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Sample records for regularly spaced stimulation

  1. Dimensional regularization in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Bollini, C.G. |; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dimensional regularization is introduced in configuration space by Fourier transforming in {nu} dimensions the perturbative momentum space Green functions. For this transformation, the Bochner theorem is used; no extra parameters, such as those of Feynman or Bogoliubov and Shirkov, are needed for convolutions. The regularized causal functions in {ital x} space have {nu}-dependent moderated singularities at the origin. They can be multiplied together and Fourier transformed (Bochner) without divergence problems. The usual ultraviolet divergences appear as poles of the resultant analytic functions of {nu}. Several examples are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Regular Decompositions for H(div) Spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kolev, Tzanio; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2012-01-01

    We study regular decompositions for H(div) spaces. In particular, we show that such regular decompositions are closely related to a previously studied “inf-sup” condition for parameter-dependent Stokes problems, for which we provide an alternative, more direct, proof.

  3. State-Space Regularization: Geometric Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Kunisch, K.

    1998-05-15

    Regularization of nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems is analyzed for a class of problems that is characterized by mappings which are the composition of a well-posed nonlinear and an ill-posed linear mapping. Regularization is carried out in the range of the nonlinear mapping. In applications this corresponds to the state-space variable of a partial differential equation or to preconditioning of data. The geometric theory of projection onto quasi-convex sets is used to analyze the stabilizing properties of this regularization technique and to describe its asymptotic behavior as the regularization parameter tends to zero.

  4. Semisupervised Support Vector Machines With Tangent Space Intrinsic Manifold Regularization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiliang; Xie, Xijiong

    2016-09-01

    Semisupervised learning has been an active research topic in machine learning and data mining. One main reason is that labeling examples is expensive and time-consuming, while there are large numbers of unlabeled examples available in many practical problems. So far, Laplacian regularization has been widely used in semisupervised learning. In this paper, we propose a new regularization method called tangent space intrinsic manifold regularization. It is intrinsic to data manifold and favors linear functions on the manifold. Fundamental elements involved in the formulation of the regularization are local tangent space representations, which are estimated by local principal component analysis, and the connections that relate adjacent tangent spaces. Simultaneously, we explore its application to semisupervised classification and propose two new learning algorithms called tangent space intrinsic manifold regularized support vector machines (TiSVMs) and tangent space intrinsic manifold regularized twin SVMs (TiTSVMs). They effectively integrate the tangent space intrinsic manifold regularization consideration. The optimization of TiSVMs can be solved by a standard quadratic programming, while the optimization of TiTSVMs can be solved by a pair of standard quadratic programmings. The experimental results of semisupervised classification problems show the effectiveness of the proposed semisupervised learning algorithms.

  5. On almost regularity and π-normality of topological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad Thabit, Sadeq Ali; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2012-05-01

    π-Normality is a weaker version of normality. It was introduced by Kalantan in 2008. π-Normality lies between normality and almost normality (resp. quasi-normality). The importance of this topological property is that it behaves slightly different from normality and almost normality (quasi-normality). π-Normality is neither a productive nor a hereditary property in general. In this paper, some properties of almost regular spaces are presented. In particular, a few results on almost regular spaces are improved. Some relationships between almost regularity and π-normality are presented. π-Generalized closed sets are used to obtain a characterization and preservation theorems of π-normal spaces. Also, we investigate that an almost regular Lindelöf space (resp. with σ-locally finite base) is not necessarily π-normal by giving two counterexamples. An almost normality of the Rational Sequence topology is proved.

  6. The effect of spacing regularity on visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Saarela, T P; Westheimer, G; Herzog, M H

    2010-08-18

    Crowding limits peripheral visual discrimination and recognition: a target easily identified in isolation becomes impossible to recognize when surrounded by other stimuli, often called flankers. Most accounts of crowding predict less crowding when the target-flanker distance increases. On the other hand, the importance of perceptual organization and target-flanker coherence in crowding has recently received more attention. We investigated the effect of target-flanker spacing on crowding in multi-element stimulus arrays. We show that increasing the average distance between the target and the flankers does not always decrease the amount of crowding but can even sometimes increase it. We suggest that the regularity of inter-element spacing plays an important role in determining the strength of crowding: regular spacing leads to the perception of a single, coherent, texture-like stimulus, making judgments about the individual elements difficult.

  7. Kilohertz Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation Is Ineffective at Regularizing the Firing of Model Thalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Couto, João; Grill, Warren M

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, including tremor, dystonia, and Parkinson's disease, but the mechanisms of action are not well understood. Symptom suppression by DBS typically requires stimulation frequencies ≥100 Hz, but when the frequency is increased above ~2 kHz, the effectiveness in tremor suppression declines (Benabid et al., 1991). We sought to test the hypothesis that the decline in efficacy at high frequencies is associated with desynchronization of the activity generated within a population of stimulated neurons. Regularization of neuronal firing is strongly correlated with tremor suppression by DBS, and desynchronization would disrupt the regularization of neuronal activity. We implemented computational models of CNS axons with either deterministic or stochastic membrane dynamics, and quantified the response of populations of model nerve fibers to extracellular stimulation at different frequencies and amplitudes. As stimulation frequency was increased from 2 to 80 Hz the regularity of neuronal firing increased (as assessed with direct estimates of entropy), in accord with the clinical effects on tremor of increasing stimulation frequency (Kuncel et al., 2006). Further, at frequencies between 80 and 500 Hz, increasing the stimulation amplitude (i.e., the proportion of neurons activated by the stimulus) increased the regularity of neuronal activity across the population, in accord with the clinical effects on tremor of stimulation amplitude (Kuncel et al., 2007). However, at stimulation frequencies above 1 kHz the regularity of neuronal firing declined due to irregular patterns of action potential generation and conduction block. The reductions in neuronal regularity that occurred at high frequencies paralleled the previously reported decline in tremor reduction and may be responsible for the loss of efficacy of DBS at very high frequencies. This analysis provides further support for the hypothesis that

  8. Kilohertz Frequency Deep Brain Stimulation Is Ineffective at Regularizing the Firing of Model Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Grill, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, including tremor, dystonia, and Parkinson's disease, but the mechanisms of action are not well understood. Symptom suppression by DBS typically requires stimulation frequencies ≥100 Hz, but when the frequency is increased above ~2 kHz, the effectiveness in tremor suppression declines (Benabid et al., 1991). We sought to test the hypothesis that the decline in efficacy at high frequencies is associated with desynchronization of the activity generated within a population of stimulated neurons. Regularization of neuronal firing is strongly correlated with tremor suppression by DBS, and desynchronization would disrupt the regularization of neuronal activity. We implemented computational models of CNS axons with either deterministic or stochastic membrane dynamics, and quantified the response of populations of model nerve fibers to extracellular stimulation at different frequencies and amplitudes. As stimulation frequency was increased from 2 to 80 Hz the regularity of neuronal firing increased (as assessed with direct estimates of entropy), in accord with the clinical effects on tremor of increasing stimulation frequency (Kuncel et al., 2006). Further, at frequencies between 80 and 500 Hz, increasing the stimulation amplitude (i.e., the proportion of neurons activated by the stimulus) increased the regularity of neuronal activity across the population, in accord with the clinical effects on tremor of stimulation amplitude (Kuncel et al., 2007). However, at stimulation frequencies above 1 kHz the regularity of neuronal firing declined due to irregular patterns of action potential generation and conduction block. The reductions in neuronal regularity that occurred at high frequencies paralleled the previously reported decline in tremor reduction and may be responsible for the loss of efficacy of DBS at very high frequencies. This analysis provides further support for the hypothesis that

  9. Regularity and predictability of human mobility in personal space.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel; Cross, Robin M; Hayes, Tamara; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental laws governing human mobility have many important applications such as forecasting and controlling epidemics or optimizing transportation systems. These mobility patterns, studied in the context of out of home activity during travel or social interactions with observations recorded from cell phone use or diffusion of money, suggest that in extra-personal space humans follow a high degree of temporal and spatial regularity - most often in the form of time-independent universal scaling laws. Here we show that mobility patterns of older individuals in their home also show a high degree of predictability and regularity, although in a different way than has been reported for out-of-home mobility. Studying a data set of almost 15 million observations from 19 adults spanning up to 5 years of unobtrusive longitudinal home activity monitoring, we find that in-home mobility is not well represented by a universal scaling law, but that significant structure (predictability and regularity) is uncovered when explicitly accounting for contextual data in a model of in-home mobility. These results suggest that human mobility in personal space is highly stereotyped, and that monitoring discontinuities in routine room-level mobility patterns may provide an opportunity to predict individual human health and functional status or detect adverse events and trends.

  10. Mathematical strategies for filtering complex systems: Regularly spaced sparse observations

    SciTech Connect

    Harlim, J. Majda, A.J.

    2008-05-01

    Real time filtering of noisy turbulent signals through sparse observations on a regularly spaced mesh is a notoriously difficult and important prototype filtering problem. Simpler off-line test criteria are proposed here as guidelines for filter performance for these stiff multi-scale filtering problems in the context of linear stochastic partial differential equations with turbulent solutions. Filtering turbulent solutions of the stochastically forced dissipative advection equation through sparse observations is developed as a stringent test bed for filter performance with sparse regular observations. The standard ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) has poor skill on the test bed and even suffers from filter divergence, surprisingly, at observable times with resonant mean forcing and a decaying energy spectrum in the partially observed signal. Systematic alternative filtering strategies are developed here including the Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (FDKF) and various reduced filters called Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (SDAF), Variance Strongly Damped Approximate Filter (VSDAF), and Reduced Fourier Domain Kalman Filter (RFDKF) which operate only on the primary Fourier modes associated with the sparse observation mesh while nevertheless, incorporating into the approximate filter various features of the interaction with the remaining modes. It is shown below that these much cheaper alternative filters have significant skill on the test bed of turbulent solutions which exceeds ETKF and in various regimes often exceeds FDKF, provided that the approximate filters are guided by the off-line test criteria. The skill of the various approximate filters depends on the energy spectrum of the turbulent signal and the observation time relative to the decorrelation time of the turbulence at a given spatial scale in a precise fashion elucidated here.

  11. Effective regularity in modulation on gastric motility induced by different acupoint stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Qing; Zhu, Bing; Rong, Pei-Jing; Ben, Hui; Li, Yan-Hua

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether manual acupuncture at representative acupoints in different parts of the body can modulate responses of gastric motility in rats and regular effects in different acupoint stimulation. METHODS: The gastric motor activity of rats was recorded by the intrapyloric balloon. The changes of gastric motility induced by the stimulation were compared with the background activity in intragastric pressure and/or waves of gastric contraction recorded before any stimulation. Morphological study was also conducted by observing the Evans dye extravasation in the skin after mustard oil injection into the intragastric mucous membrane to certify cutaneous innervations of blue dots related to gastric segmental innervations. RESULTS: In all six rats that received mustard oil injections into intragastric mucosa, small blue dots appeared in the skin over the whole abdomen, but mainly in peri-midline upper- and middle- abdomen and middle-back, a few in thigh and groin. It may speculate that cutaneous innervations of blue dots have the same distribution as gastric segmental innervations. Acu-stimulation in acupoints of head-neck, four limbs, upper chest-dorsum and lower-dorsum induced markedly augmentation of gastric motility (acupoints on head-neck such as St-2: n = 16, 105.19 ± 1.36 vs 112.25 ± 2.02 and St-3: n = 14, 101.5 ± 1.75 vs 109.36 ± 1.8; acupoints on limbs such as Sp-6: n = 19, 100.74 ± 1.54 vs 110.26 ± 3.88; St-32: n = 17, 103.59 ± 1.64 vs 108.24 ± 2.41; St-36: n = 16, 104.81 ± 1.72 vs 110.81 ± 2.74 and Li-11: n = 17, 106.47 ± 2.61 vs 114.77 ± 3.77, P < 0.05-0.001). Vigorous inhibitory regulations of gastric motility induced by acu-stimulation applied in acupoints on whole abdomen and middle-dorsum were significantly different as compared with the controls before acu-stimulation (abdomen acupoints such as Cv-12: n = 11, 109.36 ± 2.09 vs 101 ± 2.21; Cv-6: n = 18, 104.39 ± 1.42 vs 91.83 ± 3.22 and St-21: n = 12, 107 ± 2.97 vs 98.58

  12. New properties of BK-spaces defined by using regular matrix of Fibonacci numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, Sinan; Bektaş, ćiǧdem A.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we studied the new properties of BK-spaces which were defined using regular matrix of Fibonacci numbers in [1]. We computed alpha-, beta-, gamma- duals of these spaces and obtained Schauder basis. We also derived some topological properties of these spaces.

  13. Visualization of Sound Waves Using Regularly Spaced Soap Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, F.; Hutzler, S.; Ferreira, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel demonstration experiment for the visualization and measurement of standing sound waves in a tube. The tube is filled with equally spaced soap films whose thickness varies in response to the amplitude of the sound wave. The thickness variations are made visible based on optical interference. The distance between two antinodes is…

  14. 14 CFR 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... awards-regular and special. 1259.201 Section 1259.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A regular... cost if funded by another Federal entity. (b) A special Space Grant program or project award may...

  15. 14 CFR 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... awards-regular and special. 1259.201 Section 1259.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A regular... cost if funded by another Federal entity. (b) A special Space Grant program or project award may...

  16. Besov Space Regularity Conditions for Weak Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farwig, Reinhard; Sohr, Hermann; Varnhorn, Werner

    2014-06-01

    Consider a bounded domain with smooth boundary, some initial value , and a weak solution u of the Navier-Stokes system in . Our aim is to develop regularity and uniqueness conditions for u which are based on the Besov space with ; here A denotes the Stokes operator. This space, introduced by Farwig et al. (Ann. Univ. Ferrara 55:89-110, 2009 and J. Math. Fluid Mech. 14: 529-540, 2012), is a subspace of the well known Besov space , see Amann (Nonhomogeneous Navier-Stokes Equations with Integrable Low-Regularity Data. Int. Math. Ser. pp. 1-28. Kluwer/Plenum, New York, 2002). Our main results on the regularity of u exploits a variant of the space in which the integral in time has to be considered only on finite intervals (0, δ ) with . Further we discuss several criteria for uniqueness and local right-hand regularity, in particular, if u satisfies Serrin's limit condition . Finally, we obtain a large class of regular weak solutions u defined by a smallness condition with some constant.

  17. The existence results and Tikhonov regularization method for generalized mixed variational inequalities in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to establish the Tikhonov regularization method for generalized mixed variational inequalities in Banach spaces. For this purpose, we firstly prove a very general existence result for generalized mixed variational inequalities, provided that the mapping involved has the so-called mixed variational inequality property and satisfies a rather weak coercivity condition. Finally, we establish the Tikhonov regularization method for generalized mixed variational inequalities. Our findings extended the results for the generalized variational inequality problem (for short, GVIP(F, K)) in R^n spaces (He in Abstr Appl Anal, 2012) to the generalized mixed variational inequality problem (for short, GMVIP(F,φ , K) ) in reflexive Banach spaces. On the other hand, we generalized the corresponding results for the generalized mixed variational inequality problem (for short, GMVIP(F,φ ,K) ) in R^n spaces (Fu and He in J Sichuan Norm Univ (Nat Sci) 37:12-17, 2014) to reflexive Banach spaces.

  18. 14 CFR § 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... awards-regular and special. § 1259.201 Section § 1259.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS... Project Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A... its cost if funded by another Federal entity. (b) A special Space Grant program or project award...

  19. 14 CFR 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Types of Space Grant program and project... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL SPACE GRANT COLLEGE AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Program and Project Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A...

  20. 14 CFR 1259.201 - Types of Space Grant program and project awards-regular and special.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Types of Space Grant program and project... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL SPACE GRANT COLLEGE AND FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Space Grant Program and Project Awards § 1259.201 Types of Space Grant program and project awards—regular and special. (a) A...

  1. A linear regularization scheme for inverse problems with unbounded linear operators on Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohr, Holger

    2013-06-01

    This paper extends the linear regularization scheme known as the approximate inverse to unbounded linear operators on Banach spaces. The principle of feature reconstruction is adapted from bounded operators to the unbounded scenario and, in addition, a new situation is examined where the data need to be pre-processed to fit into the mathematical model. In all these cases, invariance and regularization properties are surveyed and established for the example of fractional differentiation. Numerical results confirm the derived characteristics of the presented methods.

  2. Hanke-Raus heuristic rule for variational regularization in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qinian

    2016-08-01

    We generalize the heuristic parameter choice rule of Hanke-Raus for quadratic regularization to general variational regularization for solving linear as well as nonlinear ill-posed inverse problems in Banach spaces. Under source conditions formulated as variational inequalities, we obtain a posteriori error estimates in term of the Bregman distance. By imposing certain conditions on the random noise, we establish four convergence results; one relies on the source conditions and the other three do not depend on any source conditions. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the performance.

  3. Radio stimulation and diagnostics of space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Min-Chang

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the small-scale topside ionospheric plasma structures first observed at Millstone Hill, Massachusetts with the 440 MHz incoherent scatter radar. These small-scale obliquely propagating plasma modes occurring in the vicinity of the midlatitude ionospheric trough, have large radar cross-sections and narrow spectral widths. They have, until recently, been dismissed solely as hard target contamination of the incoherent scatter radar. The geophysical conditions associated with the ionospheric trough, such as the field-aligned current activity and steep plasma density gradients, suggest that these recently discovered small-scale topside ionospheric plasmas may also appear in the auroral and polar ionosphere. In fact, this speculation has been corroborated by the preliminary experiments and data analyses at Tromso, Norway and Sondrestromfjord, Greenland. The primary research results are highlighted. Described in Section 3 are the experiments conducted at Arecibo, Puerto Rico in the past summer for simulating the geophysical conditions of generating these topside ionospheric plasma structures. Recommendation for the future research is finally given. Attached as the appendix of this report are several chapters which present the detailed results of research in the concerned topside ionospheric clutter. Highlights of the research results include: (1) causes of the enhanced radar backscatter (ERB) phenomenon; (2) occurrence of the ERB phenomenon; (3) altitudes of the ERB phenomenon; (4) strength of the ERB returns; (5) range of altitudes of the ERB returns; (6) occurrence frequency of the ERB phenomenon; (7) Doppler effect of the ERB phenomenon; (8) persistency of the ERB; and (9) distinction between ERB phenomenon and space object signatures.

  4. Integration of Building Knowledge Into Binary Space Partitioning for the Reconstruction of Regularized Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.; Jung, J.; Sohn, G.; Kada, M.; Ehlers, M.

    2015-09-01

    Recent approaches for the automatic reconstruction of 3D building models from airborne point cloud data integrate prior knowledge of roof shapes with the intention to improve the regularization of the resulting models without lessening the flexibility to generate all real-world occurring roof shapes. In this paper, we present a method to integrate building knowledge into the data-driven approach that uses binary space partitioning (BSP) for modeling the 3D building geometry. A retrospective regularization of polygons that emerge from the BSP tree is not without difficulty because it has to deal with the 2D BSP subdivision itself and the plane definitions of the resulting partition regions to ensure topological correctness. This is aggravated by the use of hyperplanes during the binary subdivision that often splits planar roof regions into several parts that are stored in different subtrees of the BSP tree. We therefore introduce the use of hyperpolylines in the generation of the BSP tree to avoid unnecessary spatial subdivisions, so that the spatial integrity of planar roof regions is better maintained. The hyperpolylines are shown to result from basic building roof knowledge that is extracted based on roof topology graphs. An adjustment of the underlying point segments ensures that the positions of the extracted hyperpolylines result in regularized 2D partitions as well as topologically correct 3D building models. The validity and limitations of the approach are demonstrated on real-world examples.

  5. A convergence rates result for an iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton-Halley method in Banach space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, B.

    2015-01-01

    The use of second order information on the forward operator often comes at a very moderate additional computational price in the context of parameter identification problems for differential equation models. On the other hand the use of general (non-Hilbert) Banach spaces has recently found much interest due to its usefulness in many applications. This motivates us to extend the second order method from Kaltenbacher (2014 Numer. Math. at press), (see also Hettlich and Rundell 2000 SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 37 587620) to a Banach space setting and analyze its convergence. We here show rates results for a particular source condition and different exponents in the formulation of Tikhonov regularization in each step. This includes a complementary result on the (first order) iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method in case of a one-homogeneous data misfit term, which corresponds to exact penalization. The results clearly show the possible advantages of using second order information, which get most pronounced in this exact penalization case. Numerical simulations for an inverse source problem for a nonlinear elliptic PDE illustrate the theoretical findings.

  6. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser from periodically spaced nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, J.

    2009-09-15

    A periodic lattice of nanoparticles supports an electrostatic mode of space charge oscillations with frequency lying in a narrow band and varying periodically around {omega}{sub pe}/{radical}(3) with the wave number, where {omega}{sub pe} is the plasma frequency of electrons inside a nanoparticle. A laser impinged on such a lattice undergoes stimulated Raman scattering producing backward sideband electromagnetic radiation. The growth rate is maximum around the pump frequency {omega}{sub 0}=0.75{omega}{sub pe}, and then decreases gradually.

  7. Learning an L1-regularized Gaussian Bayesian network in the equivalence class space.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, Diego; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2010-10-01

    Learning the structure of a graphical model from data is a common task in a wide range of practical applications. In this paper, we focus on Gaussian Bayesian networks, i.e., on continuous data and directed acyclic graphs with a joint probability density of all variables given by a Gaussian. We propose to work in an equivalence class search space, specifically using the k-greedy equivalence search algorithm. This, combined with regularization techniques to guide the structure search, can learn sparse networks close to the one that generated the data. We provide results on some synthetic networks and on modeling the gene network of the two biological pathways regulating the biosynthesis of isoprenoids for the Arabidopsis thaliana plant.

  8. Learning an L1-regularized Gaussian Bayesian network in the equivalence class space.

    PubMed

    Vidaurre, Diego; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2010-10-01

    Learning the structure of a graphical model from data is a common task in a wide range of practical applications. In this paper, we focus on Gaussian Bayesian networks, i.e., on continuous data and directed acyclic graphs with a joint probability density of all variables given by a Gaussian. We propose to work in an equivalence class search space, specifically using the k-greedy equivalence search algorithm. This, combined with regularization techniques to guide the structure search, can learn sparse networks close to the one that generated the data. We provide results on some synthetic networks and on modeling the gene network of the two biological pathways regulating the biosynthesis of isoprenoids for the Arabidopsis thaliana plant. PMID:20083459

  9. A pseudo-differential calculus on non-standard symplectic space; Spectral and regularity results in modulation spaces

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Nuno Costa; de Gosson, Maurice; Luef, Franz; Prata, João Nuno

    2011-01-01

    The usual Weyl calculus is intimately associated with the choice of the standard symplectic structure on Rn⊕Rn. In this paper we will show that the replacement of this structure by an arbitrary symplectic structure leads to a pseudo-differential calculus of operators acting on functions or distributions defined, not on Rn but rather on Rn⊕Rn. These operators are intertwined with the standard Weyl pseudo-differential operators using an infinite family of partial isometries of L2(Rn)→L2(R2n) indexed by S(Rn). This allows us to obtain spectral and regularity results for our operators using Shubinʼs symbol classes and Feichtingerʼs modulation spaces. PMID:22158824

  10. Regular structures of the lunar Orientale Basin: ring spacing and beads-like collars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    The NASA's GRAIL mission produced unprecedented detailed gravity maps of the lunar subsurface as its measurements (from very low orbits - 55 -23 kilometers) included some depths of the satellite (down to the core?). However, one might say that these maps have repeated in some aspects the principal gravity pattern acquired earlier by Clementine [1] and Kaguya missions (Fig. 3), which shows the surface densely "peppered" by evensized "craters" about 100 km in diameter. The wave planetology admits that many of them are of an impact origin but a bulk is due to an intersection of standing waves produced by the two elliptical orbit of the body (Fig. 2). The lunar community should realize that one of bases of the Moon's geology - crater size -frequency curve is of a complex nature. Impacts surely contribute to this curve but a significant part of it is due to ring structures of non-impact origin. Ring structures can be produced by an interference of standing inertiagravity waves of four directions (ortho- and diagonal) warping any rotating celestial body moving in an elliptical orbit (Fig. 2) [2]. Many ring structures observed on solid and gaseous planetary spheres are of such profound nature. They form regular grids of shoulder-to-shoulder even ring structures (Fig. 1-3). Their sizes depend on orbiting frequencies: the higher frequency- the smaller "rings", and vice versa. Satellites having two orbiting frequencies in the Solar system are particularly "peppered" with rings as a low frequency modulates a high one producing along with the main ring populations the side populations [3]. Recent MOONKAM lunar images (GRAIL mission) at the first time show so clearly intersecting planetary scale lineations (imprint of standing waves) producing chains and grids of ring features (Fig. 5-6; a theoretical model-Fig. 2). This wave woven pattern with spacing and beads has to be compared with a real gravity pattern of Fig. 1. Multi-ring spacing with the factor of √ 2 and collars

  11. Stimulated coherent emission from short electron bunches in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, G.R.M.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Ginzburg, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    In previous papers stimulated coherent emission of short electron bunches (superradiance-SR) was considered in the frame of 1-D models. In the present work we study superradiance of an electron bunch which has a finite transverse size in the frame of a 2-D model. This model include effects of optical guiding as well as transverse electromagnetic energy escaping and diffraction. Using a nonstationary parabolic equation we described SR of a sheet shaped electron bunch in free space. It is shown that the radiation is composed of a sequence of e.m. pulses which are diffracted after escaping from the channel formed by the electron beam. This process is accompanied by a progressive increase of the electron efficiency. This enhancement is caused by the phenomenon of permanent self supporting resonance due to the variation of the radiation angle and frequency.

  12. Plasma instabilities stimulated by HF transmitters in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1988-01-01

    Diffuse incoherent signal returns are often observed on Alouette and ISIS topside ionograms in addition to coherent echoes of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves. These diffuse signals, which at times can be the dominant features on topside ionograms, have been attributed to sounder-induced temperature anisotropies which drive the Harris instability. Previous theoretical investigations were based on the electrostatic approximation to the dispersion equation. The present paper will present calculations indicating that when the electromagnetic terms are retained in the dispersion equation and when the sounder-stimulated perpendicular electron temperature approaches 1 keV, then the whistler mode can have a temporal growth rate larger than the electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic wave mode central to the diffuse resonance problem. Present sounders lack the power and antenna lengths to generate whistler mode waves in this manner. In addition, such waves would have large group velocities and would quickly leave the vicinity of the sounder. Experiments to investigate the wave growth, propagation, and damping of such stimulated waves are planned for the 1990s using a highly flexible sounder on the Space Shuttle and a receiver on a subsatellite.

  13. Plasma instabilities stimulated by HF transmitters in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1988-08-01

    Diffuse incoherent signal returns are often observed on Alouette and ISIS topside ionograms in addition to coherent echoes of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves. These diffuse signals, which at times can be the dominant features on topside ionograms, have been attributed to sounder-induced temperature anisotropies which drive the Harris instability. Previous theoretical investigations were based on the electrostatic approximation to the dispersion equation. The present paper will present calculations indicating that when the electromagnetic terms are retained in the dispersion equation and when the sounder-stimulated perpendicular electron temperature approaches 1 keV, then the whistler mode can have a temporal growth rate larger than the electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic wave mode central to the diffuse resonance problem. Present sounders lack the power and antenna lengths to generate whistler mode waves in this manner. In addition, such waves would have large group velocities and would quickly leave the vicinity of the sounder. Experiments to investigate the wave growth, propagation, and damping of such stimulated waves are planned for the 1990s using a highly flexible sounder on the Space Shuttle and a receiver on a subsatellite.

  14. Inference of gene regulatory networks incorporating multi-source biological knowledge via a state space model with L1 regularization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Rui; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is a major challenge in the field of systems biology. Currently, there are two main approaches in GRN analysis using time-course observation data, namely an ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based approach and a statistical model-based approach. The ODE-based approach can generate complex dynamics of GRNs according to biologically validated nonlinear models. However, it cannot be applied to ten or more genes to simultaneously estimate system dynamics and regulatory relationships due to the computational difficulties. The statistical model-based approach uses highly abstract models to simply describe biological systems and to infer relationships among several hundreds of genes from the data. However, the high abstraction generates false regulations that are not permitted biologically. Thus, when dealing with several tens of genes of which the relationships are partially known, a method that can infer regulatory relationships based on a model with low abstraction and that can emulate the dynamics of ODE-based models while incorporating prior knowledge is urgently required. To accomplish this, we propose a method for inference of GRNs using a state space representation of a vector auto-regressive (VAR) model with L1 regularization. This method can estimate the dynamic behavior of genes based on linear time-series modeling constructed from an ODE-based model and can infer the regulatory structure among several tens of genes maximizing prediction ability for the observational data. Furthermore, the method is capable of incorporating various types of existing biological knowledge, e.g., drug kinetics and literature-recorded pathways. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown through a comparison of simulation studies with several previous methods. For an application example, we evaluated mRNA expression profiles over time upon corticosteroid stimulation in rats, thus incorporating corticosteroid

  15. Inference of gene regulatory networks incorporating multi-source biological knowledge via a state space model with L1 regularization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Rui; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is a major challenge in the field of systems biology. Currently, there are two main approaches in GRN analysis using time-course observation data, namely an ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based approach and a statistical model-based approach. The ODE-based approach can generate complex dynamics of GRNs according to biologically validated nonlinear models. However, it cannot be applied to ten or more genes to simultaneously estimate system dynamics and regulatory relationships due to the computational difficulties. The statistical model-based approach uses highly abstract models to simply describe biological systems and to infer relationships among several hundreds of genes from the data. However, the high abstraction generates false regulations that are not permitted biologically. Thus, when dealing with several tens of genes of which the relationships are partially known, a method that can infer regulatory relationships based on a model with low abstraction and that can emulate the dynamics of ODE-based models while incorporating prior knowledge is urgently required. To accomplish this, we propose a method for inference of GRNs using a state space representation of a vector auto-regressive (VAR) model with L1 regularization. This method can estimate the dynamic behavior of genes based on linear time-series modeling constructed from an ODE-based model and can infer the regulatory structure among several tens of genes maximizing prediction ability for the observational data. Furthermore, the method is capable of incorporating various types of existing biological knowledge, e.g., drug kinetics and literature-recorded pathways. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown through a comparison of simulation studies with several previous methods. For an application example, we evaluated mRNA expression profiles over time upon corticosteroid stimulation in rats, thus incorporating corticosteroid

  16. MECSAT: Stimulating Minority Undergraduate Interest in Space Science and Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S. A.; Vaughn, G. A.; Brathwaite, K. A.; Amoa, K.; Flowers, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    MECSAT is a scientific balloon project to stimulate student interest in Space Science and exploration. The project is based in an urban, minority-serving undergraduate institution and participating students are Computer Science, Physics/Space Science, Environmental Science and Mathematics majors. The project provides a hands-on end-to-end microscale view of NASA missions including instrument selection and/or construction, flight simulation and dynamics, tracking and communications, recovery, data validation and analysis, and project management. Initial student experiments included a Geiger counter (cosmic rays), dust/particle collector, ozonesonde, weather data loggers, flight computer and communications equipment. Student experiments are components of existing curriculum including courses in Space Science, Remote Sensing, Networks and Data Communications, and Scientific Computing. Student response to the project has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic and anecdotal evidence shows a significantly increased interest in NASA science among the participating students. MECSAT is partially supported by the following NASA programs: MUCERPI, MUSPIN and the New York State Space Grant Consortium.

  17. The geometric β-function in curved space-time under operator regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, Susama

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, I compare the generators of the renormalization group flow, or the geometric β-functions, for dimensional regularization and operator regularization. I then extend the analysis to show that the geometric β-function for a scalar field theory on a closed compact Riemannian manifold is defined on the entire manifold. I then extend the analysis to find the generator of the renormalization group flow to conformally coupled scalar-field theories on the same manifolds. The geometric β-function in this case is not defined.

  18. Regularities in the frequency spacings of Delta Scuti stars and the s-f Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, M.; Lenz, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    Statistical analyses of several δ Scuti stars (FG Vir, 44 Tau, BL Cam and others) show that the photometrically observed frequencies cluster around the frequencies of the radial modes over many radial orders. The observed regularities can be partly explained by modes trapped in the stellar envelope. This mode selection mechanism was already proposed by Dziembowski & Krolikowska (1990) and was shown to be efficient for ℓ = 1 modes. New pulsation model calculations confirm the observed regularities. We present the s-f diagram, which compares the average separation of the radial frequen- cies (s) with the frequency of the lowest unstable radial mode (f ). The diagram provides an estimate for the log g value of the observed star, if we assume that the centers of the observed frequency clusters correspond to the radial mode frequencies. This assumption is confirmed by examples of well-studied δ Scuti variables in which radial modes were definitely identified.

  19. Unexpected Series of Regular Frequency Spacing of δ Scuti Stars in the Non-asymptotic Regime. I. The Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparó, M.; Benkő, J. M.; Hareter, M.; Guzik, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    A sequence search method was developed to search the regular frequency spacing in δ Scuti stars through visual inspection and an algorithmic search. We searched for sequences of quasi-equally spaced frequencies, containing at least four members per sequence, in 90 δ Scuti stars observed by CoRoT. We found an unexpectedly large number of independent series of regular frequency spacing in 77 δ Scuti stars (from one to eight sequences) in the non-asymptotic regime. We introduce the sequence search method presenting the sequences and echelle diagram of CoRoT 102675756 and the structure of the algorithmic search. Four sequences (echelle ridges) were found in the 5-21 d-1 region where the pairs of the sequences are shifted (between 0.5 and 0.59 d-1) by twice the value of the estimated rotational splitting frequency (0.269 d-1). The general conclusions for the whole sample are also presented in this paper. The statistics of the spacings derived by the sequence search method, by FT (Fourier transform of the frequencies), and the statistics of the shifts are also compared. In many stars more than one almost equally valid spacing appeared. The model frequencies of FG Vir and their rotationally split components were used to formulate the possible explanation that one spacing is the large separation while the other is the sum of the large separation and the rotational frequency. In CoRoT 102675756, the two spacings (2.249 and 1.977 d-1) are in better agreement with the sum of a possible 1.710 d-1 large separation and two or one times, respectively, the value of the rotational frequency.

  20. Unexpected series of regular frequency spacing of δ Scuti stars in the non-asymptotic regime - I. The methodology

    DOE PAGES

    Paparo, M.; Benko, J. M.; Hareter, M.; Guzik, J. A.

    2016-05-11

    In this study, a sequence search method was developed to search the regular frequency spacing in δ Scuti stars through visual inspection and an algorithmic search. We searched for sequences of quasi-equally spaced frequencies, containing at least four members per sequence, in 90 δ Scuti stars observed by CoRoT. We found an unexpectedly large number of independent series of regular frequency spacing in 77 δ Scuti stars (from one to eight sequences) in the non-asymptotic regime. We introduce the sequence search method presenting the sequences and echelle diagram of CoRoT 102675756 and the structure of the algorithmic search. Four sequencesmore » (echelle ridges) were found in the 5–21 d–1 region where the pairs of the sequences are shifted (between 0.5 and 0.59 d–1) by twice the value of the estimated rotational splitting frequency (0.269 d–1). The general conclusions for the whole sample are also presented in this paper. The statistics of the spacings derived by the sequence search method, by FT (Fourier transform of the frequencies), and the statistics of the shifts are also compared. In many stars more than one almost equally valid spacing appeared. The model frequencies of FG Vir and their rotationally split components were used to formulate the possible explanation that one spacing is the large separation while the other is the sum of the large separation and the rotational frequency. In CoRoT 102675756, the two spacings (2.249 and 1.977 d–1) are in better agreement with the sum of a possible 1.710 d–1 large separation and two or one times, respectively, the value of the rotational frequency.« less

  1. Disentangling regular and chaotic motion in the standard map using complex network analysis of recurrences in phase space.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Donner, Reik V; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Recurrence in the phase space of complex systems is a well-studied phenomenon, which has provided deep insights into the nonlinear dynamics of such systems. For dissipative systems, characteristics based on recurrence plots have recently attracted much interest for discriminating qualitatively different types of dynamics in terms of measures of complexity, dynamical invariants, or even structural characteristics of the underlying attractor's geometry in phase space. Here, we demonstrate that the latter approach also provides a corresponding distinction between different co-existing dynamical regimes of the standard map, a paradigmatic example of a low-dimensional conservative system. Specifically, we show that the recently developed approach of recurrence network analysis provides potentially useful geometric characteristics distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits. We find that chaotic orbits in an intermittent laminar phase (commonly referred to as sticky orbits) have a distinct geometric structure possibly differing in a subtle way from those of regular orbits, which is highlighted by different recurrence network properties obtained from relatively short time series. Thus, this approach can help discriminating regular orbits from laminar phases of chaotic ones, which presents a persistent challenge to many existing chaos detection techniques. PMID:26931601

  2. Disentangling regular and chaotic motion in the standard map using complex network analysis of recurrences in phase space.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Donner, Reik V; Thiel, Marco; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Recurrence in the phase space of complex systems is a well-studied phenomenon, which has provided deep insights into the nonlinear dynamics of such systems. For dissipative systems, characteristics based on recurrence plots have recently attracted much interest for discriminating qualitatively different types of dynamics in terms of measures of complexity, dynamical invariants, or even structural characteristics of the underlying attractor's geometry in phase space. Here, we demonstrate that the latter approach also provides a corresponding distinction between different co-existing dynamical regimes of the standard map, a paradigmatic example of a low-dimensional conservative system. Specifically, we show that the recently developed approach of recurrence network analysis provides potentially useful geometric characteristics distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits. We find that chaotic orbits in an intermittent laminar phase (commonly referred to as sticky orbits) have a distinct geometric structure possibly differing in a subtle way from those of regular orbits, which is highlighted by different recurrence network properties obtained from relatively short time series. Thus, this approach can help discriminating regular orbits from laminar phases of chaotic ones, which presents a persistent challenge to many existing chaos detection techniques.

  3. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  4. Towards the theory of regular accelerating Universe in Riemann-Cartan space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkevich, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The problems of modern cosmology and attempts of its solution are considered. The applying of gravitation theory in the Riemann-Cartan space-time as the most natural generalization of Einstein gravitation theory in order to solve the principal cosmological problems is discussed. The gravitation theory in the Riemann-Cartan space-time leading to the solution of the problem of cosmological singularity and dark energy problem is analyzed.

  5. The IVP for the Benjamin-Ono-Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in low regularity Sobolev spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Alysson; Pastor, Ademir

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the initial-value problem associated with the Benjamin-Ono-Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. Such equation appears as a two-dimensional generalization of the Benjamin-Ono equation when transverse effects are included via weak dispersion of Zakharov-Kuznetsov type. We prove that the initial-value problem is locally well-posed in the usual L2 (R2)-based Sobolev spaces Hs (R2), s > 11 / 8, and in some weighted Sobolev spaces. To obtain our results, most of the arguments are accomplished taking into account the ones for the Benjamin-Ono equation.

  6. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncay, Ç.

    2009-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various works in the literature which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the mentioned real signals.

  7. Statistical bias and variance for the regularized inverse problem: Application to space-based atmospheric CO2 retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressie, N.; Wang, R.; Smyth, M.; Miller, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere is typically achieved through measurements that are high-resolution radiance spectra. In this article, our goal is to characterize the first-moment and second-moment properties of the errors obtained when solving the regularized inverse problem associated with space-based atmospheric CO2 retrievals, specifically for the dry air mole fraction of CO2 in a column of the atmosphere. The problem of estimating (or retrieving) state variables is usually ill posed, leading to a solution based on regularization that is often called Optimal Estimation (OE). The difference between the estimated state and the true state is defined to be the retrieval error; error analysis for OE uses a linear approximation to the forward model, resulting in a calculation where the first moment of the retrieval error (the bias) is identically zero. This is inherently unrealistic and not seen in real or simulated retrievals. Nonzero bias is expected since the forward model of radiative transfer is strongly nonlinear in the atmospheric state. In this article, we extend and improve OE's error analysis based on a first-order, multivariate Taylor series expansion, by inducing the second-order terms in the expansion. Specifically, we approximate the bias through the second derivative of the forward model, which results in a formula involving the Hessian array. We propose a stable estimate of it, from which we obtain a second-order expression for the bias and the mean square prediction error of the retrieval.

  8. Direct measurement instrument for lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces using a scanning tunneling microscope and laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerkkumsup, Pongpun; Aketagawa, Masato; Takada, Koji; Watanabe, Tomonori; Sadakata, Shin

    2003-03-01

    An instrument for direct measurement of the lattice spacing on regular crystalline surfaces, which incorporates a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a phase modulation homodyne interferometer (PMHI), was developed. Our aim was to verify the applicability of the length measurement method in which the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface obtained with the STM is used as a fine scale and the optical interference fringe, i.e., wavelength λ, of the PMHI is used as a coarse scale. The instrument consists of a STM head with a YZ axes tip scanner, a precise X-axis sample stage with flexure springs, and the PMHI with a four-path differential configuration. Combining the movements of the YZ-axes tip scanner and the X-axis sample stage, the instrument can perform long atomic STM imaging of the crystalline surface along the X axis, which is also the fast scanning axis for eliminating thermal drift. The relative displacement of the X-axis sample stage between optical interference dark fringes (=null points) of the PMHI, which is λ/16 times the integer value in the design, can be measured with a resolution of 10 pm or less using the phase modulation technique. The lattice spacing on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystalline surface was measured by comparing the number of atoms in the atomic STM image of 100 nm length with the optical fringes of the PMHI. The mean and expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the lattice spacing between α sites of the HOPG surface were 0.246 nm and 7 pm, respectively. The mean value was very close to that reported by Park and Quate [Sang-II Park and C. F. Quate, Appl. Phys. Lett. 48, 112 (1986)]. The experimental results also show the feasibility of realizing length measurement using the lattice spacing on the crystalline surface and the PMHI.

  9. Stimulating effect of space flight factors on Artemia cysts: comparison with irradiation by gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubin, Y.; Pianezzi, B.; Gasset, G.; Plannel, H.; Kovalev, E.E.

    1986-06-01

    The Artemia cyst, a gastrula in dormant state, is a very suitable material to investigate the individual effects of HZE cosmic particles. Monolayers of Artemia cysts, sandwiched with nuclear emulsions, flew aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1129. The space flight stimulated the developmental capacity expressed by higher percentages of emergence, hatching, and alive nauplii at day 4-5. A greater mean life span was reported in Artemias developed from Artemia cysts hit by the cosmic heavy ions. On Earth, Artemia cysts were exposed to 1, 10, 100, 200 and 400 Gy of gamma (gamma) rays. A stimulating effect on developmental capacity was observed for 10 Gy; the mean life span was significantly increased for this dose. These results are discussed in comparison with previous investigations performed on Earth and in space.

  10. Thermally stimulated currents and space charge studies on field-aged extruded cable material

    SciTech Connect

    Amyot, N.; Pelissou, S.; Toureille, A.

    1996-12-31

    In the perspective of gaining more knowledge on extruded cable field aging diagnosis, complementary techniques were investigated: thermally stimulated currents (TSC) and space charge measurements, the latter being performed by the thermal step (TS) method. Measurements were taken on 28 kV extruded cable samples of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). Samples were peeled-off from three cables; one unaged and two field-aged. Both techniques show differences between field-aged and unaged cable material. Results obtained by TS show that aged material can store more space charges that lead to greater intensity of the electrical field in some sites in the polymer matrix and eventually initiate electrical trees leading to breakdown. Comparison with TSC results show that the origin of space charge formation cannot be attributed uniquely to traps formed by carbonyl groups from polymer oxidation.

  11. Application of Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution for improving image quality of free space propagation x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongxing; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-11-21

    New x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques without using synchrotron radiation confront a common problem from the negative effects of finite source size and limited spatial resolution. These negative effects swamp the fine phase contrast fringes and make them almost undetectable. In order to alleviate this problem, deconvolution procedures should be applied to the blurred x-ray phase contrast images. In this study, three different deconvolution techniques, including Wiener filtering, Tikhonov regularization and Fourier-wavelet regularized deconvolution (ForWaRD), were applied to the simulated and experimental free space propagation x-ray phase contrast images of simple geometric phantoms. These algorithms were evaluated in terms of phase contrast improvement and signal-to-noise ratio. The results demonstrate that the ForWaRD algorithm is most appropriate for phase contrast image restoration among above-mentioned methods; it can effectively restore the lost information of phase contrast fringes while reduce the amplified noise during Fourier regularization.

  12. Unexpected series of regular frequency spacing of δ Scuti stars in the non-asymptotic regime. II. Sample-Echelle diagrams and rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Paparo, M.; Benko, J. M.; Hareter, M.; Guzik, J. A.

