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Sample records for regulate e-cadherin recruitment

  1. CUGBP1 and HuR regulate E-cadherin translation by altering recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to processing bodies and modulate epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting-Xi; Gu, Bei-Lin; Yan, Jun-Kai; Zhu, Jie; Yan, Wei-Hui; Chen, Jie; Qian, Lin-Xi; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness and stability of epithelial barrier depend on apical junctional complexes, which consist of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). E-cadherin is the primary component of AJs, and it is essential for maintenance of cell-to-cell interactions and regulates the epithelial barrier. However, the exact mechanism underlying E-cadherin expression, particularly at the posttranscriptional level, remains largely unknown. RNA-binding proteins CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) and HU antigen R (HuR) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelial tissues and modulate the stability and translation of target mRNAs. Here, we present evidence that CUGBP1 and HuR interact directly with the 3'-untranslated region of E-cadherin mRNA and regulate E-cadherin translation. CUGBP1 overexpression in Caco-2 cells inhibited E-cadherin translation by increasing the recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to processing bodies (PBs), thus resulting in an increase in paracellular permeability. Overexpression of HuR exhibited an opposite effect on E-cadherin expression by preventing the translocation of E-cadherin mRNA to PBs and therefore prevented CUGBP1-induced repression of E-cadherin expression. Elevation of HuR also abolished the CUGBP1-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction. These findings indicate that CUGBP1 and HuR negate each other's effects in regulating E-cadherin translation by altering the recruitment of E-cadherin mRNA to PBs and play an important role in the regulation of intestinal barrier integrity under various pathophysiological conditions.

  2. Vangl2 Regulates E-Cadherin in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Begum, Khadiza; hafiz, Khandakar musabbir bin; Kishi, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin belongs to the classic cadherin subfamily of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules and is crucial for the formation and function of epithelial adherens junctions. In this study, we demonstrate that Vangl2, a vertebrate regulator of planar cell polarity (PCP), controls E-cadherin in epithelial cells. E-cadherin co-immunoprecipitates with Vangl2 from embryonic kidney extracts, and this association is also observed in transfected fibroblasts. Vangl2 enhances the internalization of E-cadherin when overexpressed. Conversely, the quantitative ratio of E-cadherin exposed to the cell surface is increased in cultured renal epithelial cells derived from Vangl2Lpt/+ mutant mice. Interestingly, Vangl2 is also internalized through protein traffic involving Rab5- and Dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Taken together with recent reports regarding the transport of Frizzled3, MMP14 and nephrin, these results suggest that one of the molecular functions of Vangl2 is to enhance the internalization of specific plasma membrane proteins with broad selectivity. This function may be involved in the control of intercellular PCP signalling or in the PCP-related rearrangement of cell adhesions. PMID:25373475

  3. Reggies/flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell contact formation by affecting EGFR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Schrock, Yvonne; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Wiechers, Marianne; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2012-05-01

    The reggie/flotillin proteins are implicated in membrane trafficking and, together with the cellular prion protein (PrP), in the recruitment of E-cadherin to cell contact sites. Here, we demonstrate that reggies, as well as PrP down-regulation, in epithelial A431 cells cause overlapping processes and abnormal formation of adherens junctions (AJs). This defect in cell adhesion results from reggie effects on Src tyrosine kinases and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): loss of reggies reduces Src activation and EGFR phosphorylation at residues targeted by Src and c-cbl and leads to increased surface exposure of EGFR by blocking its internalization. The prolonged EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane enhances cell motility and macropinocytosis, by which junction-associated E-cadherin is internalized and recycled back to AJs. Accordingly, blockage of EGFR signaling or macropinocytosis in reggie-deficient cells restores normal AJ formation. Thus, by promoting EGFR internalization, reggies restrict the EGFR signaling involved in E-cadherin macropinocytosis and recycling and regulate AJ formation and dynamics and thereby cell adhesion.

  4. Recycling of E-cadherin: a potential mechanism for regulating cadherin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Le, T L; Yap, A S; Stow, J L

    1999-07-12

    E-Cadherin plays critical roles in many aspects of cell adhesion, epithelial development, and the establishment and maintenance of epithelial polarity. The fate of E-cadherin once it is delivered to the basolateral cell surface, and the mechanisms which govern its participation in adherens junctions, are not well understood. Using surface biotinylation and recycling assays, we observed that some of the cell surface E-cadherin is actively internalized and is then recycled back to the plasma membrane. The pool of E-cadherin undergoing endocytosis and recycling was markedly increased in cells without stable cell-cell contacts, i.e., in preconfluent cells and after cell contacts were disrupted by depletion of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that endocytic trafficking of E-cadherin is regulated by cell-cell contact. The reformation of cell junctions after replacement of Ca2+ was then found to be inhibited when recycling of endocytosed E-cadherin was disrupted by bafilomycin treatment. The endocytosis and recycling of E-cadherin and of the transferrin receptor were similarly inhibited by potassium depletion and by bafilomycin treatment, and both proteins were accumulated in intracellular compartments by an 18 degrees C temperature block, suggesting that endocytosis may occur via a clathrin-mediated pathway. We conclude that a pool of surface E-cadherin is constantly trafficked through an endocytic, recycling pathway and that this may provide a mechanism for regulating the availability of E-cadherin for junction formation in development, tissue remodeling, and tumorigenesis.

  5. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  6. Estrogen-mediated down-regulation of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oesterreich, Steffi; Deng, Wanleng; Jiang, Shiming; Cui, Xiaojiang; Ivanova, Margarita; Schiff, Rachel; Kang, Kaiyan; Hadsell, Darryl L; Behrens, Jürgen; Lee, Adrian V

    2003-09-01

    E-cadherin is an important mediator of cell-cell interactions, and has been shown to play a crucial role in breast tumor suppression. Its inactivation occurs through instability at its chromosomal locus and mutations, but also through epigenetic mechanisms such as promoter hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. We show here that the potent mitogen estrogen causes down-regulation of E-cadherin levels in both normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells, and that this down-regulation is reversed by antiestrogens. The reduction in E-cadherin levels is via a decrease in promoter activity and subsequent mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that estrogen receptor and corepressors were bound to the E-cadherin promoter, and that overexpression of corepressors such as scaffold attachment factor B resulted in enhanced repression of E-cadherin. We propose that estrogen-mediated down-regulation of E-cadherin is a novel way of reducing E-cadherin levels in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

  7. Regulation of E-cadherin: does hypoxia initiate the metastatic cascade?

    PubMed Central

    Beavon, I R

    1999-01-01

    The ability of tumours to metastasis is regarded as one of the hallmarks of malignancy. The process through which tumours evolve to achieve this has been termed the metastatic cascade. This cascade has been the subject of much investigation over many years. One of the vital events identified by these investigations is the reduction of adhesion between tumour cells facilitating invasion of the surrounding tissues and vascular channels, ultimately leading to the development of a distant metastasis. E-cadherin and its associated catenin complex have been identified as key molecules in cell adhesion. This review looks at the structure and interaction of the E-cadherin-catenin complex and the factors that appear to regulate E-cadherin expression and thus cell adhesion. From the data gathered, it has become possible to propose the hypothesis that the development of tumour hypoxia is the initiating factor that sets the tumour on the road to metastasis. PMID:10694937

  8. From cell membrane to the nucleus: an emerging role of E-cadherin in gene transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wenjun; Liu, Xi; Fan, Guiling; Zhao, Xingsheng; Sun, Yanying; Wang, Tianzhen; Zhao, Ran; Wang, Guangyu; Zhao, Ci; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Ye, Fei; Jin, Xiaoming; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin is a well-known mediator of cell–cell adherens junctions. However, many other functions of E-cadherin have been reported. Collectively, the available data suggest that E-cadherin may also act as a gene transcriptional regulator. Here, evidence supporting this claim is reviewed, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. E-cadherin has been shown to modulate the activity of several notable cell signalling pathways, and given that most of these pathways in turn regulate gene expression, we proposed that E-cadherin may regulate gene transcription by affecting these pathways. Additionally, E-cadherin has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus where documentation of an E-cadherin fragment bound to DNA suggests that E-cadherin may directly regulate gene transcription. In summary, from the cell membrane to the nucleus, a role for E-cadherin in gene transcription may be emerging. Studies specifically focused on this potential role would allow for a more thorough understanding of this transmembrane glycoprotein in mediating intra- and intercellular activities. PMID:25164084

  9. Polycystin-1 and Gα12 regulate the cleavage of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jen X.; Lu, Tzong-Shi; Li, Suyan; Wu, Yong; Ding, Lai; Denker, Bradley M.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of polycystin-1 (PC1) and Gα12 is important for development of kidney cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The integrity of cell polarity and cell-cell adhesions (mainly E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction) is altered in the renal epithelial cells of ADPKD. However, the key signaling pathway for this alteration is not fully understood. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells maintain the normal integrity of epithelial cell polarity and adherens junctions. Here, we found that deletion of Pkd1 increased activation of Gα12, which then promoted the cystogenesis of MDCK cells. The morphology of these cells was altered after the activation of Gα12. By using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found several proteins that could be related this change in the extracellular milieu. E-cadherin was one of the most abundant peptides after active Gα12 was induced. Gα12 activation or Pkd1 deletion increased the shedding of E-cadherin, which was mediated via increased ADAM10 activity. The increased shedding of E-cadherin was blocked by knockdown of ADAM10 or specific ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X. Pkd1 deletion or Gα12 activation also changed the distribution of E-cadherin in kidney epithelial cells and caused β-catenin to shift from cell membrane to nucleus. Finally, ADAM10 inhibitor, GI254023X, blocked the cystogenesis induced by PC1 knockdown or Gα12 activation in renal epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate that the E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling pathway is regulated by PC1 and Gα12 via ADAM10. Specific inhibition of this pathway, especially ADAM10 activity, could be a novel therapeutic regimen for ADPKD. PMID:25492927

  10. The Frizzled-dependent planar polarity pathway locally promotes E-cadherin turnover via recruitment of RhoGEF2

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Samantha J.; Strutt, Helen; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    Polarised tissue elongation during morphogenesis involves cells within epithelial sheets or tubes making and breaking intercellular contacts in an oriented manner. Growing evidence suggests that cell adhesion can be modulated by endocytic trafficking of E-cadherin (E-cad), but how this process can be polarised within individual cells is poorly understood. The Frizzled (Fz)-dependent core planar polarity pathway is a major regulator of polarised cell rearrangements in processes such as gastrulation, and has also been implicated in regulation of cell adhesion through trafficking of E-cad; however, it is not known how these functions are integrated. We report a novel role for the core planar polarity pathway in promoting cell intercalation during tracheal tube morphogenesis in Drosophila embryogenesis, and present evidence that this is due to regulation of turnover and levels of junctional E-cad by the guanine exchange factor RhoGEF2. Furthermore, we show that core pathway activity leads to planar-polarised recruitment of RhoGEF2 and E-cad turnover in the epidermis of both the embryonic germband and the pupal wing. We thus reveal a general mechanism by which the core planar polarity pathway can promote polarised cell rearrangements. PMID:23364328

  11. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1(-/-) embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1(-/-) microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1(-/-) epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis.

  12. Involvement of the MEK/ERK pathway in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Etsu; Henmi, Shizuka; Odake, Hiroyuki; Ino, Seitaro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin is a major component of the epithelial adherens junction. However, the regulatory mechanism of E-cadherin expression is still poorly understood. In this study, we found that EGF decreased E-cadherin expression at both mRNA and protein levels in colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells. Since E-cadherin down-regulation is a well-known hallmark of the EMT (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition), we investigated whether EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation during the EMT. EGF was unable to affect the expression of mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin, vimentin or fibronectin) or EMT-regulating transcription factors (such as SNAIL, SLUG, ZEB1, ZEB2 or TWIST), suggesting that EGF induced E-cadherin down-regulation via an EMT-independent mechanism. On the other hand, the MEK inhibitor U0126 was found to suppress EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level, suggesting that the MEK/ERK pathway is involved in EGF-induced E-cadherin down-regulation. Moreover, we also found that EGF disrupted cell-cell contact, stimulated cells to form an elongated shape with filamentous protrusions, and induced cell migration in LoVo cells. These effects were suppressed by U0126. Therefore, EGF is suggested to induce E-cadherin down-regulation at the transcriptional level through the MEK/ERK pathway, which might result in, at least in part, the induction of cellular morphological changes and cell migration in LoVo cells.

  13. Pituitary tumor transforming gene PTTG2 induces psoriasis by regulating vimentin and E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Bing; Li, Feng; Li, Ya-Qin; Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common and intractable skin disease affecting the physical and mental health of patients. This study focused on the roles of pituitary tumor transforming gene 2 (PTTG2) in psoriasis. Using real-time quantitative PCR and western blot, the expression patterns of PTTG2 were compared in psoriatic epidermis cells and normal cells, from both mRNA levels and protein levels. Knockdown of PTTG2 by siRNA was conducted in HaCaT cells to investigate the changes in cell viability and migration in vitro. Expression changes of vimentin and E-cadherin were also detected in the transfected cells. Results showed PTTG2 was significantly overexpressed in the psoriatic epidermis cells (P < 0.05). The cell viability and migration were inhibited by the knockdown of PTTG2. Besides, knockdown of PTTG2 resulted in down-regulation of vimentin and up-regulation of E-cadherin, with significant differences compared to the siRNA control group (P < 0.05). This study indicated the involvement of PTTG2 in mediating epidermis cell viability and migration and in pathogenesis of psoriasis. PTTG2 might be a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis through inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via regulating the expression of vimentin and E-cadherin. PMID:26617803

  14. CAR regulates epithelial cell junction stability through control of E-cadherin trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Penny E.; Hicks, Alexander; Nastos, Theodoros; Santis, George; Parsons, Maddy

    2013-01-01

    CAR (Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor) is the primary docking receptor for typeB coxsackie viruses and subgroup C adenoviruses. CAR is a member of the JAM family of adhesion receptors and is located to both tight and adherens junctions between epithelial cells where it can assemble adhesive contacts through homodimerisation in trans. However, the role of CAR in controlling epithelial junction dynamics remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that levels of CAR in human epithelial cells play a key role in determining epithelial cell adhesion through control of E-cadherin stability at cell-cell junctions. Mechanistically, we show that CAR is phosphorylated within the C-terminus by PKCδ and that this in turn controls Src-dependent endocytosis of E-cadherin at cell junctions. This data demonstrates a novel role for CAR in regulating epithelial homeostasis. PMID:24096322

  15. Dehydropeptidase 1 promotes metastasis through regulation of E-cadherin expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Seon-Jin; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Jong-Tae; Kim, Jae Wha; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Yeom, Young Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Lee, Younghee; Lee, Hee Gu

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropeptidase 1 (DPEP1) is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that is expressed aberrantly in several cancers. The role of DPEP1 in cancer remain controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that DPEP1 functions as a positive regulator for colon cancer cell metastasis. The expression of DPEP1 mRNA and proteins were upregulated in colon cancer tissues compared to normal mucosa. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches were used to examine the malignant phenotype of DPEP1-expressing or DPEP1-depleted cells. DPEP1 expression caused a significant increase in colon cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, DPEP1 depletion induced opposite effects. Furthermore, cilastatin, a DPEP1 inhibitor, suppressed the invasion and metastasis of DPEP1-expressing cells. DPEP1 inhibited the leukotriene D4 signaling pathway and increased the expression of E-cadherin. We also show that DPEP1 mediates TGF-β-induced EMT. TGF-β transcriptionally repressed DPEP1 expression. TGF-β treatment decreased E-cadherin expression and promoted cell invasion in DPEP1-expressing colon cancer cell lines, whereas it did not affect these parameters in DPEP1-depleted cell lines. These results suggest that DPEP1 promotes cancer metastasis by regulating E-cadherin plasticity and that it might be a potential therapeutic target for preventing the progression of colon cancer. PMID:26824987

  16. Armc8 regulates the invasive ability of hepatocellular carcinoma through E-cadherin/catenin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Jia, Changjun; Xu, Feng; Xu, Yongqing; Dai, Chaoliu

    2016-08-01

    Armc8 (armadillo-repeat-containing protein 8) was proved to promote disruption of E-cadherin complex through regulating α-catenin degradation. In this study, we investigated Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The positive rate of Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was 53.9 % and higher than that in normal hepatic tissues (9.2 %) (p < 0.05). Clinicopathological analysis shows that Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly associated with larger tumor size (≥5 cm), multiple tumor numbers, higher pathological grade (media and poor), advanced TNM stages (II/III), and advanced BCLC stages (B/C). Western blot study also detected higher Armc8 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells including HepG2, HCC97L, and SMMC-7721 than in human hepatic cell Bel-7402. We further use specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down Armc8 expression in HepG2 cells and found that knockdown of Armc8 expression significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HepG2 cells. Downregulation of Armc8 expression significantly upregulated α-catenin, β-catenin, and E-cadherin expression in HepG2 cells. Immunofluorescent study shows that knockdown of Armc8 expression restored E-cadherin expression in membrane of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that Armc8 may be a potential cancer marker in hepatocellular carcinoma and may regulate cancer invasion through E-cadherin/catenin complex. PMID:26944057

  17. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 in aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Jia, Angela J; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Christiano, Angela M; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of both classical and desmosomal cadherins has been associated with different types of carcinomas, including prostate cancer. This study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the role and regulation of cell–cell adhesion in prostate cancer aggressiveness by examining the functional implications of both E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 (DSG2). E-cadherin expression was first examined using immunofluorescence in 50 normal prostate tissues and in a cohort of 414 prostate cancer patients. Correlation and survival analyses were performed to assess its clinical significance. In primary prostate cancer patients, reduced expression of both E-cadherin and DSG2 is significantly associated with an earlier biochemical recurrence. Transgenic DU145 E-cadherin knockdown and constitutively active AKT overexpression lines were generated. Functional implications of such genetic alterations were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the latter by using tumorigenesis as well as extravasation and metastatic tumor formation assays. We observed that loss of E-cadherin leads to impaired primary and metastatic tumor formation in vivo, suggesting a tumor promoter role for E-cadherin in addition to its known role as a tumor suppressor. Activation of AKT leads to a significant reduction in E-cadherin expression and nuclear localization of Snail, suggesting a role for the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the transient repression of E-cadherin. This reduced expression may be regulated by separate mechanisms as neither the loss of E-cadherin nor activation of AKT significantly affected DSG2 expression. In conclusion, these findings illustrate the critical role of cell–cell adhesion in the progression to aggressive prostate cancer, through regulation by the PI3K pathway. PMID:26033689

  18. Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression for the maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton and tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chang; Ogle, Sally A; Schumacher, Michael A; Schilling, Neal; Tokhunts, Robert A; Orr-Asman, Melissa A; Miller, Marian L; Robbins, David J; Hollande, Frederic; Zavros, Yana

    2010-12-01

    In the stomach, strictly regulated cell adherens junctions are crucial in determining epithelial cell differentiation. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) regulates epithelial cell differentiation in the adult stomach. We sought to identify whether Shh plays a role in regulating adherens junction protein E-cadherin as a mechanism for epithelial cell differentiation. Mouse nontumorigenic gastric epithelial (IMGE-5) cells treated with Hedgehog signaling inhibitor cyclopamine and anti-Shh 5E1 antibody or transduced with short hairpin RNA against Skinny Hedgehog (IMGE-5(Ski)) were cultured. A mouse model expressing a parietal cell-specific deletion of Shh (HKCre/Shh(KO)) was used to identify further changes in adherens and tight junctions. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling in IMGE-5 cells caused loss of E-cadherin expression accompanied by disruption of F-actin cortical expression and relocalization of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Loss of E-cadherin was also associated with increased proliferation in IMGE-5(Ski) cells and increased expression of the mucous neck cell lineage marker MUC6. Compared with membrane-expressed E-cadherin and ZO-1 protein in controls, dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin and ZO-1/occludin protein complexes was observed in HKCre/Shh(KO) mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling regulates E-cadherin expression that is required for the maintenance of F-actin cortical expression and stability of tight junction protein ZO-1.

  19. Betacellulin induces Slug-mediated down-regulation of E-cadherin and cell migration in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianfang; Klausen, Christian; Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological cancers. Previous studies have demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands can induce ovarian cancer cell invasion by down-regulating E-cadherin. Betacellulin is a unique member of the EGF family. It is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and is associated with reduced survival. However, the biological functions and clinical significance of betacellulin in ovarian cancer remain unknown. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that betacellulin induces ovarian cancer cell migration by suppressing E-cadherin expression. Treatment of SKOV3 and OVCAR5 ovarian cancer cell lines with betacellulin down-regulated E-cadherin, but not N-cadherin. In addition, betacellulin treatment increased the expression of Snail and Slug, and these effects were completely blocked by pre-treatment with EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Interestingly, only knockdown of Slug reversed the down-regulation of E-cadherin by betacellulin. Betacellulin treatment induced the activation of both the MEK-ERK and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways, and it also significantly increased ovarian cancer cell migration. Importantly, the effects of betacellulin on E-cadherin, Slug and cell migration were attenuated by pre-treatment with either U0126 or LY294002. Our results suggest that betacellulin induces ovarian cancer migration and Slug-dependent E-cadherin down-regulation via EGFR-mediated MEK-ERK and PI3K-Akt signaling. PMID:27129169

  20. Transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin and oncoprotein E7 by valproic acid in HPV positive cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Akbari, Abolfazl; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Valproic acid (VPA) has proven to be as one of the most promising useful drug with anticancer properties. In this study, we investigate the VPA effects on E-cadherin expression in HeLa, TC1, MKN45, and HCT116 cell lines. This study assesses the effects of VPA on human papillomavirus E7 expression in HPV positive cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cell lines were treated by 2 mmol/l VPA and expression of E-cadherin and E7 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Student’s t test and ANOVA were used to determine changes in expression levels. Results: The results revealed that mean of E-cadherin expression is increased by VPA 1.8 times in HCT116 and MKN45 cell lines, also the mean of E-cadherin mRNA levels is up-regulated 2.9 times in HeLa and TC1 cell lines. So, E-cadherin augmentation induced by VPA in HeLa and TC-1, HPV positive cell lines, is higher than HPV negative cell lines MKN45 and HCT116. The mean of HPV E7 expression is decreased by VPA, 4.6 times in in HeLa and TC-1 cell lines. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that re-expression of E-cadherin by VPA in HPV positive cell lines is more than HPV negative cell lines. Whereas, HPV E7 reduces the expression of E-cadherin, reduction of HPV E7 expression by VPA is related to more augmentation of E-cadherin in HPV positive cell lines. So, this study demonstrates that VPA has more anticancer properties in HPV positive cell lines, and could potentially be a promising candidate for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:27482340

  1. Growth differentiation factor 8 induces SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell migration and E-cadherin down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianfang; Klausen, Christian; Xiong, Siyuan; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy because most women present with late stage disseminated disease. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is characterized by the down-regulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of N-cadherin, and is a crucial event in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a major regulator of EMT in many normal and neoplastic cell types. Growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8), which also activates TGF-β-like SMAD2/3 signaling, is best known for negatively regulating muscle growth. Though recent studies suggest that GDF8 enhances placental trophoblast cell migration, little is known about the role of GDF8 in EMT and cancer metastasis. We hypothesized that GDF8 could enhance ovarian cancer cell migration by inducing EMT. Here we demonstrate for the first time that GDF8 down-regulates E-cadherin but does not alter N-cadherin in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. This effect is abolished by the activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)4/5/7 inhibitor SB431542 or siRNA-mediated knockdown of ALK5, whereas knockdown of ALK4 is only partially inhibitory. GDF8 treatment increases the phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 and up-regulates the E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug; and these effects are abolished by pre-treatment with SB431542. Knockdown of common SMAD4 fully reverses the effects of GDF8 on E-cadherin and partially attenuates its effects on Snail and Slug. Importantly, GDF8 treatment increases SKOV3 cell migration and this effect is blocked by SB431542. Our study suggests that GDF8 promotes ovarian cancer cell migration via ALK4/5-SMAD2/3-E-cadherin signaling. PMID:27481097

  2. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  3. Vinculin potentiates E-cadherin mechanosensing and is recruited to actin-anchored sites within adherens junctions in a myosin II–dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    le Duc, Quint; Shi, Quanming; Blonk, Iris; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors integrate chemical and mechanical cues to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Integrin complexes are the mechanotransducers between the extracellular matrix and the actomyosin cytoskeleton. By analogy, cadherin complexes may function as mechanosensors at cell–cell junctions, but this capacity of cadherins has not been directly demonstrated. Furthermore, the molecular composition of the link between E-cadherin and actin, which is needed to sustain such a function, is unresolved. In this study, we describe nanomechanical measurements demonstrating that E-cadherin complexes are functional mechanosensors that transmit force between F-actin and E-cadherin. Imaging experiments reveal that intercellular forces coincide with vinculin accumulation at actin-anchored cadherin adhesions, and nanomechanical measurements show that vinculin potentiates the E-cadherin mechanosensory response. These investigations directly demonstrate the mechanosensory capacity of the E-cadherin complex and identify a novel function for vinculin at cell–cell junctions. These findings have implications for barrier function, morphogenesis, cell migration, and invasion and may extend to all soft tissues in which classical cadherins regulate cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20584916

  4. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  5. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Lee, Minjae; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  6. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  7. E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin protein expression is up-regulated in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Risberg, B; Berner, H S; Tropè, C G; Kristensen, G B; Bryne, M; Ann Florenes, V

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were firstly, to investigate the expression of E-cadherin complex proteins in ovarian carcinoma cells in serous effusions and in primary and metastatic lesions; and secondly to study the value of these four proteins and calretinin, a mesothelial marker, in the differential diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma cells from reactive mesothelial cells in effusions. Sixty-seven malignant effusions and 97 corresponding primary (n=36) and metastatic (n=61) lesions were immunohistochemically stained for E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin. Staining extent and intensity were scored. Effusion specimens were additionally analysed for calretinin immunoreactivity. Membrane immunoreactivity for E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin was detected on carcinoma cells in the majority of the effusions, but rarely on reactive mesothelial cells (p<0.001 for all markers). Calretinin immunoreactivity was confined to mesothelial cells (p<0.001). An association was seen between E-cadherin and alpha-catenin expression, in both effusions and solid tumours, and for beta-catenin in solid tumours (range p<0. 001 to p=0.014). Up-regulation of all four cadherin complex proteins was seen in carcinoma cells in effusions, when compared with corresponding primary tumours (range p<0.001 to p=0.028). As with effusions, metastatic lesions showed up-regulation of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin when compared with primary carcinomas (p=0.002-0. 015). Carcinoma cells in effusions showed in addition elevated levels of E-cadherin when compared with metastatic lesions (p<0.001). Staining results in effusions showed no association with effusion site, tumour type or histological grade. Immunoblotting on 29 malignant effusions confirmed the presence of all four proteins in the majority of samples and co-precipitation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was seen in ten specimens examined. E-cadherin complex proteins are widely expressed in ovarian carcinoma cells. Together with

  8. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin involving regulators of Hippo pathway due to HIF-1α stabilization/nuclear translocation in bone metastasis from breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Drago, Lorenzo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2015-01-15

    The present study deals with the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of E-cadherin expression under hypoxia, because the adjustment of the amount of E-cadherin due to physical stimuli of the microenvironment might influence the colonization of metastasis to skeleton. We analyzed the effect of 1% oxygen tension, that is similar to that encountered in the bone marrow by metastatic cells spreading from breast carcinoma. The purpose was to evaluate the hypoxia-orchestrated control of E-cadherin transactivation via hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and the involvement of Hippo pathway members, as regulators of transcription factors. To give a translational significance to the study, we took into consideration human pair-matched ductal breast carcinoma and bone metastasis: E-cadherin and Wwox were expressed in bone metastasis but not in breast carcinoma, while HIF-1α and TAZ seemed localized principally in nuclei of metastasis and were found in all cell compartments of breast carcinoma. A close examination of the regulatory mechanisms underlying E-cadherin expression in bone metastasis was done in 1833 clone derived from MDA-MB231 cells. Hypoxia induced E-cadherin only in 1833 clone, but not in parental cells, through HIF-1 and PPARγ activities, while Wwox decreased. Since Wwox was highly expressed in bone metastasis, the effect of ectopic Wwox was evaluated, and we showed E-cadherin transactivation and enhanced invasiveness in WWOX transfected 1833 cells. Also, hypoxia was additive with ectopic Wwox remarkably enhancing HIF-1α nuclear shuttle and accumulation due to the lengthening of the half-life of HIF-1α protein; under this experimental condition HIF-1α appeared as a slower migrated band compared with control, in agreement with the phosphorylation state. The in vitro data strongly supported the almost exclusive presence of HIF-1α in nuclei of human-bone metastasis. Thus, we identified

  9. Direct regulation of E-cadherin by targeted histone methylation of TALE-SET fusion protein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Soo; Kang, Jeong Gu; Lee, Jae-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Jeon, Seong Kook; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Kun-Hyang; Kim, Yong-Sam; Kim, Nam-Soon

    2015-09-15

    TALE-nuclease chimeras (TALENs) can bind to and cleave specific genomic loci and, are used to engineer gene knockouts and additions. Recently, instead of using the FokI domain, epigenetically active domains, such as TET1 and LSD1, have been combined with TAL effector domains to regulate targeted gene expression via DNA and histone demethylation. However, studies of histone methylation in the TALE system have not been performed. Therefore, in this study, we established a novel targeted regulation system with a TAL effector domain and a histone methylation domain. To construct a TALE-methylation fusion protein, we combined a TAL effector domain containing an E-Box region to act as a Snail binding site and the SET domain of EHMT 2 to allow for histone methylation. The constructed TALE-SET module (TSET) repressed the expression of E-cadherin via by increasing H3K9 dimethylation. Moreover, the cells that overexpressed TSET showed increased cell migration and invasion. This is the first phenotype-based study of targeted histone methylation by the TALE module, and this new system can be applied in new cancer therapies to reduce side effects.

  10. An hTERT/ZEB1 complex directly regulates E-cadherin to promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Tang, Bo; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Yong, Xin; Wu, Yu Yun; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In human cancer, high telomerase expression is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. Telomerase activation occurs through telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) induction, which contributes to malignant transformation by stabilizing telomeres. Previous studies have shown that hTERT can promote tumor invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer, liver cancer and esophageal cancer. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a requirement for tumor invasion and metastasis, plays a key role in cancer progression. Although hTERT promotes EMT through Wnt signaling in several cancers, it is unknown if other signaling pathways are involved. In the present study, we found that hTERT and ZEB1 form a complex, which directly binds to the E-cadherin promoter, and then inhibits E-cadherin expression and promots EMT in colorectal cancer cells. hTERT overexpression in HCT116 and SW480 cells could induce E-cadherin down-regulation. However, E-cadherin expression was recovered when ZEB1 function was impaired even during hTERT overexpression. Taken together, our findings suggest that hTERT can promote cancer metastasis by stimulating EMT through the ZEB1 pathway and therefore inhibiting them may prevent cancer progression.

  11. Distinct E-cadherin-based complexes regulate cell behaviour through miRNA processing or Src and p120 catenin activity

    PubMed Central

    Kourtidis, Antonis; Ngok, Siu P.; Pulimeno, Pamela; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carpio, Lomeli R.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Yan, Irene K.; Borges, Sahra; Perez, Edith A.; Storz, Peter; Copland, John A.; Patel, Tushar; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Citi, Sandra; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin and p120 catenin (p120) are essential for epithelial homeostasis, but can also exert pro-tumorigenic activities. Here, we resolve this apparent paradox by identifying two spatially and functionally distinct junctional complexes in non-transformed polarized epithelial cells: one growth suppressing at the apical zonula adherens (ZA), defined by the p120 partner PLEKHA7 and a non-nuclear subset of the core microprocessor components DROSHA and DGCR8, and one growth promoting at basolateral areas of cell–cell contact containing tyrosine-phosphorylated p120 and active Src. Recruitment of DROSHA and DGCR8 to the ZA is PLEKHA7 dependent. The PLEKHA7–microprocessor complex co-precipitates with primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) and possesses pri-miRNA processing activity. PLEKHA7 regulates the levels of select miRNAs, in particular processing of miR-30b, to suppress expression of cell transforming markers promoted by the basolateral complex, including SNAI1, MYC and CCND1. Our work identifies a mechanism through which adhesion complexes regulate cellular behaviour and reveals their surprising association with the microprocessor. PMID:26302406

  12. Epigenetic repression of E-cadherin expression by hepatitis B virus x antigen in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Arzumanyan, A; Friedman, T; Kotei, E; Ng, I O L; Lian, Z; Feitelson, M A

    2012-02-01

    Loss of E-cadherin is associated with acquisition of metastatic capacity. Numerous studies suggest that histone deacetylation and/or hypermethylation of CpG islands in E-cadherin gene (CDH1) are major mechanisms responsible for E-cadherin silencing in different tumors and cancer cell lines. The hepatitis B virus (HBV)-encoded X antigen, HBx, contributes importantly to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma using multiple mechanisms. Experiments were designed to test if in addition to CDH1 hypermethylation HBx promotes epigenetic modulation of E-cadherin transcriptional activity through histone deacetylation and miR-373. The relationships between HBx, E-cadherin, mSin3A, Snail-1 and miR-373 were evaluated in HBx expressing (HepG2X) and control (HepG2CAT) cells by western blotting, immunoprecipitation (IP), chromatin IP as well as by immunohistochemical staining of liver and tumor tissue sections from HBV-infected patients. In HepG2X cells, decreased levels of E-cadherin and elevated levels of mSin3A and Snail-1 were detected. Reciprocal IP with anti-HBx and anti-mSin3A demonstrated mutual binding. Furthermore, HBx-mSin3A colocalization was detected by immunofluorescent staining. HBx downregulated E-cadherin expression by the recruitment of the mSin3A/histone deacetylase complex to the Snail-binding sites in human CDH1. Histone deacetylation inhibition by Trichostatin-A treatment restored E-cadherin expression. Mir-373, a positive regulator of E-cadherin expression, was downregulated by HBx in HepG2X cells and tissue sections from HBV-infected patients. Thus, histone deacetylation of CDH1 and downregulation of miR-373, together with the previously demonstrated hypermethylation of CDH1 by HBx, may be important for the understanding of HBV-related carcinogenesis.

