction does not lead to appearance of the parallel alignment of polaronic clouds in the lowest energy state even for large magnitudes of the polaronic exchange fields (up to ~65 meV in Cd0.95Mn0.05Se). Also, it appears that for the range of moderate values of polaronic exchange fields (16-25 meV in Cd0.95Mn0.05Se), the regular Hubbard BMP pair Hamiltonian must be supplemented with the direct interatomic (Heisenberg) exchange interaction to form a minimal model Hamiltonian of BMP molecule with the parallel alignment of the polaronic clouds in the lowest energy state.

  10. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARTRAND, RICK

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  11. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events ...

  13. A stochastic cloud model for cloud and ozone retrievals from UV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Dmitry S.; Schüssler, Olena; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2016-11-01

    The new generation of satellite instruments provides measurements in and around the Oxygen A-band on a global basis and with a relatively high spatial resolution. These data are commonly used for the determination of cloud properties. A stochastic model and radiative transfer model, previously developed by the authors, is used as the forward model component in retrievals of cloud parameters and ozone total and partial columns. The cloud retrieval algorithm combines local and global optimization routines, and yields a retrieval accuracy of about 1% and a fast computational time. Retrieved parameters are the cloud optical thickness and the cloud-top height. It was found that the use of the independent pixel approximation instead of the stochastic cloud model leads to large errors in the retrieved cloud parameters, as well as, in the retrieved ozone height resolved partial columns. The latter can be reduced by using the stochastic cloud model to compute the optimal value of the regularization parameter in the framework of Tikhonov regularization.

  14. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197

  15. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  16. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  17. Boundary Regularity in Variational Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jan; Mingione, Giuseppe

    2010-11-01

    We prove that, if {u : Ω subset mathbb{R}^n to mathbb{R}^N} is a solution to the Dirichlet variational problem mathop minlimitswint_{Ω} F(x, w, Dw) dx quad {subject to} quad w equiv u_0 onpartial Ω, involving a regular boundary datum ( u 0, ∂Ω) and a regular integrand F( x, w, Dw) strongly convex in Dw and satisfying suitable growth conditions, then {{mathcal H}^{n-1}} -almost every boundary point is regular for u in the sense that Du is Hölder continuous in a relative neighborhood of the point. The existence of even one such regular boundary point was previously not known except for some very special cases treated by J ost & M eier (Math Ann 262:549-561, 1983). Our results are consequences of new up-to-the-boundary higher differentiability results that we establish for minima of the functionals in question. The methods also allow us to improve the known boundary regularity results for solutions to non-linear elliptic systems, and, in some cases, to improve the known interior singular sets estimates for minimizers. Moreover, our approach allows for a treatment of systems and functionals with “rough” coefficients belonging to suitable Sobolev spaces of fractional order.

  18. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Regularization Analysis of SAR Superresolution

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DICKEY,FRED M.

    2002-04-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. In a previous report the application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar was investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. This work treats the problem from the standpoint of regularization. Both the operator inversion approach and the regularization approach show that the ability to superresolve SAR imagery is severely limited by system noise.

  1. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  2. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  3. A cloud/particle model of the interstellar medium - Galactic spiral structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, F. H.; Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A cloud/particle model for gas flow in galaxies is developed that incorporates cloud-cloud collisions and supernovae as dominant local processes. Cloud-cloud collisions are the main means of dissipation. To counter this dissipation and maintain local dispersion, supernova explosions in the medium administer radial snowplow pushes to all nearby clouds. The causal link between these processes is that cloud-cloud collisions will form stars and that these stars will rapidly become supernovae. The cloud/particle model is tested and used to investigate the gas dynamics and spiral structures in galaxies where these assumptions may be reasonable. Particular attention is given to whether large-scale galactic shock waves, which are thought to underlie the regular well-delineated spiral structure in some galaxies, form and persist in a cloud-supernova dominated interstellar medium; this question is answered in the affirmative.

  4. Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  5. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  6. Venus ionospheric 'clouds' - Relationship to the magnetosheath field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Brace, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic field control of Venus plasma 'clouds' relative to the planet has been analyzed by rotating the observed locations of the clouds into a coordinate system in which all of the transverse upstream magnetic fields were aligned. The results indicate that clouds are scattered around the periphery of the planet in the terminator plane. There is no evidence of a concentration of clouds where the magnetosheath magnetic field is most strongly 'draped'. On the other hand, statistics show that the change in the orientation of the transverse upstream magnetic field between the inbound and outbound bow shock crossings, for the orbits where clouds are seen is about 30 deg greater than the average upstream change at Venus over the same time intervals.

  7. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Distributional Stress Regularity: A Corpus Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temperley, David

    2009-01-01

    The regularity of stress patterns in a language depends on "distributional stress regularity", which arises from the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables, and "durational stress regularity", which arises from the timing of syllables. Here we focus on distributional regularity, which depends on three factors. "Lexical stress patterning"…

  9. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  10. Electron cloud considerations for HIF drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    We review some previous results on electron-cloud dynamics and accumulation and the impact of electron clouds on ion beam dynamics, and assess these in the context of a magnetic-quadrupole-based heavy-ion fusion driver. We present a new analysis which exploits analytic solution of linearized envelope equations between accelerating gaps to derive a set of mapping equations which we use to extrapolate from previously obtained particle-simulation results for a beam transport system to an HIF driver.

  11. Regular Motions of Resonant Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se revisan resultados analiticos relativos a soluciones regulares del problema asteroidal eliptico promediados en la vecindad de una resonancia con jupiten Mencionamos Ia ley de estructura para libradores de alta excentricidad, la estabilidad de los centros de liberaci6n, las perturbaciones forzadas por la excentricidad de jupiter y las 6rbitas de corotaci6n. ABSTRAC This paper reviews analytical results concerning the regular solutions of the elliptic asteroidal problem averaged in the neighbourhood of a resonance with jupiter. We mention the law of structure for high-eccentricity librators, the stability of the libration centers, the perturbations forced by the eccentricity ofjupiter and the corotation orbits. Key words: ASThROIDS

  12. Energy functions for regularization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delingette, H.; Hebert, M.; Ikeuchi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regularization techniques are widely used for inverse problem solving in computer vision such as surface reconstruction, edge detection, or optical flow estimation. Energy functions used for regularization algorithms measure how smooth a curve or surface is, and to render acceptable solutions these energies must verify certain properties such as invariance with Euclidean transformations or invariance with parameterization. The notion of smoothness energy is extended here to the notion of a differential stabilizer, and it is shown that to void the systematic underestimation of undercurvature for planar curve fitting, it is necessary that circles be the curves of maximum smoothness. A set of stabilizers is proposed that meet this condition as well as invariance with rotation and parameterization.

  13. Statistical regularities reduce perceived numerosity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaying; Yu, Ru Qi

    2016-01-01

    Numerical information can be perceived at multiple levels (e.g., one bird, or a flock of birds). The level of input has typically been defined by explicit grouping cues, such as contours or connecting lines. Here we examine how regularities of object co-occurrences shape numerosity perception in the absence of explicit grouping cues. Participants estimated the number of colored circles in an array. We found that estimates were lower in arrays containing colors that consistently appeared next to each other across the experiment, even though participants were not explicitly aware of the color pairs (Experiments 1a and 1b). To provide support for grouping, we introduced color duplicates and found that estimates were lower in arrays with two identical colors (Experiment 2). The underestimation could not be explained by increased attention to individual objects (Experiment 3). These results suggest that statistical regularities reduce perceived numerosity consistent with a grouping mechanism. PMID:26451701

  14. Cloud Infrastructure & Applications - CloudIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistio, Anthony; Reich, Christoph; Doelitzscher, Frank

    The idea behind Cloud Computing is to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-Services and Software-as-a-Service over the Internet on an easy pay-per-use business model. To harness the potentials of Cloud Computing for e-Learning and research purposes, and to small- and medium-sized enterprises, the Hochschule Furtwangen University establishes a new project, called Cloud Infrastructure & Applications (CloudIA). The CloudIA project is a market-oriented cloud infrastructure that leverages different virtualization technologies, by supporting Service-Level Agreements for various service offerings. This paper describes the CloudIA project in details and mentions our early experiences in building a private cloud using an existing infrastructure.

  15. Localizing the Frequency x Regularity Word Reading Interaction in the Cerebral Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Sarty, Gordon E.; Borowsky, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to combine behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to advance our knowledge of where the Frequency x Regularity interaction on word naming is located in the cerebral cortex. Participants named high and low frequency, regular and exception words in a behavioural lab (Experiment 1) and during an fMRI…

  16. Deep learning regularized Fisher mappings.

    PubMed

    Wong, W K; Sun, Mingming

    2011-10-01

    For classification tasks, it is always desirable to extract features that are most effective for preserving class separability. In this brief, we propose a new feature extraction method called regularized deep Fisher mapping (RDFM), which learns an explicit mapping from the sample space to the feature space using a deep neural network to enhance the separability of features according to the Fisher criterion. Compared to kernel methods, the deep neural network is a deep and nonlocal learning architecture, and therefore exhibits more powerful ability to learn the nature of highly variable datasets from fewer samples. To eliminate the side effects of overfitting brought about by the large capacity of powerful learners, regularizers are applied in the learning procedure of RDFM. RDFM is evaluated in various types of datasets, and the results reveal that it is necessary to apply unsupervised regularization in the fine-tuning phase of deep learning. Thus, for very flexible models, the optimal Fisher feature extractor may be a balance between discriminative ability and descriptive ability.

  17. New Two-Body Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    We present a new scheme to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations. It is a combination of Sundman's time transformation and Levi-Civita's spatial coordinate transformation applied to the two-dimensional components of the position and velocity vectors in the osculating orbital plane. We adopt a coordinate triad specifying the plane as a function of the orbital angular momentum vector only. Since the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum is explicitly computed from the in-the-plane components of the position and velocity vectors, only two components of the orbital angular momentum vector are to be determined. In addition to these, we select the total energy of the two-body system and the physical time as additional components of the new variables. The equations of motion of the new variables have no singularity even when the mutual distance is extremely small, and therefore, the new variables are suitable to deal with close encounters. As a result, the number of dependent variables in the new scheme becomes eight, which is significantly smaller than the existing schemes to avoid close encounters: two less than the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel and the Bürdet-Ferrandiz regularizations, and five less than the Sperling-Bürdet/Bürdet-Heggie regularization.

  18. POLARIZATION STRUCTURE OF FILAMENTARY CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2015-07-01

    Filaments are considered to be basic structures, and molecular clouds consist of filaments. Filaments are often observed as extending in the direction perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field. The structure of filaments has been studied based on a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium model. Here we simulate the expected polarization pattern for isothermal magnetohydrostatic filaments. The filament exhibits a polarization pattern in which the magnetic field is apparently perpendicular to the filament when observed from the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. When the line of sight is parallel to the global magnetic field, the observed polarization pattern is dependent on the center-to-surface density ratio for the filament and the concentration of the gas mass toward the central magnetic flux tube. Filaments with low center-to-surface density ratios have an insignificant degree of polarization when observed from the direction parallel to the global magnetic field. However, models with a large center-to-surface density ratio have polarization patterns that indicate that the filament is perpendicularly threaded by the magnetic field. When mass is heavily concentrated at the central magnetic flux tube, which can be realized by the ambipolar diffusion process, the polarization pattern is similar to that expected for a low center-to-surface density contrast.

  19. Knowledge and regularity in planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, John A.; Langley, Pat; Matwin, Stan

    1992-01-01

    The field of planning has focused on several methods of using domain-specific knowledge. The three most common methods, use of search control, use of macro-operators, and analogy, are part of a continuum of techniques differing in the amount of reused plan information. This paper describes TALUS, a planner that exploits this continuum, and is used for comparing the relative utility of these methods. We present results showing how search control, macro-operators, and analogy are affected by domain regularity and the amount of stored knowledge.

  20. The Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marochnik, Leonid S.; Mukhin, Lev M.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    1991-01-01

    Views of the large-scale structure of the solar system, consisting of the Sun, the nine planets and their satellites, changed when Oort demonstrated that a gigantic cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) is located on the periphery of the solar system. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the Oort cloud's mass; (2) Hill's cloud mass; (3) angular momentum distribution in the solar system; and (4) the cometary cloud around other stars.

  1. Research on cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Lingsong; Su, Wei; Wang, Can; Zhang, Changfan

    2015-02-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as cloud storage, cloud push, mobile computing allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud service. Combined with the thought of cloud computing, this paper presents a cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system. This system mainly consists of three parts: signal acquisition client, web server deployed on the cloud service, and remote client. This system is a special website developed using asp.net and Flex RIA technology, which solves the selective contradiction between two monitoring modes, B/S and C/S. This platform supplies customer condition monitoring and data analysis service by Internet, which was deployed on the cloud server. Signal acquisition device is responsible for data (sensor data, audio, video, etc.) collection and pushes the monitoring data to the cloud storage database regularly. Data acquisition equipment in this system is only conditioned with the function of data collection and network function such as smartphone and smart sensor. This system's scale can adjust dynamically according to the amount of applications and users, so it won't cause waste of resources. As a representative case study, we developed a prototype system based on Ali cloud service using the rotor test rig as the research object. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system architecture is feasible.

  2. Tessellating the Sphere with Regular Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Bechthold, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Tessellations in the Euclidean plane and regular polygons that tessellate the sphere are reviewed. The regular polygons that can possibly tesellate the sphere are spherical triangles, squares and pentagons.

  3. Pion Cloud and the Sea of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2009-05-01

    I review recent progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon sea and the role of the nucleon's pion cloud. In particular, I discuss the consequences of the pion cloud for the d-bar - u-bar asymmetry in the proton, the neutron's electric form factor, and the proton's electric to magnetic form factor ratio.

  4. On the virial theorem for turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian, rather than Lagrangian, form of the virial theorem is derived for a turbulent, magnetized cloud embedded in a steady, turbulent, low-density intercloud medium. The role of turbulent pressure in cloud confinement is clarified, and it is shown that, in the absence of a magnetic field, a cloud can be at a somewhat lower pressure than the intercloud medium. Simple forms for the magnetic term in the virial equation are obtained. Radiation pressure is considered; its effects are relatively small under average conditions in the interstellar medium. Under typical conditions, external pressure and magnetic fields are shown to have a relatively small effect on virial estimates of the mass of self-gravitating clouds.

  5. Regular Pentagons and the Fibonacci Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doug

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how to draw a regular pentagon. Shows the sequence of a succession of regular pentagons formed by extending the sides. Calculates the general formula of the Lucas and Fibonacci sequences. Presents a regular icosahedron as an example of the golden ratio. (YP)

  6. Some Cosine Relations and the Regular Heptagon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Heng, Phongthong

    2007-01-01

    The ancient Greek mathematicians sought to construct, by use of straight edge and compass only, all regular polygons. They had no difficulty with regular polygons having 3, 4, 5 and 6 sides, but the 7-sided heptagon eluded all their attempts. In this article, the authors discuss some cosine relations and the regular heptagon. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. Natural frequency of regular basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjandra, Sugih S.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    Similar to the vibration of a guitar string or an elastic membrane, water waves in an enclosed basin undergo standing oscillatory waves, also known as seiches. The resonant (eigen) periods of seiches are determined by water depth and geometry of the basin. For regular basins, explicit formulas are available. Resonance occurs when the dominant frequency of external force matches the eigen frequency of the basin. In this paper, we implement the conservative finite volume scheme to 2D shallow water equation to simulate resonance in closed basins. Further, we would like to use this scheme and utilizing energy spectra of the recorded signal to extract resonant periods of arbitrary basins. But here we first test the procedure for getting resonant periods of a square closed basin. The numerical resonant periods that we obtain are comparable with those from analytical formulas.

  8. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex PT-symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  9. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex {P}{T} -symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  10. Bayesian regularization of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Burden, Frank; Winkler, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian regularized artificial neural networks (BRANNs) are more robust than standard back-propagation nets and can reduce or eliminate the need for lengthy cross-validation. Bayesian regularization is a mathematical process that converts a nonlinear regression into a "well-posed" statistical problem in the manner of a ridge regression. The advantage of BRANNs is that the models are robust and the validation process, which scales as O(N2) in normal regression methods, such as back propagation, is unnecessary. These networks provide solutions to a number of problems that arise in QSAR modeling, such as choice of model, robustness of model, choice of validation set, size of validation effort, and optimization of network architecture. They are difficult to overtrain, since evidence procedures provide an objective Bayesian criterion for stopping training. They are also difficult to overfit, because the BRANN calculates and trains on a number of effective network parameters or weights, effectively turning off those that are not relevant. This effective number is usually considerably smaller than the number of weights in a standard fully connected back-propagation neural net. Automatic relevance determination (ARD) of the input variables can be used with BRANNs, and this allows the network to "estimate" the importance of each input. The ARD method ensures that irrelevant or highly correlated indices used in the modeling are neglected as well as showing which are the most important variables for modeling the activity data. This chapter outlines the equations that define the BRANN method plus a flowchart for producing a BRANN-QSAR model. Some results of the use of BRANNs on a number of data sets are illustrated and compared with other linear and nonlinear models.