    2016-06-17

    A sequence search method was developed for searching for regular frequency spacing in δ Scuti stars by visual inspection (VI) and algorithmic search. The sample contains 90 δ Scuti stars observed by CoRoT. An example is given to represent the VI. The algorithm (SSA) is described in detail. The data treatment of the CoRoT light curves, the criteria for frequency filtering, and the spacings derived by two methods (i.e., three approaches: VI, SSA, and FT) are given for each target. Echelle diagrams are presented for 77 targets for which at least one sequence of regular spacing was identified. Comparing the spacing and the shifts between pairs of echelle ridges revealed that at least one pair of echelle ridges is shifted to midway between the spacing for 22 stars. The estimated rotational frequencies compared to the shifts revealed rotationally split doublets, triplets, and multiplets not only for single frequencies, but for the complete echelle ridges in 31 δ Scuti stars. Furthermore, using several possible assumptions for the origin of the spacings, we derived the large separation (more » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}\

  13. Unusual visual stimulation in dynamic balance conditions: proposal for a space motion sickness test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séverac, Alexandra; Bessou, Paul; Pagès, Bernard

    1994-08-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficiency of normal vision/unusual vestibular cues conflict to induce motion sickness. In the present study, we investigate whether, inversely, unusual visual information/normal vestibular function conflict also elicited motion sickness. The experiments were again carried out in dynamic balance conditions to increase proprioceptive input. Circular translation of the visual field with diplopia were produced by rotating Fresnel prismatic glasses. The stimulation triggered SMS-like symptoms and dynamic balance disturbance. A positive relationship was found between discomfort and balance disturbance. Unusual visual information should therefore be included in Space Motion Sickness susceptibility testing.

  14. Growth stimulation in inflorescences of an Arabidopsis tubulin mutant under microgravity conditions in space.

    PubMed

    Hoson, T; Soga, K; Wakabayashi, K; Hashimoto, T; Karahara, I; Yano, S; Tanigaki, F; Shimazu, T; Kasahara, H; Masuda, D; Kamisaka, S

    2014-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are involved in plant resistance to hypergravity, but their roles in resistance to 1 g gravity are still uncertain. To clarify this point, we cultivated an Arabidopsis α-tubulin 6 mutant (tua6) in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility on the Kibo Module of the International Space Station, and analyzed growth and cell wall mechanical properties of inflorescences. Growth of inflorescence stems was stimulated under microgravity conditions, as compared with ground and on-orbit 1 g conditions. The stems were 10-45% longer and their growth rate 15-55% higher under microgravity conditions than those under both 1 g conditions. The degree of growth stimulation tended to be higher in the tua6 mutant than the wild-type Columbia. Under microgravity conditions, the cell wall extensibility in elongating regions of inflorescences was significantly higher than the controls, suggesting that growth stimulation was caused by cell wall modifications. No clear differences were detected in any growth or cell wall property between ground and on-orbit 1 g controls. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules generally play an important role in plant resistance to the gravitational force.

  15. Third Spaces and Video-Stimulated Recall: An Exploration of Teachers' Cultural Role in an Indigenous Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Blair

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the use of video-stimulated recall as a reflective approach for supporting the development of third spaces in action research. The concept of third spaces is used as a conceptual descriptor of the specific intercultural context and relations between the researcher and participants present within the project. The paper…

  16. Simulation of Canopy CO2/H2O Fluxes for a Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) Plantation in Central Cambodia: The Effect of the Regular Spacing of Planted Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Wen; Giambelluca, Thomas; Kobayashi, N.; Lim, Tiva Khan; Jomura, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Huang, Maoyi; Chen, Qi; Ziegler, Alan; Yin, Song

    2013-09-10

    We developed a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model applicable to simulating CO2 and H2O fluxes from the canopies of rubber plantations, which are characterized by distinct canopy clumping produced by regular spacing of plantation trees. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.) plantations, which are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially change the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with traditional land covers it is replacing. Describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations via SVAT modeling is therefore essential to understanding the impacts on environmental processes. The regular spacing of plantation trees creates a peculiar canopy structure that is not well represented in most SVAT models, which generally assumes a non-uniform spacing of vegetation. Herein we develop a SVAT model applicable to rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure of rubber plantations affects canopy CO2 and H2O exchanges. Model results are compared with measurements collected at a field site in central Cambodia. Our findings suggest that it is crucial to account for intensive canopy clumping in order to reproduce observed rubber plantation fluxes. These results suggest a potentially optimal spacing of rubber trees to produce high productivity and water use efficiency.

  17. Changes in sodium activity during light stimulation in photoreceptors, glia and extracellular space in drone retina.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Orkand, R K

    1985-05-01

    Ion-selective micro-electrodes were used to measure Na+ activity, aNa, in the two types of cell, photoreceptors and glial cells, and in the extracellular space, in superfused slices of the retina of the honey-bee drone, Apis mellifera male. Movements of Na+ were induced by light stimulation, or by increasing [K+] in the superfusate. In the dark, aNa in the photoreceptors was 10 mM (S.E. of the mean = 1 mM); in the glial cells it was higher: 37 +/- 2 mM. We estimate that in this preparation about 2/3 of the free Na+ in the tissue is in the glial cells. Stimulation with a train of light flashes, 1 s-1 for 90 s caused aNa in the photoreceptors to increase by 16 +/- 2 mM. K+ activity, aK, decreased by 21 +/- 3 mM. During the standard train of light flashes, aNa in glial cells decreased by only 1.5 +/- 0.3 mM, much less than the increase in aK (7 +/- 2 mM). One possible interpretation of this result is that most of the increase in aK is due to K+ uptake by a mechanism other than Na+-K+ exchange. In extracellular fluid, stimulation caused aNa to fall to a relatively steady value in about 10 s. Unlike aK, there was no tendency for aNa to return to the base line during the remainder of the 90 s stimulation. The fall in aNa was 14 +/- 1 mM: a greater fall is prevented by extracellular electric currents and a decrease in extracellular volume. When [K+] in the superfusate was increased from 7.5 to 18 mM, aNa decreased in the glial cells but not in the photoreceptors. In this tissue, stimulation causes changes in aNa in the neurones that might be large enough to modify the biochemistry of the cells. But in the glia, the fractional changes are small.

  18. Development of a Local Size Hierarchy Causes Regular Spacing of Trees in an Even-aged Abies Forest: Analyses Using Spatial Autocorrelation and the Mark Correlation Function

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoshi N.; Kachi, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims During the development of an even-aged plant population, the spatial distribution of individuals often changes from a clumped pattern to a random or regular one. The development of local size hierarchies in an Abies forest was analysed for a period of 47 years following a large disturbance in 1959. Methods In 1980 all trees in an 8 × 8 m plot were mapped and their height growth after the disturbance was estimated. Their mortality and growth were then recorded at 1- to 4-year intervals between 1980 and 2006. Spatial distribution patterns of trees were analysed by the pair correlation function. Spatial correlations between tree heights were analysed with a spatial autocorrelation function and the mark correlation function. The mark correlation function was able to detect a local size hierarchy that could not be detected by the spatial autocorrelation function alone. Key Results The small-scale spatial distribution pattern of trees changed from clumped to slightly regular during the 47 years. Mortality occurred in a density-dependent manner, which resulted in regular spacing between trees after 1980. The spatial autocorrelation and mark correlation functions revealed the existence of tree patches consisting of large trees at the initial stage. Development of a local size hierarchy was detected within the first decade after the disturbance, although the spatial autocorrelation was not negative. Local size hierarchies that developed persisted until 2006, and the spatial autocorrelation became negative at later stages (after about 40 years). Conclusions This is the first study to detect local size hierarchies as a prelude to regular spacing using the mark correlation function. The results confirm that use of the mark correlation function together with the spatial autocorrelation function is an effective tool to analyse the development of a local size hierarchy of trees in a forest. PMID:18599560

  19. Alpha stimulation of the human parietal cortex attunes tactile perception to external space.

    PubMed

    Ruzzoli, Manuela; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2014-02-01

    An intriguing question in neuroscience concerns how somatosensory events on the skin are represented in the human brain. Since Head and Holmes' [1] neuropsychological dissociation between localizing touch on the skin and localizing body parts in external space, touch is considered to operate in a variety of spatial reference frames [2]. At least two representations of space are in competition during orienting to touch: a somatotopic one, reflecting the organization of the somatosensory cortex (S1) [3], and a more abstract, external reference frame that factors postural changes in relation to body parts and/or external space [4, 5]. Previous transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) plays a key role in supporting representations as well as orienting attention in an external reference frame [4, 6]. Here, we capitalized on the TMS entrainment approach [7, 8], targeting the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). We found that frequency-specific (10 Hz) tuning of the PPC induced spatially specific enhancement of tactile detection that was expressed in an external reference frame. This finding establishes a tight causal link between a concrete form of brain activity (10 Hz oscillation) and a specific type of spatial representation, revealing a fundamental property of how the parietal cortex encodes information. PMID:24440394

  20. Perceptual Spaces Induced by Cochlear Implant All-Polar Stimulation Mode.

    PubMed

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McKay, Colette M

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. To reduce this spread, an alternative stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with five participants. It was designed to activate all the electrodes simultaneously with appropriate current levels and polarities to recruit narrower regions of auditory nerves at specific intracochlear electrode positions (denoted all-polar electrodes). In this study, the all-polar mode was compared with the current commercial stimulation mode: the monopolar mode. The participants were asked to judge the sound dissimilarity between pairs of two-electrode pulse-train stimuli that differed in the electrode positions and were presented in either monopolar or all-polar mode with pulses on the two electrodes presented either sequentially or simultaneously. The dissimilarity ratings were analyzed using a multidimensional scaling technique and three-dimensional stimulus perceptual spaces were produced. For all the conditions (mode and simultaneity), the first perceptual dimension was highly correlated with the position of the most apical activated electrode of the electrical stimulation and the second dimension with the position of the most basal electrode. In both sequential and simultaneous conditions, the monopolar and all-polar stimuli were significantly separated by a third dimension, which may indicate that all-polar stimuli have a perceptual quality that differs from monopolar stimuli. Overall, the results suggest that both modes might successfully represent spectral information in a sound processing strategy. PMID:27604784

  1. Perceptual Spaces Induced by Cochlear Implant All-Polar Stimulation Mode

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Colette M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. To reduce this spread, an alternative stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with five participants. It was designed to activate all the electrodes simultaneously with appropriate current levels and polarities to recruit narrower regions of auditory nerves at specific intracochlear electrode positions (denoted all-polar electrodes). In this study, the all-polar mode was compared with the current commercial stimulation mode: the monopolar mode. The participants were asked to judge the sound dissimilarity between pairs of two-electrode pulse-train stimuli that differed in the electrode positions and were presented in either monopolar or all-polar mode with pulses on the two electrodes presented either sequentially or simultaneously. The dissimilarity ratings were analyzed using a multidimensional scaling technique and three-dimensional stimulus perceptual spaces were produced. For all the conditions (mode and simultaneity), the first perceptual dimension was highly correlated with the position of the most apical activated electrode of the electrical stimulation and the second dimension with the position of the most basal electrode. In both sequential and simultaneous conditions, the monopolar and all-polar stimuli were significantly separated by a third dimension, which may indicate that all-polar stimuli have a perceptual quality that differs from monopolar stimuli. Overall, the results suggest that both modes might successfully represent spectral information in a sound processing strategy. PMID:27604784

  2. Stimulated topological condensation of 'vapor phase' photons and possible implications for space power technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dudziak, M.; Pitkaenen, M.

    1999-01-22

    vacuum current presence. Whether this entire process, if it is feasible, could generate enough useful energy for spacecraft propulsion is a major open question. However, it does appear that in the least such a mechanism could provide for some type of quantum communication with storage of information in both phase and intensity of the coherent emf and with the vacuum currents acting as quantum antennae. An examination of certain models known as quantum cellular automata and networks (QCAM, CLAN) (Dudziak, 1993) and synchronized heterogeneous dynamical networks (SHDN) (Chinarov, 1998) may provide some further insight into how the suggested stimulated coherent production of photons might be initiated, controlled, and stabilized in an application for space travel or communication.

  3. Convergent and divergent effects of neck proprioceptive and visual motion stimulation on visual space processing in neglect.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Igor; Kerkhoff, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Visual motion stimulation as well as neck muscle vibration are known to effectively modulate the subjective body orientation in spatial neglect. However, so far only motion stimulation has been demonstrated to substantially influence size and space distortion in neglect patients. The present study aimed to compare the two stimulation methods with respect to their potentially differential impact on subjective body orientation and on space and size distortion, in five neglect patients showing perceptual distortions. We found comparable beneficial effects during left motion stimulation and left neck vibration for the subjective straight ahead. Additionally, left motion stimulation significantly ameliorated the leftward overextension in size matching, line bisection and distance estimation in all five patients. In contrast, during neck vibration only two patients showed an improvement for line bisection and size estimation and none did so for distance estimation. Since these two patients differed from the others as they had either no visual field defects or a major visual field sparing, we suggest--based on recent anatomical and neuropsychological findings--that neck vibration only tends to improve pure neglect-related visuo-perceptual distortions whereas motion stimulation can additionally improve perceptual distortions in neglect associated with hemianopia.

  4. Resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to 12C ion beams, stimulation of high-energy charged particles in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Junxiong; Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    To monitor the response of live microbes in space radiation environment with high-energy charged particles, we carry out ground stimulation radiation experiments. Spores of Bacillus (CGMCC 1.1849) species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. (12) C ion beams served as stimulated space radiation from 5gry, 10gry, 20gry, 40gry, to 80gry at a rate of 15gry/min Death rates are measured and mutant strains are isolated. Five representative strains are analyzed for their corresponding gene sequences, protein sequences and gene expression index of DNA repair system gene recA and recO. The statistic results showed the strains resistance to (12) C ion beams radiation is partially due to the increase of gene expression index of recA and recO. In conclusion, our research provide a surrogate system to monitor the live microbial response in resistant to space radiation environment.

  5. Formation of regularly spaced wetting ridges at 1 μm intervals on the surface of a liquid-crystalline polymer.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shu-hei; Yoshihara, Shu-suke; Kang, Sungmin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji

    2012-10-16

    A liquid-crystalline (LC) polymer melt coating a glass support shows a remarkable wetting ridge pattern resulting from a "stick-and-break" phenomenon when submerged into water at a velocity of 20 cm/s. A series of parallel, regularly spaced wetting ridges of 0.2 μm height are formed perpendicular to the advancing direction of the plate at 1 μm intervals, and the pattern continues over a wide area (1 × 2 cm(2)). The ridges function as a narrow line diffraction grating, similar to a prism that separates white light into the spectrum of colors. This process provides new insight into the controlled nanofabrication of polymers that is low-cost and high-throughput. PMID:23031253

  6. The effective intensity of Coriolis, cross-coupling stimulation is gravitoinertial force dependent: implications for space motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R; Graybiel, A

    1986-03-01

    Coriolis, cross-coupled angular acceleration stimulation readily induces motion sickness under terrestrial conditions. Nevertheless, the Skylab astronauts, when tested with such stimulation in-flight, were insusceptible even though each had been susceptible pre-flight. It is unclear whether this decreased susceptibility was the consequence of in-flight adaptation or in part the result of immediate changes in sensory-motor and vestibulo-motor function that occur during exposure to microgravity conditions. To evaluate this issue, we have tested individuals both in the high and low force phases of parabolic flight maneuvers using constant levels of Coriolis, cross-coupled stimulation. Our findings indicate that 1.) subjects are less susceptible when tested in 0 G than +2 Gz; 2.) the perceived intensity and provocativeness of Coriolis stimulation decreases in 0 G and increases in +2 Gz relative to +1 Gz baseline values; and 3.) changes in the apparent intensity of Coriolis stimulation occur virtually immediately when background gravitoinertial force level is varied. These findings explain in large part why the Skylab astronauts were refractory to motion sickness during Coriolis stimulation in-flight. The general implications for space motion sickness are discussed.

  7. Signal space separation algorithm and its application on suppressing artifacts caused by vagus nerve stimulation for magnetoencephalography recordings.

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Cui, Li; Gaa, Kathleen; Feffer, Lori; Taulu, Samu; Lee, Roland R; Huang, Mingxiong

    2009-12-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been successfully applied to presurgical epilepsy foci localization and brain functional mapping. Because the neuronal magnetic signals from the brain are extremely weak, MEG measurement requires both low environment noise and the subject/patient being free of artifact-generating metal objects. This strict requirement makes it hard for patients with vagus nerve stimulator, or other similar medical devices, to benefit from the presurgical MEG examinations. Therefore, an approach that can effectively reduce the environmental noise and faithfully recover the brain signals is highly desirable. We applied spatiotemporal signal space separation method, an advanced signal processing approach that can recover bio-magnetic signal from inside the MEG sensor helmet and suppress external disturbance from outside the helmet in empirical MEG measurements, on MEG recordings from normal control subjects and patients who has vagus nerve stimulator. The original MEG recordings were heavily contaminated, and the data could not be assessed. After applying temporal signal space separation, the strong external artifacts from outside the brain were successfully removed, and the neuronal signal from the human brain was faithfully recovered. Both of the goodness-of-fit and 95% confident limit volume confirmed the significant improvement after temporal signal space separation. Hence, temporal signal space separation makes presurgical MEG examinations possible for patients with implanted vagus nerve stimulator or similar medical devices.

  8. Application of a Rat Hindlimb Model: A Prediction of Force Spaces Reachable Through Stimulation of Nerve Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Will L.; Jindrich, Devin L.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.

    2011-01-01

    A device to generate standing or locomotion through chronically placed electrodes has not been fully developed due in part to limitations of clinical experimentation and the high number of muscle activation inputs of the leg. We investigated the feasibility of functional electrical stimulation paradigms that minimize the input dimensions for controlling the limbs by stimulating at nerve fascicles, utilizing a model of the rat hindlimb which combined previously collected morphological data with muscle physiological parameters presented herein. As validation of the model we investigated the suitability of a lumped-parameter model for prediction of muscle activation during dynamic tasks. Using the validated model we found that the space of forces producible through activation of muscle groups sharing common nerve fascicles was nonlinearly dependent on the number of discrete muscle groups that could be individually activated (equivalently, the neuroanatomical level of activation). Seven commonly innervated muscle groups were sufficient to produce 78% of the force space producible through individual activation of the 42 modeled hindlimb muscles. This novel, neuroanatomically derived reduction in input dimension emphasizes the potential to simplify controllers for functional electrical stimulation to improve functional recovery after a neuromuscular injury. PMID:21244999

  9. Studies on gene expressions analyses for Arabidopsis thaliana plants stimulated by space flight condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Pan, Yi; Li, Huasheng

    We carried out whole-genome microarray to screen the transcript profile of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings after three treatment: space microgravity condition( Seedlings grown in microgravity state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8), 1g centrifugal force in space(Seedlings grown in 1g centrifugal force state of space flight of SIMBOX on Shenzhou-8) and ground control. The result of microarray analysis is as followed: There were 368 genes significantly differentially expressed in space microgravity condition compared with that in 1g centrifuge space condition. Space radiation caused 246 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in 1g centrifuge space condition and ground control. Space conditions (including microgravity and radiation) caused 621 genes significantly differentially expressed between seedlings in space microgravity condition and ground control. Microgravity and radiation as a single factor can cause plant gene expression change, but two factors synergism can produce some new effects on plant gene expression. The function of differential expression genes were analyst by bioinformatics, and we found the expression of genes related with stress were more different, such as the dehydration of protein (dehydrin Xero2) expression is up-regulated 57 times; low-temperature-induced protein expression is up-regulated in 49 times; heat shock protein expression is up-regulated 20 times; transcription factor DREB2A expression increase 25 times; protein phosphatase 2C expression is up-regulated 14 times; transcription factor NAM-like protein expression is up-regulated 13 times; cell wall metabolism related genes (xyloglucan, endo-1, 4-beta-D-glucanase) expression is down-regulated in 15 times. The results provide scientific data for the mechanism of space mutation.

  10. Studies of plant gene expression and function stimulated by space microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Li, Huasheng; Zhao, Hui

    2016-07-01

    One of the important questions in space biology is how plants respond to an outer space environment i.e., how genetic expression is altered in space microgravity. In this study, the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings was analyzed as part of the Germany SIMBOX (Science in Microgravity Box) spaceflight experiment on Shenzhou 8. A gene chip was used to screen gene expression differences in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings between microgravity and 1g centrifugal force in space. Microarray analysis revealed that 368 genes were differentially expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated that these genes were involved in the plant's response to stress, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism, transcription, protein phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, transport and cell wall metabolism processes. Real time PCR was used to analyzed the miRNA expression including Arabidopsis miR160,miR161, miR394, miR402, miR403, and miR408. MiR408 was significantly upregulated. An overexpression vector of Arabidopsis miR408 was constructed and transferred to Arabidopsis plant. The roots of plants over expressing miR408 exhibited a slower reorientation upon gravistimulation in comparison with those of wild-type. This result indicated that miR408 could play a role in root gravitropic response.

  11. Cardiovascular response to lower body negative pressure stimulation before, during, and after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisch, F.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, G.; Wolfram, G.; Drescher, J.; Rome, J. L.; Drummer, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that space travel cause post-flight orthostatic hypotension and it was assumed that autonomic cardiovascular control deteriorates in space. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) was used to assess autonomic function of the cardiovascular system. METHODS: LBNP tests were performed on six crew-members before and on the first days post-flight in a series of three space missions. Additionally, two of the subjects performed LBNP tests in-flight. LBNP mimics fluid distribution of upright posture in a gravity independent way. It causes an artificial sequestration of blood, reduces preload, and filtrates plasma into the lower part of the body. Fluid distribution was assessed by bioelectrical impedance and anthropometric measurements. RESULTS: Heart rate, blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance increased significantly during LBNP experiments in-flight. The decrease in stroke volume, the increased pooling of blood, and the increased filtration of plasma into the lower limbs during LBNP indicated that a plasma volume reduction and a deficit of the interstitial volume of lower limbs rather than a change in cardiovascular control was responsible for the in-flight response. Post-flight LBNP showed no signs of cardiovascular deterioration. The still more pronounced haemodynamic changes during LBNP reflected the expected behaviour of cardiovascular control faced with less intravascular volume. In-flight, the status of an intra-and extravascular fluid deficit increases sympathetic activity, the release of vasoactive substances and consequently blood pressure. Post-flight, blood pressure decreases significantly below pre-flight values after restoration of volume deficits. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the cardiovascular changes in-flight are a consequence of a fluid deficit rather than a consequence of changes in autonomic signal processing.

  12. Simulated Space Radiation: Murine Skeletal Responses During Recovery and with Mechanical Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Zaragoza, Josergio; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Truong, Tiffany; Tahimic, Candice; Alwood, Joshua S.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Simulated space radiation at doses similar to those of solar particle events or a round-trip sojourn to Mars (1-2Gy) may cause skeletal tissue degradation and deplete stem/progenitor cell pools throughout the body. We hypothesized that simulated space radiation (SSR) causes late, time-dependent deficits in bone structure and bone cell function reflected by changes in gene expression in response to anabolic stimuli. We used a unique sequential dual ion exposure (proton and iron) for SSR to investigate time-dependence of responses in gene expression, cell function, and microarchitecture with respect to radiation and an anabolic stimulus of axial loading (AL). Male 16-wk C57BL6/J mice (n=120 total) were exposed to 0Gy (Sham, n=10), 56Fe (2Gy, positive control dose, n=10), or sequential ions for SSR (1Gy 1H/56Fe/1H, n=10) by total body irradiation (IR), and the tissues were harvested 2 or 6 mo. later. Further, to assess the response to anabolic stimuli, we subjected additional Sham-AL (n=15) and SSR-AL (n=15) groups to rest-inserted tibial axial loading (AL) starting at 1 and 5 months post-IR (-9N, 60 cycles/day, 3 days/wk, 4 wks). Exposure to 56Fe caused a significant reduction in cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV) compared to Sham (-34%) and SSR (-20%) in the proximal tibia metaphysis at 2-months post-IR; however BV/TV for SSR group was not different than Sham. Both 56Fe and SSR caused significant reduction in trabecular number (Tb.N) compared to Sham (-33% and -16%, respectively). Further, Tb.N for 56Fe (2Gy) was significantly lower than SSR (-21%). Ex vivo culture of marrow cells to assess growth and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells 6 months post-IR showed that both 56Fe and SSR exposures significantly impaired colony formation compared to Sham (-66% and -54%, respectively), as well as nodule mineralization (-90% and -51%, respectively). Two-way analysis of variance showed that both mechanical loading and radiation reduced BV/TV, mechanical loading

  13. Simulated Space Radiation: Murine Skeletal Responses During Recovery and with Mechanical Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Zaragoza, Josergio; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Truong, Tiffany; Tahimic, Candice; Alwood, Joshua S.; Castillo, Alesha B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Simulated space radiation at doses similar to those of solar particle events or a round-trip sojourn to Mars (1-2Gy) may cause skeletal tissue degradation and deplete stem/progenitor cell pools throughout the body. We hypothesized that simulated space radiation (SSR) causes late, time-dependent deficits in bone structure and bone cell function reflected by changes in gene expression in response to anabolic stimuli. We used a unique sequential dual ion exposure (proton and iron) for SSR to investigate time-dependence of responses in gene expression, cell function, and microarchitecture with respect to radiation and an anabolic stimulus of axial loading (AL). Male 16-wk C57BL6/J mice (n=120 total) were exposed to 0Gy (Sham, n=10), 56Fe (2Gy, positive control dose, n=10), or sequential ions for SSR (1Gy 1H/56Fe/1H, n=10) by total body irradiation (IR), and the tissues were harvested 2 or 6 mo. later. Further, to assess the response to anabolic stimuli, we subjected additional Sham-AL (n=15) and SSR-AL (n=15) groups to rest-inserted tibial axial loading (AL) starting at 1 and 5 months post-IR (-9N, 60 cycles/day, 3 days/wk, 4 wks). Exposure to 56Fe caused a significant reduction in cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV) compared to Sham (-34%) and SSR (-20%) in the proximal tibia metaphysis at 2-months post-IR; however BV/TV for SSR group was not different than Sham. Both 56Fe and SSR caused significant reduction in trabecular number (Tb.N) compared to Sham (-33% and -16%, respectively). Further, Tb.N for 56Fe (2Gy) was significantly lower than SSR (-21%). Ex vivo culture of marrow cells to assess growth and differentiation of osteoblast lineage cells 6 months post-IR showed that both 56Fe and SSR exposures significantly impaired colony formation compared to Sham (-66% and -54%, respectively), as well as nodule mineralization (-90% and -51%, respectively). Two-way analysis of variance showed that both mechanical loading and radiation reduced BV/TV, mechanical loading

  14. Subthalamic Stimulation Reduces Vowel Space at the Initiation of Sustained Production: Implications for Articulatory Motor Control in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, John J.; Alken, Amy G.; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stimulation of the subthalamic nuclei (STN) is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but complaints of speech difficulties after surgery have been difficult to quantify. Speech measures do not convincingly account for such reports. Objective: This study examined STN stimulation effects on vowel production, in order to probe whether DBS affects articulatory posturing. The objective was to compare positioning during the initiation phase with the steady prolongation phase by measuring vowel spaces for three “corner” vowels at these two time frames. Methods: Vowel space was measured over the initial 0.25 sec of sustained productions of high front (/i/), high back (/u/) and low vowels (/a/), and again during a 2 sec segment at the midpoint. Eight right-handed male subjects with bilateral STN stimulation and seven age-matched male controls were studied based on their participation in a larger study that included functional imaging. Mean values: age = 57±4.6 yrs; PD duration = 12.3±2.7 yrs; duration of DBS = 25.6±21.2 mos, and UPDRS III speech score = 1.6±0.7. STN subjects were studied off medication at their therapeutic DBS settings and again with their stimulators off, counter-balanced order. Results: Vowel space was larger in the initiation phase compared to the midpoint for both the control and the STN subjects off stimulation. With stimulation on, however, the initial vowel space was significantly reduced to the area measured at the mid-point. For the three vowels, the acoustics were differentially affected, in accordance with expected effects of front versus back position in the vocal tract. Conclusions: STN stimulation appears to constrain initial articulatory gestures for vowel production, raising the possibility that articulatory positions normally used in speech are similarly constrained. PMID:27003219

  15. Boundary Regularity in Variational Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jan; Mingione, Giuseppe

    2010-11-01

    We prove that, if {u : Ω subset mathbb{R}^n to mathbb{R}^N} is a solution to the Dirichlet variational problem mathop minlimitswint_{Ω} F(x, w, Dw) dx quad {subject to} quad w equiv u_0 onpartial Ω, involving a regular boundary datum ( u 0, ∂Ω) and a regular integrand F( x, w, Dw) strongly convex in Dw and satisfying suitable growth conditions, then {{mathcal H}^{n-1}} -almost every boundary point is regular for u in the sense that Du is Hölder continuous in a relative neighborhood of the point. The existence of even one such regular boundary point was previously not known except for some very special cases treated by J ost & M eier (Math Ann 262:549-561, 1983). Our results are consequences of new up-to-the-boundary higher differentiability results that we establish for minima of the functionals in question. The methods also allow us to improve the known boundary regularity results for solutions to non-linear elliptic systems, and, in some cases, to improve the known interior singular sets estimates for minimizers. Moreover, our approach allows for a treatment of systems and functionals with “rough” coefficients belonging to suitable Sobolev spaces of fractional order.

  16. The Volume of the Regular Octahedron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigg, Charles W.

    1974-01-01

    Five methods are given for computing the area of a regular octahedron. It is suggested that students first construct an octahedron as this will aid in space visualization. Six further extensions are left for the reader to try. (LS)

  17. Experiment aboard Russian satellite "Foton M2" in 2005: new approaches for study on stimulating effect of space flight on cell proliferation and regeneration in Urodela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Almeida, E.; Domaratskaya, E.; Tairbekov, M.; Aleinikova, K.; Mitashov, V.

    A study on space flight effect upon processes of regeneration is due to the necessity to know their characteristics in animals and human exposed to space and earth conditions shortly after flight Several experiments on the newts performed earlier aboard Russian biosatellites showed that the rate of organ and tissue regeneration in space was greater than that on the ground Space flight effect stimulating regeneration was enduring and apparent not only just after flight but long time later as well This observation found support in studies simulated physiological weightlessness by means of fast-rotating clinostat It was shown also that the higher rate of regeneration was associated with enhanced cell proliferation For instance we found that the number of cells in S-phase in regenerating tissues was significantly greater in space-flown animals than in the ground controls However it was unclear whether cell proliferation stimulation was induced by micro- g per se or by conditions of hyper- g during launching and re-adaptation on the earth Molecular mechanisms underlying the change also remained obscure These issues were addressed by the joint Russian-USA experiment Regeneration performed on Foton-M2 in 2005 In 16- day flight we used two well-known models of regeneration lens regeneration after lensectomy and tail regeneration after amputation in adult newts Pleurodeles walt Urodela In order to evaluate cell proliferative activity in time limits of microgravity influence the original method for in-flight delivering DNA precursor BrdU

  18. The effective intensity of Coriolis, cross-coupling stimulation is gravitoinertial force dependent - Implications for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the severity of the Coriolis-induced motion sickness was investigated in ten individuals subjected to high and low G-force phases of parabolic flight maneuvers using constant level Coriolis, cross-coupled angular acceleration stimulation. Using seven levels of severity in the diagnosis of motion sickness, it was found that the subjects were less susceptible at 0 G than at +2 Gz, and that the perceived intensity and provocativeness of Coriolis stimulation decreased in 0 G and increased in +2 Gz relative to the +1 Gz baseline values. The changes in the apparent intensity of Coriolis stimulation occur virtually immediately when the background gravitatioinertial force level is varied. These findings explain why the Skylab astronauts were refractory to motion sickness during Coriolis stimulation in-flight.

  19. Deep learning regularized Fisher mappings.

    PubMed

    Wong, W K; Sun, Mingming

    2011-10-01

    For classification tasks, it is always desirable to extract features that are most effective for preserving class separability. In this brief, we propose a new feature extraction method called regularized deep Fisher mapping (RDFM), which learns an explicit mapping from the sample space to the feature space using a deep neural network to enhance the separability of features according to the Fisher criterion. Compared to kernel methods, the deep neural network is a deep and nonlocal learning architecture, and therefore exhibits more powerful ability to learn the nature of highly variable datasets from fewer samples. To eliminate the side effects of overfitting brought about by the large capacity of powerful learners, regularizers are applied in the learning procedure of RDFM. RDFM is evaluated in various types of datasets, and the results reveal that it is necessary to apply unsupervised regularization in the fine-tuning phase of deep learning. Thus, for very flexible models, the optimal Fisher feature extractor may be a balance between discriminative ability and descriptive ability.

  20. Learning about Time within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity Is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan H.; Huang, Yung-Jen; Grau, James W.

    2016-01-01

    How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock) is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable), it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable) manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail). Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal) process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2) region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed. PMID:26903830

  1. Learning about Time within the Spinal Cord II: Evidence that Temporal Regularity Is Encoded by a Spinal Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan H; Huang, Yung-Jen; Grau, James W

    2016-01-01

    How a stimulus impacts spinal cord function depends upon temporal relations. When intermittent noxious stimulation (shock) is applied and the interval between shock pulses is varied (unpredictable), it induces a lasting alteration that inhibits adaptive learning. If the same stimulus is applied in a temporally regular (predictable) manner, the capacity to learn is preserved and a protective/restorative effect is engaged that counters the adverse effect of variable stimulation. Sensitivity to temporal relations implies a capacity to encode time. This study explores how spinal neurons discriminate variable and fixed spaced stimulation. Communication with the brain was blocked by means of a spinal transection and adaptive capacity was tested using an instrumental learning task. In this task, subjects must learn to maintain a hind limb in a flexed position to minimize shock exposure. To evaluate the possibility that a distinct class of afferent fibers provide a sensory cue for regularity, we manipulated the temporal relation between shocks given to two dermatomes (leg and tail). Evidence for timing emerged when the stimuli were applied in a coherent manner across dermatomes, implying that a central (spinal) process detects regularity. Next, we show that fixed spaced stimulation has a restorative effect when half the physical stimuli are randomly omitted, as long as the stimuli remain in phase, suggesting that stimulus regularity is encoded by an internal oscillator Research suggests that the oscillator that drives the tempo of stepping depends upon neurons within the rostral lumbar (L1-L2) region. Disrupting communication with the L1-L2 tissue by means of a L3 transection eliminated the restorative effect of fixed spaced stimulation. Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed.

  2. Dimensional regularization is generic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    The absence of the quadratic divergence in the Higgs sector of the Standard Model in the dimensional regularization is usually regarded to be an exceptional property of a specific regularization. To understand what is going on in the dimensional regularization, we illustrate how to reproduce the results of the dimensional regularization for the λϕ4 theory in the more conventional regularization such as the higher derivative regularization; the basic postulate involved is that the quadratically divergent induced mass, which is independent of the scale change of the physical mass, is kinematical and unphysical. This is consistent with the derivation of the Callan-Symanzik equation, which is a comparison of two theories with slightly different masses, for the λϕ4 theory without encountering the quadratic divergence. In this sense the dimensional regularization may be said to be generic in a bottom-up approach starting with a successful low energy theory. We also define a modified version of the mass independent renormalization for a scalar field which leads to the homogeneous renormalization group equation. Implications of the present analysis on the Standard Model at high energies and the presence or absence of SUSY at LHC energies are briefly discussed.

  3. Regular gravitational lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragon, Norbert

    1992-02-01

    The Einstein action with vanishing cosmological constant is for appropriate field content the unique local action which is regular at the fixed point of affine coordinate transformations. Imposing this regularity requirement one excludes also Wess-Zumino counterterms which trade gravitational anomalies for Lorentz anomalies. One has to expect dilatational and SL (D) anomalies. If these anomalies are absent and if the regularity of the quantum vertex functional can be controlled then Einstein gravity is renormalizable. On leave of absence from Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hannover, W-3000 Hannover 1, FRG.

  4. Regularization schemes and the multiplicative anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    1999-06-01

    Elizalde, Vanzo, and Zerbini have shown that the effective action of two free Euclidean scalar fields in flat space contains a `multiplicative anomaly' when ζ-function regularization is used. This is related to the Wodzicki residue. I show that there is no anomaly when using a wide range of other regularization schemes and that the anomaly can be removed by an unusual choice of renormalization scales. I define new types of anomalies and show that they have similar properties. Thus multiplicative anomalies encode no novel physics. They merely illustrate some dangerous aspects of ζ-function and Schwinger proper time regularization schemes.

  5. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  6. Economic impact of stimulated technological activity. Part 3: Case study, knowledge additions and earth links from space crew systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A case study of knowledge contributions from the crew life support aspect of the manned space program is reported. The new information needed to be learned, the solutions developed, and the relation of new knowledge gained to earthly problems were investigated. Illustrations are given in the following categories: supplying atmosphere for spacecraft; providing carbon dioxide removal and recycling; providing contaminant control and removal; maintaining the body's thermal balance; protecting against the space hazards of decompression, radiation, and meteorites; minimizing fire and blast hazards; providing adequate light and conditions for adequate visual performance; providing mobility and work physiology; and providing adequate habitability.

  7. Regularities of solar wind parameter changes based on spaced measurements at near-Earth orbit during cycles 20-24 as a basis for prediction of solar activity and space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Tamara

    Here we discuss parameters of the solar wind streams as consequences of activity of solar cycles 20-24. We use in the report results of our study of connection between solar wind parameters (IMF B, solar wind velocity V, concentration N, electric field Е = [V,B]) and IMF longitude angle U during period of SC20-24. We have used for the study data base of B, V, N, measured at 1 a.u. near ecliptic plane for period of 1963 - 2013.The azimuth component of IMF spiral corresponds to east-west component By (GSE) which plays important role in reconnection on magnetopause and in progress of geomagnetic activity. Resulting from the conducted study, main regularities determining relationship between solar wind parameters in each from SC20-24 have been derived. In particular, it was shown that E for By>0 has its maxima in each solar cycle at average U=80 deg, herewith the maxima for odd cycles (21, 23) are considerably larger than ones for even cycles (20, 22). Besides, the value of E for 23 cycle has the absolute maximum for By>0 among SC20-24! So, relative low value of maximum of sunspot number Wm=121 of SC23 is a parameter, which does not determine strength of solar wind electric field E and consequently geomagnetic activity. Geomagnetic index Dst(U) shows also absolute maximum of depression for cycle 23 at near the same U=80 deg. (By>0). B(U) is larger, Wm is larger for all U except interval for By>0, where B for odd cycles 21, 23 is higher than B for even ones 20,22. It should be noted that V (U) for SC with minimal Wm (20,23) has the highest maximum for By>0; maximum of V for By<0 are larger for even SC than for odd ones. V(U) for cycle 24 is less than V for the other SC for now, but V is increasing rapidly (HSS) for By<0 (as in SC22). Based on the results of the study and on spectral analysis of V and B for the interval studied (which allowed us to describe long-term parts of B,V by sinusoids), we conclude: the Sun may is going for a global minimum (near 2020) similar

  8. Seeking a Regularity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    This autoinstructional unit deals with the phenomena of regularity in chemical behavior. The prerequisites suggested are two other autoinstructional lessons (Experiments 1 and 2) identified in the Del Mod System as SE 018 020 and SE 018 023. The equipment needed is listed and 45 minutes is the suggested time allotment. The Student Guide includes…

  9. Light Localization and Stimulated Emission in InGaN/GaN Nanocolumns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inose, Y.; Ueda, H.; Shimosako, N.; Ema, K.; Igawa, Y.; Kishino, K.

    We report the dependence of stimulated emission phenomena on randomness in a collection of regularly arranged InGaN/GaN nanocolumns. By comparing the stimulated emission behavior for two samples with different degrees of randomness, we found that localization effects are inevitable even in the almost perfect sample, and several modes partially overlapping in space will compete with each other. The ultrafast dynamics of stimulated emission under femtosecond pulsed laser excitation were also investigated, and the emission peaks were observed to change with time.

  10. Transient effects in beam-plasma interactions in a space simulation chamber stimulated by a fast pulse electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, P. M.; Denig, W. F.; Anderson, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the interaction of electron beams with plasma generated by ionization caused by the primary electron beam was stimulated by the need to develop special vacuum tubes to operate in the kMHz frequency region. The experiments of Getty and Smullin (1963) indicated that the interaction of an energetic electron beam with its self-produced plasma resulted in the emission of wave energy over a wide range of frequencies associated with cyclotron and longitudinal plasma instabilities. This enhanced the thermal plasma density in the vicinity of the beam, and the term Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) was employed to described this phenomenon. The present investigation is concerned with some of the transient phenomena associated with wave emission during the beam switch-on and switch-off periods. Results are presented on the changes in electron energy spectra on a time scale of tens of milliseconds following beam switch-on. The results are discussed in terms of the beam plasma discharge phenomenon.

  11. Regularizing portfolio optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Susanne; Kondor, Imre

    2010-07-01

    The optimization of large portfolios displays an inherent instability due to estimation error. This poses a fundamental problem, because solutions that are not stable under sample fluctuations may look optimal for a given sample, but are, in effect, very far from optimal with respect to the average risk. In this paper, we approach the problem from the point of view of statistical learning theory. The occurrence of the instability is intimately related to over-fitting, which can be avoided using known regularization methods. We show how regularized portfolio optimization with the expected shortfall as a risk measure is related to support vector regression. The budget constraint dictates a modification. We present the resulting optimization problem and discuss the solution. The L2 norm of the weight vector is used as a regularizer, which corresponds to a diversification 'pressure'. This means that diversification, besides counteracting downward fluctuations in some assets by upward fluctuations in others, is also crucial because it improves the stability of the solution. The approach we provide here allows for the simultaneous treatment of optimization and diversification in one framework that enables the investor to trade off between the two, depending on the size of the available dataset.

  12. Space distribution of EEG responses to hanoi-moving visual and auditory stimulation with Fourier Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shijun; Wang, Yi; Bin, Guangyu; Huang, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Gang; Lv, Yanwei; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: The relationship between EEG source signals and action-related visual and auditory stimulation is still not well-understood. The objective of this study was to identify EEG source signals and their associated action-related visual and auditory responses, especially independent components of EEG. Methods: A hand-moving-Hanoi video paradigm was used to study neural correlates of the action-related visual and auditory information processing determined by mu rhythm (8–12 Hz) in 16 healthy young subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to identify separate EEG sources, and further computed in the frequency domain by applying-Fourier transform ICA (F-ICA). Results: F-ICA found more sensory stimuli-related independent components located within the sensorimotor region than ICA did. The total number of independent components of interest from F-ICA was 768, twice that of 384 from traditional time-domain ICA (p < 0.05). In the sensory-motor region C3 or C4, the total source signals intensity distribution values from all 14 subjects was 23.00 (Mean 1.64 ± 1.17) from F-ICA; which was more than the 10.5 (Mean 0.75 ± 0.62) from traditional time-domain ICA (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the intensity distribution of source signals in the C3 or C4 region was statistically significant between the ICA and F-ICA groups (strong 50 vs. 92%; weak 50 vs. 8% retrospectively; p < 0.05). In the Pz region, the total source signal intensity distribution from F-ICA was 12.50 (Mean 0.89 ± 0.53); although exceeding that of traditional time-domain ICA 8.20 (Mean 0.59 ± 0.48), the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that mu rhythm was sensitive to detection of the cognitive expression, which could be reflected by the function in the parietal lobe sensory-motor region. The results of this study could potentially be applied into early diagnosis for those with visual and hearing

  13. Regularized versus non-regularized statistical reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, N. V.

    2011-08-01

    An important feature of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) is the stochastic property of real clinical data. Statistical algorithms such as ordered subset-expectation maximization (OSEM) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) are a direct consequence of the stochastic nature of the data. The principal difference between these two algorithms is that OSEM is a non-regularized approach, while the MAP is a regularized algorithm. From the theoretical point of view, reconstruction problems belong to the class of ill-posed problems and should be considered using regularization. Regularization introduces an additional unknown regularization parameter into the reconstruction procedure as compared with non-regularized algorithms. However, a comparison of non-regularized OSEM and regularized MAP algorithms with fixed regularization parameters has shown very minor difference between reconstructions. This problem is analyzed in the present paper. To improve the reconstruction quality, a method of local regularization is proposed based on the spatially adaptive regularization parameter. The MAP algorithm with local regularization was tested in reconstruction of the Hoffman brain phantom.

  14. Higher-Order Global Regularity of an Inviscid Voigt-Regularization of the Three-Dimensional Inviscid Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, Adam; Titi, Edriss S.

    2014-03-01

    We prove existence, uniqueness, and higher-order global regularity of strong solutions to a particular Voigt-regularization of the three-dimensional inviscid resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Specifically, the coupling of a resistive magnetic field to the Euler-Voigt model is introduced to form an inviscid regularization of the inviscid resistive MHD system. The results hold in both the whole space and in the context of periodic boundary conditions. Weak solutions for this regularized model are also considered, and proven to exist globally in time, but the question of uniqueness for weak solutions is still open. Furthermore, we show that the solutions of the Voigt regularized system converge, as the regularization parameter , to strong solutions of the original inviscid resistive MHD, on the corresponding time interval of existence of the latter. Moreover, we also establish a new criterion for blow-up of solutions to the original MHD system inspired by this Voigt regularization.