  13. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  14. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  15. Thrombomodulin reduces tumorigenic and metastatic potential of lung cancer cells by up-regulation of E-cadherin and down-regulation of N-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Huo, Zihe; Zhang, Bin; Meng, Mei; Cao, Zhifei; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Quansheng

    2016-08-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell membrane protein and plays critical roles in anti-thrombosis, anti-inflammation, vascular endothelial protection, and is traditionally regarded as a "vascular protection god". In recent years, although TM has been reported to be down-regulated in a variety of malignant tumors including lung cancer, the role and mechanism of TM in lung cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we found that induction of TM overexpression by cholesterol-reducing drug atorvastatin significantly diminished the tumorigenic capability of the lung cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that TM overexpression caused G0/G1 phase arrest and markedly reduced the colony forming capability of the cells. Furthermore, overexpression of TM inhibited cell migration and invasion. Consistently, depletion of TM promoted cell growth, reduced the cell population at the G0/G1 phase, and enhanced cell migratory ability. Mechanistic study revealed that TM up-regulated E-cadherin but down-regulated N-cadherin expression, resulting in reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the lung cancer cells. Moreover, silencing TM expression led to decreased E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that TM functions as a tumor suppressive protein, providing a conceptual framework for inducing TM overexpression as a sensible strategy and approach for novel anti-lung cancer drug discovery. PMID:27223053

  16. TLE1 promotes EMT in A549 lung cancer cells through suppression of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin; Ireland, Shubha Kale; Pham, Tri; Temple, Brandi; Chen, Renwei; Raj, Madhwa HG; Biliran, Hector

    2014-01-01

    The Groucho transcriptional corepressor TLE1 protein has recently been shown to be a putative lung specific oncogene, but its underlying oncogenic activity in lung cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this report, we investigated whether TLE1 regulates lung cancer aggressiveness using the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 as a model system. Through a combination of genetic approaches, we found that TLE1 potentiates Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) in A549 cells in part through suppression of the tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin. Exogenous expression of TLE1 in A549 cells resulted in heightened EMT phenotypes (enhanced fibroblastoid morphology and increased cell migratory potential) and in molecular alterations characteristic of EMT (downregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and upregulation of the mesenchymal marker Vimentin). Conversely, downregulation of endogenous TLE1 expression in these cells resulted in reversal of basal EMT characterized by a cuboidal-like epithelial cell phenotype, reduced cell motility, and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that TLE1 suppresses E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level in part by recruiting Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) activity to the E-cadherin promoter. Consistently, the HDAC inhibitor TSA partially reversed the TLE1-induced E-cadherin downregulation and cell migration, suggesting a role for HDACs in TLE1-mediated transcriptional repression of E-cadherin and EMT function. These findings uncover a novel role of TLE1 in regulating EMT in A549 cells through its repressive effect on E-cadherin and provide a mechanism for TLE1 oncogenic activity in lung cancer. PMID:25446087

  17. Formation of post-confluence structure in human parotid gland acinar cells on PLGA through regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Chou, Ya-Shuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Su, Wei-Fang; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2012-01-01

    As a potential solution for patients to retrieve their lost salivary gland functions, tissue engineering of an auto-secretory device is profoundly needed. Under serum-free environment, primary human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells can be obtained. After reaching confluence, PGAC cells spontaneously form three-dimension (3D) cell aggregations, termed post-confluence structure (PCS), and change their behaviors. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used in the field of biomedical applications because of its biodegradable properties for desired functions. Nonetheless, the role of PLGA in facilitating PGAC cells to form PCS has seldom been explored to recover epithelial characteristics. In this study, PGAC cells were found to have a greater tendency to form PCS on PLGA than on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). By tracing cell migration paths and modulating E-cadherin activity with specific inhibitor or antibody, we demonstrated that the static force of homophilic interaction on surfaces of individual cells, but not the dynamics of cell migration, played a more important role in PCS formation. Thus, PLGA was successfully confirmed to support PGAC cells to form more PCS through the effects on enhancing E-cadherin expression, which is associated with FAK/ILK/Snail expression in PGAC cells. This result indicates that selective appropriate biomaterials may be potentially useful in generating 3D PCS on two-dimension (2D) substrate without fabricating a complex 3D scaffold.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Cell Glycosylation Regulates Cell Adhesion and Invasion through the Modulation of α2β1 Integrin and E-Cadherin Function

    PubMed Central

    Bassagañas, Sònia; Carvalho, Sandra; Dias, Ana M.; Pérez-Garay, Marta; Ortiz, M. Rosa; Figueras, Joan; Reis, Celso A.; Pinho, Salomé S.; Peracaula, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies we have described that ST3Gal III transfected pancreatic adenocarcinoma Capan-1 and MDAPanc-28 cells show increased membrane expression levels of sialyl-Lewis x (SLex) along with a concomitant decrease in α2,6-sialic acid compared to control cells. Here we have addressed the role of this glycosylation pattern in the functional properties of two glycoproteins involved in the processes of cancer cell invasion and migration, α2β1 integrin, the main receptor for type 1 collagen, and E-cadherin, responsible for cell-cell contacts and whose deregulation determines cell invasive capabilities. Our results demonstrate that ST3Gal III transfectants showed reduced cell-cell aggregation and increased invasive capacities. ST3Gal III transfected Capan-1 cells exhibited higher SLex and lower α2,6-sialic acid content on the glycans of their α2β1 integrin molecules. As a consequence, higher phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 397, which is recognized as one of the first steps of integrin-derived signaling pathways, was observed in these cells upon adhesion to type 1 collagen. This molecular mechanism underlies the increased migration through collagen of these cells. In addition, the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines as well as human pancreatic tumor tissues showed colocalization of SLex and E-cadherin, which was higher in the ST3Gal III transfectants. In conclusion, changes in the sialylation pattern of α2β1 integrin and E-cadherin appear to influence the functional role of these two glycoproteins supporting the role of these glycans as an underlying mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer cell adhesion and invasion. PMID:24878505

  19. Nuclear factor I-C (NFIC) regulates dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and E-cadherin via control of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) during dentinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Seol; Park, Su-Jin; Cho, Kwang-Hee; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2014-10-10

    Odontoblasts are a type of terminally differentiated matrix-secreting cells. A number of molecular mechanisms are involved in the differentiation of odontoblasts. Several studies demonstrated that Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) promotes odontoblast differentiation via control of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Because nuclear factor I-C (NFIC) is also known to control DSPP, we investigated the relationship between NFIC and KLF4 during odontoblast differentiation. Klf4 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in Nfic(-/-) pulp cells compared with wild type cells. In immunohistochemistry assays, dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1), and DSP protein expression was barely observed in Nfic(-/-) odontoblasts and dentin matrix. Nfic bound directly to the Klf4 promoter and stimulated Klf4 transcriptional activity, thereby regulating Dmp1 and DSPP expression during odontoblast differentiation. Nfic or Klf4 overexpression promoted mineralized nodule formation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, Nfic overexpression also decreased Slug luciferase activity but augmented E-cadherin promoter activity via up-regulation of Klf4 in odontoblasts. Our study reveals important signaling pathways during dentinogenesis: the Nfic-Klf4-Dmp1-Dspp and the Nfic-Klf4-E-cadherin pathways in odontoblasts. Our results indicate the important role of NFIC in regulating KLF4 during dentinogenesis.

  20. E-cadherin expression in macrophages dampens their inflammatory responsiveness in vitro, but does not modulate M2-regulated pathologies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, Jan; Laoui, Damya; Naessens, Thomas; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Stijlemans, Benoît; Grooten, Johan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2015-01-01

    IL-4/IL-13-induced alternatively activated macrophages (M(IL-4/IL-13), AAMs or M2) are known to express E-cadherin, enabling them to engage in heterotypic cellular interactions and IL-4-driven macrophage fusion in vitro. Here we show that E-cadherin overexpression in Raw 264.7 macrophages inhibits their inflammatory response to LPS stimulation, as demonstrated by a reduced secretion of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). To study the function of E-cadherin in M(IL-4/IL-13) macrophages in vivo, we generated macrophage-specific E-cadherin-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Using this new tool, we analyzed immunological parameters during two typical AAM-associated Th2-driven diseases and assessed Th2-associated granuloma formation. Although E-cadherin is strongly induced in AAMs during Taenia crassiceps helminth infections and allergic airway inflammation, its deletion in macrophages does not affect the course of both Th2 cytokine-driven diseases. Moreover, macrophage E-cadherin expression is largely redundant for granuloma formation around Schistosoma mansoni ova. Overall, we conclude that E-cadherin is a valuable AAM marker which suppresses the inflammatory response when overexpressed. Yet E-cadherin deletion in macrophages does not affect M(LPS+IFNγ) and M(IL-4) polarization in vitro, nor in vivo macrophage function, at least in the conditions tested. PMID:26226941

  1. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry.

  2. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry. PMID:27298373

  3. MicroRNA-10b regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition by modulating KLF4/Notch1/E-cadherin in cisplatin-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Hong, Haiyu; Sun, Xiaojin; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Shiyin; Zhao, Surong; Zhang, Mengxiao; Wang, Zhiwei; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an initiating event in tumor cell invasion and metastasis that contributes to therapeutic resistance to compounds including cisplatin. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been associated with EMT as well as resistance to standard therapies. However, the underlying mechanisms by which miRNAs control the development of resistance to cisplatin (DDP), and the accompanying EMT-like properties are required to elucidate. Here we show that microRNA-10b (miR-10b) is up-regulated in HNE1/DDP cells, and inhibition of miR-10b expression reversed the EMT phenotype. However, over-expression of miR-10b was able to promote the acquisition of an EMT phenotype in HNE1 cells. Additionally, we identified that miR-10b expression inversely correlates with KLF4, which then controls expression of Notch1. Knock-down of Notch1 inhibited cell migration, invasion, and reversed EMT in HNE1/DDP cells, which was dependent on miR-10b. In summary, our results reveal that miR-10b regulates EMT by modulating KLF4/Notch1/E-cadherin expression, which promotes invasion and migration of nasal pharyngeal carcinoma cells. PMID:27186392

  4. MicroRNA-421 regulated by HIF-1α promotes metastasis, inhibits apoptosis, and induces cisplatin resistance by targeting E-cadherin and caspase-3 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Liu, Kaiyi; Geng, Ruixuan; Dai, Congqi; Lin, Ying; Tang, Wenbo; Wu, Zheng; Chang, Jinjia; Lu, Jianwei; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as crucial factors in carcinogenesis. However, the potential mechanisms of HIF-1α and miR-421 in gastric cancer have not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that miR-421 was up-regulated by HIF-1α. Overexpression of miR-421 promoted metastasis, inhibited apoptosis, and induced cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer in vivo and in vitro. E-cadherin and caspase-3 were identified as targets of miR-421. Besides, relative mRNA expression of miR-421 was significantly increased in gastric cancer tumor tissues compared with non-tumor tissues in a cohort of gastric cancer specimens (n=107). The expression of miR-421 was higher in advanced gastric cancers compared with localized ones. Moreover, Kaplan–Meier analysis illustrated that those patients with low levels of miR-421 had a significant longer overall survival (p = 0.006) and time to relapse (p = 0.007). Therefore, miR-421 could serve as an important prognostic marker and a potential molecular target for therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:27016414

  5. Zeb1 Regulates E-cadherin and Epcam (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule) Expression to Control Cell Behavior in Early Zebrafish Development*

    PubMed Central

    Vannier, Corinne; Mock, Kerstin; Brabletz, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The ZEB1 transcription factor is best known as an inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) in cancer metastasis, acting through transcriptional repression of CDH1 (encoding E-cadherin) and the EMT-suppressing microRNA-200s (miR-200s). Here we analyze roles of the ZEB1 zebrafish orthologs, Zeb1a and Zeb1b, and of miR-200s in control of cell adhesion and morphogenesis during gastrulation and segmentation stages. Loss and gain of function analyses revealed that Zeb1 represses cdh1 expression to fine-tune adhesiveness of migrating deep blastodermal cells. Furthermore, Zeb1 acts as a repressor of epcam in the deep cells of the blastoderm and may contribute to control of epithelial integrity of enveloping layer cells, the outermost cells of the blastoderm. We found a similar ZEB1-dependent repression of EPCAM expression in human pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines, mediated through direct binding of ZEB1 to the EPCAM promoter. Thus, Zeb1 proteins employ several evolutionary conserved mechanisms to regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and cancer. PMID:23667256

  6. E-cadherin inhibits nuclear accumulation of Nrf2: implications for chemoresistance of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Dong; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Sang Geon

    2012-03-01

    Nrf2 has an anti-carcinogenic effect. However, an increase in Nrf2 activity is also implicated in cancer chemoresistance. A switch from E-cadherin to N-cadherin affects the transdifferentiation and metastasis of cancer cells. In view of the key role of this switch in cancer malignancy, we investigated the regulatory effect of E-cadherin on Nrf2. In HEK293 cells, overexpression of E-cadherin inhibited the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, and prevented Nrf2-dependent gene induction. GST pull-down and immunocytochemical assays verified the interaction between E-cadherin and Nrf2: E-cadherin bound the C-terminus of Nrf2, but not its N-terminus, which comprises the Neh2 domain responsible for phosphorylation of Ser40. Our finding that the mutation of Ser40 to alanine in Nrf2 did not affect the ability of E-cadherin to bind Nrf2 and repress target gene transactivation suggests that E-cadherin might not disturb the phosphorylation. Studies using mutant constructs of E-cadherin suggested that the β-catenin-binding domain contributes to the inhibitory effect of E-cadherin on Nrf2. Consistently, knockdown of β-catenin attenuated not only the effect of E-cadherin binding to Nrf2, but also Keap1-dependent ubiquitylation of Nrf2, and thereby increased Nrf2 activity, supporting the involvement of β-catenin in the interactions. Collectively, E-cadherin recruits Nrf2 through β-catenin, and assists the function of Keap1 for the inhibition of nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. In HepG2 cells, the loss of E-cadherin by either siRNA knockdown or treatment with TGFβ1 enhanced the constitutive or inducible activity of Nrf2, implying that chemoresistance of cancer cells upon the loss of E-cadherin might be associated with Nrf2. PMID:22302998

  7. Important factors mediates the adhesion of aspergillus fumigatus to alveolar epithelial cells with E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Fei; Sun, He; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus is widely distributed in the Earth's biosphere. It has strong adaptive capacity, and lives as saprophytic or parasitic life. This study aims to investigate the role of E-cadherin for adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in a human epithelial cell line (A549) and search the correlated molecule in aspergillus. A. fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure. After establishing the adhesion model, the adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells was evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA). FVB mice constructed with E-cadherin down-regulation were infected with aspergillus fumigatus. Preliminary exploration of E-cadherin interacting protein on the surface of aspergillus fumigates by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis. E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A. fumigatus blastospore. Adhesion of the blastospores was reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells. E-cadherin showed limited significance in the process of mice against aspergillus fumigates. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis indicated the following proteins AFUA_8G07080, AfA24A6.130c, XP_747789 can bind to E-cadherin. In conclusion, E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion of A. fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells. This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection. PMID:27347350

  8. Proteomics analysis of E-cadherin knockdown in epithelial breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Daniele; Simeone, Pasquale; Latorre, Dominga; Cascione, Francesca; Leporatti, Stefano; Trerotola, Marco; Giudetti, Anna Maria; Capobianco, Loredana; Lunetti, Paola; Rizzello, Antonia; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Alberti, Saverio; Maffia, Michele

    2015-05-20

    E-cadherin is the core protein of the epithelial adherens junction. Through its cytoplasmic domain, E-cadherin interacts with several signaling proteins; among them, α- and β-catenins mediate the link of E-cadherin to the actin cytoskeleton. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a crucial step of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is involved in cancer invasion and metastatization. In human tumors, down-regulation of E-cadherin is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Despite the critical role of E-cadherin in cancer progression, little is known about proteome alterations linked with its down-regulation. To address this point, we investigated proteomics, biophysical and functional changes of epithelial breast cancer cell lines upon shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of E-cadherin expression (shEcad). shEcad cells showed a distinct proteomic signature including altered expression of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamic and migration. Moreover, these results suggest that, besides their role in mechanical adhesion, loss of E-cadherin expression may contribute to cancer progression by modifying a complex network of pathways that tightly regulate fundamental processes as oxidative stress, immune evasion and cell metabolism. Altogether, these results extend our knowledge on the cellular modifications associated with E-cadherin down-regulation in breast cancer cells.

  9. α-Catenin and Vinculin Cooperate to Promote High E-cadherin-based Adhesion Strength*

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, William A.; Boscher, Cécile; Chu, Yeh-Shiu; Cuvelier, Damien; Martinez-Rico, Clara; Seddiki, Rima; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mege, René-Marc; Dufour, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining cell cohesiveness within tissues requires that intercellular adhesions develop sufficient strength to support traction forces applied by myosin motors and by neighboring cells. Cadherins are transmembrane receptors that mediate intercellular adhesion. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain recruits several partners, including catenins and vinculin, at sites of cell-cell adhesion. Our study used force measurements to address the role of αE-catenin and vinculin in the regulation of the strength of E-cadherin-based adhesion. αE-catenin-deficient cells display only weak aggregation and fail to strengthen intercellular adhesion over time, a process rescued by the expression of αE-catenin or chimeric E-cadherin·αE-catenins, including a chimera lacking the αE-catenin dimerization domain. Interestingly, an αE-catenin mutant lacking the modulation and actin-binding domains restores cadherin-dependent cell-cell contacts but cannot strengthen intercellular adhesion. The expression of αE-catenin mutated in its vinculin-binding site is defective in its ability to rescue cadherin-based adhesion strength in cells lacking αE-catenin. Vinculin depletion or the overexpression of the αE-catenin modulation domain strongly decreases E-cadherin-mediated adhesion strength. This supports the notion that both molecules are required for intercellular contact maturation. Furthermore, stretching of cell doublets increases vinculin recruitment and α18 anti-αE-catenin conformational epitope immunostaining at cell-cell contacts. Taken together, our results indicate that αE-catenin and vinculin cooperatively support intercellular adhesion strengthening, probably via a mechanoresponsive link between the E-cadherin·β-catenin complexes and the underlying actin cytoskeleton. PMID:23266828

  10. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Jennifer C.; Welsh, Natalie J.; Braga, Vania M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  11. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Jennifer C; Welsh, Natalie J; Braga, Vania M M

    2015-09-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  12. E-cadherin dis-engagement activates the Rap1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Asuri, Sirisha; Yan, Jingliang; Paranavitana, Nivanka C.; Quilliam, Lawrence A.

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin based adherens junctions are finely regulated by multiple cellular signaling events. Here we show that the Ras-related Rap1 GTPase is enriched in regions of nascent cell-cell contacts and strengthens E-cadherin junctions: constitutively active Rap1 expressing MDCK cells exhibit increased junctional contact and resisted calcium depletion-induced cell-cell junction disruption. E-cadherin disengagement activated Rap1 and this correlated with E-cadherin association with the Rap GEFs, C3G and PDZ-GEF I. PDZ-GEF I associated with E-cadherin and β-catenin whereas C3G interaction with E-cadherin did not involve β-catenin. Knockdown of PDZ-GEF I in MDCK cells decreased Rap1 activity following E-cadherin junction disruption. We hereby show that Rap1 plays a role in the maintenance and repair of E-cadherin junctions and is activated via an “outside-in” signaling pathway initiated by E-cadherin and mediated at least in part by PDZ-GEF I. PMID:18767072

  13. Interaction with Suv39H1 is Critical for Snail-mediated E-cadherin Repression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenfang; Wu, Yadi; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Chi; Kang, Tiebang; Rychahou, Piotr G.; Chi, Young-In; Evers, B. Mark; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of E-cadherin, a hallmark of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is often lost due to promoter DNA methylation in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC), which contributes to the metastatic advantage of this disease; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we identified that Snail interacted with Suv39H1, a major methyltransferase responsible for H3K9me3 that intimately links to DNA methylation. We demonstrated that the SNAG domain of Snail and the SET domain of Suv39H1 were required for their mutual interactions. We found that H3K9me3 and DNA methylation on the E-cadherin promoter were higher in BLBC cell lines. We showed that Snail interacted with Suv39H1 and recruited it to the E-cadherin promoter for transcriptional repression. Knockdown of Suv39H1 restored E-cadherin expression by blocking H3K9me3 and DNA methylation and resulted in the inhibition of cell migration, invasion and metastasis of BLBC. Our study not only reveals a critical mechanism underlying the epigenetic regulation of EMT, but also paves a way for the development of new treatment strategies against this disease. PMID:22562246

  14. PKCζ Promotes Breast Cancer Invasion by Regulating Expression of E-cadherin and Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) via NFκB-p65

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arindam; Danley, Marsha; Saha, Biswarup; Tawfik, Ossama; Paul, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Atypical Protein Kinase C zeta (PKCζ) forms Partitioning-defective (PAR) polarity complex for apico-basal distribution of membrane proteins essential to maintain normal cellular junctional complexes and tissue homeostasis. Consistently, tumor suppressive role of PKCζ has been established for multiple human cancers. However, recent studies also indicate pro-oncogenic function of PKCζ without firm understanding of detailed molecular mechanism. Here we report a possible mechanism of oncogenic PKCζ signaling in the context of breast cancer. We observed that depletion of PKCζ promotes epithelial morphology in mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 cells. The induction of epithelial morphology is associated with significant upregulation of adherens junction (AJ) protein E-cadherin and tight junction (TJ) protein Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1). Functionally, depletion of PKCζ significantly inhibits invasion and metastatic progression. Consistently, we observed higher expression and activation of PKCζ signaling in invasive and metastatic breast cancers compared to non-invasive diseases. Mechanistically, an oncogenic PKCζ– NFκB-p65 signaling node might be involved to suppress E-cadherin and ZO-1 expression and ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of NFκB-p65 (S536E-NFκB-p65) significantly rescues invasive potential of PKCζ-depleted breast cancer cells. Thus, our study discovered a PKCζ - NFκB-p65 signaling pathway might be involved to alter cellular junctional dynamics for breast cancer invasive progression. PMID:26218882

  15. EZH2 promotes cell migration and invasion but not alters cell proliferation by suppressing E-cadherin, partly through association with MALAT-1 in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Zi-Liang; Song, Wei-feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is an essential component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which is required for epigenetic silencing of target genes, including those affecting cancer progression. Its role in pancreatic cancer remains to be clarified; therefore, we investigated the effects of aberrantly expressed EZH2 on pancreatic cancer. We found that EZH2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. EZH2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not alter cell proliferation. Silencing of EZH2 also increased E-cadherin expression in vitro, and E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high EZH2 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. RIP and ChIP assays suggest that EZH2 is recruited to the E-cadherin promoter by the long non-coding RNA, MALAT-1 (metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), where it represses E-cadherin expression. Our results show that EZH2-based therapies may be an option for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26848980

  16. EZH2 promotes cell migration and invasion but not alters cell proliferation by suppressing E-cadherin, partly through association with MALAT-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Ting; Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Zi-Liang; Song, Wei-Feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is an essential component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which is required for epigenetic silencing of target genes, including those affecting cancer progression. Its role in pancreatic cancer remains to be clarified; therefore, we investigated the effects of aberrantly expressed EZH2 on pancreatic cancer. We found that EZH2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in pancreatic cancer patients. EZH2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not alter cell proliferation. Silencing of EZH2 also increased E-cadherin expression in vitro, and E-cadherin expression was inversely correlated with EZH2 expression in pancreatic cancer tissue samples. Patients with high EZH2 and low E-cadherin expression had the worst prognosis. RIP and ChIP assays suggest that EZH2 is recruited to the E-cadherin promoter by the long non-coding RNA, MALAT-1 (metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), where it represses E-cadherin expression. Our results show that EZH2-based therapies may be an option for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. α-Mangostin suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced invasion by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and increasing E-cadherin expression through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JIANGTAO; WU, YAOLU; LU, GUIFANG

    2013-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are major factors in the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer, which remains one of the most aggressive and lethal diseases worldwide. α-mangostin, a major xanthone compound identified in the pericarp of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana, Linn; GML), possesses unique biological activities, including antioxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. Whether α-mangostin is able to inhibit the invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells has not been elucidated. In the present study, α-mangostin was shown to inhibit the invasive ability of the pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and BxPC-3. The results showed that α-mangostin inhibited the growth of the pancreatic cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At concentrations of <5 μM, α-mangostin had no significant effects on cytotoxicity, but significantly inhibited the invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, while increasing the expression of E-cadherin. The present data also showed that α-mangostin exerted an inhibitory effect on the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the reduction of ERK phosphorylation by small interfering RNA (siRNA) potentiated the effect of α-mangostin. Taken together, the data suggest that α-mangostin inhibited the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, increasing E-cadherin expression and suppressing the ERK signaling pathway. The present study suggests that α-mangostin may be a promising agent against pancreatic cancer. PMID:23833675

  18. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  19. Expression and potential correlation among Forkhead box protein M1, Caveolin-1 and E-cadherin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Kundong; Zhou, Lisheng; Wu, Weidong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Huang, Kejian; Qiu, Zhengjun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and functions of Forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1), Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and E-cadherin in colorectal cancer (CRC), and to determine the correlations among these proteins in CRC development and progression. The protein expression of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-cadherin was identified using a human CRC and normal tissue microarray. A standard immunohistochemistry assay was performed employing anti-FoxM1, anti-Cav-1 and anti-E-cadherin antibodies. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-cadherin in CRC was determined, and correlations were investigated between FoxM1 and Cav-1, FoxM1 and E-cadherin, Cav-1 and E-cadherin, respectively. The level of FoxM1, Cav-1 and E-Cadherin protein expression in CRC was found to be associated with pathological grade, tumor clinical stages and the presence of metastasis, respectively. Elevated expression of FoxM1 and Cav-1 was observed in the CRC tissues, and a significant correlation was found between the two proteins in CRC. However, it was also observed that FoxM1 was overexpressed while E-cadherin expression was low, indicating that there was a negative correlation between FoxM1 expression and E-cadherin expression. Moreover, there was also a negative correlation between Cav-1 and E-cadherin expression. Overall, the elevated expression of FoxM1 and Cav-1 in a human CRC microarray provided novel clinical evidence to elucidate the fact that they may play a critical role in the development and progression of CRC by negatively regulating E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, the positive correlation between FoxM1 and Cav-1 suggested that the proteins may constitute a novel signaling pathway in human CRC.

  20. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  1. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  2. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  3. Syndecan-2 enhances E-cadherin shedding and fibroblast-like morphological changes by inducing MMP-7 expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohee; Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Moon, Byung-In; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-08-12

    E-cadherin plays a mechanical role in mediating cell-cell interactions and maintaining epithelial tissue integrity, and the loss of E-cadherin function has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Syndecan-2, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is upregulated during the development of colon cancer. Here, we assessed the functional relationship between E-cadherin and syndecan-2. We found that stable overexpression of syndecan-2 in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) enhanced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin to conditioned-media. Either knockdown of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) or inhibition of MMP-7 activity using GM6001 significantly reduced the extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, suggesting that syndecan-2 mediates E-cadherin shedding via MMP-7. Consistent with this notion, enhancement of MMP-7 expression by interleukin-1α treatment increased the shedding of E-cadherin. Conversely, the specific reduction of either syndecan-2 or MMP-7 reduced the shedding of E-cadherin. HT29 cells overexpressing syndecan-2 showed significantly lower cell-surface expression of E-cadherin, decreased cell-cell contact, a more fibroblastic cell morphology, and increased expression levels of ZEB-1. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 induces extracellular shedding of E-cadherin and supports the acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology by regulating MMP-7 expression in a colon cancer cell line.

  4. E-cadherin Controls Bronchiolar Progenitor Cells and Onset of Preneoplastic Lesions in Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Ceteci, Fatih; Ceteci, Semra; Zanucco, Emanuele; Thakur, Chitra; Becker, Matthias; El-Nikhely, Nefertiti; Fink, Ludger; Seeger, Werner; Savai, Rajkumar; Rapp, Ulf R

    2012-01-01

    Although progenitor cells of the conducting airway have been spatially localized and some insights have been gained regarding their molecular phenotype, relatively little is known about the mechanisms regulating their maintenance, activation, and differentiation. This study investigates the potential roles of E-cadherin in mouse Clara cells, as these cells were shown to represent the progenitor/stem cells of the conducting airways and have been implicated as the cell of origin of human non-small cell lung cancer. Postnatal inactivation of E-cadherin affected Clara cell differentiation and compromised airway regeneration under injury conditions. In steady-state adult lung, overexpression of the dominant negative E-cadherin led to an expansion of the bronchiolar stem cells and decreased differentiation concomitant with canonical Wnt signaling activation. Expansion of the bronchiolar stem cell pool was associated with an incessant proliferation of neuroepithelial body.associated Clara cells that ultimately gave rise to bronchiolar hyperplasia. Despite progressive hyperplasia, only a minority of the mice developed pulmonary solid tumors, suggesting that the loss of E-cadherin function leads to tumor formation when additional mutations are sustained. The present study reveals that E-cadherin plays a critical role in the regulation of proliferation and homeostasis of the epithelial cells lining the conducting airways. PMID:23308049

  5. XPC inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation and migration by enhancing E-Cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tiantian; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Linlin; Zhao, Ran; Zou, Ning; Qu, Meihua; Duan, Wenrui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) protein is an important DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair. Deletion of XPC is associated with early stages of human lung carcinogenesis, and reduced XPC mRNA levels predict poor patient outcome for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the mechanisms linking loss of XPC expression and poor prognosis in lung cancer are still unclear. Here, we report evidence that XPC silencing drives proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells by down-regulating E-Cadherin. XPC knockdown enhanced proliferation and migration while decreasing E-Cadherin expression in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype. Restoration of E-Cadherin in these cells suppressed XPC knockdown-induced cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that the loss of XPC repressed E-Cadherin expression by activating the ERK pathway and upregulating Snail expression. Our findings indicate that XPC silencing-induced reduction of E-Cadherin expression contributes, at least in part, to the poor outcome of NSCLC patients with low XPC expression. PMID:25871391

  6. Cloning and characterization of the human invasion suppressor gene E-cadherin (CDH1)

    SciTech Connect

    Berx, G.; Staes, K.; Hengel, J. van

    1995-03-20

    E-cadherin is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion molecule. Downregulation of E-cadherin expression often correlates with strong invasive potential and poor prognosis of human carcinomas. By using recombinant {lambda} phage, cosmid, and P1 phage clones, we isolated the full-length human E-cadherin gene (CDH1). The gene spans a region of approximately 100 kb, and its location on chromosome 16q22.1 was confirmed by FISH analysis. Detailed restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis of the gene allowed us to identify 16 exons and a 65-kb-long intron 2. The intron-exon boundaries are highly conserved in comparison with other {open_quotes}classical cadherins.{close_quotes} In intron 1 we identified a high-density CpG island that may be implicated in transcription regulation during embryogenesis and malignancy. 52 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. E-cadherin interactome complexity and robustness resolved by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhenhuan; Neilson, Lisa J; Zhong, Hang; Murray, Paul S; Rao, Megha Vaman; Zanivan, Sara; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and signaling plays an essential role in development and maintenance of healthy epithelial tissues. Adhesiveness is conferred by cadherin extracellular domains, and is regulated by an assembly of adaptors and enzymes associated with the cytoplasmic tail. Here, we employed proximity biotinylation and quantitative proteomics to isolate and identify 612 proteins in the vicinity of E-cadherin’s cytoplasmic tail. We used a structure-informed database of protein-protein interactions to construct the most comprehensive E-cadherin interactome to date, containing 89 known E-cadhesome components and 346 novel proteins. Moreover, through cloning and expression of GFP-tagged fusion proteins we localized 26 of the novel proteins to adherens junctions. Finally, employing calcium depletion and myosin inhibition we show the E-cadherin interactome to be remarkably robust to perturbation and essentially independent of cell-cell junctions or actomyosin contractility. PMID:25468996

  8. Microtubules Inhibit E-Cadherin Adhesive Activity by Maintaining Phosphorylated p120-Catenin in a Colon Carcinoma Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Stephanie L.; Petrova, Yuliya I.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Tight regulation of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesions is critical to both tissue morphogenesis during development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Cell surface expression of the cadherin-catenin complex is often directly correlated with the level of adhesion, however, examples exist where cadherin appears to be inactive and cells are completely non-adhesive. The state of p120-catenin phosphorylation has been implicated in regulating the adhesive activity of E-cadherin but the mechanism is currently unclear. We have found that destabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, independent of microtubule plus-end dynamics, dephosphorylates p120-catenin and activates E-cadherin adhesion in Colo 205 cells. Through chemical screening, we have also identified several kinases as potential regulators of E-cadherin adhesive activity. Analysis of several p120-catenin phosphomutants suggests that gross dephosphorylation of p120-catenin rather than that of specific amino acids may trigger E-cadherin adhesion. Uncoupling p120-catenin binding to E-cadherin at the membrane causes constitutive adhesion in Colo 205 cells, further supporting an inhibitory role of phosphorylated p120-catenin on E-cadherin activity. PMID:26845024

  9. Exon 11 skipping of E-cadherin RNA downregulates its expression in Head and Neck cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjai; Liao, Wei; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Wong, David T.W.; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    E-cadherin is an important tumor suppressor gene whose expression is lost when cells acquire a metastatic phenotype. We analyzed the role of E-cadherin mis-splicing as a mechanism of its downregulation by analyzing a mis-spliced E-cadherin transcript that lacks exon 11 of this gene. This results in a frame shift and a premature termination codon which targets this transcript for degradation. Tumor tissues including breast (20%, n=9)), prostate (30%, n=9) and Head and Neck (H&N) (75%, n=8) cancer, express the exon 11 skipped transcripts (versus non-malignant controls) and its levels inversely correlate with E-cadherin expression. This is a novel mechanism of E-cadherin downregulation by mis-splicing in tumor cells which is observed in highly prevalent human tumors. In the H&N cancer model, non-tumorigenic keratinocytes express exon 11 skipped splice product 2–6 fold lower than the H&N tumor cell lines. Mechanistic studies reveal that SFRS2 (SC35), a splicing factor as one of the regulators that increases mis-splicing and downregulates E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, this splicing factor was found to be over expressed in five out of seven H&N cell lines and primary H&N tumors. Also, methylation of E-cadherin gene acts as a regulator of this aberrant splicing process. In two H&N cell lines, wild type transcript expression increased 16–25 folds while the percentage of exon 11 skipped transcripts in both the cell lines decreased 5–30 folds when cells were treated with a hypomethylating agent, azacytidine. Our findings reveal that promoter methylation and an upregulated splicing factor (SFRS2) are involved in the E-cadherin mis-splicing in tumors. PMID:21764905

  10. E-cadherin mediates contact inhibition of proliferation through Hippo signaling-pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Gyun; Koh, Eunjin; Chen, Xiao; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Contact inhibition of cell growth is essential for embryonic development and maintenance of tissue architecture in adult organisms, and the growth of tumors is characterized by a loss of contact inhibition of proliferation. The recently identified Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated in contact inhibition of proliferation as well as organ size control. The modulation of the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by the highly conserved kinase cascade of the Hippo signaling pathway has been intensively studied. However, cell-surface receptors regulating the Hippo signaling pathway in mammals are not well understood. In this study, we show that Hippo signaling pathway components are required for E-cadherin–dependent contact inhibition of proliferation. Knockdown of the Hippo signaling components or overexpression of YAP inhibits the decrease in cell proliferation caused by E-cadherin homophilic binding at the cell surface, independent of other cell–cell interactions. We also demonstrate that the E-cadherin/catenin complex functions as an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway in mammalian cells. Expression of E-cadherin in MDA-MB-231 cells restores the density-dependent regulation of YAP nuclear exclusion. Knockdown of β-catenin in densely cultured MCF10A cells, which mainly depletes E-cadherin–bound β-catenin, induces a decrease in the phosphorylation of S127 residue of YAP and its nuclear accumulation. Moreover, E-cadherin homophilic binding independent of other cell interactions is sufficient to control the subcellular localization of YAP. Therefore, Our results indicate that, in addition to its role in cell–cell adhesion, E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contact directly regulates the Hippo signaling pathway to control cell proliferation. PMID:21730131

  11. Smoking induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in non-small cell lung cancer through HDAC-mediated downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S; Massion, Pierre P; Gonzalez, Adriana L; Lu, Pengcheng; Datta, Pran K

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that most cases of lung cancers (85%-90%) are directly attributable to tobacco smoking. Although association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer is well documented, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms of how smoking is involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through epigenetic changes. Here, we show that lung cancer patients with a smoking history have low E-cadherin levels and loss of E-cadherin is a poor prognostic factor in smokers. Moreover, the downregulation of E-cadherin correlates with the number of pack years. In an attempt to determine the role of long-term cigarette smoking on EMT, we observed that treatment of lung cell lines with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) induces EMT through downregulation of epithelial markers, including E-cadherin and upregulation of mesenchymal markers. CSC decreases E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level through upregulation of LEF1 and Slug, and knockdown of these two proteins increases E-cadherin expression. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest that LEF-1 and Slug binding to E-cadherin promoter is important for CSC-mediated downregulation of E-cadherin. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor MS-275 reverses CSC-induced EMT, migration, and invasion through the restoration of E-cadherin expression. These results suggest that recruitment of HDACs by transcriptional repressors LEF-1 and Slug is responsible for E-cadherin suppression and EMT in cigarette smokers and provide a potential drug target toward the treatment of lung cancer.