  11. Photometric Properties of Carbon Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, G. C.; Lagadec, E.; Kraemer, K. E.; Boyer, M. L.; Srinivasan, S.; McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment identified over 1,800 carbon-rich Mira and semi-regular variables in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Multi-epoch infrared photometry reveals that the semi-regulars and Miras follow different sequences in color-color space when using colors sensitive to molecular absorption bands. The dustiest Miras have the strongest pulsation amplitudes and longest periods. Efforts to determine bolometric magnitudes reveal possible systematic errors with published bolometric corrections.

  12. Identifying Cognitive States Using Regularity Partitions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) data can be used to depict functional connectivity of the brain. Standard techniques have been developed to construct brain networks from this data; typically nodes are considered as voxels or sets of voxels with weighted edges between them representing measures of correlation. Identifying cognitive states based on fMRI data is connected with recording voxel activity over a certain time interval. Using this information, network and machine learning techniques can be applied to discriminate the cognitive states of the subjects by exploring different features of data. In this work we wish to describe and understand the organization of brain connectivity networks under cognitive tasks. In particular, we use a regularity partitioning algorithm that finds clusters of vertices such that they all behave with each other almost like random bipartite graphs. Based on the random approximation of the graph, we calculate a lower bound on the number of triangles as well as the expectation of the distribution of the edges in each subject and state. We investigate the results by comparing them to the state of the art algorithms for exploring connectivity and we argue that during epochs that the subject is exposed to stimulus, the inspected part of the brain is organized in an efficient way that enables enhanced functionality. PMID:26317983

  13. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  14. Stochastic regularization operators on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Doetsch, Joseph; Günther, Thomas; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Most geophysical inverse problems require the solution of underdetermined systems of equations. In order to solve such inverse problems, appropriate regularization is required. Ideally, this regularization includes information on the expected model variability and spatial correlation. Based on geostatistical covariance functions, which can be adapted to the specific situation, stochastic regularization can be used to add auxiliary constraints to the given inverse problem. Stochastic regularization operators have been successfully applied to geophysical inverse problems formulated on regular grids. Here, we demonstrate the calculation of stochastic regularization operators for unstructured meshes. Unstructured meshes are advantageous with regards to incorporating arbitrary topography, undulating geological interfaces and complex acquisition geometries into the inversion. However, compared to regular grids, unstructured meshes have variable cell sizes, complicating the calculation of stochastic operators. The stochastic operators proposed here are based on a 2D exponential correlation function, allowing to predefine spatial correlation lengths. The regularization thus acts over an imposed correlation length rather than only taking into account neighbouring cells as in regular smoothing constraints. Correlation over a spatial length partly removes the effects of variable cell sizes of unstructured meshes on the regularization. Synthetic models having large-scale interfaces as well as small-scale stochastic variations are used to analyse the performance and behaviour of the stochastic regularization operators. The resulting inverted models obtained with stochastic regularization are compare against the results of standard regularization approaches (damping and smoothing). Besides using stochastic operators for regularization, we plan to incorporate the footprint of the stochastic operator in further applications such as the calculation of the cross-gradient functions

  15. Noctilucent Cloud Sightings

    NASA Video Gallery

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds form during each polar region's summer months in the coldest place in the atmosphere, 50 miles above Earth's surface. Noctilucent Clouds were first observed in 1885 by an a...

  16. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  17. Learning regularized LDA by clustering.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yanwei; Wang, Shuang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    As a supervised dimensionality reduction technique, linear discriminant analysis has a serious overfitting problem when the number of training samples per class is small. The main reason is that the between- and within-class scatter matrices computed from the limited number of training samples deviate greatly from the underlying ones. To overcome the problem without increasing the number of training samples, we propose making use of the structure of the given training data to regularize the between- and within-class scatter matrices by between- and within-cluster scatter matrices, respectively, and simultaneously. The within- and between-cluster matrices are computed from unsupervised clustered data. The within-cluster scatter matrix contributes to encoding the possible variations in intraclasses and the between-cluster scatter matrix is useful for separating extra classes. The contributions are inversely proportional to the number of training samples per class. The advantages of the proposed method become more remarkable as the number of training samples per class decreases. Experimental results on the AR and Feret face databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Inverse scattering problem for mixed-phase and cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshchepkov, Sergey; Isaka, Harumi

    1996-12-01

    A new method of particle size retrieval is proposed of rice crystal and mixed phase clouds. The method enables us to identify each component of a bi-component cloud composed namely of ice crystals and water droplets and to retrieve separately size distributions of each cloud component. Its capability is explored as usually by using 'synthetic' multi-angular data of scattered light intensity. Various cloud microphysical characteristics are modeled by assuming two non-interacting cloud components such as liquid or supercooled droplets and cubic or hexagonal ice crystals with regular simple geometrical shapes as a first approximation. The sensitivity of the method is tested for different relative concentrations of the cloud components varying over a wide range. Firstly, we investigate the applicability limits of the single-component cloud approximation in retrieving particle size distributions of a bi-component cloud. Secondly, we test the method to retrieve simultaneously the size distributions of both the components in mixed-phase clouds, and discuss the conditions of its applicability.

  19. Effect of wake potential on Coulomb crystallization in the presence of magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Saurav; Das, Nilakshi

    2012-10-15

    The formation of dust crystal in plasma under the influence of repulsive Yukawa (Debye-Hueckel) potential is a well known phenomenon. The regular structure of dust particles is affected by anisotropic ion flow near the sheath region. The bombardment of the ions over dust grains distorts their Debye sphere by overshielding the dust cloud and gives rise to an attractive oscillatory wake potential. In this paper, we have obtained an expression for wake potential along with the Yukawa type of potential in a complex plasma in the presence of magnetic field, for subsonic ion flow towards the plasma sheath. In the presence of magnetic field, interaction potential gets modified and becomes anisotropic. We have studied the combined effect of the attractive wake potential as well as repulsive Yukawa potential on a 2D dust crystal, both in the presence and absence of magnetic field, using molecular dynamic simulation.

  20. Computer animation of clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-01-28

    Computer animation of outdoor scenes is enhanced by realistic clouds. I will discuss several different modeling and rendering schemes for clouds, and show how they evolved in my animation work. These include transparency-textured clouds on a 2-D plane, smooth shaded or textured 3-D clouds surfaces, and 3-D volume rendering. For the volume rendering, I will present various illumination schemes, including the density emitter, single scattering, and multiple scattering models.

  1. Ideal regularization for learning kernels from labels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Binbin; Lai, Jianhuang; Shen, Lixin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of regularization that is able to utilize the label information of a data set for learning kernels. The proposed regularization, referred to as ideal regularization, is a linear function of the kernel matrix to be learned. The ideal regularization allows us to develop efficient algorithms to exploit labels. Three applications of the ideal regularization are considered. Firstly, we use the ideal regularization to incorporate the labels into a standard kernel, making the resulting kernel more appropriate for learning tasks. Next, we employ the ideal regularization to learn a data-dependent kernel matrix from an initial kernel matrix (which contains prior similarity information, geometric structures, and labels of the data). Finally, we incorporate the ideal regularization to some state-of-the-art kernel learning problems. With this regularization, these learning problems can be formulated as simpler ones which permit more efficient solvers. Empirical results show that the ideal regularization exploits the labels effectively and efficiently.

  2. Low-Amplitude Anisotropic Wave Train Events during Passage of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds / Mazas Amplitūdas Anizotropiju Viļņu Parādību Secība Starpplanētu Magnētisko Mākoņu Rašanās Laikā

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, R.; Mishra, R. K.

    2013-04-01

    The work presents a continuation in the series related to the long-term space observations made by ground-based neutron monitoring stations. The cosmic ray intensity variation is considered as affected by interplanetary magnetic clouds during low-amplitude anisotropic wave train (LAAWT) events. It was observed that the solar wind velocity is higher than normal (> 300 km/s) while the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strength is lower than normal on the arrival of magnetic cloud during LAAWT events. The proton density is found to remain significantly low at high solar-wind velocity, which was expected. The north/south component of interplanetary magnetic field turns southward one day before the arrival of cloud and remains in this direction after that. The cosmic ray intensity is found to increase with the solar wind velocity. It is noteworthy that the cosmic ray intensity significantly increases before and 90 h after the arrival of such a cloud, and decreases gradually after its passage. The north/south component of IMF (Bz) is found to significantly correlate with latitude angle (Ө) and disturbance storm time index Dst, whereas the geomagnetic activity index (Ap) significantly anti-correlates with these parameters, decreasing with (Ө) and Dst increasing on the arrival of interplanetary magnetic cloud during LAAWT events. Raksts ir turpinājums darbu sērijai par dažādām parādībām kosmosā, kas balstītas uz novērojumiem un datiem, iegūtiem dažādos laika periodos pasaules neitronu monitoringa stacijās (Deep River, Tokija, Maskava, u.c.). Rakstā apskatītās kosmisko staru intensitātes izmaiņas tiek pamatotas ar starpplanētu magnētisko mākoņu parādīšanos. Tiek parādītas saules vēja, magnētiskā lauka spēka, vētru pertubāciju indeksa un citu parametru atkarība no magnētisko mākoņu parādīšanās. Tiek atzīmēts, ka kosmisko staru intensitāte strauji pieaug pirms mākoņu parādīšanās un 90 stundu laikā pēc tiem, un pak

  3. Cloud Scaling Properties and Cloud Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Morcrette, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    Cloud liquid and cloud traction variability is studied as a function of horizontal scale in the ECMWF forecast model during several 10-day runs at the highest available model resolution, recently refined from approximately 60 km (T213) down to approximately 20 km (T639). At higher resolutions, model plane-parallel albedo biases are reduced, so that models may be tuned to have larger, more realistic, cloud liquid water amounts, However, the distribution of cloud liquid assumed -within- each gridbox, for radiative and thermodynamic computations, depends on ad hoc assumptions that are not necessarily consistent with observed scaling properties, or with scaling properties produced by the model at larger scales. To study the larger-scale cloud properties, ten locations on the Earth are chosen to coincide with locations having considerable surface data available for validation, and representing a variety of climatic regimes, scaling exponents are determined from a range or scales down to model resolution, and are re-computed every three hours, separately for low, medium and high clouds, as well as column-integrated cloudiness. Cloud variability fluctuates in time, due to diurnal, synoptic and other' processes, but scaling exponents are found to be relatively stable. various approaches are considered for applying computed cloud scaling to subgrid cloud distributions used for radiation, beyond simple random or maximal overlap now in common use. Considerably more work is needed to compare model cloud scaling with observations. This will be aided by increased availability of high-resolution surface, aircraft and satellite data, and by the increasing resolution of global models,

  4. New MISR Cloud Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    ... are provided for 70% of clouds observed by MISR with vector RMS difference from atmospheric motion vectors from other sources ranging from ... m/s. Cloud top heights are provided for 80% of clouds with RMS differences of less than 1 km (the same as for the existing Level 2 Stereo ...

  5. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice cyrstals suspended in the air. The study of clouds touches on many facets of armospheric science. The chemistry of clouds is tied to the chemistry of the surrounding atmosphere.

  6. Cloud Computing Explained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  7. Security in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Degaspari, John

    2011-08-01

    As more provider organizations look to the cloud computing model, they face a host of security-related questions. What are the appropriate applications for the cloud, what is the best cloud model, and what do they need to know to choose the best vendor? Hospital CIOs and security experts weigh in.

  8. Regular attractors and nonautonomous perturbations of them

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, Marko I; Zelik, Sergey V; Chepyzhov, Vladimir V

    2013-01-31

    We study regular global attractors of dissipative dynamical semigroups with discrete or continuous time and we investigate attractors for nonautonomous perturbations of such semigroups. The main theorem states that the regularity of global attractors is preserved under small nonautonomous perturbations. Moreover, nonautonomous regular global attractors remain exponential and robust. We apply these general results to model nonautonomous reaction-diffusion systems in a bounded domain of R{sup 3} with time-dependent external forces. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  9. Resolving intravoxel fiber architecture using nonconvex regularized blind compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. Y.; Huang, J. P.; Sun, C. Y.; Liu, W. Y.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2015-03-01

    In diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, accurate and reliable estimation of intravoxel fiber architectures is a major prerequisite for tractography algorithms or any other derived statistical analysis. Several methods have been proposed that estimate intravoxel fiber architectures using low angular resolution acquisitions owing to their shorter acquisition time and relatively low b-values. But these methods are highly sensitive to noise. In this work, we propose a nonconvex regularized blind compressed sensing approach to estimate intravoxel fiber architectures in low angular resolution acquisitions. The method models diffusion-weighted (DW) signals as a sparse linear combination of unfixed reconstruction basis functions and introduces a nonconvex regularizer to enhance the noise immunity. We present a general solving framework to simultaneously estimate the sparse coefficients and the reconstruction basis. Experiments on synthetic, phantom, and real human brain DW images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  10. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C M; Furman, M A; Vay, J L; Grote, D P; Ng, J T; Pivi, M F; Wang, L F

    2009-05-05

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where l{sub b} << 2{pi}{omega}{sub c}, (l{sub b} = bunch duration, {omega}{sub c} = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor {approx} 3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined density 'stripes' of multipactoring found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics will be discussed.

  11. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  12. Cloud microstructure studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, H. H., Jr.; Fowler, M. G.; Chang, D. T.; Ryan, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Over two thousand individual cloud droplet size distributions were measured with an optical cloud particle spectrometer flown on the NASA Convair 990 aircraft. Representative droplet spectra and liquid water content, L (gm/cu m) were obtained for oceanic stratiform and cumuliform clouds. For non-precipitating clouds, values of L range from 0.1 gm/cu m to 0.5 gm/cu m; with precipitation, L is often greater than 1 gm/cu m. Measurements were also made in a newly formed contrail and in cirrus clouds.

  13. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  14. State-Space Regularization: Geometric Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Kunisch, K.

    1998-05-15

    Regularization of nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems is analyzed for a class of problems that is characterized by mappings which are the composition of a well-posed nonlinear and an ill-posed linear mapping. Regularization is carried out in the range of the nonlinear mapping. In applications this corresponds to the state-space variable of a partial differential equation or to preconditioning of data. The geometric theory of projection onto quasi-convex sets is used to analyze the stabilizing properties of this regularization technique and to describe its asymptotic behavior as the regularization parameter tends to zero.

  15. Clouds Over Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Clouds above the rim of 'Endurance Crater' in this image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity can remind the viewer that Mars, our celestial neighbor, is subject to weather. On Earth, clouds like these would be referred to as 'cirrus' or the aptly nicknamed 'mares' tails.' These clouds occur in a region of strong vertical shear. The cloud particles (ice in this martian case) fall out, and get dragged along away from the location where they originally condensed, forming characteristic streamers. Opportunity took this picture with its navigation camera during the rover's 269th martian day (Oct. 26, 2004).

    The mission's atmospheric science team is studying cloud observations to deduce seasonal and time-of-day behavior of the clouds. This helps them gain a better understanding of processes that control cloud formation.

  16. Neural circuits subserving the retrieval of stems and grammatical features in regular and irregular verbs.

    PubMed

    de Diego Balaguer, Ruth; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rotte, Michael; Bahlmann, Jörg; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Münte, Thomas F

    2006-11-01

    Many languages, including English and Spanish, feature regular (dance --> danced) and irregular (catch --> caught) inflectional systems. According to psycholinguistic theories, regular and irregular inflections are instantiated either by a single or by two specialized mechanisms. Those theories differ in their assumptions concerning the underlying information necessary for the processing of regular verbs. Whereas single mechanism accounts have stated an increased involvement of phonological processing for regular verbs, dual accounts emphasize the prominence of grammatical information. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we sought to delineate the brain areas involved in the generation of complex verb forms in Spanish. This language has the advantage of isolating specific differences in the regular-irregular contrasts in terms of the number of stems associated with a verb while controlling for compositionality (regular and irregular verbs apply suffixes to be inflected). The present study showed that areas related to grammatical processing are active for both types of verbs (left opercular inferior frontal gyrus). In addition, major differences between regular and irregular verbs were also observed. Several areas of the prefrontal cortex were selectively active for irregular production, presumably reflecting their role in lexical retrieval (bilateral inferior frontal area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Regular verbs, however, showed increased activation in areas related to grammatical processing (anterior superior temporal gyrus/insular cortex) and in the left hippocampus, the latter possibly related to a greater implication of the phonological loop necessary for the reutilization of the same stem shared across all forms in regular verbs.