  15. Higher-Order Global Regularity of an Inviscid Voigt-Regularization of the Three-Dimensional Inviscid Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios, Adam; Titi, Edriss S.

    2013-05-01

    We prove existence, uniqueness, and higher-order global regularity of strong solutions to a particular Voigt-regularization of the three-dimensional inviscid resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Specifically, the coupling of a resistive magnetic field to the Euler-Voigt model is introduced to form an inviscid regularization of the inviscid resistive MHD system. The results hold in both the whole space {{R}^3} and in the context of periodic boundary conditions. Weak solutions for this regularized model are also considered, and proven to exist globally in time, but the question of uniqueness for weak solutions is still open. Furthermore, we show that the solutions of the Voigt regularized system converge, as the regularization parameter {α → 0}, to strong solutions of the original inviscid resistive MHD, on the corresponding time interval of existence of the latter. Moreover, we also establish a new criterion for blow-up of solutions to the original MHD system inspired by this Voigt regularization.

  16. Mainstreaming the Regular Classroom Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Michael

    The paper presents activities, suggested by regular classroom teachers, to help prepare the regular classroom student for mainstreaming. The author points out that regular classroom children need a vehicle in which curiosity, concern, interest, fear, attitudes and feelings can be fully explored, where prejudices can be dispelled, and where the…

  17. Space station needs, attributes, and architectural options: Commercial opportunities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbers, H. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The roles of government and industry in the commercialization of space are examined and an approach for stimulating the interests of potential users is described. Several illustrative examples of potential commercial developments are presented. The role of manned space systems in space commercialization is discussed as well as some of the issues and opportunities that are likely to be encountered in the commercial exploitation of the unique characteristics of space. Results suggest that interest in space facilities can be found among a number of commercially oriented users. In order to develop and maintain the involvement of these potential users, however, space demonstrations are required, and commercial growth or evolution depends on the results of the initial in situ experience. Manned facilities are required for the conceptual research and development phases and for maintenance and servicing operations during production or operational missions. Space facilities must be easily accessible by dependable and regularly scheduled means.

  18. Stimulated Raman scattering from individual water and ethanol droplets at morphology-dependent resonances.

    PubMed

    Snow, J B; Qian, S X; Chang, R K

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from an individual liquid droplet (~30-microm radius) has been observed for H(2)O, D(2)O, and ethanol. The occurrence of a series of spectrally narrow peaks that are regularly spaced in wavelength is consistent with morphology-dependent resonances of the droplet, which acts as an optical resonator. The input intensity required to achieve the SRS threshold for the droplet is considerably less than that for the liquid in an optical cell.

  19. Electrically Stimulated Antagonist Muscle Contraction Increased Muscle Mass and Bone Mineral Density of One Astronaut - Initial Verification on the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yoshio; Yoshimitsu, Kazuhiro; Omoto, Masayuki; Hashida, Ryuki; Tagawa, Yoshihiko; Inada, Tomohisa; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal atrophy is one of the major problems of extended periods of exposure to weightlessness such as on the International Space Station (ISS). We developed the Hybrid Training System (HTS) to maintain an astronaut’s musculoskeletal system using an electrically stimulated antagonist to resist the volitional contraction of the agonist instead of gravity. The present study assessed the system’s orbital operation capability and utility, as well as its preventative effect on an astronaut’s musculoskeletal atrophy. Methods HTS was attached to the non-dominant arm of an astronaut staying on the ISS, and his dominant arm without HTS was established as the control (CTR). 10 sets of 10 reciprocal elbow curls were one training session, and 12 total sessions of training (3 times per week for 4 weeks) were performed. Pre and post flight ground based evaluations were performed by Biodex (muscle performance), MRI (muscle volume), and DXA (BMD, lean [muscle] mass, fat mass). Pre and post training inflight evaluations were performed by a hand held dynamometer (muscle force) and a measuring tape (upper arm circumference). Results The experiment was completed on schedule, and HTS functioned well without problems. Isokinetic elbow extension torque (Nm) changed -19.4% in HTS, and -21.7% in CTR. Isokinetic elbow flexion torque changed -23.7% in HTS, and there was no change in CTR. Total Work (Joule) of elbow extension changed -8.3% in HTS, and +0.3% in CTR. For elbow flexion it changed -23.3% in HTS and -32.6% in CTR. Average Power (Watts) of elbow extension changed +22.1% in HTS and -8.0% in CTR. For elbow flexion it changed -6.5% in HTS and -4.8% in CTR. Triceps muscle volume according to MRI changed +11.7% and that of biceps was +2.1% using HTS, however -0.1% and -0.4% respectively for CTR. BMD changed +4.6% in the HTS arm and -1.2% for CTR. Lean (muscle) mass of the arm changed only +10.6% in HTS. Fat mass changed -12.6% in HTS and -6.4% in CTR

  20. Augmenting saturated LTP by broadly spaced episodes of theta-burst stimulation in hippocampal area CA1 of adult rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guan

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model system for studying cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. Recent interest in mechanisms underlying the advantage of spaced over massed learning has prompted investigation into the effects of distributed episodes of LTP induction. The amount of LTP induced in hippocampal area CA1 by one train (1T) of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in young Sprague-Dawley rats was further enhanced by additional bouts of 1T given at 1-h intervals. However, in young Long-Evans (LE) rats, 1T did not initially saturate LTP. Instead, a stronger LTP induction paradigm using eight trains of TBS (8T) induced saturated LTP in hippocampal slices from both young and adult LE rats as well as adult mice. The saturated LTP induced by 8T could be augmented by another episode of 8T following an interval of at least 90 min. The success rate across animals and slices in augmenting LTP by an additional episode of 8T increased significantly with longer intervals between the first and last episodes, ranging from 0% at 30- and 60-min intervals to 13–66% at 90- to 180-min intervals to 90–100% at 240-min intervals. Augmentation above initially saturated LTP was blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-APV). These findings suggest that the strength of induction and interval between episodes of TBS, as well as the strain and age of the animal, are important components in the augmentation of LTP. PMID:25057146

  1. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  2. Regularization in radio tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Ramakrishnan; Martin, Richard; Anderson, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    This paper demonstrates methods to select and apply regularization to the linear least-squares model formulation of the radio tomographic imaging (RTI) problem. Typically, the RTI inverse problem of image reconstruction is ill-conditioned due to the extremely small singular values of the weight matrix which relates the link signal strengths to the voxel locations of the obstruction. Regularization is included to offset the non-invertible nature of the weight matrix by adding a regularization term such as the matrix approximation of derivatives in each dimension based on the difference operator. This operation yields a smooth least-squares solution for the measured data by suppressing the high energy or noise terms in the derivative of the image. Traditionally, a scalar weighting factor of the regularization matrix is identified by trial and error (adhoc) to yield the best fit of the solution to the data without either excessive smoothing or ringing oscillations at the boundaries of the obstruction. This paper proposes new scalar and vector regularization methods that are automatically computed based on the weight matrix. Evidence of the effectiveness of these methods compared to the preset scalar regularization method is presented for stationary and moving obstructions in an RTI wireless sensor network. The variation of the mean square reconstruction error as a function of the scalar regularization is calculated for known obstructions in the network. The vector regularization procedure based on selective updates to the singular values of the weight matrix attains the lowest mean square error.

  3. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  4. Nonconvex Regularization in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuia, Devis; Flamary, Remi; Barlaud, Michel

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of different regularizers and their implications in high dimensional image classification and sparse linear unmixing. Although kernelization or sparse methods are globally accepted solutions for processing data in high dimensions, we present here a study on the impact of the form of regularization used and its parametrization. We consider regularization via traditional squared (2) and sparsity-promoting (1) norms, as well as more unconventional nonconvex regularizers (p and Log Sum Penalty). We compare their properties and advantages on several classification and linear unmixing tasks and provide advices on the choice of the best regularizer for the problem at hand. Finally, we also provide a fully functional toolbox for the community.

  5. Rotating regular black hole solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    Based on the Newman-Janis algorithm, the Ayón-Beato-García spacetime metric [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5056 (1998)] of the regular spherically symmetric, static, and charged black hole has been converted into rotational form. It is shown that the derived solution for rotating a regular black hole is regular and the critical value of the electric charge for which two horizons merge into one sufficiently decreases in the presence of the nonvanishing rotation parameter a of the black hole.

  6. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARTRAND, RICK

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  7. Exploring the spectrum of regularized bosonic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ambjørn, J. Makeenko, Y.

    2015-03-15

    We implement a UV regularization of the bosonic string by truncating its mode expansion and keeping the regularized theory “as diffeomorphism invariant as possible.” We compute the regularized determinant of the 2d Laplacian for the closed string winding around a compact dimension, obtaining the effective action in this way. The minimization of the effective action reliably determines the energy of the string ground state for a long string and/or for a large number of space-time dimensions. We discuss the possibility of a scaling limit when the cutoff is taken to infinity.

  8. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197

  9. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  10. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  11. Sparse regularization for force identification using dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    The classical function expansion method based on minimizing l2-norm of the response residual employs various basis functions to represent the unknown force. Its difficulty lies in determining the optimum number of basis functions. Considering the sparsity of force in the time domain or in other basis space, we develop a general sparse regularization method based on minimizing l1-norm of the coefficient vector of basis functions. The number of basis functions is adaptively determined by minimizing the number of nonzero components in the coefficient vector during the sparse regularization process. First, according to the profile of the unknown force, the dictionary composed of basis functions is determined. Second, a sparsity convex optimization model for force identification is constructed. Third, given the transfer function and the operational response, Sparse reconstruction by separable approximation (SpaRSA) is developed to solve the sparse regularization problem of force identification. Finally, experiments including identification of impact and harmonic forces are conducted on a cantilever thin plate structure to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of SpaRSA. Besides the Dirac dictionary, other three sparse dictionaries including Db6 wavelets, Sym4 wavelets and cubic B-spline functions can also accurately identify both the single and double impact forces from highly noisy responses in a sparse representation frame. The discrete cosine functions can also successfully reconstruct the harmonic forces including the sinusoidal, square and triangular forces. Conversely, the traditional Tikhonov regularization method with the L-curve criterion fails to identify both the impact and harmonic forces in these cases.

  12. Regularization Analysis of SAR Superresolution

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DICKEY,FRED M.

    2002-04-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. In a previous report the application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar was investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. This work treats the problem from the standpoint of regularization. Both the operator inversion approach and the regularization approach show that the ability to superresolve SAR imagery is severely limited by system noise.

  13. Muscle Stimulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Goddard Space Flight Center contract, Electrologic of America was able to refine the process of densely packing circuitry on personal computer boards, providing significant contributions to the closed-loop systems for the Remote Manipulator System Simulator. The microcircuitry work was then applied to the StimMaster FES Ergometer, an exercise device used to stimulate muscles suffering from paralysis. The electrical stimulation equipment was developed exclusively for V-Care Health Systems, Inc. Product still commercially available as of March 2002.

  14. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  15. Learning rates of lq coefficient regularization learning with gaussian kernel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobo; Zeng, Jinshan; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2014-10-01

    Regularization is a well-recognized powerful strategy to improve the performance of a learning machine and l(q) regularization schemes with 0 < q < ∞ are central in use. It is known that different q leads to different properties of the deduced estimators, say, l(2) regularization leads to a smooth estimator, while l(1) regularization leads to a sparse estimator. Then how the generalization capability of l(q) regularization learning varies with q is worthy of investigation. In this letter, we study this problem in the framework of statistical learning theory. Our main results show that implementing l(q) coefficient regularization schemes in the sample-dependent hypothesis space associated with a gaussian kernel can attain the same almost optimal learning rates for all 0 < q < ∞. That is, the upper and lower bounds of learning rates for l(q) regularization learning are asymptotically identical for all 0 < q < ∞. Our finding tentatively reveals that in some modeling contexts, the choice of q might not have a strong impact on the generalization capability. From this perspective, q can be arbitrarily specified, or specified merely by other nongeneralization criteria like smoothness, computational complexity or sparsity.

  16. The Effect of Early Stimulation: The Problem of Focus in Developmental Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William

    Studies of the effect of environmental stimulation on an individual's development in either general or specific ability conclude that some specific stimulation should be introduced at an early age while a child is still malleable. An intense, persistent, and regular tutorial approach within the family encourages the development of a special talent…

  17. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  18. Distributional Stress Regularity: A Corpus Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temperley, David

    2009-01-01

    The regularity of stress patterns in a language depends on "distributional stress regularity", which arises from the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables, and "durational stress regularity", which arises from the timing of syllables. Here we focus on distributional regularity, which depends on three factors. "Lexical stress patterning"…

  19. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p < 0.05). Improvement in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III score (off medication, on stimulation) 12 months after the operation was higher for patients who underwent 3D-SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). The total electrical energy

  20. Regular Motions of Resonant Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se revisan resultados analiticos relativos a soluciones regulares del problema asteroidal eliptico promediados en la vecindad de una resonancia con jupiten Mencionamos Ia ley de estructura para libradores de alta excentricidad, la estabilidad de los centros de liberaci6n, las perturbaciones forzadas por la excentricidad de jupiter y las 6rbitas de corotaci6n. ABSTRAC This paper reviews analytical results concerning the regular solutions of the elliptic asteroidal problem averaged in the neighbourhood of a resonance with jupiter. We mention the law of structure for high-eccentricity librators, the stability of the libration centers, the perturbations forced by the eccentricity ofjupiter and the corotation orbits. Key words: ASThROIDS

  1. Energy functions for regularization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delingette, H.; Hebert, M.; Ikeuchi, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regularization techniques are widely used for inverse problem solving in computer vision such as surface reconstruction, edge detection, or optical flow estimation. Energy functions used for regularization algorithms measure how smooth a curve or surface is, and to render acceptable solutions these energies must verify certain properties such as invariance with Euclidean transformations or invariance with parameterization. The notion of smoothness energy is extended here to the notion of a differential stabilizer, and it is shown that to void the systematic underestimation of undercurvature for planar curve fitting, it is necessary that circles be the curves of maximum smoothness. A set of stabilizers is proposed that meet this condition as well as invariance with rotation and parameterization.

  2. Statistical regularities reduce perceived numerosity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiaying; Yu, Ru Qi

    2016-01-01

    Numerical information can be perceived at multiple levels (e.g., one bird, or a flock of birds). The level of input has typically been defined by explicit grouping cues, such as contours or connecting lines. Here we examine how regularities of object co-occurrences shape numerosity perception in the absence of explicit grouping cues. Participants estimated the number of colored circles in an array. We found that estimates were lower in arrays containing colors that consistently appeared next to each other across the experiment, even though participants were not explicitly aware of the color pairs (Experiments 1a and 1b). To provide support for grouping, we introduced color duplicates and found that estimates were lower in arrays with two identical colors (Experiment 2). The underestimation could not be explained by increased attention to individual objects (Experiment 3). These results suggest that statistical regularities reduce perceived numerosity consistent with a grouping mechanism. PMID:26451701

  3. New Two-Body Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    We present a new scheme to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations. It is a combination of Sundman's time transformation and Levi-Civita's spatial coordinate transformation applied to the two-dimensional components of the position and velocity vectors in the osculating orbital plane. We adopt a coordinate triad specifying the plane as a function of the orbital angular momentum vector only. Since the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum is explicitly computed from the in-the-plane components of the position and velocity vectors, only two components of the orbital angular momentum vector are to be determined. In addition to these, we select the total energy of the two-body system and the physical time as additional components of the new variables. The equations of motion of the new variables have no singularity even when the mutual distance is extremely small, and therefore, the new variables are suitable to deal with close encounters. As a result, the number of dependent variables in the new scheme becomes eight, which is significantly smaller than the existing schemes to avoid close encounters: two less than the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel and the Bürdet-Ferrandiz regularizations, and five less than the Sperling-Bürdet/Bürdet-Heggie regularization.

  4. Color correction optimization with hue regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Huaping; Quan, Shuxue

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that observers are capable of judging the quality of an image without any knowledge of the original scene. When no reference is available, observers can extract the apparent objects in an image and compare them with the typical colors of similar objects recalled from their memories. Some generally agreed upon research results indicate that although perfect colorimetric rendering is not conspicuous and color errors can be well tolerated, the appropriate rendition of certain memory colors such as skin, grass, and sky is an important factor in the overall perceived image quality. These colors are appreciated in a fairly consistent manner and are memorized with slightly different hues and higher color saturation. The aim of color correction for a digital color pipeline is to transform the image data from a device dependent color space to a target color space, usually through a color correction matrix which in its most basic form is optimized through linear regressions between the two sets of data in two color spaces in the sense of minimized Euclidean color error. Unfortunately, this method could result in objectionable distortions if the color error biased certain colors undesirably. In this paper, we propose a color correction optimization method with preferred color reproduction in mind through hue regularization and present some experimental results.

  5. On Nonperiodic Euler Flows with Hölder Regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isett, Philip; Oh, Sung-Jin

    2016-08-01

    In (Isett, Regularity in time along the coarse scale flow for the Euler equations, 2013), the first author proposed a strengthening of Onsager's conjecture on the failure of energy conservation for incompressible Euler flows with Hölder regularity not exceeding {1/3}. This stronger form of the conjecture implies that anomalous dissipation will fail for a generic Euler flow with regularity below the Onsager critical space {L_t^∞ B_{3,∞}^{1/3}} due to low regularity of the energy profile. This paper is the first and main paper in a series of two, the results of which may be viewed as first steps towards establishing the conjectured failure of energy regularity for generic solutions with Hölder exponent less than {1/5}. The main result of the present paper shows that any given smooth Euler flow can be perturbed in {C^{1/5-ɛ}_{t,x}} on any pre-compact subset of R× R^3 to violate energy conservation. Furthermore, the perturbed solution is no smoother than {C^{1/5-ɛ}_{t,x}}. As a corollary of this theorem, we show the existence of nonzero {C^{1/5-ɛ}_{t,x}} solutions to Euler with compact space-time support, generalizing previous work of the first author (Isett, Hölder continuous Euler flows in three dimensions with compact support in time, 2012) to the nonperiodic setting.

  6. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation Modern methods of the theory of complex systems allow to build mathematical models of complex systems where self-organizing processes are largely determined by nonlinear effects and feedback. However, there exist some factors that exert significant influence on the dynamics of geomorphosystems, but hardly can be adequately expressed in the language of mathematical models. Conceptual modeling allows us to overcome this difficulty. It is based on the methods of synergetic, which, together with the theory of dynamic systems and classical geomorphology, enable to display the dynamics of geomorphological systems. The most adequate for mathematical modeling of complex systems is the concept of model dynamics based on equilibrium. This concept is based on dynamic equilibrium, the tendency to which is observed in the evolution of all geomorphosystems. As an objective law, it is revealed in the evolution of fluvial relief in general, and in river channel processes in particular, demonstrating the ability of these systems to self-organization. Channel process is expressed in the formation of river reaches, rifts, meanders and floodplain. As floodplain is a periodically flooded surface during high waters, it naturally connects river channel with slopes, being one of boundary expressions of the water stream activity. Floodplain dynamics is inseparable from the channel dynamics. It is formed at simultaneous horizontal and vertical displacement of the river channel, that is at Y=Y(x, y), where х, y - horizontal and vertical coordinates, Y - floodplain height. When dу/dt=0 (for not lowering river channel), the river, being displaced in a horizontal plane, leaves behind a low surface, which flooding during high waters (total duration of flooding) changes from the maximum during the initial moment of time t0 to zero in the moment tn. In a similar manner changed is the total amount of accumulated material on the floodplain surface

  7. Knowledge and regularity in planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, John A.; Langley, Pat; Matwin, Stan

    1992-01-01

    The field of planning has focused on several methods of using domain-specific knowledge. The three most common methods, use of search control, use of macro-operators, and analogy, are part of a continuum of techniques differing in the amount of reused plan information. This paper describes TALUS, a planner that exploits this continuum, and is used for comparing the relative utility of these methods. We present results showing how search control, macro-operators, and analogy are affected by domain regularity and the amount of stored knowledge.

  8. Estimating signal loss in regularized GRACE gravity field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, S. C.; Wahr, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    Gravity field solutions produced using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are subject to errors that increase as a function of increasing spatial resolution. Two commonly used techniques to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the gravity field solutions are post-processing, via spectral filters, and regularization, which occurs within the least-squares inversion process used to create the solutions. One advantage of post-processing methods is the ability to easily estimate the signal loss resulting from the application of the spectral filter by applying the filter to synthetic gravity field coefficients derived from models of mass variation. This is a critical step in the construction of an accurate error budget. Estimating the amount of signal loss due to regularization, however, requires the execution of the full gravity field determination process to create synthetic instrument data; this leads to a significant cost in computation and expertise relative to post-processing techniques, and inhibits the rapid development of optimal regularization weighting schemes. Thus, while a number of studies have quantified the effects of spectral filtering, signal modification in regularized GRACE gravity field solutions has not yet been estimated. In this study, we examine the effect of one regularization method. First, we demonstrate that regularization can in fact be performed as a post-processing step if the solution covariance matrix is available. Regularization then is applied as a post-processing step to unconstrained solutions from the Center for Space Research (CSR), using weights reported by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales/Groupe de Recherches de geodesie spatiale (CNES/GRGS). After regularization, the power spectra of the CSR solutions agree well with those of the CNES/GRGS solutions. Finally, regularization is performed on synthetic gravity field solutions derived from a land surface model, revealing that in

  9. An Anisotropic Partial Regularity Criterion for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavica, Igor; Rusin, Walter; Ziane, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we address the partial regularity of suitable weak solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We prove an interior regularity criterion involving only one component of the velocity. Namely, if (u, p) is a suitable weak solution and a certain scale-invariant quantity involving only u 3 is small on a space-time cylinder {{Qr^{*}}(x_0,t_0)} , then u is regular at (x 0, t 0).

  10. "Space, the Final Frontier"; Books on Space and Space Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Advocates play in a child's life. Describes how science fiction seizes the imaginations of young readers with its tales of the future and of outer space. Talks about various nonfiction books about space. Elaborates a workshop on books about space exploration. Gives 10 questions about stimulating student response. (PA)

  11. Wave dynamics of regular and chaotic rays

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.W.

    1983-09-01

    In order to investigate general relationships between waves and rays in chaotic systems, I study the eigenfunctions and spectrum of a simple model, the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation in a stadium boundary, for which the rays are ergodic. Statistical measurements are performed so that the apparent randomness of the stadium modes can be quantitatively contrasted with the familiar regularities observed for the modes in a circular boundary (with integrable rays). The local spatial autocorrelation of the eigenfunctions is constructed in order to indirectly test theoretical predictions for the nature of the Wigner distribution corresponding to chaotic waves. A portion of the large-eigenvalue spectrum is computed and reported in an appendix; the probability distribution of successive level spacings is analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions. The two principal conclusions are: 1) waves associated with chaotic rays may exhibit randomly situated localized regions of high intensity; 2) the Wigner function for these waves may depart significantly from being uniformly distributed over the surface of constant frequency in the ray phase space.

  12. Regularized estimation of Euler pole parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktuğ, Bahadir; Yildirim, Ömer

    2013-07-01

    Euler vectors provide a unified framework to quantify the relative or absolute motions of tectonic plates through various geodetic and geophysical observations. With the advent of space geodesy, Euler parameters of several relatively small plates have been determined through the velocities derived from the space geodesy observations. However, the available data are usually insufficient in number and quality to estimate both the Euler vector components and the Euler pole parameters reliably. Since Euler vectors are defined globally in an Earth-centered Cartesian frame, estimation with the limited geographic coverage of the local/regional geodetic networks usually results in highly correlated vector components. In the case of estimating the Euler pole parameters directly, the situation is even worse, and the position of the Euler pole is nearly collinear with the magnitude of the rotation rate. In this study, a new method, which consists of an analytical derivation of the covariance matrix of the Euler vector in an ideal network configuration, is introduced and a regularized estimation method specifically tailored for estimating the Euler vector is presented. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the least squares estimation in terms of the mean squared error.

  13. Tessellating the Sphere with Regular Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Bechthold, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Tessellations in the Euclidean plane and regular polygons that tessellate the sphere are reviewed. The regular polygons that can possibly tesellate the sphere are spherical triangles, squares and pentagons.

  14. Methods for determining regularization for atmospheric retrieval problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Tilman

    2002-03-01

    The atmosphere of Earth has already been investigated by several spaceborne instruments, and several further instruments will be launched, e.g., NASA's Earth Observing System Aura platform and the European Space Agency's Environmental Satellite. To stabilize the results in atmospheric retrievals, constraints are used in the iteration process. Therefore hard constraints (discretization of the retrieval grid) and soft constraints (regularization operators) are included in the retrieval. Tikhonov regularization is often used as a soft constraint. In this study, different types of Tikhonov operator were compared, and several new methods were developed to determine the optimal strength of the constraint operationally. The resulting regularization parameters were applied successfully to an ozone retrieval from simulated nadir sounding spectra like those expected to be measured by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer, which is part of the Aura platform. Retrievals were characterized by means of estimated error, averaging kernel, vertical resolution, and degrees of freedom.

  15. A low-cost multichannel wireless neural stimulation system for freely roaming animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Monzurul; Chen, Xi; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Objectives. Electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural activity are the basis of many therapies and neural prostheses. Conventional stimulation systems have a number of practical limitations, especially in experiments involving freely roaming subjects. Our main objective was to develop a modular, versatile and inexpensive multichannel wireless system able to overcome some of these constraints. Approach. We have designed and implemented a new multichannel wireless neural stimulator based on commercial components. The system is small (2 cm × 4 cm × 0.5 cm) and light in weight (9 g) which allows it to be easily carried in a small backpack. To test and validate the performance and reliability of the whole system we conducted several bench tests and in vivo experiments. Main results. The performance and accuracy of the stimulator were comparable to commercial threaded systems. Stimulation sequences can be constructed on-the-fly with 251 selectable current levels (from 0 to 250 µA) with 1 µA step resolution. The pulse widths and intervals can be as long as 65 ms in 2 µs time resolution. The system covers approximately 10 m of transmission range in a regular laboratory environment and 100 m in free space (line of sight). Furthermore it provides great flexibility for experiments since it allows full control of the stimulator and the stimulation parameters in real time. When there is no stimulation, the device automatically goes into low-power sleep mode to preserve battery power. Significance. We introduce the design of a powerful multichannel wireless stimulator assembled from commercial components. Key features of the system are their reliability, robustness and small size. The system has a flexible design that can be modified straightforwardly to tailor it to any specific experimental need. Furthermore it can be effortlessly adapted for use with any kind of multielectrode arrays.

  16. Regular Pentagons and the Fibonacci Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doug

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how to draw a regular pentagon. Shows the sequence of a succession of regular pentagons formed by extending the sides. Calculates the general formula of the Lucas and Fibonacci sequences. Presents a regular icosahedron as an example of the golden ratio. (YP)

  17. Some Cosine Relations and the Regular Heptagon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Heng, Phongthong

    2007-01-01

    The ancient Greek mathematicians sought to construct, by use of straight edge and compass only, all regular polygons. They had no difficulty with regular polygons having 3, 4, 5 and 6 sides, but the 7-sided heptagon eluded all their attempts. In this article, the authors discuss some cosine relations and the regular heptagon. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Natural frequency of regular basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjandra, Sugih S.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    Similar to the vibration of a guitar string or an elastic membrane, water waves in an enclosed basin undergo standing oscillatory waves, also known as seiches. The resonant (eigen) periods of seiches are determined by water depth and geometry of the basin. For regular basins, explicit formulas are available. Resonance occurs when the dominant frequency of external force matches the eigen frequency of the basin. In this paper, we implement the conservative finite volume scheme to 2D shallow water equation to simulate resonance in closed basins. Further, we would like to use this scheme and utilizing energy spectra of the recorded signal to extract resonant periods of arbitrary basins. But here we first test the procedure for getting resonant periods of a square closed basin. The numerical resonant periods that we obtain are comparable with those from analytical formulas.

  19. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex PT-symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  20. Regularized degenerate multi-solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Francisco; Fring, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    We report complex {P}{T} -symmetric multi-soliton solutions to the Korteweg de-Vries equation that asymptotically contain one-soliton solutions, with each of them possessing the same amount of finite real energy. We demonstrate how these solutions originate from degenerate energy solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Technically this is achieved by the application of Darboux-Crum transformations involving Jordan states with suitable regularizing shifts. Alternatively they may be constructed from a limiting process within the context Hirota's direct method or on a nonlinear superposition obtained from multiple Bäcklund transformations. The proposed procedure is completely generic and also applicable to other types of nonlinear integrable systems.

  1. Effect of regular and decaffeinated coffee on serum gastrin levels.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, F; DeFrancesco, A; Andriulli, A; Piantino, P; Arrigoni, A; Massarenti, P; Balzola, F

    1986-04-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that the noncaffeine gastric acid stimulant effect of coffee might be by way of serum gastrin release. After 10 healthy volunteers drank 50 ml of coffee solution corresponding to one cup of home-made regular coffee containing 10 g of sugar and 240 mg/100 ml of caffeine, serum total gastrin levels peaked at 10 min and returned to basal values within 30 min; the response was of little significance (1.24 times the median basal value). Drinking 100 ml of sugared water (as control) resulted in occasional random elevations of serum gastrin which were not statistically significant. Drinking 100 ml of regular or decaffeinated coffee resulted in a prompt and lasting elevation of total gastrin; mean integrated outputs after regular or decaffeinated coffee were, respectively, 2.3 and 1.7 times the values in the control test. Regular and decaffeinated coffees share a strong gastrin-releasing property. Neither distension, osmolarity, calcium, nor amino acid content of the coffee solution can account for this property, which should be ascribed to some other unidentified ingredient. This property is at least partially lost during the process of caffeine removal. PMID:3745848

  2. A New Regularization Mechanism for the Boltzmann Equation Without Cut-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Luis

    2016-11-01

    We apply recent results on regularity for general integro-differential equations to derive a priori estimates in Hölder spaces for the space homogeneous Boltzmann equation in the non cut-off case. We also show an a priori estimate in {L^∞} which applies in the space inhomogeneous case as well, provided that the macroscopic quantities remain bounded.

  3. Bayesian regularization of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Burden, Frank; Winkler, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian regularized artificial neural networks (BRANNs) are more robust than standard back-propagation nets and can reduce or eliminate the need for lengthy cross-validation. Bayesian regularization is a mathematical process that converts a nonlinear regression into a "well-posed" statistical problem in the manner of a ridge regression. The advantage of BRANNs is that the models are robust and the validation process, which scales as O(N2) in normal regression methods, such as back propagation, is unnecessary. These networks provide solutions to a number of problems that arise in QSAR modeling, such as choice of model, robustness of model, choice of validation set, size of validation effort, and optimization of network architecture. They are difficult to overtrain, since evidence procedures provide an objective Bayesian criterion for stopping training. They are also difficult to overfit, because the BRANN calculates and trains on a number of effective network parameters or weights, effectively turning off those that are not relevant. This effective number is usually considerably smaller than the number of weights in a standard fully connected back-propagation neural net. Automatic relevance determination (ARD) of the input variables can be used with BRANNs, and this allows the network to "estimate" the importance of each input. The ARD method ensures that irrelevant or highly correlated indices used in the modeling are neglected as well as showing which are the most important variables for modeling the activity data. This chapter outlines the equations that define the BRANN method plus a flowchart for producing a BRANN-QSAR model. Some results of the use of BRANNs on a number of data sets are illustrated and compared with other linear and nonlinear models.

  4. Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, D. A.; Bulyarskii, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated with the use of AM1 quantum-chemical semiempirical method. It has been found that regular hydrogen chemisorption deforms nanotubes, in some cases leading to stable prismatic modifications. The dependence of the adsorption energy on the density of hydrogen coverage has been found. A procedure for determining the adsorption energy by the spectra of thermally stimulated desorption has been proposed.

  5. Flicker Regularity Is Crucial for Entrainment of Alpha Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Notbohm, Annika; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) in human electroencephalogram (EEG) modulate perception via phase-dependent inhibition. If entrained to an external driving force, inhibition maxima and minima of the oscillation appear more distinct in time and make potential phase-dependent perception predictable. There is an ongoing debate about whether visual stimulation is suitable to entrain alpha oscillations. On the one hand, it has been argued that a series of light flashes results in transient event-related responses (ERPs) superimposed on the ongoing EEG. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that alpha oscillations become entrained to a series of light flashes if they are presented at a certain temporal regularity. This raises the question under which circumstances a sequence of light flashes causes entrainment, i.e., whether an arrhythmic stream of light flashes would also result in entrainment. Here, we measured detection rates in response to visual targets at two opposing stimulation phases during rhythmic and arrhythmic light stimulation. We introduce a new measure called “behavioral modulation depth” to determine differences in perception. This measure is capable of correcting for inevitable artifacts that occur in visual detection tasks during visual stimulation. The physical concept of entrainment predicts that increased stimulation intensity should produce stronger entrainment. Thus, two experiments with medium (Experiment 1) and high (Experiment 2) stimulation intensity were performed. Data from the first experiment show that the behavioral modulation depth (alpha phase-dependent differences in detection threshold) increases with increasing entrainment of alpha oscillations. Furthermore, individual alpha phase delays of entrained alpha oscillations determine the behavioral modulation depth: the largest behavioral modulation depth can be found if targets presented during the minimum of the entrained oscillation are

  6. A Generic Path Algorithm for Regularized Statistical Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Wu, Yichao

    2014-01-01

    Regularization is widely used in statistics and machine learning to prevent overfitting and gear solution towards prior information. In general, a regularized estimation problem minimizes the sum of a loss function and a penalty term. The penalty term is usually weighted by a tuning parameter and encourages certain constraints on the parameters to be estimated. Particular choices of constraints lead to the popular lasso, fused-lasso, and other generalized ℓ1 penalized regression methods. In this article we follow a recent idea by Wu (2011, 2012) and propose an exact path solver based on ordinary differential equations (EPSODE) that works for any convex loss function and can deal with generalized ℓ1 penalties as well as more complicated regularization such as inequality constraints encountered in shape-restricted regressions and nonparametric density estimation. Non-asymptotic error bounds for the equality regularized estimates are derived. In practice, the EPSODE can be coupled with AIC, BIC, Cp or cross-validation to select an optimal tuning parameter, or provides a convenient model space for performing model averaging or aggregation. Our applications to generalized ℓ1 regularized generalized linear models, shape-restricted regressions, Gaussian graphical models, and nonparametric density estimation showcase the potential of the EPSODE algorithm. PMID:25242834

  7. Regular and Irregular Mixing in Hydrocarbon Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Register, Richard; Beckingham, Bryan

    2014-03-01

    Since hydrocarbon polymers interact through relatively simple (dispersive) interactions, one might expect them to be described by simple models of mixing energetics, such as regular mixing. However, the pioneering work of Graessley on saturated hydrocarbon polymer blends showed that while regular mixing is obeyed in some cases, both positive and negative deviations (in the magnitude of the mixing enthalpy) from regular mixing are observed in other cases. Here, we describe the mixing energetics for two series of hydrocarbon polymers wherein the interaction strengths may be continuously tuned, and which can be readily incorporated into block copolymers. Random copolymers of styrene and medium-vinyl isoprene, in which either the isoprene or both the isoprene and styrene units have been saturated, obey regular mixing over the entire composition range and for both hydrogenated derivatives. Well-defined block copolymers with arbitrarily small interblock interaction strengths can be constructed from these units, permitting the interdomain spacing to be made arbitrarily large while holding the order-disorder transition temperature constant. However, block copolymers of hydrogenated polybutadiene with such random copolymers show very strong positive deviations from regular mixing when the styrene aromaticity is preserved, and sizable negative deviations when the styrene units are saturated to vinylcyclohexane. Both of these cases can be quantitatively described by a ternary mixing model.

  8. Information fusion in regularized inversion of tomographic pumping tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; ,

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate a simple approach to incorporating geophysical information into the analysis of tomographic pumping tests for characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field in an aquifer. A number of authors have suggested a tomographic approach to the analysis of hydraulic tests in aquifers - essentially simultaneous analysis of multiple tests or stresses on the flow system - in order to improve the resolution of the estimated parameter fields. However, even with a large amount of hydraulic data in hand, the inverse problem is still plagued by non-uniqueness and ill-conditioning and the parameter space for the inversion needs to be constrained in some sensible fashion in order to obtain plausible estimates of aquifer properties. For seismic and radar tomography problems, the parameter space is often constrained through the application of regularization terms that impose penalties on deviations of the estimated parameters from a prior or background model, with the tradeoff between data fit and model norm explored through systematic analysis of results for different levels of weighting on the regularization terms. In this study we apply systematic regularized inversion to analysis of tomographic pumping tests in an alluvial aquifer, taking advantage of the steady-shape flow regime exhibited in these tests to expedite the inversion process. In addition, we explore the possibility of incorporating geophysical information into the inversion through a regularization term relating the estimated K distribution to ground penetrating radar velocity and attenuation distributions through a smoothing spline model. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Partial Regularity for Holonomic Minimisers of Quasiconvex Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We prove partial regularity for local minimisers of certain strictly quasiconvex integral functionals, over a class of Sobolev mappings into a compact Riemannian manifold, to which such mappings are said to be holonomically constrained. Our approach uses the lifting of Sobolev mappings to the universal covering space, the connectedness of the covering space, an application of Ekeland's variational principle and a certain tangential A-harmonic approximation lemma obtained directly via a Lipschitz approximation argument. This allows regularity to be established directly on the level of the gradient. Several applications to variational problems in condensed matter physics with broken symmetries are also discussed, in particular those concerning the superfluidity of liquid helium-3 and nematic liquid crystals.

  10. Stochastic regularization operators on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Doetsch, Joseph; Günther, Thomas; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Most geophysical inverse problems require the solution of underdetermined systems of equations. In order to solve such inverse problems, appropriate regularization is required. Ideally, this regularization includes information on the expected model variability and spatial correlation. Based on geostatistical covariance functions, which can be adapted to the specific situation, stochastic regularization can be used to add auxiliary constraints to the given inverse problem. Stochastic regularization operators have been successfully applied to geophysical inverse problems formulated on regular grids. Here, we demonstrate the calculation of stochastic regularization operators for unstructured meshes. Unstructured meshes are advantageous with regards to incorporating arbitrary topography, undulating geological interfaces and complex acquisition geometries into the inversion. However, compared to regular grids, unstructured meshes have variable cell sizes, complicating the calculation of stochastic operators. The stochastic operators proposed here are based on a 2D exponential correlation function, allowing to predefine spatial correlation lengths. The regularization thus acts over an imposed correlation length rather than only taking into account neighbouring cells as in regular smoothing constraints. Correlation over a spatial length partly removes the effects of variable cell sizes of unstructured meshes on the regularization. Synthetic models having large-scale interfaces as well as small-scale stochastic variations are used to analyse the performance and behaviour of the stochastic regularization operators. The resulting inverted models obtained with stochastic regularization are compare against the results of standard regularization approaches (damping and smoothing). Besides using stochastic operators for regularization, we plan to incorporate the footprint of the stochastic operator in further applications such as the calculation of the cross-gradient functions

  11. On a regularity criterion for the Navier-Stokes equations involving gradient of one velocity component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Pokorný, Milan

    2009-12-01

    We improve the regularity criterion for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the full three-dimensional space involving the gradient of one velocity component. The method is based on recent results of Cao and Titi [see "Regularity criteria for the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," Indiana Univ. Math. J. 57, 2643 (2008)] and Kukavica and Ziane [see "Navier-Stokes equations with regularity in one direction," J. Math. Phys. 48, 065203 (2007)]. In particular, for s ɛ[2,3], we get that the solution is regular if ∇u3ɛLt(0,T;Ls(R3)), 2/t+3/s≤23/12.

  12. Nonlinear Regularizing Effect for Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golse, François

    2010-03-01

    The Tartar-DiPerna compensated compactness method, used initially to construct global weak solutions of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws for large data, can be adapted in order to provide some regularity estimates on these solutions. This note treats two examples: (a) the case of scalar conservation laws with convex flux, and (b) the Euler system for a polytropic, compressible fluid, in space dimension one.

  13. Learning regularized LDA by clustering.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yanwei; Wang, Shuang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    As a supervised dimensionality reduction technique, linear discriminant analysis has a serious overfitting problem when the number of training samples per class is small. The main reason is that the between- and within-class scatter matrices computed from the limited number of training samples deviate greatly from the underlying ones. To overcome the problem without increasing the number of training samples, we propose making use of the structure of the given training data to regularize the between- and within-class scatter matrices by between- and within-cluster scatter matrices, respectively, and simultaneously. The within- and between-cluster matrices are computed from unsupervised clustered data. The within-cluster scatter matrix contributes to encoding the possible variations in intraclasses and the between-cluster scatter matrix is useful for separating extra classes. The contributions are inversely proportional to the number of training samples per class. The advantages of the proposed method become more remarkable as the number of training samples per class decreases. Experimental results on the AR and Feret face databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Nondissipative Velocity and Pressure Regularizations for the ICON Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restelli, M.; Giorgetta, M.; Hundertmark, T.; Korn, P.; Reich, S.

    2009-04-01

    A challenging aspect in the numerical simulation of atmospheric and oceanic flows is the multiscale character of the problem both in space and time. The small spacial scales are generated by the turbulent energy and enstrophy cascades, and are usually dealt with by means of turbulence parametrizations, while the small temporal scales are governed by the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves, which are of little importance for the large scale dynamics and are often eliminated by means of a semi-implicit time discretization. We propose to treat both phenomena of subgrid turbulence and temporal scale separation in a unified way by means of nondissipative regularizations of the underlying model equations. More precisely, we discuss the use of two regularized equation sets: the velocity regularization, also know as Lagrangian averaged Navier-Stokes system, and the pressure regularization. Both regularizations are nondissipative since they do not enhance the dissipation of energy and enstrophy of the flow. The velocity regularization models the effects of the subgrid velocity fluctuations on the mean flow, it has thus been proposed as a turbulence parametrization and it has been found to yield promising results in ocean modeling [HHPW08]. In particular, the velocity regularization results in a higher variability of the numerical solution. The pressure regularization, discussed in [RWS07], modifies the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves so that the resulting system can be discretized explicitly in time with time steps analogous to those allowed by a semi-implicit method. Compared to semi-implicit time integrators, however, the pressure regularization takes fully into account the geostrophic balance of the flow. We discuss here the implementation of the velocity and pressure regularizations within the numerical framework of the ICON general circulation model (GCM) [BR05] for the case of the rotating shallow water system, showing how the original numerical

  15. Ideal regularization for learning kernels from labels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Binbin; Lai, Jianhuang; Shen, Lixin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of regularization that is able to utilize the label information of a data set for learning kernels. The proposed regularization, referred to as ideal regularization, is a linear function of the kernel matrix to be learned. The ideal regularization allows us to develop efficient algorithms to exploit labels. Three applications of the ideal regularization are considered. Firstly, we use the ideal regularization to incorporate the labels into a standard kernel, making the resulting kernel more appropriate for learning tasks. Next, we employ the ideal regularization to learn a data-dependent kernel matrix from an initial kernel matrix (which contains prior similarity information, geometric structures, and labels of the data). Finally, we incorporate the ideal regularization to some state-of-the-art kernel learning problems. With this regularization, these learning problems can be formulated as simpler ones which permit more efficient solvers. Empirical results show that the ideal regularization exploits the labels effectively and efficiently.

  16. On the regularizing effect for unbounded solutions of first-order Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barles, Guy; Chasseigne, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    We give a simplified proof of regularizing effects for first-order Hamilton-Jacobi Equations of the form ut + H (x , t , Du) = 0 in RN × (0 , + ∞) in the case where the idea is to first estimate ut. As a consequence, we have a Lipschitz regularity in space and time for coercive Hamiltonians and, for hypo-elliptic Hamiltonians, we also have an Hölder regularizing effect in space following a result of L.C. Evans and M.R. James.

  17. Reducing errors in the GRACE gravity solutions using regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, Himanshu; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Tapley, Byron D.

    2012-09-01

    solutions (RL04) from the Center for Space Research (CSR). Post-fit residual analysis shows that the regularized solutions fit the data to within the noise level of GRACE. A time series of filtered hydrological model is used to confirm that signal attenuation for basins in the Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) database over 320 km radii is less than 1 cm equivalent water height RMS, which is within the noise level of GRACE.

  18. Regular attractors and nonautonomous perturbations of them

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, Marko I; Zelik, Sergey V; Chepyzhov, Vladimir V

    2013-01-31

    We study regular global attractors of dissipative dynamical semigroups with discrete or continuous time and we investigate attractors for nonautonomous perturbations of such semigroups. The main theorem states that the regularity of global attractors is preserved under small nonautonomous perturbations. Moreover, nonautonomous regular global attractors remain exponential and robust. We apply these general results to model nonautonomous reaction-diffusion systems in a bounded domain of R{sup 3} with time-dependent external forces. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  19. Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract covers a one hour presentation on Space Exploration. The audience is elementary students; therefore there are few words on the slides, mostly pictures of living and working in space. The presentation opens with a few slides describing a day in the life of a space explorer. It begins with a launch, discussions of day-night cycles, eating, exercising, housekeeping, EVA, relaxation, and sleeping. The next section of the presentation shows photos of astronauts performing experiments on the ISS. Yokomi Elementary School launched this fall with the most advanced educational technology tools available in schools today. The science and technology magnet school is equipped with interactive white boards, digital projectors, integrated sound systems and several computers for use by teachers and students. The only elementary school in Fresno Unified with a science focus also houses dedicated science classrooms equipped specifically for elementary students to experience hands-on science instruction in addition to the regular elementary curriculum.