  12. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Tim; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Andries, Vanessa; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Hochepied, Tino; Huylebroeck, Danny; Berx, Geert; Stemmler, Marc P; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  13. p120 Catenin-Mediated Stabilization of E-Cadherin Is Essential for Primitive Endoderm Specification

    PubMed Central

    Haenebalcke, Lieven; Stryjewska, Agata; De Rycke, Riet; Lemeire, Kelly; Huylebroeck, Danny; Stemmler, Marc P.; Wirth, Dagmar; Haigh, Jody J.; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is critical for naive pluripotency of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). E-cadherin-depleted mESC fail to downregulate their pluripotency program and are unable to initiate lineage commitment. To further explore the roles of cell adhesion molecules during mESC differentiation, we focused on p120 catenin (p120ctn). Although one key function of p120ctn is to stabilize and regulate cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion, it has many additional functions, including regulation of transcription and Rho GTPase activity. Here, we investigated the role of mouse p120ctn in early embryogenesis, mESC pluripotency and early fate determination. In contrast to the E-cadherin-null phenotype, p120ctn-null mESCs remained pluripotent, but their in vitro differentiation was incomplete. In particular, they failed to form cystic embryoid bodies and showed defects in primitive endoderm formation. To pinpoint the underlying mechanism, we undertook a structure-function approach. Rescue of p120ctn-null mESCs with different p120ctn wild-type and mutant expression constructs revealed that the long N-terminal domain of p120ctn and its regulatory domain for RhoA were dispensable, whereas its armadillo domain and interaction with E-cadherin were crucial for primitive endoderm formation. We conclude that p120ctn is not only an adaptor and regulator of E-cadherin, but is also indispensable for proper lineage commitment. PMID:27556156

  14. E-cadherin expression in transitional cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Székely, Eszter; Török, Virág; Székely, Tamás; Riesz, Péter; Romics, Imre

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyzed the expression of E-cadherin, one of the most important cell adhesion molecules, on histological slides of tumors of bladder cancer patients. The aim of the study was to see whether there is any association between E-cadherin expression and tumor grade, stage, age and gender of the patients, number of recurrences, or overall survival. The samples were examined in 51 primary bladder transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of 50 patients, resected by transurethral resection (TUR) between January 1, 1996 and January 1, 1997. Immunoreactions were performed with monoclonal anti-human E-cadherin antibody. Forty of the fifty patients could be clinically followed. The analysis of the results on these forty patients was performed by contingency analysis and significance was assessed by chi2 test. No significant association between E-cadherin expression and tumor grade, stage, age or gender of the patients, the number of recurrences, or overall survival could be seen.

  15. Characterization of E-cadherin-dependent and -independent events in a new model of c-Fos-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Kriajevska, Marina; Berditchevski, Fedor; Bronstein, Igor; Lukanidin, Eugene M.; Pringle, J. Howard; Mellon, J. Kilian; Tulchinsky, Eugene M. . E-mail: et32@le.ac.uk

    2007-01-15

    Fos proteins have been implicated in control of tumorigenesis-related genetic programs including invasion, angiogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this study, we demonstrate that c-Fos is able to induce mesenchymal transition in murine tumorigenic epithelial cell lines. Expression of c-Fos in MT1TC1 cells led to prominent alterations in cell morphology, increased expression of mesenchymal markers, vimentin and S100A4, DNA methylation-dependent down-regulation of E-cadherin and abrogation of cell-cell adhesion. In addition, c-Fos induced a strong {beta}-catenin-independent proliferative response in MT1TC1 cells and stimulated cell motility, invasion and adhesion to different extracellular matrix proteins. To explore whether loss of E-cadherin plays a role in c-Fos-mediated mesenchymal transition, we expressed wild-type E-cadherin and two different E-cadherin mutants in MT1TC1/c-fos cells. Expression of wild-type E-cadherin restored epithelioid morphology and enhanced cellular levels of catenins. However, exogenous E-cadherin did not influence expression of c-Fos-dependent genes, only partly suppressed growth of MT1TC1/c-fos cells and produced no effect on c-Fos-stimulated cell motility and invasion in matrigel. On the other hand, re-expression of E-cadherin specifically negated c-Fos-induced adhesion to collagen type I, but not to laminin or fibronectin. Of interest, mutant E-cadherin which lacks the ability to form functional adhesive complexes had an opposite, potentiating effect on cell adhesion to collagen I. These data suggest that cell adhesion to collagen I is regulated by the functional state of E-cadherin. Overall, our data demonstrate that, with the exception of adhesion to collagen I, c-Fos is dominant over E-cadherin in relation to the aspects of mesenchymal transition assayed in this study.

  16. Acute and chronic cadmium exposure promotes E-cadherin degradation in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Esmeralda; Louie, Maggie C; Sevigny, Mary B

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is an environmental carcinogen that usually enters the body at minute concentrations through diet or cigarette smoke and bioaccumulates in soft tissues. In past studies, cadmium has been shown to contribute to the development of more aggressive cancer phenotypes including increased cell migration and invasion. This study aims to determine if cadmium exposure-both acute and chronic-contributes to breast cancer progression by interfering with the normal functional relationship between E-cadherin and β-catenin. An MCF7 breast cancer cell line (MCF7-Cd) chronically exposed to 10(-7)  M CdCl2 was previously developed and used as a model system to study chronic exposures, whereas parental MCF7 cells exposed to 10(-6)  M CdCl2 for short periods of time were used to study acute exposures. Cadmium exposure of MCF7 cells led to the degradation of the E-cadherin protein via the ubiquitination pathway. This resulted in fewer E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and the relocation of active β-catenin to the nucleus, where it interacted with transcription factor TCF-4 to modulate gene expression. Interestingly, only cells chronically exposed to cadmium showed a significant decrease in the localization of β-catenin to the plasma membrane and an increased distance between cells. Our data suggest that cadmium exposure promotes breast cancer progression by (1) down-regulating E-cadherin, thus decreasing the number of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complexes, and (2) enhancing the nuclear translocation of β-catenin to increase expression of cancer-promoting proteins (i.e., c-Jun and cyclin D1).

  17. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  18. Role of E-cadherin, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins, and p120 (cell adhesion molecules) in prolactinoma behavior.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi Rong; Li, Chiun Chei; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Mizusawa, Noriko; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Shozo; Tashiro, Takashi; Horiguchi, Hidehisa; Wakatsuki, Shingo; Hirokawa, Mitsuyoshi; Sano, Toshiaki

    2002-12-01

    E-cadherin/catenin complex regulates cellular adhesion and motility and is believed to function as an invasion suppressor system. In a number of cancers, abnormal and reduced expression of E-cadherin/catenin complex is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Prolactinomas show frequent invasion on the surrounding structures, despite their histologically benign nature. Furthermore, gender-based differences in endocrine and surgical findings are found in patients with prolactinoma. To understand biological factors governing prolactinoma behavior, this study analyzed the expression of E-cadherin; alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins; p120; and cell proliferation marker MIB-1 labeling index in 13 invasive tumors (9 in men, 4 in women), 26 noninvasive tumors (4 in men, 22 in women), and 8 normal anterior pituitaries by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining of E-cadherin; alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins; and p120 showed a membranous pattern of reactivity and generally stronger in normal pituitaries than in prolactinomas. Expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was significantly lower in invasive than in noninvasive prolactinomas (P <.002 and P <.005, respectively), and reduced expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was more frequent in invasive than in noninvasive prolactinomas (P <.001 and P <.05, respectively); in contrast, gamma-catenin expression showed higher in invasive than in noninvasive prolactinomas (P <.05). Expression of E-cadherin was significantly lower in macroprolactinomas than in microprolactinomas (P <.01), and decreased expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin predicted high MIB-1 expression (P <.05). Moreover, the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin was significantly lower in macroprolactinomas in men than in those in women (P <.01 and P <.02, respectively). No statistical correlations were observed between expression of alpha-catenin, p120, and clinicopathologic features. In conclusion, the reduction of E-cadherin and beta

  19. Cadherin controls nectin recruitment into adherens junctions by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Troyanovsky, Regina B.; Indra, Indrajyoti; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Hong, Soonjin; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism that coordinates activities of different adhesion receptors is poorly understood. We investigated this mechanism by focusing on the nectin-2 and E-cadherin adherens junction receptors. We found that, cadherin was not required for the basic process of nectin junction formation because nectin-2 formed junctions in cadherin-deficient A431D cells. Formation of nectin-2 junctions in these cells, however, became regulated by cadherin as soon as E-cadherin was re-expressed. E-cadherin recruited nectin-2 into adherens junctions, where both proteins formed distinct but tightly associated clusters. Live-cell imaging showed that the appearance of E-cadherin clusters often preceded that of nectin-2 clusters at sites of junction assembly. Inactivation of E-cadherin clustering by different strategies concomitantly suppressed the formation of nectin clusters. Furthermore, cadherin significantly increased the stability of nectin clusters, thereby making them resistant to the BC-12 antibody, which targets the nectin-2 adhesion interface. By testing different E-cadherin–α-catenin chimeras, we showed that the recruitment of nectin into chimera junctions is mediated by the actin-binding domain of α-catenin. Our data suggests that E-cadherin regulates assembly of nectin junctions through α-catenin-induced remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton around the cadherin clusters. PMID:25395582

  20. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and E47 EMT factor: novel partners in E-cadherin repression and early metastasis colonization.

    PubMed

    Canesin, G; Cuevas, E P; Santos, V; López-Menéndez, C; Moreno-Bueno, G; Huang, Y; Csiszar, K; Portillo, F; Peinado, H; Lyden, D; Cano, A

    2015-02-19

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with increased aggressiveness and acquisition of migratory properties providing tumor cells with the ability to invade into adjacent tissues. Downregulation of E-cadherin, a hallmark of EMT, is mediated by several transcription factors (EMT-TFs) that act also as EMT inducers, among them, Snail1 and the bHLH transcription factor E47. We previously described lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a member of the lysyl oxidase family, as a Snail1 regulator and EMT inducer. Here we show that LOXL2 is also an E47-interacting partner and functionally collaborates in the repression of E-cadherin promoter. Loss and gain of function analyses combined with in vivo studies in syngeneic breast cancer models demonstrate the participation of LOXL2 and E47 in tumor growth and their requirement for lung metastasis. Furthermore, LOXL2 and E47 contribute to early steps of metastatic colonization by cell and noncell autonomous functions regulating the recruitment of bone marrow progenitor cells to the lungs and by direct transcriptional regulation of fibronectin and cytokines TNFα, ANG-1 and GM-CSF. Moreover, fibronectin and GM-CSF proved to be necessary for LOXL2/E47-mediated modulation of tumor growth and lung metastasis.

  1. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) and E47 EMT factor: novel partners in E-cadherin repression and early metastasis colonization.

    PubMed

    Canesin, G; Cuevas, E P; Santos, V; López-Menéndez, C; Moreno-Bueno, G; Huang, Y; Csiszar, K; Portillo, F; Peinado, H; Lyden, D; Cano, A

    2015-02-19

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with increased aggressiveness and acquisition of migratory properties providing tumor cells with the ability to invade into adjacent tissues. Downregulation of E-cadherin, a hallmark of EMT, is mediated by several transcription factors (EMT-TFs) that act also as EMT inducers, among them, Snail1 and the bHLH transcription factor E47. We previously described lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a member of the lysyl oxidase family, as a Snail1 regulator and EMT inducer. Here we show that LOXL2 is also an E47-interacting partner and functionally collaborates in the repression of E-cadherin promoter. Loss and gain of function analyses combined with in vivo studies in syngeneic breast cancer models demonstrate the participation of LOXL2 and E47 in tumor growth and their requirement for lung metastasis. Furthermore, LOXL2 and E47 contribute to early steps of metastatic colonization by cell and noncell autonomous functions regulating the recruitment of bone marrow progenitor cells to the lungs and by direct transcriptional regulation of fibronectin and cytokines TNFα, ANG-1 and GM-CSF. Moreover, fibronectin and GM-CSF proved to be necessary for LOXL2/E47-mediated modulation of tumor growth and lung metastasis. PMID:24632622

  2. The effects of adriamycin on E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion and apoptosis during early kidney development.

    PubMed

    Yay, A; Ozdamar, S; Balcioglu, E; Baran, M; Akkus, D; Sonmez, M F

    2015-07-01

    Adriamycin (ADR) is strongly teratogenic. We investigated the effects of ADR on apoptosis and the intensity of E-cadherin expression in developing kidneys. An experimental group of rats was given 2 mg/kg/day ADR on days 6-9 of gestation and a control group was given saline on the same schedule. Embryos were decapitated on days 13, 15, 17 and 19 of gestation, and processed and embedded in paraffin for routine light microscopy. Kidney specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or periodic acid-Schiff, or immunostained for E-cadherin. Apoptosis was assessed using the TUNEL method. Weight loss and developmental deficiency were determined in embryos of the experimental group. ADR damaged or destroyed tubule epithelial cells, which caused apparent dilatation of the tubule lumen. Also, the brush borders of proximal tubules were damaged and glomerular spaces were dilated. ADR caused apoptosis of kidney tissue by days 15, 17 and 19 of development and E-cadherin expression was up-regulated during kidney development compared to controls. We found that ADR can cause apoptosis and increased E-cadherin expression in the developing rat kidney. E-cadherin expression and apoptosis may contribute to the development of ADR nephrotoxicity.

  3. Cdc42-Interacting Protein 4 Represses E-Cadherin Expression by Promoting β-Catenin Translocation to the Nucleus in Murine Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuou; Zhou, Qiaodan; Liu, Lili; Liu, Ping; Pei, Guangchang; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2015-08-14

    Renal fibrosis is an inevitable outcome of end-stage chronic kidney disease. During this process, epithelial cells lose E-cadherin expression. β-Catenin may act as a mediator by accumulation and translocation to the nucleus. Studies have suggested that CIP4, a Cdc42 effector protein, is associated with β-catenin. However, whether CIP4 contributes to E-cadherin loss in epithelial cells by regulating β-catenin translocation is unclear. In this study, we investigated the involvement of CIP4 in β-catenin translocation. Expression of CIP4 was upregulated in renal tissues of 5/6 nephrectomized rats and mainly distributed in renal tubular epithelia. In TGF-β1-treated NRK-52E cells, upregulation of CIP4 expression was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin. CIP4 overexpression promoted the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus, which was accompanied by reduced expression of E-cadherin even without TGF-β1 stimulation. In contrast, CIP4 depletion by using siRNA inhibited the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus and reversed the decrease in expression of E-cadherin. The interaction between CIP4 and β-catenin was detected. We also show that β-catenin depletion could restore the expression of E-cadherin that was suppressed by CIP4 overexpression. In conclusion, these results suggest that CIP4 overexpression represses E-cadherin expression by promoting β-catenin translocation to the nucleus.

  4. Type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase modulates adherens junction and E-cadherin trafficking via a direct interaction with μ1B adaptin

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Kun; Bairstow, Shawn F.; Carbonara, Chateen; Turbin, Dmitry A.; Huntsman, David G.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Assembly of E-cadherin–based adherens junctions (AJ) is obligatory for establishment of polarized epithelia and plays a key role in repressing the invasiveness of many carcinomas. Here we show that type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPKIγ) directly binds to E-cadherin and modulates E-cadherin trafficking. PIPKIγ also interacts with the μ subunits of clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes and acts as a signalling scaffold that links AP complexes to E-cadherin. Depletion of PIPKIγ or disruption of PIPKIγ binding to either E-cadherin or AP complexes results in defects in E-cadherin transport and blocks AJ assembly. An E-cadherin germline mutation that loses PIPKIγ binding and shows disrupted basolateral membrane targeting no longer forms AJs and leads to hereditary gastric cancers. These combined results reveal a novel mechanism where PIPKIγ serves as both a scaffold, which links E-cadherin to AP complexes and the trafficking machinery, and a regulator of trafficking events via the spatial generation of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. PMID:17261850

  5. Immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in feline mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Zappulli, V; De Cecco, S; Trez, D; Caliari, D; Aresu, L; Castagnaro, M

    2012-01-01

    E-cadherin and β-catenin have been studied in carcinogenesis and tumour progression and reduced membrane expression of these molecules in canine mammary tumours has been associated with a poor prognosis. The present study investigated immunohistochemically the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in 53 mammary tumours and 48 hyperplastic or dysplastic lesions from 57 queens. E-cadherin and β-catenin expression was membranous in all samples and there was a significant decrease in expression in malignant tumours and metastases. Cytoplasmic expression of both markers was inversely correlated to the membrane localization. β-catenin nuclear labelling was detected in one lymph node metastasis (60% positive cells) and in the basal/myoepithelial cells of 6/7 ductal tumours. No correlation with survival was found for either marker. These results confirm the role of these proteins in maintaining tissue architecture and in inhibiting cell invasiveness and potentially indicate the oncogenic potential of the Wnt/β-catenin transduction pathway in feline mammary tumours. In addition, specific independent expression of β-catenin in the nuclei of basal/myoepithelial cells might suggest that this molecule is involved in regulation of the mammary stem/pluripotent cell component. Further studies should include more cases of benign mammary neoplasia and further investigate β-catenin nuclear expression in ductal tumours. PMID:22520821

  6. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  7. The Role of E-Cadherin in Maintaining the Barrier Function of Corneal Epithelium after Treatment with Cultured Autologous Oral Mucosa Epithelial Cell Sheet Grafts for Limbal Stem Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, Richard H.; Wood, Andrew; Oliva, Joan; Niihara, Hope; Makalinao, Andrew; Thropay, Jacquelyn; Pan, Derek; Tiger, Kumar; Garcia, Julio; Laporte, Amanda; French, Samuel W.; Niihara, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The role of E-cadherin in epithelial barrier function of cultured autologous oral mucosa epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) grafts was examined. CAOMECS were cultured on a temperature-responsive surface and grafted onto rabbit corneas with Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD). E-cadherin levels were significantly higher in CAOMECS compared to normal and LSCD epithelium. Beta-catenin colocalized with E-cadherin in CAOMECS cell membranes while phosphorylated beta-catenin was significantly increased. ZO-1, occludin, and Cnx43 were also strongly expressed in CAOMECS. E-cadherin and beta-catenin localization at the cell membrane was reduced in LSCD corneas, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a restoration of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression. LSCD corneas did not show continuous staining for ZO-1 or for Cnx43, while CAOMECS-grafted corneas showed a positive expression of ZO-1 and Cnx43. Cascade Blue® hydrazide did not pass through CAOMECS. Because E-cadherin interactions are calcium-dependent, EGTA was used to chelate calcium and disrupt cell adhesion. EGTA-treated CAOMECS completely detached from cell culture surface, and E-cadherin levels were significantly decreased. In conclusion, E cadherin high expression contributed to CAOMECS tight and gap junction protein recruitment at the cell membrane, thus promoting cellular adhesion and a functional barrier to protect the ocular surface. PMID:27777792

  8. ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells through upregulation of E-cadherin in a Id1-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Ming, Jia; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin in breast cancer cell. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. - Abstract: ERβ1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. It plays an important role in regulating the progression of breast cancer. However, the mechanisms of ERβ1 in tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis are still not fully clear. In this study, we showed that the expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we also found that ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and upregulated E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. Taken together, our study provides further understanding of the molecular mechanism of ERβ1 in tumor metastasis and suggests the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches to target Id1 to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

  9. E-cadherin enhances neuregulin signaling and promotes Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    Basak, Sayantani; Desai, Darshan J; Rho, Esther H; Ramos, Roselle; Maurel, Patrice; Kim, Haesun A

    2015-09-01

    In myelinating Schwann cells, E-cadherin is a component of the adherens junctions that stabilize the architecture of the noncompact myelin region. In other cell types, E-cadherin has been considered as a signaling receptor that modulates intracellular signal transduction and cellular responses. To determine whether E-cadherin plays a regulatory role during Schwann cell myelination, we investigated the effects of E-cadherin deletion and over-expression in Schwann cells. In vivo, Schwann cell-specific E-cadherin ablation results in an early myelination delay. In Schwann cell-dorsal root ganglia neuron co-cultures, E-cadherin deletion attenuates myelin formation and shortens the myelin segment length. When over-expressed in Schwann cells, E-cadherin improves myelination on Nrg1 type III(+/-) neurons and induces myelination on normally non-myelinated axons of sympathetic neurons. The pro-myelinating effect of E-cadherin is associated with an enhanced Nrg1-erbB receptor signaling, including activation of the downstream Akt and Rac. Accordingly, in the absence of E-cadherin, Nrg1-signaling is diminished in Schwann cells. Our data also show that E-cadherin expression in Schwann cell is induced by axonal Nrg1 type III, indicating a reciprocal interaction between E-cadherin and the Nrg1 signaling. Altogether, our data suggest a regulatory function of E-cadherin that modulates Nrg1 signaling and promotes Schwann cell myelin formation.

  10. MiR-429 reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition by restoring E-cadherin expression in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Lun; Ho, Jar-Yi; Chou, Sheng-Chieh; Yu, Dah-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) accompanying loss of E-cadherin is important for invasiveness and metastasis of bladder cancer. MicroRNAs (miRs) had been associated with cancer progression and differentiation in several cancers. Our goal is to find out the specific miR which modulates EMT in bladder cancer. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the miRs expression in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) cell lines. MiR or siRNA mimics was used to regulate miR and mRNA level respectively. Migration and scratch assays were used to determine the migratory ability. Zymography assay was used to confirm the metalloproteinase activity. Western blotting was used to elucidate the mechanism which regulated by specific miR. MiR-429 was highly expressed in low grade UCC cell lines. Exogenous mimic of miR-429 treatment dramatically inhibited the migratory ability of T24 cells. MiR-429 downstream target ZEB1 was decreased, E-cadherin was restored, and β-catenin was contrarily decreased by exogenous mimic of miR-429 treatment in T24 cells. Cell invasive ability was also inhibited by exogenous mimic of miR-429 treatment through inactivating the MMP-2 activity in T24 cells. E-cadherin protein expression level was inhibited by E-cadherin siRNA accompanied with increasing cell migratory ability when compared with control group in low grade TSGH8301 cells. MiR-429 decreased the cell migratory and invasive abilities through reducing ZEB1 and β-catenin, restoring the E-cadherin expression and inactivation of MMP-2 of UCC cells. MiR-429 might be used as a progression marker of bladder cancer. PMID:27058893

  11. Long non-coding RNA LINC01133 represses KLF2, P21 and E-cadherin transcription through binding with EZH2, LSD1 in non small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Jing; Zhang, Meiling; Lu, Kai-hua

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are emerging as crucial regulators and prognostic markers in multiple cancers including non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we screened LINCO1133 as a new candidate lncRNA which promotes NSCLC development and progression, in two independent datasets (GSE18842 and GSE19804) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). LINC01133 is previously found to be over-expressed in lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC) and knockdown its expression inhibits LSCC cells invasion. However, its' molecular mechanism and downstream targets involving in regulation of cancer cells phenotype is not known. Here, we found that LINC01133 expression is up-regulated in NSCLC tissues, and its' over-expression is associated with patients poor prognosis and short survival time. LINC01133 knockdown decreased NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion and induced cell cycle G1/S phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations showed that LINC01133 could interact with EZH2, LSD1 and recruit them to KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin promoter regions to repress their transcription. Furthermore, rescue experiments demonstrated that LINC01133 oncogenic function is partly through regulating KLF2. Lastly, we found that there was negative correlation between LINC01133 and KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin in NSCLC. Overall, our findings illuminate how LINC01133 over-expression confers an oncogenic function in NSCLC that may offer a novel therapy target in this disease. PMID:26840083

  12. Long non-coding RNA LINC01133 represses KLF2, P21 and E-cadherin transcription through binding with EZH2, LSD1 in non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zang, Chongshuang; Nie, Feng-Qi; Wang, Qian; Sun, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Jing; Zhang, Meiling; Lu, Kai-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are emerging as crucial regulators and prognostic markers in multiple cancers including non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we screened LINCO1133 as a new candidate lncRNA which promotes NSCLC development and progression, in two independent datasets (GSE18842 and GSE19804) from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). LINC01133 is previously found to be over-expressed in lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC) and knockdown its expression inhibits LSCC cells invasion. However, its' molecular mechanism and downstream targets involving in regulation of cancer cells phenotype is not known. Here, we found that LINC01133 expression is up-regulated in NSCLC tissues, and its' over-expression is associated with patients poor prognosis and short survival time. LINC01133 knockdown decreased NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion and induced cell cycle G1/S phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations showed that LINC01133 could interact with EZH2, LSD1 and recruit them to KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin promoter regions to repress their transcription. Furthermore, rescue experiments demonstrated that LINC01133 oncogenic function is partly through regulating KLF2. Lastly, we found that there was negative correlation between LINC01133 and KLF2, P21 or E-cadherin in NSCLC. Overall, our findings illuminate how LINC01133 over-expression confers an oncogenic function in NSCLC that may offer a novel therapy target in this disease.

  13. The Anoikis Effector Bit1 Inhibits EMT through Attenuation of TLE1-Mediated Repression of E-Cadherin in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin; Pham, Tri; Temple, Brandi; Gray, Selena; Cannon, Cornita; Chen, Renwei; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Biliran, Hector

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial Bcl-2 inhibitor of transcription 1 (Bit1) protein is part of an anoikis-regulating pathway that is selectively dependent on integrins. We previously demonstrated that the caspase-independent apoptotic effector Bit1 exerts tumor suppressive function in lung cancer in part by inhibiting anoikis resistance and anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Herein we show a novel function of Bit1 as an inhibitor cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line. Suppression of endogenous Bit1 expression via siRNA and shRNA strategies promoted mesenchymal phenotypes, including enhanced fibroblastoid morphology and cell migratory potential with concomitant downregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin expression. Conversely, ectopic Bit1 expression in A549 cells promoted epithelial transition characterized by cuboidal-like epithelial cell phenotype, reduced cell motility, and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Specific downregulation of E-cadherin in Bit1-transfected cells was sufficient to block Bit1-mediated inhibition of cell motility while forced expression of E-cadherin alone attenuated the enhanced migration of Bit1 knockdown cells, indicating that E-cadherin is a downstream target of Bit1 in regulating cell motility. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR and reporter analyses revealed that Bit1 upregulates E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level through the transcriptional regulator Amino-terminal Enhancer of Split (AES) protein. Importantly, the Bit1/AES pathway induction of E-cadherin expression involves inhibition of the TLE1-mediated repression of E-cadherin, by decreasing TLE1 corepressor occupancy at the E-cadherin promoter as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Consistent with its EMT inhibitory function, exogenous Bit1 expression significantly suppressed the formation of lung metastases of A549 cells in an in vivo experimental

  14. Dissociation of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex by MG132 and bortezomib enhances CDDP induced cell death in oral cancer SCC-25 cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Lanhai; Liu, Xiqiang; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Fengchun; Wang, Jianning; Huang, Hongzhang

    2015-12-01

    E-cadherin/β-catenin complex plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of tissues and regulating cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis. To address the relationships between the change of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex and cell apoptosis, human oral squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells were used to investigate whether the dissociation of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was the main reason of MG132- or bortezomib-induced apoptosis. We found that MG132 or bortezomib alone induced remarkable loss of cell integrity and contact, inhibited cell growth, survival, migration and caused cell cycle arrest, intracellular ROS production. Further experiments showed that colony formations were significantly decreased by MG132 and bortezomib alone or plus cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (CDDP). Immunofluorescence staining showed that SCC-25 cells exhibited remarkable accumulations of β-catenin in cytoplasm and few E-cadherin in cell membranes after MG132 or bortezomib treatment. Western blot results showed that MG132 or bortezomib induced high accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and activation of apoptosis related protein caspase-3. Meanwhile, the combinational use of MG132 or bortezomib with CDDP led to synergistic effects on SCC-25 cells. However, knockdown of β-catenin could decrease MG132 or bortezomib induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that the regulation of E-cadherin/β-catenin complex could be a promising therapeutic target to overcome the multidrug resistance of oral cancer.

  15. Curcumin Suppresses Metastasis via Sp-1, FAK Inhibition, and E-Cadherin Upregulation in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Sureshbabul, Munisamy; Chen, Huei-Wen; Lin, Yu-Shuang; Lee, Jen-Yi; Hong, Qi-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Chien; Yu, Sung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious public health problem that results due to changes of diet and various environmental stress factors in the world. Curcumin is a traditional medicine used for treatment of a wide variety of tumors. However, antimetastasis mechanism of curcumin on CRC has not yet been completely investigated. Here, we explored the underlying molecular mechanisms of curcumin on metastasis of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin significantly inhibits cell migration, invasion, and colony formation in vitro and reduces tumor growth and liver metastasis in vivo. We found that curcumin suppresses Sp-1 transcriptional activity and Sp-1 regulated genes including ADEM10, calmodulin, EPHB2, HDAC4, and SEPP1 in CRC cells. Curcumin inhibits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and enhances the expressions of several extracellular matrix components which play a critical role in invasion and metastasis. Curcumin reduces CD24 expression in a dose-dependent manner in CRC cells. Moreover, E-cadherin expression is upregulated by curcumin and serves as an inhibitor of EMT. These results suggest that curcumin executes its antimetastasis function through downregulation of Sp-1, FAK, and CD24 and by promoting E-cadherin expression in CRC cells. PMID:23970932

  16. Clinicopathological significance of SIRT1 and p300/CBP expression in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer and the correlation with E-cadherin and MLH1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Hua; Huang, Qin; Fan, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Hong-Yan; Yang, Jun; Feng, An-Ning

    2013-10-01

    SIRT1 and p300/CBP, which are considered to be essential histone deacetylases and acetyltransferases, are also considered to be relative to tumorigenesis because they modulate the expression of several tumor suppressor genes. Therefore, this study investigated the expression of SIRT1 and p300/CBP in gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer and their correlation with E-cadherin and MLH1 in order to explore the clinicopathological significance of SIRT1 and p300/CBP expression and their possible effects involving E-cadherin and MLH1 expression. Tissue microarray technique and immunohistochemical stains were applied to evaluate the SIRT1, p300/CBP, E-cadherin, and MLH1 expression in 176 GEJ cancer tissues and 32 normal GEJ region tissues. The results showed that the over-expression of SIRT1 was associated with a higher number of metastasis lymph nodes, more advanced staging, and shorter mean survival time. SIRT1 and p300/CBP were negatively and positively correlated with the expression of E-cadherin and MLH1, respectively, in the cancer cases. These results indicated a possible effect of SIRT1 and p300/CBP involved in regulating the expression of E-cadherin and MLH1, thus participating in the tumor progression of GEJ cancer.

  17. Regulatory Variants and Disease: The E-Cadherin −160C/A SNP as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gongcheng; Pan, Tiejun; Guo, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in noncoding sequences have largely been ignored in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Yet, amounting evidence suggests that many noncoding SNPs especially those that are in the vicinity of protein coding genes play important roles in shaping chromatin structure and regulate gene expression and, as such, are implicated in a wide variety of diseases. One of such regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) is the E-cadherin (CDH1) promoter −160C/A SNP (rs16260) which is known to affect E-cadherin promoter transcription by displacing transcription factor binding and has been extensively scrutinized for its association with several diseases especially malignancies. Findings from studying this SNP highlight important clinical relevance of rSNPs and justify their inclusion in future GWAS to identify novel disease causing SNPs. PMID:25276428

  18. A Pathway for the Control of Anoikis Sensitivity by E-Cadherin and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Park, Sun Hee; Cieply, Benjamin; Schupp, Jane; Killiam, Elizabeth; Zhang, Fan; Rimm, David L.; Frisch, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Detachment of epithelial cells from matrix or attachment to an inappropriate matrix engages an apoptotic response known as anoikis, which prevents metastasis. Cellular sensitivity to anoikis is compromised during the oncogenic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), through unknown mechanisms. We report here a pathway through which EMT confers anoikis resistance. NRAGE (neurotrophin receptor-interacting melanoma antigen) interacted with a component of the E-cadherin complex, ankyrin-G, maintaining NRAGE in the cytoplasm. Oncogenic EMT downregulated ankyrin-G, enhancing the nuclear localization of NRAGE. The oncogenic transcriptional repressor protein TBX2 interacted with NRAGE, repressing the tumor suppressor gene p14ARF. P14ARF sensitized cells to anoikis; conversely, the TBX2/NRAGE complex protected cells against anoikis by downregulating this gene. This represents a novel pathway for the regulation of anoikis by EMT and E-cadherin. PMID:21746881

  19. Defining the E-cadherin repressor interactome in epithelial-mesenchymal transition: the PMC42 model as a case study.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Kokkinos, Maria I; Blick, Tony; Ackland, M Leigh; Thompson, Erik W; Newgreen, Donald F

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a feature of migratory cellular processes in all stages of life, including embryonic development and wound healing. Importantly, EMT features cluster with disease states such as chronic fibrosis and cancer. The dissolution of the E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction (AJ) is a key preliminary step in EMT and may occur early or late in the growing epithelial tumour. This is a first step for tumour cells towards stromal invasion, intravasation, extravasation and distant metastasis. The AJ may be inactivated in EMT by directed E-cadherin cleavage; however, it is increasingly evident that the majority of AJ changes are transcriptional and mediated by an expanding group of transcription factors acting directly or indirectly to repress E-cadherin expression. A review of the current literature has revealed that these factors may regulate each other in a hierarchical pattern where Snail1 (formerly Snail) and Snail2 (formerly Slug) are initially induced, leading to the activation of Zeb family members, TCF3, TCF4, Twist, Goosecoid and FOXC2. Within this general pathway, many inter-regulatory relationships have been defined which may be important in maintaining the EMT phenotype. This may be important given the short half-life of Snail1 protein. We have investigated these inter-regulatory relationships in the mesenchymal breast carcinoma cell line PMC42 (also known as PMC42ET) and its epithelial derivative, PMC42LA. This review also discusses several newly described regulators of E-cadherin repressors including oestrogen receptor-α and new discoveries in hypoxia- and growth factor-induced EMT. Finally, we evaluated how these findings may influence approaches to current cancer treatment.

  20. Expression of E-cadherin and vimentin in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingping; Tao, Detao; Xu, Qing; Gao, Zhenlin; Tang, Daofang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the levels of E-cadherin, vimentin expression in tumor tissues from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and the relationship between the expression of E-cadherin, vimentin and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, in order to explore its values for predicting the invasion and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma, short survival of patients in many types of cancer. E-cadherin and vimentin expression of 10 benign and 42 OSCC tumor tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. E-cadherin is positively expressed in normal oral mucosa epithelium, but vimentin expression is not found in normal oral mucosa epithelia; the E-cadherin and vimentin were expressed in 26 of 42 (61.9%) and 16 of 42 (38.1%), respectively. No statistically difference was found for E-cadherin and vimentin expression in patients with different age, gender and tumor location, E-cadherin and vimentin expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and tissue location (P < 0.05); E-cadherin expression was also significantly associated with tumor stage (P < 0.05); there are significantly difference between infiltrative margin and central area in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma for E-cadherin and vimentin positive expression (P < 0.05). E-cadherin and vimentin positive expression was associated with tumor metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our study preliminarily confirmed that EMT phenomenon is existed during the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Co-evaluation of E-cadherin and vimentin might be a valuable tool for predicting OSCC patient outcome. PMID:26045832

  1. Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling via its FadA adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendy; Hao, Yujun; Cai, Guifang; Han, Yiping W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), but causality and underlying mechanisms remain to be established. We demonstrate that Fn adheres to, invades and induces oncogenic and inflammatory responses to stimulate growth of CRC cells through its unique FadA adhesin. FadA binds to E-cadherin, activates β-catenin signaling, and differentially regulates the inflammatory and oncogenic responses. The FadA-binding site on E-cadherin is mapped to an 11 amino acid region. A synthetic peptide derived from this region of E-cadherin abolishes FadA-induced CRC cell growth, and oncogenic and inflammatory responses. FadA levels in the colon tissue from patients with adenomas and adenocarcinomas is >10–100 times higher compared to normal individuals. The increased FadA expression in CRC correlates with increased expression of oncogenic and inflammatory genes. This study unveils a mechanism by which Fn can drive CRC and identifies FadA as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:23954158

  2. Three mechanisms control E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens.

    PubMed

    Woichansky, Innokenty; Beretta, Carlo Antonio; Berns, Nicola; Riechmann, Veit

    2016-01-01

    E-cadherin localization to the zonula adherens is fundamental for epithelial differentiation but the mechanisms controlling localization are unclear. Using the Drosophila follicular epithelium we genetically dissect E-cadherin transport in an in vivo model. We distinguish three mechanisms mediating E-cadherin accumulation at the zonula adherens. Two membrane trafficking pathways deliver newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. One is Rab11 dependent and targets E-cadherin directly to the zonula adherens, while the other transports E-cadherin to the lateral membrane. Lateral E-cadherin reaches the zonula adherens by endocytosis and targeted recycling. We show that this pathway is dependent on RabX1, which provides a functional link between early and recycling endosomes. Moreover, we show that lateral E-cadherin is transported to the zonula adherens by an apically directed flow within the plasma membrane. Differential activation of these pathways could facilitate cell shape changes during morphogenesis, while their misregulation compromises cell adhesion and tissue architecture in differentiated epithelia. PMID:26960923

  3. ADAM12-directed ectodomain shedding of E-cadherin potentiates trophoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, M; Hogg, K; Perdu, S; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2015-12-01

    Trophoblasts, placental cells of epithelial lineage, undergo extensive differentiation to form the cellular components of the placenta. Trophoblast progenitor cell differentiation into the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast is a key developmental process required for placental function, where defects in syncytiotrophoblast formation and turnover associate with placental pathologies and link to poor pregnancy outcomes. The cellular and molecular processes governing syncytiotrophoblast formation are poorly understood, but require the activation of pathways that direct cell fusion. The protease, A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12), controls cell fusion in myoblasts and is highly expressed in the placenta localizing to multiple trophoblast populations. However, the importance of ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion is unknown. Here, we describe a function for ADAM12 in regulating trophoblast fusion. Using two distinct trophoblast models of cell fusion, we show that ADAM12 is dynamically upregulated and is under the transcriptional control of protein kinase A. siRNA-directed loss of ADAM12 impedes spontaneous fusion of primary cytotrophoblasts, whereas overexpression of the secreted variant, ADAM12S, potentiates cell fusion in the Bewo trophoblast cell line. Mechanistically, both ectopic and endogenous levels of ADAM12 were shown to control trophoblast fusion through E-cadherin ectodomain shedding and remodeling of intercellular boundaries. This study describes a novel role for ADAM12 in placental development, specifically highlighting its importance in controlling the differentiation of villous cytotrophoblasts into multinucleated cellular structures. Moreover, this work identifies E-cadherin as a novel ADAM12 substrate, and highlights the significance that cell adhesion molecule ectodomain shedding has in normal development.