  17. Electromagnetic wave propagation with negative phase velocity in regular black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Manzoor, R.

    2012-12-15

    We discuss the propagation of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in regular black holes. For this purpose, we consider the Bardeen model as a nonlinear magnetic monopole and the Bardeen model coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics with a cosmological constant. It turns out that the region outside the event horizon of each regular black hole does not support negative phase velocity propagation, while its possibility in the region inside the event horizon is discussed.

  18. Electron cloud wakefields in bunch trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, F. B.; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Electron cloud is a concern for many modern and future accelerator facilities. There are a number of undesired effects attributed to the presence of electron clouds. Among them are coherent instabilities, emittance growth, cryogenic heat load, synchronous phase shift and pressure rise. In long bunch trains one can observe the emittance growth getting faster along the bunch train. The interaction between the beam and the electron cloud is a two-stream interaction. The prameters of the electron cloud wakefields depend on the beam intensity, beam centroid perturbations, and on the electron density and perturbations. If the electron cloud forgets the bunch centroid perturbation very fast, the buildup itself, via growing density, becomes a way of coupling between the bunches. In the present paper we address how the bunch perturbation shape affects the multi-bunch wakefields under the conditions similar to the CERN LHC and SPS. We study the interplay between the single-bunch and multi-bunch electron cloud wakefields. The effect of the dipole magnetic field on the multi-bunch wakefields is studied.

  19. Tracing magnetic field orientation in starless cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Lee, C. W.; Dib, S.

    It is now well understood that stars are formed in the interiors of dense, gravitationally bound molecular cloud cores that are both magnetized and turbulent. But the relative role played by the magnetic field and the turbulence in cloud formation and evolution and in the subsequent star formation is a matter of debate. In a magnetically dominated scenario, the magnetic field geometry of the cores is expected to be inherited unchanged from their low-density envelope, even for an hour glass geometry of the field, unless the action of turbulence disturbs it. We carried out polarimetry of stars projected on starless molecular clouds, LDN 183 and LDN 1544, in R-filter. The comparison of these fields with those in the interiors of the cloud cores inferred from the sub-mm polarization shows that both magnetic field and turbulence are important in the cloud formation and evolution of star formation.

  20. Regular Decompositions for H(div) Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2012-01-01

    We study regular decompositions for H(div) spaces. In particular, we show that such regular decompositions are closely related to a previously studied “inf-sup” condition for parameter-dependent Stokes problems, for which we provide an alternative, more direct, proof.

  1. 12 CFR 725.3 - Regular membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advances without approval of the NCUA Board for a period of six months after becoming a member. This subsection shall not apply to any credit union which becomes a Regular member of the Facility within six... member of the Facility at any time within six months prior to becoming a Regular member of the Facility....

  2. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Transport Code for Regular Triangular Geometry

    1993-06-09

    DIAMANT2 solves the two-dimensional static multigroup neutron transport equation in planar regular triangular geometry. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous problems subject to vacuum, reflective or input specified boundary flux conditions are solved. Anisotropy is allowed for the scattering source. Volume and surface sources are allowed for inhomogeneous problems.

  4. Transition from regular to chaotic motion in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopáček, Ondřej

    2011-10-01

    Cosmic black holes can act as agents of particle acceleration. We study properties of a system consisting of a rotating black hole immersed in a large-scale organized magnetic field. Electrically charged particles in the immediate neighborhood of the horizon are influenced by strong gravity acting together with magnetic and induced electric components. We relax several constraints which were often imposed in previous works: the magnetic field does not have to share a common symmetry axis with the spin of the black hole but they can be inclined with respect to each other, thus violating the axial symmetry. Also, the black hole does not have to remain at rest but it can instead perform fast translational motion together with rotation. We demonstrate that the generalization brings new effects. Starting from uniform electro-vacuum fields in the curved spacetime, we find separatrices and identify magnetic neutral points forming in certain circumstances. We suggest that these structures can represent signatures of magnetic reconnection triggered by frame-dragging effects in the ergosphere. We further investigate the motion of charged particles in these black hole magnetospheres. We concentrate on the transition from the regular motion to chaos, and in this context we explore the characteristics of chaos in relativity. For the first time, we apply recurrence plots as a suitable technique to quantify the degree of chaoticness near a black hole.

  5. Overview of New Cloud Optical Properties in Air Force Weather Worldwide Merged Cloud Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.; Conner, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for real-time cloud analysis to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes the Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) II system to develop an hourly cloud analysis. The system creates cloud masks at pixel level from 16 different satellite sources, diagnoses cloud layers, reconciles the pixel level data to a regular grid by instrument class, and optimally merges the various instrument classes to create a final multi-satellite analysis. In Jan, 2013, Northrop Grumman Corp. delivered a new CDFS II baseline which included the addition of new Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc (AER) developed Cloud Optical Property (COP) variables in the analysis. The new variables include phase (ice/water), optical depth, ice/water path, and particle size. In addition, the COP schemes have radically changed the derivation of cloud properties like cloud top height and thickness. The Northrop-developed CDFS II Test Bed was used to examine and characterize the behavior of these new variables in order to understand how the variables are performing, especially between instrument classes. Understanding this behavior allows performance tuning and uncertainty estimation which will assist users seeking to reason with the data and will be necessary for use in model development and climatology development. This presentation will provide a basic overview of the CDFS II produced COP variables and show results from experiments conducted on the CDFS II Testbed. Results will include a basic comparison of COP derived using different instrument classes as well as comparison between pixel level and derived gridded products with an eye towards better characterization of uncertainty.

  6. On regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Nigam, Nilima; Stockie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we consider regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution with applications to prototypical elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). We study the convergence of a sequence of distributions SH to a singular term S as a parameter H (associated with the support size of SH) shrinks to zero. We characterize this convergence in both the weak-* topology of distributions and a weighted Sobolev norm. These notions motivate a framework for constructing regularizations of the delta distribution that includes a large class of existing methods in the literature. This framework allows different regularizations to be compared. The convergence of solutions of PDEs with these regularized source terms is then studied in various topologies such as pointwise convergence on a deleted neighborhood and weighted Sobolev norms. We also examine the lack of symmetry in tensor product regularizations and effects of dissipative error in hyperbolic problems.

  7. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: mlombard@eso.or

    2009-09-20

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 +- 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A{sub K} > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} a few x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}.

  8. Magnetic fields of chemically peculiar and related stars. I. Main results of 2014 and near-future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    2015-04-01

    We make a critical analysis of the results of studies of magnetic fields in chemically peculiar and related stars, published mostly in 2014. Methodological matters are discussed, and research results are analyzed. Most of the measurements of magnetic fields were obtained with well-known instruments. In 2014 a large observational project MiMeS was accomplished, the observations of more than 500 objects were performed, magnetic fields were found in 35 of them. Twenty new magnetic stars have been detected from the observations with the SAORAS 6-m telescope. Regular measurements of magnetic fields with an accuracy of units of gauss are conducted on a number of telescopes using the HARPS, ESPaDOnS, and NARVAL spectropolarimeters. The fields of complex topology have been studied, magnetic maps have been built, a connection with the distribution of anomalies of chemical composition has been found. The debate about the existence of a magnetic field of about 1 G in Vega and some other objects is ongoing. Apparently, the absence of a large-scale magnetic field greater than tens of gauss in the mercury-manganese and Am stars is confirmed. First CP stars were detected outside the Galaxy, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Observations of magnetic fields in solar-type stars are continued, a strong correlation between the field strength and the degree of chromospheric activity was discovered.

  9. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  10. Stratus Cloud Supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S.; Hudson, J. G.; Jha, V.

    2009-12-01

    Extensive aircraft measurements of cloud microphysics and complete CCN spectra from 15 flights in central California stratus clouds are presented. Cloud droplet and CCN concentrations varied over an order of magnitude in this July-August, 2008 POST project. Correlation coefficients (R) between CCN and average total cloud droplet concentrations within parcels with specific minimal liquid water contents (LWC) are shown in the table. For most LWC thresholds R is greatest for CCN concentrations at rather high supersaturations (S); i.e., 1%. The highest R for the 0.1 gm-3 are for the 300’ altitude CCN measurements but the number of cases is very small. The 0.5 g-3 R values are higher at lower S but the number of cases is also very small. The high cloud S implied by most R values goes against conventional wisdom that low stratus cloud updraft velocities limit cloud S to < 0.3%. On the other hand average droplet concentrations for most LWC thresholds match best the CCN concentrations at 0.2-0.3% S, which is more in keeping with conventional wisdom. However, these average droplet concentrations were probably reduced from adiabatic values by entrainment, which would suggest higher initial cloud S. Yum and Hudson (2002, Tellus) did report S > 1% in some maritime clouds. Further research is ongoing with this data set to substantiate stratus cloud S values. If stratus cloud S is determined to be higher than previous estimates this would imply that a much larger subset of particles (even smaller sizes) influence cloud microphysics and this would have important climate implications. As has recently been reported for small cumulus clouds (Hudson et al. 2009 JGR and Hudson and Noble 2009 GRL) negative R values were found for CCN with larger cloud droplets and drizzle drop concentrations. Correlation coefficients (R) between average droplet and CCN concentrations. 1st row (1 min)is for CCN measurements in ascents or descents closest to cloud base. 2nd row is for CCN averaged in

  11. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation Modern methods of the theory of complex systems allow to build mathematical models of complex systems where self-organizing processes are largely determined by nonlinear effects and feedback. However, there exist some factors that exert significant influence on the dynamics of geomorphosystems, but hardly can be adequately expressed in the language of mathematical models. Conceptual modeling allows us to overcome this difficulty. It is based on the methods of synergetic, which, together with the theory of dynamic systems and classical geomorphology, enable to display the dynamics of geomorphological systems. The most adequate for mathematical modeling of complex systems is the concept of model dynamics based on equilibrium. This concept is based on dynamic equilibrium, the tendency to which is observed in the evolution of all geomorphosystems. As an objective law, it is revealed in the evolution of fluvial relief in general, and in river channel processes in particular, demonstrating the ability of these systems to self-organization. Channel process is expressed in the formation of river reaches, rifts, meanders and floodplain. As floodplain is a periodically flooded surface during high waters, it naturally connects river channel with slopes, being one of boundary expressions of the water stream activity. Floodplain dynamics is inseparable from the channel dynamics. It is formed at simultaneous horizontal and vertical displacement of the river channel, that is at Y=Y(x, y), where х, y - horizontal and vertical coordinates, Y - floodplain height. When dу/dt=0 (for not lowering river channel), the river, being displaced in a horizontal plane, leaves behind a low surface, which flooding during high waters (total duration of flooding) changes from the maximum during the initial moment of time t0 to zero in the moment tn. In a similar manner changed is the total amount of accumulated material on the floodplain surface

  12. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation Modern methods of the theory of complex systems allow to build mathematical models of complex systems where self-organizing processes are largely determined by nonlinear effects and feedback. However, there exist some factors that exert significant influence on the dynamics of geomorphosystems, but hardly can be adequately expressed in the language of mathematical models. Conceptual modeling allows us to overcome this difficulty. It is based on the methods of synergetic, which, together with the theory of dynamic systems and classical geomorphology, enable to display the dynamics of geomorphological systems. The most adequate for mathematical modeling of complex systems is the concept of model dynamics based on equilibrium. This concept is based on dynamic equilibrium, the tendency to which is observed in the evolution of all geomorphosystems. As an objective law, it is revealed in the evolution of fluvial relief in general, and in river channel processes in particular, demonstrating the ability of these systems to self-organization. Channel process is expressed in the formation of river reaches, rifts, meanders and floodplain. As floodplain is a periodically flooded surface during high waters, it naturally connects river channel with slopes, being one of boundary expressions of the water stream activity. Floodplain dynamics is inseparable from the channel dynamics. It is formed at simultaneous horizontal and vertical displacement of the river channel, that is at Y=Y(x, y), where х, y - horizontal and vertical coordinates, Y - floodplain height. When dу/dt=0 (for not lowering river channel), the river, being displaced in a horizontal plane, leaves behind a low surface, which flooding during high waters (total duration of flooding) changes from the maximum during the initial moment of time t0 to zero in the moment tn. In a similar manner changed is the total amount of accumulated material on the floodplain surface

  13. Energy Aware Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgerie, Anne-Cécile; de Assunção, Marcos Dias; Lefèvre, Laurent

    Cloud infrastructures are increasingly becoming essential components for providing Internet services. By benefiting from economies of scale, Clouds can efficiently manage and offer a virtually unlimited number of resources and can minimize the costs incurred by organizations when providing Internet services. However, as Cloud providers often rely on large data centres to sustain their business and offer the resources that users need, the energy consumed by Cloud infrastructures has become a key environmental and economical concern. This chapter presents an overview of techniques that can improve the energy efficiency of Cloud infrastructures. We propose a framework termed as Green Open Cloud, which uses energy efficient solutions for virtualized environments; the framework is validated on a reference scenario.

  14. Periodic variations in Io's sodium and potassium clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L.

    1977-01-01

    Spectra of Io's sodium cloud taken 7.5 to 45 sec north and south of Io at a variety of magnetic latitudes of Io obtained during 17 nights of the 1975 apparition of Jupiter confirm the weakening of the cloud in the neighborhood of Jupiter's magnetic equator. The time scale for these changes is 1.5 hours or less. For impact ionization to cause these changes, a minimum flux of 100 billion/sq cm/sec 15 eV electrons or 40 billion/sq cm/sec 8 keV protons is required. Sodium velocities near 10 km/sec are required to explain the replenishment of ionized regions of the cloud. We also obtained spectra of Io's potassium cloud on eight nights during the 1975 apparition. This cloud appears to behave like the sodium cloud as Io's magnetic latitude varies. The potassium, however, may become much weaker as Io passes through the magnetic equator. The brightest intensity measured for the 7665 A resonance line was about 1 kR at a point 7.5 sec east of Io.

  15. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  16. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2010-01-01

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators. PMID:20365403

  17. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Cheng; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2010-01-01

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators.

  18. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ly Cheng; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2010-01-15

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators.

  19. Clouds and hazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knollenberg, R. G.

    1982-03-01

    Characteristics of the planetary-scale cloud and haze system on Venus are discussed. The clouds have been found to be rather tenuous, with an average visibility of about 1 km, and the main cloud deck is at an altitude of 45-70 km. Haze layers, with optical depths from about 0.1 to 1 in., overlie and underlie the main cloud deck. A multi-modal cloud particle size distribution has been obtained, corresponding to populations of aerosols varying in composition with altitude, H2SO4 droplets, and larger particles including H2SO4 droplets and possibly crystals of unknown composition. The entire cloud system has an optical depth of 20-35 at visible wavelengths, a radiometric albedo increasing from 0.77 to 0.82 from equator to pole, single scattering albedoes from 0.995 in the upper cloud region to 0.999 in the lower clouds, and striking UV absorption contrasts. Although embedded in the zonal circulation at altitudes of greatest wind velocity and vertical shear, cloud particle growth is most strongly influenced by radiative exchanges.

  20. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  1. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  2. Manifold regularized multitask feature learning for multimodality disease classification.

    PubMed

    Jie, Biao; Zhang, Daoqiang; Cheng, Bo; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-02-01

    Multimodality based methods have shown great advantages in classification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodromal stage, that is, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Recently, multitask feature selection methods are typically used for joint selection of common features across multiple modalities. However, one disadvantage of existing multimodality based methods is that they ignore the useful data distribution information in each modality, which is essential for subsequent classification. Accordingly, in this paper we propose a manifold regularized multitask feature learning method to preserve both the intrinsic relatedness among multiple modalities of data and the data distribution information in each modality. Specifically, we denote the feature learning on each modality as a single task, and use group-sparsity regularizer to capture the intrinsic relatedness among multiple tasks (i.e., modalities) and jointly select the common features from multiple tasks. Furthermore, we introduce a new manifold-based Laplacian regularizer to preserve the data distribution information from each task. Finally, we use the multikernel support vector machine method to fuse multimodality data for eventual classification. Conversely, we also extend our method to the semisupervised setting, where only partial data are labeled. We evaluate our method using the baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data of subjects from AD neuroimaging initiative database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can not only achieve improved classification performance, but also help to discover the disease-related brain regions useful for disease diagnosis. PMID:25277605

  3. SparkClouds: visualizing trends in tag clouds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bongshin; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Karlson, Amy K; Carpendale, Sheelash

    2010-01-01

    Tag clouds have proliferated over the web over the last decade. They provide a visual summary of a collection of texts by visually depicting the tag frequency by font size. In use, tag clouds can evolve as the associated data source changes over time. Interesting discussions around tag clouds often include a series of tag clouds and consider how they evolve over time. However, since tag clouds do not explicitly represent trends or support comparisons, the cognitive demands placed on the person for perceiving trends in multiple tag clouds are high. In this paper, we introduce SparkClouds, which integrate sparklines into a tag cloud to convey trends between multiple tag clouds. We present results from a controlled study that compares SparkClouds with two traditional trend visualizations—multiple line graphs and stacked bar charts—as well as Parallel Tag Clouds. Results show that SparkClouds ability to show trends compares favourably to the alternative visualizations.