  20. 12 CFR 725.3 - Regular membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advances without approval of the NCUA Board for a period of six months after becoming a member. This subsection shall not apply to any credit union which becomes a Regular member of the Facility within six... member of the Facility at any time within six months prior to becoming a Regular member of the Facility....

  1. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  2. Transport Code for Regular Triangular Geometry

    1993-06-09

    DIAMANT2 solves the two-dimensional static multigroup neutron transport equation in planar regular triangular geometry. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous problems subject to vacuum, reflective or input specified boundary flux conditions are solved. Anisotropy is allowed for the scattering source. Volume and surface sources are allowed for inhomogeneous problems.

  3. Relative optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence efficiencies of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C dosimeters to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space and radiotherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sawakuchi, G. O.; Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Benton, E. R.; Gaza, R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.

    2008-12-15

    This article presents a comprehensive characterization of the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) relative luminescence efficiencies of carbon-doped aluminum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) for heavy charged particles (HCPs) with atomic numbers ranging from 1 (proton) to 54 (xenon) and energies ranging from 7 to 1000 MeV/u, and investigates the dependence of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C response on experimental conditions. Relative luminescence efficiency values are presented for 19 primary charge/energy combinations, plus 31 additional charge/energy combinations obtained by introducing absorbers in the primary beam. Our results show that for energies of hundreds of MeV/u the data can be described by a single curve of relative luminescence efficiency versus linear energy transfer (LET). This information is needed to compensate for the reduced OSL efficiency to high-LET particles in such applications as space dosimetry. For lower energies, the relative luminescence efficiency as function of LET cannot be described by a single curve; instead, it separates into different components corresponding to different particles. We also present data on the low-LET dose response of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, measured under the same experimental conditions in which the relative luminescence efficiencies to HCPs were obtained, providing information relevant to future theoretical investigations of HCP energy deposition and luminescence production in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  4. On regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Nigam, Nilima; Stockie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we consider regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution with applications to prototypical elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). We study the convergence of a sequence of distributions SH to a singular term S as a parameter H (associated with the support size of SH) shrinks to zero. We characterize this convergence in both the weak-* topology of distributions and a weighted Sobolev norm. These notions motivate a framework for constructing regularizations of the delta distribution that includes a large class of existing methods in the literature. This framework allows different regularizations to be compared. The convergence of solutions of PDEs with these regularized source terms is then studied in various topologies such as pointwise convergence on a deleted neighborhood and weighted Sobolev norms. We also examine the lack of symmetry in tensor product regularizations and effects of dissipative error in hyperbolic problems.

  5. 14 CFR 121.487 - Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned. 121.487 Section 121.487 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  6. 14 CFR 121.487 - Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned. 121.487 Section 121.487 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  7. 14 CFR 121.487 - Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned. 121.487 Section 121.487 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  8. 14 CFR 121.487 - Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned. 121.487 Section 121.487 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  9. 14 CFR 121.487 - Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots not regularly assigned. 121.487 Section 121.487 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  10. Analysis of regularizing properties of nonlinear electrodynamics in the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. I. Sokolov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    New regularizing manifestations of the Einstein-Born-Infeld theory for a massive charged force center in the space-time are considered. The properties of isotropic geodesics in this space are analyzed. It is shown that the charge may exceed the maximum possible charge in the Reissner-Nordstroem solution; the possibility of eliminating one of the metric horizons is also noted.

  11. Elementary Particle Spectroscopy in Regular Solid Rewrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trell, Erik

    2008-10-01

    The Nilpotent Universal Computer Rewrite System (NUCRS) has operationalized the radical ontological dilemma of Nothing at All versus Anything at All down to the ground recursive syntax and principal mathematical realisation of this categorical dichotomy as such and so governing all its sui generis modalities, leading to fulfilment of their individual terms and compass when the respective choice sequence operations are brought to closure. Focussing on the general grammar, NUCRS by pure logic and its algebraic notations hence bootstraps Quantum Mechanics, aware that it "is the likely keystone of a fundamental computational foundation" also for e.g. physics, molecular biology and neuroscience. The present work deals with classical geometry where morphology is the modality, and ventures that the ancient regular solids are its specific rewrite system, in effect extensively anticipating the detailed elementary particle spectroscopy, and further on to essential structures at large both over the inorganic and organic realms. The geodetic antipode to Nothing is extension, with natural eigenvector the endless straight line which when deployed according to the NUCRS as well as Plotelemeian topographic prescriptions forms a real three-dimensional eigenspace with cubical eigenelements where observed quark-skewed quantum-chromodynamical particle events self-generate as an Aristotelean phase transition between the straight and round extremes of absolute endlessness under the symmetry- and gauge-preserving, canonical coset decomposition SO(3)×O(5) of Lie algebra SU(3). The cubical eigen-space and eigen-elements are the parental state and frame, and the other solids are a range of transition matrix elements and portions adapting to the spherical root vector symmetries and so reproducibly reproducing the elementary particle spectroscopy, including a modular, truncated octahedron nano-composition of the Electron which piecemeal enter into molecular structures or compressed to each

  12. Elementary Particle Spectroscopy in Regular Solid Rewrite

    SciTech Connect

    Trell, Erik

    2008-10-17

    The Nilpotent Universal Computer Rewrite System (NUCRS) has operationalized the radical ontological dilemma of Nothing at All versus Anything at All down to the ground recursive syntax and principal mathematical realisation of this categorical dichotomy as such and so governing all its sui generis modalities, leading to fulfilment of their individual terms and compass when the respective choice sequence operations are brought to closure. Focussing on the general grammar, NUCRS by pure logic and its algebraic notations hence bootstraps Quantum Mechanics, aware that it ''is the likely keystone of a fundamental computational foundation'' also for e.g. physics, molecular biology and neuroscience. The present work deals with classical geometry where morphology is the modality, and ventures that the ancient regular solids are its specific rewrite system, in effect extensively anticipating the detailed elementary particle spectroscopy, and further on to essential structures at large both over the inorganic and organic realms. The geodetic antipode to Nothing is extension, with natural eigenvector the endless straight line which when deployed according to the NUCRS as well as Plotelemeian topographic prescriptions forms a real three-dimensional eigenspace with cubical eigenelements where observed quark-skewed quantum-chromodynamical particle events self-generate as an Aristotelean phase transition between the straight and round extremes of absolute endlessness under the symmetry- and gauge-preserving, canonical coset decomposition SO(3)xO(5) of Lie algebra SU(3). The cubical eigen-space and eigen-elements are the parental state and frame, and the other solids are a range of transition matrix elements and portions adapting to the spherical root vector symmetries and so reproducibly reproducing the elementary particle spectroscopy, including a modular, truncated octahedron nano-composition of the Electron which piecemeal enter into molecular structures or compressed to each

  13. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Charles E.; Wyart, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Temporal predictions are increasingly recognized as fundamental instruments for optimizing performance, enabling mammals to exploit regularities in the world. However, the notion of temporal predictions is often confounded with the idea of entrainment to periodic sensory inputs. At the behavioral level, it is also unclear whether perceptual sensitivity and reaction time improvements benefit the same way from temporal predictions and periodic stimulation. In two behavioral experiments on human

  14. Weak Gravitational Lensing from Regular Bardeen Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarnejad, Hossein; niad, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    In this article we study weak gravitational lensing of regular Bardeen black hole which has scalar charge g and mass m. We investigate the angular position and magnification of non-relativistic images in two cases depending on the presence or absence of photon sphere. Defining dimensionless charge parameter q= {g}/{2m} we seek to disappear photon sphere in the case of |q|>{24√5}/{125} for which the space time metric encounters strongly with naked singularities. We specify the basic parameters of lensing in terms of scalar charge by using the perturbative method and found that the parity of images is different in two cases: (a) The strongly naked singularities is present in the space time. (b) singularity of space time is weak or is eliminated (the black hole lens).

  15. Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevidimova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative regularities in floodplain formation Modern methods of the theory of complex systems allow to build mathematical models of complex systems where self-organizing processes are largely determined by nonlinear effects and feedback. However, there exist some factors that exert significant influence on the dynamics of geomorphosystems, but hardly can be adequately expressed in the language of mathematical models. Conceptual modeling allows us to overcome this difficulty. It is based on the methods of synergetic, which, together with the theory of dynamic systems and classical geomorphology, enable to display the dynamics of geomorphological systems. The most adequate for mathematical modeling of complex systems is the concept of model dynamics based on equilibrium. This concept is based on dynamic equilibrium, the tendency to which is observed in the evolution of all geomorphosystems. As an objective law, it is revealed in the evolution of fluvial relief in general, and in river channel processes in particular, demonstrating the ability of these systems to self-organization. Channel process is expressed in the formation of river reaches, rifts, meanders and floodplain. As floodplain is a periodically flooded surface during high waters, it naturally connects river channel with slopes, being one of boundary expressions of the water stream activity. Floodplain dynamics is inseparable from the channel dynamics. It is formed at simultaneous horizontal and vertical displacement of the river channel, that is at Y=Y(x, y), where х, y - horizontal and vertical coordinates, Y - floodplain height. When dу/dt=0 (for not lowering river channel), the river, being displaced in a horizontal plane, leaves behind a low surface, which flooding during high waters (total duration of flooding) changes from the maximum during the initial moment of time t0 to zero in the moment tn. In a similar manner changed is the total amount of accumulated material on the floodplain surface

  16. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2010-01-01

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators. PMID:20365403

  17. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Cheng; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2010-01-01

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators.

  18. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ly Cheng; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2010-01-15

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators.

  19. Advanced stimulation technology program helps zero in the optimum frac treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, B.

    1995-08-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has initiated the Advanced Stimulation Technology (AST) program to ensure that successful stimulation technologies developed in previous GRI programs are available to the petroleum industry and are used regularly. The AST program focuses on benefits analysis, real-time fracture treatment evaluation, and understanding critical concepts in fracture stimulation.

  20. Tactile stimulation lowers stress in fish.

    PubMed

    Soares, Marta C; Oliveira, Rui F; Ros, Albert F H; Grutter, Alexandra S; Bshary, Redouan

    2011-01-01

    In humans, physical stimulation, such as massage therapy, reduces stress and has demonstrable health benefits. Grooming in primates may have similar effects but it remains unclear whether the positive effects are due to physical contact or to its social value. Here we show that physical stimulation reduces stress in a coral reef fish, the surgeonfish Ctenochaetus striatus. These fish regularly visit cleaner wrasses Labroides dimidiatus to have ectoparasites removed. The cleanerfish influences client decisions by physically touching the surgeonfish with its pectoral and pelvic fins, a behaviour known as tactile stimulation. We simulated this behaviour by exposing surgeonfish to mechanically moving cleanerfish models. Surgeonfish had significantly lower levels of cortisol when stimulated by moving models compared with controls with access to stationary models. Our results show that physical contact alone, without a social aspect, is enough to produce fitness-enhancing benefits, a situation so far only demonstrated in humans. PMID:22086335

  1. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung Fung

    1988-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  2. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  3. Parallel Communicating Grammar Systems with Regular Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardubská, Dana; Plátek, Martin; Otto, Friedrich

    Parallel communicating grammar systems with regular control (RPCGS, for short) are introduced, which are obtained from returning regular parallel communicating grammar systems by restricting the derivations that are executed in parallel by the various components through a regular control language. For the class of languages that are generated by RPCGSs with constant communication complexity we derive a characterization in terms of a restricted type of freely rewriting restarting automaton. From this characterization we obtain that these languages are semi-linear, and that centralized RPCGSs with constant communication complexity are of the same generative power as non-centralized RPCGSs with constant communication complexity.

  4. Regular biorthogonal pairs and pseudo-bosonic operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, H.; Takakura, M.

    2016-08-01

    The first purpose of this paper is to show a method of constructing a regular biorthogonal pair based on the commutation rule: ab - ba = I for a pair of operators a and b acting on a Hilbert space H with inner product (ṡ| ṡ ). Here, sequences {ϕn} and {ψn} in a Hilbert space H are biorthogonal if (ϕn|ψm) = δnm, n, m = 0, 1, …, and they are regular if both Dϕ ≡ Span{ϕn} and Dψ ≡ Span{ψn} are dense in H . Indeed, the assumptions to construct the regular biorthogonal pair coincide with the definition of pseudo-bosons as originally given in F. Bagarello ["Pseudobosons, Riesz bases, and coherent states," J. Math. Phys. 51, 023531 (2010)]. Furthermore, we study the connections between the pseudo-bosonic operators a, b, a†, b† and the pseudo-bosonic operators defined by a regular biorthogonal pair ({ϕn}, {ψn}) and an ONB e of H in H. Inoue ["General theory of regular biorthogonal pairs and its physical applications," e-print arXiv:math-ph/1604.01967]. The second purpose is to define and study the notion of D -pseudo-bosons in F. Bagarello ["More mathematics for pseudo-bosons," J. Math. Phys. 54, 063512 (2013)] and F. Bagarello ["From self-adjoint to non self-adjoint harmonic oscillators: Physical consequences and mathematical pitfalls," Phys. Rev. A 88, 032120 (2013)] and give a method of constructing D -pseudo-bosons on some steps. Then it is shown that for any ONB e = {en} in H and any operators T and T-1 in L † ( D ) , we may construct operators A and B satisfying D -pseudo bosons, where D is a dense subspace in a Hilbert space H and L † ( D ) the set of all linear operators T from D to D such that T * D ⊂ D , where T* is the adjoint of T. Finally, we give some physical examples of D -pseudo-bosons based on standard bosons by the method of constructing D -pseudo-bosons stated above.

  5. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  6. Parallelization of irregularly coupled regular meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Craig; Crowley, Kay; Saltz, Joel; Reeves, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Regular meshes are frequently used for modeling physical phenomena on both serial and parallel computers. One advantage of regular meshes is that efficient discretization schemes can be implemented in a straight forward manner. However, geometrically-complex objects, such as aircraft, cannot be easily described using a single regular mesh. Multiple interacting regular meshes are frequently used to describe complex geometries. Each mesh models a subregion of the physical domain. The meshes, or subdomains, can be processed in parallel, with periodic updates carried out to move information between the coupled meshes. In many cases, there are a relatively small number (one to a few dozen) subdomains, so that each subdomain may also be partitioned among several processors. We outline a composite run-time/compile-time approach for supporting these problems efficiently on distributed-memory machines. These methods are described in the context of a multiblock fluid dynamics problem developed at LaRC.

  7. Regular Exercise: Antidote for Deadly Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160326.html Regular Exercise: Antidote for Deadly Diseases? High levels of physical ... Aug. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Getting lots of exercise may reduce your risk for five common diseases, ...

  8. Mixed-Norm Regularization for Brain Decoding

    PubMed Central

    Flamary, R.; Jrad, N.; Phlypo, R.; Congedo, M.; Rakotomamonjy, A.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the use of mixed-norm regularization for sensor selection in event-related potential (ERP) based brain-computer interfaces (BCI). The classification problem is cast as a discriminative optimization framework where sensor selection is induced through the use of mixed-norms. This framework is extended to the multitask learning situation where several similar classification tasks related to different subjects are learned simultaneously. In this case, multitask learning helps in leveraging data scarcity issue yielding to more robust classifiers. For this purpose, we have introduced a regularizer that induces both sensor selection and classifier similarities. The different regularization approaches are compared on three ERP datasets showing the interest of mixed-norm regularization in terms of sensor selection. The multitask approaches are evaluated when a small number of learning examples are available yielding to significant performance improvements especially for subjects performing poorly. PMID:24860614

  9. On the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wengu; Li, Junfeng

    2008-03-01

    We consider the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation ut+uux+uxxx+[beta](uxx+uxxxx)+[eta]uxxxxx=0. We established the global well posedness for the initial value problem of Benney-Lin equation in the Sobolev spaces for 0[greater-or-equal, slanted]s>-2, improving the well-posedness result of Biagioni and Linares [H.A. Biaginoi, F. Linares, On the Benney-Lin and Kawahara equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 211 (1997) 131-152]. For s<-2 we also prove some ill-posedness issues.

  10. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Breit, Gupta, and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the fifth-time of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. A successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest.

  11. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments.

  12. Channeling power across ecological systems: social regularities in community organizing.

    PubMed

    Christens, Brian D; Inzeo, Paula Tran; Faust, Victoria

    2014-06-01

    Relational and social network perspectives provide opportunities for more holistic conceptualizations of phenomena of interest in community psychology, including power and empowerment. In this article, we apply these tools to build on multilevel frameworks of empowerment by proposing that networks of relationships between individuals constitute the connective spaces between ecological systems. Drawing on an example of a model for grassroots community organizing practiced by WISDOM—a statewide federation supporting local community organizing initiatives in Wisconsin—we identify social regularities (i.e., relational and temporal patterns) that promote empowerment and the development and exercise of social power through building and altering relational ties. Through an emphasis on listening-focused one-to-one meetings, reflection, and social analysis, WISDOM organizing initiatives construct and reinforce social regularities that develop social power in the organizing initiatives and advance psychological empowerment among participant leaders in organizing. These patterns are established by organizationally driven brokerage and mobilization of interpersonal ties, some of which span ecological systems.Hence, elements of these power-focused social regularities can be conceptualized as cross-system channels through which micro-level empowerment processes feed into macro-level exercise of social power, and vice versa. We describe examples of these channels in action, and offer recommendations for theory and design of future action research [corrected] .

  13. Nonrigid registration using regularization that accomodates local tissue rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Dan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Roberson, Michael; Balter, James; Kessler, Marc

    2006-03-01

    Regularized nonrigid medical image registration algorithms usually estimate the deformation by minimizing a cost function, consisting of a similarity measure and a penalty term that discourages "unreasonable" deformations. Conventional regularization methods enforce homogeneous smoothness properties of the deformation field; less work has been done to incorporate tissue-type-specific elasticity information. Yet ignoring the elasticity differences between tissue types can result in non-physical results, such as bone warping. Bone structures should move rigidly (locally), unlike the more elastic deformation of soft issues. Existing solutions for this problem either treat different regions of an image independently, which requires precise segmentation and incurs boundary issues; or use an empirical spatial varying "filter" to "correct" the deformation field, which requires the knowledge of a stiffness map and departs from the cost-function formulation. We propose a new approach to incorporate tissue rigidity information into the nonrigid registration problem, by developing a space variant regularization function that encourages the local Jacobian of the deformation to be a nearly orthogonal matrix in rigid image regions, while allowing more elastic deformations elsewhere. For the case of X-ray CT data, we use a simple monotonic increasing function of the CT numbers (in HU) as a "rigidity index" since bones typically have the highest CT numbers. Unlike segmentation-based methods, this approach is flexible enough to account for partial volume effects. Results using a B-spline deformation parameterization illustrate that the proposed approach improves registration accuracy in inhale-exhale CT scans with minimal computational penalty.

  14. 3D harmonic phase tracking with anatomical regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yitian; Bernard, Olivier; Saloux, Eric; Manrique, Alain; Allain, Pascal; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; De Craene, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that extends HARP to handle 3D tagged MRI images. HARP results were regularized by an original regularization framework defined in an anatomical space of coordinates. In the meantime, myocardium incompressibility was integrated in order to correct the radial strain which is reported to be more challenging to recover. Both the tracking and regularization of LV displacements were done on a volumetric mesh to be computationally efficient. Also, a window-weighted regression method was extended to cardiac motion tracking which helps maintain a low complexity even at finer scales. On healthy volunteers, the tracking accuracy was found to be as accurate as the best candidates of a recent benchmark. Strain accuracy was evaluated on synthetic data, showing low bias and strain errors under 5% (excluding outliers) for longitudinal and circumferential strains, while the second and third quartiles of the radial strain errors are in the (-5%,5%) range. In clinical data, strain dispersion was shown to correlate with the extent of transmural fibrosis. Also, reduced deformation values were found inside infarcted segments. PMID:26363844

  15. Manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization with label information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huirong; Zhang, Jiangshe; Wang, Changpeng; Liu, Junmin

    2016-03-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a popular technique for finding parts-based, linear representations of non-negative data has been successfully applied in a wide range of applications, such as feature learning, dictionary learning, and dimensionality reduction. However, both the local manifold regularization of data and the discriminative information of the available label have not been taken into account together in NMF. We propose a new semisupervised matrix decomposition method, called manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization (MRNMF) with label information, which incorporates the manifold regularization and the label information into the NMF to improve the performance of NMF in clustering tasks. We encode the local geometrical structure of the data space by constructing a nearest neighbor graph and enhance the discriminative ability of different classes by effectively using the label information. Experimental comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods on theCOIL20, PIE, Extended Yale B, and MNIST databases demonstrate the effectiveness of MRNMF.

  16. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  17. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts. PMID:27036798

  18. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts.

  19. Characteristics of density currents over regular and irregular rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used as a tool to understand the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of density currents. Simulations have been performed for lock-exchange flow with gate separating the dense and the lighter fluid. As the lock is released the dense fluid collapses with the lighter fluid on the top, resulting in formation of horizontally evolving density current. The talk will focus on the fundamental differences between the propagation of the density current over regular and irregular rough surfaces. The flow statistics and the flow structures are discussed. The results have revealed the spacing between the roughness elements is an important factor in classifying the density currents. The empirical relations of the front velocity and location for the dense and sparse roughness have been evaluated in terms of the roughness height, spacing between the elements and the initial amount of lock fluid. DNS results for a dense current flowing over a (a) smooth and (b) rough bottom with egg-carton roughness elements in a regular configuration. In these simulations the lock-exchange box is located in the middle of the channel and has two gates which allow two dense currents to be generated, one moving to the right and one to the left side of the channel. Note how the dense current interface presents smaller structures when over a rough bottom (right).

  20. Perturbations in a regular bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Geshnizjani, G.

    2006-03-15

    We consider a simple toy model of a regular bouncing universe. The bounce is caused by an extra timelike dimension, which leads to a sign flip of the {rho}{sup 2} term in the effective four dimensional Randall Sundrum-like description. We find a wide class of possible bounces: big bang avoiding ones for regular matter content, and big rip avoiding ones for phantom matter. Focusing on radiation as the matter content, we discuss the evolution of scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We compute a spectral index of n{sub s}=-1 for scalar perturbations and a deep blue index for tensor perturbations after invoking vacuum initial conditions, ruling out such a model as a realistic one. We also find that the spectrum (evaluated at Hubble crossing) is sensitive to the bounce. We conclude that it is challenging, but not impossible, for cyclic/ekpyrotic models to succeed, if one can find a regularized version.

  1. Strong regularizing effect of integrable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin

    1997-11-01

    Many time evolution problems have the so-called strong regularization effect, that is, with any irregular initial data, as soon as becomes greater than 0, the solution becomes C{sup {infinity}} for both spacial and temporal variables. This paper studies 1 x 1 dimension integrable systems for such regularizing effect. In the work by Sachs, Kappler [S][K], (see also earlier works [KFJ] and [Ka]), strong regularizing effect is proved for KdV with rapidly decaying irregular initial data, using the inverse scattering method. There are two equivalent Gel`fand-Levitan-Marchenko (GLM) equations associated to an inverse scattering problem, one is normalized at x = {infinity} and another at x = {infinity}. The method of [S][K] relies on the fact that the KdV waves propagate only in one direction and therefore one of the two GLM equations remains normalized and can be differentiated infinitely many times. 15 refs.

  2. Shadow of rotating regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Amir, Muhammed; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the shadows cast by the different types of rotating regular black holes viz. Ayón-Beato-García (ABG), Hayward, and Bardeen. These black holes have in addition to the total mass (M ) and rotation parameter (a ), different parameters as electric charge (Q ), deviation parameter (g ), and magnetic charge (g*). Interestingly, the size of the shadow is affected by these parameters in addition to the rotation parameter. We found that the radius of the shadow in each case decreases monotonically, and the distortion parameter increases when the values of these parameters increase. A comparison with the standard Kerr case is also investigated. We have also studied the influence of the plasma environment around regular black holes to discuss its shadow. The presence of the plasma affects the apparent size of the regular black hole's shadow to be increased due to two effects: (i) gravitational redshift of the photons and (ii) radial dependence of plasma density.

  3. Numerical Comparison of Two-Body Regularizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2007-06-01

    We numerically compare four schemes to regularize a three-dimensional two-body problem under perturbations: the Sperling-Bürdet (S-B), Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (K-S), and Bürdet-Ferrandiz (B-F) regularizations, and a three-dimensional extension of the Levi-Civita (L-C) regularization we developed recently. As for the integration time of the equation of motion, the least time is needed for the unregularized treatment, followed by the K-S, the extended L-C, the B-F, and the S-B regularizations. However, these differences become significantly smaller when the time to evaluate perturbations becomes dominant. As for the integration error after one close encounter, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations are tied for the least error, followed by the S-B, the B-F, and finally the unregularized scheme for unperturbed orbits with eccentricity less than 2. This order is not changed significantly by various kinds of perturbations. As for the integration error of elliptical orbits after multiple orbital periods, the situation remains the same except for the rank of the S-B scheme, which varies from the best to the second worst depending on the length of integration and/or on the nature of perturbations. Also, we confirm that Kepler energy scaling enhances the performance of the unregularized, K-S, and extended L-C schemes. As a result, the K-S and the extended L-C regularizations with Kepler energy scaling provide the best cost performance in integrating almost all the perturbed two-body problems.

  4. Regular homotopy for immersions of graphs into surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permyakov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    We study invariants of regular immersions of graphs into surfaces up to regular homotopy. The concept of the winding number is used to introduce a new simple combinatorial invariant of regular homotopy. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  5. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F.; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  6. Regular transport dynamics produce chaotic travel times.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jorge; Muñoz, Víctor; Rogan, José; Zarama, Roberto; Johnson, Neil F; Toledo, Benjamín; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In the hope of making passenger travel times shorter and more reliable, many cities are introducing dedicated bus lanes (e.g., Bogota, London, Miami). Here we show that chaotic travel times are actually a natural consequence of individual bus function, and hence of public transport systems more generally, i.e., chaotic dynamics emerge even when the route is empty and straight, stops and lights are equidistant and regular, and loading times are negligible. More generally, our findings provide a novel example of chaotic dynamics emerging from a single object following Newton's laws of motion in a regularized one-dimensional system.

  7. REGULAR VERSUS DIFFUSIVE PHOTOSPHERIC FLUX CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2011-04-20

    Observations of photospheric flux cancellation on the Sun imply that cancellation can be a diffusive rather than regular process. A criterion is derived, which quantifies the parameter range in which diffusive photospheric cancellation should occur. Numerical estimates show that regular cancellation models should be expected to give a quantitatively accurate description of photospheric cancellation. The estimates rely on a recently suggested scaling for a turbulent magnetic diffusivity, which is consistent with the diffusivity measurements on spatial scales varying by almost two orders of magnitude. Application of the turbulent diffusivity to large-scale dispersal of the photospheric magnetic flux is discussed.

  8. Exploring Regularities for Improving FAÇADE Reconstruction from Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Gorte, B.; Zlatanova, S.

    2016-06-01

    (Semi)-automatic facade reconstruction from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds is often affected by both quality of point cloud itself and imperfectness of object recognition algorithms. In this paper, we employ regularities, which exist on façades, to mitigate these problems. For example, doors, windows and balconies often have orthogonal and parallel boundaries. Many windows are constructed with the same shape. They may be arranged at the same lines and distance intervals, so do different windows. By identifying regularities among objects with relatively poor quality, these can be applied to calibrate the objects and improve their quality. The paper focuses on the regularities among the windows, which is the majority of objects on the wall. Regularities are classified into three categories: within an individual window, among similar windows and among different windows. Nine cases are specified as a reference for exploration. A hierarchical clustering method is employed to identify and apply regularities in a feature space, where regularities can be identified from clusters. To find the corresponding features in the nine cases of regularities, two phases are distinguished for similar and different windows. In the first phase, ICP (iterative closest points) is used to identify groups of similar windows. The registered points and a number of transformation matrices are used to identify and apply regularities among similar windows. In the second phase, features are extracted from the boundaries of the different windows. When applying regularities by relocating windows, the connections, called chains, established among the similar windows in the first phase are preserved. To test the performance of the algorithms, two datasets from terrestrial LiDAR point clouds are used. Both show good effects on the reconstructed model, while still matching with original point cloud, preventing over or under-regularization.

  9. Stable sequential Kuhn-Tucker theorem in iterative form or a regularized Uzawa algorithm in a regular nonlinear programming problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumin, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    A parametric nonlinear programming problem in a metric space with an operator equality constraint in a Hilbert space is studied assuming that its lower semicontinuous value function at a chosen individual parameter value has certain subdifferentiability properties in the sense of nonlinear (nonsmooth) analysis. Such subdifferentiability can be understood as the existence of a proximal subgradient or a Fréchet subdifferential. In other words, an individual problem has a corresponding generalized Kuhn-Tucker vector. Under this assumption, a stable sequential Kuhn-Tucker theorem in nondifferential iterative form is proved and discussed in terms of minimizing sequences on the basis of the dual regularization method. This theorem provides necessary and sufficient conditions for the stable construction of a minimizing approximate solution in the sense of Warga in the considered problem, whose initial data can be approximately specified. A substantial difference of the proved theorem from its classical same-named analogue is that the former takes into account the possible instability of the problem in the case of perturbed initial data and, as a consequence, allows for the inherited instability of classical optimality conditions. This theorem can be treated as a regularized generalization of the classical Uzawa algorithm to nonlinear programming problems. Finally, the theorem is applied to the "simplest" nonlinear optimal control problem, namely, to a time-optimal control problem.

  10. Man in space.

    PubMed

    Solovjev, V A

    1987-09-01

    Today, more than 20 years after the first in the world man's space walk, soviet cosmonautics gained large experience of extravehicular activity (EVA). Space suits of high reliability, onboard facilities for passing through the airlock, sets of special tools and technological rigging, as well as procedures for carrying out various EVA's were developed. In the course of the Salyut-7 space station orbital operation the EVA's have become regular. The author of the report as the participant of the EVA's considers the main steps of man activities in space and analyzes specific problems arised in performing such activities.

  11. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  12. Temporally Regular Musical Primes Facilitate Subsequent Syntax Processing in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

    PubMed

    Bedoin, Nathalie; Brisseau, Lucie; Molinier, Pauline; Roch, Didier; Tillmann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Children with developmental language disorders have been shown to be also impaired in rhythm and meter perception. Temporal processing and its link to language processing can be understood within the dynamic attending theory. An external stimulus can stimulate internal oscillators, which orient attention over time and drive speech signal segmentation to provide benefits for syntax processing, which is impaired in various patient populations. For children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and dyslexia, previous research has shown the influence of an external rhythmic stimulation on subsequent language processing by comparing the influence of a temporally regular musical prime to that of a temporally irregular prime. Here we tested whether the observed rhythmic stimulation effect is indeed due to a benefit provided by the regular musical prime (rather than a cost subsequent to the temporally irregular prime). Sixteen children with SLI and 16 age-matched controls listened to either a regular musical prime sequence or an environmental sound scene (without temporal regularities in event occurrence; i.e., referred to as "baseline condition") followed by grammatically correct and incorrect sentences. They were required to perform grammaticality judgments for each auditorily presented sentence. Results revealed that performance for the grammaticality judgments was better after the regular prime sequences than after the baseline sequences. Our findings are interpreted in the theoretical framework of the dynamic attending theory (Jones, 1976) and the temporal sampling (oscillatory) framework for developmental language disorders (Goswami, 2011). Furthermore, they encourage the use of rhythmic structures (even in non-verbal materials) to boost linguistic structure processing and outline perspectives for rehabilitation. PMID:27378833

  13. Temporally Regular Musical Primes Facilitate Subsequent Syntax Processing in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bedoin, Nathalie; Brisseau, Lucie; Molinier, Pauline; Roch, Didier; Tillmann, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Children with developmental language disorders have been shown to be also impaired in rhythm and meter perception. Temporal processing and its link to language processing can be understood within the dynamic attending theory. An external stimulus can stimulate internal oscillators, which orient attention over time and drive speech signal segmentation to provide benefits for syntax processing, which is impaired in various patient populations. For children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and dyslexia, previous research has shown the influence of an external rhythmic stimulation on subsequent language processing by comparing the influence of a temporally regular musical prime to that of a temporally irregular prime. Here we tested whether the observed rhythmic stimulation effect is indeed due to a benefit provided by the regular musical prime (rather than a cost subsequent to the temporally irregular prime). Sixteen children with SLI and 16 age-matched controls listened to either a regular musical prime sequence or an environmental sound scene (without temporal regularities in event occurrence; i.e., referred to as “baseline condition”) followed by grammatically correct and incorrect sentences. They were required to perform grammaticality judgments for each auditorily presented sentence. Results revealed that performance for the grammaticality judgments was better after the regular prime sequences than after the baseline sequences. Our findings are interpreted in the theoretical framework of the dynamic attending theory (Jones, 1976) and the temporal sampling (oscillatory) framework for developmental language disorders (Goswami, 2011). Furthermore, they encourage the use of rhythmic structures (even in non-verbal materials) to boost linguistic structure processing and outline perspectives for rehabilitation. PMID:27378833

  14. Model-Based Analysis and Design of Waveforms for Efficient Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    The design space for electrical stimulation of the nervous system is extremely large, and because the response to stimulation is highly non-linear, the selection of stimulation parameters to achieve a desired response is a challenging problem. Computational models of the response of neurons to extracellular stimulation allow analysis of the effects of stimulation parameters on neural excitation and provide an approach to select or design optimal parameters of stimulation. Here, I review the use of computational models to understand the effects of stimulation waveform on the energy efficiency of neural excitation and to design novel stimulation waveforms to increase the efficiency of neural stimulation. PMID:26541380

  15. A Quantitative Measure of Memory Reference Regularity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, T; de Supinski, B R; McKee, S A; Mueller, F; Yoo, A

    2001-10-01

    The memory performance of applications on existing architectures depends significantly on hardware features like prefetching and caching that exploit the locality of the memory accesses. The principle of locality has guided the design of many key micro-architectural features, including cache hierarchies, TLBs, and branch predictors. Quantitative measures of spatial and temporal locality have been useful for predicting the performance of memory hierarchy components. Unfortunately, the concept of locality is constrained to capturing memory access patterns characterized by proximity, while sophisticated memory systems are capable of exploiting other predictable access patterns. Here, we define the concepts of spatial and temporal regularity, and introduce a measure of spatial access regularity to quantify some of this predictability in access patterns. We present an efficient online algorithm to dynamically determine the spatial access regularity in an application's memory references, and demonstrate its use on a set of regular and irregular codes. We find that the use of our algorithm, with its associated overhead of trace generation, slows typical applications by a factor of 50-200, which is at least an order of magnitude better than traditional full trace generation approaches. Our approach can be applied to the characterization of program access patterns and in the implementation of sophisticated, software-assisted prefetching mechanisms, and its inherently parallel nature makes it well suited for use with multi-threaded programs.

  16. Dyslexia in Regular Orthographies: Manifestation and Causation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Heinz; Schurz, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes our research on the manifestation of dyslexia in German and on cognitive deficits, which may account for the severe reading speed deficit and the poor orthographic spelling performance that characterize dyslexia in regular orthographies. An only limited causal role of phonological deficits (phonological awareness,…

  17. Strategies of Teachers in the Regular Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leeuw, Renske Ria; De Boer, Anke Aaltje

    2016-01-01

    It is known that regular schoolteachers have difficulties in educating students with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties (SEBD), mainly because of their disruptive behavior. In order to manage the disruptive behavior of students with SEBD many advices and strategies are provided in educational literature. However, very little is known…

  18. TAUBERIAN THEOREMS FOR MATRIX REGULAR VARIATION.

    PubMed

    Meerschaert, M M; Scheffler, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Karamata's Tauberian theorem relates the asymptotics of a nondecreasing right-continuous function to that of its Laplace-Stieltjes transform, using regular variation. This paper establishes the analogous Tauberian theorem for matrix-valued functions. Some applications to time series analysis are indicated.

  19. TAUBERIAN THEOREMS FOR MATRIX REGULAR VARIATION

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, M. M.; SCHEFFLER, H.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Karamata’s Tauberian theorem relates the asymptotics of a nondecreasing right-continuous function to that of its Laplace-Stieltjes transform, using regular variation. This paper establishes the analogous Tauberian theorem for matrix-valued functions. Some applications to time series analysis are indicated. PMID:24644367

  20. Regular Classroom Teachers' Perceptions of Mainstreaming Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringlaben, Ravic P.; Price, Jay R.

    To assess regular classroom teachers' perceptions of mainstreaming, a 22 item questionnaire was completed by 117 teachers (K through 12). Among results were that nearly half of the Ss indicated a lack of preparation for implementing mainstreaming; 47% tended to be very willing to accept aminstreamed students; 42% said mainstreaming was working…

  1. Regularities in Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the assumption that Spearman's law acts unsystematically and approximately uniformly for various subtests of cognitive ability in an IQ test battery when high- and low-ability IQ groups are selected. Data from national standardization samples for Wechsler adult and child IQ tests affirm regularities in Spearman's "Law of Diminishing…

  2. Learning regular expressions for clinical text classification

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Duy Duc An; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Natural language processing (NLP) applications typically use regular expressions that have been developed manually by human experts. Our goal is to automate both the creation and utilization of regular expressions in text classification. Methods We designed a novel regular expression discovery (RED) algorithm and implemented two text classifiers based on RED. The RED+ALIGN classifier combines RED with an alignment algorithm, and RED+SVM combines RED with a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Two clinical datasets were used for testing and evaluation: the SMOKE dataset, containing 1091 text snippets describing smoking status; and the PAIN dataset, containing 702 snippets describing pain status. We performed 10-fold cross-validation to calculate accuracy, precision, recall, and F-measure metrics. In the evaluation, an SVM classifier was trained as the control. Results The two RED classifiers achieved 80.9–83.0% in overall accuracy on the two datasets, which is 1.3–3% higher than SVM's accuracy (p<0.001). Similarly, small but consistent improvements have been observed in precision, recall, and F-measure when RED classifiers are compared with SVM alone. More significantly, RED+ALIGN correctly classified many instances that were misclassified by the SVM classifier (8.1–10.3% of the total instances and 43.8–53.0% of SVM's misclassifications). Conclusions Machine-generated regular expressions can be effectively used in clinical text classification. The regular expression-based classifier can be combined with other classifiers, like SVM, to improve classification performance. PMID:24578357

  3. A novel combined regularization algorithm of total variation and Tikhonov regularization for open electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhen; Ling, Lin; Li, Gang

    2013-07-01

    A Tikhonov regularization method in the inverse problem of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) often results in a smooth distribution reconstruction, with which we can barely make a clear separation between the inclusions and background. The recently popular total variation (TV)regularization method including the lagged diffusivity (LD) method can sharpen the edges, and is robust to noise in a small convergence region. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel regularization method combining the Tikhonov and LD regularization methods. Firstly, we clarify the implementation details of the Tikhonov, LD and combined methods in two-dimensional open EIT by performing the current injection and voltage measurement on one boundary of the imaging object. Next, we introduce a weighted parameter to the Tikhonov regularization method aiming to explore the effect of the weighted parameter on the resolution and quality of reconstruction images with the inclusion at different depths. Then, we analyze the performance of these algorithms with noisy data. Finally, we evaluate the effect of the current injection pattern on reconstruction quality and propose a modified current injection pattern.The results indicate that the combined regularization algorithm with stable convergence is able to improve the reconstruction quality with sharp contrast and more robust to noise in comparison to the Tikhonov and LD regularization methods solely. In addition, the results show that the current injection pattern with a bigger driver angle leads to a better reconstruction quality.

  4. On the Regularity Set and Angular Integrability for the Navier-Stokes Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ancona, Piero; Lucà, Renato

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the size of the regular set for suitable weak solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation, in the sense of Caffarelli-Kohn-Nirenberg (Commun Pure Appl Math 35:771-831, 1982). We consider initial data in weighted Lebesgue spaces with mixed radial-angular integrability, and we prove that the regular set increases if the data have higher angular integrability, invading the whole half space {\\{t > 0\\}} in an appropriate limit. In particular, we obtain that if the {L2} norm with weight {|x|^{-frac12}} of the data tends to 0, the regular set invades {\\{t > 0\\}}; this result improves Theorem D of Caffarelli et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 35:771-831, 1982).

  5. Using Tikhonov Regularization for Spatial Projections from CSR Regularized Spherical Harmonic GRACE Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Save, H.; Bettadpur, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated before that using Tikhonov regularization produces spherical harmonic solutions from GRACE that have very little residual stripes while capturing all the signal observed by GRACE within the noise level. This paper demonstrates a two-step process and uses Tikhonov regularization to remove the residual stripes in the CSR regularized spherical harmonic coefficients when computing the spatial projections. We discuss methods to produce mass anomaly grids that have no stripe features while satisfying the necessary condition of capturing all observed signal within the GRACE noise level.

  6. Transportation concepts for space industrialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    Space shuttle and heavy lift launch vehicle concepts are described with attention to transportation cost trends. Chemical (LOX/LH2), nuclear, and electric propulsion systems are considered. Suggested space shuttle projects include the support of manned geosynchronous missions and the transfer of bulk cargo and large-delicate space structures from fabrication/assembly orbits to their operational locations. It is thought that development of the space shuttle will stimulate interest in space industrialization.

  7. Neural Evidence of Statistical Learning: Efficient Detection of Visual Regularities without Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.; Scholl, Brian J.; Chun, Marvin M.; Johnson, Marcia K.

    2009-01-01

    Our environment contains regularities distributed in space and time that can be detected by way of statistical learning. This unsupervised learning occurs without intent or awareness, but little is known about how it relates to other types of learning, how it affects perceptual processing, and how quickly it can occur. Here we use fMRI during…

  8. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  9. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  10. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  11. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section 61.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS Regular Fellowships § 61.3 Purpose of regular fellowships. Regular fellowships...

  12. Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y. M.

    2011-05-06

    In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

  13. Charged fermions tunneling from regular black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Javed, W.

    2012-11-15

    We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions as a tunneling process from charged regular black holes, i.e., the Bardeen and ABGB black holes. For this purpose, we apply the semiclassical WKB approximation to the general covariant Dirac equation for charged particles and evaluate the tunneling probabilities. We recover the Hawking temperature corresponding to these charged regular black holes. Further, we consider the back-reaction effects of the emitted spin particles from black holes and calculate their corresponding quantum corrections to the radiation spectrum. We find that this radiation spectrum is not purely thermal due to the energy and charge conservation but has some corrections. In the absence of charge, e = 0, our results are consistent with those already present in the literature.

  14. Tracking magnetogram proper motions by multiscale regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.

    1995-01-01

    Long uninterrupted sequences of solar magnetograms from the global oscillations network group (GONG) network and from the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO) satellite will provide the opportunity to study the proper motions of magnetic features. The possible use of multiscale regularization, a scale-recursive estimation technique which begins with a prior model of how state variables and their statistical properties propagate over scale. Short magnetogram sequences are analyzed with the multiscale regularization algorithm as applied to optical flow. This algorithm is found to be efficient, provides results for all the spatial scales spanned by the data and provides error estimates for the solutions. It is found that the algorithm is less sensitive to evolutionary changes than correlation tracking.

  15. Modeling Regular Replacement for String Constraint Solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Xiang; Li, Chung-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Bugs in user input sanitation of software systems often lead to vulnerabilities. Among them many are caused by improper use of regular replacement. This paper presents a precise modeling of various semantics of regular substitution, such as the declarative, finite, greedy, and reluctant, using finite state transducers (FST). By projecting an FST to its input/output tapes, we are able to solve atomic string constraints, which can be applied to both the forward and backward image computation in model checking and symbolic execution of text processing programs. We report several interesting discoveries, e.g., certain fragments of the general problem can be handled using less expressive deterministic FST. A compact representation of FST is implemented in SUSHI, a string constraint solver. It is applied to detecting vulnerabilities in web applications

  16. Supplementary Auditory and Vestibular Stimulation: Effects on Institutionalized Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Supplementary stimulation was supplied for 30 minutes per day for approximately six weeks to 156 normal, full-term institutionalized infants prior to adoption. The Gesell Developmental Schedules were administered regularly (until age 27 months), to determine whether development had been enhanced by the treatment. (JMB)

  17. A regular version of Smilansky model

    SciTech Connect

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a modification of Smilansky model in which a singular potential “channel” is replaced by a regular, below unbounded potential which shrinks as it becomes deeper. We demonstrate that, similarly to the original model, such a system exhibits a spectral transition with respect to the coupling constant, and determine the critical value above which a new spectral branch opens. The result is generalized to situations with multiple potential “channels.”.