  4. Surface functionalization of inorganic nano-crystals with fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera synergistically accelerates trans-gene delivery into embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kutsuzawa, K; Chowdhury, E H; Nagaoka, M; Maruyama, K; Akiyama, Y; Akaike, T

    2006-11-24

    Stem cells holding great promises in regenerative medicine have the potential to be differentiated to a specific cell type through genetic manipulation. However, conventional ways of gene transfer to such progenitor cells suffer from a number of disadvantages particularly involving safety and efficacy issues. Here, we report on the development of a bio-functionalized inorganic nano-carrier of DNA by embedding fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera on the carrier, leading to its high affinity interactions with embryonic stem cell surface and accelerated trans-gene delivery for subsequent expression. While only apatite nano-particles were very inefficient in transfecting embryonic stem cells, fibronectin-anchored particles and to a more significant extent, fibronectin and E-cadherin-Fc-associated particles dramatically enhanced trans-gene delivery with a value notably higher than that of commercially available lipofection system. The involvement of both cell surface integrin and E-cadherin in mediating intracellular localization of the hybrid carrier was verified by blocking integrin binding site with excess free fibronectin and up-regulating both integrin and E-cadherin through PKC activation. Thus, the new establishment of a bio-functional hybrid gene-carrier would promote and facilitate development of stem cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine.

  5. Surface functionalization of inorganic nano-crystals with fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera synergistically accelerates trans-gene delivery into embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuzawa, K.; Chowdhury, E.H.; Nagaoka, M.; Maruyama, K.; Akiyama, Y.; Akaike, T. . E-mail: takaike@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    Stem cells holding great promises in regenerative medicine have the potential to be differentiated to a specific cell type through genetic manipulation. However, conventional ways of gene transfer to such progenitor cells suffer from a number of disadvantages particularly involving safety and efficacy issues. Here, we report on the development of a bio-functionalized inorganic nano-carrier of DNA by embedding fibronectin and E-cadherin chimera on the carrier, leading to its high affinity interactions with embryonic stem cell surface and accelerated trans-gene delivery for subsequent expression. While only apatite nano-particles were very inefficient in transfecting embryonic stem cells, fibronectin-anchored particles and to a more significant extent, fibronectin and E-cadherin-Fc-associated particles dramatically enhanced trans-gene delivery with a value notably higher than that of commercially available lipofection system. The involvement of both cell surface integrin and E-cadherin in mediating intracellular localization of the hybrid carrier was verified by blocking integrin binding site with excess free fibronectin and up-regulating both integrin and E-cadherin through PKC activation. Thus, the new establishment of a bio-functional hybrid gene-carrier would promote and facilitate development of stem cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine.

  6. The lysyl oxidases LOX and LOXL2 are necessary and sufficient to repress E-cadherin in hypoxia: insights into cellular transformation processes mediated by HIF-1.

    PubMed

    Schietke, Ruth; Warnecke, Christina; Wacker, Ingrid; Schödel, Johannes; Mole, David R; Campean, Valentina; Amann, Kerstin; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Behrens, Jürgen; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Wiesener, Michael S

    2010-02-26

    Hypoxia has been shown to promote tumor metastasis and lead to therapy resistance. Recent work has demonstrated that hypoxia represses E-cadherin expression, a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is believed to amplify tumor aggressiveness. The molecular mechanism of E-cadherin repression is unknown, yet lysyl oxidases have been implicated to be involved. Gene expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX) and the related LOX-like 2 (LOXL2) is strongly induced by hypoxia. In addition to the previously demonstrated LOX, we characterize LOXL2 as a direct transcriptional target of HIF-1. We demonstrate that activation of lysyl oxidases is required and sufficient for hypoxic repression of E-cadherin, which mediates cellular transformation and takes effect in cellular invasion assays. Our data support a molecular pathway from hypoxia to cellular transformation. It includes up-regulation of HIF and subsequent transcriptional induction of LOX and LOXL2, which repress E-cadherin and induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Lysyl oxidases could be an attractive molecular target for cancers of epithelial origin, in particular because they are partly extracellular.

  7. Hypermethylation Status of E-Cadherin Gene in Gastric Cancer Patients in a High Incidence Area.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon; Alam, Khursheed; Afroze, Dil; Yousuf, Adfar; Banday, Manzoor; Kawoosa, Fizalah

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most prevalant cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. As in other cancers gastric carcinogenesis is multifactorial involving environmental, genetic and epigenetic components. Epigenetic silencing due to hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes is one of the key events in gastric carcinogenesis. This study was aimed to analyse the hypermethylation status of the E-Cadherin (CDH1) gene promoter in GCs in the ethnic Kashmiri population. In this study a total of 80 GC patients were recruited. Hypermethylation in tumour tissue was detected by methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR). Hypermethylation of CDH1 promoter was observed in 52 (65%) of gastric carcinoma cases which was significantly much higher than adjacent normal tissue [p≤0.0001]. Further the frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation was significantly different with intestinal and diffuse types of gastric cancer [55.7% vs 82.1%; <0.05]. Moreover females and cases with lymph node invasion had higher frequencies of CDH1 hypermethylation [P≤0.05]. Thus the current data indicate a vital role of epigenetic alteration of CDH1 in the causation and development of gastric cancer, particularly of diffuse type, in our population.

  8. The E-cadherin complex contains the src substrate p120.

    PubMed

    Aghib, D F; McCrea, P D

    1995-05-01

    Using normal MDCK cells, and MDCK cells stably transfected with a temperature-sensitive viral src allele (pp60 ts-v-src), we have examined the composition and tyrosine phosphorylation of the E-cadherin complex. E-cadherin is a transmembrane calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule that is complexed with cytoplasmic proteins including alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), and actin. We have identified two heterodimeric complexes which demonstrate that alpha-catenin interacts directly with beta-catenin, or with plakoglobin, in the absence of E-cadherin. beta-Catenin has previously been shown to bind directly to E-cadherin. We propose that E-cadherin associates with alpha-catenin, and thereby the actin cytoskeleton, via either beta-catenin or plakoglobin. We have further identified three new but related protein components of the E-cadherin complex, which are each cross-reactive by Western blot analysis to antibodies directed against p120, a phosphotyrosine substrate of src, and a phosphotyrosine, phosphoserine, and phosphothreonine substrate of growth factor-stimulated signaling pathways. Greater quantities of the p120-related proteins were found present in the E-cadherin immunoprecipitates of ts-src MDCK cells compared to normal MDCK cells, while two of the p120 cross-reactive species were significantly tyrosine phosphorylated in both normal and ts-src MDCK cells. The association of p120-related species with the E-cadherin complex adds them to our consideration of possible modulators of cadherin function. Likewise, the newly identified alpha-catenin-beta-catenin and alpha-catenin-plakoglobin dimers may have interesting biological properties, conceivably including the titration of catenins between cadherin and APC complexes.

  9. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo.

  10. The Metalloprotease Meprinβ Processes E-Cadherin and Weakens Intercellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Huguenin, Maya; Müller, Eliane J.; Trachsel-Rösmann, Sandra; Oneda, Beatrice; Ambort, Daniel; Sterchi, Erwin E.; Lottaz, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background Meprin (EC 3.4.24.18), an astacin-like metalloprotease, is expressed in the epithelium of the intestine and kidney tubules and has been related to cancer, but the mechanistic links are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We used MDCK and Caco-2 cells stably transfected with meprinα and or meprinβ to establish models of renal and intestinal epithelial cells expressing this protease at physiological levels. In both models E-cadherin was cleaved, producing a cell-associated 97-kDa E-cadherin fragment, which was enhanced upon activation of the meprin zymogen and reduced in the presence of a meprin inhibitor. The cleavage site was localized in the extracellular domain adjacent to the plasma membrane. In vitro assays with purified components showed that the 97-kDa fragment was specifically generated by meprinβ, but not by ADAM-10 or MMP-7. Concomitantly with E-cadherin cleavage and degradation of the E-cadherin cytoplasmic tail, the plaque proteins β-catenin and plakoglobin were processed by an intracellular protease, whereas α-catenin, which does not bind directly to E-cadherin, remained intact. Using confocal microscopy, we observed a partial colocalization of meprinβ and E-cadherin at lateral membranes of incompletely polarized cells at preconfluent or early confluent stages. Meprinβ-expressing cells displayed a reduced strength of cell-cell contacts and a significantly lower tendency to form multicellular aggregates. Conclusions/Significance By identifying E-cadherin as a substrate for meprinβ in a cellular context, this study reveals a novel biological role of this protease in epithelial cells. Our results suggest a crucial role for meprinβ in the control of adhesiveness via cleavage of E-cadherin with potential implications in a wide range of biological processes including epithelial barrier function and cancer progression. PMID:18478055

  11. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo

  12. Sustained α-catenin Activation at E-cadherin Junctions in the Absence of Mechanical Force.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Hartman, Kevin L; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    Mechanotransduction at E-cadherin junctions has been postulated to be mediated in part by a force-dependent conformational activation of α-catenin. Activation of α-catenin allows it to interact with vinculin in addition to F-actin, resulting in a strengthening of junctions. Here, using E-cadherin adhesions reconstituted on synthetic, nanopatterned membranes, we show that activation of α-catenin is dependent on E-cadherin clustering, and is sustained in the absence of mechanical force or association with F-actin or vinculin. Adhesions were formed by filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin clusters, which could be distinguished as either peripheral or central assemblies depending on their relative location at the cell-bilayer adhesion. Whereas F-actin, vinculin, and phosphorylated myosin light chain associated only with the peripheral assemblies, activated α-catenin was present in both peripheral and central assemblies, and persisted in the central assemblies in the absence of actomyosin tension. Impeding filopodia-mediated nucleation and micron-scale assembly of E-cadherin adhesion complexes by confining the movement of bilayer-bound E-cadherin on nanopatterned substrates reduced the levels of activated α-catenin. Taken together, these results indicate that although the initial activation of α-catenin requires micron-scale clustering that may allow the development of mechanical forces, sustained force is not required for maintaining α-catenin in the active state. PMID:27602732

  13. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Diego A.; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  14. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Diego A; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-07-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  15. Drosophila E-cadherin is required for the maintenance of ring canals anchoring to mechanically withstand tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    Loyer, Nicolas; Kolotuev, Irina; Pinot, Mathieu; Le Borgne, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular bridges called “ring canals” (RCs) resulting from incomplete cytokinesis play an essential role in intercellular communication in somatic and germinal tissues. During Drosophila oogenesis, RCs connect the maturing oocyte to nurse cells supporting its growth. Despite numerous genetic screens aimed at identifying genes involved in RC biogenesis and maturation, how RCs anchor to the plasma membrane (PM) throughout development remains unexplained. In this study, we report that the clathrin adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex, although dispensable for the biogenesis of RCs, is required for the maintenance of the anchorage of RCs to the PM to withstand the increased membrane tension associated with the exponential tissue growth at the onset of vitellogenesis. Here we unravel the mechanisms by which AP-1 enables the maintenance of RCs’ anchoring to the PM during size expansion. We show that AP-1 regulates the localization of the intercellular adhesion molecule E-cadherin and that loss of AP-1 causes the disappearance of the E-cadherin–containing adhesive clusters surrounding the RCs. E-cadherin itself is shown to be required for the maintenance of the RCs’ anchorage, a function previously unrecognized because of functional compensation by N-cadherin. Scanning block-face EM combined with transmission EM analyses reveals the presence of interdigitated, actin- and Moesin-positive, microvilli-like structures wrapping the RCs. Thus, by modulating E-cadherin trafficking, we show that the sustained E-cadherin–dependent adhesion organizes the microvilli meshwork and ensures the proper attachment of RCs to the PM, thereby counteracting the increasing membrane tension induced by exponential tissue growth. PMID:26424451

  16. Dragon (repulsive guidance molecule RGMb) inhibits E-cadherin expression and induces apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Li, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yueshui; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wan, Chao; Yang, Baoxue; Lan, Hui-Yao; Lin, Herbert Y; Xia, Yin

    2013-11-01

    Dragon is one of the three members of the repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family, i.e. RGMa, RGMb (Dragon), and RGMc (hemojuvelin). We previously identified the RGM members as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) co-receptors that enhance BMP signaling. Our previous studies found that Dragon is highly expressed in the tubular epithelial cells of mouse kidneys. However, the roles of Dragon in renal epithelial cells are yet to be defined. We now show that overexpression of Dragon increased cell death induced by hypoxia in association with increased cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and cleaved caspase-3 levels in mouse inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD3) cells. Dragon also inhibited E-cadherin expression but did not affect epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-β in IMCD3 cells. Previous studies suggest that the three RGM members can function as ligands for the receptor neogenin. Interestingly, our present study demonstrates that the Dragon actions on apoptosis and E-cadherin expression in IMCD3 cells were mediated by the neogenin receptor but not through the BMP pathway. Dragon expression in the kidney was up-regulated by unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice. Compared with wild-type mice, heterozygous Dragon knock-out mice exhibited 45-66% reduction in Dragon mRNA expression, decreased epithelial apoptosis, and increased tubular E-cadherin expression and had attenuated tubular injury after unilateral ureteral obstruction. Our results suggest that Dragon may impair tubular epithelial integrity and induce epithelial apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Dimethoxy Curcumin Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing Survivin and Inhibits Invasion by Enhancing E-Cadherin in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Dai, Fang; Chen, Zhehang; Wang, Saisai; Cheng, Xiaobin; Sheng, Qinsong; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a kind of lipophilic analog of curcumin with great improvement in chemical and metabolic stability. DMC has been studied in breast and renal cancer, but no research in colon cancer has been found yet. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two colon cancer cells (HT-29 and SW480) and one normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM460) were used in this study. We studied the effect of DMC on the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Transwell migration assay was used to estimate the inhibition of DMC on invasion. Moreover, the expressions of PARP, caspase-3, survivin and E-cadherin were detected to uncover the related signaling pathways by western blotting assay both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS DMC significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner; IC50 for DMC was calculated to be 43.4, 28.2 and 454.8µM on HT-29, SW480 and NCM460. DMC significantly increased the apoptosis in both HT-29 (p=0.0051) and SW480 (p=0.0013) cells in vitro, and significantly suppressed the growth of both cell lines in vivo. Moreover, DMC reduced the number of migrated cells in both HT-29 (p=0.007) and SW480 (p=0.004) cells. By western blotting analysis, the cleavage of pro-caspases-3 and PARP were clearly induced by DMC to their active form, while the expression of survivin was reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in both cells in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS DMC may exert an effective anti-tumor effect in colon cancer cells by down-regulating survivin and upregulating E-cadherin. PMID:27614381

  18. Dimethoxy Curcumin Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing Survivin and Inhibits Invasion by Enhancing E-Cadherin in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Dai, Fang; Chen, Zhehang; Wang, Saisai; Cheng, Xiaobin; Sheng, Qinsong; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a kind of lipophilic analog of curcumin with great improvement in chemical and metabolic stability. DMC has been studied in breast and renal cancer, but no research in colon cancer has been found yet. Material/Methods Two colon cancer cells (HT-29 and SW480) and one normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM460) were used in this study. We studied the effect of DMC on the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Transwell migration assay was used to estimate the inhibition of DMC on invasion. Moreover, the expressions of PARP, caspase-3, survivin and E-cadherin were detected to uncover the related signaling pathways by western blotting assay both in vitro and in vivo. Results DMC significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner; IC50 for DMC was calculated to be 43.4, 28.2 and 454.8μM on HT-29, SW480 and NCM460. DMC significantly increased the apoptosis in both HT-29 (p=0.0051) and SW480 (p=0.0013) cells in vitro, and significantly suppressed the growth of both cell lines in vivo. Moreover, DMC reduced the number of migrated cells in both HT-29 (p=0.007) and SW480 (p=0.004) cells. By western blotting analysis, the cleavage of pro-caspases-3 and PARP were clearly induced by DMC to their active form, while the expression of survivin was reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in both cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions DMC may exert an effective anti-tumor effect in colon cancer cells by down-regulating survivin and upregulating E-cadherin. PMID:27614381

  19. An E-cadherin-mediated hitchhiking mechanism for C. elegans germ cell internalization during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Daisuke; Nance, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Gastrulation movements place endodermal precursors, mesodermal precursors and primordial germ cells (PGCs) into the interior of the embryo. Somatic cell gastrulation movements are regulated by transcription factors that also control cell fate, coupling cell identity and position. By contrast, PGCs in many species are transcriptionally quiescent, suggesting that they might use alternative gastrulation strategies. Here, we show that C. elegans PGCs internalize by attaching to internal endodermal cells, which undergo morphogenetic movements that pull the PGCs into the embryo. We show that PGCs enrich HMR-1/E-cadherin at their surfaces to stick to endoderm. HMR-1 expression in PGCs is necessary and sufficient to ensure internalization, suggesting that HMR-1 can promote PGC-endoderm adhesion through a mechanism other than homotypic trans interactions between the two cell groups. Finally, we demonstrate that the hmr-1 3′ untranslated region promotes increased HMR-1 translation in PGCs. Our findings reveal that quiescent PGCs employ a post-transcriptionally regulated hitchhiking mechanism to internalize during gastrulation, and demonstrate a morphogenetic role for the conserved association of PGCs with the endoderm. PMID:22675206

  20. Clinicopathologic Correlations of E-cadherin and Prrx-1 Expression Loss in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Kijong; Kim, Hyunsung; Chung, Yumin; Ahn, Hyein; Sim, Jongmin; Wi, Young Chan; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Song, Young-Soo; Paik, Seung Sam; Oh, Young-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing predictive markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is important, because many patients experience recurrence and metastasis. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process that plays an important role during embryogenesis and also during cancer metastasis. Paired-related homeobox protein 1 (Prrx-1) is an EMT inducer that has recently been introduced, and its prognostic significance in HCC is largely unknown. Methods Tissue microarray was constructed using surgically resected primary HCCs from 244 cases. Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and Prrx-1 was performed. The correlation between E-cadherin loss and Prrx-1 expression, as well as other clinicopathologic factors, was evaluated. Results E-cadherin expression was decreased in 96 cases (39.4%). Loss of E-cadherin correlated with a higher recurrence rate (p < .001) but was not correlated with patient’s survival. Thirty-two cases (13.3%) showed at least focal nuclear Prrx-1 immunoreactivity while all non-neoplastic livers (n = 22) were negative. Prrx-1 expression was not associated with E-cadherin loss, survival or recurrence rates, pathologic factors, or the Ki-67 labeling index. Twenty tumors that were positive for E-cadherin and Prrx-1 had significantly higher nuclear grades than the rest of the cohort (p = .037). In Cox proportional hazard models, E-cadherin loss and large vessel invasion were independent prognostic factors for shorter disease-free survival. Cirrhosis and high Ki-67 index (> 40%) were independent prognostic factors for shorter overall survival. Conclusions Prrx-1 was expressed in small portions of HCCs but not in normal livers. Additional studies with a large number of Prrx-1-positive cases are required to confirm the results of this study. PMID:27580127

  1. Activation of EGFR promotes squamous carcinoma SCC10A cell migration and invasion via inducing EMT-like phenotype change and MMP-9-mediated degradation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian-Hong; Zhu, Wei; Li, Mao-Yu; Li, Xin-Hui; Yi, Hong; Zeng, Gu-Qing; Wan, Xun-Xun; He, Qiu-Yan; Li, Jian-Huang; Qu, Jia-Quan; Chen, Yu; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang

    2011-09-01

    EGFR is a potent stimulator of invasion and metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). However, the mechanism by which EGFR may stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis still need to be elucidated. In this study, we showed that activation of EGFR by EGF in HNSCC cell line SCC10A enhanced cell migration and invasion, and induced loss of epitheloid phenotype in parallel with downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of N-cadherin and vimentin, indicating that EGFR promoted SCC10A cell migration and invasion possibly by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype change. Interestingly, activation of EGFR by EGF induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and soluble E-cadherin (sE-cad), and knockdown of MMP-9 by siRNA inhibited sE-cad production induced by EGF in SCC10A. Moreover, both MMP-9 knockdown and E-cadherin overexpression inhibited cell migration and invasion induced by EGF in SCC10A. The results indicate that EGFR activation promoted cell migration and invasion through inducing MMP-9-mediated degradation of E-cadherin into sE-cad. Pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR, MEK, and PI3K kinase activity in SCC10A reduced phosphorylated levels of ERK-1/2 and AKT, production of MMP-9 and sE-cad, cell migration and invasion, and expressional changes of EMT markers (E-cadherin and N-cadherin) induced by EGF, indicating that EGFR activation promotes cell migration and invasion via ERK-1/2 and PI3K-regulated MMP-9/E-cadherin signaling pathways. Taken together, the data suggest that EGFR activation promotes HNSCC SCC10A cell migration and invasion by inducing EMT-like phenotype change and MMP-9-mediated degradation of E-cadherin into sE-cad related to activation of ERK-1/2 and PI3K signaling pathways.

  2. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells.

  3. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  4. Application of APTES-Anti-E-cadherin film for early cancer monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ben Ismail, Manel; Carreiras, Franck; Agniel, Rémy; Mili, Donia; Sboui, Dejla; Zanina, Nahla; Othmane, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Cancer staging is a way to classify cancer according to the extent of the disease in the body. The stage is usually determined by several factors such as the location of the primary tumor, the tumor size, the degree of spread in the surrounding tissues, etc. The study of E-cadherin (EC) expression on cancerous cells of patients has revealed variations in the molecular expression patterns of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. The detection of these cells requires a long procedure involving conventional techniques, thus, the requirement for development of new rapid devices that permit direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates the sensing field progress. Here, we explore if E-cadherin could be used as a biomarker to bind and detect epithelial cancer cells. Hence, the sensitive and specific detection of E-cadherin expressed on epithelial cells is approached by immobilizing anti-E-cadherin antibody (AEC) onto aminosilanized indium-tin oxide (ITO) surface. The immunosensing surfaces have been characterized by electrochemical measurements, wettability and confocal microscopy and their performance has been assessed in the presence of cancer cell lines. Under optimal conditions, the resulting immunosensor displayed a selective detection of E-cadherin expressing cells, which could be detected either by fluorescence or electrochemical techniques. The developed immunosensing surface could provide a simple tool that can be applied to cancer staging. PMID:27423102

  5. Protein zero is necessary for E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Menichella, D M; Arroyo, E J; Awatramani, R; Xu, T; Baron, P; Vallat, J M; Balsamo, J; Lilien, J; Scarlato, G; Kamholz, J; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2001-12-01

    Protein Zero (P0), the major structural protein in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin, acts as a homotypic adhesion molecule and is thought to mediate compaction of adjacent wraps of myelin membrane. E-Cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule, is also expressed in myelinating Schwann cells in the PNS and is involved in forming adherens junctions between adjacent loops of membrane at the paranode. To determine the relationship, if any, between P0-mediated and cadherin-mediated adhesion during myelination, we investigated the expression of E-cadherin and its binding partner, beta-catenin, in sciatic nerve of mice lacking P0 (P0(-/-)). We find that in P0(-/-) peripheral myelin neither E-cadherin nor beta-catenin are localized to paranodes, but are instead found in small puncta throughout the Schwann cell. In addition, only occasional, often rudimentary, adherens junctions are formed. Analysis of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression during nerve development demonstrates that E-cadherin and beta-catenin are localized to the paranodal region after the onset of myelin compaction. Interestingly, axoglial junction formation is normal in P0(-/-) nerve. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P0 is necessary for the formation of adherens junctions but not axoglial junctions in myelinating Schwann cells. PMID:11749037

  6. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  7. SLIT2 attenuation during lung cancer progression deregulates beta-catenin and E-cadherin and associates with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ruo-Chia; Lee, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Han-Shui; Chen, Ben-Han; Tsai, Wan-Ching; Tzao, Ching; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2010-01-15

    Chromosome 4p15.3 is frequently deleted in late-stage lung cancer. We investigated the significance of the SLIT2 gene located in this region to lung cancer progression. SLIT2 encodes an extracellular glycoprotein that can suppress breast cancer by regulating beta-catenin. In this study, we examined alterations in the structure or expression of SLIT2, its receptor ROBO1, and beta-catenin, along with the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta)/beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (betaTrCP) pathway in lung cancer cell lines and patients. Low SLIT2 expression correlated with an upward trend of pathological stage and poorer survival in lung cancer patients. Importantly, SLIT2, betaTrCP, and beta-catenin expression levels predicted postoperative recurrence of lung cancer in patients. Stimulating SLIT2 expression by various methods increased the level of E-cadherin caused by attenuation of its transcriptional repressor SNAI1. Conversely, knocking down SLIT2 expression increased cell migration and reduced cell adhesion through coordinated deregulation of beta-catenin and E-cadherin/SNAI1 in the AKT/GSK3beta/betaTrCP pathway. Our findings indicate that SLIT2 suppresses lung cancer progression, defining it as a novel "theranostic" factor with potential as a therapeutic target and prognostic predictor in lung cancer. Cancer Res; 70(2); 543-51.

  8. Mir-373 affects human lung cancer cells' growth and its E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weihua; He, Xiaoyan; Kong, Jing; Ye, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study was to elucidate whether the expression of E-cadherin can be affected by the recombinant has-mir-373 eukaryotic expression plasmid vector through tests in vitro, and to analyze the relationship between the expression of E-cadherin and tumor growth. According to the has-mir-373 sequence in miRBase database, two template DNA sequences were designed. The has-mir-373 sequence and a control sequence were synthesized and cloned into pGenesil-1 eukaryotic expression plasmid vector. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into human lung cancer A549 cells by liposome-mediated method. The mir-373 expression in A549 cells was detected by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium) was used to analyze the growth of cancer cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the levels of E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, respectively. The expression of E-cadherin in cells was determined by immunocytochemistry. The mobility capability of transfected cells were evaluated by using wound healing assay in vitro. The fluorescent light was observed under fluorescent microscope. RT-PCR indicated that the mRNA of E-cadherin increased, and the Western blotting results also displayed that mir-373 promoted the expression of the E-cadherin protein. Compared with the control groups, MTT method and wound healing assay demonstrated that both the growth rate and migration of A549 cells transfected with the recombinant has-mir-373 eukaryotic expression plasmid was also decreased significantly (p < 0.001). The differences between the other two control groups were not significant (p > 0.05). The immunocytochemistry demonstrated a significant increase of E-cadherin protein levels in the cells transfected with mir-373, but not in the cells of the control group. Mir-373 could increase the expression levels of the E-cadherin and decrease the migration ability of human lung cancer A549 cells in

  9. Intestinal trefoil factor controls the expression of the adenomatous polyposis coli-catenin and the E-cadherin-catenin complexes in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Noda, M; Rowan, A; Dixon, C; Chinery, R; Jawhari, A; Hattori, T; Wright, N A; Bodmer, W F; Pignatelli, M

    1998-03-17

    Intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the trefoil family of peptides, small molecules constitutively expressed in epithelial tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. TFF3 has been shown to promote migration of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and to enhance mucosal healing and epithelial restitution in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effect of recombinant TFF3 (rTFF3) stimulation on the expression and cellular localization of the epithelial (E)-cadherin-catenin complex, a prime mediator of Ca2+ dependent cell-cell adhesion, and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-catenin complex in HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Stimulation by rTFF3 (10(-9) M and 10(-8) M) for 20-24 hr led to cell detachment and to a reduction in intercellular adhesion in HT29 and HCT116 cells. In both cell lines, E-cadherin expression was down-regulated. The expression of APC, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin also was decreased in HT29 cells, with a translocation of APC into the nucleus. No change in either cell adhesion or in the expression of E-cadherin, the catenins, and APC was detected in SW480 cells. In addition, TFF3 induced DNA fragmentation and morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in HT29. Tyrphostin, a competitive inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the effects of TFF3. Our results indicate that by perturbing the complexes between E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and associated proteins, TFF3 may modulate epithelial cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

  10. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Miranda V; Lee, Donghoon M; Harris, Tony J C; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2015-08-31

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair.

  11. UV-induction of keratinocyte endothelin-1 downregulates E-cadherin in melanocytes and melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sumayah; Schneider, Robert J

    2002-08-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a peptide that is secreted by keratinocytes in the skin in response to ultraviolet irradiation, is a ligand for the endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptor. Blockade of this receptor inhibits melanoma cell growth and induces cell death in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, ET(B) is a melanoma progression marker. These findings suggest that the ET-1/ET(B) receptor pathway contributes to melanoma development or progression. Here, we demonstrate that activation of the ET-1/ET(B) pathway downregulates E-cadherin and associated catenin proteins in human melanocytes and melanoma cells. E-cadherin is an established suppressor of melanoma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of E-cadherin by ET-1/ET(B) involves the downstream activation of caspase-8 but not of distal, executioner caspases, and does not lead to apoptosis. ET-1 also induces a transient association between caspase-8 and E-cadherin:beta-catenin complexes. Hence, activation of the ET-1/ET(B) pathway promotes molecular events known to promote melanoma invasion.

  12. Polarized E-cadherin endocytosis directs actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Miranda V.; Lee, Donghoon M.; Harris, Tony J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic epithelia have a remarkable ability to rapidly repair wounds. A supracellular actomyosin cable around the wound coordinates cellular movements and promotes wound closure. Actomyosin cable formation is accompanied by junctional rearrangements at the wound margin. We used in vivo time-lapse quantitative microscopy to show that clathrin, dynamin, and the ADP-ribosylation factor 6, three components of the endocytic machinery, accumulate around wounds in Drosophila melanogaster embryos in a process that requires calcium signaling and actomyosin contractility. Blocking endocytosis with pharmacological or genetic approaches disrupted wound repair. The defect in wound closure was accompanied by impaired removal of E-cadherin from the wound edge and defective actomyosin cable assembly. E-cadherin overexpression also resulted in reduced actin accumulation around wounds and slower wound closure. Reducing E-cadherin levels in embryos in which endocytosis was blocked rescued actin localization to the wound margin. Our results demonstrate a central role for endocytosis in wound healing and indicate that polarized E-cadherin endocytosis is necessary for actomyosin remodeling during embryonic wound repair. PMID:26304727

  13. Suppression of E-cadherin Mediates Gallotannin Induced Apoptosis in Hep G2 Hepatocelluar Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Ko, Hyunsuk; Kim, Bogeun; Jung, Kwon; Lew, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Though gallotannin was known to have anti-oxidant and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of gallotannin still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, antitumor mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gallotannin significantly exerted cytotoxicity against Hep G2 and Chang hepatocellular carcinoma cells with the accumulation of the sub-G1 population and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferasedUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells as an apoptotic feature. Also, gallotannin attenuated the expression of pro-caspase9, pro-caspase3, Bcl2 and integrin β1 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) in Hep G2 and Chang cancer cells. Furthermore, gallotannin suppressed cell repair motility by wound healing assay and also inhibited cell adhesion in Hep G2 cells. Of note, gallotannin attenuated the expression of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) to form cell-cell adhesion from the early stage, and also beta-catenin at late phase in Hep G2 cells. Consistently, Immunofluorescence assay showed that E-cadherin or β-catenin expression was suppressed in a time dependent manner by gallotannin. Furthermore, silencing of E-cadherin by siRNA transfection method enhanced PAPR cleavage, caspase 3 activation and sub G1 population and attenuated the cell adhesion induced by gallotannin in Hep G2 cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the disruption of cell adhesion junction by suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin enhanced apoptosis in Hep G2 liver cancer cells. PMID:24795530

  14. E-cadherin expression is commonly downregulated by CpG island hypermethylation in esophageal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Si, H X; Tsao, S W; Lam, K Y; Srivastava, G; Liu, Y; Wong, Y C; Shen, Z Y; Cheung, A L

    2001-11-01

    E-cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule, is regarded as an invasion-suppressor molecule and a prognostic marker in many types of human cancers. Downregulation of E-cadherin is common in esophageal carcinoma and is associated with an increase in invasive and metastatic potential. To study the mechanisms responsible for inactivation of this gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we investigated the methylation status around the 5' promoter region of E-cadherin gene of six ESCC cell lines by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, and compared it with E-cadherin protein and mRNA expression. We also studied the methylation status of 20 ESCC clinical specimens. Methylation was noted in four of the six cell lines (one fully methylated and three partially methylated). The completely methylated cell line lacked E-cadherin protein expression and mRNA transcription. E-cadherin expression and transcription were reduced in a partially methylated cell line but preserved in the other partially methylated cell lines. Treatment of E-cadherin-negative carcinoma cells with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, induced re-expression of the gene. A high frequency of methylation (16/20, 80%) was also noted in the 20 ESCC clinical samples. Our results indicate that 5' CpG island methylation is common in esophageal carcinoma and may play an important role in downregulation of E-cadherin.

  15. Synthetic (glyco-)peptides of the homophilic recognition domain of E-cadherin lead to increased E-cadherin mRNA synthesis and are inductors of cell differentiation in primary lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zeckey, Christian; Dahm, Manfred; Wallrath, Anja; Herr, Monika; Walter Kunz, Horst; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Horn, Sigrid

    2010-07-15

    E-cadherin is one of the critical molecules involved in the metastatic process in many types of cancer. Once combined, E-cadherin exceeds the amount of membranous E-cadherin on the cellular surface by activation of intracellular signaling cascades. Studies on transformed keratinocytes of the HaCat cell line showed induction of differentiation by synthetical partial structures of the homophilic binding region of E-cadherin. The knowledge of effects in lung cancer cells is sparse. Therefore, the effects in primary lung cancer cell lines were investigated. Four primary lung cancer cell lines were incubated for 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24h with synthetic partial structures (peptide and glycopeptide). The control substance was sodium butyrate. mRNA was isolated, and relative quantification of E-cadherin was performed using the Real-Time PCR. During the stimulation period, morphologic pictures were taken, and immunohistochemical staining of membranous E-cadherin was performed. Life/dead assays were used to display cell vitality. The intracellular E-cadherin mRNA amount was increased after incubation with the synthetic partial structures. Life/dead assays showed improved survival and integrated cell/cell bindings after stimulation with the partial structures. Increased cell mortality was revealed after sodium butyrate incubation. An effect mediated via E-cadherin on the cellular surface is proposed. The two synthetic partial structures of the homophilic binding region of E-cadherin increased the intracellular E-cadherin mRNA amount, cell-cell bindings, and survival of the tumor cells. Extracellular binding by synthetic partial structures to the binding region may have a beneficial influence on tumor progression in the metastatic process. PMID:20403671

  16. Alternate RASSF1 Transcripts Control SRC Activity, E-Cadherin Contacts, and YAP-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, Nikola; Scrace, Simon; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Grawenda, Anna M.; Bradley, Leanne; Pankova, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Yee, Karen S.; Buffa, Francesca; Goding, Colin R.; Timpson, Paul; Sibson, Nicola; O’Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor progression to invasive carcinoma is associated with activation of SRC family kinase (SRC, YES, FYN) activity and loss of cellular cohesion. The hippo pathway-regulated cofactor YAP1 supports the tumorigenicity of RAS mutations but requires both inactivation of hippo signaling and YES-mediated phosphorylation of YAP1 for oncogenic activity. Exactly how SRC kinases are activated and hippo signaling is lost in sporadic human malignancies remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that hippo-mediated inhibition of YAP1 is lost upon promoter methylation of the RAS effector and hippo kinase scaffold RASSF1A. We find that RASSF1A promoter methylation reduces YAP phospho-S127, which derepresses YAP1, and actively supports YAP1 activation by switching RASSF1 transcription to the independently transcribed RASSF1C isoform that promotes Tyr kinase activity. Using affinity proteomics, proximity ligation, and real-time molecular visualization, we find that RASSF1C targets SRC/YES to epithelial cell-cell junctions and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and YAP1. RASSF1A restricts SRC activity, preventing motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo, with epigenetic inactivation correlating with increased inhibitory pY527-SRC in breast tumors. These data imply that distinct RASSF1 isoforms have opposing functions, which provide a biomarker for YAP1 activation and explain correlations of RASSF1 methylation with advanced invasive disease in humans. The ablation of epithelial integrity together with subsequent YAP1 nuclear localization allows transcriptional activation of β-catenin/TBX-YAP/TEAD target genes, including Myc, and an invasive phenotype. These findings define gene transcript switching as a tumor suppressor mechanism under epigenetic control. PMID:26549256

  17. Loss of heterozygosity at E-cadherin and other loci on chromosome 16 in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, H.; Chen, S.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.