  4. Functional neuroimaging study in identical twin pairs discordant for regular cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Lepore, Rebecca L; Kristjansson, Sean D; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Barnes, Kelly Anne; Petersen, Steven E; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the tremendous public health and financial burden of cigarette smoking, relatively little is understood about brain mechanisms that subserve smoking behavior. This study investigated the effect of lifetime regular smoking on brain processing in a reward guessing task using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a co-twin control study design in monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs that maximally controls for genetic and family background factors. Young adult (24-34 years) MZ female twin pairs (n = 15 pairs), discordant for regular smoking defined using Centers for Disease Control criteria as having smoked ≥100 cigarettes in their lifetime, were recruited from an ongoing genetic epidemiological longitudinal study of substance use and psychopathology. We applied hypothesis-driven region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain analyses to investigate the effect of regular smoking on reward processing. Reduced response to reward and punishment in regular compared with never-regular smokers was seen in hypothesis-driven ROI analysis of bilateral ventral striatum. Whole-brain analysis identified bilateral reward-processing regions that showed activation differences in response to winning or losing money but no effect of regular smoking; and frontal/parietal regions, predominantly in the right hemisphere, that showed robust effect of regular smoking but no effect of winning or losing money. Altogether, using a study design that maximally controls for group differences, we found that regular smoking had modest effects on striatal reward processing regions but robust effects on cognitive control/attentional systems. PMID:22340136

  5. Functional Neuroimaging Study in Identical Twin Pairs Discordant for Regular Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Lepore, Rebecca L.; Kristjansson, Sean D.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Barnes, Kelly Anne; Petersen, Steven E.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Heath, Andrew C.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the tremendous public health and financial burden of cigarette smoking, relatively little is understood about brain mechanisms that subserve smoking behavior. This study investigated the effect of lifetime regular smoking on brain processing in a reward guessing task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a cotwin-control study design in monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs that maximally controls for genetic and family background factors. Young adult (24–34 years) MZ female twin pairs (n=15 pairs), discordant for regular smoking defined using Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria as having smoked ≥100 cigarettes lifetime were recruited from an ongoing genetic epidemiological longitudinal study of substance use and psychopathology. We applied hypothesis-driven region of interest and whole brain analyses to investigate the effect of regular smoking on reward processing. Reduced response to reward and punishment in regular compared to never-regular smokers was seen in hypothesis-driven region of interest analysis of bilateral ventral striatum. Whole brain analysis identified bilateral reward-processing regions that showed activation differences in response to winning or losing money but no effect of regular smoking; and frontal/parietal regions, predominantly in the right hemisphere, that showed robust effect of regular smoking but no effect of winning or losing money. Altogether, using a study design that maximally controls for group differences, we found that regular smoking had modest effects on striatal reward processing regions but robust effects on cognitive control/attentional systems. PMID:22340136

  6. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung Fung

    1988-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  7. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  8. Parallel Communicating Grammar Systems with Regular Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardubská, Dana; Plátek, Martin; Otto, Friedrich

    Parallel communicating grammar systems with regular control (RPCGS, for short) are introduced, which are obtained from returning regular parallel communicating grammar systems by restricting the derivations that are executed in parallel by the various components through a regular control language. For the class of languages that are generated by RPCGSs with constant communication complexity we derive a characterization in terms of a restricted type of freely rewriting restarting automaton. From this characterization we obtain that these languages are semi-linear, and that centralized RPCGSs with constant communication complexity are of the same generative power as non-centralized RPCGSs with constant communication complexity.

  9. Regularization schemes and the multiplicative anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    1999-06-01

    Elizalde, Vanzo, and Zerbini have shown that the effective action of two free Euclidean scalar fields in flat space contains a `multiplicative anomaly' when ζ-function regularization is used. This is related to the Wodzicki residue. I show that there is no anomaly when using a wide range of other regularization schemes and that the anomaly can be removed by an unusual choice of renormalization scales. I define new types of anomalies and show that they have similar properties. Thus multiplicative anomalies encode no novel physics. They merely illustrate some dangerous aspects of ζ-function and Schwinger proper time regularization schemes.

  10. HI clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.

    We present HI and Halpha surveys of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Parkes multibeam receiver, and the 16 inch optical telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO). Using a Fourier-plane technique, we have merged both ATCA and Parkes observations, providing an accurate set of images of the LMC sensitive to structure on scales of 9 pc upward. The spatial dynamic range (2.8 orders of magnitude), velocity resolution (1.649 km/sec per channel) allow for studies of phenomena ranging from the galaxy-wide interaction of the LMC with its close neighbors to the small-scale injection of energy from supernovae and stellar associations into the ISM of the LMC. On the large scale, the HI disk appears to be remarkably symmetric and to have a well-organized and orderly, if somewhat complex, rotational field. The bulk of the HI resides in a disk of 7.3 kpc in diameter. The mass of disk component of the LMC is 2.5 x10^9 M[sun ]and the mass within a radius of 4 kpc is about 3.5 x 10^9 M[sun ]. The structure of the neutral atomic ISM in the LMC is dominated by HI filaments combined with numerous shell, holes, and HI clouds. 23 HI supergiant shells and 103 giant shells are catalogued. Supergiant shells are defined as those regions whose extent is much larger than the HI scale height. The size distribution of HI shells follows a crude power law, N(log R) =AR^-1.5 . The HI clouds have been identified by defining a cloud to be an object composed of all pixels in right ascension, declination, and velocity that are connected and that lie above the threshold brightness temperature. The size spectrum of HI clouds is similar to the typical size spectrum of holes and shells in the HI distribution. The relationship between the size and the velocity dispersion of HI cloud is found to have the power law relationship so called as Larson's scaling law. A slope of the power law varies from 1.2 to 1.6. The virial masses of HI clouds range from 10

  11. Lost in Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Shetye, Sandeep D.; Chilukuri, Sri; Sturken, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing can reduce cost significantly because businesses can share computing resources. In recent years Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) have used Cloud effectively for cost saving and for sharing IT expenses. With the success of SMBs, many perceive that the larger enterprises ought to move into Cloud environment as well. Government agency s stove-piped environments are being considered as candidates for potential use of Cloud either as an enterprise entity or pockets of small communities. Cloud Computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than as a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility over a network. Underneath the offered services, there exists a modern infrastructure cost of which is often spread across its services or its investors. As NASA is considered as an Enterprise class organization, like other enterprises, a shift has been occurring in perceiving its IT services as candidates for Cloud services. This paper discusses market trends in cloud computing from an enterprise angle and then addresses the topic of Cloud Computing for NASA in two possible forms. First, in the form of a public Cloud to support it as an enterprise, as well as to share it with the commercial and public at large. Second, as a private Cloud wherein the infrastructure is operated solely for NASA, whether managed internally or by a third-party and hosted internally or externally. The paper addresses the strengths and weaknesses of both paradigms of public and private Clouds, in both internally and externally operated settings. The content of the paper is from a NASA perspective but is applicable to any large enterprise with thousands of employees and contractors.

  12. The Volume of the Regular Octahedron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigg, Charles W.

    1974-01-01

    Five methods are given for computing the area of a regular octahedron. It is suggested that students first construct an octahedron as this will aid in space visualization. Six further extensions are left for the reader to try. (LS)

  13. Parallelization of irregularly coupled regular meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Craig; Crowley, Kay; Saltz, Joel; Reeves, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Regular meshes are frequently used for modeling physical phenomena on both serial and parallel computers. One advantage of regular meshes is that efficient discretization schemes can be implemented in a straight forward manner. However, geometrically-complex objects, such as aircraft, cannot be easily described using a single regular mesh. Multiple interacting regular meshes are frequently used to describe complex geometries. Each mesh models a subregion of the physical domain. The meshes, or subdomains, can be processed in parallel, with periodic updates carried out to move information between the coupled meshes. In many cases, there are a relatively small number (one to a few dozen) subdomains, so that each subdomain may also be partitioned among several processors. We outline a composite run-time/compile-time approach for supporting these problems efficiently on distributed-memory machines. These methods are described in the context of a multiblock fluid dynamics problem developed at LaRC.

  14. Regular Exercise: Antidote for Deadly Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160326.html Regular Exercise: Antidote for Deadly Diseases? High levels of physical ... Aug. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Getting lots of exercise may reduce your risk for five common diseases, ...

  15. Mixed-Norm Regularization for Brain Decoding

    PubMed Central

    Flamary, R.; Jrad, N.; Phlypo, R.; Congedo, M.; Rakotomamonjy, A.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the use of mixed-norm regularization for sensor selection in event-related potential (ERP) based brain-computer interfaces (BCI). The classification problem is cast as a discriminative optimization framework where sensor selection is induced through the use of mixed-norms. This framework is extended to the multitask learning situation where several similar classification tasks related to different subjects are learned simultaneously. In this case, multitask learning helps in leveraging data scarcity issue yielding to more robust classifiers. For this purpose, we have introduced a regularizer that induces both sensor selection and classifier similarities. The different regularization approaches are compared on three ERP datasets showing the interest of mixed-norm regularization in terms of sensor selection. The multitask approaches are evaluated when a small number of learning examples are available yielding to significant performance improvements especially for subjects performing poorly. PMID:24860614

  16. Venus ionopause 'clouds' and IMF sector boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, Hanying; Ma, Yingjuan; Zhang, Tielong; McEnulty, T.

    Disconnected or partially connected structures observed by the PVO Langmuir Probe near the ionopause of Venus were called 'clouds' by Brace et al. (1980). These authors speculated that the loss of atmosphere represented by these features could be significant compared to other loss processes. Russell et al. (1982) subsequently showed that the clouds occurred together with sharp rotations in the magnetic field. They suggested that the extreme draping of the interplanetary field that occurs near the ionopause at the draping poles could exert JxB forces sufficient to pull the ionospheric plasma in the cloud tailward and out into the heliosphere. But in 1991, Ong et al. demonstrated via analysis of many clouds that they are not generally seen in the polar regions of the draped magnetosheath field. Instead they occur at times when the interplanetary magnetic field undergoes a sudden rotation, as in interplanetary field sector boundaries. We discuss the statistics of such rotations at the orbit of Venus and their frequency as a function of solar cycle. Whether they enable or enhance escape or not requires simulation studies, but this study calls attention to the potential importance of time dependent external conditions.

  17. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-06-25

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code"POSINST" was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ~;;(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed.

  18. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Breit, Gupta, and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the fifth-time of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. A successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest.

  19. Study of an expanding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paissan, G. H.; Rovira, M. G.; Stenborg, G.

    We present the kinematical evolution and theoretical interpretation of two dynamical events as observed in the low corona (1.05 to 2 Rsun) by the Coronagraph MICA in the green coronal line at 530.3 nm. They occurred on March 22 and January 21, 2002. White light coronagraph images obtained by the LASCO-C2 and -C3 instruments on board SOHO helped track the events farther out in the corona. Their correlation with signature chromospheric and transition region altitudes is analyzed with the help of i) Halpha images from the HASTA telescope, and ii) EUV emission line images from EIT on board SOHO. The first event is depicted as an impulsive event related to M1.6-class X-ray activity and associated CME, while the other one matches the characterization of the so-called gradual events associated to a filament eruption. The kinematic pattern, jointly with the morphology, of the events are in agreement with the theoretical models of emerging flux ropes by Chen (1996), and Chen & Shibata (2000). FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  20. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, seen rising high above the base cloud cover and casting long shadows, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  1. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, rising above the base cloud cover, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  2. On Cloud Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Bridget; Weil, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Across the U.S., innovative collaboration practices are happening in the cloud: Sixth-graders participate in literary salons. Fourth-graders mentor kindergarteners. And teachers use virtual Post-it notes to advise students as they create their own television shows. In other words, cloud computing is no longer just used to manage administrative…

  3. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  4. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  5. Learning in the Clouds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Engaged learning--the type that happens outside textbooks and beyond the four walls of the classroom--moves beyond right and wrong answers to grappling with the uncertainties and contradictions of a complex world. iPhones back up to the "cloud." GoogleDocs is all about "cloud computing." Facebook is as ubiquitous as the sky.…

  6. The cyanopolyynes as a chemical clock for molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is proposed for determining the ages of molecular clouds. The method utilizes the properties of the long-chain organic molecules known as the cyanopolyynes (HC/2k + 1/N, k = 0, 1, 2, 3 ...), which are found in a variety of clouds. The observed regular abundance decline of these molecules as a function of chain length suggests that they are formed sequentially. If so, the age of the cloud can be read off as the time to grow the longest chain present. Although the creation process for the chains is still unknown, the age can be obtained from knowledge of the chain destruction mechanism. Destruction is probably due to adsorption onto the surfaces of interstellar grains. Using the known properties of grains, the age can be obtained from the cloud density and the abundance ratios of the cyanopolyynes. As a first application, minimum ages for the four dark clouds B335, TMC-1, TMC-2, and L183 are obtained. These minimum ages are 1.3 x 10 to the 6th yr, 9.7 x 10 to the 5th yr, 3.4 x 10 to the 5th yr, and 3.3 x 10 to the 5th yr, respectively. In each case, the ages are greater than or equal to the cloud's free-fall collapse time. These four clouds are therefore either in a state of hydrostatic balance or have only recently begun to collapse, following an earlier period of hydrostatic support.

  7. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  8. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  9. Identifying Nearby Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Shah, R. Y., Jackson, J. M.; Bania, T. M.; Clemens, D. P.; Johnson, A. M.; Flynn, E.; Bonaventura, N.; Simon, R.; Meyer, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent molecular surveys, such as the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey, are revealing the complex structure and dynamics of clouds within the Galactic plane. Yet, difficulties often remain in separating molecular clouds along a line of sight. Identification of nearby clouds is facilitated through the combination of molecular datasets and extinction maps. Star counts at optical and infrared (IR) wavelengths indirectly trace extinction, and when morphologically similar to molecular emission, unambiguously reveal nearby clouds. Here we present the methodology and data used to separate and determine the relative distance to two molecular clouds along the same line of sight (GRSMC 45.60+0.30 and GRSMC 45.46+0.05). We use a combination of optical and near-IR star count maps (derived from the US Naval Observatory and 2MASS catalogs, respectively) and molecular data from the BU-FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey.

  10. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  11. Cloud model bat algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Li, Liangliang; Ma, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: "bats approach their prey." Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization. PMID:24967425

  12. SMILES ice cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  13. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John; Shen, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution hypothesis of Woese (1979), according to which prebiotic reactions occurred rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns was criticized by Scherer (1985). This paper proposes a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that answers Scherer's concerns and supports Woese's hypothesis. According to this mechanism, rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by, or synthesized during entry of meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust, would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and would be polymerized within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and evaporation of cloud drops.

  14. Molecular clouds. [significance in stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt is made to understand star formation in the context of the dense interstellar molecular gas from which stars are made. Attention is given to how molecular observations (e.g., UV spectroscopy and radio 21-cm and recombination line observations) provide data on the physical state of the dense interstellar gas; observations of H II regions, stellar associations, and dark nebulae are discussed. CO clouds are studied with reference to radial velocity, temperature, density, ionization, magnetic field.