  18. Optical tomography by means of regularized MLEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majer, Charles L.; Urbanek, Tina; Peter, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    To solve the inverse problem involved in fluorescence mediated tomography a regularized maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction strategy is proposed. This technique has recently been applied to reconstruct galaxy clusters in astronomy and is adopted here. The MLEM algorithm is implemented as Richardson-Lucy (RL) scheme and includes entropic regularization and a floating default prior. Hence, the strategy is very robust against measurement noise and also avoids converging into noise patterns. Normalized Gaussian filtering with fixed standard deviation is applied for the floating default kernel. The reconstruction strategy is investigated using the XFM-2 homogeneous mouse phantom (Caliper LifeSciences Inc., Hopkinton, MA) with known optical properties. Prior to optical imaging, X-ray CT tomographic data of the phantom were acquire to provide structural context. Phantom inclusions were fit with various fluorochrome inclusions (Cy5.5) for which optical data at 60 projections over 360 degree have been acquired, respectively. Fluorochrome excitation has been accomplished by scanning laser point illumination in transmission mode (laser opposite to camera). Following data acquisition, a 3D triangulated mesh is derived from the reconstructed CT data which is then matched with the various optical projection images through 2D linear interpolation, correlation and Fourier transformation in order to assess translational and rotational deviations between the optical and CT imaging systems. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed regularized MLEM algorithm, when driven with a constant initial condition, yields reconstructed images that tend to be smoother in comparison to classical MLEM without regularization. Once the floating default prior is included this bias was significantly reduced.

  19. A regularization approach to hydrofacies delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt; Tartakovsky, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We consider an inverse problem of identifying complex internal structures of composite (geological) materials from sparse measurements of system parameters and system states. Two conceptual frameworks for identifying internal boundaries between constitutive materials in a composite are considered. A sequential approach relies on support vector machines, nearest neighbor classifiers, or geostatistics to reconstruct boundaries from measurements of system parameters and then uses system states data to refine the reconstruction. A joint approach inverts the two data sets simultaneously by employing a regularization approach.

  20. Regularization of parallel MRI reconstruction using in vivo coil sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Otazo, Ricardo; Xu, Jian; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2009-02-01

    Parallel MRI can achieve increased spatiotemporal resolution in MRI by simultaneously sampling reduced k-space data with multiple receiver coils. One requirement that different parallel MRI techniques have in common is the need to determine spatial sensitivity information for the coil array. This is often done by smoothing the raw sensitivities obtained from low-resolution calibration images, for example via polynomial fitting. However, this sensitivity post-processing can be both time-consuming and error-prone. Another important factor in Parallel MRI is noise amplification in the reconstruction, which is due to non-unity transformations in the image reconstruction associated with spatially correlated coil sensitivity profiles. Generally, regularization approaches, such as Tikhonov and SVD-based methods, are applied to reduce SNR loss, at the price of introducing residual aliasing. In this work, we present a regularization approach using in vivo coil sensitivities in parallel MRI to overcome these potential errors into the reconstruction. The mathematical background of the proposed method is explained, and the technique is demonstrated with phantom images. The effectiveness of the proposed method is then illustrated clinically in a whole-heart 3D cardiac MR acquisition within a single breath-hold. The proposed method can not only overcome the sensitivity calibration problem, but also suppress a substantial portion of reconstruction-related noise without noticeable introduction of residual aliasing artifacts.

  1. General theory of regular biorthogonal pairs and its physical operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, H.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a general theory of regular biorthogonal sequences and its physical operators. Biorthogonal sequences {ϕn} and {ψn} in a Hilbert space H are said to be regular if Span {ϕn} and Span {ψn} are dense in H . The first purpose is to show that there exists a non-singular positive self-adjoint operator Tf in H defined by an orthonormal basis (ONB) f ≡ {fn} in H such that ϕn = Tffn and ψ n = Tf - 1 f n , n = 0, 1, …, and such an ONB f is unique. The second purpose is to define and study the lowering operators Af and Bf † , the raising operators Bf and Af † , and the number operators Nf and Nf † determined by the non-singular positive self-adjoint operator Tf. These operators connect with quasi-Hermitian quantum mechanics and its relatives. This paper clarifies and simplifies the mathematical structure of this framework and minimizes the required assumptions.

  2. Mesoscopic Higher Regularity and Subadditivity in Elliptic Homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Scott; Kuusi, Tuomo; Mourrat, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new method for obtaining quantitative results in stochastic homogenization for linear elliptic equations in divergence form. Unlike previous works on the topic, our method does not use concentration inequalities (such as Poincaré or logarithmic Sobolev inequalities in the probability space) and relies instead on a higher ( C k , k ≥ 1) regularity theory for solutions of the heterogeneous equation, which is valid on length scales larger than a certain specified mesoscopic scale. This regularity theory, which is of independent interest, allows us to, in effect, localize the dependence of the solutions on the coefficients and thereby accelerate the rate of convergence of the expected energy of the cell problem by a bootstrap argument. The fluctuations of the energy are then tightly controlled using subadditivity. The convergence of the energy gives control of the scaling of the spatial averages of gradients and fluxes (that is, it quantifies the weak convergence of these quantities), which yields, by a new "multiscale" Poincaré inequality, quantitative estimates on the sublinearity of the corrector.

  3. Low-cost management aspects for developing, producing and operating future space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehlich, Robert A.; Rücker, Udo

    2005-01-01

    It is believed that a potential means for further significant reduction of the recurrent launch cost, which results also in a stimulation of launch rates of small satellites, is to make the launcher reusable, to increase its reliability and to make it suitable for new markets such as mass space tourism. Therefore, not only launching small satellites with expendable rockets on non-regular flights but also with reusable rockets on regular flights should be considered for the long term. However, developing, producing and operating reusable rockets require a fundamental change in the current "business as usual" philosophy. Under current conditions, it might not be possible to develop, to produce or to operate a reusable vehicle fleet economically. The favorite philosophy is based on "smart business" processes adapted by the authors using cost engineering techniques. In the following paper, major strategies for reducing costs are discussed, which are applied for a representative program proposal.

  4. Charge-regularization effects on polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2012-02-01

    When electrically charged macromolecules are dispersed in polar solvents, their effective net charge is generally different from their chemical charges, due to competition between counterion adsorption and the translational entropy of dissociated counterions. The effective charge changes significantly as the experimental conditions change such as variations in solvent quality, temperature, and the concentration of added small electrolytes. This charge-regularization effect leads to major difficulties in interpreting experimental data on polyelectrolyte solutions and challenges in understanding the various polyelectrolyte phenomena. Even the most fundamental issue of experimental determination of molar mass of charged macromolecules by light scattering method has been difficult so far due to this feature. We will present a theory of charge-regularization of flexible polyelectrolytes in solutions and discuss the consequences of charge-regularization on (a) experimental determination of molar mass of polyelectrolytes using scattering techniques, (b) coil-globule transition, (c) macrophase separation in polyelectrolyte solutions, (c) phase behavior in coacervate formation, and (d) volume phase transitions in polyelectrolyte gels.

  5. Automatic detection of regularly repeating vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, David

    2005-09-01

    Many animal species produce repetitive sounds at regular intervals. This regularity can be used for automatic recognition of the sounds, providing improved detection at a given signal-to-noise ratio. Here, the detection of sperm whale sounds is examined. Sperm whales produce highly repetitive ``regular clicks'' at periods of about 0.2-2 s, and faster click trains in certain behavioral contexts. The following detection procedure was tested: a spectrogram was computed; values within a certain frequency band were summed; time windowing was applied; each windowed segment was autocorrelated; and the maximum of the autocorrelation within a certain periodicity range was chosen. This procedure was tested on sets of recordings containing sperm whale sounds and interfering sounds, both low-frequency recordings from autonomous hydrophones and high-frequency ones from towed hydrophone arrays. An optimization procedure iteratively varies detection parameters (spectrogram frame length and frequency range, window length, periodicity range, etc.). Performance of various sets of parameters was measured by setting a standard level of allowable missed calls, and the resulting optimium parameters are described. Performance is also compared to that of a neural network trained using the data sets. The method is also demonstrated for sounds of blue whales, minke whales, and seismic airguns. [Funding from ONR.

  6. Regularized robust coding for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian; Zhang, David

    2013-05-01

    Recently the sparse representation based classification (SRC) has been proposed for robust face recognition (FR). In SRC, the testing image is coded as a sparse linear combination of the training samples, and the representation fidelity is measured by the l2-norm or l1 -norm of the coding residual. Such a sparse coding model assumes that the coding residual follows Gaussian or Laplacian distribution, which may not be effective enough to describe the coding residual in practical FR systems. Meanwhile, the sparsity constraint on the coding coefficients makes the computational cost of SRC very high. In this paper, we propose a new face coding model, namely regularized robust coding (RRC), which could robustly regress a given signal with regularized regression coefficients. By assuming that the coding residual and the coding coefficient are respectively independent and identically distributed, the RRC seeks for a maximum a posterior solution of the coding problem. An iteratively reweighted regularized robust coding (IR(3)C) algorithm is proposed to solve the RRC model efficiently. Extensive experiments on representative face databases demonstrate that the RRC is much more effective and efficient than state-of-the-art sparse representation based methods in dealing with face occlusion, corruption, lighting, and expression changes, etc.

  7. Regularity theory for general stable operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros-Oton, Xavier; Serra, Joaquim

    2016-06-01

    We establish sharp regularity estimates for solutions to Lu = f in Ω ⊂Rn, L being the generator of any stable and symmetric Lévy process. Such nonlocal operators L depend on a finite measure on S n - 1, called the spectral measure. First, we study the interior regularity of solutions to Lu = f in B1. We prove that if f is Cα then u belong to C α + 2 s whenever α + 2 s is not an integer. In case f ∈L∞, we show that the solution u is C2s when s ≠ 1 / 2, and C 2 s - ɛ for all ɛ > 0 when s = 1 / 2. Then, we study the boundary regularity of solutions to Lu = f in Ω, u = 0 in Rn ∖ Ω, in C 1 , 1 domains Ω. We show that solutions u satisfy u /ds ∈C s - ɛ (Ω ‾) for all ɛ > 0, where d is the distance to ∂Ω. Finally, we show that our results are sharp by constructing two counterexamples.

  8. Stimulating Investment in Research and Development. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    Views on ways the U.S. tax code might be used to stimulate investment in research and development were presented at this hearing. Witnesses represented industry and universities and included experts on how tax policy impacts scientific research and development. The document contains testimonies and supporting documentation from the following…

  9. Chiral Thirring–Wess model with Faddeevian regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Rahaman, Anisur

    2015-03-15

    Replacing vector type of interaction of the Thirring–Wess model by the chiral type a new model is presented which is termed here as chiral Thirring–Wess model. Ambiguity parameters of regularization are so chosen that the model falls into the Faddeevian class. The resulting Faddeevian class of model in general does not possess Lorentz invariance. However we can exploit the arbitrariness admissible in the ambiguity parameters to relate the quantum mechanically generated ambiguity parameters with the classical parameter involved in the masslike term of the gauge field which helps to maintain physical Lorentz invariance instead of the absence of manifestly Lorentz covariance of the model. The phase space structure and the theoretical spectrum of this class of model have been determined through Dirac’s method of quantization of constraint system.

  10. Temporal Prediction in lieu of Periodic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Morillon, Benjamin; Schroeder, Charles E; Wyart, Valentin; Arnal, Luc H

    2016-02-24

    Predicting not only what will happen, but also when it will happen is extremely helpful for optimizing perception and action. Temporal predictions driven by periodic stimulation increase perceptual sensitivity and reduce response latencies. At the neurophysiological level, a single mechanism has been proposed to mediate this twofold behavioral improvement: the rhythmic entrainment of slow cortical oscillations to the stimulation rate. However, temporal regularities can occur in aperiodic contexts, suggesting that temporal predictions per se may be dissociable from entrainment to periodic sensory streams. We investigated this possibility in two behavioral experiments, asking human participants to detect near-threshold auditory tones embedded in streams whose temporal and spectral properties were manipulated. While our findings confirm that periodic stimulation reduces response latencies, in agreement with the hypothesis of a stimulus-driven entrainment of neural excitability, they further reveal that this motor facilitation can be dissociated from the enhancement of auditory sensitivity. Perceptual sensitivity improvement is unaffected by the nature of temporal regularities (periodic vs aperiodic), but contingent on the co-occurrence of a fulfilled spectral prediction. Altogether, the dissociation between predictability and periodicity demonstrates that distinct mechanisms flexibly and synergistically operate to facilitate perception and action. PMID:26911682

  11. Analysis of regularized inversion of data corrupted by white Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekkonen, Hanne; Lassas, Matti; Siltanen, Samuli

    2014-04-01

    Tikhonov regularization is studied in the case of linear pseudodifferential operator as the forward map and additive white Gaussian noise as the measurement error. The measurement model for an unknown function u(x) is \\begin{eqnarray*} m(x) = Au(x) + \\delta \\varepsilon (x), \\end{eqnarray*} where δ > 0 is the noise magnitude. If ɛ was an L2-function, Tikhonov regularization gives an estimate \\begin{eqnarray*} T_\\alpha (m) = \\mathop {{arg\\, min}}_{u\\in H^r} \\big \\lbrace \\Vert A u-m\\Vert _{L^2}^2+ \\alpha \\Vert u\\Vert _{H^r}^2 \\big \\rbrace \\end{eqnarray*} for u where α = α(δ) is the regularization parameter. Here penalization of the Sobolev norm \\Vert u\\Vert _{H^r} covers the cases of standard Tikhonov regularization (r = 0) and first derivative penalty (r = 1). Realizations of white Gaussian noise are almost never in L2, but do belong to Hs with probability one if s < 0 is small enough. A modification of Tikhonov regularization theory is presented, covering the case of white Gaussian measurement noise. Furthermore, the convergence of regularized reconstructions to the correct solution as δ → 0 is proven in appropriate function spaces using microlocal analysis. The convergence of the related finite-dimensional problems to the infinite-dimensional problem is also analysed.

  12. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  13. Effects of periodic stimulation on an overly activated neuronal circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Okyu; Kim, Kiwoong; Park, Sungwon; Moon, Hie-Tae

    2011-08-01

    Motivated by therapeutic deep brain stimulation, we carried out a model study on the effects of periodic stimulation on an overly activated neuronal circuit. Our neuronal circuit, modeled as a small-world network of noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neurons, is controlled to undergo the mechanism of coherence resonance to exhibit spontaneous synchronization of neuronal firing. This state of energy burst is then directly modulated by a chain of electric pulses. Our study shows that (i) the stimulation blocks the synchronization by generating traveling waves, (ii) only the pulse with proper frequency can block the synchronization, and (iii) the effects of stimulation are completely reversible. It is also found that the stimulation is effective only when the network maintains fairly good structural regularity.

  14. Stimulant Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Taryn M; Haning, William F

    2016-07-01

    Compared with other illicit substances, stimulants are not commonly used by adolescents; however, they represent a serious concern regarding substance use among youths. This article uses methamphetamine as a model for stimulant use in adolescents; cocaine and prescription stimulants are also mentioned. Methamphetamine use among adolescents and young adults is a serious health concern with potentially long-term physical, cognitive, and psychiatric consequences. Brain development and the effects of misusing stimulants align such that usage in adolescents can more dangerous than during adulthood. It seems helpful to keep in mind the differences between adolescents and young adults when implementing interventions. PMID:27338967

  15. Correction of multi-spectral MRI intensity non-uniformity via spatially regularized feature condensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Uros; Pernus, Franjo; Likar, Bostjan

    2003-05-01

    In MRI, image intensity non-uniformity is an adverse phenomenon that increases inter-tissue overlapping. The aim of this study was to provide a novel general framework, named regularized feature condensing (RFC), for condensing the distribution of image features and apply it to correct intensity non-uniformity via spatial regularization. The proposed RCF method is an iterative procedure, which consists of four basic steps. First, creation of a feature space, which consists of multi-spectral image intensities and corresponding second derivatives. Second, estimation of the intensity condensing map in feature space, i.e. the estimation of the increase of feature probability densities by a well-established mean shift procedure. Third, regularization of intensity condensing map in image space, which yields the estimation of intensity non-uniformity. Fourth, applying the estimation of non-uniformity correction to the input image. In this way, the intensity distributions of distinct tissues are gradually condensed via spatial regularization. The method was tested on simulated and real MR brain images for which gold standard segmentations were available. The results showed that the method did not induce additional intensity variations in simulated uniform images and efficiently removed intensity non-uniformity in real MR brain images. The proposed RCF method is a powerful fully automated intensity non-uniformity correction method that makes no a prior assumptions on the image intensity distribution and provides non-parametric non-uniformity correction.

  16. Regular physical exercise: way to healthy life.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Nessa, A; Hossain, M A

    2010-01-01

    Any bodily activity or movement that enhances and maintains overall health and physical fitness is called physical exercise. Habit of regular physical exercise has got numerous benefits. Exercise is of various types such as aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise and flexibility exercise. Aerobic exercise moves the large muscle groups with alternate contraction and relaxation, forces to deep breath, heart to pump more blood with adequate tissue oxygenation. It is also called cardiovascular exercise. Examples of aerobic exercise are walking, running, jogging, swimming etc. In anaerobic exercise, there is forceful contraction of muscle with stretching, usually mechanically aided and help to build up muscle strength and muscle bulk. Examples are weight lifting, pulling, pushing, sprinting etc. Flexibility exercise is one type of stretching exercise to improve the movements of muscles, joints and ligaments. Walking is a good example of aerobic exercise, easy to perform, safe, effective, does not require any training or equipment and less chance of injury. Regular 30 minutes brisk walking in the morning with 150 minutes per week is a good exercise. Regular exercise improves the cardiovascular status, reduces the risk of cardiac disease, high blood pressure and cerebrovascular disease. It reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity, helps in glycemic control, prevents obesity and diabetes mellitus. It is helpful for relieving anxiety, stress, brings a sense of well being and overall physical fitness. Global trend is mechanization, labor savings and leading to epidemic of long term chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases etc. All efforts should be made to create public awareness promoting physical activity, physically demanding recreational pursuits and providing adequate facilities. PMID:20046192

  17. Causal Measurement Models: Can Criticism Stimulate Clarification?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    In their 2016 work, Aguirre-Urreta et al. provided a contribution to the literature on causal measurement models that enhances clarity and stimulates further thinking. Aguirre-Urreta et al. presented a form of statistical identity involving mapping onto the portion of the parameter space involving the nomological net, relationships between the…

  18. Bose and Fermi statistics and the regularization of the nonrelativistic Jacobian for the scale anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chris L.; Ordóñez, Carlos R.

    2016-10-01

    We regulate in Euclidean space the Jacobian under scale transformations for two-dimensional nonrelativistic fermions and bosons interacting via contact interactions and compare the resulting scaling anomalies. For fermions, Grassmannian integration inverts the Jacobian; however, this effect is canceled by the regularization procedure and a result similar to that of bosons is attained. We show the independence of the result with respect to the regulating function, and show the robustness of our methods by comparing the procedure with an effective potential method using both cutoff and ζ -function regularization.

  19. A Regular Tetrahedron Formation Strategy for Swarm Robots in Three-Dimensional Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, M. Fikret; Li, Xiang; Liang, Ximing

    A decentralized control method, namely Regular Tetrahedron Formation (RTF), is presented for a swarm of simple robots operating in three-dimensional space. It is based on virtual spring mechanism and enables four neighboring robots to autonomously form a Regular Tetrahedron (RT) regardless of their initial positions. RTF method is applied to various sizes of swarms through a dynamic neighbor selection procedure. Each robot's behavior depends only on position of three dynamically selected neighbors. An obstacle avoidance model is also introduced. Final, algorithm is studied with computational experiments which demonstrated that it is effective.

  20. Total-variation regularization with bound constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2009-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for bound-constrained total-variation (TV) regularization that in comparison with its predecessors is simple, fast, and flexible. We use a splitting approach to decouple TV minimization from enforcing the constraints. Consequently, existing TV solvers can be employed with minimal alteration. This also makes the approach straightforward to generalize to any situation where TV can be applied. We consider deblurring of images with Gaussian or salt-and-pepper noise, as well as Abel inversion of radiographs with Poisson noise. We incorporate previous iterative reweighting algorithms to solve the TV portion.

  1. The regular state in higher order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Trachilis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    We consider the higher-order gravity theory derived from the quadratic Lagrangian R + 𝜖R2 in vacuum as a first-order (ADM-type) system with constraints, and build time developments of solutions of an initial value formulation of the theory. We show that all such solutions, if analytic, contain the right number of free functions to qualify as general solutions of the theory. We further show that any regular analytic solution which satisfies the constraints and the evolution equations can be given in the form of an asymptotic formal power series expansion.

  2. New Regularization Method for EXAFS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Tatiana Ye.; Korshunov, Maxim E.; Antonova, Tatiana V.; Ageev, Alexander L.; Moll, Henry; Reich, Tobias

    2007-02-01

    As an alternative to the analysis of EXAFS spectra by conventional shell fitting, the Tikhonov regularization method has been proposed. An improved algorithm that utilizes a priori information about the sample has been developed and applied to the analysis of U L3-edge spectra of soddyite, (UO2)2SiO4ṡ2H2O, and of U(VI) sorbed onto kaolinite. The partial radial distribution functions g1(UU), g2(USi), and g3(UO) of soddyite agree with crystallographic values and previous EXAFS results.

  3. New Regularization Method for EXAFS Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, Tatiana Ye.; Reich, Tobias; Korshunov, Maxim E.; Antonova, Tatiana V.; Ageev, Alexander L.; Moll, Henry

    2007-02-02

    As an alternative to the analysis of EXAFS spectra by conventional shell fitting, the Tikhonov regularization method has been proposed. An improved algorithm that utilizes a priori information about the sample has been developed and applied to the analysis of U L3-edge spectra of soddyite, (UO2)2SiO4{center_dot}2H2O, and of U(VI) sorbed onto kaolinite. The partial radial distribution functions g1(UU), g2(USi), and g3(UO) of soddyite agree with crystallographic values and previous EXAFS results.

  4. Regular systems of inbreeding with mutation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R B

    1988-08-01

    Probability of identity by type is studied for regular systems of inbreeding in the presence of mutation. Analytic results are presented for half-sib mating, first cousin mating, and half nth cousin mating under both infinite allele and two allele (back mutation) models. Reasonable rates of mutation do not provide significantly different results from probability of identity by descent in the absence of mutation. Homozygosity is higher under half-sib mating than under first cousin mating, but the expected number of copies of a gene in the population is higher under first cousin mating than under half-sib mating.

  5. Multichannel image regularization using anisotropic geodesic filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Grazzini, Jacopo A

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends a recent image-dependent regularization approach introduced in aiming at edge-preserving smoothing. For that purpose, geodesic distances equipped with a Riemannian metric need to be estimated in local neighbourhoods. By deriving an appropriate metric from the gradient structure tensor, the associated geodesic paths are constrained to follow salient features in images. Following, we design a generalized anisotropic geodesic filter; incorporating not only a measure of the edge strength, like in the original method, but also further directional information about the image structures. The proposed filter is particularly efficient at smoothing heterogeneous areas while preserving relevant structures in multichannel images.

  6. Supporting Regularized Logistic Regression Privately and Efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenfa; Liu, Hongzhe; Yang, Peng; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most popular statistical and machine learning models, logistic regression with regularization has found wide adoption in biomedicine, social sciences, information technology, and so on. These domains often involve data of human subjects that are contingent upon strict privacy regulations. Concerns over data privacy make it increasingly difficult to coordinate and conduct large-scale collaborative studies, which typically rely on cross-institution data sharing and joint analysis. Our work here focuses on safeguarding regularized logistic regression, a widely-used statistical model while at the same time has not been investigated from a data security and privacy perspective. We consider a common use scenario of multi-institution collaborative studies, such as in the form of research consortia or networks as widely seen in genetics, epidemiology, social sciences, etc. To make our privacy-enhancing solution practical, we demonstrate a non-conventional and computationally efficient method leveraging distributing computing and strong cryptography to provide comprehensive protection over individual-level and summary data. Extensive empirical evaluations on several studies validate the privacy guarantee, efficiency and scalability of our proposal. We also discuss the practical implications of our solution for large-scale studies and applications from various disciplines, including genetic and biomedical studies, smart grid, network analysis, etc. PMID:27271738

  7. Supporting Regularized Logistic Regression Privately and Efficiently.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfa; Liu, Hongzhe; Yang, Peng; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most popular statistical and machine learning models, logistic regression with regularization has found wide adoption in biomedicine, social sciences, information technology, and so on. These domains often involve data of human subjects that are contingent upon strict privacy regulations. Concerns over data privacy make it increasingly difficult to coordinate and conduct large-scale collaborative studies, which typically rely on cross-institution data sharing and joint analysis. Our work here focuses on safeguarding regularized logistic regression, a widely-used statistical model while at the same time has not been investigated from a data security and privacy perspective. We consider a common use scenario of multi-institution collaborative studies, such as in the form of research consortia or networks as widely seen in genetics, epidemiology, social sciences, etc. To make our privacy-enhancing solution practical, we demonstrate a non-conventional and computationally efficient method leveraging distributing computing and strong cryptography to provide comprehensive protection over individual-level and summary data. Extensive empirical evaluations on several studies validate the privacy guarantee, efficiency and scalability of our proposal. We also discuss the practical implications of our solution for large-scale studies and applications from various disciplines, including genetic and biomedical studies, smart grid, network analysis, etc. PMID:27271738

  8. Supporting Regularized Logistic Regression Privately and Efficiently.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfa; Liu, Hongzhe; Yang, Peng; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most popular statistical and machine learning models, logistic regression with regularization has found wide adoption in biomedicine, social sciences, information technology, and so on. These domains often involve data of human subjects that are contingent upon strict privacy regulations. Concerns over data privacy make it increasingly difficult to coordinate and conduct large-scale collaborative studies, which typically rely on cross-institution data sharing and joint analysis. Our work here focuses on safeguarding regularized logistic regression, a widely-used statistical model while at the same time has not been investigated from a data security and privacy perspective. We consider a common use scenario of multi-institution collaborative studies, such as in the form of research consortia or networks as widely seen in genetics, epidemiology, social sciences, etc. To make our privacy-enhancing solution practical, we demonstrate a non-conventional and computationally efficient method leveraging distributing computing and strong cryptography to provide comprehensive protection over individual-level and summary data. Extensive empirical evaluations on several studies validate the privacy guarantee, efficiency and scalability of our proposal. We also discuss the practical implications of our solution for large-scale studies and applications from various disciplines, including genetic and biomedical studies, smart grid, network analysis, etc.

  9. The Regularity of Optimal Irrigation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Jean-Michel; Santambrogio, Filippo

    2010-02-01

    A branched structure is observable in draining and irrigation systems, in electric power supply systems, and in natural objects like blood vessels, the river basins or the trees. Recent approaches of these networks derive their branched structure from an energy functional whose essential feature is to favor wide routes. Given a flow s in a river, a road, a tube or a wire, the transportation cost per unit length is supposed in these models to be proportional to s α with 0 < α < 1. The aim of this paper is to prove the regularity of paths (rivers, branches,...) when the irrigated measure is the Lebesgue density on a smooth open set and the irrigating measure is a single source. In that case we prove that all branches of optimal irrigation trees satisfy an elliptic equation and that their curvature is a bounded measure. In consequence all branching points in the network have a tangent cone made of a finite number of segments, and all other points have a tangent. An explicit counterexample disproves these regularity properties for non-Lebesgue irrigated measures.

  10. Accelerating Large Data Analysis By Exploiting Regularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Ellsworth, David

    2003-01-01

    We present techniques for discovering and exploiting regularity in large curvilinear data sets. The data can be based on a single mesh or a mesh composed of multiple submeshes (also known as zones). Multi-zone data are typical to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Regularities include axis-aligned rectilinear and cylindrical meshes as well as cases where one zone is equivalent to a rigid-body transformation of another. Our algorithms can also discover rigid-body motion of meshes in time-series data. Next, we describe a data model where we can utilize the results from the discovery process in order to accelerate large data visualizations. Where possible, we replace general curvilinear zones with rectilinear or cylindrical zones. In rigid-body motion cases we replace a time-series of meshes with a transformed mesh object where a reference mesh is dynamically transformed based on a given time value in order to satisfy geometry requests, on demand. The data model enables us to make these substitutions and dynamic transformations transparently with respect to the visualization algorithms. We present results with large data sets where we combine our mesh replacement and transformation techniques with out-of-core paging in order to achieve significant speed-ups in analysis.

  11. Regularized Semiparametric Estimation for Ordinary Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Naisyin

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are widely used in modeling dynamic systems and have ample applications in the fields of physics, engineering, economics and biological sciences. The ODE parameters often possess physiological meanings and can help scientists gain better understanding of the system. One key interest is thus to well estimate these parameters. Ideally, constant parameters are preferred due to their easy interpretation. In reality, however, constant parameters can be too restrictive such that even after incorporating error terms, there could still be unknown sources of disturbance that lead to poor agreement between observed data and the estimated ODE system. In this paper, we address this issue and accommodate short-term interferences by allowing parameters to vary with time. We propose a new regularized estimation procedure on the time-varying parameters of an ODE system so that these parameters could change with time during transitions but remain constants within stable stages. We found, through simulation studies, that the proposed method performs well and tends to have less variation in comparison to the non-regularized approach. On the theoretical front, we derive finite-sample estimation error bounds for the proposed method. Applications of the proposed method to modeling the hare-lynx relationship and the measles incidence dynamic in Ontario, Canada lead to satisfactory and meaningful results. PMID:26392639

  12. GENERATING OSCILLATORY BURSTS FROM A NETWORK OF REGULAR SPIKING NEURONS WITHOUT INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jing; Lai, Dihui; Meyer, Ulrike; Luksch, Harald; Wessel, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Avian nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis (Ipc) neurons are reciprocally connected with the layer 10 (L10) neurons in the optic tectum and respond with oscillatory bursts to visual stimulation. Our in vitro experiments show that both neuron types respond with regular spiking to somatic current injection and that the feedforward and feedback synaptic connections are excitatory, but of different strength and time course. To elucidate mechanisms of oscillatory bursting in this network of regularly spiking neurons, we investigated an experimentally constrained model of coupled leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with spike-rate adaptation. The model reproduces the observed Ipc oscillatory bursting in response to simulated visual stimulation. A scan through the model parameter volume reveals that Ipc oscillatory burst generation can be caused by strong and brief feedforward synaptic conductance changes. The mechanism is sensitive to the parameter values of spike-rate adaptation. In conclusion, we show that a network of regular-spiking neurons with feedforward excitation and spike-rate adaptation can generate oscillatory bursting in response to a constant input. PMID:19572191

  13. [Electromagnetic urological stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zaslavskiĭ AOi; Markarov, G S; Gelis, Iu S

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with an electromagnetic urological stimulator which generates a modulated low-frequency electromagnetic field of nonthermal intensity and its brief technical data. It presents a treatment regimen for urolithiasis and recommendations how to use the above therapeutical agent to stimulate urinary function in patients with urolithiasis in order to inoperatively eliminate urinary calculi and sand which form following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

  14. Stimulating your appetite.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    A number of legal and illegal drugs can help stimulate appetite and are used for people with HIV to prevent wasting. Stimulating hunger is important because lower calorie intake and poor absorption of nutrients are associated with wasting. The uses and potential drawbacks of marijuana, thalidomide (Synovir), Marinol, and Megace are described. PMID:11365223

  15. Regular black holes and noncommutative geometry inspired fuzzy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shinpei

    2016-05-01

    We investigated regular black holes with fuzzy sources in three and four dimensions. The density distributions of such fuzzy sources are inspired by noncommutative geometry and given by Gaussian or generalized Gaussian functions. We utilized mass functions to give a physical interpretation of the horizon formation condition for the black holes. In particular, we investigated three-dimensional BTZ-like black holes and four-dimensional Schwarzschild-like black holes in detail, and found that the number of horizons is related to the space-time dimensions, and the existence of a void in the vicinity of the center of the space-time is significant, rather than noncommutativity. As an application, we considered a three-dimensional black hole with the fuzzy disc which is a disc-shaped region known in the context of noncommutative geometry as a source. We also analyzed a four-dimensional black hole with a source whose density distribution is an extension of the fuzzy disc, and investigated the horizon formation condition for it.

  16. Learning about time within the spinal cord: evidence that spinal neurons can abstract and store an index of regularity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan H.; Turtle, Joel D.; Huang, Yung-Jen; Strain, Misty M.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Grau, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that intermittent noxious stimulation has divergent effects on spinal cord plasticity depending upon whether it occurs in a regular (fixed time, FT) or irregular (variable time, VT) manner: In spinally transected animals, VT stimulation to the tail or hind leg impaired spinal learning whereas an extended exposure to FT stimulation had a restorative/protective effect. These observations imply that lower level systems are sensitive to temporal relations. Using spinally transected rats, it is shown that the restorative effect of FT stimulation emerges after 540 shocks; fewer shocks generate a learning impairment. The transformative effect of FT stimulation is related to the number of shocks administered, not the duration of exposure. Administration of 360 FT shocks induces a learning deficit that lasts 24 h. If a second bout of FT stimulation is given a day after the first, it restores the capacity to learn. This savings effect implies that the initial training episode had a lasting (memory-like) effect. Two bouts of shock have a transformative effect when applied at different locations or at difference frequencies, implying spinal systems abstract and store an index of regularity (rather than a specific interval). Implications of the results for step training and rehabilitation after injury are discussed. PMID:26539090

  17. Optokinetic Stimulation Affects Temporal Estimation in Healthy Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Caltagirone, Carlo; Oliveri, Massimiliano

    2007-01-01

    The representation of time and space are closely linked in the cognitive system. Optokinetic stimulation modulates spatial attention in healthy subjects and patients with spatial neglect. In order to evaluate whether optokinetic stimulation could influence time perception, a group of healthy subjects performed "time-comparison" tasks of sub- and…

  18. Electrical stimulation for pressure sore prevention and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bogie, K M; Reger, S I; Levine, S P; Sahgal, V

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of therapeutic electrical stimulation (ES) specific to wound healing and pressure sore prevention. The application of ES for wound healing has been found to increase the rate of healing by more than 50%. Furthermore, the total number of wounds healed is also increased. However, optimal delivery techniques for ES therapy have not been established to date. A study of stimulation current effects on wound healing in a pig model has shown that direct current (DC) stimulation is most effective in wound area reduction and alternating current (AC) stimulation for wound volume reduction at current densities of 127 microA/cm2 and 1,125 microA/cm2, respectively. Preliminary studies have been carried out at two research centers to assess the role of ES in pressure sore prevention. Surface stimulation studies have shown that ES can produce positive short-term changes in tissue health variables such as regional blood flow and pressure distribution. The use of an implanted stimulation system consisting of intramuscular electrodes with percutaneous leads has been found to produce additional long-term changes. Specifically, gluteal muscle thickness increased by 50% with regular long-term ES application concurrent with a 20% decrease in regional interface pressures and increased tissue oxygen levels. These findings indicate that an implantable ES system may have great potential for pressure sore prevention, particularly for individuals who lack sensation or who are physically unable to perform regular independent pressure relief.

  19. Global structure of regular tori in a generic 4D symplectic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, S.; Richter, M.; Onken, F.; Bäcker, A.; Ketzmerick, R.

    2014-06-01

    For the case of generic 4d symplectic maps with a mixed phase space, we investigate the global organization of regular tori. For this, we compute elliptic 1-tori of two coupled standard maps and display them in a 3d phase-space slice. This visualizes how all regular 2-tori are organized around a skeleton of elliptic 1-tori in the 4d phase space. The 1-tori occur in two types of one-parameter families: (α) Lyapunov families emanating from elliptic-elliptic periodic orbits, which are observed to exist even far away from them and beyond major resonance gaps, and (β) families originating from rank-1 resonances. At resonance gaps of both types of families either (i) periodic orbits exist, similar to the Poincaré-Birkhoff theorem for 2d maps, or (ii) the family may form large bends. In combination, these results allow for describing the hierarchical structure of regular tori in the 4d phase space analogously to the islands-around-islands hierarchy in 2d maps.

  20. Recognition Memory for Novel Stimuli: The Structural Regularity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Anne M.; Morris, Alison L.; Langley, Moses M.

    2007-01-01

    Early studies of human memory suggest that adherence to a known structural regularity (e.g., orthographic regularity) benefits memory for an otherwise novel stimulus (e.g., G. A. Miller, 1958). However, a more recent study suggests that structural regularity can lead to an increase in false-positive responses on recognition memory tests (B. W. A.…

  1. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  2. The Essential Special Education Guide for the Regular Education Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004 has placed a renewed emphasis on the importance of the regular classroom, the regular classroom teacher and the general curriculum as the primary focus of special education. This book contains over 100 topics that deal with real issues and concerns regarding the regular classroom and…

  3. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced... withholding (spouse annuity only), recovery of debts due the Federal government, and garnishment pursuant...

  4. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced... withholding (spouse annuity only), recovery of debts due the Federal government, and garnishment pursuant...

  5. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced... withholding (spouse annuity only), recovery of debts due the Federal government, and garnishment pursuant...

  6. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced... withholding (spouse annuity only), recovery of debts due the Federal government, and garnishment pursuant...

  7. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced... withholding (spouse annuity only), recovery of debts due the Federal government, and garnishment pursuant...

  8. Regularity of free boundaries a heuristic retro

    PubMed Central

    Caffarelli, Luis A.; Shahgholian, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This survey concerns regularity theory of a few free boundary problems that have been developed in the past half a century. Our intention is to bring up different ideas and techniques that constitute the fundamentals of the theory. We shall discuss four different problems, where approaches are somewhat different in each case. Nevertheless, these problems can be divided into two groups: (i) obstacle and thin obstacle problem; (ii) minimal surfaces, and cavitation flow of a perfect fluid. In each case, we shall only discuss the methodology and approaches, giving basic ideas and tools that have been specifically designed and tailored for that particular problem. The survey is kept at a heuristic level with mainly geometric interpretation of the techniques and situations in hand. PMID:26261372

  9. Local orientational mobility in regular hyperbranched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgushev, Maxim; Markelov, Denis A.; Fürstenberg, Florian; Guérin, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics of local bond orientation in regular hyperbranched polymers modeled by Vicsek fractals. The local dynamics is investigated through the temporal autocorrelation functions of single bonds and the corresponding relaxation forms of the complex dielectric susceptibility. We show that the dynamic behavior of single segments depends on their remoteness from the periphery rather than on the size of the whole macromolecule. Remarkably, the dynamics of the core segments (which are most remote from the periphery) shows a scaling behavior that differs from the dynamics obtained after structural average. We analyze the most relevant processes of single segment motion and provide an analytic approximation for the corresponding relaxation times. Furthermore, we describe an iterative method to calculate the orientational dynamics in the case of very large macromolecular sizes.

  10. Generalized equations of state and regular universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, F.; Cruz, N.; González, E.

    2016-05-01

    We found non singular solutions for universes filled with a fluid which obey a Generalized Equation of State of the form P(ρ) = - Aρ + γρλ. An emergent universe is obtained if A =1 and λ = 1/2. If the matter source is reinterpret as that of a scalar matter field with some potential, the corresponding potential is derived. For a closed universe, an exact bounce solution is found for A = 1/3 and the same λ. We also explore how the composition of theses universes ean be interpreted in terms of known fluids. It is of interest to note that accelerated solutions previously found for the late time evolution also represent regular solutions at early times.

  11. Local orientational mobility in regular hyperbranched polymers.

    PubMed

    Dolgushev, Maxim; Markelov, Denis A; Fürstenberg, Florian; Guérin, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamics of local bond orientation in regular hyperbranched polymers modeled by Vicsek fractals. The local dynamics is investigated through the temporal autocorrelation functions of single bonds and the corresponding relaxation forms of the complex dielectric susceptibility. We show that the dynamic behavior of single segments depends on their remoteness from the periphery rather than on the size of the whole macromolecule. Remarkably, the dynamics of the core segments (which are most remote from the periphery) shows a scaling behavior that differs from the dynamics obtained after structural average. We analyze the most relevant processes of single segment motion and provide an analytic approximation for the corresponding relaxation times. Furthermore, we describe an iterative method to calculate the orientational dynamics in the case of very large macromolecular sizes. PMID:27575171

  12. Regularization of Motion Equations with L-Transformation and Numerical Integration of the Regular Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleshchikov, Sergei M.

    2003-04-01

    The sets of L-matrices of the second, fourth and eighth orders are constructed axiomatically. The defining relations are taken from the regularization of motion equations for Keplerian problem. In particular, the Levi-Civita matrix and KS-matrix are L-matrices of second and fourth order, respectively. A theorem on the ranks of L-transformations of different orders is proved. The notion of L-similarity transformation is introduced, certain sets of L-matrices are constructed, and their classification is given. An application of fourth order L-matrices for N-body problem regularization is given. A method of correction for regular coordinates in the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration method for regular motion equations of a perturbed two-body problem is suggested. Comparison is given for the results of numerical integration in the problem of defining the orbit of a satellite, with and without the above correction method. The comparison is carried out with respect to the number of calls to the subroutine evaluating the perturbational accelerations vector. The results of integration using the correction turn out to be in a favorable position.

  13. Regularization of Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Van Vorst, D. G.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We compare two different methods of computation of a temporally local frequency:1) A stabilized instantaneous frequency using the theory of the analytic signal.2) A temporally variant centroid (or dominant) frequency estimated from a time-frequency decomposition.The first method derives from Taner et al (1979) as modified by Fomel (2007) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method computes the power centroid (Cohen, 1995) of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor or Stockwell Transform. Common to both methods is the necessity of division by a diagonal matrix, which requires appropriate regularization.We modify Fomel's (2007) method by explicitly penalizing the roughness of the estimate. Following Farquharson and Oldenburg (2004), we employ both the L curve and GCV methods to obtain the smoothest model that fits the data in the L2 norm.Using synthetic data, quarry blast, earthquakes and the DPRK tests, our results suggest that the optimal method depends on the data. One of the main applications for this work is the discrimination between blast events and earthquakesFomel, Sergey. " Local seismic attributes." , Geophysics, 72.3 (2007): A29-A33.Cohen, Leon. " Time frequency analysis theory and applications." USA: Prentice Hall, (1995).Farquharson, Colin G., and Douglas W. Oldenburg. "A comparison of automatic techniques for estimating the regularization parameter in non-linear inverse problems." Geophysical Journal International 156.3 (2004): 411-425.Taner, M. Turhan, Fulton Koehler, and R. E. Sheriff. " Complex seismic trace analysis." Geophysics, 44.6 (1979): 1041-1063.

  14. Regularization for Atmospheric Temperature Retrieval Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Galarza-Galarza, Ruben

    1997-01-01

    Passive remote sensing of the atmosphere is used to determine the atmospheric state. A radiometer measures microwave emissions from earth's atmosphere and surface. The radiance measured by the radiometer is proportional to the brightness temperature. This brightness temperature can be used to estimate atmospheric parameters such as temperature and water vapor content. These quantities are of primary importance for different applications in meteorology, oceanography, and geophysical sciences. Depending on the range in the electromagnetic spectrum being measured by the radiometer and the atmospheric quantities to be estimated, the retrieval or inverse problem of determining atmospheric parameters from brightness temperature might be linear or nonlinear. In most applications, the retrieval problem requires the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind making this an ill-posed problem. The numerical solution of the retrieval problem requires the transformation of the continuous problem into a discrete problem. The ill-posedness of the continuous problem translates into ill-conditioning or ill-posedness of the discrete problem. Regularization methods are used to convert the ill-posed problem into a well-posed one. In this paper, we present some results of our work in applying different regularization techniques to atmospheric temperature retrievals using brightness temperatures measured with the SSM/T-1 sensor. Simulation results are presented which show the potential of these techniques to improve temperature retrievals. In particular, no statistical assumptions are needed and the algorithms were capable of correctly estimating the temperature profile corner at the tropopause independent of the initial guess.

  15. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  16. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  17. Spend a Day in Outer Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama as stimulating experience for students in aerospace education. The center has the largest collection of space-age hardware assembled under one roof, a Space Flight simulator, a Skylab space station mock-up and many more interesting exhibits. (BR)

  18. Unitarity and ultraviolet regularity in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, Ivan; Ashtekar, Abhay

    2015-06-01

    Quantum field theory in curved space-times is a well developed area in mathematical physics which has had important phenomenological applications to the very early universe. However, it is not commonly appreciated that on time-dependent space-times—including the simplest cosmological models—dynamics of quantum fields is not unitary in the standard sense. This issue is first explained with an explicit example, and it is then shown that a generalized notion of unitarity does hold. The generalized notion allows one to correctly pass to the Schrödinger picture starting from the Heisenberg picture used in the textbook treatments. Finally, we indicate how these considerations can be extended from simple cosmological models to general globally hyperbolic space-times.

  19. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R. B.; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J.; Lee, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding. PMID:27002902

  20. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R B; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding.