    1994-09-01

    Our study of genome-wide screening and mapping of genetic aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed that the copy number of DNA sequences on chromosome 16q was reduced in a significant number of ovarian tumors. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on 16q has only been reported in ovarian tumors from the Japanese population; this arm has not been thoroughly studied in most LOH analyses of ovarian cancers. We have investigated LOH status at four chromosome 16q loci in 74 common epithelial ovarian tumors (benign and borderline 16, grade I 5, GII 6 and GIII 47). LOH frequencies of .27 (9/33), .19 (10/54), .23 (8/35) and .24 (10/42) were found at HP, D16S408, D16S421 and E-cadherin (E-cad) loci, respectively. Considering overall LOH on chromosome 16q, 26 out of 62 cases (41.9%) heterozygous for one or more loci showed LOH at a minimum of one locus. Our results are consistent with the observation made by CGH and also imply that most LOH in 16q is associated with physical deletion of at least a portion of 16q. E-cad is an intercellular adhesion molecule of epithelial tissues, and reduced E-cad expression is associated with invasiveness of several cancers (breast, bladder, lung, etc.). Thus E-cad may function as a tumor suppressor gene. In addition, the cell matrix adhesion regulator gene (CMAR), which is located distal to E-cad, may be a second candidate. This possibility is currently being investigated by additional LOH analysis. Southern analysis of DNA from tumors with LOH using a full-length E-cad cDNA probe detected only Pvull and MspI polymorphisms but no gross alterations in the remaining alleles. Further studies by SSCP, which explore the possible inactivating mutations in the remaining E-cad alleles, are in progress.

  18. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  19. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression.

  20. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression. PMID:26189796

  1. Level of expression of E-cadherin mRNA in colorectal cancer correlates with clinical outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Dorudi, S.; Hanby, A. M.; Poulsom, R.; Northover, J.; Hart, I. R.

    1995-01-01

    A series of colorectal carcinomas (n = 49) resected from patients with known clinical outcomes were analysed for E-cadherin expression using in situ hybridisation to measure mRNA. Patients surviving 5 years or longer (n = 31) exhibited significantly higher levels of E-cadherin mRNA than those surviving less than 5 years (n = 18, P = 0.003). These preliminary results from this small sample suggest that E-cadherin expression may be a useful prognostic marker in colorectal cancer patients. Images Figure 1 PMID:7880746

  2. The Characteristics and Prognostic Effect of E-Cadherin Expression in Colorectal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renjie; Ma, Xiaoji; Li, Yaqi; He, Yiping; Huang, Dan; Cai, Sanjun; Peng, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is rare. The aim of this study is to understand the clinicopathological features and identify the possible prognostic factors in colorectal SRCC. Methods Patients with SRCC who underwent primary lesion resection at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from September 2008 to July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient’s gender, age, tumor location, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, synchronous distant metastasis, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression were studied with prognosis, and the correlation between E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed. All clinicopathological and molecular factors were put into multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model for detecting independent prognostic factors. Results 59 patients accounting for 0.89% of total colorectal cancer patients met the criteria and were enrolled in the study. The median survival time is 28.9 months, and the 3-year survival rate is 62.7%. SRCC were seen more common in young male patients. Advanced stage was more common in SRCC, 58 (98.3%) patients had T3/T4 lesions, 52 (88.1%) patients had lymph node metastasis, and 14 (23.7%) patients had distant metastasis. Distant metastases were seen more common in peritoneal cavity. Distant metastasis (HR = 4.194, 95% CI: 1.297–13.567), lymphovascular invasion (HR = 2.888, 95% CI: 1.115–7.483), and E-cadherin expression (HR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.096–0.768) were independent predictors for survival. Conclusions SRCC is a rare subtype of colorectal cancer with poor prognosis. Distant metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and E-cadherin expression can predict prognosis of colorectal SRCCs independently. More precise therapy and more close surveillance are needed for these patients. PMID:27509205

  3. Loss of miR-200b promotes invasion via activating the Kindlin-2/integrin β1/AKT pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: An E-cadherin-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Wu, Chengsheng; Li, Shang; Jiao, Ji-Wei; Cao, Hui-Hui; Lai, Raymond; Xu, Li-Yan; Li, En-Min

    2015-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that loss of miR-200b enhances the invasiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. However, whether the miR-200-ZEB1/2-E-cadherin regulatory cascade, a master regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is involved in the regulation of ESCC invasion remains elusive. Here, we show that miR-200b represses ESCC cell invasion in vivo without altering the expression of E-cadherin and vimentin, two surrogate markers of EMT. However, an inverse correlation was observed between the expression levels of miR-200b and ZEB1/2 in both ESCC cell lines (n = 7, P < 0.05) and ESCC tumor samples (n = 88, P < 0.05). Methylation of E-cadherin gene was found to block the regulation of E-cadherin by the miR-200b-ZEB1/2 axis, indicating that an E-cadherin-independent mechanism can mediate the biological function of miR-200b in ESCC. We revealed that miR-200b suppresses the integrin β1-AKT pathway via targeting Kindlin-2 to mitigate ESCC cell invasiveness. In two independent cohorts of ESCC samples (n = 20 and n = 53, respectively), Kindlin-2 expression positively correlated with the activation status of both the integrin signaling pathway and the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway (both P < 0.01). These data highlight that suppression of the Kindlin-2-integrin β1-AKT regulatory axis is an alternative mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of miR-200b in ESCC.

  4. Quantification of topological features in cell meshes to explore E-cadherin dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Tânia; Figueiredo, Joana; Ribeiro, Ana Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Seruca, Raquel; Sanches, João Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, defective E-cadherin leads to cell detachment, migration and metastization. Further, alterations mediated by E-cadherin dysfunction affect cell topology and tissue organization. Herein, we propose a novel quantitative approach, based on microscopy images, to analyse abnormal cellular distribution patterns. We generated undirected graphs composed by sets of triangles which accurately reproduce cell positioning and structural organization within each image. Network analysis was developed by exploring triangle geometric features, namely area, edges length and formed angles, as well as their variance, when compared with the respective equilateral triangles. We generated synthetic networks, mimicking the diversity of cell-cell interaction patterns, and evaluated the applicability of the selected metrics to study topological features. Cells expressing wild-type E-cadherin and cancer-related mutants were used to validate our strategy. Specifically, A634V, R749W and P799R cancer-causing mutants present more disorganized spatial distribution when compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, P799R exhibited higher length and angle distortions and abnormal cytoskeletal organization, suggesting the formation of very dynamic and plastic cellular interactions. Hence, topological analysis of cell network diagrams is an effective tool to quantify changes in cell-cell interactions and, importantly, it can be applied to a myriad of processes, namely tissue morphogenesis and cancer. PMID:27151223

  5. Letter to the Editor: Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Release Oncogenic Soluble E-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Since their discovery, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Despite intensive research and remarkable progress, it is becoming increasingly acknowledged that their yet incomplete, biological characterisation represents one of the major drawbacks to their successful translation into the clinics. The expression of the transmembrane protein E-cadherin in hPSCs is well defined to be pivotal to the maintenance of the pluripotent state by mediating intercellular adhesion and intracellular signaling. Next to these canonical functions, were here report for the first time that hPSCs are subject to matrix metalloproteinase-dependent E-cadherin ectodomain shedding. This generates a ∼80-kD, soluble E-cadherin fragment which is released into the extracellular space, and which is well described to exert paracrine signaling activity and classified as being oncogenic. Collectively, this finding does not only improve our knowledge on the signaling crosstalk between hPSCs and their cellular environment and the type and nature of the paracrine signals produced by these cells, but also has clear implications for the development of efficient and safe stem cell-based therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:2443-2446. PMID:27399873

  6. Persisting and Increasing Neutrophil Infiltration Associates with Gastric Carcinogenesis and E-cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hualin; Ma, Yue; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Chunlei; Huang, Hai; Xia, Ying; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation is considered the most important cause of gastric cancer. The actual process how chronic inflammation triggers gastric carcinogenesis is still not clear. In this study, neutrophils and relative markers in gastric cancer development were examined with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence RNA in situ hybridization methods. On average, 24 times more neutrophils were found in gastric cancer tissues and about 9 times more neutrophils were found in gastric intestinal metaplasia tissues comparing to normal gastric tissue controls. CagA+ H. pylori infection in cancer adjacent tissues or EBV infection in cancer tissues did not increase neutrophil infiltration into gastric cancer tissues significantly. Neutrophil density was positively correlated with cell proliferation while negatively correlated with E-cadherin intensity. E-cadherin is also transcriptionally downregulated in gastric cancer tissues comparing to adjacent tissue controls. The increased neutrophils in the gastric cancer tissues appear to be related to increased chemoattractant IL-8 levels. In gastric cancers, neutrophil numbers were higher comparing to cancer adjacent tissues and not associated with patient ages, tumor invasion depth, tumor staging, metastasis or cancer types. The conclusion is that persisting and increasing neutrophil infiltration is associated with E-cadherin downregulation, cell proliferation and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27412620

  7. Benign, malignant salivary gland tumors: comparison of immunohistochemical expression of e-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Sudeendra; Kaveri, H; Rekha, K

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess any variation in the immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. A total of 60 cases of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors were evaluated immunohistochemically for E-cadherin expression. These included 10 cases of pleomorphic adenoma (PA), 2 cases of canalicular adenoma (CA), 2 cases of myoepithelioma (MY), 24 cases of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), 12 cases of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), 9 cases of adenocarcinoma (AC) and 1 case of carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (Ca Ex PA). 48 cases (80%) showed positive expression, in which benign tumors exhibited relatively increased reactivity (85.7%) as compared to the malignant tumors (78.3%). 10 PA, 2 MY, 20 ACC, 9 MEC, 6 AC and 1 Ca Ex PA expressed E-cadherin. Negative expression was evident in CA, ACC, MEC and AC. Statistically significant reduction in reactivity was evident in mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, when compared to pleomorphic adenoma.

  8. Tissue stroma as a regulator of leukocyte recruitment in inflammation.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Helen M; Butler, Lynn M; Buckley, Chris D; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2012-03-01

    The stromal milieu (cellular and matrix components) helps establish tissue "address-codes" that direct leukocyte behavior in inflamed tissue. Coordinated interactions among the stroma, leukocytes, and ECs dictate which leukocytes are recruited, whether they are retained within the inflamed site, and how long they survive. Herein, we discuss how the stromal milieu influences the leukocyte recruitment cascade. Moreover, we explore how corruption of the stromal phenotype in chronic inflammatory diseases contributes to undesired, continuous recruitment of leukocytes. Emerging complex, multicellular, multilayered (co-)culture models are now addressing the molecular circuitry involved in regulating stromal organization during inflammation. Understanding context-specific changes in pro- or anti-inflammatory agents derived from the stroma, such as IL-6 (and its cofactors), is important for the generation of therapeutic strategies that restore the balance between recruitment and clearance of the inflammatory infiltrate in chronic disease.

  9. Designed Stem Cell Aggregates: Enhanced Biological Functions of Human Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Aggregates Incorporating E-Cadherin-Modified PLGA Microparticles (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Hongli; Gao, Chao; Li, Suhua; Shuai, Qizhi; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Ke; Cao, Lei; Lang, Ren; Gu, Zhongwei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    E-cadherin-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (hE-cad-PLGA) microparticles were fabricated and then mediated the 3D cell aggregates of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on page 1949 by Jun Yang and co-workers. The hE-cad-Fc matrix and the PLGA microparticles synergistically regulate the proliferation and bioactive factors secretions of MSCs by activating EGFR, AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. The hE-cad-PLGA microparticles offer a novel route to expand multipotent stem cell-based clinical applications. PMID:27511954

  10. Expression of cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in Xenopus embryos begins at gastrulation and predominates in the ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The expression of the Ca2+-dependent epithelial cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (also known as uvomorulin and L-CAM) in the early stages of embryonic development of Xenopus laevis was examined. E-Cadherin was identified in the Xenopus A6 epithelial cell line by antibody cross- reactivity and several biochemical characteristics. Four independent mAbs were generated against purified Xenopus E-cadherin. All four mAbs recognized the same polypeptides in A6 cells, adult epithelial tissues, and embryos. These mAbs inhibited the formation of cell contacts between A6 cells and stained the basolateral plasma membranes of A6 cells, hepatocytes, and alveolar epithelial cells. The time of E- cadherin expression in early Xenopus embryos was determined by immunoblotting. Unlike its expression in early mouse embryos, E- cadherin was not present in the eggs or early blastula of Xenopus laevis. These findings indicate that a different Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion molecule, perhaps another member of the cadherin gene family, is responsible for the Ca2+-dependent adhesion between cleavage stage Xenopus blastomeres. Detectable accumulation of E-cadherin started just before gastrulation at stage 9 1/2 and increased rapidly up to the end of gastrulation at stage 15. In stage 15 embryos, specific immunofluorescence staining of E-cadherin was discernible only in ectoderm, but not in mesoderm and endoderm. The ectoderm at this stage consists of two cell layers. The outer cell layer of ectoderm was stained intensely, and staining was localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of these cells. Lower levels of staining were observed in the inner cell layer of ectoderm. The coincidence of E-cadherin expression with the process of gastrulation and its restriction to the ectoderm indicate that it may play a role in the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation and resulting segregation of embryonic germ layers. PMID:2472408

  11. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  12. Rb depletion results in deregulation of E-cadherin and induction of cellular phenotypic changes that are characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Arima, Yoshimi; Inoue, Yasumichi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Hayashi, Hidemi; Nagano, Osamu; Saya, Hideyuki; Taya, Yoichi

    2008-07-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) is mutated or expressed at very low levels in several tumor types, including retinoblastoma and osteosarcoma, as well as small cell lung, colon, prostate, bladder, and breast carcinomas. Loss or reduction of Rb expression is seen most commonly in high-grade breast adenocarcinomas, suggesting that a relationship may exist between loss of Rb function and a less-differentiated state, increased proliferation, and high metastatic potential. In this study, we found that knockdown of Rb by small interfering RNA in MCF7 breast cancer cells disrupts cell-cell adhesion and induces a mesenchymal-like phenotype. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key event in embryonic morphogenesis, is implicated in the metastasis of primary tumors. Additionally, Rb is decreased during growth factor- and cytokine-induced EMT and overexpression of Rb inhibits the EMT in MCF10A human mammary epithelial cells. Ectopic expression and knockdown of Rb resulted in increased or reduced expression of E-cadherin, which is specifically involved in epithelial cell-cell adhesion. Other EMT-related transcriptional factors, including Slug and Zeb-1, are also induced by Rb depletion. Furthermore, we confirmed that Rb binds to an E-cadherin promoter sequence in association with the transcription factor activator protein-2alpha. Finally, in breast cancer specimens, we observed a concurrent down-regulation of Rb and E-cadherin expression in mesenchymal-like invasive cancers. These findings suggest that Rb inactivation contributes to tumor progression due to not only loss of cell proliferation control but also conversion to an invasive phenotype and that the inhibition of EMT is a novel tumor suppressor function of Rb.

  13. Deciphering Seed Sequence Based Off-Target Effects in a Large-Scale RNAi Reporter Screen for E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert; Nicke, Barbara; Pohlenz, Hans-Dieter; Sohler, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Functional RNAi based screening is affected by large numbers of false positive and negative hits due to prevalent sequence based off-target effects. We performed a druggable genome targeting siRNA screen intended to identify novel regulators of E-cadherin (CDH1) expression, a known key player in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Analysis of primary screening results indicated a large number of false-positive hits. To address these crucial difficulties we developed an analysis method, SENSORS, which, similar to published methods, is a seed enrichment strategy for analyzing siRNA off-targets in RNAi screens. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that accounting for seed based off-target effects stratifies primary screening results and enables the discovery of additional screening hits. While traditional hit detection methods are prone to false positive results which are undetected, we were able to identify false positive hits robustly. Transcription factor MYBL1 was identified as a putative novel target required for CDH1 expression and verified experimentally. No siRNA pool targeting MYBL1 was present in the used siRNA library. Instead, MYBL1 was identified as a putative CDH1 regulating target solely based on the SENSORS off-target score, i.e. as a gene that is a cause for off-target effects down regulating E-cadherin expression. PMID:26361354

  14. Gene expression of WNTs, β-catenin and E-cadherin during the periimplantation period of pregnancy in pigs--involvement of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Kiewisz, Jolanta; Kaczmarek, Monika M; Andronowska, Aneta; Blitek, Agnieszka; Ziecik, Adam J

    2011-09-01

    WNTs (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member) are morphogenes considered as important factors taking part in uterus developmental processes and implantation. β-catenin is a downstream effector of WNTs action within the cell as well as, through E-cadherin, affecting epithelial organization and function. This study was conducted to investigate WNT4, WNT5A, WNT7A, β-catenin (CTNNB1) and E-cadherin (CDH1) gene expression and protein localization in the endometrium during the periimplantation period. Furthermore, the effect of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) on WNTs, CTNNB1 and CDH1 gene expression in the porcine endometrium in vitro was examined. WNT4 protein was localized in the luminal and glandular epithelium as well as in the basal lamina of the uterine mucosa. WNT5A protein was detected only in the luminal epithelium. WNT7A, β-catenin and E-cadherin protein were identified both in the luminal and glandular epithelial cells, however, WNT7A protein immunoreactivity varied during respective days of estrous cycle and/or pregnancy. Despite unchanged expression of WNT4 mRNA in the endometrium of cyclic and early pregnant pigs, the negative influence of E(2) on WNT4 gene during in vitro experiment was observed. WNT4 and CDH1 gene expression was negatively correlated with blood plasma E(2) and P(4) level in uterine luminal flushings (ULFs) on Day 12 of pregnancy. Expression of WNT5A gene was up-regulated in the endometrium on Day 9 of pregnancy when compared to the respective day of the estrous cycle. A significant decrease of WNT7A gene expression and increase of CDH1 mRNA amount was detected on Day 12 of pregnancy. Overall, the results show the spatial localization of WNT4, WNT5A, WNT7A, β-catenin and E-cadherin proteins in porcine endometrium during periimplantation period of pregnancy and indicate significant changes of WNT5A, WNT7A and CDH1 gene expression before implantation in the pig.

  15. Cleavage of E-cadherin and β-catenin by calpain affects Wnt signaling and spheroid formation in suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Konze, Sarah A; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F R

    2014-04-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell-cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that pharmacological

  16. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  17. Expression of FoxM1 and the EMT-associated protein E-cadherin in gastric cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Ke-Jian; Wu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Jun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) and E-cadherin in tissues of gastric cancer in order to reveal any correlation between FoxM1, E-cadherin and clinicopathological parameters. The association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin in the development and progression of gastric cancer was also investigated. The expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissue on tissue microarray was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer was explored, and the association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin was further examined using statistical techniques. In gastric cancer tissues, the expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin was strongly positive, but it was weak in normal gastric mucosa. Overexpression of FoxM1 was evident in gastric cancer, and was associated with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), advanced tumor state (P<0.05) and lymph node (or distant) metastasis (P<0.05), whereas E-cadherin had the opposite effects. Furthermore, the correlation between FoxM1 and E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue was negative. In conclusion, the high FoxM1 expression and low E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue suggests that these proteins play a critical role in the development and progression of gastric cancer.

  18. E-Cadherin-Dependent Stimulation of Traction Force at Focal Adhesions via the Src and PI3K Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Estevez, Maruxa; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between cadherin- and integrin-dependent signals controls cell behavior, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the strength of adhesion to the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. We deposited cells expressing a defined repertoire of cadherins and integrins on fibronectin (FN)-coated polyacrylamide gels (FN-PAG) and on FN-coated pillars used as a micro-force sensor array (μFSA), and analyzed the functional relationship between these adhesion receptors to determine how it regulates cell traction force. We found that cadherin-mediated adhesion stimulated cell spreading on FN-PAG, and this was modulated by the substrate stiffness. We compared S180 cells with cells stably expressing different cadherins on μFSA and found that traction forces were stronger in cells expressing cadherins than in parental cells. E-cadherin-mediated contact and mechanical coupling between cells are required for this increase in cell-FN traction force, which was not observed in isolated cells, and required Src and PI3K activities. Traction forces were stronger in cells expressing type I cadherins than in cells expressing type II cadherins, which correlates with our previous observation of a higher intercellular adhesion strength developed by type I compared with type II cadherins. Our results reveal one of the mechanisms whereby molecular cross talk between cadherins and integrins upregulates traction forces at cell-FN adhesion sites, and thus provide additional insight into the molecular control of cell behavior. PMID:22853894

  19. Cell-cell contacts mediated by E-cadherin (uvomorulin) restrict invasive behavior of L-cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    L-cells were cotransfected with plasmids coding for mouse E-cadherin (uvomorulin) and the neophosphotransferase gene, and stable transfectants expressing E-cadherin at the cell surface were selected and cloned. Control transfection was done with the neophosphotransferase gene alone. The invasive migration of transfected and untransfected L-cells into three-dimensional collagen gels was then analyzed. L-cells not expressing E-cadherin migrated efficiently into the gels, whereas invasion of the E-cadherin-expressing L-cells was restricted in a cell density dependent manner. At sparse density, when the cells exhibited little cell-cell contacts, no difference was observed between the level of invasion of the cadherin-expressing cells and the control cells. However, with increasing cell density, decreasing amounts of the cadherin-expressing cells but increasing amounts of the control cells migrated into the gels. At confluent density hardly any cadherin-expressing cells were able to migrate into the gels. The inhibition of the invasion of the cadherin-expressing cells could be reverted if confluent cells were cultured in the presence of monoclonal antibodies against E-cadherin. Since the expression of E-cadherin did not influence the invasive mobility of single cells, these results indicate that E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts inhibited invasive cellular migration. Time-lapse videoscopy and studies of cell migration from a monolayer into a cell-free area demonstrated that the restricted invasion could be explained by contact inhibition of cell movement of the cadherin-expressing cells. PMID:1649199

  20. E-cadherin germline mutation carriers: clinical management and genetic implications.

    PubMed

    Corso, Giovanni; Figueiredo, Joana; Biffi, Roberto; Trentin, Chiara; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Serrano, Davide; Cassano, Enrico; Annibale, Bruno; Melo, Soraia; Seruca, Raquel; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Roviello, Franco; Galimberti, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomic dominant syndrome associated with E-cadherin protein (CDH1) gene germline mutations. Clinical criteria for genetic screening were revised in 2010 by the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium at the Cambridge meeting. About 40 % of families fulfilling clinical criteria for this inherited disease present deleterious CDH1 germline mutations. Lobular breast cancer is a neoplastic condition associated with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer syndrome. E-cadherin constitutional mutations have been described in both settings, in gastric and breast cancers. The management of CDH1 asymptomatic mutation carriers requires a multidisciplinary approach; the only life-saving procedure is the prophylactic total gastrectomy after thorough genetic counselling. Several prophylactic gastrectomies have been performed to date; conversely, no prophylactic mastectomies have been described in CDH1 mutant carriers. However, the recent discovery of novel germline alterations in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast cancer opens up a new debate in the management of these individuals. In this critical review, we describe the clinical management of CDH1 germline mutant carriers providing specific recommendations for genetic counselling, clinical criteria, surveillance and/ or prophylactic surgery.

  1. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo . E-mail: gsuriano@ipatimup.pt

    2005-10-15

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein.

  2. Diffuse Type Gastric and Lobular Breast Carcinoma in a Familial Gastric Cancer Patient with an E-Cadherin Germline Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Gisela; Vogelsang, Holger; Becker, Ingrid; Hutter, Jörg; Ott, Katja; Candidus, Sonja; Grundei, Tobias; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Mueller, James; Siewert, Jörg R.; Höfler, Heinz

    1999-01-01

    E-Cadherin alterations have been reported frequently in sporadic diffuse type gastric and lobular breast carcinomas. Germline mutations of this gene have been identified recently in several gastric cancer families. We analyzed seven patients with a family history of the disease who had diffuse type gastric cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 for germline mutations in CDH1, the gene encoding the E-cadherin protein. We identified a frameshift mutation in exon 3 in one patient with a strong family history of gastric cancer. The same germline mutation was found in the patient’s mother, who had metachronous development of lobular breast and diffuse type gastric carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry for E-cadherin protein expression revealed an abnormal staining pattern in both of these tumors, suggesting complete inactivation of the cell adhesion molecule. Thus, our finding suggests that besides diffuse type gastric cancer, lobular breast carcinomas may be associated with germline CDH1 mutations. PMID:10433926

  3. Expression of p27Kip1 and E-cadherin in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Indonesian Patients.

    PubMed

    E I, Auerkari; V, Joewono; D R, Handjari; A T, Sarwono; A W, Suhartono; K, Eto; M A, Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic damage of DNA and its expression. The expression of the tumor suppressors E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) has been tested on 57 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) of Indonesian subjects. HNSCC tumor samples including both primary and (unrelated) nodal cases were obtained from the archives of Indonesian hospitals, in accordance with acknowledged ethical requirements. Only modest correlation was found between reduced expression of E-cadherin or p27(Kip1) with increased malignancy of primary and nodal growth. The observed strong correlation regardless of malignancy between the expressed levels of E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) suggests that also in combination these would not help to better predict the outcome of HNSCC.

  4. Elongin B/C recruitment regulates substrate binding by CIS.

    PubMed

    Piessevaux, Julie; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Peelman, Frank; Tavernier, Jan

    2008-08-01

    SOCS proteins play a major role in the regulation of cytokine signaling. They are recruited to activated receptors and can suppress signaling by different mechanisms including targeting of the receptor complex for proteasomal degradation. The activity of SOCS proteins is regulated at different levels including transcriptional control and posttranslational modification. We describe here a novel regulatory mechanism for CIS, one of the members of this protein family. A CIS mutant deficient in recruitment of the Elongin B/C complex completely failed to suppress STAT5 activation. This deficiency was not caused by altered turnover of CIS but by loss of cytokine receptor interaction. Intriguingly, no such effect was seen for binding to MyD88. The interaction between CIS and the Elongin B/C complex, which depends on the levels of uncomplexed Elongin B/C, was easily disrupted. This regulatory mechanism may be unique for CIS, as similar mutations in SOCS1, -2, -3, -6, and -7 had no functional impact. Our findings indicate that the SOCS box not only plays a role in the formation of E3 ligase complexes but, at least for CIS, can also regulate the binding modus of SOCS box-containing proteins. PMID:18508766

  5. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue. PMID:26880767

  6. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue.

  7. Correlation Between E-cadherin Immunoexpression and Efficacy of First Line Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Advanced High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miše, Branka Petrić; Telesmanić, Vesna Dobrić; Tomić, Snježana; Šundov, Dinka; Čapkun, Vesna; Vrdoljak, Eduard

    2015-04-01

    To analyze correlation between immunoexpression of E-cadherin and efficacy of first line platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. The expression of E-cadherin was analyzed immunohistochemically in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples from 98 patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer and related to clinical features (stage according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and residual tumors after initial cytoreductive surgery), response to platinum-based chemotherapy (according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid tumors (RECIST 1.1 criteria)), platinum sensitivity (according to platinum free interval (PFI) as platinum-refractory, platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive) and patients progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). E-cadherin immunostaining was positive in 74 and negative in 24 serous ovarian carcinomas. E-cadherin immunoreactivity was not associated with FIGO stage, residual tumor after initial cytoreductive surgery and number of chemotherapy cycles. Positive E-cadherin expression predict significantly better response to first line platinum-based chemotherapy (p < 0.001) and platinum sensitivity (p < 0.001). Moreover, positive E-cadherin expression predict significantly longer PFS (p < 0.001) and OS (p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis for OS showed that positive E-cadherin expression is predictor to platinum sensitivity (p < 0.001) and longer OS (p = 0.01). Positive E-cadherin expression seems to be a predictor of better response to first line platinum-based chemotherapy, platinum sensitivity and favorable clinical outcome in patients with advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Negative E-cadherin expression was shown to be significant, independent predictor of poorer PFS and OS. E-cadherin as a marker has predictive and prognostic value.

  8. Altered E-Cadherin Levels and Distribution in Melanocytes Precede Clinical Manifestations of Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Roselyne Y; Luciani, Flavie; Cario-André, Muriel; Rubod, Alain; Petit, Valérie; Benzekri, Laila; Ezzedine, Khaled; Lepreux, Sébastien; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Taieb, A; Gauthier, Yvon; Larue, Lionel; Delmas, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder resulting from the loss of melanocytes from the basal epidermal layer. The pathogenesis of the disease is likely multifactorial and involves autoimmune causes, as well as oxidative and mechanical stress. It is important to identify early events in vitiligo to clarify pathogenesis, improve diagnosis, and inform therapy. Here, we show that E-cadherin (Ecad), which mediates the adhesion between melanocytes and keratinocytes in the epidermis, is absent from or discontinuously distributed across melanocyte membranes of vitiligo patients long before clinical lesions appear. This abnormality is associated with the detachment of the melanocytes from the basal to the suprabasal layers in the epidermis. Using human epidermal reconstructed skin and mouse models with normal or defective Ecad expression in melanocytes, we demonstrated that Ecad is required for melanocyte adhesiveness to the basal layer under oxidative and mechanical stress, establishing a link between silent/preclinical, cell-autonomous defects in vitiligo melanocytes and known environmental stressors accelerating disease expression. Our results implicate a primary predisposing skin defect affecting melanocyte adhesiveness that, under stress conditions, leads to disappearance of melanocytes and clinical vitiligo. Melanocyte adhesiveness is thus a potential target for therapy aiming at disease stabilization.

  9. Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Dianati, Elham; Poiraud, Jérémy; Weber-Ouellette, Anne; Plante, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Gap junctions are intercellular channels made of connexins (Cxs) that allow direct communication between adjacent cells. Modulation of Cxs has been associated with abnormal development and function of the mammary gland and breast cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying their expression during normal mammary gland are not yet known. Cxs interact with components of tight and adherens junctions. Thus, we hypothesized that the expression levels of Cxs vary during mammary gland development and are regulated through stage-dependent interactions with members of the tight and adherens junctions. Our specific objectives were to: 1) determine the expression of Cxs and tight and adherens junction proteins throughout development and 2) characterize Cxs interactions with components of tight and adherens junctions. Murine mammary glands were sampled at various developmental stages (pre-pubescent to post-weaning). RT-qPCR and western-blot analyses demonstrated differential expression patterns for all gap (Cx43, Cx32, Cx26, Cx30), tight (Claudin-1, -3, -4, -7) and adherens (β-catenin, E- and P-cadherins) junctions throughout development. Interestingly, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated interactions between these different types of junctions. Cx30 interacted with Cx26 just at the late pregnancy stage. While Cx43 showed a persistent interaction with β-catenin from virginity to post-weaning, its interactions with E-cadherin and Claudin-7 were transient. Cx32 interacted with Cx26, E-cadherin and β-catenin during lactation. Immunofluorescence results confirmed the existence of a junctional nexus that remodeled during mammary gland development. Together, our results confirm that the expression levels of Cxs vary concomitantly and that Cxs form junctional nexuses with tight and adherens junctions, suggesting the existence of common regulatory pathways.

  10. Clinico-pathological correlation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front of Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Mehendiratta, Monica; Solomon, Monica Charlotte; Boaz, Karen; Guddattu, Vasudeva; Mohindra, Aashima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have indicated that although malignant cells at the invasive tumor front, bare morphological resemblance to the cells at central portion of the tumor, their molecular character differs significantly. E-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that connects epithelial cells. This study attempts to correlate the E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front with tumor differentiation along with its clinico-pathological parameters. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining with E-cadherin was carried out on archival cases of primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (n = 30). The E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front was analyzed and was linked to clinico-pathological parameters including patient prognosis. Results: The downregulation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor edge when compared with patient's prognosis yielded a significant correlation (P = 0.041) but its correlation with the degree of differentiation determined was not significant (P = 0.27). Also, its association with tumor size and lymph node status was negative. Conclusions: Loss of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front is an important event in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors with a loss of expression of E-cadherin are those which had a poor prognosis PMID:25328302

  11. Induction of E-cadherin+ human amniotic fluid cell differentiation into oocyte-like cells via culture in medium supplemented with follicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Huang, Yongyi; Bu, Yanzhen; Zhao, Yanhui; Zou, Gang; Liu, Zhixue

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent human amniotic fluid cells (HuAFCs) can differentiate into various types of somatic cell in vitro. However, their differentiation into oocyte-like cells has never been described to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, differentiation of E-cadherin+ and E-cadherin- HuAFC sub-populations into oocyte-like cells was induced via culture in medium containing bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. The E-cadherin+ HuAFCs expressed DAZL highly. Post-induction, cells with an oocyte-like phenotype were found among the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, expressing markers specific to germ cells and oocytes (VASA, ZP3 and GDF9) and meiosis (DMC1 and SCP3). When specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress E-cadherin in the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, the levels of DAZL expression were reduced. Post-induction, the morphology of the siRNA‑E‑cadherin HuAFCs was poorer and the expression levels of germ cell-specific markers were lower compared with those of the siRNA-mock HuAFCs. Therefore, E-cadherin+ HuAFCs could be more easily induced to differentiate into oocyte-like cells by bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. In addition, the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs exhibited potential characteristics of DAZL protein expression, and thus it was conjectured that bovine follicular fluid acts on DAZL protein and promotes E-cadherin+ HuAFC differentiation into oocyte-like cells.

  12. Induction of E-cadherin+ human amniotic fluid cell differentiation into oocyte-like cells via culture in medium supplemented with follicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Huang, Yongyi; Bu, Yanzhen; Zhao, Yanhui; Zou, Gang; Liu, Zhixue

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent human amniotic fluid cells (HuAFCs) can differentiate into various types of somatic cell in vitro. However, their differentiation into oocyte-like cells has never been described to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, differentiation of E-cadherin+ and E-cadherin- HuAFC sub-populations into oocyte-like cells was induced via culture in medium containing bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. The E-cadherin+ HuAFCs expressed DAZL highly. Post-induction, cells with an oocyte-like phenotype were found among the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, expressing markers specific to germ cells and oocytes (VASA, ZP3 and GDF9) and meiosis (DMC1 and SCP3). When specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress E-cadherin in the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, the levels of DAZL expression were reduced. Post-induction, the morphology of the siRNA‑E‑cadherin HuAFCs was poorer and the expression levels of germ cell-specific markers were lower compared with those of the siRNA-mock HuAFCs. Therefore, E-cadherin+ HuAFCs could be more easily induced to differentiate into oocyte-like cells by bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. In addition, the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs exhibited potential characteristics of DAZL protein expression, and thus it was conjectured that bovine follicular fluid acts on DAZL protein and promotes E-cadherin+ HuAFC differentiation into oocyte-like cells. PMID:24788191

  13. Prognostic and Clinicopathological Significance of Downregulated E-Cadherin Expression in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated the prognostic role of E-cadherin in patients with NSCLC; however, the result still remains inconclusive. An up-to data system review and meta-analysis was necessary to give a comprehensive evaluation of prognostic role of E-cadherin in NSCLC. Methods Eligible studies were searched in Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science databases. The inclusion criteria were studies that assessed the relationship between E-cadherin expression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the prognosis or clinicopathological features in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis according to race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, histological type, and sample size were also conducted. Odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to examine the risk or hazard association. Results A total of 29 studies including 4010 patients were qualified for analysis. The analysis suggested that downregulated E-cadherin expression was significant associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival/progression-free survival (DFS/PFS) in patients with NSCLC. Subgroup analysis by race, percentage of reduced/negative E-cadherin expression, sample size also found the significant association in OS. When only the stage I NSCLC were considered, downregulated E-cadherin expression still had an unfavorable impact on OS. Additionally, downregulated E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with differentiation grade, lymphnode metastasis, vascular invasion, and TNM stage. Conclusion Downregulated E-cadherin expression detected by IHC seems to correlate with tumour progression and could serve as an important prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC. PMID:24978478

  14. Inhibition of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity in palate mesenchyme cells attenuates Wnt signaling via aberrant E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Warner, Dennis R; Smith, Scott C; Smolenkova, Irina A; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    p300 is a multifunctional transcriptional coactivator that interacts with numerous transcription factors and exhibits protein/histone acetyltransferase activity. Loss of p300 function in humans and in mice leads to craniofacial defects. In this study, we demonstrated that inhibition of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity with the compound, C646, altered the expression of several genes, including Cdh1 (E-cadherin) in mouse maxillary mesenchyme cells, which are the cells that give rise to the secondary palate. The increased expression of plasma membrane-bound E-cadherin was associated with reduced cytosolic β-catenin, that led to attenuated signaling through the canonical Wnt pathway. Furthermore, C646 reduced both cell proliferation and the migratory ability of these cells. These results suggest that p300 histone acetyltransferase activity is critical for Wnt-dependent palate mesenchymal cell proliferation and migration, both processes that play a significant role in morphogenesis of the palate.