  15. Water Ice Clouds over the Northern Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 48.5 N and 240.5 W, displays splotchy water ice clouds that obscure the northern lowland plains in the region where the Viking 2 spacecraft landed. This image is far enough north to catch the edge of the north polar hood that develops during the northern winter. This is a cap of water and carbon dioxide ice clouds that form over the Martian north pole. As Mars progresses into northern spring, the persistent north polar hood ice clouds will dissipate and the surface viewing conditions will improve greatly. As the season develops, an equatorial belt of water ice clouds will form. This belt of water ice clouds is as characteristic of the Martian climate as the southern hemisphere summer dust storm season. Seasons on Mars have a dramatic effect on the state of the dynamic Martian atmosphere. The Story Muted in an almost air-brushed manner, this image doesn't have the crispness that most THEMIS images have. That's because clouds were rising over the surface of the red planet on the day this picture was taken. Finding clouds on Mars might remind us of conditions here on Earth, but these Martian clouds are made of frozen water and frozen carbon dioxide -- in other words, clouds of ice and 'dry ice.' Strange as that may sound, the clouds seen here form on a pretty regular basis at the north Martian pole during its winter season. As springtime comes to the northern hemisphere of Mars (and fall comes to the southern), these clouds will slowly disappear, and a nice belt of water ice clouds will form around the equator. So, if you were a THEMIS camera aimer, that might tell you when your best viewing conditions for different areas on Mars would be. As interesting as clear pictures of Martian landforms are, however, you wouldn't want to bypass the weather altogether. Pictures showing seasonal shifts are great for scientists to study, because they reveal a lot about the patterns of the Martian climate and the

  16. Cirrus cloud retrieval using infrared sounding data: Multilevel cloud errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study we perform an error analysis for cloud-top pressure retrieval using the High-Resolution Infrared Radiometric Sounder (HIRS/2) 15-microns CO2 channels for the two-layer case of transmissive cirrus overlying an overcast, opaque stratiform cloud. This analysis includes standard deviation and bias error due to instrument noise and the presence of two cloud layers, the lower of which is opaque. Instantaneous cloud pressure retrieval errors are determined for a range of cloud amounts (0.1-1.0) and cloud-top pressures (850-250 mb). Large cloud-top pressure retrieval errors are found to occur when a lower opaque layer is present underneath an upper transmissive cloud layer in the satellite field of view (FOV). Errors tend to increase with decreasing upper-cloud effective cloud amount and with decreasing cloud height (increasing pressure). Errors in retrieved upper-cloud pressure result in corresponding errors in derived effective cloud amount. For the case in which a HIRS FOV has two distinct cloud layers, the difference between the retrieved and actual cloud-top pressure is positive in all cases, meaning that the retrieved upper-cloud height is lower than the actual upper-cloud height. In addition, errors in retrieved cloud pressure are found to depend upon the lapse rate between the low-level cloud top and the surface. We examined which sounder channel combinations would minimize the total errors in derived cirrus cloud height caused by instrument noise and by the presence of a lower-level cloud. We find that while the sounding channels that peak between 700 and 1000 mb minimize random errors, the sounding channels that peak at 300-500 mb minimize bias errors. For a cloud climatology, the bias errors are most critical.

  17. Evolution of Ion Clouds in the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrochuk, Yevgeny; Blaunstein, Nathan; Mishin, Evgeny; Pedersen, Todd; Caton, Ron; Viggiano, Al; Schuman, Nick

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of 2- and 3-dimentional numerical investigations of the evolution of samarium ion clouds injected in the equatorial ionosphere, alike the recent MOSC experiments. The ambient conditions are described by a standard model of the quiet-time equatorial ionosphere from 90 to 350 km. The altitudinal distribution of the transport processes and ambient electric and magnetic fields is taken into account. The fast process of stratification of ion clouds and breaking into small plasmoids occur only during the late stage of the cloud evolution. The role of the background plasma and its depletion zones formed due to the short-circuiting currents is not as evident as in mid latitudes. It is also revealed that the altitudinal dependence of the diffusion and drift plays a minor role in the cloud evolution at the equator. Likewise, the cloud remains stable with respect to the Raleigh-Taylor and gradient-drift instabilities. These two features are defined by the equatorial near-horizontal magnetic field which leads to a strongly-elongated ellipsoid-like plasma cloud. The critical dip angle separating the stable (equatorial) and unstable (mid-latitude) cloud regimes will be defined in future simulation studies, as well as the dependence on the ambient electric field and neutral wind. 2Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory

  18. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts. PMID:27036798

  19. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts.

  20. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  1. Community Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  2. Clouds in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacmeister, Julio; Rienecker, Michele; Suarez, Max; Norris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The GEOS-5 atmospheric model is being developed as a weather-and-climate capable model. It must perform well in assimilation mode as well as in weather and climate simulations and forecasts and in coupled chemistry-climate simulations. In developing GEOS-5, attention has focused on the representation of moist processes. The moist physics package uses a single phase prognostic condensate and a prognostic cloud fraction. Two separate cloud types are distinguished by their source: "anvil" cloud originates in detraining convection, and large-scale cloud originates in a PDF-based condensation calculation. Ice and liquid phases for each cloud type are considered. Once created, condensate and fraction from the anvil and statistical cloud types experience the same loss processes: evaporation of condensate and fraction, auto-conversion of liquid or mixed phase condensate, sedimentation of frozen condensate, and accretion of condensate by falling precipitation. The convective parameterization scheme is the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert, or RAS, scheme. Satellite data are used to evaluate the performance of the moist physics packages and help in their tuning. In addition, analysis of and comparisons to cloud-resolving models such as the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model are used to help improve the PDFs used in the moist physics. The presentation will show some of our evaluations including precipitation diagnostics.

  3. Diagnosing AIRS Sampling with CloudSat Cloud Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric; Yue, Qing; Guillaume, Alexandre; Kahn, Brian

    2011-01-01

    AIRS yield and sampling vary with cloud state. Careful utilization of collocated multiple satellite sensors is necessary. Profile differences between AIRS and ECMWF model analyses indicate that AIRS has high sampling and excellent accuracy for certain meteorological conditions. Cloud-dependent sampling biases may have large impact on AIRS L2 and L3 data in climate research. MBL clouds / lower tropospheric stability relationship is one example. AIRS and CloudSat reveal a reasonable climatology in the MBL cloud regime despite limited sampling in stratocumulus. Thermodynamic parameters such as EIS derived from AIRS data map these cloud conditions successfully. We are working on characterizing AIRS scenes with mixed cloud types.

  4. Inverse scattering problem for mixed-phase and ice clouds. I. Numerical simulation of particle sizing from phase-function measurements.

    PubMed

    Oshchepkov, S; Isaka, H

    1997-11-20

    We propose a new method of particle size retrieval for mixed-phase and ice crystal clouds. The method enables us to identify each component of a bicomponent cloud composed of water droplets and ice crystals and to retrieve a size distribution separately for each cloud component. We explore the method's capability by using sythetic multiangular data of scattered-light intensity. We model cloud microphysical characteristics by assuming two noninteracting cloud components, such as liquid or supercooled droplets and cubic or hexagonal ice crystals, with regular simple geometrical shapes as first approximation. The sensitivity of the method is tested for different relative concentrations of the cloud components that are varied over a wide range. First, we investigate the applicability limit of the single-component cloud approximation in retrieving particle size distributions of a bicomponent cloud. Second, we test the method to retrieve size distributions simultaneously for both components in mixed-phase clouds, and we discuss the conditions of its applicability.

  5. Perturbations in a regular bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Geshnizjani, G.

    2006-03-15

    We consider a simple toy model of a regular bouncing universe. The bounce is caused by an extra timelike dimension, which leads to a sign flip of the {rho}{sup 2} term in the effective four dimensional Randall Sundrum-like description. We find a wide class of possible bounces: big bang avoiding ones for regular matter content, and big rip avoiding ones for phantom matter. Focusing on radiation as the matter content, we discuss the evolution of scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We compute a spectral index of n{sub s}=-1 for scalar perturbations and a deep blue index for tensor perturbations after invoking vacuum initial conditions, ruling out such a model as a realistic one. We also find that the spectrum (evaluated at Hubble crossing) is sensitive to the bounce. We conclude that it is challenging, but not impossible, for cyclic/ekpyrotic models to succeed, if one can find a regularized version.

  6. Strong regularizing effect of integrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin

    1997-11-01

    Many time evolution problems have the so-called strong regularization effect, that is, with any irregular initial data, as soon as becomes greater than 0, the solution becomes C{sup {infinity}} for both spacial and temporal variables. This paper studies 1 x 1 dimension integrable systems for such regularizing effect. In the work by Sachs, Kappler [S][K], (see also earlier works [KFJ] and [Ka]), strong regularizing effect is proved for KdV with rapidly decaying irregular initial data, using the inverse scattering method. There are two equivalent Gel`fand-Levitan-Marchenko (GLM) equations associated to an inverse scattering problem, one is normalized at x = {infinity} and another at x = {infinity}. The method of [S][K] relies on the fact that the KdV waves propagate only in one direction and therefore one of the two GLM equations remains normalized and can be differentiated infinitely many times. 15 refs.

  7. Clouds and the Near-Earth Environment: Possible Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Voiculescu, Mirela; Dragomir, Carmelia

    2015-12-01

    Climate variability is a hot topic not only for scientists and policy-makers, but also for each and every one of us. The anthropogenic activities are considered to be responsible for most climate change, however there are large uncertainties about the magnitude of effects of solar variability and other extraterrestrial influences, such as galactic cosmic rays on terrestrial climate. Clouds play an important role due to feedbacks of the radiation budget: variation of cloud cover/composition affects climate, which, in turn, affects cloud cover via atmospheric dynamics and sea temperature variations. Cloud formation and evolution are still under scientific scrutiny, since their microphysics is still not understood. Besides atmospheric dynamics and other internal climatic parameters, extraterrestrial sources of cloud cover variation are considered. One of these is the solar wind, whose effect on cloud cover might be modulated by the global atmospheric electrical circuit. Clouds height and composition, their seasonal variation and latitudinal distribution should be considered when trying to identify possible mechanisms by which solar energy is transferred to clouds. The influence of the solar wind on cloud formation can be assessed also through the ap index - the geomagnetic storm index, which can be readily connected with interplanetary magnetic field, IMF structure. This paper proposes to assess the possible relationship between both cloud cover and solar wind proxies, as the ap index, function of cloud height and composition and also through seasonal studies. The data covers almost three solar cycles (1984-2009). Mechanisms are looked for by investigating observed trends or correlation at local/seasonal scale

  8. Mixed phase cloud observation in Ny-Alesund, Svalbard: Preliminary results from the May-June 2011 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, M.; Uchiyama, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Kobayashi, H.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds and aerosols are key elements having the potential to change climate by their radiative effects on the energy balance in the global climate system. In the Arctic, we have been continuing ground-based remote-sensing measurements for clouds and aerosols using a sky-radiometer, a micro-pulse lidar and an all-sky camera in Ny-Alesund (78.9N, 11.9E), Svalbard. In addition to the regular operations, we have performed an intensive observation campaign for mixed phase clouds in May-June 2011. This campaign aimed at low-level clouds to investigate cloud optical and microphysical properties and cloud-aerosol interaction processes in the Arctic, mainly from cloud radiation measurements and active remote-sensing at the surface, and in-situ microphysics measurements at the Norwegian Zeppelin Station located at a 474 meters high mountain-side. The instrumentation for in-situ measurements includes conventional cloud microphysics probes, i.e., DMT CAPS and Gerber PVM-100, and a newly developed cloud particle microscopic imager for cloud water/ice particle size distributions and the effective radius. The Rion KR-12A aerosol particle counter and the TSI 3007 condensation particle counter were placed in the ropeway cabin for measuring particle number and size distribution to see the difference between in-cloud and below-cloud conditions. We will present preliminary results from the in-situ cloud measurements for several days during the May-June 2011 field experiment.

  9. Numerical Comparison of Two-Body Regularizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    We numerically compare four schemes to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations: the Sperling-Bürdet (S-B), Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (K-S), and Bürdet-Ferrandiz (B-F) regularizations, and a three-dimensional extension of the Levi-Civita (L-C) regularization we developed recently. As for the integration time of the equation of motion, the least time is needed for the unregularized treatment, followed by the K-S, the extended L-C, the B-F, and the S-B regularizations. However, these differences become significantly smaller when the time to evaluate perturbations becomes dominant. As for the integration error after one close encounter, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations are tied for the least error, followed by the S-B, the B-F, and finally the unregularized scheme for unperturbed orbits with eccentricity less than 2. This order is not changed significantly by various kinds of perturbations. As for the integration error of elliptical orbits after multiple orbital periods, the situation remains the same except for the rank of the S-B scheme, which varies from the best to the second worst depending on the length of integration and/or on the nature of perturbations. Also, we confirm that Kepler energy scaling enhances the performance of the unregularized, K-S, and extended L-C schemes. As a result, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations with Kepler energy scaling provide the best cost performance in integrating almost all the perturbed two-body problems.

  10. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article.

  11. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. PMID:22289098

  12. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  13. Regular homotopy for immersions of graphs into surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    We study invariants of regular immersions of graphs into surfaces up to regular homotopy. The concept of the winding number is used to introduce a new simple combinatorial invariant of regular homotopy. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  14. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F.; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  15. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  16. Cloud and Aerosol Characterization During CAEsAR 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Tesche, M.; Krejci, R.; Baumgardner, D.; Walther, A.; Rosati, B.; Widequist, U.; Tunved, P.; O'Connor, E.; Ström, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud and Aerosol Experiment at Åre (CAEsAR 2014) campaign took place from June to October 2014 at Mt. Åreskutan, Sweden, a remote mountain site in Northern Sweden. The campaign was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of clouds and aerosols under orographic forcing. A unique and comprehensive set-up allowed an in-situ characterization of both constituents at a mountain top station at 1200 m a.s.l. including instruments to measure cloud droplet size distribution, meteorological parameters, cloud residual properties (using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet), cloud water composition and various aerosol chemical and microphysical properties (e.g. size, optical and hygroscopic properties). At the same time, a remote sensing site was installed below the mountain site at 420 m a.s.l. in the immediate vicinity (< 3 km horizontally), with vertical profiling from an aerosol lidar, winds and turbulence from a scanning Doppler lidar, a Sun photometer measuring aerosol columnar optical properties, and a precipitation sampler taking rain water for chemical analysis. In addition, regular radiosoundings were performed from the valley. Here, we present the results of this intensive campaign which includes approx. 900 hours of in-cloud sampling. Various unique cloud features were frequently observed such as dynamically-driven droplet growth, bimodal droplet distributions, and the activation of particles down to approx. 20 nm in dry particle diameter. During the campaign, a forest fire smoke plume was transported over the site with measureable impacts on the cloud properties. This data will be used to constrain cloud and aerosol models, as well as to validate satellite retrievals. A first comparison to VIIRS and MODIS satellite retrievals will also be shown.

  17. Cloud Distribution Statistics from LITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission has demonstrated the utility of spaceborne lidar in observing multilayer clouds and has provided a dataset showing the distribution of tropospheric clouds and aerosols. These unambiguous observations of the vertical distribution of clouds will allow improved verification of current cloud climatologies and GCM cloud parameterizations. Although there is now great interest in cloud profiling radar, operating in the mm-wave region, for the spacebased observation of cloud heights the results of the LITE mission have shown that satellite lidars can also make significant contributions in this area.

  18. Observations of orographic Cloud Base Heights from satellite and in-situ measurements at the Monteverde Cloud Mist Forest Reserve, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asefi, S.; Zeng, J.; Han, Q.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.; Nair, U. S.; Ray, D.; McCarty, W. R.; Jedlovec, G.

    2005-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud mist forests are among the most biologically rich and diverse ecosystems, providing habitats for many of the world's endangered species. Survival of these habitats depends strongly on regular and frequent immersion in orographic clouds. At the Monteverde Cloud Mist Forest Reserve in Costa Rica, the bases of the clouds have shifted upslope, leading to anuran population crashes, an increase in the upper elevation of bird ranges on the Pacific slope, and longer dry season mist-free intervals. Satellite remote sensing techniques have been developed to determine the orographic cloud base heights; these are tested for the dry season month of March 2003 over the Monteverde cloud forests. The approach derives MODIS cloud top pressures and then converts them to cloud top heights using geopotential height profiles. The NCAR Land Use and Cloud Interaction Experiment (LUCIE), consisting of paired mobile radiosonde systems deployed in Costa Rica, provided the means for validating the retrievals. Results show that the four MODIS CO2 slicing channels do not provide sufficiently accurate cloud top height values, although some of the differences are due to a mismatch in the observational periods. In order to improve the results, two alternative approaches are examined. Simulated geopotential height profiles from the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) initialized with soundings provided superior results. Another approach investigated the utility of multiple combinations of channels in the CO2 slicing technique using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data for cloud height assignment. Using AIRS a more accurate determination of cloud top height is achieved. Cloud thicknesses are estimated using three different approaches: 1) constant liquid water content (CLWC); 2) an empirical relationship; and 3) an adiabatic model. The CLWC approach provided the most consistent results. Cloud base heights are computed from subtracting cloud thickness from cloud

  19. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores: Preliminary 3D Cloud Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Giangrande, S.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mead, J.