  1. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon–Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  2. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, M.; Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon-Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  3. Temporal sparsity exploiting nonlocal regularization for 4D computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Guo, Enyu; Kaestner, Anders; Lionheart, William R B; Bent, Julian; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging applications in medical and material sciences are frequently limited by the number of tomographic projections collected. The inversion of the limited projection data is an ill-posed problem and needs regularization. Traditional spatial regularization is not well adapted to the dynamic nature of time-lapse tomography since it discards the redundancy of the temporal information. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative reconstruction algorithm with a nonlocal regularization term to account for time-evolving datasets. The aim of the proposed nonlocal penalty is to collect the maximum relevant information in the spatial and temporal domains. With the proposed sparsity seeking approach in the temporal space, the computational complexity of the classical nonlocal regularizer is substantially reduced (at least by one order of magnitude). The presented reconstruction method can be directly applied to various big data 4D (x, y, z+time) tomographic experiments in many fields. We apply the proposed technique to modelled data and to real dynamic X-ray microtomography (XMT) data of high resolution. Compared to the classical spatio-temporal nonlocal regularization approach, the proposed method delivers reconstructed images of improved resolution and higher contrast while remaining significantly less computationally demanding. PMID:27002902

  4. Regularization of the circular restricted three-body problem using `similar' coordinate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, R.; Szücs-Csillik, I.

    2012-04-01

    The regularization of a new problem, namely the three-body problem, using `similar' coordinate system is proposed. For this purpose we use the relation of `similarity', which has been introduced as an equivalence relation in a previous paper (see Roman in Astrophys. Space Sci. doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0747-1, 2011). First we write the Hamiltonian function, the equations of motion in canonical form, and then using a generating function, we obtain the transformed equations of motion. After the coordinates transformations, we introduce the fictitious time, to regularize the equations of motion. Explicit formulas are given for the regularization in the coordinate systems centered in the more massive and the less massive star of the binary system. The `similar' polar angle's definition is introduced, in order to analyze the regularization's geometrical transformation. The effect of Levi-Civita's transformation is described in a geometrical manner. Using the resulted regularized equations, we analyze and compare these canonical equations numerically, for the Earth-Moon binary system.

  5. An efficient, advanced regularized inversion method for highly parameterized environmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skahill, B. E.; Baggett, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The Levenberg-Marquardt method of computer based parameter estimation can be readily modified in cases of high parameter insensitivity and correlation by the inclusion of various regularization devices to maintain numerical stability and robustness, including; for example, Tikhonov regularization and truncated singular value decomposition. With Tikhonov regularization, where parameters or combinations of parameters cannot be uniquely estimated, they are provided with values or assigned relationships with other parameters that are decreed to be realistic by the modeler. Tikhonov schemes provide a mechanism for assimilation of valuable "outside knowledge" into the inversion process, with the result that parameter estimates, thus informed by a modeler's expertise, are more suitable for use in the making of important predictions by that model than would otherwise be the case. However, by maintaining the high dimensionality of the adjustable parameter space, they can potentially be computational burdensome. Moreover, while Tikhonov schemes are very attractive and hence widely used, problems with numerical stability can sometimes arise because the strength with which regularization constraints are applied throughout the regularized inversion process cannot be guaranteed to exactly complement inadequacies in the information content of a given calibration dataset. We will present results associated with development efforts that include an accelerated Levenberg-Marquardt local search algorithm adapted for Tikhonov regularization, and a technique which allows relative regularization weights to be estimated as parameters through the calibration process itself (Doherty and Skahill, 2006). This new method, encapsulated in the MICUT software (Skahill et al., 2008) will be compared, in terms of efficiency and enforcement of regularization relationships, with the SVD Assist method (Tonkin and Doherty, 2005) contained in the popular PEST package by considering various watershed

  6. Dynamic experiment design regularization approach to adaptive imaging with array radar/SAR sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the "model-free" variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the "model-based" descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations.

  7. [Formula: see text] regularity properties of singular parameterizations in isogeometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Takacs, T; Jüttler, B

    2012-11-01

    Isogeometric analysis (IGA) is a numerical simulation method which is directly based on the NURBS-based representation of CAD models. It exploits the tensor-product structure of 2- or 3-dimensional NURBS objects to parameterize the physical domain. Hence the physical domain is parameterized with respect to a rectangle or to a cube. Consequently, singularly parameterized NURBS surfaces and NURBS volumes are needed in order to represent non-quadrangular or non-hexahedral domains without splitting, thereby producing a very compact and convenient representation. The Galerkin projection introduces finite-dimensional spaces of test functions in the weak formulation of partial differential equations. In particular, the test functions used in isogeometric analysis are obtained by composing the inverse of the domain parameterization with the NURBS basis functions. In the case of singular parameterizations, however, some of the resulting test functions do not necessarily fulfill the required regularity properties. Consequently, numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations cannot be applied properly. We discuss the regularity properties of the test functions. For one- and two-dimensional domains we consider several important classes of singularities of NURBS parameterizations. For specific cases we derive additional conditions which guarantee the regularity of the test functions. In addition we present a modification scheme for the discretized function space in case of insufficient regularity. It is also shown how these results can be applied for computational domains in higher dimensions that can be parameterized via sweeping.

  8. Dynamic Experiment Design Regularization Approach to Adaptive Imaging with Array Radar/SAR Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the “model-free” variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the “model-based” descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations. PMID:22163859

  9. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    PubMed

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone. PMID:27513219

  10. MRI reconstruction with joint global regularization and transform learning.

    PubMed

    Tanc, A Korhan; Eksioglu, Ender M

    2016-10-01

    Sparsity based regularization has been a popular approach to remedy the measurement scarcity in image reconstruction. Recently, sparsifying transforms learned from image patches have been utilized as an effective regularizer for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) reconstruction. Here, we infuse additional global regularization terms to the patch-based transform learning. We develop an algorithm to solve the resulting novel cost function, which includes both patchwise and global regularization terms. Extensive simulation results indicate that the introduced mixed approach has improved MRI reconstruction performance, when compared to the algorithms which use either of the patchwise transform learning or global regularization terms alone.

  11. Prevalence of legal and illegal stimulating agents in sports.

    PubMed

    Deventer, K; Roels, K; Delbeke, F T; Van Eenoo, P

    2011-08-01

    This paper reviews the prevalence of legal and illegal stimulants in relation to doping-control analysis. Stimulants are among the oldest classes of doping agents, having been used since ancient times. Despite the ease with which they can be detected and the availability of sensitive detection methods, stimulants are still popular among athletes. Indeed, they remain one of the top three most popular classes of prohibited substances. Because the list of legal and illegal stimulants is extensive only a selection is discussed in detail. The compounds selected are caffeine, ephedrines, amphetamine and related compounds, methylphenidate, cocaine, strychnine, modafinil, adrafinil, 4-methyl-2-hexaneamine, and sibutramine. These compounds are mainly prevalent in sport or are of therapeutic importance. Because stimulants are the oldest doping class the first detection methods were for this group. Several early detection techniques including GC-NPD, GC-ECD, and TLC are highlighted. The more novel detection techniques GC-MS and LC-MS are also discussed in detail. In particular, the last technique has been shown to enable successful detection of stimulants difficult to detect by GC-MS or for stimulants previously undetectable. Because stimulants are also regularly detected in nutritional (food) supplements a section on this topic is also included. PMID:21479548

  12. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W. S.

    2001-09-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  13. Deep brain stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain The neurostimulator, which puts out the electric current. The stimulator is similar to a heart pacemaker . It is usually placed under the skin near the collarbone, but may be ... pulses travel from the neurostimulator, along the extension ...

  14. ACTH stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 102. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. ACTH stimulation test - diagnostic. In: ... . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  16. 8. Asymptotically Flat and Regular Cauchy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dain, Sergio

    I describe the construction of a large class of asymptotically flat initial data with non-vanishing mass and angular momentum for which the metric and the extrinsic curvature have asymptotic expansions at space-like infinity in terms of powers of a radial coordinate. I emphasize the motivations and the main ideas behind the proofs.

  17. Error analysis for matrix elastic-net regularization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Chen, Na; Li, Luoqing

    2012-05-01

    Elastic-net regularization is a successful approach in statistical modeling. It can avoid large variations which occur in estimating complex models. In this paper, elastic-net regularization is extended to a more general setting, the matrix recovery (matrix completion) setting. Based on a combination of the nuclear-norm minimization and the Frobenius-norm minimization, we consider the matrix elastic-net (MEN) regularization algorithm, which is an analog to the elastic-net regularization scheme from compressive sensing. Some properties of the estimator are characterized by the singular value shrinkage operator. We estimate the error bounds of the MEN regularization algorithm in the framework of statistical learning theory. We compute the learning rate by estimates of the Hilbert-Schmidt operators. In addition, an adaptive scheme for selecting the regularization parameter is presented. Numerical experiments demonstrate the superiority of the MEN regularization algorithm.

  18. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  19. Local regularity for time-dependent tug-of-war games with varying probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Mikko; Ruosteenoja, Eero

    2016-07-01

    We study local regularity properties of value functions of time-dependent tug-of-war games. For games with constant probabilities we get local Lipschitz continuity. For more general games with probabilities depending on space and time we obtain Hölder and Harnack estimates. The games have a connection to the normalized p (x , t)-parabolic equation ut = Δu + (p (x , t) - 2) Δ∞Nu.

  20. Grouping pursuit through a regularization solution surface *

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaotong; Huang, Hsin-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Summary Extracting grouping structure or identifying homogenous subgroups of predictors in regression is crucial for high-dimensional data analysis. A low-dimensional structure in particular–grouping, when captured in a regression model, enables to enhance predictive performance and to facilitate a model's interpretability Grouping pursuit extracts homogenous subgroups of predictors most responsible for outcomes of a response. This is the case in gene network analysis, where grouping reveals gene functionalities with regard to progression of a disease. To address challenges in grouping pursuit, we introduce a novel homotopy method for computing an entire solution surface through regularization involving a piecewise linear penalty. This nonconvex and overcomplete penalty permits adaptive grouping and nearly unbiased estimation, which is treated with a novel concept of grouped subdifferentials and difference convex programming for efficient computation. Finally, the proposed method not only achieves high performance as suggested by numerical analysis, but also has the desired optimality with regard to grouping pursuit and prediction as showed by our theoretical results. PMID:20689721

  1. Compression and regularization with the information bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strouse, Dj; Schwab, David

    Compression fundamentally involves a decision about what is relevant and what is not. The information bottleneck (IB) by Tishby, Pereira, and Bialek formalized this notion as an information-theoretic optimization problem and proposed an optimal tradeoff between throwing away as many bits as possible, and selectively keeping those that are most important. The IB has also recently been proposed as a theory of sensory gating and predictive computation in the retina by Palmer et al. Here, we introduce an alternative formulation of the IB, the deterministic information bottleneck (DIB), that we argue better captures the notion of compression, including that done by the brain. As suggested by its name, the solution to the DIB problem is a deterministic encoder, as opposed to the stochastic encoder that is optimal under the IB. We then compare the IB and DIB on synthetic data, showing that the IB and DIB perform similarly in terms of the IB cost function, but that the DIB vastly outperforms the IB in terms of the DIB cost function. Our derivation of the DIB also provides a family of models which interpolates between the DIB and IB by adding noise of a particular form. We discuss the role of this noise as a regularizer.

  2. Mapping algorithms on regular parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.

    1989-01-01

    It is significant that many of time-intensive scientific algorithms are formulated as nested loops, which are inherently regularly structured. In this dissertation the relations between the mathematical structure of nested loop algorithms and the architectural capabilities required for their parallel execution are studied. The architectural model considered in depth is that of an arbitrary dimensional systolic array. The mathematical structure of the algorithm is characterized by classifying its data-dependence vectors according to the new ZERO-ONE-INFINITE property introduced. Using this classification, the first complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions for correct transformation of a nested loop algorithm onto a given systolic array of an arbitrary dimension by means of linear mappings is derived. Practical methods to derive optimal or suboptimal systolic array implementations are also provided. The techniques developed are used constructively to develop families of implementations satisfying various optimization criteria and to design programmable arrays efficiently executing classes of algorithms. In addition, a Computer-Aided Design system running on SUN workstations has been implemented to help in the design. The methodology, which deals with general algorithms, is illustrated by synthesizing linear and planar systolic array algorithms for matrix multiplication, a reindexed Warshall-Floyd transitive closure algorithm, and the longest common subsequence algorithm.

  3. Reverberation mapping by regularized linear inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.; Done, Christine

    1995-01-01

    Reverberation mapping of active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission-line regions requires the numerical deconvolution of two time series. We suggest the application of a new method, regularized linear inversion, to the solution of this problem. This method possesses many good features; it imposes no restrictions on the sign of the response function; it can provide clearly defined uncertainty estimates; it involves no guesswork about unmeasured data; it can give a clear indication of when the underlying convolution model is inadequate; and it is computationally very efficient. Using simulated data, we find the minimum S/N and length of the time series in order for this method to work satisfactorily. We also define guidelines for choosing the principal tunable parameter of the method and for interpreting the results. Finally, we reanalyze published data from the 1989 NGC 5548 campaign using this new method and compare the results to those previously obtained by maximum entropy analysis. For some lines we find good agreement, but for others, especially C III lambda(1909) and Si IV lambda(1400), we find significant differences. These can be attributed to the inability of the maximum entropy method to find negative values of the response function, but also illustrate the nonuniqueness of any deconvolution technique. We also find evidence that certain line light curves (e.g., C IV lambda(1549)) cannot be fully described by the simple linear convolution model.

  4. Identifying Cognitive States Using Regularity Partitions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) data can be used to depict functional connectivity of the brain. Standard techniques have been developed to construct brain networks from this data; typically nodes are considered as voxels or sets of voxels with weighted edges between them representing measures of correlation. Identifying cognitive states based on fMRI data is connected with recording voxel activity over a certain time interval. Using this information, network and machine learning techniques can be applied to discriminate the cognitive states of the subjects by exploring different features of data. In this work we wish to describe and understand the organization of brain connectivity networks under cognitive tasks. In particular, we use a regularity partitioning algorithm that finds clusters of vertices such that they all behave with each other almost like random bipartite graphs. Based on the random approximation of the graph, we calculate a lower bound on the number of triangles as well as the expectation of the distribution of the edges in each subject and state. We investigate the results by comparing them to the state of the art algorithms for exploring connectivity and we argue that during epochs that the subject is exposed to stimulus, the inspected part of the brain is organized in an efficient way that enables enhanced functionality. PMID:26317983

  5. Determinants of Scanpath Regularity in Reading.

    PubMed

    von der Malsburg, Titus; Kliegl, Reinhold; Vasishth, Shravan

    2015-09-01

    Scanpaths have played an important role in classic research on reading behavior. Nevertheless, they have largely been neglected in later research perhaps due to a lack of suitable analytical tools. Recently, von der Malsburg and Vasishth (2011) proposed a new measure for quantifying differences between scanpaths and demonstrated that this measure can recover effects that were missed with the traditional eyetracking measures. However, the sentences used in that study were difficult to process and scanpath effects accordingly strong. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity, sensitivity, and scope of applicability of the scanpath measure, using simple sentences that are typically read from left to right. We derived predictions for the regularity of scanpaths from the literature on oculomotor control, sentence processing, and cognitive aging and tested these predictions using the scanpath measure and a large database of eye movements. All predictions were confirmed: Sentences with short words and syntactically more difficult sentences elicited more irregular scanpaths. Also, older readers produced more irregular scanpaths than younger readers. In addition, we found an effect that was not reported earlier: Syntax had a smaller influence on the eye movements of older readers than on those of young readers. We discuss this interaction of syntactic parsing cost with age in terms of shifts in processing strategies and a decline of executive control as readers age. Overall, our results demonstrate the validity and sensitivity of the scanpath measure and thus establish it as a productive and versatile tool for reading research.

  6. Regularized spherical polar fourier diffusion MRI with optimal dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2013-01-01

    Compressed Sensing (CS) takes advantage of signal sparsity or compressibility and allows superb signal reconstruction from relatively few measurements. Based on CS theory, a suitable dictionary for sparse representation of the signal is required. In diffusion MRI (dMRI), CS methods proposed for reconstruction of diffusion-weighted signal and the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) utilize two kinds of Dictionary Learning (DL) methods: 1) Discrete Representation DL (DR-DL), and 2) Continuous Representation DL (CR-DL). DR-DL is susceptible to numerical inaccuracy owing to interpolation and regridding errors in a discretized q-space. In this paper, we propose a novel CR-DL approach, called Dictionary Learning - Spherical Polar Fourier Imaging (DL-SPFI) for effective compressed-sensing reconstruction of the q-space diffusion-weighted signal and the EAP. In DL-SPFI, a dictionary that sparsifies the signal is learned from the space of continuous Gaussian diffusion signals. The learned dictionary is then adaptively applied to different voxels using a weighted LASSO framework for robust signal reconstruction. Compared with the start-of-the-art CR-DL and DR-DL methods proposed by Merlet et al. and Bilgic et al., respectively, our work offers the following advantages. First, the learned dictionary is proved to be optimal for Gaussian diffusion signals. Second, to our knowledge, this is the first work to learn a voxel-adaptive dictionary. The importance of the adaptive dictionary in EAP reconstruction will be demonstrated theoretically and empirically. Third, optimization in DL-SPFI is only performed in a small subspace resided by the SPF coefficients, as opposed to the q-space approach utilized by Merlet et al. We experimentally evaluated DL-SPFI with respect to L1-norm regularized SPFI (L1-SPFI), which uses the original SPF basis, and the DR-DL method proposed by Bilgic et al. The experiment results on synthetic and real data indicate that the learned dictionary produces

  7. The Relationship between Gentle Tactile Stimulation on the Fetus and Its Temperament 3 Months after Birth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe-Wei; Hua, Jing; Xu, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gentle tactile stimulation on the fetus in its temperament 3 months after birth. Method. A total of 302 mother-3-month-infant dyads enrolled the retrospective cohort study. 76 mothers had regular gentle tactile stimulation on the fetus in their pregnancy; 62 mothers had irregular tactile stimulation on the fetus, and the rest of 164 mothers who had no tactile stimulation served as nonexposure group. Temperament was assessed using the EITS (a nine-dimensional scale of temperament). Results. Significant difference in temperament type was found among infants in 3 groups at 3 months of age. In the regular practice group, the babies with easy type temperament accounted for 73.7%, which was higher than that in irregular practice group (53.2%, P = 0.012) and that in the control group (42.1%, P < 0.001). Compared to infants in no practice group, the infants who had received regular gentle tactile stimulation before birth were lower in negative mood (P = 0.047) while higher in adaptability (P < 0.001), approach (P = 0.001), and persistence (P = 0.001), respectively. Conclusion. Regular gentle tactile stimulation on fetus may promote the formation of easy type infant temperament. PMID:26180374

  8. Temporal Regularity of the Environment Drives Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It’s reasonable to assume that a regularly paced sequence should be perceived as regular, but here we show that perceived regularity depends on the context in which the sequence is embedded. We presented one group of participants with perceptually regularly paced sequences, and another group of participants with mostly irregularly paced sequences (75% irregular, 25% regular). The timing of the final stimulus in each sequence could be varied. In one experiment, we asked whether the last stimulus was regular or not. We found that participants exposed to an irregular environment frequently reported perfectly regularly paced stimuli to be irregular. In a second experiment, we asked participants to judge whether the final stimulus was presented before or after a flash. In this way, we were able to determine distortions in temporal perception as changes in the timing necessary for the sound and the flash to be perceived synchronous. We found that within a regular context, the perceived timing of deviant last stimuli changed so that the relative anisochrony appeared to be perceptually decreased. In the irregular context, the perceived timing of irregular stimuli following a regular sequence was not affected. These observations suggest that humans use temporal expectations to evaluate the regularity of sequences and that expectations are combined with sensory stimuli to adapt perceived timing to follow the statistics of the environment. Expectations can be seen as a-priori probabilities on which perceived timing of stimuli depend. PMID:27441686

  9. [Spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Christophe; Mariotti, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Neuromodulation techniques modify the activity of the central or peripheral nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation is a reversible and minimally invasive treatment whose efficacy and cost effectiveness are recognized for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain or ischemic pain. Spinal cord stimulation is not the option of last resort and should be considered among other options before prescribing long-term opioids or considering reoperation. The selection and regular follow-up of patients are crucial to the success of the therapy. PMID:27506068

  10. Random matrix theory for mixed regular-chaotic dynamics in the super-extensive regime

    SciTech Connect

    El-Hady, A. Abd; Abul-Magd, A. Y.

    2011-10-27

    We apply Tsallis's q-indexed nonextensive entropy to formulate a random matrix theory (RMT), which may be suitable for systems with mixed regular-chaotic dynamics. We consider the super-extensive regime of q<1. We obtain analytical expressions for the level-spacing distributions, which are strictly valid for 2 X2 random-matrix ensembles, as usually done in the standard RMT. We compare the results with spacing distributions, numerically calculated for random matrix ensembles describing a harmonic oscillator perturbed by Gaussian orthogonal and unitary ensembles.

  11. TRANSIENT LUNAR PHENOMENA: REGULARITY AND REALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.

    2009-05-20

    Transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) have been reported for centuries, but their nature is largely unsettled, and even their existence as a coherent phenomenon is controversial. Nonetheless, TLP data show regularities in the observations; a key question is whether this structure is imposed by processes tied to the lunar surface, or by terrestrial atmospheric or human observer effects. I interrogate an extensive catalog of TLPs to gauge how human factors determine the distribution of TLP reports. The sample is grouped according to variables which should produce differing results if determining factors involve humans, and not reflecting phenomena tied to the lunar surface. Features dependent on human factors can then be excluded. Regardless of how the sample is split, the results are similar: {approx}50% of reports originate from near Aristarchus, {approx}16% from Plato, {approx}6% from recent, major impacts (Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, and Aristarchus), plus several at Grimaldi. Mare Crisium produces a robust signal in some cases (however, Crisium is too large for a 'feature' as defined). TLP count consistency for these features indicates that {approx}80% of these may be real. Some commonly reported sites disappear from the robust averages, including Alphonsus, Ross D, and Gassendi. These reports begin almost exclusively after 1955, when TLPs became widely known and many more (and inexperienced) observers searched for TLPs. In a companion paper, we compare the spatial distribution of robust TLP sites to transient outgassing (seen by Apollo and Lunar Prospector instruments). To a high confidence, robust TLP sites and those of lunar outgassing correlate strongly, further arguing for the reality of TLPs.

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  13. Phase-regularized polygon computer-generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Im, Dajeong; Moon, Eunkyoung; Park, Yohan; Lee, Deokhwan; Hahn, Joonku; Kim, Hwi

    2014-06-15

    The dark-line defect problem in the conventional polygon computer-generated hologram (CGH) is addressed. To resolve this problem, we clarify the physical origin of the defect and address the concept of phase-regularization. A novel synthesis algorithm for a phase-regularized polygon CGH for generating photorealistic defect-free holographic images is proposed. The optical reconstruction results of the phase-regularized polygon CGHs without the dark-line defects are presented.

  14. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  15. L1-norm locally linear representation regularization multi-source adaptation learning.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianwen; Wen, Shiting; Hu, Wenjun

    2015-09-01

    In most supervised domain adaptation learning (DAL) tasks, one has access only to a small number of labeled examples from target domain. Therefore the success of supervised DAL in this "small sample" regime needs the effective utilization of the large amounts of unlabeled data to extract information that is useful for generalization. Toward this end, we here use the geometric intuition of manifold assumption to extend the established frameworks in existing model-based DAL methods for function learning by incorporating additional information about the target geometric structure of the marginal distribution. We would like to ensure that the solution is smooth with respect to both the ambient space and the target marginal distribution. In doing this, we propose a novel L1-norm locally linear representation regularization multi-source adaptation learning framework which exploits the geometry of the probability distribution, which has two techniques. Firstly, an L1-norm locally linear representation method is presented for robust graph construction by replacing the L2-norm reconstruction measure in LLE with L1-norm one, which is termed as L1-LLR for short. Secondly, considering the robust graph regularization, we replace traditional graph Laplacian regularization with our new L1-LLR graph Laplacian regularization and therefore construct new graph-based semi-supervised learning framework with multi-source adaptation constraint, which is coined as L1-MSAL method. Moreover, to deal with the nonlinear learning problem, we also generalize the L1-MSAL method by mapping the input data points from the input space to a high-dimensional reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) via a nonlinear mapping. Promising experimental results have been obtained on several real-world datasets such as face, visual video and object.

  16. Logarithmic convergence rates of the iteratively regularized Gauss - Newton method for an inverse potential and an inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohage, Thorsten

    1997-10-01

    Convergence and logarithmic convergence rates of the iteratively regularized Gauss - Newton method in a Hilbert space setting are proven provided a logarithmic source condition is satisfied. This method is applied to an inverse potential and an inverse scattering problem, and the source condition is interpreted as a smoothness condition in terms of Sobolev spaces for the case where the domain is a circle. Numerical experiments yield convergence and convergence rates of the form expected by our general convergence theorem.

  17. Centers for the commercial development of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Susan E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, NASA initiated an innovative effort called Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). The CCDS program was designed to increase private-sector interest and investment in space-related activities, while encouraging U.S. economic leadership and stimulating advances in promising areas of research and development. Research conducted in the Centers handling the following areas is summarized: materials processing; life sciences; remote sensing; automation and robotics; space propulsion; space structures and materials; and space power.

  18. p-exponent and p-leaders, Part I: Negative pointwise regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffard, S.; Melot, C.; Leonarduzzi, R.; Wendt, H.; Abry, P.; Roux, S. G.; Torres, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    Multifractal analysis aims to characterize signals, functions, images or fields, via the fluctuations of their local regularity along time or space, hence capturing crucial features of their temporal/spatial dynamics. Multifractal analysis is becoming a standard tool in signal and image processing, and is nowadays widely used in numerous applications of different natures. Its common formulation relies on the measure of local regularity via the Hölder exponent, by nature restricted to positive values, and thus to locally bounded functions or signals. It is here proposed to base the quantification of local regularity on p-exponents, a novel local regularity measure potentially taking negative values. First, the theoretical properties of p-exponents are studied in detail. Second, wavelet-based multiscale quantities, the p-leaders, are constructed and shown to permit accurate practical estimation of p-exponents. Exploiting the potential dependence with p, it is also shown how the collection of p-exponents enriches the classification of locally singular behaviors in functions, signals or images. The present contribution is complemented by a companion article developing the p-leader based multifractal formalism associated to p-exponents.

  19. Manifold regularized multitask learning for semi-supervised multilabel image classification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yong; Tao, Dacheng; Geng, Bo; Xu, Chao; Maybank, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    It is a significant challenge to classify images with multiple labels by using only a small number of labeled samples. One option is to learn a binary classifier for each label and use manifold regularization to improve the classification performance by exploring the underlying geometric structure of the data distribution. However, such an approach does not perform well in practice when images from multiple concepts are represented by high-dimensional visual features. Thus, manifold regularization is insufficient to control the model complexity. In this paper, we propose a manifold regularized multitask learning (MRMTL) algorithm. MRMTL learns a discriminative subspace shared by multiple classification tasks by exploiting the common structure of these tasks. It effectively controls the model complexity because different tasks limit one another's search volume, and the manifold regularization ensures that the functions in the shared hypothesis space are smooth along the data manifold. We conduct extensive experiments, on the PASCAL VOC'07 dataset with 20 classes and the MIR dataset with 38 classes, by comparing MRMTL with popular image classification algorithms. The results suggest that MRMTL is effective for image classification. PMID:22997267

  20. Manifold regularized multitask learning for semi-supervised multilabel image classification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yong; Tao, Dacheng; Geng, Bo; Xu, Chao; Maybank, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    It is a significant challenge to classify images with multiple labels by using only a small number of labeled samples. One option is to learn a binary classifier for each label and use manifold regularization to improve the classification performance by exploring the underlying geometric structure of the data distribution. However, such an approach does not perform well in practice when images from multiple concepts are represented by high-dimensional visual features. Thus, manifold regularization is insufficient to control the model complexity. In this paper, we propose a manifold regularized multitask learning (MRMTL) algorithm. MRMTL learns a discriminative subspace shared by multiple classification tasks by exploiting the common structure of these tasks. It effectively controls the model complexity because different tasks limit one another's search volume, and the manifold regularization ensures that the functions in the shared hypothesis space are smooth along the data manifold. We conduct extensive experiments, on the PASCAL VOC'07 dataset with 20 classes and the MIR dataset with 38 classes, by comparing MRMTL with popular image classification algorithms. The results suggest that MRMTL is effective for image classification.

  1. Stable iteratively regularized gradient method for nonlinear irregular equations under large noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokurin, Mihail Yu

    2006-02-01

    We consider an iteratively regularized version of the method of gradient descent for solving nonlinear irregular equations F(x) = 0 in a Hilbert space. When studying regularization methods for such equations with noisy operators F, traditional conditions on available approximations {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}} amount to error estimates of the form \\Vert {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x)- F(x) \\Vert \\leq \\delta , for x from a neighbourhood of a solution. Convergence of the methods is usually established on the assumption that the error level δ → 0, i.e. that noisy elements {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) strongly converge to the exact value F(x). In this paper we analyse approximating properties of the regularized gradient method assuming that {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) may converge to F(x) only weakly. We suggest an a priori stopping rule for the gradient iteration and give error estimates for obtained approximate solutions in terms of levels of strong and weak perturbations of the original operator. The main theorem generalizes recent results of Bakushinsky and Kokurin (2004 Iterative Methods for Approximate Solution of Inverse Problems (Dordrecht: Springer)) on the stopping of regularized gradient method under strong perturbations of F.

  2. A regularizing iterative ensemble Kalman method for PDE-constrained inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Marco A.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a derivative-free computational framework for approximating solutions to nonlinear PDE-constrained inverse problems. The general aim is to merge ideas from iterative regularization with ensemble Kalman methods from Bayesian inference to develop a derivative-free stable method easy to implement in applications where the PDE (forward) model is only accessible as a black box (e.g. with commercial software). The proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman method can be derived as an approximation of the regularizing Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) scheme (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) in which the derivative of the forward operator and its adjoint are replaced with empirical covariances from an ensemble of elements from the admissible space of solutions. The resulting ensemble method consists of an update formula that is applied to each ensemble member and that has a regularization parameter selected in a similar fashion to the one in the LM scheme. Moreover, an early termination of the scheme is proposed according to a discrepancy principle-type of criterion. The proposed method can be also viewed as a regularizing version of standard Kalman approaches which are often unstable unless ad hoc fixes, such as covariance localization, are implemented. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed numerical investigation of the regularizing and convergence properties of the proposed regularizing ensemble Kalman scheme; the proof of these properties is an open problem. By means of numerical experiments, we investigate the conditions under which the proposed method inherits the regularizing properties of the LM scheme of (Hanke 1997 Inverse Problems 13 79-95) and is thus stable and suitable for its application in problems where the computation of the Fréchet derivative is not computationally feasible. More concretely, we study the effect of ensemble size, number of measurements, selection of initial ensemble and tunable parameters on the performance of the method

  3. Dose domain regularization of MLC leaf patterns for highly complex IMRT plans

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y.; Ruan, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke; O’Connor, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The advent of automated beam orientation and fluence optimization enables more complex intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning using an increasing number of fields to exploit the expanded solution space. This has created a challenge in converting complex fluences to robust multileaf collimator (MLC) segments for delivery. A novel method to regularize the fluence map and simplify MLC segments is introduced to maximize delivery efficiency, accuracy, and plan quality. Methods: In this work, we implemented a novel approach to regularize optimized fluences in the dose domain. The treatment planning problem was formulated in an optimization framework to minimize the segmentation-induced dose distribution degradation subject to a total variation regularization to encourage piecewise smoothness in fluence maps. The optimization problem was solved using a first-order primal-dual algorithm known as the Chambolle-Pock algorithm. Plans for 2 GBM, 2 head and neck, and 2 lung patients were created using 20 automatically selected and optimized noncoplanar beams. The fluence was first regularized using Chambolle-Pock and then stratified into equal steps, and the MLC segments were calculated using a previously described level reducing method. Isolated apertures with sizes smaller than preset thresholds of 1–3 bixels, which are square units of an IMRT fluence map from MLC discretization, were removed from the MLC segments. Performance of the dose domain regularized (DDR) fluences was compared to direct stratification and direct MLC segmentation (DMS) of the fluences using level reduction without dose domain fluence regularization. Results: For all six cases, the DDR method increased the average planning target volume dose homogeneity (D95/D5) from 0.814 to 0.878 while maintaining equivalent dose to organs at risk (OARs). Regularized fluences were more robust to MLC sequencing, particularly to the stratification and small aperture removal. The maximum and

  4. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  5. Time-dependent activation of parieto-frontal networks for directing attention to tactile space. A study with paired transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses in right-brain-damaged patients with extinction.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M; Rossini, P M; Filippi, M M; Traversa, R; Cicinelli, P; Palmieri, M G; Pasqualetti, P; Caltagirone, C

    2000-09-01

    Tactile extinction has been interpreted as an attentional disorder, closely related to hemineglect, due to hyperactivation of the unaffected hemisphere, resulting in an ipsilesional attentional bias. Paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques, with a subthreshold conditioning stimulus (CS) followed at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) by a suprathreshold test stimulus (TS), are useful for investigating intracortical inhibition and facilitation in the human motor cortex. In the present work, we investigated the effects of paired TMS over the posterior parietal and frontal cortex of the unaffected hemisphere in a group of eight right-brain-damaged patients with tactile extinction who were carrying out a bimanual tactile discrimination task. The aim of the study was to verify if paired TMS could induce selective inhibition or facilitation of the unaffected hemisphere depending on the ISI, resulting, respectively, in an improvement and a worsening of contralesional extinction. In addition, we wanted to investigate if the effects of parietal and frontal TMS on contralesional extinction appeared at different intervals, suggesting time-dependent activation in the cortical network for the processing of tactile spatial information. Paired TMS stimuli with a CS and a TS, separated by two ISIs of 1 and 10 ms, were applied over the left parietal and frontal cortex after various intervals from the presentation of bimanual cutaneous stimuli. Single-test parietal TMS stimuli improved the patients' performance, whereas paired TMS had distinct effects depending on the ISI: at ISI = 1 ms the improvement in extinction was greater than that induced by single-pulse TMS; at ISI = 10 ms we observed worsening of extinction, with complete reversal of the effects of single-pulse TMS. Compared with TMS delivered over the frontal cortex, parietal TMS improved the extinction rate in a time window that began earlier. These findings shed further light on the mechanism of

  6. Influence of modularity and regularity on disparity of atelostomata sea urchins.

    PubMed

    López-Sauceda, Juan; Malda-Barrera, Juan; Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solís-Marín, Francisco; Aragón, José L

    2014-01-01

    A modularity approach is used to study disparity rates and evolvability of sea urchins belonging to the Atelostomata superorder. For this purpose, the pentameric sea urchin architecture is partitioned into modular spatial components and the interference between modules is quantified using areas and a measurement of the regularity of the spatial partitions. This information is used to account for the variability through time (disparity) and potential for morphological variation and evolution (evolvability) in holasteroid echinoids. We obtain that regular partitions of the space produce modules with high modular integrity, whereas irregular partitions produce low modular integrity; the former ones are related with high morphological disparity (facilitation hypothesis). Our analysis also suggests that a pentameric body plan with low regularity rates in Atelostomata reflects a stronger modular integration among modules than within modules, which could favors bilaterality against radial symmetry. Our approach constitutes a theoretical platform to define and quantify spatial organization in partitions of the space that can be related to modules in a morphological analysis.

  7. Regular and chaotic motions in applied dynamics of a rigid body.

    PubMed

    Beletskii, V. V.; Pivovarov, M. L.; Starostin, E. L.

    1996-06-01

    Periodic and regular motions, having a predictable functioning mode, play an important role in many problems of dynamics. The achievements of mathematics and mechanics (beginning with Poincare) have made it possible to establish that such motion modes, generally speaking, are local and form "islands" of regularity in a "chaotic sea" of essentially unpredictable trajectories. The development of computer techniques together with theoretical investigations makes it possible to study the global structure of the phase space of many problems having applied significance. A review of a number of such problems, considered by the authors in the past four or five years, is given in this paper. These include orientation and rotation problems of artificial and natural celestial bodies and the problem of controlling the motion of a locomotion robot. The structure of phase space is investigated for these problems. The phase trajectories of the motion are constructed by a numerical implementation of the Poincare point map method. Distinctions are made between regular (or resonance), quasiregular (or conditionally periodic), and chaotic trajectories. The evolution of the phase picture as the parameters are varied is investigated. A large number of "phase portraits" gives a notion of the arrangement and size of the stability islands in the "sea" of chaotic motions, about the appearance and disappearance of these islands as the parameters are varied, etc. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12780243

  8. Regular and chaotic motions in applied dynamics of a rigid body.

    PubMed

    Beletskii, V. V.; Pivovarov, M. L.; Starostin, E. L.

    1996-06-01

    Periodic and regular motions, having a predictable functioning mode, play an important role in many problems of dynamics. The achievements of mathematics and mechanics (beginning with Poincare) have made it possible to establish that such motion modes, generally speaking, are local and form "islands" of regularity in a "chaotic sea" of essentially unpredictable trajectories. The development of computer techniques together with theoretical investigations makes it possible to study the global structure of the phase space of many problems having applied significance. A review of a number of such problems, considered by the authors in the past four or five years, is given in this paper. These include orientation and rotation problems of artificial and natural celestial bodies and the problem of controlling the motion of a locomotion robot. The structure of phase space is investigated for these problems. The phase trajectories of the motion are constructed by a numerical implementation of the Poincare point map method. Distinctions are made between regular (or resonance), quasiregular (or conditionally periodic), and chaotic trajectories. The evolution of the phase picture as the parameters are varied is investigated. A large number of "phase portraits" gives a notion of the arrangement and size of the stability islands in the "sea" of chaotic motions, about the appearance and disappearance of these islands as the parameters are varied, etc. (c) 1996 American Institute of Physics.

  9. What does galvanic vestibular stimulation stimulate?

    PubMed

    Wardman, Daniel L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    The technique of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has been used for a long time. The stimulus produces stereotyped automatic postural and ocular responses. The mechanisms underlying these responses are not understood although they are commonly attributed to altered otolith output. Based on animal studies, it seems reasonable to assume that vestibular afferents from the otoliths and semicircular canals are affected similarly by GVS. With this assumption, and anatomical knowledge of the vestibular apparatus, a model is developed to describe the expected responses of vestibular afferents to percutaneous GVS and the physiological implications of this altered sensory signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS, the most commonly used technique, should produce a canal signal consistent with a strong ear-down roll towards the cathodal side, a smaller nose-to-cathode yaw, but no pitch signal. Bilateral bipolar GVS should also produce an otolith signal consistent with tilt towards the cathodal side or a translational acceleration towards the anodal side. The expected responses for other configurations of GVS are also described. The model appears consistent with published data on the ocular and postural responses to GVS, and suggests other testable hypotheses concerning postural, ocular and perceptual responses to GVS.

  10. Cognitive Aspects of Regularity Exhibit When Neighborhood Disappears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sau-Chin; Hu, Jon-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Although regularity refers to the compatibility between pronunciation of character and sound of phonetic component, it has been suggested as being part of consistency, which is defined by neighborhood characteristics. Two experiments demonstrate how regularity effect is amplified or reduced by neighborhood characteristics and reveals the…

  11. 20 CFR 216.13 - Regular current connection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Regular current connection test. 216.13... ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Current Connection With the Railroad Industry § 216.13 Regular current connection test. An employee has a current connection with the railroad industry if he or she meets one of...

  12. 20 CFR 216.13 - Regular current connection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Regular current connection test. 216.13... ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Current Connection With the Railroad Industry § 216.13 Regular current connection test. An employee has a current connection with the railroad industry if he or she meets one of...

  13. 20 CFR 216.13 - Regular current connection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regular current connection test. 216.13... ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Current Connection With the Railroad Industry § 216.13 Regular current connection test. An employee has a current connection with the railroad industry if he or she meets one of...

  14. 20 CFR 216.13 - Regular current connection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Regular current connection test. 216.13... ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Current Connection With the Railroad Industry § 216.13 Regular current connection test. An employee has a current connection with the railroad industry if he or she meets one of...

  15. 20 CFR 216.13 - Regular current connection test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Regular current connection test. 216.13... ELIGIBILITY FOR AN ANNUITY Current Connection With the Railroad Industry § 216.13 Regular current connection test. An employee has a current connection with the railroad industry if he or she meets one of...

  16. 12 CFR 311.5 - Regular procedure for closing meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regular procedure for closing meetings. 311.5... RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS § 311.5 Regular... a meeting will be taken only when a majority of the entire Board votes to take such action....

  17. Reading Comprehension and Regularized Orthography. Parts 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvell, Robert L.

    The purpose of this study was to compare mature readers' comprehension of text presented in traditional orthography with their comprehension of text presented in a regularized orthography, specifically, to determine whether, when traditional orthography is regularized, any loss of meaning is attributable to the loss of the visual dissimilarity of…

  18. Inclusion Professional Development Model and Regular Middle School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royster, Otelia; Reglin, Gary L.; Losike-Sedimo, Nonofo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a professional development model on regular education middle school teachers' knowledge of best practices for teaching inclusive classes and attitudes toward teaching these classes. There were 19 regular education teachers who taught the core subjects. Findings for Research Question 1…

  19. 29 CFR 778.408 - The specified regular rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicable).” The word “regular” describing the rate in this provision is not to be treated as surplusage. To... agreement in the courts. In both of the two cases before it, the Supreme Court found that the relationship... rate. There is no requirement, however, that the regular rate specified be equal to the regular rate...

  20. 32 CFR 724.211 - Regularity of government affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regularity of government affairs. 724.211 Section 724.211 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Authority/Policy for Departmental Discharge Review § 724.211 Regularity of...

  1. Gait variability and regularity of people with transtibial amputations.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kim; Hanada, Ed; Adderson, James

    2013-02-01

    Gait temporal-spatial variability and step regularity as measured by trunk accelerometry, measures relevant to fall risk and mobility, have not been well studied in individuals with lower-limb amputations. The study objective was to explore the differences in gait variability and regularity between individuals with unilateral transtibial amputations due to vascular (VAS) or nonvascular (NVAS) reasons and fall history over the past year. Of the 34 individuals with trans-tibial amputations who participated, 72% of the 18 individuals with VAS and 50% of the 16 individuals with NVAS had experienced at least one fall in the past year. The incidence of falls was not significantly different between groups. Variability measures included the coefficient of variation (CV) in swing time and step length obtained from an electronic walkway. Regularity measures included anteroposterior, medial-lateral and vertical step regularity obtained from trunk accelerations. When controlling for velocity, balance confidence and time since amputation, there were no significant differences in gait variability or regularity measures between individuals with VAS and NVAS. In comparing fallers to nonfallers, no significant differences were found in gait variability or regularity measures when controlling for velocity and balance confidence. Vertical step regularity (p=0.026) was found to be the only significant parameter related to fall history, while it only had poor to fair discriminatory ability related to fall history. There is some indication that individuals who have experienced a fall may walk with decreased regularity and this should be explored in future studies.

  2. 77 FR 76078 - Regular Board of Directors Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Regular Board of Directors Sunshine Act Meeting TIME & DATE: 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, January 9, 2013.... Call to Order II. Executive Session III. Approval of the Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes...

  3. 77 FR 15142 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act TIME AND DATE: 2:30 p.m., Monday, March 26, 2012.... Executive Session III. Approval of the Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the...

  4. 76 FR 74831 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act TIME AND DATE: 1:30 p.m., Monday, December 5... . AGENDA: I. Call to Order II. Executive Session III. Approval of the Regular Board of Directors...

  5. 29 CFR 553.233 - “Regular rate” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Overtime Compensation Rules § 553.233 “Regular rate” defined. The rules for computing an employee's “regular rate”, for purposes of the Act's overtime pay...

  6. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. Recent findings Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation. Priming interventions or paired associative stimulation can be used to ‘standardize’ the brain-state and hereby, homogenize the group response to stimulation. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical profiling based on magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy can capture trait-related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified rules. In contrast, adaptive closed-loop stimulation dynamically adjusts stimulation settings based on the occurrence of stimulation-induced state changes. Summary Approaches that take into account trait-related and state-related determinants of stimulation-induced plasticity bear considerable potential to establish noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation as interventional therapeutic tool. PMID:27224087

  7. Regular expression order-sorted unification and matching

    PubMed Central

    Kutsia, Temur; Marin, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    We extend order-sorted unification by permitting regular expression sorts for variables and in the domains of function symbols. The obtained signature corresponds to a finite bottom-up unranked tree automaton. We prove that regular expression order-sorted (REOS) unification is of type infinitary and decidable. The unification problem presented by us generalizes some known problems, such as, e.g., order-sorted unification for ranked terms, sequence unification, and word unification with regular constraints. Decidability of REOS unification implies that sequence unification with regular hedge language constraints is decidable, generalizing the decidability result of word unification with regular constraints to terms. A sort weakening algorithm helps to construct a minimal complete set of REOS unifiers from the solutions of sequence unification problems. Moreover, we design a complete algorithm for REOS matching, and show that this problem is NP-complete and the corresponding counting problem is #P-complete. PMID:26523088

  8. Generalisation for regular black holes on general relativity to f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Fabris, Júlio C.; Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Marques, Glauber T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we determine regular black hole solutions using a very general f( R) theory, coupled to a non-linear electromagnetic field given by a Lagrangian {L}_NED. The functions f( R) and {L}_NED are in principle left unspecified. Instead, the model is constructed through a choice of the mass function M( r) presented in the metric coefficients. Solutions which have a regular behaviour of the geometric invariants are found. These solutions have two horizons, the event horizon and the Cauchy horizon. All energy conditions are satisfied in the whole space-time, except the strong energy condition (SEC), which is violated near the Cauchy horizon. We present also a new theorem related to the energy conditions in f( R) gravity, re-obtaining the well-known conditions in the context of general relativity when the geometry of the solution is the same.