  15. Helicobacter spp. infection induces changes in epithelial proliferation and E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa of pigs.

    PubMed

    Bracarense, A P F R L; Yamasaki, L; Silva, E O; Oliveira, R L; Alfieri, A A

    2013-11-01

    Gastric disease is common in finishing pigs. Helicobacter spp. infection has been associated with gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric neoplasia in man and animals. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Helicobacter spp. infection on gastric morphology in pigs, with emphasis on glandular cell proliferation and E-cadherin expression. Samples of fundus and antrum from 67 finishing pigs were examined microscopically and by immunohistochemistry. The presence of Helicobacter spp. was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Mucosal changes were evaluated and epithelial proliferation was determined by evaluation of the morphometry of nucleolar organizer regions and counting proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells and mitotic figures. Intercellular adhesion was evaluated by E-cadherin expression. In 47 (70%) pigs, Helicobacter spp. infection was confirmed by PCR. Histological findings associated with the infection included mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria and glandular degeneration. There was a significant association between infection and epithelial proliferation in both regions as well as a decrease in the expression of E-cadherin in the antrum.

  16. Enhanced Biological Functions of Human Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Aggregates Incorporating E-Cadherin-Modified PLGA Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mao, Hongli; Gao, Chao; Li, Suhua; Shuai, Qizhi; Xu, Jianbin; Xu, Ke; Cao, Lei; Lang, Ren; Gu, Zhongwei; Akaike, Toshihiro; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising source of multipotent cells for various cell-based therapies due to their unique properties, and formation of 3D MSC aggregates has been explored as a potential strategy to enhance therapeutic efficacy. In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles modified with human E-cadherin fusion protein (hE-cad-PLGA microparticles) have been fabricated and integrated with human MSCs to form 3D cell aggregates. The results show that, compared with the plain PLGA, the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles distribute within the aggregates more evenly and further result in a more significant improvement of cellular proliferation and secretion of a series of bioactive factors due to the synergistic effects from the bioactive E-cadherin fragments and the PLGA microparticles. Meanwhile, the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles incorporated in the aggregates upregulate the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activate the AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in the MSCs. Additionally, the E-cadherin/β-catenin cellular membrane complex in the MSCs is markedly stimulated by the hE-cad-PLGA microparticles. Therefore, engineering 3D cell aggregates with hE-cad-PLGA microparticles can be a promising method for ex vivo multipotent stem-cell expansion with enhanced biological functions and may offer a novel route to expand multipotent stem-cell-based clinical applications. PMID:27245478

  17. Transition of Immunohistochemical Expression of E-Cadherin and Vimentin from Premalignant to Malignant Lesions of Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Kafil; Ara, Anjum; Siddiqui, Shahid A; Sherwani, Rana K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to study the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers E-cadherin and vimentin in precancerous lesions of the oral cavity and oropharynx and to use the specific pattern of expression to predict invasiveness. Methods This cross-sectional study looked at 87 cases of oral and oropharyngeal lesions obtained between December 2012 and November 2014 in the Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, India. Fifty-three biopsies from the buccal mucosa, tongue, and pharynx and 34 resected oral specimens were evaluated for premalignant and malignant lesions using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical stains. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and mesenchymal marker vimentin was evaluated wherever possible. Slides were examined for staining pattern (cytoplasmic or membrane), proportion, and intensity of staining of tumor cells. Patients follow-up and therapy related changes were also studied. Results There were 64 premalignant and 23 malignant cases in our study with 65 (74.7%) cases seen in males and 22 (25.3%) cases seen in females. The majority of malignant cases, (n = 15; 64.2%) were seen in the fifth and sixth decades of life while most of the premalignant lesions (n = 36; 56.4%) were seen in the fourth and fifth decade. Amongst the 64 premalignant oral lesions, leukoplakia comprised of 14 cases (21.9%), of which three cases had associated mild to moderate dysplasia. The majority of premalignant lesions showed strong E-cadherin expression and decreased expression of vimentin with negative and weak expression in both dysplasias and carcinoma in situ (p = 0.013). E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas compared to dysplasias and carcinoma in situ and the difference in immunoreactivity was statistically significant (p < 0.050). Vimentin expression increased as the tumor progressed from dysplasias to carcinoma in situ to invasive

  18. DNA repair choice defines a common pathway for recruitment of chromatin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gwendolyn; Papamichos-Chronakis, Manolis; Peterson, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is essential for maintenance of genome stability. Recent work has implicated a host of chromatin regulators in the DNA damage response, and although several functional roles have been defined, the mechanisms that control their recruitment to DNA lesions remain unclear. Here, we find that efficient DSB recruitment of the INO80, SWR-C, NuA4, SWI/SNF, and RSC enzymes is inhibited by the non-homologous end joining machinery, and that their recruitment is controlled by early steps of homologous recombination. Strikingly, we find no significant role for H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2AX) in the recruitment of chromatin regulators, but rather their recruitment coincides with reduced levels of γH2AX. Our work indicates that cell cycle position plays a key role in DNA repair pathway choice and that recruitment of chromatin regulators is tightly coupled to homologous recombination. PMID:23811932

  19. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  20. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  1. E-cadherin downregulation at the infiltrating tumour front is associated with histological grade and stage in colorectal carcinoma of Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Dass, Serena Diane; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Ong, Diana Bee-Lan; Teoh, Kean-Hooi; Looi, Lai-Meng

    2015-04-01

    Loss of E-cadherin, a 120 kDA transmembrane glycoprotein responsible for cell-cell adhesion, is one of the hallmarks of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). E-cadherin expression was immunohistochemically studied in 94 histopathologically re-confirmed colorectal carcinomas (CRC) using a monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin (Dako: Clone NCH-38) on a Ventana Benchmark XT automated system. Each case was assessed for E-cadherin immunopositivity at two separate locations viz the tumour centre (TC) as well as the infiltrating front (IF). Expression was semiquantitated for proportion of immunopositive malignant cells as 0 (negative), 1 (1-25% staining), 2 (26-50% staining), 3 (51-75% staining) and 4 (>75% staining) and staining intensity: 0 (negative), 1 (weak), 2 (moderate) and 3 (strong). The final histoscore of E-cadherin immunopositivity was arbitrarily computed as proportion of immunopositivity multiplied by staining intensity of the malignant cells. E-cadherin histoscores were significantly lower at the IF (4.5±2.5) compared with TC (10.7±2.4). Furthermore, the histoscores were significantly reduced at the IF of 49 TNM III+IV tumours (3.6±2.5) compared with 45 II+III CRC (5.4±2.2). Reduction of E-cadherin expression was also noted in the 23 high grade (TC=8.6±3.2; IF=2.6±2.3) compared with 71 low grade tumours (TC=11.4±1.5; IF=5.1±2.3). E-cadherin is downregulated at the infiltrating front of CRC, possibly marking for EMT at this location. The downregulation is further enhanced amongst late stage and high grade tumours compared with earlier stage and low grade tumours; findings which are similar to that noted in CRC of other populations.

  2. Expression of e-cadherin, alpha-catenins and Beta-catenins in human gastric carcinomas - correlation with histology and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yasui, W; Kuniyasu, H; Akama, Y; Kitahara, K; Nagafuchi, A; Ishihara, S; Tsukita, S; Tahara, E

    1995-01-01

    The expression of cell-cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin and its associated proteins, alpha- and beta-catenins in human gastric carcinomas was examined by Western blotting. All the seven gastric carcinoma cell lines expressed E-cadherin except KATOIII, which was derived from pleural effusion of a scirrhous type stomach cancer or Borrmann's type-4 carcinoma. The expression of alpha-catenin was not detected in HSC43 derived from scirrhous carcinoma, while HSC39 expressed abnormal beta-catenin caused by genetic alteration. In gastric carcinoma cases, the levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin were significantly lower in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas and scirrhous carcinomas when compared to other types of gastric carcinomas. Deeply invasive carcinomas expressed E-cadherin and alpha-catenin at lower levels. However, the expression level of alpha-catenin was not necessarily consistent with that of E-cadherin. One of 10 gastric carcinomas examined showed complete deletion of alpha-catenin gene in Southern blotting. beta-catenin was expressed at lower level in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas than in well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. These findings suggest that reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and its associated molecules, catenins, is involved in the development and infiltrative growth of scirrhous type gastric carcinomas. PMID:21597700

  3. Immunolocalization of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the cyclic and early pregnant canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Payan-Carreira, R; Pires, M A; Santos, C; Holst, B Ström; Colaço, J; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2016-09-01

    Putative changes in E-cadherin and β-catenin during implantation in dogs are of interest to study, as they are relevant proteins for epithelial integrity. E-cadherin and β-catenin were immunolocalized in the canine endometrium during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy, using monoclonal antibodies. Both proteins were detected in all types of endometrial epithelia (surface epithelium [SE], superficial glandular, and deep glandular epithelia) at all stages of the estrous cycle and in early placental structures. E-cadherin depicted a gradient of intensity apparently being lowest in the SE to progressively increase toward the deepness of the endometrial glands, regardless of the stage of estrous cycle. The overall immunostaining was, however, weaker at diestrus. In pregnant samples, the trophoblast was conspicuously immunolabeled compared with the endometrial surface lining epithelium. In the latter, the cytoplasmic pattern predominated over the membrane-bound, as was also seen in the decidual cells of the placental labyrinth. In the early placenta, only trophoblast cells and lacunae retained membrane signals. β-Catenin membrane labeling appeared relatively constant throughout the cycle, although a tendency toward a decrease in intensity was detected at the secretory stages. In addition, a dislocation of the immunoreaction from membrane to the cytoplasm was observed in both the SE and the glandular epithelia at particular stages of the cycle. In early pregnancy, a loss of the membranous pattern was observed in the SE and labyrinth, but neither on trophoblast nor in lacunae. The results show the existence of a softening of the adherens junctional complex in progestagen-dominated stages favoring embryo-maternal interactions and endometrial invasion during canine implantation. PMID:27155731

  4. CDH1/E-cadherin and solid tumors. An updated gene-disease association analysis using bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Abascal, María Florencia; Besso, María José; Rosso, Marina; Mencucci, María Victoria; Aparicio, Evangelina; Szapiro, Gala; Furlong, Laura Inés; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica Hebe

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that causes millions of deaths worldwide. Among cancers, Solid Tumors (ST) stand-out due to their high incidence and mortality rates. Disruption of cell-cell adhesion is highly relevant during tumor progression. Epithelial-cadherin (protein: E-cadherin, gene: CDH1) is a key molecule in cell-cell adhesion and an abnormal expression or/and function(s) contributes to tumor progression and is altered in ST. A systematic study was carried out to gather and summarize current knowledge on CDH1/E-cadherin and ST using bioinformatics resources. The DisGeNET database was exploited to survey CDH1-associated diseases. Reported mutations in specific ST were obtained by interrogating COSMIC and IntOGen tools. CDH1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) were retrieved from the dbSNP database. DisGeNET analysis identified 609 genes annotated to ST, among which CDH1 was listed. Using CDH1 as query term, 26 disease concepts were found, 21 of which were neoplasms-related terms. Using DisGeNET ALL Databases, 172 disease concepts were identified. Of those, 80 ST disease-related terms were subjected to manual curation and 75/80 (93.75%) associations were validated. On selected ST, 489 CDH1 somatic mutations were listed in COSMIC and IntOGen databases. Breast neoplasms had the highest CDH1-mutation rate. CDH1 was positioned among the 20 genes with highest mutation frequency and was confirmed as driver gene in breast cancer. Over 14,000 SNP for CDH1 were found in the dbSNP database. This report used DisGeNET to gather/compile current knowledge on gene-disease association for CDH1/E-cadherin and ST; data curation expanded the number of terms that relate them. An updated list of CDH1 somatic mutations was obtained with COSMIC and IntOGen databases and of SNP from dbSNP. This information can be used to further understand the role of CDH1/E-cadherin in health and disease. PMID:26674224

  5. Expression of E-Cadherin, Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Progesterone Receptor in Mouse Blastocysts after Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Movaghar, Bahar; Askarian, Saeedeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The appropriate interaction between a blastocyst and the endometrium is essential for successful implantation. Numerous factors, including hormone receptors (progesterone receptor), cytokines [leukemia inhibitory factors (LIF)], and adherence molecules such as E-cadherin are involved in the cross-talk that occurs between the embryo and endometrium. Studies show that a lack of these genes impact endometrial receptivity. In this study, we compare the expression levels of E-cadherin, LIF, and progesterone receptor (PgR) genes in blastocysts that have been obtained from superovulated mice to those obtained from natural cycles. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, for the experimental group, a total of 17 virgin female NMRI mice (6- 8 weeks old) were injected with 7.5 IU pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG). Their blastocysts (approximately n= 120) were flushed out after 3.5 days, following administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The control group consisted of blastocysts from 62 female mice that were mated with male mice. The natural cycle blastocysts were flushed out from the female mice uteri 3.5 days after mating. The expression levels of E-cadherin, LIF, t PgR genes were examined by quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were analyzed by the student’s t-test (one sample t-test). Results: Expression levels of all studied genes were significantly lower in the hormone-treated group compared to the natural cycle blastocysts (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although ovarian stimulation is utilized to obtain more oocytes in ART cycles, it seems that this could disadvantageous to implantation because of the decrease in expression levels of certain genes. Because of the important roles of E-cadherin, LIF, and progesterone receptor in the implantation process, we have shown lower expression levels of these genes in mouse blastocysts obtained from ovarian-stimulated mice than those derived from

  6. CDH1/E-cadherin and solid tumors. An updated gene-disease association analysis using bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Abascal, María Florencia; Besso, María José; Rosso, Marina; Mencucci, María Victoria; Aparicio, Evangelina; Szapiro, Gala; Furlong, Laura Inés; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica Hebe

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that causes millions of deaths worldwide. Among cancers, Solid Tumors (ST) stand-out due to their high incidence and mortality rates. Disruption of cell-cell adhesion is highly relevant during tumor progression. Epithelial-cadherin (protein: E-cadherin, gene: CDH1) is a key molecule in cell-cell adhesion and an abnormal expression or/and function(s) contributes to tumor progression and is altered in ST. A systematic study was carried out to gather and summarize current knowledge on CDH1/E-cadherin and ST using bioinformatics resources. The DisGeNET database was exploited to survey CDH1-associated diseases. Reported mutations in specific ST were obtained by interrogating COSMIC and IntOGen tools. CDH1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) were retrieved from the dbSNP database. DisGeNET analysis identified 609 genes annotated to ST, among which CDH1 was listed. Using CDH1 as query term, 26 disease concepts were found, 21 of which were neoplasms-related terms. Using DisGeNET ALL Databases, 172 disease concepts were identified. Of those, 80 ST disease-related terms were subjected to manual curation and 75/80 (93.75%) associations were validated. On selected ST, 489 CDH1 somatic mutations were listed in COSMIC and IntOGen databases. Breast neoplasms had the highest CDH1-mutation rate. CDH1 was positioned among the 20 genes with highest mutation frequency and was confirmed as driver gene in breast cancer. Over 14,000 SNP for CDH1 were found in the dbSNP database. This report used DisGeNET to gather/compile current knowledge on gene-disease association for CDH1/E-cadherin and ST; data curation expanded the number of terms that relate them. An updated list of CDH1 somatic mutations was obtained with COSMIC and IntOGen databases and of SNP from dbSNP. This information can be used to further understand the role of CDH1/E-cadherin in health and disease.

  7. Heparan sulphate as a regulator of leukocyte recruitment in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Archana V; Katakam, Sampath K; Urbanowitz, Ann-Kathrin; Gotte, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A key event in inflammatory disease is the transendothelial recruitment of leukocytes from the circulation to the site of inflammation. Intense research in the past decades indicates that the polyanionic carbohydrate heparan sulphate (HS) modulates multiple steps in the leukocyte recruitment cascade. Leukocyte recruitment is initiated by endothelial cell activation and presentation of chemokines to rolling leukocytes, which, via integrin activation, results in adhesion and diapedesis through the vessel wall. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) immobilize the chemokines on the luminal endothelial cells, rendering them more robust against mechanical or hydrodynamic perturbations. During inflammation, endothelial HSPGs serve as ligands to L-selectin on leukocytes, transport chemokines in a basolateral to apical direction across the endothelium, and present chemokines at the luminal surface of the endothelium to circulating cells. HSPGs also promote chemokine oligomerization, which influences chemokine receptor signaling. Furthermore, proteoglycans of the syndecan family are involved in modulating integrin-mediated tight adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. Creation of a chemokine gradient by a localized chemokine release influences the speed of leukocyte recruitment from the blood to the tissue by attracting crawling neutrophils to optimal sites for transmigration. The directionality of intraluminal crawling is thought to be influenced by both mechanotactic and haptotactic signals, which are modulated by HS-dependent signaling processes. Finally, diapedesis is influenced by HS regarding transendothelial chemokine gradient formation and integrin- CAM interactions, and further enhanced by heparanase-mediated degradation of the endothelial basement membrane. Overall, the multifunctional role of HS in inflammation marks it as a potential target of glycan-centered therapeutic approaches.

  8. RAB2A controls MT1-MMP endocytic and E-cadherin polarized Golgi trafficking to promote invasive breast cancer programs.

    PubMed

    Kajiho, Hiroaki; Kajiho, Yuko; Frittoli, Emanuela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Oldani, Amanda; Garre, Massimiliano; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Palamidessi, Andrea; Vecchi, Manuela; Chavrier, Philippe; Perez, Frank; Scita, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of tumor cell dissemination and the contribution of membrane trafficking in this process are poorly understood. Through a functional siRNA screening of human RAB GTPases, we found that RAB2A, a protein essential for ER-to-Golgi transport, is critical in promoting proteolytic activity and 3D invasiveness of breast cancer (BC) cell lines. Remarkably, RAB2A is amplified and elevated in human BC and is a powerful and independent predictor of disease recurrence in BC patients. Mechanistically, RAB2A acts at two independent trafficking steps. Firstly, by interacting with VPS39, a key component of the late endosomal HOPS complex, it controls post-endocytic trafficking of membrane-bound MT1-MMP, an essential metalloprotease for matrix remodeling and invasion. Secondly, it further regulates Golgi transport of E-cadherin, ultimately controlling junctional stability, cell compaction, and tumor invasiveness. Thus, RAB2A is a novel trafficking determinant essential for regulation of a mesenchymal invasive program of BC dissemination. PMID:27255086

  9. Carcinoma cells induce lumen filling and EMT in epithelial cells through soluble E-cadherin-mediated activation of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pratima U; D'Ambrosio, Julia; Inge, Landon J; Mason, Robert W; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2015-12-01

    In epithelial cancers, carcinoma cells coexist with normal cells. Although it is known that the tumor microenvironment (TME) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, it is not completely understood how the tumor influences adjacent normal epithelial cells. In this study, a three-dimensional co-culture system comprising non-transformed epithelial cells (MDCK) and transformed carcinoma cells (MSV-MDCK) was used to demonstrate that carcinoma cells sequentially induce preneoplastic lumen filling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cysts. MMP-9 secreted by carcinoma cells cleaves cellular E-cadherin (encoded by CDH1) from epithelial cells to generate soluble E-cadherin (sE-cad), a pro-oncogenic protein. We show that sE-cad induces EGFR activation, resulting in lumen filling in MDCK cysts. Long-term sE-cad treatment induced EMT. sE-cad caused lumen filling by induction of the ERK signaling pathway and triggered EMT through the sustained activation of the AKT pathway. Although it is known that sE-cad induces MMP-9 release and consequent EGFR activation in tumor cells, our results, for the first time, demonstrate that carcinoma cells can induce sE-cad shedding in adjacent epithelial cells, which leads to EGFR activation and the eventual transdifferentiation of the normal epithelial cells. PMID:26483386

  10. Single molecule imaging of green fluorescent proteins in living cells: E-cadherin forms oligomers on the free cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Iino, R; Koyama, I; Kusumi, A

    2001-01-01

    Single green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules were successfully imaged for the first time in living cells. GFP linked to the cytoplasmic carboxyl terminus of E-cadherin (E-cad-GFP) was expressed in mouse fibroblast L cells, and observed using an objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. Based on the fluorescence intensity of individual fluorescent spots, the majority of E-cad-GFP molecules on the free cell surface were found to be oligomers of various sizes, many of them greater than dimers, suggesting that oligomerization of E-cadherin takes place before its assembly at cell-cell adhesion sites. The translational diffusion coefficient of E-cad-GFP is reduced by a factor of 10 to 40 upon oligomerization. Because such large decreases in translational mobility cannot be explained solely by increases in radius upon oligomerization, an oligomerization-induced trapping model is proposed in which, when oligomers are formed, they are trapped in place due to greatly enhanced tethering and corralling effects of the membrane skeleton on oligomers (compared with monomers). The presence of many oligomers greater than dimers on the free surface suggests that these greater oligomers are the basic building blocks for the two-dimensional cell adhesion structures (adherens junctions). PMID:11371443

  11. The expressions of NEDD9 and E-cadherin correlate with metastasis and poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Sun, Tingting; Yuan, Qingzhong; Pan, Guozheng; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Diwen

    2016-01-01

    Background Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a member of Crk-associated substrate family, is involved in cancer cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition. E-cadherin is a key event in the cellular invasion during the epithelial–mesenchymal transition mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association among NEDD9 expression, E-cadherin expression, and survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Methods NEDD9 and E-cadherin expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 106 TNBC patients and 120 non-TNBC patients. And the association of clinicopathological factors with survival was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression in TNBC patients. Results The results revealed that the rate of increased expression of NEDD9 and reduced expression of E-cadherin was significantly higher in TNBC group than that in non-TNBC group (P<0.001, both). Comparison of features between TNBC and non-TNBC groups showed that histological type (P=0.026) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.001) were significantly different. Correlation analysis showed that positive NEDD9 expression and negative E-cadherin expression were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis stage (P<0.05). In addition, the enhanced NEDD9 expression was significantly associated with a reduced 5-year survival for TNBC patients (overall survival [OS]: P=0.013; disease-free survival [DFS]: P=0.021). Negative E-cadherin expression showed a significantly worse 5-year OS and DFS (OS: P=0.011; DFS: P=0.012). Multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis (OS: P=0.006; DFS: P=0.004), tumor-node-metastasis stage (OS: P=0.012; DFS: P=0.001), NEDD9 (OS: P=0.046; DFS: P=0.022), and E-cadherin (OS: P=0.022; DFS: P=0.025) independently predicted a poor prognosis of OS and DFS. Moreover, patients with NEDD9-positive/E-cadherin-negative expression had a significantly worse

  12. Elevated Src family kinase activity stabilizes E-cadherin-based junctions and collective movement of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Veracini, Laurence; Grall, Dominique; Schaub, Sébastien; Divonne, Stéphanie Beghelli-de la Forest; Etienne-Grimaldi, Marie-Christine; Milano, Gérard; Bozec, Alexandre; Babin, Emmanuel; Sudaka, Anne; Thariat, Juliette; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    EGF receptor (EGFR) overexpression is thought to drive head and neck carcinogenesis however clinical responses to EGFR-targeting agents have been modest and alternate targets are actively sought to improve results. Src family kinases (SFKs), reported to act downstream of EGFR are among the alternative targets for which increased expression or activity in epithelial tumors is commonly associated to the dissolution of E-cadherin-based junctions and acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype. Robust expression of total and activated Src was observed in advanced stage head and neck tumors (N=60) and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines. In cultured cancer cells Src co-localized with E-cadherin in cell-cell junctions and its phosphorylation on Y419 was both constitutive and independent of EGFR activation. Selective inhibition of SFKs with SU6656 delocalized E-cadherin and disrupted cellular junctions without affecting E-cadherin expression and this effect was phenocopied by knockdown of Src or Yes. These findings reveal an EGFR-independent role for SFKs in the maintenance of intercellular junctions, which likely contributes to the cohesive invasion E-cadherin-positive cells in advanced tumors. Further, they highlight the need for a deeper comprehension of molecular pathways that drive collective cell invasion, in absence of mesenchymal transition, in order to combat tumor spread. PMID:25779657

  13. Distinct roles of secreted HtrA proteases from gram-negative pathogens in cleaving the junctional protein and tumor suppressor E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Benjamin; Geppert, Tim; Boehm, Manja; Reisen, Felix; Plattner, Patrick; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Sewald, Norbert; Ferreira, Fatima; Briza, Peter; Schneider, Gisbert; Backert, Steffen; Wessler, Silja

    2012-03-23

    The periplasmic chaperone and serine protease HtrA is important for bacterial stress responses and protein quality control. Recently, we discovered that HtrA from Helicobacter pylori is secreted and cleaves E-cadherin to disrupt the epithelial barrier, but it remained unknown whether this maybe a general virulence mechanism. Here, we show that important other pathogens including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter jejuni, but not Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cleaved E-cadherin on host cells. HtrA deletion in C. jejuni led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage, loss of cell adherence, paracellular transmigration, and basolateral invasion. Computational modeling of HtrAs revealed a conserved pocket in the active center exhibiting pronounced proteolytic activity. Differential E-cadherin cleavage was determined by an alanine-to-glutamine exchange in the active center of neisserial HtrA. These data suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is a prevalent pathogenic mechanism of multiple gram-negative bacteria representing an attractive novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat bacterial infections. PMID:22337879

  14. Concerted loss of TGFβ-mediated proliferation control and E-cadherin disrupts epithelial homeostasis and causes oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andl, Thomas; Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Richards, Nicole F.; Allison, Gillian L.; Loomans, Holli A.; Washington, M.Kay; Revetta, Frank; Lee, Rebecca K.; Taylor, Chase; Moses, Harold L.; Andl, Claudia D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the etiology of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral mucosa is well understood, the cellular origin and the exact molecular mechanisms leading to their formation are not. Previously, we observed the coordinated loss of E-cadherin (CDH1) and transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2) in esophageal squamous tumors. To investigate if the coordinated loss of Cdh1 and Tgfbr2 is sufficient to induce tumorigenesis in vivo, we developed two mouse models targeting ablation of both genes constitutively or inducibly in the oral–esophageal epithelium. We show that the loss of both Cdh1 and Tgfbr2 in both models is sufficient to induce squamous cell carcinomas with animals succumbing to the invasive disease by 18 months of age. Advanced tumors have the ability to invade regional lymph nodes and to establish distant pulmonary metastasis. The mouse tumors showed molecular characteristics of human tumors such as overexpression of Cyclin D1. We addressed the question whether TGFβ signaling may target known stem cell markers and thereby influence tumorigenesis. From our mouse and human models, we conclude that TGFβ signaling regulates key aspects of stemness and quiescence in vitro and in vivo. This provides a new explanation for the importance of TGFβ in mucosal homeostasis. PMID:25233932

  15. The Hedgehog Inhibitor Cyclopamine Reduces β-Catenin-Tcf Transcriptional Activity, Induces E-Cadherin Expression, and Reduces Invasion in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qualtrough, David; Rees, Phil; Speight, Beverley; Williams, Ann C.; Paraskeva, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major global health problem resulting in over 600,000 deaths world-wide every year with the majority of these due to metastatic disease. Wnt signalling, and more specifically β-catenin-related transcription, has been shown to drive both tumorigenesis and the metastatic process in colorectal neoplasia, yet its complex interactions with other key signalling pathways, such as hedgehog, remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that the Hedgehog (HH) signalling pathway is active in cells from colorectal tumours, and that inhibition of the pathway with cyclopamine induces apoptosis. We now show that cyclopamine treatment reduces β-catenin related transcription in colorectal cancer cell lines, and that this effect can be reversed by addition of Sonic Hedgehog protein. We also show that cyclopamine concomitantly induces expression of the tumour suppressor and prognostic indicator E-cadherin. Consistent with a role for HH in regulating the invasive potential we show that cyclopamine reduces the expression of transcription factors (Slug, Snail and Twist) associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and reduces the invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, these data show that pharmacological inhibition of the hedgehog pathway has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26393651

  16. IGF-I Induces Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition via the IGF-IR-Src-MicroRNA-30a-E-Cadherin Pathway in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Li, Heming; Guo, Xuefen; Wang, Zhe; Liang, Shanshan; Dang, Chengxue

    2016-01-01

    Recurrence and distant metastasis are the most common cause of therapeutic failure in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) can induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in many epithelial tumors; however, whether IGF-I can enhance NPC metastasis by EMT and the mechanisms remain unclear. Herein, we have identified that IGF-I could induce EMT and enhance migration ability in NPC cell lines. Furthermore, both Src inhibitor and microRNA-30a (miR-30a) inhibitor reversed IGF-I-induced EMT, suggesting the involvement of an IGF-IR-Src-miR-30a-E-cadherin pathway in IGF-I-induced EMT in NPC cell lines. Overall, the results of the present study may provide more useful information regarding the mechanisms of the IGF-IR signaling pathway in the regulation of NPC metastasis. Both Src kinase and miR-30a can be potential biomarkers for selecting high risk of metastasis in NPC patients. PMID:27656832

  17. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  18. The postnatal accumulation of junctional E-cadherin is inversely correlated with the capacity for supporting cells to convert directly into sensory hair cells in mammalian balance organs.

    PubMed

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M; Corwin, Jeffrey T

    2011-08-17

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species' capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases more than sixfold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h, they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions, the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration.

  19. The Postnatal Accumulation of Junctional E-cadherin Is Inversely Correlated with the Capacity for Supporting Cells to Convert Directly into Sensory Hair Cells in Mammalian Balance Organs

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R.; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species’ capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases >6-fold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration. PMID:21849546

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  1. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  2. Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon cancer stem cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Bu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Wang, Qiyi; Sha, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis and recurrence are the challenges of cancer therapy. Recently, mounting evidence has suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are critical factors in tumor metastasis and recurrence. The oncogene, Bmi-1, promotes the development of hematologic malignancies and many solid tumors. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms through which Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon CSCs (CCSCs) using the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Sphere formation medium and magnetic‑activated cell sorting were used to enrich and screen the CCSCs. CD133 and CD44 were regarded as markers of CCSCs and they were found to be co-expressed in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Colony formation assay, cell proliferation assay and viability assay using the Cell Counting Kit-8, and transplantation assay using nude mice injected with CCSCs were used to examine the CCSCs. The CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells exhibited greater cloning efficiency, an enhanced proliferative ability, increased cell viability and stronger tumorigenicity; these cells were used as the CCSCs for subsequent experiments. In addition, the invasive and migratory abilities of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells were markedly decreased when Bmi-1 was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results of RT-qPCR and western blot analysis suggested that Bmi-1 had a negative effect on E-cadherin expression. On the whole, our findings suggest that Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of CCSCs through the downregulation of E-cadherin, possibly by inducing EMT. Our findings thus indicate that Bmi-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27600678

  3. Force via integrins but not E-cadherin decreases Oct3/4 expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Yuhei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C.; Tanaka, Tetsuya S.; Sato, Masaaki; Wang, Ning

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins or cadherins induces similar cell stiffening responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces cell spreading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical factors play a critical role in fate decisions of stem cells. Recently we have demonstrated that a local force applied via Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides coated magnetic beads to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells increases cell spreading and cell stiffness and decreases Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) gene expression. However, it is not clear whether the effects of the applied stress on these functions of ES cells can be extended to natural extracellular matrix proteins or cell-cell adhesion molecules. Here we show that a local cyclic shear force applied via fibronectin or laminin to integrin receptors increased cell spreading and stiffness, downregulated Oct3/4 gene expression, and decreased cell proliferation rate. In contrast, the same cyclic force applied via cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (Cdh1) had no effects on cell spreading, Oct3/4 gene expression, and the self-renewal of mouse ES cells, but induced significant cell stiffening. Our findings demonstrate that biological responses of ES cells to force applied via integrins are different from those to force via E-cadherin, suggesting that mechanical forces might play different roles in different force transduction pathways to shape early embryogenesis.

  4. Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon cancer stem cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zefeng; Bu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Wang, Qiyi; Sha, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis and recurrence are the challenges of cancer therapy. Recently, mounting evidence has suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are critical factors in tumor metastasis and recurrence. The oncogene, Bmi-1, promotes the development of hematologic malignancies and many solid tumors. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms through which Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon CSCs (CCSCs) using the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Sphere formation medium and magnetic-activated cell sorting were used to enrich and screen the CCSCs. CD133 and CD44 were regarded as markers of CCSCs and they were found to be co-expressed in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Colony formation assay, cell proliferation assay and viability assay using the Cell Counting Kit-8, and transplantation assay using nude mice injected with CCSCs were used to examine the CCSCs. The CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells exhibited greater cloning efficiency, an enhanced proliferative ability, increased cell viability and stronger tumorigenicity; these cells were used as the CCSCs for subsequent experiments. In addition, the invasive and migratory abilities of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells were markedly decreased when Bmi-1 was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results of RT-qPCR and western blot analysis suggested that Bmi-1 had a negative effect on E-cadherin expression. On the whole, our findings suggest that Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of CCSCs through the downregulation of E-cadherin, possibly by inducing EMT. Our findings thus indicate that Bmi-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27600678

  5. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  6. PTEN Loss in E-Cadherin-Deficient Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Rescues Apoptosis and Results in Development of Classical Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Mirjam C; Nethe, Micha; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; de Ruiter, Julian R; Schut, Eva; Bonzanni, Nicola; Zeeman, Amber L; Wientjens, Ellen; van der Burg, Eline; Wessels, Lodewyk; van Amerongen, Renée; Jonkers, Jos

    2016-08-23

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype with poor response to chemotherapy. Besides loss of E-cadherin, a hallmark of ILC, genetic inactivation of PTEN is frequently observed in patients. Through concomitant Cre-mediated inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN in mammary epithelium, we generated a mouse model of classical ILC (CLC), the main histological ILC subtype. While loss of E-cadherin induced cell dissemination and apoptosis, additional PTEN inactivation promoted cell survival and rapid formation of invasive mammary tumors that recapitulate the histological and molecular features, estrogen receptor (ER) status, growth kinetics, metastatic behavior, and tumor microenvironment of human CLC. Combined inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN is sufficient to cause CLC development. These CLCs showed significant tumor regression upon BEZ235-mediated inhibition of PI3K signaling. In summary, this mouse model provides important insights into CLC development and suggests inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting CLC. PMID:27524621

  7. Dog as model for down-expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in tubular epithelial cells in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Pregel, Paola; Valenza, Federico; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2008-12-01

    Mechanism of renal fibrosis leading to end stage kidney remains still a challenge of interest in humans. The pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease is characterized by progressive loss of kidney function and fibrosis. The mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been predominantly studied in in vitro studies, and we previously demonstrated the EMT of tubular epithelial cells in dogs. In this study, we examined and quantified the modifications of cadherin-catenin complex by immunohistochemistry of E-cadherin and beta-catenin and the mesenchymal marker vimentin in 25 dogs with three different spontaneous inflammatory renal diseases. Results showed a significant down-expression of levels of E-cadherin and beta-catenin directly correlated with the tubular-interstitial damage (TID). In TID grades 2 and 3, E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced (p < 0.001). beta-catenin expression was overall similar to E-cadherin. The mesenchymal-associated protein, vimentin, was de novo identified in tubules within areas of inflammation. In this work, we identified the loss of cadherin or catenin expression as a progressive mechanism in tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, which allows dissociation of structural integrity of renal epithelia and loss of epithelial polarity. The dog might result more significant as model for new therapies.