    2010-03-15

    The deployment of the Scanning W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) during the AMF campaign at Azores signals the first deployment of an ARM Facility-owned scanning cloud radar and offers a prelude for the type of 3D cloud observations that ARM will have the capability to provide at all the ARM Climate Research Facility sites by the end of 2010. The primary objective of the deployment of Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) at the ARM Facility sites is to map continuously (operationally) the 3D structure of clouds and shallow precipitation and to provide 3D microphysical and dynamical retrievals for cloud life cycle and cloud-scale process studies. This is a challenging task, never attempted before, and requires significant research and development efforts in order to understand the radar's capabilities and limitations. At the same time, we need to look beyond the radar meteorology aspects of the challenge and ensure that the hardware and software capabilities of the new systems are utilized for the development of 3D data products that address the scientific needs of the new Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. The SWACR observations at Azores provide a first look at such observations and the challenges associated with their analysis and interpretation. The set of scan strategies applied during the SWACR deployment and their merit is discussed. The scan strategies were adjusted for the detection of marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus that were frequently observed at the Azores deployment. Quality control procedures for the radar reflectivity and Doppler products are presented. Finally, preliminary 3D-Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Locations (3D-ARSCL) products on a regular grid will be presented, and the challenges associated with their development discussed. In addition to data from the Azores deployment, limited data from the follow-up deployment of the SWACR at the ARM SGP site will be presented. This effort provides a blueprint for the effort required for the

  20. My NASA Data Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  1. Turbulence in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, R. L.

    The basic aim of this paper is to offer a primer of basic concepts and methods of analysis for observationally-oriented individuals who wish to work in the rapidly developing area of molecular cloud turbulence. First the difficulties which beset early attempts to determine the nature of gas motions within molecular clouds are reviewed. Some aspects of turbulence as a hydrodynamic phenomenon are considered next along with an introduction to the statistical vocabulary of the subject which is required to understand the methods for analyzing observational data. A simple and useful approximation for estimating the velocity correlation length of a molecular cloud is also described. The paper concludes with a final perspective, which considers the extent to which size-velocity dispersion correlations can serve as a probe of chaotic velocity fields in molecular clouds.

  2. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  3. GEOS-5 Modeled Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows clouds from a simulation using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Verison 5 (GEOS-5). The global atmospheric simulation covers a period from Feb 3, 2010 through Feb ...

  4. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  5. Noctilucent Clouds in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    Swedish photographer Peter Rosén took this close-up, time-lapse movieof Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) over Stockholm, Sweden on the evening ofJuly 16, 2012. "What looked like a serene view from a di...

  6. Global regularity to the 3D MHD equations with large initial data in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the global regularity to the 3D incompressible MHD equations with large initial data in bounded domains. Let μ, ν, u, and b denote the viscosity coefficient, magnetic diffusivity, velocity field, and magnetic field, respectively. We construct new systems for (u - b) and (u + b) to overcome the difficulties caused by the large initial data. It is shown that ↑" separators=" ( u , b ) ↑ H 1 is globally bounded as long as ↑" separators=" ( u0 - b 0 ) ↑ H 1 + |" separators=" μ - ν | ( μ + ν ) - 1 or ↑" separators=" ( u0 + b 0 ) ↑ H 1 + |" separators=" μ - ν | ( μ + ν ) - 1 is sufficiently small, which indicates that the Navier-Stokes equations can be regularized by the magnetic field.

  7. Marine cloud brightening.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-09-13

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could-subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein-have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  8. Magellanic Clouds: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (figure 1) have long been seen as the prototypical young STELLAR POPULATION. The presence of young GLOBULAR CLUSTERS in the Clouds spoke to southern hemisphere observers of the opportunity to study close up processes which have not occurred in the Milky Way for a long time. Young globulars are also seen in other gas-rich, highly disturbed environments, such as merging galaxi...

  9. Light tunneling in clouds.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, H Moyses

    2003-03-20

    Solar radiation, traveling outside cloud water droplets, excites sharp resonances and surface waves by tunneling into the droplets. This effect contributes substantially to the total absorption (typically, of the order of 20%) and yields the major contribution to backscattering, producing the meteorological glory. Usual computational practices in atmospheric science misrepresent resonance contributions and cannot be relied on in the assessment of possible anomalies in cloud absorption.

  10. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  11. Cloud Inhomogeneity from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Two full months (July 2003 and January 2004) of MODIS Atmosphere Level-3 data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are analyzed in order to characterize the horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness and water path at global scales. Various options to derive cloud variability parameters are discussed. The climatology of cloud inhomogeneity is built by first calculating daily parameter values at spatial scales of l degree x 1 degree, and then at zonal and global scales, followed by averaging over monthly time scales. Geographical, diurnal, and seasonal changes of inhomogeneity parameters are examined separately for the two cloud phases, and separately over land and ocean. We find that cloud inhomogeneity is weaker in summer than in winter, weaker over land than ocean for liquid clouds, weaker for local morning than local afternoon, about the same for liquid and ice clouds on a global scale, but with wider probability distribution functions (PDFs) and larger latitudinal variations for ice, and relatively insensitive to whether water path or optical thickness products are used. Typical mean values at hemispheric and global scales of the inhomogeneity parameter nu (roughly the mean over the standard deviation of water path or optical thickness), range from approximately 2.5 to 3, while for the inhomogeneity parameter chi (the ratio of the logarithmic to linear mean) from approximately 0.7 to 0.8. Values of chi for zonal averages can occasionally fall below 0.6 and for individual gridpoints below 0.5. Our results demonstrate that MODIS is capable of revealing significant fluctuations in cloud horizontal inhomogenity and stress the need to model their global radiative effect in future studies.

  12. Marine Cloud Brightening

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  13. FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; King, M. D.; Randall, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Issac, G. A.; Pinto, J. O.; Uttal, T.; Bucholtz, A.; Cripe, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Fairall, C. W.; Garrett, T. J.; Hudson, J.; Intrieri, J. M.; Jakob, C.; Jensen, T.; Lawson, P.; Marcotte, D.; Nguyen, L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted in the Arctic during April through July, 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud-radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and Barrow, Alaska. In this paper we describe the programmatic and science objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modelling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

  14. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  15. A Quantitative Measure of Memory Reference Regularity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, T; de Supinski, B R; McKee, S A; Mueller, F; Yoo, A

    2001-10-01

    The memory performance of applications on existing architectures depends significantly on hardware features like prefetching and caching that exploit the locality of the memory accesses. The principle of locality has guided the design of many key micro-architectural features, including cache hierarchies, TLBs, and branch predictors. Quantitative measures of spatial and temporal locality have been useful for predicting the performance of memory hierarchy components. Unfortunately, the concept of locality is constrained to capturing memory access patterns characterized by proximity, while sophisticated memory systems are capable of exploiting other predictable access patterns. Here, we define the concepts of spatial and temporal regularity, and introduce a measure of spatial access regularity to quantify some of this predictability in access patterns. We present an efficient online algorithm to dynamically determine the spatial access regularity in an application's memory references, and demonstrate its use on a set of regular and irregular codes. We find that the use of our algorithm, with its associated overhead of trace generation, slows typical applications by a factor of 50-200, which is at least an order of magnitude better than traditional full trace generation approaches. Our approach can be applied to the characterization of program access patterns and in the implementation of sophisticated, software-assisted prefetching mechanisms, and its inherently parallel nature makes it well suited for use with multi-threaded programs.

  16. Dyslexia in Regular Orthographies: Manifestation and Causation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Heinz; Schurz, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes our research on the manifestation of dyslexia in German and on cognitive deficits, which may account for the severe reading speed deficit and the poor orthographic spelling performance that characterize dyslexia in regular orthographies. An only limited causal role of phonological deficits (phonological awareness,…

  17. Strategies of Teachers in the Regular Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leeuw, Renske Ria; De Boer, Anke Aaltje

    2016-01-01

    It is known that regular schoolteachers have difficulties in educating students with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties (SEBD), mainly because of their disruptive behavior. In order to manage the disruptive behavior of students with SEBD many advices and strategies are provided in educational literature. However, very little is known…

  18. TAUBERIAN THEOREMS FOR MATRIX REGULAR VARIATION.

    PubMed

    Meerschaert, M M; Scheffler, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Karamata's Tauberian theorem relates the asymptotics of a nondecreasing right-continuous function to that of its Laplace-Stieltjes transform, using regular variation. This paper establishes the analogous Tauberian theorem for matrix-valued functions. Some applications to time series analysis are indicated.

  19. TAUBERIAN THEOREMS FOR MATRIX REGULAR VARIATION

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, M. M.; SCHEFFLER, H.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Karamata’s Tauberian theorem relates the asymptotics of a nondecreasing right-continuous function to that of its Laplace-Stieltjes transform, using regular variation. This paper establishes the analogous Tauberian theorem for matrix-valued functions. Some applications to time series analysis are indicated. PMID:24644367

  20. Regular Classroom Teachers' Perceptions of Mainstreaming Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringlaben, Ravic P.; Price, Jay R.

    To assess regular classroom teachers' perceptions of mainstreaming, a 22 item questionnaire was completed by 117 teachers (K through 12). Among results were that nearly half of the Ss indicated a lack of preparation for implementing mainstreaming; 47% tended to be very willing to accept aminstreamed students; 42% said mainstreaming was working…

  1. Regularities in Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the assumption that Spearman's law acts unsystematically and approximately uniformly for various subtests of cognitive ability in an IQ test battery when high- and low-ability IQ groups are selected. Data from national standardization samples for Wechsler adult and child IQ tests affirm regularities in Spearman's "Law of Diminishing…

  2. MHD Turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gong, H.; Brunt, C.; Ostriker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of MHD turbulence in the Taurus Molecular Cloud is examined from 12CO and 13CO J=1-0 imaging observations using the FCRAO 14 meter telescope. The degree of velocity anisotropy is measured from velocity structure functions derived separately along the x and y axes using Principal Component Analysis of spectroscopic imaging data (Brunt & Heyer 2002). Such anisotropy is predicted from model descriptions and computational simulations of MHD turbulence in the case of strong magnetic fields (Goldreich & Sridhar 1995; Cho, Lazarian, & Vishniac 2002; Vestuto, Ostriker, & Stone 2003). Within a subfield of the Taurus image where the column densities are low, this velocity anisotropy is largest along an angle that is coincident with the local magnetic field direction determined independently from optical polarization of background stars.The structure function derived from data perpendicular to the local field shows a shallower scaling exponent and a larger scaling coefficient than the values that describe the structure function constructed along the magnetic field as predicted by the MHD models. This alignment provides strong evidence that the magnetic field is a significant dynamical force within this column density regime of the Taurus cloud.

  3. Efficient surface reconstruction from noisy data using regularized membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2009-05-01

    A physically motivated method for surface reconstruction is proposed that can recover smooth surfaces from noisy and sparse data sets. No orientation information is required. By a new technique based on regularized-membrane potentials the input sample points are aggregated, leading to improved noise tolerability and outlier removal, without sacrificing much with respect to detail (feature) recovery. After aggregating the sample points on a volumetric grid, a novel, iterative algorithm is used to classify grid points as exterior or interior to the surface. This algorithm relies on intrinsic properties of the smooth scalar field on the grid which emerges after the aggregation step. Second, a mesh-smoothing paradigm based on a mass-spring system is introduced. By enhancing this system with a bending-energy minimizing term we ensure that the final triangulated surface is smoother than piecewise linear. In terms of speed and flexibility, the method compares favorably with respect to previous approaches. Most parts of the method are implemented on modern graphics processing units (GPUs). Results in a wide variety of settings are presented, ranging from surface reconstruction on noise-free point clouds to grayscale image segmentation.

  4. Wavelet variance analysis for random fields on a regular lattice.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debashis; Percival, Donald B

    2012-02-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in using wavelets to analyze time series and images that can be regarded as realizations of certain 1-D and 2-D stochastic processes on a regular lattice. Wavelets give rise to the concept of the wavelet variance (or wavelet power spectrum), which decomposes the variance of a stochastic process on a scale-by-scale basis. The wavelet variance has been applied to a variety of time series, and a statistical theory for estimators of this variance has been developed. While there have been applications of the wavelet variance in the 2-D context (in particular, in works by Unser in 1995 on wavelet-based texture analysis for images and by Lark and Webster in 2004 on analysis of soil properties), a formal statistical theory for such analysis has been lacking. In this paper, we develop the statistical theory by generalizing and extending some of the approaches developed for time series, thus leading to a large-sample theory for estimators of 2-D wavelet variances. We apply our theory to simulated data from Gaussian random fields with exponential covariances and from fractional Brownian surfaces. We demonstrate that the wavelet variance is potentially useful for texture discrimination. We also use our methodology to analyze images of four types of clouds observed over the southeast Pacific Ocean.

  5. THE LAUNCHING OF COLD CLOUDS BY GALAXY OUTFLOWS. I. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS WITH RADIATIVE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, Evan; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.

  6. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  7. Bayesian Exploration of Cloud Microphysical Sensitivities in Mesoscale Cloud Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that changes in cloud microphysical processes can have a significant effect on the structure and evolution of cloud systems. In particular, changes in water phase and the associated energy sources and sinks have a direct influence on cloud mass and precipitation, and an indirect effect on cloud system thermodynamic properties and dynamics. The details of cloud particle nucleation and growth, as well as the interactions among vapor, liquid, and ice phases, occur on scales too small to be explicitly simulated in the vast majority of numerical models. These processes are represented by approximations that introduce uncertainty into the simulation of cloud mass and spatial distribution and by extension the simulation of the cloud system itself. This presentation demonstrates how Bayesian methodologies can be used to explore the relationships between cloud microphysics and cloud content, precipitation, dynamics, and radiative transfer. Specifically, a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to compute the probability distribution of cloud microphysical parameters consistent with particular mesoscale environments. Two different physical systems are considered. The first example explores the multivariate functional relationships between precipitation, cloud microphysics, and the environment in a deep convective cloud system. The second examines how changes in cloud microphysical parameters may affect orographic cloud structure, precipitation, and dynamics. In each case, the Bayesian framework can be shown to provide unique information on the inter-dependencies present in the physical system.

  8. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Galli, D.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Cosmic rays play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. Aims: In this paper we examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. Methods: To check whether the cosmic-ray ionisation rate can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of cosmic rays in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of cosmic rays using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core with different initial conditions. Results: We find that an increment of the toroidal component of the magnetic field, or, in general, a more twisted configuration of the field lines, results in a decrease in the cosmic-ray flux. This is mainly due to the magnetic mirroring effect that is stronger where larger variations in the field direction are present. In particular, we find a decrease of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate below 10-18 s-1 in the central 300-400 AU, where density is higher than about 109 cm-3. This very low value of the ionisation rate is attained in the cases of intermediate and low magnetisation (mass-to-flux ratio λ = 5 and 17, respectively) and for toroidal fields larger than about 40% of the total field. Conclusions: Magnetic field effects can significantly reduce the ionisation fraction in collapsing clouds. We provide a handy fitting formula to compute approximately the attenuation of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate

  9. Learning regular expressions for clinical text classification

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duy Duc An; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Natural language processing (NLP) applications typically use regular expressions that have been developed manually by human experts. Our goal is to automate both the creation and utilization of regular expressions in text classification. Methods We designed a novel regular expression discovery (RED) algorithm and implemented two text classifiers based on RED. The RED+ALIGN classifier combines RED with an alignment algorithm, and RED+SVM combines RED with a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Two clinical datasets were used for testing and evaluation: the SMOKE dataset, containing 1091 text snippets describing smoking status; and the PAIN dataset, containing 702 snippets describing pain status. We performed 10-fold cross-validation to calculate accuracy, precision, recall, and F-measure metrics. In the evaluation, an SVM classifier was trained as the control. Results The two RED classifiers achieved 80.9–83.0% in overall accuracy on the two datasets, which is 1.3–3% higher than SVM's accuracy (p<0.001). Similarly, small but consistent improvements have been observed in precision, recall, and F-measure when RED classifiers are compared with SVM alone. More significantly, RED+ALIGN correctly classified many instances that were misclassified by the SVM classifier (8.1–10.3% of the total instances and 43.8–53.0% of SVM's misclassifications). Conclusions Machine-generated regular expressions can be effectively used in clinical text classification. The regular expression-based classifier can be combined with other classifiers, like SVM, to improve classification performance. PMID:24578357

  10. A novel combined regularization algorithm of total variation and Tikhonov regularization for open electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhen; Ling, Lin; Li, Gang

    2013-07-01

    A Tikhonov regularization method in the inverse problem of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) often results in a smooth distribution reconstruction, with which we can barely make a clear separation between the inclusions and background. The recently popular total variation (TV)regularization method including the lagged diffusivity (LD) method can sharpen the edges, and is robust to noise in a small convergence region. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel regularization method combining the Tikhonov and LD regularization methods. Firstly, we clarify the implementation details of the Tikhonov, LD and combined methods in two-dimensional open EIT by performing the current injection and voltage measurement on one boundary of the imaging object. Next, we introduce a weighted parameter to the Tikhonov regularization method aiming to explore the effect of the weighted parameter on the resolution and quality of reconstruction images with the inclusion at different depths. Then, we analyze the performance of these algorithms with noisy data. Finally, we evaluate the effect of the current injection pattern on reconstruction quality and propose a modified current injection pattern.The results indicate that the combined regularization algorithm with stable convergence is able to improve the reconstruction quality with sharp contrast and more robust to noise in comparison to the Tikhonov and LD regularization methods solely. In addition, the results show that the current injection pattern with a bigger driver angle leads to a better reconstruction quality.