  9. A regularized model for impact in explicit dynamics applied to the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Peter; De Lorenzis, Laura; Unger, Jörg F.

    2016-07-01

    In the numerical simulation of impact phenomena, artificial oscillations can occur due to an instantaneous change of velocity in the contact area. In this paper, a nonlinear penalty regularization is used to avoid these oscillations. A particular focus is the investigation of higher order methods in space and time to increase the computational efficiency. The spatial discretization is realized by higher order spectral element methods that are characterized by a diagonal mass matrix. The time integration scheme is based on half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme of fourth order. For the conditionally stable scheme, the critical time step is influenced by the penalty regularization. A framework is presented to adjust the penalty stiffness and the time step for a specific mesh to avoid oscillations. The methods presented in this paper are applied to 1D-simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar, which is commonly used for the investigation of materials under dynamic loading.

  10. A regularized model for impact in explicit dynamics applied to the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Peter; De Lorenzis, Laura; Unger, Jörg F.

    2016-10-01

    In the numerical simulation of impact phenomena, artificial oscillations can occur due to an instantaneous change of velocity in the contact area. In this paper, a nonlinear penalty regularization is used to avoid these oscillations. A particular focus is the investigation of higher order methods in space and time to increase the computational efficiency. The spatial discretization is realized by higher order spectral element methods that are characterized by a diagonal mass matrix. The time integration scheme is based on half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme of fourth order. For the conditionally stable scheme, the critical time step is influenced by the penalty regularization. A framework is presented to adjust the penalty stiffness and the time step for a specific mesh to avoid oscillations. The methods presented in this paper are applied to 1D-simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar, which is commonly used for the investigation of materials under dynamic loading.

  11. Classical Scattering and Block Regularization for the Homogeneous Central Field Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Cristina

    2002-11-01

    The present paper offers an alternative point of view of block regularization for the motion of a particle in a central potential field of the form -x-α, where x is the distance between the particle and the source and α some positive real number. Working in the physical space, we consider the scattering angle determined by the path of the particle as a function of angular momentum. We prove that a particle flow is passing over the collision singularity preserving differentiability with respect to initial data if and only if α = 2(1-1/n), n positive integer, n >= 2. This result coincides with the outcome of block regularization applied by McGehee to the same dynamical problem. We discuss that this identity was to expect since both methods target the same physical constraint over the flow.

  12. Entropy principle, non-regular processes, and generalized exploitation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triani, V.; Cimmelli, V. A.

    2012-06-01

    The classical Coleman-Noll approach to the exploitation of the entropy principle regards the classical balances of mass, linear and angular momentum and energy as differential constraints for the entropy inequality, and presupposes that the second law of thermodynamics is a restriction on the constitutive equations describing the material properties [B. D. Coleman and W. Noll, "The thermodynamics of elastic materials with heat conduction and viscosity," Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. 13, 167-178 (1963), 10.1007/BF01262690]. In 1996, Muschik and Ehrentraut proved that this presupposition may be confirmed by a rigorous proof, provided that an amendment to the classical second law of thermodynamics, which asserts that, except in equilibria, reversible process directions in state space do not exist, is postulated ["An amendment to the second law," J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 21, 175-192 (1996), 10.1515/jnet.1996.21.2.175]. In their paper, the authors considered regular processes only. In a recent article [V. Triani and V. A. Cimmelli, "Interpretation of second law of thermodynamics in the presence of interfaces," Continuum. Mech. Thermodyn. 24, 165-174 (2012), 10.1007/s00161-011-0231-8], we proved that the result above remains valid in the presence of interfaces across which the unknown fields suffer jump discontinuities. Here, we show that the same conclusions achieved by Muschik and Ehrentraut and Triani and Cimmelli hold when the classical Coleman-Noll and Liu ["Method of Lagrange multipliers for exploitation of the entropy principle," Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. 46, 131-148 (1972), 10.1007/BF00250688] procedures for the exploitation of the second law, are generalized by considering also the gradients of the fundamental balance equations as constraints for the entropy inequality.

  13. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  14. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W.

    1999-02-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimetry is attractive to the health physics and dosimetry community due to its all-optical character, fast data acquisition and the avoidance of heating the detector. Until recently there was no luminescent material sensitive enough to radiation, and at the same time suitable for stimulation with visible light, for use in this application. However, anion-deficient aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al2O3:C) appears to be not only an extremely sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) material, but is also well-suited to OSL applications. Several OSL readout protocols have been suggested, including cw-OSL, pulsed OSL (POSL), and 'delayed' OSL (DOSL). The paper discusses the physical mechanisms that give rise to the OSL signals and the dependence of these signals upon absorbed dose. Example applications of the use of OSL from Al2O3:C in environmental radiation and ultraviolet-B dosimetry are discussed.

  15. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  16. Cognitive stimulation in brainstorming.

    PubMed

    Dugosh, K L; Paulus, P B; Roland, E J; Yang, H C

    2000-11-01

    Research on group brainstorming has demonstrated that it is less effective for generating large numbers of ideas than individual brainstorming, yet various scholars have presumed that group idea sharing should enhance cognitive stimulation and idea production. Three experiments examined the potential of cognitive stimulation in brainstorming. Experiments 1 and 2 used a paradigm in which individuals were exposed to ideas on audiotape as they were brainstorming, and Experiment 3 used the electronic brainstorming paradigm. Evidence was obtained for enhanced idea generation both during and after idea exposure. The attentional set of the participant and the content of the exposure manipulation (number of ideas, presence of irrelevant information) influenced this effect. These results are consistent with a cognitive perspective on group brainstorming.

  17. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  18. Shape-constrained regularization by statistical multiresolution for inverse problems: asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Klaus; Marnitz, Philipp; Munk, Axel

    2012-06-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel regularization technique for solving linear ill-posed operator equations in Hilbert spaces from data that are corrupted by white noise. We combine convex penalty functionals with extreme-value statistics of projections of the residuals on a given set of sub-spaces in the image space of the operator. We prove general consistency and convergence rate results in the framework of Bregman divergences which allows for a vast range of penalty functionals. Various examples that indicate the applicability of our approach will be discussed. We will illustrate in the context of signal and image processing that the presented method constitutes a locally adaptive reconstruction method.

  19. Oxidants as stimulators of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y J; Forman, H J; Sevanian, A

    1997-01-01

    Redox (oxidation-reduction) reactions regulate signal transduction. Oxidants such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and lipid hydroperoxides (i.e., reactive oxygen species) are now realized as signaling molecules under subtoxic conditions. Nitric oxide is also an example of a redox mediator. Reactive oxygen species induce various biological processes such as gene expression by stimulating signal transduction components such as Ca(2+)-signaling and protein phosphorylation. Various oxidants increase cytosolic Ca2+; however, the exact origin of Ca2+ is controversial. Ca2+ may be released from the endoplasmic reticulum, extracellular space, or mitochondria in response to oxidant-influence on Ca2+ pumps, channels, and transporters. Alternatively, oxidants may release Ca2+ from Ca2+ binding proteins. Various oxidants stimulate tyrosine as well as serine/threonine phosphorylation, and direct stimulation of protein kinases and inhibition of protein phosphatases by oxidants have been proposed as mechanisms. The oxidant-stimulation of the effector molecules such as phospholipase A2 as well as the activation of oxidative stress-responsive transcription factors may also depend on the oxidant-mediated activation of Ca(2+)-signaling and/or protein phosphorylation. In addition to the stimulation of signal transduction by oxidants, the observations that ligand-receptor interactions produce reactive oxygen species and that antioxidants block receptor-mediated signal transduction led to a proposal that reactive oxygen species may be second messengers for transcription factor activation, apoptosis, bone resorption, cell growth, and chemotaxis. Physiological significance of the role of biological oxidants in the regulation of signal transduction as well as the mechanisms of the oxidant-stimulation of signal transduction are discussed.

  20. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  1. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  2. Evolution and regularity results for epitaxially strained thin films and material voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piovano, Paolo

    In this dissertation we study free boundary problems that model the evolution of interfaces in the presence of elasticity, such as thin film profiles and material void boundaries. These problems are characterized by the competition between the elastic bulk energy and the anisotropic surface energy. First, we consider the evolution equation with curvature regularization that models the motion of a two-dimensional thin film by evaporation-condensation on a rigid substrate. The film is strained due to the mismatch between the crystalline lattices of the two materials and anisotropy is taken into account. We present the results contained in [62] where the author establishes short time existence, uniqueness and regularity of the solution using De Giorgi's minimizing movements to exploit the L2-gradient flow structure of the equation. This seems to be the first analytical result for the evaporation-condensation case in the presence of elasticity. Second, we consider the relaxed energy introduced in [20] that depends on admissible pairs (E, u) of sets E and functions u defined only outside of E. For dimension three this energy appears in the study of the material voids in solids, where the pairs (E, u) are interpreted as the admissible configurations that consist of void regions E in the space and of displacements u of the atoms of the crystal. We provide the precise mathematical framework that guarantees the existence of minimal energy pairs (E, u). Then, we establish that for every minimal configuration (E, u), the function u is C1,gloc -regular outside an essentially closed subset of E. No hypothesis of starshapedness is assumed on the voids and all the results that are contained in [18] hold true for every dimension d ≥ 2. Key Words and Sentences: surface energy, elastic bulk energy, minimizing movements, evolution, gradient flow, motion by mean curvature, minimal configurations, existence, uniqueness, regularity, partial regularity, lower density bound, thin film

  3. Regular Cosmogenic Nuclide Dosing of Sediment Moving Down Desert Piedmonts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, K. K.; Bierman, P. R.; Hooke, R. L.; Eppes, M. C.; Persico, L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.

    2001-12-01

    Low-gradient alluvial piedmonts are common in desert areas throughout the world; however, long-term rates of processes that modify these landscapes are poorly understood. Using cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al, we attempt to quantify the long-term (>103 y) behavior of desert piedmonts in Southern California. We measured the activity of 10Be and 26Al in three samples of drainage basin alluvium and six amalgamated samples from transects spaced at 1-km intervals down a piedmont in Fort Irwin, Mojave Desert, California. Each transect sample consists of sediment from 21 collection sites spaced at 150 m intervals. Such sampling averages the variability of nuclide activity between sub-sample locations and thus gives a long-term dosing history of sediment as it is transported from uplands to the distal piedmont. The piedmont is heavily used during military training exercises during which hundreds of wheeled and tracked vehicles traverse the surface. The piedmont surface is planar, and fan-head incision is minimal at the rangefront decreasing to zero between the first and second transects, 1.5 km from the rangefront. 10Be activity increases steadily from 5.87 X 105 atoms g-1 at the rangefront to 1.02 X 6 atoms g-1 at the piedmont bottom. Nuclide activity and distance are well correlated (r2 = 0.95) suggesting that sediment is dosed uniformly as it is transported down piedmont. We have measured similar increases in nuclide activity in transect samples collected from two other Mojave Desert piedmonts, those fringing the Iron and Granite Mountains (Nichols et al, in press, Geomorphology). These piedmonts have nuclide activities that also correlate well with distance (r2 = 0.98 and 0.96, respectively) from their rangefronts, but nuclides increase at a lower rate down piedmont. Modeled sediment transport speeds for the Iron and Granite Mountain piedmonts are decimeters per year. The regular increase in nuclide activities down three different Mojave Desert piedmonts suggests that

  4. Intralaminar stimulation of the inferior colliculus facilitates frequency-specific activation in the auditory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allitt, B. J.; Benjaminsen, C.; Morgan, S. J.; Paolini, A. G.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Auditory midbrain implants (AMI) provide inadequate frequency discrimination for open set speech perception. AMIs that can take advantage of the tonotopic laminar of the midbrain may be able to better deliver frequency specific perception and lead to enhanced performance. Stimulation strategies that best elicit frequency specific activity need to be identified. This research examined the characteristic frequency (CF) relationship between regions of the auditory cortex (AC), in response to stimulated regions of the inferior colliculus (IC), comparing monopolar, and intralaminar bipolar electrical stimulation. Approach. Electrical stimulation using multi-channel micro-electrode arrays in the IC was used to elicit AC responses in anaesthetized male hooded Wistar rats. The rate of activity in AC regions with CFs within 3 kHz (CF-aligned) and unaligned CFs was used to assess the frequency specificity of responses. Main results. Both monopolar and bipolar IC stimulation led to CF-aligned neural activity in the AC. Altering the distance between the stimulation and reference electrodes in the IC led to changes in both threshold and dynamic range, with bipolar stimulation with 400 µm spacing evoking the lowest AC threshold and widest dynamic range. At saturation, bipolar stimulation elicited a significantly higher mean spike count in the AC at CF-aligned areas than at CF-unaligned areas when electrode spacing was 400 µm or less. Bipolar stimulation using electrode spacing of 400 µm or less also elicited a higher rate of elicited activity in the AC in both CF-aligned and CF-unaligned regions than monopolar stimulation. When electrodes were spaced 600 µm apart no benefit over monopolar stimulation was observed. Furthermore, monopolar stimulation of the external cortex of the IC resulted in more localized frequency responses than bipolar stimulation when stimulation and reference sites were 200 µm apart. Significance. These findings have implications for the

  5. Two hybrid regularization frameworks for solving the electrocardiography inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingfeng; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guofa; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, two hybrid regularization frameworks, LSQR-Tik and Tik-LSQR, which integrate the properties of the direct regularization method (Tikhonov) and the iterative regularization method (LSQR), have been proposed and investigated for solving ECG inverse problems. The LSQR-Tik method is based on the Lanczos process, which yields a sequence of small bidiagonal systems to approximate the original ill-posed problem and then the Tikhonov regularization method is applied to stabilize the projected problem. The Tik-LSQR method is formulated as an iterative LSQR inverse, augmented with a Tikhonov-like prior information term. The performances of these two hybrid methods are evaluated using a realistic heart-torso model simulation protocol, in which the heart surface source method is employed to calculate the simulated epicardial potentials (EPs) from the action potentials (APs), and then the acquired EPs are used to calculate simulated body surface potentials (BSPs). The results show that the regularized solutions obtained by the LSQR-Tik method are approximate to those of the Tikhonov method, the computational cost of the LSQR-Tik method, however, is much less than that of the Tikhonov method. Moreover, the Tik-LSQR scheme can reconstruct the epcicardial potential distribution more accurately, specifically for the BSPs with large noisy cases. This investigation suggests that hybrid regularization methods may be more effective than separate regularization approaches for ECG inverse problems.

  6. A local-order regularization for geophysical inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheymasi, H. Mohammadi; Gholami, A.

    2013-11-01

    Different types of regularization have been developed to obtain stable solutions to linear inverse problems. Among these, total variation (TV) is known as an edge preserver method, which leads to piecewise constant solutions and has received much attention for solving inverse problems arising in geophysical studies. However, the method shows staircase effects and is not suitable for the models including smooth regions. To overcome the staircase effect, we present a method, which employs a local-order difference operator in the regularization term. This method is performed in two steps: First, we apply a pre-processing step to find the edge locations in the regularized solution using a properly defined minmod limiter, where the edges are determined by a comparison of the solutions obtained using different order regularizations of the TV types. Then, we construct a local-order difference operator based on the information obtained from the pre-processing step about the edge locations, which is subsequently used as a regularization operator in the final sparsity-promoting regularization. Experimental results from the synthetic and real seismic traveltime tomography show that the proposed inversion method is able to retain the smooth regions of the regularized solution, while preserving sharp transitions presented in it.

  7. Three regularities of recognition memory: the role of bias.

    PubMed

    Hilford, Andrew; Maloney, Laurence T; Glanzer, Murray; Kim, Kisok

    2015-12-01

    A basic assumption of Signal Detection Theory is that decisions are made on the basis of likelihood ratios. In a preceding paper, Glanzer, Hilford, and Maloney (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 431-455, 2009) showed that the likelihood ratio assumption implies that three regularities will occur in recognition memory: (1) the Mirror Effect, (2) the Variance Effect, (3) the normalized Receiver Operating Characteristic (z-ROC) Length Effect. The paper offered formal proofs and computational demonstrations that decisions based on likelihood ratios produce the three regularities. A survey of data based on group ROCs from 36 studies validated the likelihood ratio assumption by showing that its three implied regularities are ubiquitous. The study noted, however, that bias, another basic factor in Signal Detection Theory, can obscure the Mirror Effect. In this paper we examine how bias affects the regularities at the theoretical level. The theoretical analysis shows: (1) how bias obscures the Mirror Effect, not the other two regularities, and (2) four ways to counter that obscuring. We then report the results of five experiments that support the theoretical analysis. The analyses and the experimental results also demonstrate: (1) that the three regularities govern individual, as well as group, performance, (2) alternative explanations of the regularities are ruled out, and (3) that Signal Detection Theory, correctly applied, gives a simple and unified explanation of recognition memory data.

  8. Taxonomy of space tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Li, Z. L.; Li, Y. L.

    When we map an area or create a digital database for it, the first task is often to partition the space into smaller units. There are traditionally two methods of partitioning: vector and raster. A vector partition delineates the boundary of features by polylines while a raster partition subdivides the space into a regular matrix of square or rectangular pixels. These two are complementary methods of subdividing the space either by features or by unconstrained space cells. In the third dimension, they are extended to polyhedra and voxels, respectively. We will argue in this paper that the terms "vector" and "raster" cannot describe all cases of tessellation. With advances in data modelling, variations of the two traditional methods have been developed, such as the representation of a feature by pixels and not by polylines. At present, there is a lack of systematic terminology to describe the various methods of tessellation. In this paper, we will propose a taxonomy for three-dimensional space tessellation. Its essential feature is to distinguish between abstract concepts of tessellation and their encoding methods. We recognise that tessellation of geographic space is carried out in different stages with increasingly precise mathematical meaning. This provides us with an insight into the process of spatial tessellation and a model to systematically describe the various structures. These concepts could form a basis for spatial data models.

  9. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  10. Fractional norm regularization: learning with very few relevant features.

    PubMed

    Kaban, Ata

    2013-06-01

    Learning in the presence of a large number of irrelevant features is an important problem in high-dimensional tasks. Previous studies have shown that L1-norm regularization can be effective in such cases while L2-norm regularization is not. Furthermore, work in compressed sensing suggests that regularization by nonconvex (e.g., fractional) semi-norms may outperform L1-regularization. However, for classification it is largely unclear when this may or may not be the case. In addition, the nonconvex problem is harder to solve than the convex L1 problem. In this paper, we provide a more in-depth analysis to elucidate the potential advantages and pitfalls of nonconvex regularization in the context of logistic regression where the regularization term employs the family of Lq semi-norms. First, using results from the phenomenon of concentration of norms and distances in high dimensions, we gain intuition about the working of sparse estimation when the dimensionality is very high. Second, using the probably approximately correct (PAC)-Bayes methodology, we give a data-dependent bound on the generalization error of Lq-regularized logistic regression, which is applicable to any algorithm that implements this model, and may be used to predict its generalization behavior from the training set alone. Third, we demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by experiments and applications, where the PAC-Bayes bound is used to guide the choice of semi-norm in the regularization term. The results support the conclusion that the optimal choice of regularization depends on the relative fraction of relevant versus irrelevant features, and a fractional norm with a small exponent is most suitable when the fraction of relevant features is very small.

  11. Strategy for implementing research in hydrology to promote space science among school children in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabi, Omowumi O.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a proposed activity to introduce school children in Nigeria to research in hydrology through the public outreach coordinated by the United Nations affiliated African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English (ARCSSTE-E). Over the years, ARCSSTE-E has established a vibrant relationship with Nigerian schools through periodic zonal and national space educational workshops organized for students and teachers. The enthusiasm displayed by the students, coupled with the brilliant performance in the evaluation tests, indicated that this method of informal education is suitable for stimulating the interest of Nigerian pre-collegiate youths in space science and technology, and also to inspire the young learners and develop their interest in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Because only few representatives from each school can participate in these public outreach programs, it became expedient for the Centre to inaugurate space clubs in schools as a forum for students and teachers to meet regularly to discuss space related issues. Since the first space club was officially launched in 2007, the Centre has inaugurated over 300 space clubs in primary, secondary and tertiary institutions, strategically distributed over the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria. The presentation highlights a space club activity designed to introduce the students to precipitation data collection, with locally fabricated rain gauges. The paper also documents the proposed post-data collection activities in which ARCSSTE-E, acting as the coordinating Centre will collaborate with other national and international organizations to standardize and utilize the rainfall data collected by the students for ground validation of satellite data from the Global Precipitation Measurement. Key words: Public Outreach, Space Club, Human Capacity Development, Hydrologic Research, Global Precipitation Measurement.

  12. EU Space Awareness: Initial implemenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    EU Space Awareness uses the excitement of space to attract young people into science and technology and stimulate European and global citizenship. The project will show children and teenagers the opportunities offered by space science and engineering and inspire primary-school children when their curiosity is high and their value systems are being formed. EU Space Awareness, a 3-year project, has started in March 2015 with 10 partner organisations and 15 network nodes in 17 European countries and the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development. During this talk we will give a update about the intial implementation of the project and its relevant for astronomy for development.

  13. Regularity criterion for the 3D Hall-magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mimi

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the regularity problem for the 3D incompressible resistive viscous Hall-magneto-hydrodynamic (Hall-MHD) system. The Kolmogorov 41 phenomenological theory of turbulence [14] predicts that there exists a critical wavenumber above which the high frequency part is dominated by the dissipation term in the fluid equation. Inspired by this idea, we apply an approach of splitting the wavenumber combined with an estimate of the energy flux to obtain a new regularity criterion. The regularity condition presented here is weaker than conditions in the existing criteria (Prodi-Serrin type criteria) for the 3D Hall-MHD system.

  14. Factors distinguishing regular readers of breast cancer information in magazines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J D

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the differences between women who were regular and occasional readers of breast cancer information in magazines. Based on uses and gratifications theory and the Health Belief Model, women respondents (n = 366) were predicted to differentially expose themselves to information. A discriminant analysis showed that women who were regular readers reported greater fear, perceived vulnerability, general health concern, personal experience, and surveillance need for breast cancer-related information. The results are discussed in terms of the potential positive and negative consequences of regular exposure to breast cancer information in magazines. PMID:9311097

  15. Some results on the spectra of strongly regular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luís António de Almeida; Mano, Vasco Moço

    2016-06-01

    Let G be a strongly regular graph whose adjacency matrix is A. We associate a real finite dimensional Euclidean Jordan algebra 𝒱, of rank three to the strongly regular graph G, spanned by I and the natural powers of A, endowed with the Jordan product of matrices and with the inner product as being the usual trace of matrices. Finally, by the analysis of the binomial Hadamard series of an element of 𝒱, we establish some inequalities on the parameters and on the spectrum of a strongly regular graph like those established in theorems 3 and 4.

  16. Low-Rank Matrix Factorization With Adaptive Graph Regularizer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gui-Fu; Wang, Yong; Zou, Jian

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel low-rank matrix factorization algorithm with adaptive graph regularizer (LMFAGR). We extend the recently proposed low-rank matrix with manifold regularization (MMF) method with an adaptive regularizer. Different from MMF, which constructs an affinity graph in advance, LMFAGR can simultaneously seek graph weight matrix and low-dimensional representations of data. That is, graph construction and low-rank matrix factorization are incorporated into a unified framework, which results in an automatically updated graph rather than a predefined one. The experimental results on some data sets demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art low-rank matrix factorization methods.

  17. Quaternion regularization and stabilization of perturbed central motion. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    1993-04-01

    Generalized regular quaternion equations for the three-dimensional two-body problem in terms of Kustaanheimo-Stiefel variables are obtained within the framework of the quaternion theory of regularizing and stabilizing transformations of the Newtonian equations for perturbed central motion. Regular quaternion equations for perturbed central motion of a material point in a central field with a certain potential Pi are also derived in oscillatory and normal forms. In addition, systems of perturbed central motion equations are obtained which include quaternion equations of perturbed orbit orientations in oscillatory or normal form, and a generalized Binet equation is derived. A comparative analysis of the equations is carried out.

  18. Space physiology and medicine, 2nd ed

    SciTech Connect

    Nicogossian, A.E.; Huntoon, C.L.; Pool, S.L.; Johnson, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Physiological Adaptation to Space Flight: Overall Adaptation to Space Flight and Implications; The Neurovestibular System; Performance; The Cardiopulmonary System; Nutrition; Bone and Mineral Metabolism; Hematology, Immunology, Endocrinology, and Biochemistry; Microgravity: Stimulations and Analogs; Health Maintenance of Space Crewmemebers: Medical Evaluation for Astronaut Selection and Longitudinal Studies; Biomedical Training of Space Crews; Ground-Based Medical Programs; Countermeasures to Space Deconditioning; Medical Problems of Space Flight: Toxic Hazards in Space Operations; Radiation Exposure Issues and Medical Care and Health Maintenance in Flight.

  19. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The space shuttle flight system and mission profile are briefly described. Emphasis is placed on the economic and social benefits of the space transportation system. The space shuttle vehicle is described in detail.

  20. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  1. Generic quantum walks with memory on regular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Mc Gettrick, Michael; Gao, Fei; Xu, Jie; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Quantum walks with memory (QWM) are a type of modified quantum walks that record the walker's latest path. As we know, only two kinds of QWM have been presented up to now. It is desired to design more QWM for research, so that we can explore the potential of QWM. In this work, by presenting the one-to-one correspondence between QWM on a regular graph and quantum walks without memory (QWoM) on a line digraph of the regular graph, we construct a generic model of QWM on regular graphs. This construction gives a general scheme for building all possible standard QWM on regular graphs and makes it possible to study properties of different kinds of QWM. Here, by taking the simplest example, which is QWM with one memory on the line, we analyze some properties of QWM, such as variance, occupancy rate, and localization.

  2. Loop Invariants, Exploration of Regularities, and Mathematical Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginat, David

    2001-01-01

    Presents an approach for illustrating, on an intuitive level, the significance of loop invariants for algorithm design and analysis. The illustration is based on mathematical games that require the exploration of regularities via problem-solving heuristics. (Author/MM)

  3. Regularization of the restricted problem of four bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.

    1967-01-01

    Regularization of restricted three-body problem extended to case where three primaries of any mass revolve in circular orbits around common center of mass and fourth body of infinitesimal mass moves in their field

  4. What's Regular Exercise Worth? Maybe $2,500 Per Year

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160859.html What's Regular Exercise Worth? Maybe $2,500 Per Year That's how ... afford the time and money to start an exercise routine? Maybe this will help: A new study ...

  5. Are Pupils in Special Education Too "Special" for Regular Education?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pijl, Ysbrand J.; Pijl, Sip J.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands special needs pupils are often referred to separate schools for the Educable Mentally Retarded (EMR) or the Learning Disabled (LD). There is an ongoing debate on how to reduce the growing numbers of special education placements. One of the main issues in this debate concerns the size of the difference in cognitive abilities between pupils in regular education and those eligible for LD or EMR education. In this study meta-analysis techniques were used to synthesize the findings from 31 studies on differences between pupils in regular primary education and those in special education in the Netherlands. Studies were grouped into three categories according to the type of measurements used: achievement, general intelligence and neuropsychological tests. It was found that pupils in regular education and those in special education differ in achievement and general intelligence. Pupils in schools for the educable mentally retarded in particular perform at a much lower level than is common in regular Dutch primary education.

  6. Regularized Chapman-Enskog expansion for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schochet, Steven; Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    Rosenau has recently proposed a regularized version of the Chapman-Enskog expansion of hydrodynamics. This regularized expansion resembles the usual Navier-Stokes viscosity terms at law wave-numbers, but unlike the latter, it has the advantage of being a bounded macroscopic approximation to the linearized collision operator. The behavior of Rosenau regularization of the Chapman-Enskog expansion (RCE) is studied in the context of scalar conservation laws. It is shown that thie RCE model retains the essential properties of the usual viscosity approximation, e.g., existence of traveling waves, monotonicity, upper-Lipschitz continuity..., and at the same time, it sharpens the standard viscous shock layers. It is proved that the regularized RCE approximation converges to the underlying inviscid entropy solution as its mean-free-path epsilon approaches 0, and the convergence rate is estimated.

  7. A novel regularized edge-preserving super-resolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chen, Fu-sheng; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Using super-resolution (SR) technology is a good approach to obtain high-resolution infrared image. However, Image super-resolution reconstruction is essentially an ill-posed problem, it is important to design an effective regularization term (image prior). Gaussian prior is widely used in the regularization term, but the reconstructed SR image becomes over-smoothness. Here, a novel regularization term called non-local means (NLM) term is derived based on the assumption that the natural image content is likely to repeat itself within some neighborhood. In the proposed framework, the estimated high image is obtained by minimizing a cost function. The iteration method is applied to solve the optimum problem. With the progress of iteration, the regularization term is adaptively updated. The proposed algorithm has been tested in several experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and can reconstruct higher quality images both in quantitative term and perceptual effect.

  8. Identifying basketball performance indicators in regular season and playoff games.

    PubMed

    García, Javier; Ibáñez, Sergio J; De Santos, Raúl Martinez; Leite, Nuno; Sampaio, Jaime

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify basketball game performance indicators which best discriminate winners and losers in regular season and playoffs. The sample used was composed by 323 games of ACB Spanish Basketball League from the regular season (n=306) and from the playoffs (n=17). A previous cluster analysis allowed splitting the sample in balanced (equal or below 12 points), unbalanced (between 13 and 28 points) and very unbalanced games (above 28 points). A discriminant analysis was used to identify the performance indicators either in regular season and playoff games. In regular season games, the winning teams dominated in assists, defensive rebounds, successful 2 and 3-point field-goals. However, in playoff games the winning teams' superiority was only in defensive rebounding. In practical applications, these results may help the coaches to accurately design training programs to reflect the importance of having different offensive set plays and also have specific conditioning programs to prepare for defensive rebounding.

  9. Stimulated parametric emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Kataoka, Shogo; Murase, Rena; Watanabe, Wataru; Higashi, Tsunehito; Kawakami, Shigeki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel microscopy technique based on the four-wave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our proposed FWM technique can be used to obtain a one-dimensional image of ethanol-thinned Coumarin 120 solution sandwiched between a hole-slide glass and a cover slip, and a two-dimensional image of a leaf of Camellia sinensis.

  10. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, Joseph J.; Arbid, Elias J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic limb ischemia involves the restoration of pulsatile blood flow to the distal extremity. Some patients cannot be treated with endovascular means or with open surgery; some may have medical comorbidities that render them unfit for surgery, while others may have persistent ischemia or pain even in the face of previous attempts at reperfusion. In spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a device with electrodes is implanted in the epidural space to stimulate sensory fibers. This activates cell-signaling molecules that in turn cause the release of vasodilatory molecules, a decrease in vascular resistance, and relaxation of smooth muscle cells. SCS also suppresses sympathetic vasoconstriction and pain transmission. When patient selection is based on microcirculatory parameters, SCS therapy can significantly improve pain relief, halt the progression of ulcers, and potentially achieve limb salvage. PMID:23805343

  11. Note on regular black holes in a brane world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, J. C. S.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that regular black holes in a Randall-Sundrum-type brane world model are generated by the nonlocal bulk influence, expressed by a constant parameter in the brane metric, only in the spherical case. In the axial case (black holes with rotation), this influence forbids them. A nonconstant bulk influence is necessary to generate regular black holes with rotation in this context.

  12. Analog neural nets with gaussian or other common noise distribution cannot recognize arbitrary regular languages.

    PubMed

    Maass, W; Sontag, E D

    1999-04-01

    We consider recurrent analog neural nets where the output of each gate is subject to gaussian noise or any other common noise distribution that is nonzero on a sufficiently large part of the state-space. We show that many regular languages cannot be recognized by networks of this type, and we give a precise characterization of languages that can be recognized. This result implies severe constraints on possibilities for constructing recurrent analog neural nets that are robust against realistic types of analog noise. On the other hand, we present a method for constructing feedforward analog neural nets that are robust with regard to analog noise of this type.

  13. A Regularized Neural Net Approach for Retrieval of Atmospheric and Surface Temperatures with the IASI Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, F.; Chedin, A.; Scott, N. A.; Rossow, W. B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, a fast atmospheric and surface temperature retrieval algorithm is developed for the high resolution Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) space-borne instrument. This algorithm is constructed on the basis of a neural network technique that has been regularized by introduction of a priori information. The performance of the resulting fast and accurate inverse radiative transfer model is presented for a large divE:rsified dataset of radiosonde atmospheres including rare events. Two configurations are considered: a tropical-airmass specialized scheme and an all-air-masses scheme.

  14. Graph Regularized Meta-path Based Transductive Regression in Heterogeneous Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mengting; Ouyang, Yunbo; Kaplan, Lance; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    A number of real-world networks are heterogeneous information networks, which are composed of different types of nodes and links. Numerical prediction in heterogeneous information networks is a challenging but significant area because network based information for unlabeled objects is usually limited to make precise estimations. In this paper, we consider a graph regularized meta-path based transductive regression model (Grempt), which combines the principal philosophies of typical graph-based transductive classification methods and transductive regression models designed for homogeneous networks. The computation of our method is time and space efficient and the precision of our model can be verified by numerical experiments. PMID:26705510

  15. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco

    2012-07-13

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  16. An adaptive Tikhonov regularization method for fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Ke; Luo, Jianwen; Bai, Jing

    2013-08-01

    The high degree of absorption and scattering of photons propagating through biological tissues makes fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction a severe ill-posed problem and the reconstructed result is susceptible to noise in the measurements. To obtain a reasonable solution, Tikhonov regularization (TR) is generally employed to solve the inverse problem of FMT. However, with a fixed regularization parameter, the Tikhonov solutions suffer from low resolution. In this work, an adaptive Tikhonov regularization (ATR) method is presented. Considering that large regularization parameters can smoothen the solution with low spatial resolution, while small regularization parameters can sharpen the solution with high level of noise, the ATR method adaptively updates the spatially varying regularization parameters during the iteration process and uses them to penalize the solutions. The ATR method can adequately sharpen the feasible region with fluorescent probes and smoothen the region without fluorescent probes resorting to no complementary priori information. Phantom experiments are performed to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the spatial resolution and reduce the noise of FMT reconstruction at the same time.

  17. The relationship between lifestyle regularity and subjective sleep quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.; Reynolds, Charles F 3rd; Buysse, Daniel J.; DeGrazia, Jean M.; Kupfer, David J.

    2003-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a diary instrument-the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), which allows the assessment of lifestyle regularity-and a questionnaire instrument--the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which allows the assessment of subjective sleep quality. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between lifestyle regularity and subjective sleep quality. Lifestyle regularity was assessed by both standard (SRM-17) and shortened (SRM-5) metrics; subjective sleep quality was assessed by the PSQI. We hypothesized that high lifestyle regularity would be conducive to better sleep. Both instruments were given to a sample of 100 healthy subjects who were studied as part of a variety of different experiments spanning a 9-yr time frame. Ages ranged from 19 to 49 yr (mean age: 31.2 yr, s.d.: 7.8 yr); there were 48 women and 52 men. SRM scores were derived from a two-week diary. The hypothesis was confirmed. There was a significant (rho = -0.4, p < 0.001) correlation between SRM (both metrics) and PSQI, indicating that subjects with higher levels of lifestyle regularity reported fewer sleep problems. This relationship was also supported by a categorical analysis, where the proportion of "poor sleepers" was doubled in the "irregular types" group as compared with the "non-irregular types" group. Thus, there appears to be an association between lifestyle regularity and good sleep, though the direction of causality remains to be tested.

  18. Nonlocal means-based regularizations for statistical CT reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown remarkable gains over the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) method in improving image quality for low-dose computed tomography (CT). They reconstruct the CT images by maximizing/minimizing a cost function in a statistical sense, where the cost function usually consists of two terms: the data-fidelity term modeling the statistics of measured data, and the regularization term reflecting a prior information. The regularization term in SIR plays a critical role for successful image reconstruction, and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm in image processing applications, we proposed, in this work, a family of generic and edgepreserving NLM-based regularizations for SIR. We evaluated one of them where the potential function takes the quadratic-form. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms clearly demonstrated that SIR with the proposed regularization can achieve more significant gains than SIR with the widely-used Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  19. Global services systems - Space communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepphird, F. H.; Wolbers, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    The requirements projected to the year 2000 for space-based global service systems, including both personal communications and innovative services, are developed based on historic trends and anticipated worldwide demographic and economic growth patterns. The growing demands appear to be best satisfied by developing larger, more sophisticated space systems in order to reduce the size, complexity, and expense of ground terminals. The availability of low-cost ground terminals will, in turn, further stimulate the generation of new services and new customers.

  20. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  1. Central nervous system stimulants.

    PubMed

    George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Three major types of CNS stimulant are currently abused in sport: amphetamine, cocaine and caffeine. Each drug type has its own characteristic mechanism of action on CNS neurones and their associated receptors and nerve terminals. Amphetamine is widely abused in sports requiring intense anaerobic exercise where it prolongs the tolerance to anaerobic metabolism. It is addictive, and chronic abuse causes marked behavioural change and sometimes psychosis. Major sports abusing amphetamine are cycling, American football, ice-hockey and baseball. Cocaine increases tolerance to intense exercise, yet most of its chronic effects on energy metabolism are negative. Its greatest effects seem to be as a central stimulant and the enhancement of short-term anaerobic exercise. It is highly addictive and can cause cerebral and cardiovascular fatalities. Caffeine enhances fatty acid metabolism leading to glucose conservation, which appears to benefit long-distance endurance events such as skiing. Caffeine is also addictive, and chronic abuse can lead to cardiac damage. Social abuse of each of the three drugs is often difficult to distinguish from their abuse in sport.

  2. Recent Developments in Career Education in the Netherlands: Learning by Experience and Value Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmeister, Jane; Veugelers, Wiel

    Career education in the Netherlands is a regular part of the curriculum and provides students the opportunity to collect information about different professions and studies. The policy of the Dutch administration is to stimulate the creation of secondary schools with both vocational and academic tracks. Career education is designed to balance…

  3. The Rocks From Space 'Space Safari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Victoria; Brooks, Val

    2010-05-01

    We describe an integrated online science programme incorporating Moodle virtual learning environments (VLEs) and Elluminate Live! virtual classrooms. The "Space Safari" was run as part of the Rocks From Space (RFS) programme hosted at The Open University (OU) and in partnership with Stockton City Learning Centre (SCLC). Schools used these resources for direct science teaching or to incorporate them into the wider curriculum (arts/literature etc), after which they produce an output. Emphasis was on providing links between schools and scientists within the higher education sector. Live sessions with experts via Elluminate Live! were held regularly, including sessions with NASA scientists and astronomers in Mallorca. Teachers and students have used Space Safari resources as part of the school science curriculum and to develop key skills and additional curriculum skills. They have also used it for informal (forums, online discussions) opportunities to engage with science. Over 3 years of the project, over 1500 students have engaged, with the project. The use of virtual classrooms enabled direct interaction with many students; one session alone involved over 100 students. This project is now hosted on the eTwinning portal to enable sustainability and widen access.

  4. Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate directions for the applied research and technology programs that will develop space power systems for U.S. future space missions beyond 1995 are explored. Spacecraft power supplies; space stations, space power reactors, solar arrays, thermoelectric generators, energy storage, and communication satellites are among the topics discussed.

  5. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  6. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  7. A comprehensive methodology for algorithm characterization, regularization and mapping into optimal VLSI arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Barada, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation provides a fairly comprehensive treatment of a broad class of algorithms as it pertains to systolic implementation. The authors describe some formal algorithmic transformations that can be utilized to map regular and some irregular compute-bound algorithms into the beat fit time-optimal systolic architectures. The resulted architectures can be one-dimensional, two-dimensional, three-dimensional or nonplanar. The methodology detailed in the dissertation employs, like other methods, the concept of dependence vector to order, in space and time, the index points representing the algorithm. However, by differentiating between two types of dependence vectors, the ordering procedure is allowed to be flexible and time optimal. Furthermore, unlike other methodologies, the approach reported here does not put constraints on the topology or dimensionality of the target architecture. The ordered index points are represented by nodes in a diagram called Systolic Precedence Diagram (SPD). The SPD is a form of precedence graph that takes into account the systolic operation requirements of strictly local communications and regular data flow. Therefore, any algorithm with variable dependence vectors has to be transformed into a regular indexed set of computations with local dependencies. This can be done by replacing variable dependence vectors with sets of fixed dependence vectors. The SPD is transformed into an acyclic, labeled, directed graph called the Systolic Directed Graph (SDG). The SDG models the data flow as well as the timing for the execution of the given algorithm on a time-optimal array.

  8. Analyzing complicated protein folding kinetics rapidly by analytical Laplace inversion using a Tikhonov regularization variant.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Hadley, Kevin Charles; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic experiments provide much information about protein folding mechanisms. Time-resolved signals are often best described by expressions with many exponential terms, but this hinders the extraction of rate constants by nonlinear least squares (NLS) fitting. Numerical inverse Laplace transformation, which converts a time-resolved dataset into a spectrum of amplitudes as a function of rate constant, allows easy estimation of the rate constants, amplitudes, and number of processes underlying the data. Here, we present a Tikhonov regularization-based method that converts a dataset into a rate spectrum, subject to regularization constraints, without requiring an iterative search of parameter space. This allows more rapid generation of rate spectra as well as analysis of datasets too noisy to process by existing iterative search algorithms. This method's simplicity also permits highly objective, largely automatic analysis with minimal human guidance. We show that this regularization method reproduces results previously obtained by NLS fitting and that it is effective for analyzing datasets too complex for traditional fitting methods. This method's reliability and speed, as well as its potential for objective, model-free analysis, make it extremely useful as a first step in analysis of complicated noisy datasets and an excellent guide for subsequent NLS analysis.

  9. Variational regularization of complex deautoconvolution and phase retrieval in ultrashort laser pulse characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzengruber, Stephan W.; Bürger, Steven; Hofmann, Bernd; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The SD-SPIDER method for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses requires the solution of a nonlinear integral equation of autoconvolution type with a device-based kernel function. Taking into account the analytical background of a variational regularization approach for solving the corresponding ill-posed operator equation formulated in complex-valued L 2-spaces over finite real intervals, we suggest and evaluate numerical procedures using NURBS and the TIGRA method for calculating the regularized solutions in a stable manner. In this context, besides the complex deautoconvolution problem with noisy but full data, a phase retrieval problem is introduced which adapts to the experimental state of the art in laser optics. For the treatment of this problem facet, which is formulated as a tensor product operator equation, we derive the well-posedness of variational regularization methods. Case studies with synthetic and real optical data show the capability of the implemented approach as well as its limitations due to measurement deficits.

  10. Variational regularization of complex deautoconvolution and phase retrieval in ultrashort laser pulse characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzengruber, Stephan W.; Bürger, Steven; Hofmann, Bernd; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2016-03-01

    The SD-SPIDER method for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses requires the solution of a nonlinear integral equation of autoconvolution type with a device-based kernel function. Taking into account the analytical background of a variational regularization approach for solving the corresponding ill-posed operator equation formulated in complex-valued L2-spaces over finite real intervals, we suggest and evaluate numerical procedures using NURBS and the TIGRA method for calculating the regularized solutions in a stable manner. In this context, besides the complex deautoconvolution problem with noisy but full data, a phase retrieval problem is introduced which adapts to the experimental state of the art in laser optics. For the treatment of this problem facet, which is formulated as a tensor product operator equation, we derive the well-posedness of variational regularization methods. Case studies with synthetic and real optical data show the capability of the implemented approach as well as its limitations due to measurement deficits.