  8. E-cadherin in non-tumor epithelium adjacent to oral cancer as risk marker for the development of multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    González-Moles, M A; Bravo, M; Ruiz-Avila, I; Gil-Montoya, J A; Acebal, F; Esteban, F

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the loss of E-cadherin is a risk factor for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and whether it could serve as a diagnostic marker for oral premalignant fields. We studied 77 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) with associated non-tumour epithelia from 61 patients. Immunohistochemical studies (antibody NHC-38) were used to investigate E-cadherin expression, which was completely lost in basal (48% of cases) and parabasal (43%) layers of non-tumour epithelia close to the tumour and in basal (47%) and parabasal (38%) layers of non-tumour epithelia distant from the tumour. In multiple tumours E-cadherin expression was significantly lower than in single tumours in the basal, parabasal layers, and the middle third of close (p=0.002, <0.001, <0.001) and distant (p=0.041, p<0.001, p=0.005) non-tumour epithelia, respectively. Downregulation of E-cadherin may be valuable as a risk marker for the development of multiple tumours in the oral cavity and for the diagnosis of premalignant fields.

  9. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  10. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  11. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G.; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A.; Karess, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1–Mad2 complex requires the Rod–Zw10–Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rodZ3, a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted RZ3ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rodZ3 mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rodZ3 larvae, RZ3ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. RZ3ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rodZ3 is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells. PMID:25616898

  12. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment.

    PubMed

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A; Karess, Roger E

    2015-03-15

    Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1-Mad2 complex requires the Rod-Zw10-Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rod(Z3), a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted R(Z3)ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rod(Z3) mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rod(Z3) larvae, R(Z3)ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. R(Z3)ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rod(Z3) is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells.

  13. Defects in the adherens junction complex (E-cadherin/ β-catenin) in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shameer; Nijhuis, Anke; Kumagai, Tomoko; Lindsay, James; Silver, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial monolayer of the intestine is a selective barrier permitting nutrient and electrolyte absorption yet acting to protect the underlying tissue compartments and cellular components from attack and infiltration by antigens, bacteria and bacterial products present in the lumen. Disruption of this barrier has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The adherens junction (AJ), together with tight junctions (TJ) and desmosomes, form an apical junction complex that controls epithelial cell-to-cell adherence and barrier function as well as regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intracellular signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation. Numerous studies and reviews highlight the responses of TJs to physiological and pathological stimuli. By comparison, the response of AJ proteins, and the subsequent consequences for barrier function, when exposed to the IBD inflammatory milieu, is less well studied. In this review, we will highlight the roles and responses of the AJ proteins in IBD and provide suggestions for future studies. We will also consider recently proposed therapeutic strategies to preserve or restore epithelial barrier functions to prevent and treat IBD. PMID:25238996

  14. Detecting cell-in-cell structures in human tumor samples by E-cadherin/CD68/CD45 triple staining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyan; Chen, Ang; Wang, Ting; Wang, Manna; Ning, Xiangkai; He, Meifang; Hu, Yazhuo; Yuan, Long; Li, Shichong; Wang, Qiwei; Liu, Hong; Chen, Zhaolie; Ren, Jun; Sun, Qiang

    2015-08-21

    Although Cell-in-cell structures (CICs) had been documented in human tumors for decades, it is unclear what types of CICs were formed largely due to low resolution of traditional way such as H&E staining. In this work, we employed immunofluorescent method to stain a panel of human tumor samples simultaneously with antibodies against E-cadherin for Epithelium, CD68 for Macrophage and CD45 for Leukocytes, which we termed as "EML method" based on the cells detected. Detail analysis revealed four types of CICs, with tumor cells or macrophage engulfing tumor cells or leukocytes respectively. Interestingly, tumor cells seem to be dominant over macrophage (93% vs 7%) as the engulfer cells in all CICs detected, whereas the overall amount of internalized tumor cells is comparable to that of internalized CD45+ leukocytes (57% vs 43%). The CICs profiles vary from tumor to tumor, which may indicate different malignant stages and/or inflammatory conditions. Given the potential impacts different types of CICs might have on tumor growth, we therefore recommend EML analysis of tumor samples to clarify the correlation of CICs subtypes with clinical prognosis in future researches. PMID:26109430

  15. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Karina; Gomes, Fernando; Loureiro Bracarense, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1) and deoxynivalenol (DON) cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM), DON (10 µM) and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON). Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%), DON (93%) and FB1 plus DON (100%). The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON. PMID:24287571

  16. A role for E-cadherin in ensuring cohesive migration of a heterogeneous population of non-epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kyra; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration is a key process underlying the morphogenesis of many organs as well as tumour invasion, which very often involves heterogeneous cell populations. Here we investigated how such populations can migrate cohesively in the Drosophila posterior midgut, comprised of epithelial and mesenchymal cells and show a novel role for the epithelial adhesion molecule E-cadherin (E-Cad) in mesenchymal cells. Despite a lack of junctions at the ultrastructure level, reducing E-Cad levels causes mesenchymal cells to detach from one another and from neighbouring epithelial cells; as a result, coordination between the two populations is lost. Moreover, Bazooka and recycling mechanisms are also required for E-Cad accumulation in mesenchymal cells. These results indicate an active role for E-Cad in mediating cohesive and ordered migration of non-epithelial cells, and discount the notion of E-Cad as just an epithelial feature that has to be switched off to enable migration of mesenchymal cells. PMID:26272476

  17. Transcytosis of Listeria monocytogenes across the intestinal barrier upon specific targeting of goblet cell accessible E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Nikitas, Georgios; Deschamps, Chantal; Disson, Olivier; Niault, Théodora; Cossart, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a foodborne pathogen that crosses the intestinal barrier upon interaction between its surface protein InlA and its species-specific host receptor E-cadherin (Ecad). Ecad, the key constituent of adherens junctions, is typically situated below tight junctions and therefore considered inaccessible from the intestinal lumen. In this study, we investigated how Lm specifically targets its receptor on intestinal villi and crosses the intestinal epithelium to disseminate systemically. We demonstrate that Ecad is luminally accessible around mucus-expelling goblet cells (GCs), around extruding enterocytes at the tip and lateral sides of villi, and in villus epithelial folds. We show that upon preferential adherence to accessible Ecad on GCs, Lm is internalized, rapidly transcytosed across the intestinal epithelium, and released in the lamina propria by exocytosis from where it disseminates systemically. Together, these results show that Lm exploits intrinsic tissue heterogeneity to access its receptor and reveal transcytosis as a novel and unanticipated pathway that is hijacked by Lm to breach the intestinal epithelium and cause systemic infection. PMID:21967767

  18. Epithelial cell-derived periostin functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14ARF/Mdm2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjun; Liu, Rui; Fu, Jiao; Yang, Qi; Shi, Jing; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Periostin is usually considered as an oncogene in diverse human cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, esophagus, and pancreas cancers, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression is decreased whereas stromal periostin expression is significantly increased as compared with normal gastric tissues. Moreover, periostin produced by stromal myofibroblasts markedly promotes gastric cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that periostin derived from different types of cells may play distinct biological roles in gastric tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell-derived periostin in gastric cancer. Our data showed that periglandular periostin was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric mucosa. In addition, its expression in metastatic lymph nodes was significantly lower than that in their primary cancer tissues. Our data also demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression was negatively associated with tumor stage. More importantly, restoration of periostin expression in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved revealed that periostin restoration enhanced Rb phosphorylation and sequentially activated the transcription of E2F1 target gene p14(ARF), leading to Mdm2 inactivation and the stabilization of p53 and E-cadherin proteins. Strikingly, these effects of periostin were abolished upon Rb deletion. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived periostin exerts tumor-suppressor activities in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14(ARF)/Mdm2 signaling pathway. PMID:25486483

  19. Expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: are potential prognostic markers?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma presents with a preference for the head and neck region, and shows a distinct aggressive behavior, with frequent local recurrences, regional and distant metastasis. The alterations in the cadherin-catenin complex are fundamental requirements for the metastasis process, and this is the first study to evaluate the immunostaining of E-cadherin and β-catenin in oral basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Seventeen cases of this tumor located exclusively in the mouth were compared to 26 cases of poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and 28 cases of well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma matched by stage and tumor site. The immunostaining of E-cadherin and β-catenin were evaluated in the three groups and compared to their clinicopathological features and prognosis. Results For groups poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, reduction or absence of E-cadherin staining was observed in more than 80.0% of carcinomas, and it was statistically significant compared to well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (p = .019). A strong expression of β-catenin was observed in 26.9% and 20.8% of well to moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, respectively, and in 41.2% of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. The 5-year and 10-year overall and disease-free survival rates demonstrated no significant differences among all three groups. Conclusions The clinical and biological behavior of three groups of the oral cavity tumors evaluated are similar. E-cadherin and β-catenin immunostaining showed no prognostic value for basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:24893577

  20. Aberrant expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin proteins in placenta of bovine embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kohan-Ghadr, H R; Smith, L C; Arnold, D R; Murphy, B D; Lefebvre, R C

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal placental development is common in the bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)-derived fetus. In the present study, we characterised the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin, structural proteins of adherens junctions, in SCNT gestations as a model for impaired placentation. Cotyledonary tissues were separated from pregnant uteri of SCNT (n = 6) and control pregnancies (n = 8) obtained by artificial insemination. Samples were analysed by western blot, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Bovine trophectoderm cell lines derived from SCNT and control embryos were analysed to compare with the in utero condition. Although no differences in E-cadherin or β-catenin mRNA abundance were observed in fetal tissues between the two groups, proteins encoded by these genes were markedly under-expressed in SCNT trophoblast cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed a different pattern of E-cadherin and total β-catenin localisation in SCNT placentas compared with controls. No difference was observed in subcellular localisation of dephosphorylated active-β-catenin protein in SCNT tissues compared with controls. However, qRT-PCR confirmed that the wingless (WNT)/β-catenin signalling pathway target genes CCND1, CLDN1 and MSX1 were downregulated in SCNT placentas. No differences were detected between two groups of bovine trophectoderm cell lines. Our results suggest that impaired expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin proteins, along with defective β-catenin signalling during embryo attachment, specifically during placentation, is a molecular mechanism explaining insufficient placentation in the bovine SCNT-derived fetus.

  1. SNX3 recruits to phagosomes and negatively regulates phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Rong Yuan Ray; Wong, Siew Heng

    2013-05-01

    Phagocytes such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages employ phagocytosis to take up pathogenic bacteria into phagosomes, digest the bacteria and present the bacteria-derived peptide antigens to the adaptive immunity. Hence, efficient antigen presentation depends greatly on a well-regulated phagocytosis process. Lipids, particularly phosphoinositides, are critical components of the phagosomes. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3 ] is formed at the phagocytic cup, and as the phagosome seals off from the plasma membrane, rapid disappearance of PI(3,4,5)P3 is accompanied by high levels of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P) formation. The sorting nexin (SNX) family consists of a diverse group of Phox-homology (PX) domain-containing cytoplasmic and membrane-associated proteins that are potential effectors of phosphoinositides. We hypothesized that SNX3, a small sorting nexin that contains a single PI3P lipid-binding PX domain as its only protein domain, localizes to phagosomes and regulates phagocytosis in DC. Our results show that SNX3 recruits to nascent phagosomes and silencing of SNX3 enhances phagocytic uptake of bacteria by DC. Furthermore, SNX3 competes with PI3P lipid-binding protein, early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) recruiting to membranes. Our results indicate that SNX3 negatively regulates phagocytosis in DC possibly by modulating recruitment of essential PI3P lipid-binding proteins of the phagocytic pathways, such as EEA1, to phagosomal membranes.

  2. Differential Regulation of Clathrin and Its Adaptor Proteins during Membrane Recruitment for Endocytosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianwei; Yan, Xu; Meng, Tingting; Wang, Yutong; Wang, Qingmei; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Gu, Ying; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is dependent on the function of clathrin and its accessory heterooligomeric adaptor protein complexes, ADAPTOR PROTEIN2 (AP-2) and the TPLATE complex (TPC), and is negatively regulated by the hormones auxin and salicylic acid (SA). The details for how clathrin and its adaptor complexes are recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) to regulate CME, however, are poorly understood. We found that SA and the pharmacological CME inhibitor tyrphostin A23 reduce the membrane association of clathrin and AP-2, but not that of the TPC, whereas auxin solely affected clathrin membrane association, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic and pharmacological experiments revealed that loss of AP2μ or AP2σ partially affected the membrane association of other AP-2 subunits and that the AP-2 subunit AP2σ, but not AP2μ, was required for SA- and tyrphostin A23-dependent inhibition of CME. Furthermore, we show that although AP-2 and the TPC are both required for the PM recruitment of clathrin in wild-type cells, the TPC is necessary for clathrin PM association in AP-2-deficient cells. These results indicate that developmental signals may differentially modulate the membrane recruitment of clathrin and its core accessory complexes to regulate the process of CME in plant cells. PMID:26945051

  3. Melanocyte migration is influenced by E-cadherin-dependent adhesion of keratinocytes in both two- and three-dimensional in vitro wound models.

    PubMed

    Keswell, Dheshnie; Kidson, Susan H; Davids, Lester M

    2015-02-01

    During wound healing, melanocytes are required to migrate into the wounded area that is still in the process of re-construction. The role and behaviour of melanocytes during this process is poorly understood, that is, whether melanocyte migration into the wound is keratinocyte-dependent or not. This paper attempts, through the use of both two- and three-dimensional in vitro models, to understand the role and behaviour of melanocytes during the process of wound healing. In addition, it sheds light on whether keratinocytes influence/contribute toward melanocyte migration and ultimately wound healing. Scratch assays were performed to analyse migration and Western blot analyses measured cellular E-cadherin expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse the in vivo 3D wound healing effect. Scratch assays performed on co-cultures of melanocytes and keratinocytes demonstrated that melanocytes actively migrated, with the use of their dendrites, into the scratch ahead of the proliferating keratinocyte sheet. Migration of the melanocyte into the wound bed was accompanied by loss of attachment to keratinocytes at the wound front with concomitant downregulation of E-cadherin expression as observed through immunocytochemistry. This result suggests that, in vitro, melanocyte migration occurs independently of keratinocytes but that the migration is influenced by keratinocyte E-cadherin expression. We now demonstrate that melanocyte migration during re-pigmentation is an active process, and suggest that targeting of mechanisms involved in active melanocyte migration (e.g. the melanocyte dendrite) may enhance the re-pigmentation process.

  4. CTCF regulates NELF, DSIF and P-TEFb recruitment during transcription.

    PubMed

    Laitem, Clélia; Zaborowska, Justyna; Tellier, Michael; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Cao, Qingfu; Egloff, Sylvain; Handa, Hiroshi; Murphy, Shona

    2015-01-01

    CTCF is a versatile transcription factor with well-established roles in chromatin organization and insulator function. Recent findings also implicate CTCF in the control of elongation by RNA polymerase (RNAP) II. Here we show that CTCF knockdown abrogates RNAP II pausing at the early elongation checkpoint of c-myc by affecting recruitment of DRB-sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF). CTCF knockdown also causes a termination defect on the U2 snRNA genes (U2), by affecting recruitment of negative elongation factor (NELF). In addition, CTCF is required for recruitment of positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which phosphorylates NELF, DSIF, and Ser2 of the RNAP II CTD to activate elongation of transcription of c-myc and recognition of the snRNA gene-specific 3' box RNA processing signal. These findings implicate CTCF in a complex network of protein:protein/protein:DNA interactions and assign a key role to CTCF in controlling RNAP II transcription through the elongation checkpoint of the protein-coding c-myc and the termination site of the non-coding U2, by regulating the recruitment and/or activity of key players in these processes.

  5. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Robert T.; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Hoey, David A.

    2015-03-27

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. - Highlights: • Physically stimulated osteocytes secrete factors that regulate osteoprogenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. • Physically stimulated osteoblasts secrete factors that also regulate progenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment but inhibit proliferation of osteoprogenitors. • This study highlights a contrasting

  6. Unliganded thyroid hormone receptor regulates metamorphic timing via the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Anuran metamorphosis involves a complex series of tissue transformations that change an aquatic tadpole to a terrestrial frog and resembles the postembryonic perinatal period in mammals. Thyroid hormone (TH) plays a causative role in amphibian metamorphosis and its effect is mediated by TH receptors (TRs). Molecular analyses during Xenopus development have shown that unliganded TR recruits histone deacetylase (HDAC)-containing N-CoR/SMRT complexes and causes histone deacetylation at target genes while liganded TR leads to increased histone acetylations and altered histone methylations at target genes. Transgenic studies involving mutant TR-cofactors have shown that corepressor recruitment by unliganded TR is required to ensure proper timing of the onset of metamorphosis while coactivator levels influence the rate of metamorphic progression. In addition, a number of factors that can influence cellular free TH levels appear to contribute the timing of metamorphic transformations of different organs by regulating the levels of unliganded vs. liganded TR in an organ-specific manner. Thus, the recruitment of HDAC-containing corepressor complexes by unliganded TR likely controls both the timing of the initiation of metamorphosis and the temporal regulation of organ-specific transformations. Similar mechanisms likely mediate TR function in mammals as the maturation of many organs during postembryonic development is dependent upon TH and resembles organ metamorphosis in amphibians.

  7. Release from myosin V via regulated recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase controls organelle localization.

    PubMed

    Yau, Richard G; Peng, Yutian; Valiathan, Rajeshwari R; Birkeland, Shanda R; Wilson, Thomas E; Weisman, Lois S

    2014-03-10

    Molecular motors transport organelles to specific subcellular locations. Upon arrival at their correct locations, motors release organelles via unknown mechanisms. The yeast myosin V, Myo2, binds the vacuole-specific adaptor Vac17 to transport the vacuole from the mother cell to the bud. Here, we show that vacuole detachment from Myo2 occurs in multiple regulated steps along the entire pathway of vacuole transport. Detachment initiates in the mother cell with the phosphorylation of Vac17 that recruits the E3 ligase Dma1 to the vacuole. However, Dma1 recruitment also requires the assembly of the vacuole transport complex and is first observed after the vacuole enters the bud. Dma1 remains on the vacuole until the bud and mother vacuoles separate. Subsequently, Dma1 targets Vac17 for proteasomal degradation. Notably, we find that the termination of peroxisome transport also requires Dma1. We predict that this is a general mechanism that detaches myosin V from select cargoes.

  8. Kinesin- and Myosin-driven Steps of Vesicle Recruitment for Ca2+-regulated Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Guo-Qiang; Morris, Robert L.; Liao, Guochun; Alderton, Janet M.; Scholey, Jonathan M.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Kinesin and myosin have been proposed to transport intracellular organelles and vesicles to the cell periphery in several cell systems. However, there has been little direct observation of the role of these motor proteins in the delivery of vesicles during regulated exocytosis in intact cells. Using a confocal microscope, we triggered local bursts of Ca2+-regulated exocytosis by wounding the cell membrane and visualized the resulting individual exocytotic events in real time. Different temporal phases of the exocytosis burst were distinguished by their sensitivities to reagents targeting different motor proteins. The function blocking antikinesin antibody SUK4 as well as the stalk-tail fragment of kinesin heavy chain specifically inhibited a slow phase, while butanedione monoxime, a myosin ATPase inhibitor, inhibited both the slow and fast phases. The blockage of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II with autoinhibitory peptide also inhibited the slow and fast phases, consistent with disruption of a myosin-actin– dependent step of vesicle recruitment. Membrane resealing after wounding was also inhibited by these reagents. Our direct observations provide evidence that in intact living cells, kinesin and myosin motors may mediate two sequential transport steps that recruit vesicles to the release sites of Ca2+-regulated exocytosis, although the identity of the responsible myosin isoform is not yet known. They also indicate the existence of three semistable vesicular pools along this regulated membrane trafficking pathway. In addition, our results provide in vivo evidence for the cargo-binding function of the kinesin heavy chain tail domain. PMID:9281579

  9. Adr1 and Cat8 Mediate Coactivator Recruitment and Chromatin Remodeling at Glucose-Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Biddick, Rhiannon K.; Law, G. Lynn; Young, Elton T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adr1 and Cat8 co-regulate numerous glucose-repressed genes in S. cerevisiae, presenting a unique opportunity to explore their individual roles in coactivator recruitment, chromatin remodeling, and transcription. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the individual contributions of Cat8 and Adr1 on the expression of a cohort of glucose-repressed genes and found three broad categories: genes that need both activators for full derepression, genes that rely mostly on Cat8 and genes that require only Adr1. Through combined expression and recruitment data, along with analysis of chromatin remodeling at two of these genes, ADH2 and FBP1, we clarified how these activators achieve this wide range of co-regulation. We find that Adr1 and Cat8 are not intrinsically different in their abilities to recruit coactivators but rather, promoter context appears to dictate which activator is responsible for recruitment to specific genes. These promoter-specific contributions are also apparent in the chromatin remodeling that accompanies derepression: ADH2 requires both Adr1 and Cat8, whereas, at FBP1, significant remodeling occurs with Cat8 alone. Although over-expression of Adr1 can compensate for loss of Cat8 at many genes in terms of both activation and chromatin remodeling, this over-expression cannot complement all of the cat8Δ phenotypes. Conclusions/Significance Thus, at many of the glucose-repressed genes, Cat8 and Adr1 appear to have interchangeable roles and promoter architecture may dictate the roles of these activators. PMID:18197247

  10. α-catenin, vinculin, and F-actin in strengthening E-cadherin cell–cell adhesions and mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Sylvie; Mège, René-Marc; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins play a crucial role in establishing intercellular adhesion, regulating cortical tension, and maintaining mechanical coupling between cells. The mechanosensitive regulation of intercellular adhesion strengthening depends on the recruitment of adhesion complexes at adhesion sites and their anchoring to the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, the molecular mechanisms coupling cadherin-associated complexes to the actin cytoskeleton are actively being studied, with a particular focus on α-catenin and vinculin. We have recently addressed the role of these proteins by analyzing the consequences of their depletion and the expression of α-catenin mutants in the formation and strengthening of cadherin-mediated adhesions. We have used the dual pipette assay to measure the forces required to separate cell doublets formed in suspension. In this commentary, we briefly summarize the current knowledge on the role of α-catenin and vinculin in cadherin-actin cytoskeletal interactions. These data shed light on the tension-dependent contribution of α-catenin and vinculin in a mechanoresponsive complex that promotes the connection between cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton and their requirement in the development of adhesion strengthening. PMID:23739176

  11. EB1 enables spindle microtubules to regulate centromeric recruitment of Aurora B

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Budhaditya; Kestner, Cortney A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase coordinates kinetochore–microtubule attachments with spindle checkpoint signaling on each mitotic chromosome. We find that EB1, a microtubule plus end–tracking protein, is required to enrich Aurora B at inner centromeres in a microtubule-dependent manner. This regulates phosphorylation of both kinetochore and chromatin substrates. EB1 regulates the histone phosphorylation marks (histone H2A phospho-Thr120 and histone H3 phospho-Thr3) that localize Aurora B. The chromosomal passenger complex containing Aurora B can be found on a subset of spindle microtubules that exist near prometaphase kinetochores, known as preformed K-fibers (kinetochore fibers). Our data suggest that EB1 enables the spindle microtubules to regulate the phosphorylation of kinetochores through recruitment of the Aurora B kinase. PMID:24616220

  12. Regulation of retromer recruitment to endosomes by sequential action of Rab5 and Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Raul; van Vlijmen, Thijs; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Prabhu, Yogikala; Rojas, Adriana L.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.R.; Raposo, Graça; van der Sluijs, Peter; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2008-01-01

    The retromer complex mediates retrograde transport of transmembrane cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Mammalian retromer is composed of a sorting nexin (SNX) dimer that binds to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate–enriched endosomal membranes and a vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) 26/29/35 trimer that participates in cargo recognition. The mammalian SNX dimer is necessary but not sufficient for recruitment of the Vps26/29/35 trimer to membranes. In this study, we demonstrate that the guanosine triphosphatase Rab7 contributes to this recruitment. The Vps26/29/35 trimer specifically binds to Rab7–guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and localizes to Rab7-containing endosomal domains. Interference with Rab7 function causes dissociation of the Vps26/29/35 trimer but not the SNX dimer from membranes. This blocks retrieval of mannose 6-phosphate receptors to the TGN and impairs cathepsin D sorting. Rab5-GTP does not bind to the Vps26/29/35 trimer, but perturbation of Rab5 function causes dissociation of both the SNX and Vps26/29/35 components from membranes through inhibition of a pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. These findings demonstrate that Rab5 and Rab7 act in concert to regulate retromer recruitment to endosomes. PMID:18981234

  13. PKA Regulates PINK1 Stability and Parkin Recruitment to Damaged Mitochondria through Phosphorylation of MIC60.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Shiori; Uno, Midori; Tani, Naoki; Shimazaki, Shunta; Ebara, Natsumi; Kato, Hiroki; Kosako, Hidetaka; Oka, Toshihiko

    2016-05-01

    A mitochondrial kinase, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), selectively recruits the ubiquitin ligase Parkin to damaged mitochondria, which modifies mitochondria by polyubiquitination, leading to mitochondrial autophagy. Here, we report that treatment with an adenylate cyclase agonist or expression of protein kinase A (PKA) impairs Parkin recruitment to damaged mitochondria and decreases PINK1 protein levels. We identified a mitochondrial membrane protein, MIC60 (also known as mitofilin), as a PKA substrate. Mutational and mass spectrometric analyses revealed that the Ser528 residue of MIC60 undergoes PKA-dependent phosphorylation. MIC60 transiently interacts with PINK1, and MIC60 downregulation leads to a reduction in PINK1 and mislocalization of Parkin. Phosphorylation-mimic mutants of MIC60 fail to restore the defect in Parkin recruitment in MIC60-knocked down cells, whereas a phosphorylation-deficient MIC60 mutant facilitates the mitochondrial localization of Parkin. Our findings indicate that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of MIC60 negatively regulates mitochondrial clearance that is initiated by PINK1 and Parkin. PMID:27153535

  14. NAC1 regulates the recruitment of the proteasome complex into dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haowei; Korutla, Laxminarayana; Champtiaux, Nicholas; Toda, Shigenobu; LaLumiere, Ryan; Vallone, Joseph; Klugmann, Matthias; Blendy, Julie A; Mackler, Scott A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2007-08-15

    Coordinated proteolysis of synaptic proteins is required for synaptic plasticity, but a mechanism for recruiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) into dendritic spines is not known. NAC1 is a cocaine-regulated transcriptional protein that was found to complex with proteins in the UPS, including cullins and Mov34. NAC1 and the proteasome were cotranslocated from the nucleus into dendritic spines in cortical neurons in response to proteasome inhibition or disinhibiting synaptic activity with bicuculline. Bicuculline also produced a progressive accumulation of the proteasome and NAC1 in the postsynaptic density. Recruitment of the proteasome into dendrites and postsynaptic density by bicuculline was prevented in neurons from mice harboring an NAC1 gene deletion or in neurons transfected with mutated NAC1 lacking the proteasome binding domain. These experiments show that NAC1 modulates the translocation of the UPS from the nucleus into dendritic spines, thereby suggesting a potential missing link in the recruitment of necessary proteolysis machinery for synaptic remodeling.

  15. Interactions between JARID2 and noncoding RNAs regulate PRC2 recruitment to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Syuzo; Bonasio, Roberto; Saldaña-Meyer, Ricardo; Yoshida, Takahaki; Son, Jinsook; Nishino, Koichiro; Umezawa, Akihiro; Reinberg, Danny

    2014-01-23

    JARID2 is an accessory component of Polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) required for the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). A role for JARID2 in the recruitment of PRC2 to target genes silenced during differentiation has been put forward, but the molecular details remain unclear. We identified a 30-amino-acid region of JARID2 that mediates interactions with long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and found that the presence of lncRNAs stimulated JARID2-EZH2 interactions in vitro and JARID2-mediated recruitment of PRC2 to chromatin in vivo. Native and crosslinked RNA immunoprecipitations of JARID2 revealed that Meg3 and other lncRNAs from the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 locus, an important regulator of development, interacted with PRC2 via JARID2. Lack of MEG3 expression in human induced pluripotent cells altered the chromatin distribution of JARID2, PRC2, and H3K27me3. Our findings show that lncRNAs facilitate JARID2-PRC2 interactions on chromatin and suggest a mechanism by which lncRNAs contribute to PRC2 recruitment.

  16. Platelet-Derived CCL5 Regulates CXC Chemokine Formation and Neutrophil Recruitment in Acute Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Zhang, Songen; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating data suggest that platelets not only regulate thrombosis and haemostasis but also inflammatory processes. Platelets contain numerous potent pro-inflammatory compounds, including the chemokines CCL5 and CXCL4, although their role in acute colitis remains elusive. The aim of this study is to examine the role of platelets and platelet-derived chemokines in acute colitis. Acute colitis is induced in female Balb/c mice by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) for 5 days. Animals receive a platelet-depleting, anti-CCL5, anti-CXCL4, or a control antibody prior to DSS challenge. Colonic tissue is collected for quantification of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CXCL5, CXCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and CCL5 levels as well as morphological analyses. Platelet depletion reduce tissue damage and clinical disease activity index in DSS-exposed animals. Platelet depletion not only reduces levels of CXCL2 and CXCL5 but also levels of CCL5 in the inflamed colon. Immunoneutralization of CCL5 but not CXCL4 reduces tissue damage, CXC chemokine expression, and neutrophil recruitment in DSS-treated animals. These findings show that platelets play a key role in acute colitis by regulating CXC chemokine generation, neutrophil infiltration, and tissue damage in the colon. Moreover, our results suggest that platelet-derived CCL5 is an important link between platelet activation and neutrophil recruitment in acute colitis.

  17. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  18. Characterization of Ascites-Derived Ovarian Tumor Cells from Spontaneously Occurring Ovarian Tumors of the Chicken: Evidence for E-Cadherin Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Anupama; Hadley, Jill A.; Hendricks, Gilbert L.; Elkin, Robert G.; Cooper, Timothy; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, a highly metastatic disease, is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Chickens are widely used as a model for human ovarian cancer as they spontaneously develop epithelial ovarian tumors similar to humans. The cellular and molecular biology of chicken ovarian cancer (COVCAR) cells, however, have not been studied. Our objectives were to culture COVCAR cells and to characterize their invasiveness and expression of genes and proteins associated with ovarian cancer. COVCAR cell lines (n = 13) were successfully maintained in culture for up to19 passages, cryopreserved and found to be viable upon thawing and replating. E-cadherin, cytokeratin and α-smooth muscle actin were localized in COVCAR cells by immunostaining. COVCAR cells were found to be invasive in extracellular matrix and exhibited anchorage-independent growth forming colonies, acini and tube-like structures in soft agar. Using RT-PCR, COVCAR cells were found to express E-cadherin, N-cadherin, cytokeratin, vimentin, mesothelin, EpCAM, steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, inhibin subunits-α, βA, βB, anti-müllerian hormone, estrogen receptor [ER]-α, ER-β, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and activin receptors. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater N-cadherin, vimentin, and VEGF mRNA levels and lesser cytokeratin mRNA levels in COVCAR cells as compared with normal ovarian surface epithelial (NOSE) cells, which was suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Western blotting analyses revealed significantly greater E-cadherin levels in COVCAR cell lines compared with NOSE cells. Furthermore, cancerous ovaries and COVCAR cell lines expressed higher levels of an E-cadherin cleavage product when compared to normal ovaries and NOSE cells, respectively. Cancerous ovaries were found to express significantly higher ovalbumin levels whereas COVCAR cell lines did not express ovalbumin thus suggesting that the latter did not originate from oviduct. Taken

  19. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  20. Actin Cytoskeleton Regulation of Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in Metastatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Jay; Nabi, Ivan R.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with loss of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin and disruption of cell-cell junctions as well as with acquisition of migratory properties including reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and activation of the RhoA GTPase. Here we show that depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton of various metastatic cancer cell lines with Cytochalasin D (Cyt D) reduces cell size and F-actin levels and induces E-cadherin expression at both the protein and mRNA level. Induction of E-cadherin was dose dependent and paralleled loss of the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin. E-cadherin levels increased 2 hours after addition of Cyt D in cells showing an E-cadherin mRNA response but only after 10-12 hours in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 cells in which E-cadherin mRNA level were only minimally affected by Cyt D. Cyt D treatment induced the nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of EMT-associated SNAI 1 and SMAD1/2/3 transcription factors. In non-metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells, that express E-cadherin and represent a cancer cell model for EMT, actin depolymerization with Cyt D induced elevated E-cadherin while actin stabilization with Jasplakinolide reduced E-cadherin levels. Elevated E-cadherin levels due to Cyt D were associated with reduced activation of Rho A. Expression of dominant-negative Rho A mutant increased and dominant-active Rho A mutant decreased E-cadherin levels and also prevented Cyt D induction of E-cadherin. Reduced Rho A activation downstream of actin remodelling therefore induces E-cadherin and reverses EMT in cancer cells. Cyt D treatment inhibited migration and, at higher concentrations, induced cytotoxicity of both HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells and normal Hs27 fibroblasts, but only induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition in HT-1080 cancer cells. Our studies suggest that actin remodelling is an upstream regulator of EMT in metastatic cancer cells. PMID:25756282

  1. WT1 recruits TET2 to regulate its target gene expression and suppress leukemia cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiping; Xiao, Mengtao; Chen, Xiufei; Chen, Leilei; Xu, Yanping; Lv, Lei; Wang, Pu; Yang, Hui; Ma, Shenghong; Lin, Huaipeng; Jiao, Bo; Ren, Ruibao; Ye, Dan; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The TET2 DNA dioxygenase regulates cell identity and suppresses tumorigenesis by modulating DNA methylation and expression of a large number of genes. How TET2, like most other chromatin modifying enzymes, is recruited to specific genomic sites is unknown. Here we report that WT1, a sequence-specific transcription factor, is mutated in a mutually exclusive manner with TET2, IDH1 and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). WT1 physically interacts with and recruits TET2 to its target genes to activate their expression. The interaction between WT1 and TET2 is disrupted by multiple AML-derived TET2 mutations. TET2 suppresses leukemia cell proliferation and colony formation in a manner dependent on WT1. These results provide a mechanism for targeting TET2 to specific DNA sequence in the genome. Our results also provide an explanation for the mutual exclusivity of WT1 and TET2 mutations in AML and suggest an IDH1/2-TET2-WT1 pathway in suppressing AML. PMID:25601757

  2. BICD2, dynactin, and LIS1 cooperate in regulating dynein recruitment to cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Splinter, Daniël; Razafsky, David S.; Schlager, Max A.; Serra-Marques, Andrea; Grigoriev, Ilya; Demmers, Jeroen; Keijzer, Nanda; Jiang, Kai; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; King, Stephen J.; Akhmanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major microtubule minus-end–directed cellular motor. Most dynein activities require dynactin, but the mechanisms regulating cargo-dependent dynein–dynactin interaction are poorly understood. In this study, we focus on dynein–dynactin recruitment to cargo by the conserved motor adaptor Bicaudal D2 (BICD2). We show that dynein and dynactin depend on each other for BICD2-mediated targeting to cargo and that BICD2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) strongly promotes stable interaction between dynein and dynactin both in vitro and in vivo. Direct visualization of dynein in live cells indicates that by itself the triple BICD2-N–dynein–dynactin complex is unable to interact with either cargo or microtubules. However, tethering of BICD2-N to different membranes promotes their microtubule minus-end–directed motility. We further show that LIS1 is required for dynein-mediated transport induced by membrane tethering of BICD2-N and that LIS1 contributes to dynein accumulation at microtubule plus ends and BICD2-positive cellular structures. Our results demonstrate that dynein recruitment to cargo requires concerted action of multiple dynein cofactors. PMID:22956769

  3. Intracellular uptake and intraspheroidal distribution of hypericin and hydrophilic analogues using E-cadherin transfected T-24 human bladder cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnolatac, Ivo; Huygens, Ann; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2008-02-01

    Hypericin (HYP) is used after instillation as a diagnostic tool for the fluorescence detection of CIS in the human bladder. In this study the in vitro cellular accumulation and intraspheroidal distribution of HYP and three analogues (OH1, OH2, OH3) with gradually increasing hydrophilicity were studied. E-cadherin negative (T24-C1 -) and E-cadherin positive (T24-H3 ++) human bladder cancer cells were used. We report that in the presence of FBS all compounds were taken up by the monolayer cells to the same limited extent, whereas the overall intracellular accumulation was substantially higher when the incubation of the different dyes took place using cell medium not supplemented with FBS. The results of this study therefore confirm the competition between cellular uptake of HYP and analogues and binding to FBS constituents. Investigating the permeation of the compounds in spheroids, it was found that all HYP analogues diffused dramatically better through the three-dimensional cell layers than HYP itself. This enhanced ability of hydrophilic HYP analogues to permeate through the cell layers in the presence of FBS can be explained in terms of a preferred binding to HDL as compared to LDL. The results further show that all compounds, including LDL-binding HYP, substantially permeated better in T24-C1 - spheroids than in T24-H3 ++ spheroids. The data therefore support the hypothesis that a lowered cellular cohesion is the key to understand the selective uptake of hypericin and its analogues in malignant urothelial cells.