  11. What Happens to a High Velocity Cloud When it Hits the Milky Way's Disk: Is Dark Matter Necessary for Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter halos enshroud some of the most massive high velocity clouds. Their gravitational pull confines the clouds as they pass through the intergalactic medium. Given the ability of dark matter halos to stabilize their embedded baryonic clouds against hydrodynamic interactions that would otherwise disrupt them, it has further been suggested that dark matter halos could enable high velocity clouds to survive impacts with the Milky Way's disk. The survival of high velocity clouds, such as the Smith Cloud, during a passage through the disk has been cited as evidence for the presence of dark matter. However, a second actor, the magnetic field, may also be at play. In order to characterize, measure, and disentangle their effects, we have performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations of massive high velocity clouds as they impact a galactic disk. Here, we present the rate at which material dissipates in a variety of situations that include or exclude dark matter and magnetic fields.

  12. Stratocumulus cloud evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Rogers, D.P.; Norris, P.M.; Johnson, D.W.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and evolution of the extra-tropical marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) depends largely on the variability of stratus and stratocumulus clouds. The typical boundary-layer is capped by a temperature inversion that limits exchange with the free atmosphere. Cloud-top is usually coincident with the base of the inversion. Stratus clouds are generally associated with a well-mixed MABL, whereas daytime observations of stratocumulus-topped boundary-layers indicate that the cloud and subcloud layers are often decoupled due to shortwave radiative heating of the cloud layer. In this case the surface-based mixed layer is separated from the base of the stratocumulus (Sc) by a layer that is stable to dry turbulent mixing. This is sometimes referred to as the transition layer. Often cumulus clouds (Cu) develop in the transition layer. The cumulus tops may remain below the Sc base or they may penetrate into the Sc layer and occasionally through the capping temperature inversion. While this cloud structure is characteristic of the daytime MABL, it may persist at night also. The Cu play an important role in connecting the mixed layer to the Sc layer. If the Cu are active they transport water vapor from the sea surface that maintains the Sc against the dissipating effects of shortwave heating. The Cu, however, are very sensitive to small changes in the heat and moisture in the boundary-layer and are transient features. Here the authors discuss the effect of these small Cu on the turbulent structure of the MABL.

  13. Marine cloud brightening

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  14. Dust properties and magnetic field geometry towards LDN 1570

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, C.; Maheswar, G.; Pandey, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed both optical linear polarimetric and photometric observations of an isolated dark globule LDN 1570 aim to study the dust polarizing and extinction properties and to map the magnetic field geometry so as to understand not only the importance of magnetic fields in formation and evolution of clouds but also the correlation of the inferred magnetic field structure with the cloud structure and its dynamics. Dust size indicators (R V and λ max ) reveal for the presence of slightly bigger dust grains towards the cloud region. The inferred magnetic field geometry, which closely follows the cloud structure revealed by Herschel images, suggest that the cloud could have been formed due to converging material flows along the magnetic field lines.

  15. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  16. Using Tikhonov Regularization for Spatial Projections from CSR Regularized Spherical Harmonic GRACE Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, H.; Bettadpur, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated before that using Tikhonov regularization produces spherical harmonic solutions from GRACE that have very little residual stripes while capturing all the signal observed by GRACE within the noise level. This paper demonstrates a two-step process and uses Tikhonov regularization to remove the residual stripes in the CSR regularized spherical harmonic coefficients when computing the spatial projections. We discuss methods to produce mass anomaly grids that have no stripe features while satisfying the necessary condition of capturing all observed signal within the GRACE noise level.

  17. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  18. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  19. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  20. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  1. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  2. Orbiter cloud photopolarimeter investigation.

    PubMed

    Travis, L D; Coffeen, D L; Hansen, J E; Kawabata, K; Lacis, A A; Lane, W A; Limaye, S S; Stone, P H

    1979-02-23

    The first polarization measurements of the orbiter cloud photopolarimeter have detected a planet-wide layer of submicrometer aerosols of substantial visible optical thickness, of the order of 0.05 to 0.1, in the lower stratosphere well above the main visible sulfuric acid cloud layer. Early images show a number of features observed by Mariner 10 in 1974, including planetary scale markings that propagate around the planet in the retrograde sense at roughly 100 meters per second and bright- and dark-rimmed cells suggesting convective activity at low latitudes. The polar regions are covered by bright clouds down to latitudes aproximately 50 degrees, with both caps significantly brighter (relative to low latitudes) than the south polar cloud observed by Mariner 10. The cellular features, often organized into clusters with large horizontal scale, exist also at mid-latitudes, and include at least one case in which a cell cuts across the edge of the bright polar cloud of the northern hemisphere.

  3. Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. M.

    2011-05-06

    In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

  4. Charged fermions tunneling from regular black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Javed, W.

    2012-11-15

    We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions as a tunneling process from charged regular black holes, i.e., the Bardeen and ABGB black holes. For this purpose, we apply the semiclassical WKB approximation to the general covariant Dirac equation for charged particles and evaluate the tunneling probabilities. We recover the Hawking temperature corresponding to these charged regular black holes. Further, we consider the back-reaction effects of the emitted spin particles from black holes and calculate their corresponding quantum corrections to the radiation spectrum. We find that this radiation spectrum is not purely thermal due to the energy and charge conservation but has some corrections. In the absence of charge, e = 0, our results are consistent with those already present in the literature.

  5. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  6. DISCOVERY OF THE PIGTAIL MOLECULAR CLOUD IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Shinji; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nagai, Makoto; Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Hasegawa, Tetsuo

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the discovery of a helical molecular cloud in the central molecular zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy. This 'pigtail' molecular cloud appears at (l, b, V{sub LSR}) {approx_equal} (-0.{sup 0}7, + 0.{sup 0}0, - 70 to -30 km s{sup -1}), with a spatial size of {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign 20 pc{sup 2} and a mass of (2-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. This is the third helical gaseous nebula found in the Galactic center region to date. Line intensity ratios indicate that the pigtail molecular cloud has slightly higher temperature and/or density than the other normal clouds in the CMZ. We also found a high-velocity wing emission near the footpoint of this cloud. We propose a formation model of the pigtail molecular cloud. It might be associated with a magnetic tube that is twisted and coiled because of the interaction between clouds in the innermost x{sub 1} orbit and ones in the outermost x{sub 2} orbit.

  7. A regular version of Smilansky model

    SciTech Connect

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a modification of Smilansky model in which a singular potential “channel” is replaced by a regular, below unbounded potential which shrinks as it becomes deeper. We demonstrate that, similarly to the original model, such a system exhibits a spectral transition with respect to the coupling constant, and determine the critical value above which a new spectral branch opens. The result is generalized to situations with multiple potential “channels.”.

  8. Optical tomography by means of regularized MLEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majer, Charles L.; Urbanek, Tina; Peter, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    To solve the inverse problem involved in fluorescence mediated tomography a regularized maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction strategy is proposed. This technique has recently been applied to reconstruct galaxy clusters in astronomy and is adopted here. The MLEM algorithm is implemented as Richardson-Lucy (RL) scheme and includes entropic regularization and a floating default prior. Hence, the strategy is very robust against measurement noise and also avoids converging into noise patterns. Normalized Gaussian filtering with fixed standard deviation is applied for the floating default kernel. The reconstruction strategy is investigated using the XFM-2 homogeneous mouse phantom (Caliper LifeSciences Inc., Hopkinton, MA) with known optical properties. Prior to optical imaging, X-ray CT tomographic data of the phantom were acquire to provide structural context. Phantom inclusions were fit with various fluorochrome inclusions (Cy5.5) for which optical data at 60 projections over 360 degree have been acquired, respectively. Fluorochrome excitation has been accomplished by scanning laser point illumination in transmission mode (laser opposite to camera). Following data acquisition, a 3D triangulated mesh is derived from the reconstructed CT data which is then matched with the various optical projection images through 2D linear interpolation, correlation and Fourier transformation in order to assess translational and rotational deviations between the optical and CT imaging systems. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed regularized MLEM algorithm, when driven with a constant initial condition, yields reconstructed images that tend to be smoother in comparison to classical MLEM without regularization. Once the floating default prior is included this bias was significantly reduced.

  9. A regularization approach to hydrofacies delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Tartakovsky, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We consider an inverse problem of identifying complex internal structures of composite (geological) materials from sparse measurements of system parameters and system states. Two conceptual frameworks for identifying internal boundaries between constitutive materials in a composite are considered. A sequential approach relies on support vector machines, nearest neighbor classifiers, or geostatistics to reconstruct boundaries from measurements of system parameters and then uses system states data to refine the reconstruction. A joint approach inverts the two data sets simultaneously by employing a regularization approach.

  10. Sparse regularization for force identification using dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    The classical function expansion method based on minimizing l2-norm of the response residual employs various basis functions to represent the unknown force. Its difficulty lies in determining the optimum number of basis functions. Considering the sparsity of force in the time domain or in other basis space, we develop a general sparse regularization method based on minimizing l1-norm of the coefficient vector of basis functions. The number of basis functions is adaptively determined by minimizing the number of nonzero components in the coefficient vector during the sparse regularization process. First, according to the profile of the unknown force, the dictionary composed of basis functions is determined. Second, a sparsity convex optimization model for force identification is constructed. Third, given the transfer function and the operational response, Sparse reconstruction by separable approximation (SpaRSA) is developed to solve the sparse regularization problem of force identification. Finally, experiments including identification of impact and harmonic forces are conducted on a cantilever thin plate structure to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of SpaRSA. Besides the Dirac dictionary, other three sparse dictionaries including Db6 wavelets, Sym4 wavelets and cubic B-spline functions can also accurately identify both the single and double impact forces from highly noisy responses in a sparse representation frame. The discrete cosine functions can also successfully reconstruct the harmonic forces including the sinusoidal, square and triangular forces. Conversely, the traditional Tikhonov regularization method with the L-curve criterion fails to identify both the impact and harmonic forces in these cases.

  11. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  12. Cloud top entrainment instability and cloud top distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Classical cloud-top entrainment instability condition formulation is discussed. A saturation point diagram is used to investigate the details of mixing in cases where the cloud-top entrainment instability criterion is satisfied.

  13. Charge-regularization effects on polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2012-02-01

    When electrically charged macromolecules are dispersed in polar solvents, their effective net charge is generally different from their chemical charges, due to competition between counterion adsorption and the translational entropy of dissociated counterions. The effective charge changes significantly as the experimental conditions change such as variations in solvent quality, temperature, and the concentration of added small electrolytes. This charge-regularization effect leads to major difficulties in interpreting experimental data on polyelectrolyte solutions and challenges in understanding the various polyelectrolyte phenomena. Even the most fundamental issue of experimental determination of molar mass of charged macromolecules by light scattering method has been difficult so far due to this feature. We will present a theory of charge-regularization of flexible polyelectrolytes in solutions and discuss the consequences of charge-regularization on (a) experimental determination of molar mass of polyelectrolytes using scattering techniques, (b) coil-globule transition, (c) macrophase separation in polyelectrolyte solutions, (c) phase behavior in coacervate formation, and (d) volume phase transitions in polyelectrolyte gels.

  14. Automatic detection of regularly repeating vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, David

    2005-09-01

    Many animal species produce repetitive sounds at regular intervals. This regularity can be used for automatic recognition of the sounds, providing improved detection at a given signal-to-noise ratio. Here, the detection of sperm whale sounds is examined. Sperm whales produce highly repetitive ``regular clicks'' at periods of about 0.2-2 s, and faster click trains in certain behavioral contexts. The following detection procedure was tested: a spectrogram was computed; values within a certain frequency band were summed; time windowing was applied; each windowed segment was autocorrelated; and the maximum of the autocorrelation within a certain periodicity range was chosen. This procedure was tested on sets of recordings containing sperm whale sounds and interfering sounds, both low-frequency recordings from autonomous hydrophones and high-frequency ones from towed hydrophone arrays. An optimization procedure iteratively varies detection parameters (spectrogram frame length and frequency range, window length, periodicity range, etc.). Performance of various sets of parameters was measured by setting a standard level of allowable missed calls, and the resulting optimium parameters are described. Performance is also compared to that of a neural network trained using the data sets. The method is also demonstrated for sounds of blue whales, minke whales, and seismic airguns. [Funding from ONR.

  15. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  16. Regularized robust coding for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian; Zhang, David

    2013-05-01

    Recently the sparse representation based classification (SRC) has been proposed for robust face recognition (FR). In SRC, the testing image is coded as a sparse linear combination of the training samples, and the representation fidelity is measured by the l2-norm or l1 -norm of the coding residual. Such a sparse coding model assumes that the coding residual follows Gaussian or Laplacian distribution, which may not be effective enough to describe the coding residual in practical FR systems. Meanwhile, the sparsity constraint on the coding coefficients makes the computational cost of SRC very high. In this paper, we propose a new face coding model, namely regularized robust coding (RRC), which could robustly regress a given signal with regularized regression coefficients. By assuming that the coding residual and the coding coefficient are respectively independent and identically distributed, the RRC seeks for a maximum a posterior solution of the coding problem. An iteratively reweighted regularized robust coding (IR(3)C) algorithm is proposed to solve the RRC model efficiently. Extensive experiments on representative face databases demonstrate that the RRC is much more effective and efficient than state-of-the-art sparse representation based methods in dealing with face occlusion, corruption, lighting, and expression changes, etc.

  17. Regularity theory for general stable operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros-Oton, Xavier; Serra, Joaquim

    2016-06-01

    We establish sharp regularity estimates for solutions to Lu = f in Ω ⊂Rn, L being the generator of any stable and symmetric Lévy process. Such nonlocal operators L depend on a finite measure on S n - 1, called the spectral measure. First, we study the interior regularity of solutions to Lu = f in B1. We prove that if f is Cα then u belong to C α + 2 s whenever α + 2 s is not an integer. In case f ∈L∞, we show that the solution u is C2s when s ≠ 1 / 2, and C 2 s - ɛ for all ɛ > 0 when s = 1 / 2. Then, we study the boundary regularity of solutions to Lu = f in Ω, u = 0 in Rn ∖ Ω, in C 1 , 1 domains Ω. We show that solutions u satisfy u /ds ∈C s - ɛ (Ω ‾) for all ɛ > 0, where d is the distance to ∂Ω. Finally, we show that our results are sharp by constructing two counterexamples.

  18. HNCO in molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

    1984-05-15

    In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

  19. Winter Clouds Over Mie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 March 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image shows late winter clouds over the 104 km (65 mi) diameter crater, Mie. Cellular clouds occur in the lower martian atmosphere, surrounding Mie Crater. Their cloudtops are at an altitude that is below the crater rim. Higher than the crater rim occurs a series of lee wave clouds, indicating air circulation moving from west/northwest (left) toward the east/southeast (right). Mie Crater is located in Utopia Planitia, not too far from the Viking 2 landing site, near 48.5 N, 220.4 W. Sunlight illuminates this January 2004 scene from the lower left.