  11. A Regularized Linear Dynamical System Framework for Multivariate Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Linear Dynamical System (LDS) is an elegant mathematical framework for modeling and learning Multivariate Time Series (MTS). However, in general, it is difficult to set the dimension of an LDS’s hidden state space. A small number of hidden states may not be able to model the complexities of a MTS, while a large number of hidden states can lead to overfitting. In this paper, we study learning methods that impose various regularization penalties on the transition matrix of the LDS model and propose a regularized LDS learning framework (rLDS) which aims to (1) automatically shut down LDSs’ spurious and unnecessary dimensions, and consequently, address the problem of choosing the optimal number of hidden states; (2) prevent the overfitting problem given a small amount of MTS data; and (3) support accurate MTS forecasting. To learn the regularized LDS from data we incorporate a second order cone program and a generalized gradient descent method into the Maximum a Posteriori framework and use Expectation Maximization to obtain a low-rank transition matrix of the LDS model. We propose two priors for modeling the matrix which lead to two instances of our rLDS. We show that our rLDS is able to recover well the intrinsic dimensionality of the time series dynamics and it improves the predictive performance when compared to baselines on both synthetic and real-world MTS datasets. PMID:25905027

  12. Frame-based compressive sensing MR image reconstruction with balanced regularization.

    PubMed

    Shoulie Xie; Cuntai Guan; Weimin Huang; Zhongkang Lu

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the frame-based MR image reconstruction from undersampled k-space measurements by using a balanced ℓ(1)-regularized approach. Analysis-based and synthesis-based approaches are two common methods in ℓ(1)-regularized image restoration. They are equivalent under the orthogonal transform, but there exists a gap between them under redundant transform such as frame. Thus the third approach was developed to reduce the gap by penalizing the distance between the representation vector and the canonical frame coefficient of the estimated image, this balanced approach bridges the synthesis-based and analysis-based approaches and balances the fidelity, sparsity and smoothness of the solution. These frame-based approaches have been studied and compared for optical image restoration over the last few years. In this paper, we further study and compare these three approaches for the compressed sensing MR image reconstruction under redundant frame domain. These ℓ(1)-regularized optimization problems are solved by using a variable splitting strategy and the classical alternating direction method of multiplier (ADMM). Numerical simulation results show that the balanced approach can reduce the gap between the analysis-based and synthesis-based approaches and are even better than these two approaches under our experimental conditions.

  13. A linearized current stimulator for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ding-Lan; Chu, Yu-Jung

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops the front end of the stimulator which is applied in the implantable deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. This stimulator adopts the low power switched-capacitor DAC accompanying with voltage-to-current transconductance amplifiers to obtain the adjustable output currents. The proposed distortion cancellation technique improves the linearity of the current stimulator. Multiple transconductance amplifiers sharing a single DAC save the circuit area. The biphasic stimulation waveform is generated from the bridge switching technique and the programmable pulse. This stimulation circuit provides the 0 approximately 165 microA current for a typical loading of 10 kΩ, 8 approximately 120 micros pulse width, and 126 approximately 244 Hz frequencies with a 0.35 microm CMOS technology at 3.3 V supply voltage. PMID:21096724

  14. Plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides in patients receiving regular hemodialysis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Ekman, R

    1992-01-01

    The fasting plasma levels of 10 vasoactive regulatory peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 23 stable patients with chronic renal failure receiving regular hemodialysis treatment (RDT) and compared with those of healthy controls. The plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide, beta-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, motilin, neuropeptide Y, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were increased. The plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide was not statistically different from that of the controls. The plasma concentration of gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was lowered in the RDT-patients. The arterial blood pressure correlated with the plasma levels of motilin and neuropeptide Y. We conclude that patients with chronic renal failure receiving RDT have increased concentrations of 8 out of 10 measured vasoactive regulatory peptides. The elevated levels of vasoactive peptides may contribute to the adaptation of the cardiovascular system to impaired renal function.

  15. Norepinephrine alterations under stress conditions following the regular practice of meditation.

    PubMed

    Morrell, E M; Hollandsworth, J G

    1986-01-01

    The present study reexamined an investigation that found enhanced plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels during isometric handgrip after 30 days of meditation practice. Since hemodynamic activity did not show corresponding increases, it was suggested that meditation had down regulated the cardiovascular response to sympathetic stimulation. The present study assessed response to venipuncture as well as isometric stress. At posttest, meditators showed a trend towards higher plasma NE levels than controls during isometric handgrip. However, in contrast to previous speculation, this did not appear to represent cardiovascular down-regulation. At the same time, meditators produced the greater NE levels during venipuncture, accompanied by marginally lower heart rate. The results support the association between regular meditation and noradrenergic hyperactivation, but suggest the need for further investigation of underlying mechanisms.

  16. Regular vibrational state progressions at the dissociation limit of SCCl2.

    PubMed

    Chowdary, Praveen D; Gruebele, Martin

    2009-01-14

    We observe sharp features in the vibrational spectrum of SCCl(2) at and above its two lowest-lying dissociation limits. Highly regular vibrational progressions persist at dissociation, as in some smaller molecules studied previously by others. Nearly all of the SCCl(2) transitions studied by stimulated emission pumping can be assigned and fitted by a simple effective Hamiltonian without resonance terms, up to a total vibrational excitation of 36 quanta. The character of the highly excited vibrational wave functions is not normal mode-like, but it nonetheless arises gradually from the normal modes as the energy increases. The number of sharp vibrational features observed matches a scaling model that predicts localization of nearly all vibrational states near dissociation as the size of a polyatomic molecule increases.

  17. Regular treatment with salmeterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular salmeterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and FDA submissions in relation to salmeterol. The date of the most recent search was August 2011. Selection criteria We included controlled parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular salmeterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 26 trials comparing salmeterol to placebo and eight trials comparing with salbutamol. These included 62,815 participants with asthma (including 2,599 children). In six trials (2,766 patients), no serious adverse event data could be obtained. All-cause mortality was higher with regular salmeterol than placebo but the increase was not significant (Peto odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI 0.85 to 2.08)). Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when regular salmeterol was compared with placebo (OR 1.15 95% CI 1.02 to 1.29). One extra serious adverse event occurred over 28 weeks for every 188 people

  18. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  19. Prospective regularization design in prior-image-based reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hao; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2015-12-21

    Prior-image-based reconstruction (PIBR) methods leveraging patient-specific anatomical information from previous imaging studies and/or sequences have demonstrated dramatic improvements in dose utilization and image quality for low-fidelity data. However, a proper balance of information from the prior images and information from the measurements is required (e.g. through careful tuning of regularization parameters). Inappropriate selection of reconstruction parameters can lead to detrimental effects including false structures and failure to improve image quality. Traditional methods based on heuristics are subject to error and sub-optimal solutions, while exhaustive searches require a large number of computationally intensive image reconstructions. In this work, we propose a novel method that prospectively estimates the optimal amount of prior image information for accurate admission of specific anatomical changes in PIBR without performing full image reconstructions. This method leverages an analytical approximation to the implicitly defined PIBR estimator, and introduces a predictive performance metric leveraging this analytical form and knowledge of a particular presumed anatomical change whose accurate reconstruction is sought. Additionally, since model-based PIBR approaches tend to be space-variant, a spatially varying prior image strength map is proposed to optimally admit changes everywhere in the image (eliminating the need to know change locations a priori). Studies were conducted in both an ellipse phantom and a realistic thorax phantom emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. The proposed method demonstrated accurate estimation of the optimal prior image strength while achieving a substantial computational speedup (about a factor of 20) compared to traditional exhaustive search. Moreover, the use of the proposed prior strength map in PIBR demonstrated accurate reconstruction of anatomical changes without foreknowledge of change locations in

  20. Prospective regularization design in prior-image-based reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hao; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Webster Stayman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Prior-image-based reconstruction (PIBR) methods leveraging patient-specific anatomical information from previous imaging studies and/or sequences have demonstrated dramatic improvements in dose utilization and image quality for low-fidelity data. However, a proper balance of information from the prior images and information from the measurements is required (e.g. through careful tuning of regularization parameters). Inappropriate selection of reconstruction parameters can lead to detrimental effects including false structures and failure to improve image quality. Traditional methods based on heuristics are subject to error and sub-optimal solutions, while exhaustive searches require a large number of computationally intensive image reconstructions. In this work, we propose a novel method that prospectively estimates the optimal amount of prior image information for accurate admission of specific anatomical changes in PIBR without performing full image reconstructions. This method leverages an analytical approximation to the implicitly defined PIBR estimator, and introduces a predictive performance metric leveraging this analytical form and knowledge of a particular presumed anatomical change whose accurate reconstruction is sought. Additionally, since model-based PIBR approaches tend to be space-variant, a spatially varying prior image strength map is proposed to optimally admit changes everywhere in the image (eliminating the need to know change locations a priori). Studies were conducted in both an ellipse phantom and a realistic thorax phantom emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. The proposed method demonstrated accurate estimation of the optimal prior image strength while achieving a substantial computational speedup (about a factor of 20) compared to traditional exhaustive search. Moreover, the use of the proposed prior strength map in PIBR demonstrated accurate reconstruction of anatomical changes without foreknowledge of change locations in

  1. Improvements In Optically Stimulated Electron Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Welch, Christopher S.; Joe, Edmond J.; Hefner, Bill B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE) used in inspection for contamination of critical bonding surfaces in solid rocket motors of Space Shuttle prior to formation of adhesive bonds on surfaces during manufacture and refurbishment. Fundamental OSEE inspection technique described in "Surface-Contamination Inspection Tool for Field Use" (MFS-25581) and "Detecting Contamination With Photoelectron Emission" (MFS-25619). OSEE measurement head easily portable, and measurement operation convenient and rapid, making it useful inspection technique in industrial environment. Reveals contamination in many situations in which other techniques do not work.

  2. Space Technology for Medical Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    A line of biomedical devices based on aerospace expertise leads a sampling of spinoffs in the field of medicine. These include a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-developed computer program used by the Centers for Disease Control, medical products research, crawling aid, portable medical system, and human tissue stimulator.…

  3. A model and regularization scheme for ultrasonic beamforming clutter reduction.

    PubMed

    Byram, Brett; Dei, Kazuyuki; Tierney, Jaime; Dumont, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic clutter produced by off-axis and multipath scattering is known to cause image degradation, and in some cases these sources may be the prime determinants of in vivo image quality. We have previously shown some success addressing these sources of image degradation by modeling the aperture domain signal from different sources of clutter, and then decomposing aperture domain data using the modeled sources. Our previous model had some shortcomings including model mismatch and failure to recover B-Mode speckle statistics. These shortcomings are addressed here by developing a better model and by using a general regularization approach appropriate for the model and data. We present results with L1 (lasso), L2 (ridge), and L1/L2 combined (elastic-net) regularization methods. We call our new method aperture domain model image reconstruction (ADMIRE). Our results demonstrate that ADMIRE with L1 regularization, or weighted toward L1 in the case of elastic-net regularization, have improved image quality. L1 by itself works well, but additional improvements are seen with elastic-net regularization over the pure L1 constraint. On in vivo example cases, L1 regularization showed mean contrast improvements of 4.6 and 6.8 dB on fundamental and harmonic images, respectively. Elastic net regularization (α = 0.9) showed mean contrast improvements of 17.8 dB on fundamental images and 11.8 dB on harmonic images. We also demonstrate that in uncluttered Field II simulations the decluttering algorithm produces the same contrast, contrast-tonoise ratio, and speckle SNR as normal B-mode imaging, demonstrating that ADMIRE preserves typical image features.

  4. Multiscale regularized reconstruction for enhancing microcalcification in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, Chuan

    2012-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) holds strong promise for improving the sensitivity of detecting subtle mass lesions. Detection of microcalcifications is more difficult because of high noise and subtle signals in the large DBT volume. It is important to enhance the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of microcalcifications in DBT reconstruction. A major challenge of implementing microcalcification enhancement or noise regularization in DBT reconstruction is to preserve the image quality of masses, especially those with ill-defined margins and subtle spiculations. We are developing a new multiscale regularization (MSR) method for the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) to improve the CNR of microcalcifications without compromising the quality of masses. Each DBT slice is stratified into different frequency bands via wavelet decomposition and the regularization method applies different degrees of regularization to different frequency bands to preserve features of interest and suppress noise. Regularization is constrained by a characteristic map to avoid smoothing subtle microcalcifications. The characteristic map is generated via image feature analysis to identify potential microcalcification locations in the DBT volume. The MSR method was compared to the non-convex total pvariation (TpV) method and SART with no regularization (NR) in terms of the CNR and the full width at half maximum of the line profiles intersecting calcifications and mass spiculations in DBT of human subjects. The results demonstrated that SART regularized by the MSR method was superior to the TpV method for subtle microcalcifications in terms of CNR enhancement. The MSR method preserved the quality of subtle spiculations better than the TpV method in comparison to NR.

  5. Particle motion and Penrose processes around rotating regular black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    The neutral particle motion around rotating regular black hole that was derived from the Ayón-Beato-García (ABG) black hole solution by the Newman-Janis algorithm in the preceding paper (Toshmatov et al., Phys. Rev. D, 89:104017, 2014) has been studied. The dependencies of the ISCO (innermost stable circular orbits along geodesics) and unstable orbits on the value of the electric charge of the rotating regular black hole have been shown. Energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole through various processes has been examined. We have found expression of the center of mass energy for the colliding neutral particles coming from infinity, based on the BSW (Baňados-Silk-West) mechanism. The electric charge Q of rotating regular black hole decreases the potential of the gravitational field as compared to the Kerr black hole and the particles demonstrate less bound energy at the circular geodesics. This causes an increase of efficiency of the energy extraction through BSW process in the presence of the electric charge Q from rotating regular black hole. Furthermore, we have studied the particle emission due to the BSW effect assuming that two neutral particles collide near the horizon of the rotating regular extremal black hole and produce another two particles. We have shown that efficiency of the energy extraction is less than the value 146.6 % being valid for the Kerr black hole. It has been also demonstrated that the efficiency of the energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole via the Penrose process decreases with the increase of the electric charge Q and is smaller in comparison to 20.7 % which is the value for the extreme Kerr black hole with the specific angular momentum a= M.

  6. Another look at statistical learning theory and regularization.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Vladimir; Ma, Yunqian

    2009-09-01

    The paper reviews and highlights distinctions between function-approximation (FA) and VC theory and methodology, mainly within the setting of regression problems and a squared-error loss function, and illustrates empirically the differences between the two when data is sparse and/or input distribution is non-uniform. In FA theory, the goal is to estimate an unknown true dependency (or 'target' function) in regression problems, or posterior probability P(y/x) in classification problems. In VC theory, the goal is to 'imitate' unknown target function, in the sense of minimization of prediction risk or good 'generalization'. That is, the result of VC learning depends on (unknown) input distribution, while that of FA does not. This distinction is important because regularization theory originally introduced under clearly stated FA setting [Tikhonov, N. (1963). On solving ill-posed problem and method of regularization. Doklady Akademii Nauk USSR, 153, 501-504; Tikhonov, N., & V. Y. Arsenin (1977). Solution of ill-posed problems. Washington, DC: W. H. Winston], has been later used under risk-minimization or VC setting. More recently, several authors [Evgeniou, T., Pontil, M., & Poggio, T. (2000). Regularization networks and support vector machines. Advances in Computational Mathematics, 13, 1-50; Hastie, T., Tibshirani, R., & Friedman, J. (2001). The elements of statistical learning: Data mining, inference and prediction. Springer; Poggio, T. and Smale, S., (2003). The mathematics of learning: Dealing with data. Notices of the AMS, 50 (5), 537-544] applied constructive methodology based on regularization framework to learning dependencies from data (under VC-theoretical setting). However, such regularization-based learning is usually presented as a purely constructive methodology (with no clearly stated problem setting). This paper compares FA/regularization and VC/risk minimization methodologies in terms of underlying theoretical assumptions. The control of model

  7. Regular theta-firing neurons in the nucleus incertus during sustained hippocampal activation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo; Luque-Garcia, Aina; Luque-Martinez, Aina; Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Guerrero-Martínez, Juan; Bataller-Mompeán, Manuel; Teruel-Martí, Vicent

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the existence of theta-coupled neuronal activity in the nucleus incertus (NI). Theta rhythm is relevant for cognitive processes such as spatial navigation and memory processing, and can be recorded in a number of structures related to the hippocampal activation including the NI. Strong evidence supports the role of this tegmental nucleus in neural circuits integrating behavioural activation with the hippocampal theta rhythm. Theta oscillations have been recorded in the local field potential of the NI, highly coupled to the hippocampal waves, although no rhythmical activity has been reported in neurons of this nucleus. The present work analyses the neuronal activity in the NI in conditions leading to sustained hippocampal theta in the urethane-anaesthetised rat, in order to test whether such activation elicits a differential firing pattern. Wavelet analysis has been used to better define the neuronal activity already described in the nucleus, i.e., non-rhythmical neurons firing at theta frequency (type I neurons) and fast-firing rhythmical neurons (type II). However, the most remarkable finding was that sustained stimulation activated regular-theta neurons (type III), which were almost silent in baseline conditions and have not previously been reported. Thus, we describe the electrophysiological properties of type III neurons, focusing on their coupling to the hippocampal theta. Their spike rate, regularity and phase locking to the oscillations increased at the beginning of the stimulation, suggesting a role in the activation or reset of the oscillation. Further research is needed to address the specific contribution of these neurons to the entire circuit.

  8. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-06-13

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one's performance. PMID:27478569

  9. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  10. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  11. Engagement Sensitive Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepesh; Dutta, Anirban; Das, Abhijit; Lahiri, Uttama

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance. PMID:27478569

  12. Neural control of fast-regular saccades and antisaccades: an investigation using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Doricchi, F; Perani, D; Incoccia, C; Grassi, F; Cappa, S F; Bettinardi, V; Galati, G; Pizzamiglio, L; Fazio, F

    1997-08-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow changes related to the performance of two oculomotor tasks and a central fixation task were compared in ten healthy human subjects. The tasks were: (a) performance of fast-regular saccades; (b) performance of voluntary antisaccades away from a peripheral cue; (c) passive maintenance of central visual fixation in the presence of irrelevant peripheral stimulation. The saccadic task was associated with a relative increase in activity in a number of occipitotemporal areas. Compared with both the fixation and the saccadic task, the performance of antisaccades activated a set of areas including: the superior and inferior parietal lobules, the precentral and prefrontal cortex, the cingulate cortex, and the supplementary motor area. The results of the present study suggest that: (a) compared with self-determined saccadic responses the performance of fast regular, reflexive saccades produces a limited activation of the frontal eye fields; (b) in the antisaccadic task the inferior parietal lobes subserve operations of sensory-motor integration dealing with attentional disengagement from the initial peripheral cue (appearing at an invalid spatial location) and with the recomputation of the antisaccadic vector on the basis of the wrong (e.g., spatially opposite) information provided by the same cue.

  13. Prior regular exercise prevents synaptic plasticity impairment in sleep deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Hajali, Vahid; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that physical exercise plays a preventive role in synaptic plasticity deficits in the hippocampus of sleep-deprived male rats. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of treadmill running on early long term potentiation (E-LTP) at the Cornu Ammonis (CA1) area of the hippocampus in sleep-deprived female rats. Intact and ovariectomiezed (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present study. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and the multiple platform method was applied to induce 72 h sleep deprivation (SD). We examine the effect of exercise and/or SD on synaptic plasticity using in vivo extracellular recording in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. The field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) slope was measured before and 2h after high frequency stimulation (HFS) in the experimental groups. Field potential recording indicated that the induction and maintenance phase of E-LTP impaired in the sleep deprived animals compared to the other groups. After 72 h SD, E-LTP impairments were prevented by 4 weeks of regular treadmill exercise. In conclusion, the synaptic plasticity deficit in sleep-deprived female rats was improved by regular physical exercise. Further studies are suggested to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms.

  14. Regular tai chi chuan exercise enhances functional mobility and CD4CD25 regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, S‐H; Chuang, H; Lin, L‐W; Hsiao, C‐Y; Eng, H L

    2006-01-01

    Background The duration and vigour of physical exercise are widely considered to be critical elements that may positively or negatively affect physical health and immune response. Objectives To investigate the effect of a 12 week programme of regular tai chi chuan exercise (TCC) on functional mobility, beliefs about benefits of exercise on physical and psychological health, and immune regulation in middle aged volunteers. Methods This quasi‐experimental research design involving one group with testing before and after the programme was conducted to measure the effect of 12 weeks of TCC exercise in 14 men and 23 women from the normal community. Results Regular TCC exercise had a highly significant positive effect on functional mobility (p  =  0.001) and beliefs about the health benefits of exercise (p  =  0.013) in the 37 participants. Total white blood cell and red blood cell count did not change significantly, but a highly significant (p<0.001) decrease in monocyte count occurred. A significant (p  =  0.05) increase in the ratio of T helper to suppressor cells (CD4:CD8) was found, along with a significant (p  =  0.015) increase in CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. Production of the regulatory T cell mediators transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 under specific antigen stimulation (varicella zoster virus) was also significantly increased after this exercise programme. Conclusions A 12 week programme of regular TCC exercise enhances functional mobility, personal health expectations, and regulatory T cell function. PMID:16505081

  15. Singularities, trapped sets, and cosmic censorship in asymptotically flat space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Krolak, A. ); Rudnicki, W. )

    1993-01-01

    We show that space-time is future asymptotically predictable from a regular partial Cauchy provided that singularities are causally preceded by trapped sets. Future asymptotic predictability is a formal statement of cosmic censorship in asymptotically flat space-times. A regular partial Cauchy surface means that singularities in gravitational collapse can arise only from regular initial data. Our result confirms a supposition by Hawking that singularities forced by singularity theorems cannot be naked.

  16. Regularization methods used in error analysis of solar particle spectra measured on SOHO/EPHIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharytonov, A.; Böhm, E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The telescope EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium INstrument) on the SOHO (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) spacecraft measures the energy deposit of solar particles passing through the detector system. The original energy spectrum of solar particles is obtained by regularization methods from EPHIN measurements. It is important not only to obtain the solution of this inverse problem but also to estimate errors or uncertainties of the solution. Aims: The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of errors or noise in the instrument response function (IRF) and in the measurements when calculating energy spectra in space-based observations by regularization methods. Methods: The basis of solar particle spectra calculation is the Fredholm integral equation with the instrument response function as the kernel that is obtained by the Monte Carlo technique in matrix form. The original integral equation reduces to a singular system of linear algebraic equations. The nonnegative solution is obtained by optimization with constraints. For the starting value we use the solution of the algebraic problem that is calculated by regularization methods such as the singular value decomposition (SVD) or the Tikhonov methods. We estimate the local errors from special algebraic and statistical equations that are considered as direct or inverse problems. Inverse problems for the evaluation of errors are solved by regularization methods. Results: This inverse approach with error analysis is applied to data from the solar particle event observed by SOHO/EPHIN on day 1996/191. We find that the various methods have different strengths and weaknesses in the treatment of statistical and systematic errors.

  17. McGehee regularization of general SO(3)-invariant potentials and applications to stationary and spherically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Pablo; Mars, Marc

    2014-12-01

    The McGehee regularization is a method to study the singularity at the origin of the dynamical system describing a point particle in a plane moving under the action of a power-law potential. It was used by Belbruno and Pretorius (2011 Class. Quantum Grav. 28 195007) to perform a dynamical system regularization of the singularity at the center of the motion of massless test particles in the Schwarzschild spacetime. In this paper, we generalize the McGehee transformation so that we can regularize the singularity at the origin of the dynamical system describing the motion of causal geodesics (timelike or null) in any stationary and spherically symmetric spacetime of Kerr-Schild form. We first show that the geodesics for both massive and massless particles can be described globally in the Kerr-Schild spacetime as the motion of a Newtonian point particle in a suitable radial potential and study the conditions under which the central singularity can be regularized using an extension of the McGehee method. As an example, we apply these results to causal geodesics in the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström spacetimes. Interestingly, the geodesic trajectories in the whole maximal extension of both spacetimes can be described by a single two-dimensional phase space with non-trivial topology. This topology arises from the presence of excluded regions in the phase space determined by the condition that the tangent vector of the geodesic be causal and future directed.

  18. Space prospects. [european space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A strategy for keeping the Common Market's space effort independent of and competitive with NASA and the space shuttle is discussed. Limited financing is the chief obstacle to this. Proposals include an outer space materials processing project and further development of the Ariane rocket. A manned space program is excluded for the foreseeable future.

  19. Ninja Turtles, Space Aliens, and Regular Folks: A Fifth-Grade Genre Study of Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a fifth grade teacher's eight-week unit of study on fiction. Notes that fiction had been a part of the teacher's reading workshop but was absent from her writing workshop. Discusses immersion and exploration, characterization, developing plot, and drafting and revision. (RS)

  20. Regular treatment with formoterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular formoterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions in relation to formoterol. The date of the most recent search was January 2012. Selection criteria We included controlled, parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular formoterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second author checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 22 studies (8032 participants) comparing regular formoterol to placebo and salbutamol. Non-fatal serious adverse event data could be obtained for all participants from published studies comparing formoterol and placebo but only 80% of those comparing formoterol with salbutamol or terbutaline. Three deaths occurred on regular formoterol and none on placebo; this difference was not statistically significant. It was not possible to assess disease-specific mortality in view of the small number of deaths. Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when

  1. Saving Strokes with Space Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Inventor Dave Pelz developed a space spinoff Teacher Alignment Computer for Sunmark Preceptor Golf Ltd. which helps golfers learn proper putting aim. The light beam, reflected into the computer, measures putter alignment and lights atop the box tell the golfer he is on target or off to either side and how much. A related putting aid idea is to stroke the ball at the putter's "sweet spot," which is bracketed by metal prongs. Regular practice develops solid impacts for better putting.

  2. Spiral scan peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    King, K F; Schaefer, D J

    2000-07-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields induce electric fields that can cause physiological stimulation. Stimulation has been empirically characterized as a function of dB/dt and duration based on experiments using trapezoidal and sinusoidal gradient waveforms with constant ramp time, amplitude, and direction. For two-dimensional (2D) spiral scans, the readout gradient waveforms are frequency- and amplitude-modulated sinusoids on two orthogonal axes in quadrature. The readout gradient waveform therefore rotates with amplitude and angular velocity that are generally not constant. It does not automatically follow that spiral stimulation thresholds can be predicted using available stimulation models. We scanned 18 normal volunteers with a 2D spiral scan and measured global thresholds for axial, sagittal, and coronal planes. We concluded that the stimulation model evaluated accurately predicts slew rate-limited spiral mean stimulation thresholds, if the effective ramp time is chosen to be the half-period at the end of the spiral readout.

  3. Processing nouns and verbs in the left frontal cortex: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Fregni, Felipe; Shapiro, Kevin; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2008-04-01

    Neuropsychological and neurophysiological studies suggest that the production of verbs in speech depends on cortical regions in the left frontal lobe. However, the precise topography of these regions, and their functional roles in verb production, remains matters of debate. In an earlier study with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), we showed that stimulation to the left anterior midfrontal gyrus disrupted verb production, but not noun production, in a task that required subjects to perform simple morphological alternations. This result raises a number of questions: for example, is the effect of stimulation focal and specific to that brain region? Is the behavioral effect limited to rule-based, regular transformations, or can it be generalized over the grammatical category? In the present study, we used rTMS to suppress the excitability of distinct parts of the left prefrontal cortex to assess their role in producing regular and irregular verbs compared to nouns. We compared rTMS to sham stimulation and to stimulation of homologous areas in the right hemisphere. Response latencies increased for verbs, but were unaffected for nouns, following stimulation to the left anterior midfrontal gyrus. No significant interference specific for verbs resulted after stimulation to two other areas in the left frontal lobe, the posterior midfrontal gyrus and Broca's area. These results therefore reinforce the idea that the left anterior midfrontal cortex is critical for processing verbs. Moreover, none of the regions stimulated was preferentially engaged in the production of regular or irregular inflection, raising questions about the role of the frontal lobes in processing inflectional morphology.

  4. SPECT reconstruction using DCT-induced tight framelet regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahan; Li, Si; Xu, Yuesheng; Schmidtlein, C. R.; Lipson, Edward D.; Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Wavelet transforms have been successfully applied in many fields of image processing. Yet, to our knowledge, they have never been directly incorporated to the objective function in Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) image reconstruction. Our aim has been to investigate if the ℓ1-norm of non-decimated discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of the estimated radiotracer distribution could be effectively used as the regularization term for the penalized-likelihood (PL) reconstruction, where a regularizer is used to enforce the image smoothness in the reconstruction. In this study, the ℓ1-norm of 2D DCT wavelet decomposition was used as a regularization term. The Preconditioned Alternating Projection Algorithm (PAPA), which we proposed in earlier work to solve penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction with non-differentiable regularizers, was used to solve this optimization problem. The DCT wavelet decompositions were performed on the transaxial reconstructed images. We reconstructed Monte Carlo simulated SPECT data obtained for a numerical phantom with Gaussian blobs as hot lesions and with a warm random lumpy background. Reconstructed images using the proposed method exhibited better noise suppression and improved lesion conspicuity, compared with images reconstructed using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm with Gaussian post filter (GPF). Also, the mean square error (MSE) was smaller, compared with EM-GPF. A critical and challenging aspect of this method was selection of optimal parameters. In summary, our numerical experiments demonstrated that the ℓ1-norm of discrete cosine transform (DCT) wavelet frame transform DCT regularizer shows promise for SPECT image reconstruction using PAPA method.

  5. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  6. Image Super-Resolution via Adaptive Regularization and Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feilong; Cai, Miaomiao; Tan, Yuanpeng; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that image patches can be well represented as a sparse linear combination of elements from an appropriately selected over-complete dictionary. Recently, single-image super-resolution (SISR) via sparse representation using blurred and downsampled low-resolution images has attracted increasing interest, where the aim is to obtain the coefficients for sparse representation by solving an l0 or l1 norm optimization problem. The l0 optimization is a nonconvex and NP-hard problem, while the l1 optimization usually requires many more measurements and presents new challenges even when the image is the usual size, so we propose a new approach for SISR recovery based on regularization nonconvex optimization. The proposed approach is potentially a powerful method for recovering SISR via sparse representations, and it can yield a sparser solution than the l1 regularization method. We also consider the best choice for lp regularization with all p in (0, 1), where we propose a scheme that adaptively selects the norm value for each image patch. In addition, we provide a method for estimating the best value of the regularization parameter λ adaptively, and we discuss an alternate iteration method for selecting p and λ . We perform experiments, which demonstrates that the proposed regularization nonconvex optimization method can outperform the convex optimization method and generate higher quality images.

  7. Fast multislice fluorescence molecular tomography using sparsity-inducing regularization.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Sedigheh Marjaneh; Sarkar, Saeed; Darezereshki, Ziba

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a rapidly growing imaging method that facilitates the recovery of small fluorescent targets within biological tissue. The major challenge facing the FMT reconstruction method is the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. In order to overcome this problem, the acquisition of large FMT datasets and the utilization of a fast FMT reconstruction algorithm with sparsity regularization have been suggested recently. Therefore, the use of a joint L1/total-variation (TV) regularization as a means of solving the ill-posed FMT inverse problem is proposed. A comparative quantified analysis of regularization methods based on L1-norm and TV are performed using simulated datasets, and the results show that the fast composite splitting algorithm regularization method can ensure the accuracy and robustness of the FMT reconstruction. The feasibility of the proposed method is evaluated in an in vivo scenario for the subcutaneous implantation of a fluorescent-dye-filled capillary tube in a mouse, and also using hybrid FMT and x-ray computed tomography data. The results show that the proposed regularization overcomes the difficulties created by the ill-posed inverse problem.

  8. Spatially varying regularization of deconvolution in 3D microscopy.

    PubMed

    Seo, J; Hwang, S; Lee, J-M; Park, H

    2014-08-01

    Confocal microscopy has become an essential tool to explore biospecimens in 3D. Confocal microcopy images are still degraded by out-of-focus blur and Poisson noise. Many deconvolution methods including the Richardson-Lucy (RL) method, Tikhonov method and split-gradient (SG) method have been well received. The RL deconvolution method results in enhanced image quality, especially for Poisson noise. Tikhonov deconvolution method improves the RL method by imposing a prior model of spatial regularization, which encourages adjacent voxels to appear similar. The SG method also contains spatial regularization and is capable of incorporating many edge-preserving priors resulting in improved image quality. The strength of spatial regularization is fixed regardless of spatial location for the Tikhonov and SG method. The Tikhonov and the SG deconvolution methods are improved upon in this study by allowing the strength of spatial regularization to differ for different spatial locations in a given image. The novel method shows improved image quality. The method was tested on phantom data for which ground truth and the point spread function are known. A Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence value of 0.097 is obtained with applying spatially variable regularization to the SG method, whereas KL value of 0.409 is obtained with the Tikhonov method. In tests on a real data, for which the ground truth is unknown, the reconstructed data show improved noise characteristics while maintaining the important image features such as edges.

  9. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sreedhar S; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin; Egert, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable 'state' to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit quantitative

  10. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sreedhar S.; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable ‘state’ to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit

  11. Autonomous Optimization of Targeted Stimulation of Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sreedhar S; Wülfing, Jan; Okujeni, Samora; Boedecker, Joschka; Riedmiller, Martin; Egert, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Driven by clinical needs and progress in neurotechnology, targeted interaction with neuronal networks is of increasing importance. Yet, the dynamics of interaction between intrinsic ongoing activity in neuronal networks and their response to stimulation is unknown. Nonetheless, electrical stimulation of the brain is increasingly explored as a therapeutic strategy and as a means to artificially inject information into neural circuits. Strategies using regular or event-triggered fixed stimuli discount the influence of ongoing neuronal activity on the stimulation outcome and are therefore not optimal to induce specific responses reliably. Yet, without suitable mechanistic models, it is hardly possible to optimize such interactions, in particular when desired response features are network-dependent and are initially unknown. In this proof-of-principle study, we present an experimental paradigm using reinforcement-learning (RL) to optimize stimulus settings autonomously and evaluate the learned control strategy using phenomenological models. We asked how to (1) capture the interaction of ongoing network activity, electrical stimulation and evoked responses in a quantifiable 'state' to formulate a well-posed control problem, (2) find the optimal state for stimulation, and (3) evaluate the quality of the solution found. Electrical stimulation of generic neuronal networks grown from rat cortical tissue in vitro evoked bursts of action potentials (responses). We show that the dynamic interplay of their magnitudes and the probability to be intercepted by spontaneous events defines a trade-off scenario with a network-specific unique optimal latency maximizing stimulus efficacy. An RL controller was set to find this optimum autonomously. Across networks, stimulation efficacy increased in 90% of the sessions after learning and learned latencies strongly agreed with those predicted from open-loop experiments. Our results show that autonomous techniques can exploit quantitative

  12. Hydromechanical stimulation of bioluminescent plankton.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Stefan; Kurisu, Futoshi; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Pyrocystis fusiformis was investigated for different hydraulic conditions ('hydromechanical stimulation'). Pipe flow and oscillating shear produced luminescence, whereas changes in hydrostatic pressure were not stimulating. More intense fluid motion led to higher intensity, mainly due to a higher probability of cell response. The organism was also able to emit light in a glucose-salt mixture. The experiments suggest that the cells are effectively stimulated if the flow conditions change in time.

  13. Downscaling Satellite Precipitation with Emphasis on Extremes: A Variational 1-Norm Regularization in the Derivative Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ebtehaj, A. M.; Zhang, S. Q.; Hou, A. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of precipitation observations from space, e.g., from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the forthcoming Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) Mission, has fueled renewed interest in developing frameworks for downscaling and multi-sensor data fusion that can handle large data sets in computationally efficient ways while optimally reproducing desired properties of the underlying rainfall fields. Of special interest is the reproduction of extreme precipitation intensities and gradients, as these are directly relevant to hazard prediction. In this paper, we present a new formalism for downscaling satellite precipitation observations, which explicitly allows for the preservation of some key geometrical and statistical properties of spatial precipitation. These include sharp intensity gradients (due to high-intensity regions embedded within lower-intensity areas), coherent spatial structures (due to regions of slowly varying rainfall),and thicker-than-Gaussian tails of precipitation gradients and intensities. Specifically, we pose the downscaling problem as a discrete inverse problem and solve it via a regularized variational approach (variational downscaling) where the regularization term is selected to impose the desired smoothness in the solution while allowing for some steep gradients(called 1-norm or total variation regularization). We demonstrate the duality between this geometrically inspired solution and its Bayesian statistical interpretation, which is equivalent to assuming a Laplace prior distribution for the precipitation intensities in the derivative (wavelet) space. When the observation operator is not known, we discuss the effect of its misspecification and explore a previously proposed dictionary-based sparse inverse downscaling methodology to indirectly learn the observation operator from a database of coincidental high- and low-resolution observations. The proposed method and ideas are illustrated in case

  14. Evidence against an effect of grouping by spectral regularity on the perception of virtual pitch.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, V

    1999-11-01

    Two experiments investigated the role of the regularity of the frequency spacing of harmonics, as a separate factor from harmonicity, on the perception of the virtual pitch of a harmonic series. The first experiment compared the shifts produced by mistuning the 3rd, 4th, and 5th harmonics in the pitch of two harmonic series: the odd-H and the all-H tones. The odd-H tone contained odd harmonics 1 to 11, plus the 4th harmonic; the all-H tone contained harmonics 1 to 12. Both tones had a fundamental frequency of 155 Hz. Pitch shifts produced by mistuning the 3rd harmonic, but not the 4th and 5th harmonics, were found to be significantly larger for the odd-H tone than for the all-H tone. This finding was consistent with the idea that grouping by spectral regularity affects pitch perception since an odd harmonic made a larger contribution than an adjacent even harmonic to the pitch of the odd-H tone. However, an alternative explanation was that the 3rd mistuned harmonic produced larger pitch shifts within the odd-H tone than the 4th mistuned harmonic because of differences in the partial masking of these harmonics by adjacent harmonics. The second experiment tested these explanations by measuring pitch shifts for a modified all-H tone in which each mistuned odd harmonic was tested in the presence of the 4th harmonic, but in the absence of its other even-numbered neighbor. The results showed that, for all mistuned harmonics, pitch shifts for the modified all-H tone were not significantly different from those for the odd-H tone. These findings suggest that the harmonic relations among frequency components, rather than the regularity of their frequency spacing, is the primary factor for the perception of the virtual pitch of complex sounds.

  15. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    PubMed

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. PMID:20696448

  16. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  17. Electrical stimulation: a societal perspective.

    PubMed

    Gater, D R; McDowell, S M; Abbas, J J

    2000-01-01

    Societal perspective on functional electrical stimulation is colored by media influence, popular thought, and political climate as much as by the science that supports it. The purpose of this article is to examine how these influences facilitate or inhibit the application of electrical stimulation in today's world and to describe the challenges facing the use of electrical stimulation in the future. Emphasis will be placed on perceived need, cost, and available resources and how these factors must be addressed to utilize functional electrical stimulation successfully in society.

  18. Minimum divergence viscous flow simulation through finite difference and regularization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Rodolfo A.; Mirabolghasemi, Maryam; Bryant, Steven L.; Prodanović, Maša

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new algorithm to simulate single- and two-phase viscous flow through a three-dimensional Cartesian representation of the porous space, such as those available through X-ray microtomography. We use the finite difference method to discretize the governing equations and also propose a new method to enforce the incompressible flow constraint under zero Neumann boundary conditions for the velocity components. Finite difference formulation leads to fast parallel implementation through linear solvers for sparse matrices, allowing relatively fast simulations, while regularization techniques used on solving inverse problems lead to the desired incompressible fluid flow. Tests performed using benchmark samples show good agreement with experimental/theoretical values. Additional tests are run on Bentheimer and Buff Berea sandstone samples with available laboratory measurements. We compare the results from our new method, based on finite differences, with an open source finite volume implementation as well as experimental results, specifically to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we calculate relative permeability by using this modified finite difference technique together with a level set based algorithm for multi-phase fluid distribution in the pore space. To our knowledge this is the first time regularization techniques are used in combination with finite difference fluid flow simulations.

  19. Modeling and Analyzing Web Service Behavior with Regular Flow Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jingang; Tan, Qingping; Cao, Guorong

    Web services are emerging as a promising technology for the development of next generation distributed heterogeneous software systems. To support automated service composition and adaptation, there should be a formal approach for modeling Web service behavior. In this paper we present a novel methodology of modeling and analyzing based on regular flow nets—extended from Petri nets and YAWL. Firstly, we motivate the formal definition of regular flow nets. Secondly, the formalism for dealing with symbolic marking is developed and it is used to define symbolic coverability tree. Finally, an algorithm for generating symbolic coverability tree is presented. Using symbolic coverability tree we can analyze the properties of regular flow nets we concerned. The technology of modeling and analyzing we proposed allows us to deal with cyclic services and data dependence among services.

  20. Optimized Bayes variational regularization prior for 3D PET images.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Eugenio; Presotto, Luca; De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Bettinardi, Valentino

    2014-09-01

    A new prior for variational Maximum a Posteriori regularization is proposed to be used in a 3D One-Step-Late (OSL) reconstruction algorithm accounting also for the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the PET system. The new regularization prior strongly smoothes background regions, while preserving transitions. A detectability index is proposed to optimize the prior. The new algorithm has been compared with different reconstruction algorithms such as 3D-OSEM+PSF, 3D-OSEM+PSF+post-filtering and 3D-OSL with a Gauss-Total Variation (GTV) prior. The proposed regularization allows controlling noise, while maintaining good signal recovery; compared to the other algorithms it demonstrates a very good compromise between an improved quantitation and good image quality. PMID:24958594

  1. Regularity based descriptor computed from local image oscillations.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Leonardo; Olague, Gustavo; Legrand, Pierrick; Lutton, Evelyne

    2007-05-14

    This work presents a novel local image descriptor based on the concept of pointwise signal regularity. Local image regions are extracted using either an interest point or an interest region detector, and discriminative feature vectors are constructed by uniformly sampling the pointwise Hölderian regularity around each region center. Regularity estimation is performed using local image oscillations, the most straightforward method directly derived from the definition of the Hölder exponent. Furthermore, estimating the Hölder exponent in this manner has proven to be superior, in most cases, when compared to wavelet based estimation as was shown in previous work. Our detector shows invariance to illumination change, JPEG compression, image rotation and scale change. Results show that the proposed descriptor is stable with respect to variations in imaging conditions, and reliable performance metrics prove it to be comparable and in some instances better than SIFT, the state-of-the-art in local descriptors. PMID:19546918

  2. Analysis of the "Learning in Regular Classrooms" movement in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, M; Manset, G

    2000-04-01

    The Learning in Regular Classrooms experiment has evolved in response to China's efforts to educate its large population of students with disabilities who, until the mid-1980s, were denied a free education. In the Learning in Regular Classrooms, students with disabilities (primarily sensory impairments or mild mental retardation) are educated in neighborhood schools in mainstream classrooms. Despite difficulties associated with developing effective inclusive programming, this approach has contributed to a major increase in the enrollment of students with disabilities and increased involvement of schools, teachers, and parents in China's newly developing special education system. Here we describe the development of the Learning in Regular Classroom approach and the challenges associated with educating students with disabilities in China.

  3. Structural characterization of the packings of granular regular polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuncheng; Dong, Kejun; Yu, Aibing

    2015-12-01

    By using a recently developed method for discrete modeling of nonspherical particles, we simulate the random packings of granular regular polygons with three to 11 edges under gravity. The effects of shape and friction on the packing structures are investigated by various structural parameters, including packing fraction, the radial distribution function, coordination number, Voronoi tessellation, and bond-orientational order. We find that packing fraction is generally higher for geometrically nonfrustrated regular polygons, and can be increased by the increase of edge number and decrease of friction. The changes of packing fraction are linked with those of the microstructures, such as the variations of the translational and orientational orders and local configurations. In particular, the free areas of Voronoi tessellations (which are related to local packing fractions) can be described by log-normal distributions for all polygons. The quantitative analyses establish a clearer picture for the packings of regular polygons.

  4. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb

    2009-01-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  5. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  6. Manufacture of Regularly Shaped Sol-Gel Pellets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kinder, James D.

    2006-01-01

    An extrusion batch process for manufacturing regularly shaped sol-gel pellets has been devised as an improved alternative to a spray process that yields irregularly shaped pellets. The aspect ratio of regularly shaped pellets can be controlled more easily, while regularly shaped pellets pack more efficiently. In the extrusion process, a wet gel is pushed out of a mold and chopped repetitively into short, cylindrical pieces as it emerges from the mold. The pieces are collected and can be either (1) dried at ambient pressure to xerogel, (2) solvent exchanged and dried under ambient pressure to ambigels, or (3) supercritically dried to aerogel. Advantageously, the extruded pellets can be dropped directly in a cross-linking bath, where they develop a conformal polymer coating around the skeletal framework of the wet gel via reaction with the cross linker. These pellets can be dried to mechanically robust X-Aerogel.

  7. Certain problems of space biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyarov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments in the field of biotechnology conducted by the USA Apollo and Skylab space probes are described, as well as the joint Soviet-American Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). Experiments in electrophoretic separation in space of biological compounds in a liquid medium are detailed. Space processing of vaccines and separation of human and animal cells are described. Methyl-cellulose, a coating for use in electrophoresis was developed. Erythropoietin, which stimulates the formation of red blood corpuscles in bone marrow, was obtained in pure form.

  8. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  9. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  10. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  11. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  12. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  13. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  14. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  15. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If...

  16. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  17. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a...

  18. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  19. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If...

  20. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a...