  20. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  1. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  2. Giant Molecular Cloud Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Van Loo, Sven; nakamura, fumitaka; Bruderer, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a potentially dominant mechanism for galactic star formation: triggering via collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We create detailed numerical simulations of this process, utilizing the Enzo code with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), including non-ideal effects, and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to explore how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments, clumps and stars. We implement photo-dissociation region (PDR) based density/temperature/extinction-dependent heating and cooling functions that span the atomic to molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. We first carried out a parameter space study via a suite of 2D simulations, which track the fate of an initially stable clump embedded within one of the clouds. We have then extended these calculations to 3D, including introduction of initial turbulence into the clouds and magnetically-regulated sub-grid models for star formation. Different magnetic field strengths and orientations are considered, as is the role of cloud collisions at various velocities and impact parameters. We examine the effects of including ambipolar diffusion. Between isolated and colliding cases, the density and kinematic structure are visualized and characterized, in addition to magnetic field configuration. We discuss observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, focusing on 13CO(J=2-1), 13CO(J=3-2), and 12CO(J=8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra, which we synthesize from our simulation outputs. We find the ratio of J=8-7 to lower-J emission to be a powerful diagnostic probe of GMC collisions. We also analyze magnetic field orientation relative to filamentary structure, comparing to observations within the Galaxy. Finally, we examine the level of star formation activity that is induced by collisions and distinguishing kinematic properties of the stars that form by this mechanism.

  3. The Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessman, Paul R.

    1990-01-01

    Although the outermost planet, Pluto, is 6 x 10 to the 9th km from the sun, the sun's gravitational sphere of influence extends much further, out to about 2 x 10 to the 13th km. This space is occupied by the Oort cloud, comprising 10 to the 12th-10 to the 13th cometary nuclei, formed in the primordial solar nebula. Observations and computer modeling have contributed to a detailed understanding of the structure and dynamics of the cloud, which is thought to be the source of the long-period comets and possibly comet showers.

  4. Infrared cloud radiance.

    PubMed

    Kattawar, G W; Plass, G N

    1969-06-01

    The radiance of clouds is calculated at nine wavelengths in the ir. The single scattering function is obtained by Mie theory from the measured values of the complex index of refraction and with two different drop size distributions. Multiple scattering is taken into account by a Monte Carlo technique which computes the exact three-dimensional paths of the photons. The upward and downward radiance is obtained as a function of optical thickness, angle of observation, drop size distribution, and incident solar angle. The mean optical path of the photon, the cloud albedo, and the flux at the lower and upper boundaries are also given.

  5. Opaque cloud detection

    DOEpatents

    Roskovensky, John K.

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  6. Dust clouds of Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, D. F.

    1982-03-01

    The development of knowledge of the exact nature of the dust clouds in the southern Milky Way galaxy is traced. First observation of the clouds were made by Herschel in 1784, and identification came with Barnard in 1916. The region around Barnard 86 is reviewed, noting the presence of the cluster NGC 6520 and NGC 6523, which is an area of a wide and dark dust lane backed by a blue nebulosity. Further attention is given to the blue objects NGC 6589, and NGC 6590, the Trifid nebula M20, the H II region NGC 6559 and IC 1274-5, and the six hot stars in the Sagittarius constellation.

  7. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  8. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  9. Real World: Global Cloud Observation Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about precipitation and how clouds are formed. Find out why scientists study clouds and how you can help NASA collect cloud observation data as part of the Students' Cloud Observation OnLine,...

  10. Relationships among cloud occurrence frequency, overlap, and effective thickness derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat merged cloud vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profiles derived from the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and cloud profiling radar. The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical profiles can be related by a cloud overlap matrix when the correlation length of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data (July 2006) support these assumptions, although the correlation length sometimes increases with separation distance when the cloud top height is large. The data also show that the correlation length depends on cloud top hight and the maximum occurs when the cloud top height is 8 to 10 km. The cloud correlation length is equivalent to the decorrelation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth (2000) when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same. The simple relationships derived in this study can be used to estimate the top-of-atmosphere irradiance difference caused by cloud fraction, uppermost cloud top, and cloud thickness vertical profile differences.

  11. Active Imaging through Cirrus Clouds.

    PubMed

    Landesman, B; Kindilien, P; Pierson, R; Matson, C; Mosley, D

    1997-11-24

    The presence of clouds of ice particles in the uplink and downlink path of an illumination beam can severely impede the performance of an active imaging system. Depending on the optical depth of the cloud, i.e., its density and depth, the beam can be completely scattered and extinguished, or the beam can pass through the cloud with some fraction attenuated, scattered, and depolarized. In particular, subvisual cirrus clouds, i.e., high, thin cirrus clouds that cannot be observed from the ground, can affect the properties and alignment of both uplink and downlink beams. This paper discusses the potential for active imaging in the presence of cirrus clouds. We document field data results from an active imaging experiment conducted several years ago, which the authors believe to show the effects of cirrus clouds on an active imaging system. To verify these conclusions, we include the results of a simulation of the interaction of a coherent illumination scheme with a cirrus cloud.

  12. Cloud structure from infrared imagery.

    PubMed

    Blau, H H

    1968-10-01

    Infrared images of clouds recorded in reflected sunlight at wavelengths at which water and ice absorb will show greater structural detail than visible images, and, in principle, can provide information on cloud phase and particle size distributions.

  13. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources.

  14. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  15. Animated View of Noctilucent Cloud

    NASA Video Gallery

    Polar mesospheric clouds, as they are known to those who study them from satellite observations, are also often called "noctilucent," or night shining, clouds as seen by ground-based observers. Bec...

  16. G2 Gas Cloud Simulation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This simulation shows the future behavior of the G2 gas cloud now approaching Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. X-ray emission from the cloud's tidal interaction w...

  17. Stratocumulus Clouds, eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This sheet of closed-cell stratocumulus clouds was sighted in the eastern Pacific Ocean (13.5N, 141.0W) southeast of the Hawaiian Islands. This cloud sheet has a distinctive fracture zone that separates an older cloud layer (right side of scene) from a newly formed layer (left). Stratocumulus cloud sheets originate over the cold waters of the California current and migrate westward over the Pacific Ocean.

  18. Utilizing clouds for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the use of cloud computing resources for the Belle II experiment. A number of different methods are used to exploit the private and opportunistic clouds. Clouds are making significant contributions to the generation of Belle II MC data samples and it is expected that their impact will continue to grow over the coming years.

  19. A View from the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is definitely a thing now, but it's not new and it's not even novel. Back when people were first learning about the Internet in the 1990s, every diagram that one saw showing how the Internet worked had a big cloud in the middle. That cloud represented the diverse links, routers, gateways, and protocols that passed traffic around in…

  20. Wind measurements in noctilucent clouds.

    PubMed

    Theon, J S; Smith, W S; McGovern, W E

    1969-05-01

    The results of eight soundings conducted from sites at high latitude during the summers of 1963 through 1965 suggest that a relation exists between the winds at the mesopause and the occurrence of noctilucent clouds. These measurements indicate that situations in which noctilucent clouds are present are associated with lower wind speeds than is the case where there are no clouds.

  1. The Basics of Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Most school business officials have heard the term "cloud computing" bandied about and may have some idea of what the term means. In fact, they likely already leverage a cloud-computing solution somewhere within their district. But what does cloud computing really mean? This brief article puts a bit of definition behind the term and helps one…

  2. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  3. Training in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretlow, Cassi; Jayroe, Tina

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how cloud-based applications, such as Google Calendar, Wikidot, Google Docs, Google Sites, YouTube, and Craigslist, played a big part in the success of their plan of implementing a technology training program for customers and employees. A few years ago the Denver Public Library, where the authors work, developed…

  4. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nm

    Images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.

    Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.

    The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.

    The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter

  5. Invisible Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS') cloud detection capability is so sensitive that it can detect clouds that would be indistinguishable to the human eye. This pair of images highlights MODIS' ability to detect what scientists call 'sub-visible cirrus.' The image on top shows the scene using data collected in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum-the part our eyes can see. Clouds are apparent in the center and lower right of the image, while the rest of the image appears to be relatively clear. However, data collected at 1.38um (lower image) show that a thick layer of previously undetected cirrus clouds obscures the entire scene. These kinds of cirrus are called 'sub-visible' because they can't be detected using only visible light. MODIS' 1.38um channel detects electromagnetic radiation in the infrared region of the spectrum. These images were made from data collected on April 4, 2000. Image courtesy Mark Gray, MODIS Atmosphere Team

  6. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    These cirrocumulus clouds photographed over open ocean - location unknown, seem to be in a state of agitation as in the early stages of storm development. The window frame at the top of this scene obscures almost half of the image and the panel seen in the middle of the scene is a corner of one of the payload bay closure doors.

  7. Data Products on Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Vuong T.; Mandl, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation lays out the data processing products that exist and are planned for the Matsu cloud for Earth Observing 1. The presentation focuses on a new feature called co-registration of Earth Observing 1 with Landsat Global Land Survey chips.

  8. Methanol in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Friberg, P; Madden, S C; Hjalmarson, A; Irvine, W M

    1988-01-01

    We report observations, for the first time, of the 2(0) - 1(0)A+ and E, 2(-1) - 1(-1) E, and 1(0) - 0(0)A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC1, L134N, and B335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few 10(13) cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L134N, to an upper limit of 4 10(12) cm-2 (3 sigma). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed. A new, more accurate, rest frequency 96741.39(0.01) MHz is determined for the 2(0) - 1(0) A+ E line of methanol.

  9. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks.

  10. Seeding the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2013-01-01

    For any institution looking to shift enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to the cloud, big savings can be achieved--but only if the school has properly prepped "before" negotiations begin. These three steps can help: (1) Mop up the mess first; (2) Understand the true costs for services; and (3) Calculate the cost of transition.

  11. Living under a Cloud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gursky, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the efforts of three high school teachers at Richland High School in Richland (Washington) to change the school logo from a mushroom cloud, the symbol for a nuclear explosion. Opposition to these teachers' efforts has come from school administrators and fellow teachers, students, alumnae, and community residents. (IAH)

  12. Data in the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Garofalo, Joe

    2010-01-01

    The ability to move from one representation of data to another is one of the key characteristics of expert mathematicians and scientists. Cloud computing will offer more opportunities to create and display multiple representations of data, making this skill even more important in the future. The advent of the Internet led to widespread…

  13. Computing in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Web-based applications offer teachers, students, and school districts a convenient way to accomplish a wide range of tasks, from accounting to word processing, for free. Cloud computing has the potential to offer staff and students better services at a lower cost than the technology deployment models they're using now. Saving money and improving…

  14. Ice clouds over Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayetha, Vinay Kumar

    Arctic clouds have been recognized long ago as one of the key elements modulating the global climate system. They have gained much interest in recent years because the availability of new continuous datasets is opening doors to explore cloud and aerosol properties as never before. This is particularly important in the light of current climate change studies that predict changing weather scenarios around the world. This research investigates the occurrence and properties of a few types of ice clouds over the Arctic region with datasets available through the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (AFARS; 64.86° N, 147.84° W). This study exclusively focuses on ice clouds that form in the upper (cirrus clouds) and midlevels of the troposphere, and that are transparent to laser pulses (visible optical depth, tau < 3.0 -- 4.0). Cirrus clouds are ice-dominated clouds that are formed in the upper levels of the troposphere and are relatively thin such that their visual appearances range from bluish to gray in color. Mid-level ice clouds are those clouds primarily composed of ice crystals forming in the midlevels of the troposphere. It is hypothesized that unlike the basic midlevel cloud type (altostratus), other varieties of midlevel ice clouds exist at times over the Arctic region. The midlevel ice clouds studied here are also transparent to laser pulses and sometimes appear as a family of cirrus clouds to a surface observer. Because of their intermediate heights of occurrence in the troposphere, these could have microphysical properties and radiative effects that are distinct from those associated with upper level ice clouds in the troposphere. A ground-based lidar dataset with visual observations for identifying cloud types collected at AFARS over eight years is used to investigate this hypothesis. Cloud types over AFARS have been identified by a surface observer (Professor Kenneth Sassen) using established characteristics traits. Essential macrophysical

  15. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  16. Lost in the Cloud - New Challenges for Teaching GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellman, C. J.; Pupedis, G.

    2016-06-01

    As cloud based services move towards becoming the dominant paradigm in many areas of information technology, GIS has also moved into `the Cloud', creating a new opportunities for professionals and students alike, while at the same time presenting a range of new challenges and opportunities for GIS educators. Learning for many students in the geospatial science disciplines has been based on desktop software for GIS, building their skills from basic data handling and manipulation to advanced spatial analysis and database storage. Cloud-based systems challenge this paradigm in many ways, with some of the skills being replaced by clever and capable software tools, while the ubiquitous nature of the computing environment offers access and processing from anywhere, on any device. This paper describes our experiences over the past two years in developing and delivering a new course incorporating cloud based technologies for GIS and illustrates the many benefits and pitfalls of a cloud based approach to teaching. Throughout the course, students were encouraged to provide regular feedback on the course through the use of online journals. This allowed students to critique the approach to teaching, the learning materials available and to describe their own level of comfort and engagement with the material in an honest and non-confrontational manner. Many of the students did not have a strong information technology background and the journals provided great insight into the views of the students and the challenges they faced in mastering this technology.

  17. Regular physical exercise: way to healthy life.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Nessa, A; Hossain, M A

    2010-01-01

    Any bodily activity or movement that enhances and maintains overall health and physical fitness is called physical exercise. Habit of regular physical exercise has got numerous benefits. Exercise is of various types such as aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise and flexibility exercise. Aerobic exercise moves the large muscle groups with alternate contraction and relaxation, forces to deep breath, heart to pump more blood with adequate tissue oxygenation. It is also called cardiovascular exercise. Examples of aerobic exercise are walking, running, jogging, swimming etc. In anaerobic exercise, there is forceful contraction of muscle with stretching, usually mechanically aided and help to build up muscle strength and muscle bulk. Examples are weight lifting, pulling, pushing, sprinting etc. Flexibility exercise is one type of stretching exercise to improve the movements of muscles, joints and ligaments. Walking is a good example of aerobic exercise, easy to perform, safe, effective, does not require any training or equipment and less chance of injury. Regular 30 minutes brisk walking in the morning with 150 minutes per week is a good exercise. Regular exercise improves the cardiovascular status, reduces the risk of cardiac disease, high blood pressure and cerebrovascular disease. It reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity, helps in glycemic control, prevents obesity and diabetes mellitus. It is helpful for relieving anxiety, stress, brings a sense of well being and overall physical fitness. Global trend is mechanization, labor savings and leading to epidemic of long term chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases etc. All efforts should be made to create public awareness promoting physical activity, physically demanding recreational pursuits and providing adequate facilities. PMID:20046192

  18. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, V R; Marshall, J; Shen, T

    1991-01-01

    In the traditional concept for the origin of life as proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s, prebiotic reactants became slowly concentrated in the primordial oceans and life evolved slowly from a series of highly protracted chemical reactions during the first billion years of Earth's history. However, chemical evolution may not have occurred continuously because planetesimals and asteroids impacted the Earth many times during the first billion years, may have sterilized the Earth, and required the process to start over. A rapid process of chemical evolution may have been required in order that life appeared at or before 3.5 billion years ago. Thus, a setting favoring rapid chemical evolution may be required. A chemical evolution hypothesis set forth by Woese in 1979 accomplished prebiotic reactions rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns. However, in 1985 Scherer raised a number of objections to Woese's hypothesis and concluded that it was not valid. We propose a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that satisfies Scherer's concerns regarding the Woese hypothesis and includes advantageous droplet chemistry. Prebiotic reactants were supplied to the atmosphere by comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust or synthesized in the atmosphere from simple compounds using energy sources such as ultraviolet light, corona discharge, or lightning. These prebiotic monomers would have first encountered moisture in cloud drops and precipitation. We propose that rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial Earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by , or synthesized during entry of, meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei. Polymerization would have occurred within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and

  19. Total-variation regularization with bound constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2009-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for bound-constrained total-variation (TV) regularization that in comparison with its predecessors is simple, fast, and flexible. We use a splitting approach to decouple TV minimization from enforcing the constraints. Consequently, existing TV solvers can be employed with minimal alteration. This also makes the approach straightforward to generalize to any situation where TV can be applied. We consider deblurring of images with Gaussian or salt-and-pepper noise, as well as Abel inversion of radiographs with Poisson noise. We incorporate previous iterative reweighting algorithms to solve the TV portion.

  20. The regular state in higher order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Trachilis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    We consider the higher-order gravity theory derived from the quadratic Lagrangian R + 𝜖R2 in vacuum as a first-order (ADM-type) system with constraints, and build time developments of solutions of an initial value formulation of the theory. We show that all such solutions, if analytic, contain the right number of free functions to qualify as general solutions of the theory. We further show that any regular analytic solution which satisfies the constraints and the evolution equations can be given in the form of an asymptotic formal power series expansion.