  4. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  5. Collagen type I may influence the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vera C; Demasi, Ana Paula Dias; Furuse, Cristiane; Altemani, Albina; Alves, Venâncio A; Freitas, Leandro L; Araújo, Ney S

    2009-07-01

    Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an aggressive salivary gland malignancy, usually derived from a long-standing or a recurrent benign tumor, the pleomorphic adenoma (PA). In the context of dynamic reciprocity, changes in the composition and structure of extracellular matrix proteins and cell surface receptors have been frequently associated with dysfunctional adhesion and invasive behavior of tumor cells. It is not fully understood if these changes are involved in the conversion of PA to CXPA. In this study, different progression stages of CXPA were investigated regarding the expression of the major extracellular matrix proteins, collagen type I, and of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, the components of adherens junctions. By immunohistochemical analysis, we have demonstrated that direct contact of tumor cells with fibrillar type I collagen, particularly near the invasive front and in invasive areas prevailing small nests of CXPA cells, could be associated with reduced expression of the E-cadherin and beta-catenin adhesion molecules and with invasive behavior of epithelial, but not of CXPA with myoepithelial component. Our results also suggested that this association could depend on the organization of collagen molecules, being prevented by high-order polymeric structures. These findings could implicate the local microenvironment in the transition from the premalignant PA to invasive CXPA.

  6. A Regulatory Network Involving β-Catenin, e-Cadherin, PI3k/Akt, and Slug Balances Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells In Response to Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tyng-Shyan; Li, Li; Moalim-Nour, Lilian; Jia, Deyong; Bai, Jian; Yao, Zemin; Bennett, Steffany A L; Figeys, Daniel; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying disparate roles of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in maintaining self-renewal or inducing differentiation and lineage specification in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are not clear. In this study, we provide the first demonstration that self-renewal versus differentiation of human ESCs (hESCs) in response to Wnt signaling is predominantly determined by a two-layer regulatory circuit involving β-catenin, E-cadherin, PI3K/Akt, and Slug in a time-dependent manner. Short-term upregulation of β-catenin does not lead to the activation of T-cell factor (TCF)-eGFP Wnt reporter in hESCs. Instead, it enhances E-cadherin expression on the cell membrane, thereby enhancing hESC self-renewal through E-cadherin-associated PI3K/Akt signaling. Conversely, long-term Wnt activation or loss of E-cadherin intracellular β-catenin binding domain induces TCF-eGFP activity and promotes hESC differentiation through β-catenin-induced upregulation of Slug. Enhanced expression of Slug leads to a further reduction of E-cadherin that serves as a β-catenin "sink" sequestering free cytoplasmic β-catenin. The formation of such a framework reinforces hESCs to switch from a state of temporal self-renewal associated with short-term Wnt/β-catenin activation to definitive differentiation. Stem Cells 2015;33:1419-1433.

  7. Talin regulates moesin–NHE-1 recruitment to invadopodia and promotes mammary tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yarong; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Sharma, Ved P.; Miskolci, Veronika; Hodgson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich protrusions that degrade the extracellular matrix and are required for stromal invasion, intravasation, and metastasis. The role of the focal adhesion protein talin in regulating these structures is not known. Here, we demonstrate that talin is required for invadopodial matrix degradation and three-dimensional extracellular matrix invasion in metastatic breast cancer cells. The sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE-1) is linked to the cytoskeleton by ezrin/radixin/moesin family proteins and is known to regulate invadopodium-mediated matrix degradation. We show that the talin C terminus binds directly to the moesin band 4.1 ERM (FERM) domain to recruit a moesin–NHE-1 complex to invadopodia. Silencing talin resulted in a decrease in cytosolic pH at invadopodia and blocked cofilin-dependent actin polymerization, leading to impaired invadopodium stability and matrix degradation. Furthermore, talin is required for mammary tumor cell motility, intravasation, and spontaneous lung metastasis in vivo. Thus, our findings provide a novel understanding of how intracellular pH is regulated and a molecular mechanism by which talin enhances tumor cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:24891603

  8. Global Regulator SATB1 Recruits β-Catenin and Regulates TH2 Differentiation in Wnt-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Notani, Dimple; Gottimukkala, Kamalvishnu P.; Jayani, Ranveer S.; Limaye, Amita S.; Damle, Madhujit V.; Mehta, Sameet; Purbey, Prabhat Kumar; Joseph, Jomon; Galande, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the conserved Wnt signalling cascade promotes the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, which then associates with the lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor proteins (LEF/TCFs) to activate target genes. Wnt/β -catenin signalling is essential for T cell development and differentiation. Here we show that special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1), the T lineage-enriched chromatin organizer and global regulator, interacts with β-catenin and recruits it to SATB1's genomic binding sites. Gene expression profiling revealed that the genes repressed by SATB1 are upregulated upon Wnt signalling. Competition between SATB1 and TCF affects the transcription of TCF-regulated genes upon β-catenin signalling. GATA-3 is a T helper type 2 (TH2) specific transcription factor that regulates production of TH2 cytokines and functions as TH2 lineage determinant. SATB1 positively regulated GATA-3 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of SATB1 downregulated GATA-3 expression in differentiating human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that SATB1 influences TH2 lineage commitment by reprogramming gene expression. In the presence of Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1), an inhibitor of Wnt signalling, GATA-3 is downregulated and the expression of signature TH2 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 is reduced, indicating that Wnt signalling is essential for TH2 differentiation. Knockdown of β-catenin also produced similar results, confirming the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in TH2 differentiation. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that SATB1 recruits β-catenin and p300 acetyltransferase on GATA-3 promoter in differentiating TH2 cells in a Wnt-dependent manner. SATB1 coordinates TH2 lineage commitment by reprogramming gene expression. The SATB1:β-catenin complex activates a number of SATB1 regulated genes, and hence this study has potential to find novel Wnt responsive genes. These results demonstrate that SATB1 orchestrates TH2 lineage commitment by

  9. Pten regulates spindle pole movement through Dlg1-mediated recruitment of Eg5 to centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Ree, Janine H.; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Kanakkanthara, Arun; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (Pten) suppresses neoplastic growth by negatively regulating PI(3)K signalling through its phosphatase activity1. To gain insight into the actions of non-catalytic Pten domains in normal physiological processes and tumorigenesis2,3, we engineered mice lacking the PDZ-binding domain (PDZ-BD). Here, we show that the PDZ-BD regulates centrosome movement and that its heterozygous or homozygous deletion promotes aneuploidy and tumour formation. We found that Pten is recruited to pre-mitotic centrosomes in a Plk1-dependent fashion to create a docking site for protein complexes containing the PDZ-domain-containing protein Dlg1 (also known as Sap97) and Eg5 (also known as Kif11), a kinesin essential for centrosome movement and bipolar spindle formation4. Docking of Dlg1–Eg5 complexes to Pten depended on Eg5 phosphorylation by the Nek9–Nek6 mitotic kinase cascade and Cdk1. PDZ-BD deletion or Dlg1 ablation impaired loading of Eg5 onto centrosomes and spindle pole motility, yielding asymmetrical spindles that are prone to chromosome missegregation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Pten, through the Dlg1-binding ability of its PDZ-BD, accumulates phosphorylated Eg5 at duplicated centrosomes to establish symmetrical bipolar spindles that properly segregate chromosomes, and suggest that this function contributes to tumour suppression. PMID:27240320

  10. Regulation of angiogenesis, mural cell recruitment and adventitial macrophage behavior by Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Aplin, Alfred C; Ligresti, Giovanni; Fogel, Eric; Zorzi, Penelope; Smith, Kelly; Nicosia, Roberto F

    2014-01-01

    The angiogenic response to injury can be studied by culturing rat or mouse aortic explants in collagen gels. Gene expression studies show that aortic angiogenesis is preceded by an immune reaction with overexpression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-inducible genes. TLR1, 3, and 6 are transiently upregulated at 24 h whereas TLR2, 4, and 8 expression peaks at 24 h but remains elevated during angiogenesis and vascular regression. Expression of TLR5, 7 and 9 steadily increases over time and is highest during vascular regression. Studies with isolated cells show that TLRs are expressed at higher levels in aortic macrophages compared to endothelial or mural cells with the exception of TLR2 and TLR9 which are more abundant in the aortic endothelium. LPS and other TLR ligands dose dependently stimulate angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor production. TLR9 ligands also influence the behavior of nonendothelial cell types by blocking mural cell recruitment and inducing formation of multinucleated giant cells by macrophages. TLR9-induced mural cell depletion is associated with reduced expression of the mural cell recruiting factor PDGFB. The spontaneous angiogenic response of the aortic rings to injury is reduced in cultures from mice deficient in myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule of TLRs, and following treatment with an inhibitor of the NFκB pathway. These results suggest that the TLR system participates in the angiogenic response of the vessel wall to injury and may play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory angiogenesis in reactive and pathologic processes.

  11. Reduced expression of E-cadherin and p120-catenin and elevated expression of PLC-γ1 and PIKE are associated with aggressiveness of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Liao, Liyan; Shrestha, Chandrama; Ji, Shangli; Chen, Ying; Peng, Jian; Wang, Larry; Liao, Eryuan; Xie, Zhongjian

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most lethal malignant tumors. The cadherin/catenin cell-cell adhesion complex plays a major role in cancer development and progression. p120-catenin (p120) is a cytoplasmic molecule closely associated with E-cadherin which activates phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1). Our previous studies indicate that activation of PLC-γ1 plays a critical role in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced migration and proliferation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) is highly expressed in SCC cells and mediates EGFR-dependent SCC cell proliferation. Our current study was to determine whether the expression of E-cadherin, p120, PLC-γ1, and PIKE, is associated with OSCC. To address this issue, we assessed levels and localization of E-cadherin, p120, PLC-γ1, and PIKE in specimen of 92 patients with OSCC by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of E-cadherin, and p120 negatively correlated with the tumor differentiation and the expression of PLC-γ1 and PIKE positively correlated with the tumor differentiation. The expression of PLC-γ1 and PIKE in OSCC stage T3 + T4 or in OSCC with lymph node metastasis was significantly higher than that in OSCC stage T1 + T2 or in OSCC without lymph node metastasis. The expression of p120 positively correlated with levels of E-cadherin but negatively correlated with levels of PLC-γ1 and PIKE in OSCC. These data indicate that increased expression of PLC-γ1 and PIKE and decreased expression of E-cadherin and p120 are associated with the aggressiveness of OSCC.

  12. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. PMID:27071484

  13. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  14. Long noncoding RNA-EBIC promotes tumor cell invasion by binding to EZH2 and repressing E-cadherin in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning-xia; Ye, Chen; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Chen; Wang, Shao-bing; Jin, Zhi-jun; Sun, Shu-han; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to play key roles in tumorgenesis. However, the contributions of lncRNAs to cervical cancer (CC) remain largely unknown. In this study, differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs in cervical cancer and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. We found 708 probe sets of lncRNAs increased and 836 probe sets decreased in CC tissues, while 1288 mRNA differential probe sets increased and 901 mRNA probe sets decreased. The results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Then, we found a specific differentially expressed lncRNA can physically bind to enhancer of zeste homolog2 (EZH2) by using RNA immunoprecipitation. We termed it as EZH2-binding lncRNA in cervical cancer [lncRNA-EBIC]. Wound healing assays and Matrigel invasion assays were used to determine the function of this lncRNA by silencing it. We observed that the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells in vitro were inhibited upon suppression of lncRNA-EBIC by siRNA. We also found that the association between lncRNA-EBIC and EZH2 was required for the repression of E-cadherin, which was a key molecular in the metastasis of cervical cancer. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that lncRNA-EBIC was an oncogenic lncRNA, which could promote tumor cell invasion in CC by binding to EZH2 and inhibiting E-cadherin expression.

  15. Long Noncoding RNA-EBIC Promotes Tumor Cell Invasion by Binding to EZH2 and Repressing E-Cadherin in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Chen; Wang, Shao-bing; Jin, Zhi-jun; Sun, Shu-han; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to play key roles in tumorgenesis. However, the contributions of lncRNAs to cervical cancer (CC) remain largely unknown. In this study, differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs in cervical cancer and paired peritumoral tissues were detected by transcriptome microarray analysis. We found 708 probe sets of lncRNAs increased and 836 probe sets decreased in CC tissues, while 1288 mRNA differential probe sets increased and 901 mRNA probe sets decreased. The results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Then, we found a specific differentially expressed lncRNA can physically bind to enhancer of zeste homolog2 (EZH2) by using RNA immunoprecipitation. We termed it as EZH2-binding lncRNA in cervical cancer [lncRNA-EBIC]. Wound healing assays and Matrigel invasion assays were used to determine the function of this lncRNA by silencing it. We observed that the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells in vitro were inhibited upon suppression of lncRNA-EBIC by siRNA. We also found that the association between lncRNA-EBIC and EZH2 was required for the repression of E-cadherin, which was a key molecular in the metastasis of cervical cancer. Conclusion These results demonstrated that lncRNA-EBIC was an oncogenic lncRNA, which could promote tumor cell invasion in CC by binding to EZH2 and inhibiting E-cadherin expression. PMID:25007342

  16. A correlation between altered O-GlcNAcylation, migration and with changes in E-cadherin levels in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng-zhen; Yu, Chao; Zhao, De-zhang; Wu, Ming-jun; Yang, Zhu

    2013-06-10

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic and reversible posttranslational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In recent years, the roles of O-GlcNAcylation in several human malignant tumors have been investigated, and O-GlcNAcylation was found to be linked to cellular features relevant to metastasis. In this study, we modeled four diverse ovarian cancer cells and investigated the effects of O-GlcNAcylation on ovarian cancer cell migration. We found that total O-GlcNAcylation level was elevated in HO-8910PM cells compared to OVCAR3 cells. Additionally, through altering the total O-GlcNAcylation level by OGT silencing or OGA inhibition, we found that the migration of OVCAR3 cells was dramatically enhanced by PUGNAc and Thiamet G treatment, and the migration ability of HO-8910PM cells was significantly inhibited by OGT silencing. Furthermore, we also found that the expression of E-cadherin, an O-GlcNAcylated protein in ovarian cancer cells, was reduced by OGA inhibition in OVCAR3 cells and elevated by OGT silencing in HO-8910PM cells. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation could enhance ovarian cancer cell migration and decrease the expression of E-cadherin. Our studies also suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might become another potential target for the therapy of ovarian cancer. -- Highlights: • We examine the migration potential of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • We examine the total O-GlcNAcylation level of diverse ovarian cancer cells. • Increasing O-GlcNAcylation level will enhance the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • Reducing O-GlcNAcylation level will inhibit the migration of ovarian cancer cells. • The mechanism explains O-GlcNAcylation enhance ovarian cancer cell migration.

  17. NF-kappaB represses E-cadherin expression and enhances epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells: potential involvement of ZEB-1 and ZEB-2.

    PubMed

    Chua, H L; Bhat-Nakshatri, P; Clare, S E; Morimiya, A; Badve, S; Nakshatri, H

    2007-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is constitutively active in both cancer cells and stromal cells of breast cancer; however, the precise role of activated NF-kappaB in cancer progression is not known. Using parental MCF10A cells and a variant that expresses the myoepithelial marker p63 stably overexpressing the constitutively active p65 subunit of NF-kappaB (MCF10A/p65), we show that NF-kappaB suppresses the expression of epithelial specific genes E-cadherin and desmoplakin and induces the expression of the mesenchymal specific gene vimentin. P65 also suppressed the expression of p63 and the putative breast epithelial progenitor marker cytokeratin 5/6. MCF10A/p65 cells were phenotypically similar to cells undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). MCF10A/p65 cells failed to form characteristic acini in three-dimensional Matrigel. Analysis of parental and MCF10A/p65 cells for genes previously shown to be involved in EMT revealed elevated expression of ZEB-1 and ZEB-2 in MCF10A/p65 cells compared to parental cells. In transient transfection assays, p65 increased ZEB-1 promoter activity. Furthermore, MCF10A cells overexpressing ZEB-1 showed reduced E-cadherin and p63 expression and displayed an EMT phenotype. The siRNA against ZEB-1 or ZEB-2 reduced the number of viable MCF10A/p65 but not parental cells, suggesting the dependence of MCF10A/p65 cells to ZEB-1 and ZEB-2 for cell cycle progression or survival. MCF10A cells chronically exposed to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), a potent NF-kappaB inducer, also exhibited the EMT-like phenotype and ZEB-1/ZEB-2 induction, both of which were reversed following TNFalpha withdrawal.

  18. ELMOD2 is anchored to lipid droplets by palmitoylation and regulates adipocyte triglyceride lipase recruitment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Murakami, Tatsuro; Cheng, Jinglei; Kano, Hiroyuki; Fukata, Masaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2015-06-15

    Adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of triglycerides. The Arf1-coat protein complex I (COPI) machinery is known to be engaged in the recruitment of ATGL to lipid droplets (LDs), but the regulatory mechanism has not been clarified. In the present study, we found that ELMOD2, a putative noncanonical Arf-GTPase activating protein (GAP) localizing in LDs, plays an important role in controlling ATGL transport to LDs. We showed that knockdown of ELMOD2 by RNA interference induced an increase in the amount of ATGL existing in LDs and decreased the total cellular triglycerides. These effects of ELMOD2 knockdown were canceled by transfection of small interfering RNA-resistant cDNA of wild-type ELMOD2 but not by that of mutated ELMOD2 lacking the Arf-GAP activity. ELMOD2 was distributed in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria as well as in LDs, but palmitoylation was required only for distribution to LDs. An ELMOD2 mutant deficient in palmitoylation failed to reconstitute the ATGL transport after the ELMOD2 knockdown, indicating that distribution in LDs is indispensable to the functionality of ELMOD2. These results indicate that ELMOD2 regulates ATGL transport and cellular lipid metabolism by modulating the Arf1-COPI activity in LDs.

  19. ELMOD2 is anchored to lipid droplets by palmitoylation and regulates adipocyte triglyceride lipase recruitment.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka; Murakami, Tatsuro; Cheng, Jinglei; Kano, Hiroyuki; Fukata, Masaki; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2015-06-15

    Adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the major enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of triglycerides. The Arf1-coat protein complex I (COPI) machinery is known to be engaged in the recruitment of ATGL to lipid droplets (LDs), but the regulatory mechanism has not been clarified. In the present study, we found that ELMOD2, a putative noncanonical Arf-GTPase activating protein (GAP) localizing in LDs, plays an important role in controlling ATGL transport to LDs. We showed that knockdown of ELMOD2 by RNA interference induced an increase in the amount of ATGL existing in LDs and decreased the total cellular triglycerides. These effects of ELMOD2 knockdown were canceled by transfection of small interfering RNA-resistant cDNA of wild-type ELMOD2 but not by that of mutated ELMOD2 lacking the Arf-GAP activity. ELMOD2 was distributed in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria as well as in LDs, but palmitoylation was required only for distribution to LDs. An ELMOD2 mutant deficient in palmitoylation failed to reconstitute the ATGL transport after the ELMOD2 knockdown, indicating that distribution in LDs is indispensable to the functionality of ELMOD2. These results indicate that ELMOD2 regulates ATGL transport and cellular lipid metabolism by modulating the Arf1-COPI activity in LDs. PMID:25904333

  20. SDCCAG8 Regulates Pericentriolar Material Recruitment and Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Insolera, Ryan; Shao, Wei; Airik, Rannar; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Shi, Song-Hai

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations of SDCCAG8 are associated with nephronophthisis and Bardet-Biedl Syndrome, as well as schizophrenia; however, the function of SDCCAG8 remains largely unknown. Here, we show that SDCCAG8 regulates centrosomal accumulation of pericentriolar material and neuronal polarization and migration in the developing mouse cortex. Sdccag8 expression is selectively elevated in newborn neurons prior to their commencement of radial locomotion, and suppression of this expression by short-hairpin RNAs or a loss-of-function allele impairs centrosomal recruitment of γ-tubulin and pericentrin, interferes with microtubule organization, decouples the centrosome and the nucleus, and disrupts neuronal migration. Moreover, SDCCAG8 interacts and co-traffics with pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1), a centriolar satellite protein crucial for targeting proteins to the centrosome. Expression of SDCCAG8 carrying a human mutation causes neuronal migration defects. These results reveal a critical role for SDCCAG8 in controlling centrosomal properties and function, and provide insights into the basis of neurological defects linked to SDCCAG8 mutations. PMID:25088364

  1. Targeting P38 Pathway Regulates Bony Formation via MSC Recruitment during Mandibular Distraction Osteogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zi-hui; Wu, Bao-lei; Ye, Chen; Jia, Sen; Yang, Xin-jie; Hou, Rui; Lei, De-lin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely used self-tissue engineering. However, complications and discomfort due to the long treatment period are still the bottleneck of DO. Novel strategies to accelerate bone formation in DO are still needed. P38 is capable of regulating the osteogenic differentiation of both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteoblasts, which are crucial to bone regeneration. However, it is not clear whether targeting p38 could regulate bony formation in DO. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the effects of local application of either p38 agonist anisomycin or p38 inhibitor SB203580 in a rat model of DO. 30 adult rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (A) rats injected with DMSO served as the control group; (B) rats injected with p38 agonist anisomycin; (C) rats injected with p38 inhibitor SB203580. All the rats were subjected to mandibular distraction and the injection was performed daily during this period. The distracted mandibles were harvested on days 15 and 30 after surgery and subjected to the following analysis. Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation results showed that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin increased new bone formation in DO, whereas p38 inhibitor SB203580 decreased it. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested that anisomycin promoted MSC recruitment in the distraction gap. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that local application of p38 agonist anisomycin can increase new bone formation during DO. This study may lead to a novel cell-based strategy for the improvement of bone regeneration. PMID:27766028

  2. Environmental factors regulating the recruitment of walleye Sander vitreus and white bass Morone chrysops in irrigation reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Koupal, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that regulate fish recruitment is essential for effective management of fisheries. Generally, first-year survival, and therefore recruitment, is inherently less consistent in systems with high intra- and interannual variability. Irrigation reservoirs display sporadic patterns of annual drawdown, which can pose a substantial challenge to recruitment of fishes. We developed species-specific models using an 18-year data set compiled from state and federal agencies to investigate variables that regulate the recruitment of walleye Sander vitreus and white bass Morone chrysops in irrigation reservoirs in south-west Nebraska, USA. The candidate model set for walleye included only abiotic variables (water-level elevation, minimum daily air temperature during winter prior to hatching, annual precipitation, spring warming rate and May reservoir discharge), and the candidate model set for white bass included primarily biotic variables (catch per unit effort (CPUE) of black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, CPUE of age-0 walleye, CPUE of bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and CPUE of age-3 and older white bass), each of which had a greater relative importance than the single abiotic variable (minimum daily air temperature during winter after hatching). Our findings improve the understanding of the recruitment of fishes in irrigation reservoirs and the relative roles of abiotic and biotic factors.

  3. Integrated Proteomics and Genomics Analysis Reveals a Novel Mesenchymal to Epithelial Reverting Transition in Leiomyosarcoma through Regulation of Slug*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jilong; Eddy, James A.; Pan, Yuan; Hategan, Andrea; Tabus, Ioan; Wang, Yingmei; Cogdell, David; Price, Nathan D.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Lazar, Alexander J. F.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Trent, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is one of the most common mesenchymal tumors. Proteomics profiling analysis by reverse-phase protein lysate array surprisingly revealed that expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin (encoded by CDH1) was significantly elevated in a subset of leiomyosarcomas. In contrast, E-cadherin was rarely expressed in the gastrointestinal stromal tumors, another major mesenchymal tumor type. We further sought to 1) validate this finding, 2) determine whether there is a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition (MErT) in leiomyosarcoma, and if so 3) elucidate the regulatory mechanism responsible for this MErT. Our data showed that the epithelial cell markers E-cadherin, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, and pan-cytokeratin were often detected immunohistochemically in leiomyosarcoma tumor cells on tissue microarray. Interestingly, the E-cadherin protein expression was correlated with better survival in leiomyosarcoma patients. Whole genome microarray was used for transcriptomics analysis, and the epithelial gene expression signature was also associated with better survival. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome data showed an inverse correlation between E-cadherin and E-cadherin repressor Slug (SNAI2) expression in leiomyosarcoma, and this inverse correlation was validated on tissue microarray by immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and Slug. Knockdown of Slug expression in SK-LMS-1 leiomyosarcoma cells by siRNA significantly increased E-cadherin; decreased the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N-cadherin (encoded by CDH2); and significantly decreased cell proliferation, invasion, and migration. An increase in Slug expression by pCMV6-XL5-Slug transfection decreased E-cadherin and increased vimentin and N-cadherin. Thus, MErT, which is mediated through regulation of Slug, is a clinically significant phenotype in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:20651304

  4. Bromodichloromethane induces cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats by suppression of E-cadherin expression via hypermethylation or transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Shun-Chang; Luo, Yan; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2013-11-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) - induced cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats. Rats were administered at doses of 0 and 100mg/kg/day BDCM dissolved in corn oil by gavage for 5 days/week for 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Then the colon, kidney and liver were collected. No histologic lesions were observed in the colon of rats exposed to BDCM, while there were mild nephrotoxicity and marginal hepatotoxicity related to BDCM treatment. Moreover, BDCM enhanced cell proliferation in the colon and kidney but not in the liver. In colons, hypermethylation in E-cadherin promoter might be associated with inhibition of mRNA and protein expression after 12 weeks of BDCM exposure. In kidneys, BDCM decreased E-cadherin mRNA expression, accompanying with transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1. However, suppression of E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression occurred in the absence of significant changes in DNA methylation. Therefore, suppression of E-cadherin expression via hypermethylation or transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1 may be involved in BDCM-induced cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats.

  5. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2

    PubMed Central

    Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Thompson, Elizabeth L.; Yeo, Jung Eun; Cheung, Ronald S.; Huang, Jen-Wei; Sobeck, Alexandra; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex). However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway. PMID:26430909

  6. Analysis of cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration in drosophila ovaries using GFP-actin and E-cadherin-GFP fusion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhusha, Vladyslav V.; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Oda, Hiroki

    1999-06-01

    Coordination of cell migration and adhesion is essential for movement of tissues during morphogenesis. During Drosophila oogenesis so called border cells (BCs) break from an anterior epithelium of egg chamber, acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology, and migrate posteriorly between nurse cells to oocyte. The confocal microscopic observation of BCs has revealed well-developed forepart lamellipodium stained with Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin), PS2 integrin, cytoplasmic myosin and F-actin. To investigate mechanism of BC migration in vivo we have constructed a DE-cadherin-GFP and a GFP-actin fusion proteins and induced their expression BCs utilizing the UAS/GAL4 system. The DE-cadherin-GFP signal as well as immunostaining of PS2 integrin visualized a track of migrating BCs providing an evidence that adhesive molecules are pulled out and left behind on the surface of nurse cells. Our data suggest that two distinct adhesive systems, DE-cadherins and PS2 integrins simultaneously mediate the migration of BCs. Release of adhesive contacts in the tail region is a rate- limited event in BC migration. The spatial-temporal sequence of actin-based events visualized by the GFP-actin suggest a treadmilling model for actin behavior in BC lamellipodium. BC migration can be considered as simultaneous reiterating processes of lamellipodium extension and adhesive attachment, cytoskeletal contraction, and rear detachment.

  7. Significance of the hedgehog pathway-associated proteins Gli-1 and Gli-2 and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated proteins Twist and E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyung Wook; Hong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that abnormal activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is involved in the occurrence, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. In addition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) also performs an important function in the invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. However, the significance of the Hh signaling pathway and EMT in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In the present study, the expression of Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) and Gli family zinc finger 2 (Gli-2), which are key transcriptional factors in the Hh signaling pathway, and Twist and E-cadherin, which are two factors involved in EMT, was examined in 42 patients with HCC and 20 cases of non-tumorous liver (NTL) tissue by immunohistochemistry. Clinicopathological information was collected in order to analyze the correlation of the Hh signaling pathway with EMT. The present study aimed to examine the difference in the expression of Gli-1, Gli-2, E-cadherin and Twist in HCC and NTL to assess the diagnostic value of these factors in HCC. Additionally, the present study aimed to elucidate the correlation between those proteins and other clinicopathological parameters. Whether abnormal activation of the Hh signaling pathway is closely associated with EMT was also evaluated. Gli-1 and Twist expression was found to be significantly increased and E-cadherin expression was found to be decreased in HCC in contrast to NTL (Gli-1, P=0.019; Twist, P=0.003; E-cadherin, P<0.001). Increased Twist expression was associated with the tumor size (P=0.043), and loss of or decreased E-cadherin expression was associated with the histological type of HCC (P=0.021). There was an inverse association between the expression of Twist and E-cadherin (P=0.006). These results showed that Twist overexpression by induction of EMT changes is involved in the occurrence and progression of HCC. However, the role of Hh signaling pathway-associated proteins in HCC may require elucidation by

  8. Significance of the hedgehog pathway-associated proteins Gli-1 and Gli-2 and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated proteins Twist and E-cadherin in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyung Wook; Hong, Ran

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that abnormal activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is involved in the occurrence, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. In addition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) also performs an important function in the invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. However, the significance of the Hh signaling pathway and EMT in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In the present study, the expression of Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) and Gli family zinc finger 2 (Gli-2), which are key transcriptional factors in the Hh signaling pathway, and Twist and E-cadherin, which are two factors involved in EMT, was examined in 42 patients with HCC and 20 cases of non-tumorous liver (NTL) tissue by immunohistochemistry. Clinicopathological information was collected in order to analyze the correlation of the Hh signaling pathway with EMT. The present study aimed to examine the difference in the expression of Gli-1, Gli-2, E-cadherin and Twist in HCC and NTL to assess the diagnostic value of these factors in HCC. Additionally, the present study aimed to elucidate the correlation between those proteins and other clinicopathological parameters. Whether abnormal activation of the Hh signaling pathway is closely associated with EMT was also evaluated. Gli-1 and Twist expression was found to be significantly increased and E-cadherin expression was found to be decreased in HCC in contrast to NTL (Gli-1, P=0.019; Twist, P=0.003; E-cadherin, P<0.001). Increased Twist expression was associated with the tumor size (P=0.043), and loss of or decreased E-cadherin expression was associated with the histological type of HCC (P=0.021). There was an inverse association between the expression of Twist and E-cadherin (P=0.006). These results showed that Twist overexpression by induction of EMT changes is involved in the occurrence and progression of HCC. However, the role of Hh signaling pathway-associated proteins in HCC may require elucidation by

  9. Aurora-A recruitment and centrosomal maturation are regulated by a Golgi-activated pool of Src during G2

    PubMed Central

    Barretta, Maria Luisa; Spano, Daniela; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Scaloni, Andrea; Corda, Daniela; Colanzi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is composed of stacks of cisternae laterally connected by tubules to form a ribbon-like structure. At the onset of mitosis, the Golgi ribbon is broken down into discrete stacks, which then undergo further fragmentation. This ribbon cleavage is required for G2/M transition, which thus indicates that a ‘Golgi mitotic checkpoint' couples Golgi inheritance with cell cycle transition. We previously showed that the Golgi-checkpoint regulates the centrosomal recruitment of the mitotic kinase Aurora-A; however, how the Golgi unlinking regulates this recruitment was unknown. Here we show that, in G2, Aurora-A recruitment is promoted by activated Src at the Golgi. Our data provide evidence that Src and Aurora-A interact upon Golgi ribbon fragmentation; Src phosphorylates Aurora-A at tyrosine 148 and this specific phosphorylation is required for Aurora-A localization at the centrosomes. This process, pivotal for centrosome maturation, is a fundamental prerequisite for proper spindle formation and chromosome segregation. PMID:27242098

  10. Regulation of mRNA Levels by Decay-Promoting Introns that Recruit the Exosome Specificity Factor Mmi1.

    PubMed

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Passoni, Monica; Shah, Sneha; Granneman, Sander; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2015-12-22

    In eukaryotic cells, inefficient splicing is surprisingly common and leads to the degradation of transcripts with retained introns. How pre-mRNAs are committed to nuclear decay is unknown. Here, we uncover a mechanism by which specific intron-containing transcripts are targeted for nuclear degradation in fission yeast. Sequence elements within these "decay-promoting" introns co-transcriptionally recruit the exosome specificity factor Mmi1, which induces degradation of the unspliced precursor and leads to a reduction in the levels of the spliced mRNA. This mechanism negatively regulates levels of the RNA helicase DDX5/Dbp2 to promote cell survival in response to stress. In contrast, fast removal of decay-promoting introns by co-transcriptional splicing precludes Mmi1 recruitment and relieves negative expression regulation. We propose that decay-promoting introns facilitate the regulation of gene expression. Based on the identification of multiple additional Mmi1 targets, including mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and sn/snoRNAs, we suggest a general role in RNA regulation for Mmi1 through transcript degradation.

  11. Regulation of mRNA Levels by Decay-Promoting Introns that Recruit the Exosome Specificity Factor Mmi1

    PubMed Central

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Passoni, Monica; Shah, Sneha; Granneman, Sander; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Summary In eukaryotic cells, inefficient splicing is surprisingly common and leads to the degradation of transcripts with retained introns. How pre-mRNAs are committed to nuclear decay is unknown. Here, we uncover a mechanism by which specific intron-containing transcripts are targeted for nuclear degradation in fission yeast. Sequence elements within these “decay-promoting” introns co-transcriptionally recruit the exosome specificity factor Mmi1, which induces degradation of the unspliced precursor and leads to a reduction in the levels of the spliced mRNA. This mechanism negatively regulates levels of the RNA helicase DDX5/Dbp2 to promote cell survival in response to stress. In contrast, fast removal of decay-promoting introns by co-transcriptional splicing precludes Mmi1 recruitment and relieves negative expression regulation. We propose that decay-promoting introns facilitate the regulation of gene expression. Based on the identification of multiple additional Mmi1 targets, including mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and sn/snoRNAs, we suggest a general role in RNA regulation for Mmi1 through transcript degradation. PMID:26670050

  12. The re-expression of the epigenetically silenced e-cadherin gene by a polyamine analogue lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) inhibitor in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature observed during the transformation process of many cancers, including those of hematologic origin. Histone modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, collaborate with DNA CpG island methylation to regulate gene expression. The dynamic process of histone methylation is the latest of these epigenetic modifications to be described, and the identification and characterization of LSD1 as a demethylase of lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) has confirmed that both the enzyme and the modified histone play important roles as regulators of gene expression. LSD1 activity contributes to the suppression of gene expression by demethylating promoter-region mono- and dimethyl- H3K4 histone marks that are associated with active gene expression. As most posttranslational modifications are reversible, the enzymes involved in the modification of histones have become targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of the polyamine analogue LSD1 inhibitor 2d (1,15-bis{N5-[3,3-(diphenyl)propyl]-N1-biguanido}-4,12-diazapentadecane) in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. In each line studied, 2d evoked cytotoxicity and inhibited LSD1 activity, as evidenced by increases in the global levels of mono- and di-methylated H3K4 proteins. Global increases in other chromatin modifications were also observed following exposure to 2d, suggesting a broad response to this compound with respect to chromatin regulation. On a gene-specific level, treatment with 2d resulted in the reexpression of e-cadherin, a tumor suppressor gene frequently silenced by epigenetic modification in AML. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the ecadherin promoter further confirmed that this re-expression was concurrent with changes in both active and repressive histone marks that were consistent with LSD1 inhibition. As hematologic malignancies have demonstrated

  13. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  14. Loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of invasiveness correlates with tyrosine phosphorylation of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex in cells transformed with a temperature-sensitive v-SRC gene

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Loss of histotypic organization of epithelial cells is a common feature in normal development as well as in the invasion of carcinomas. Here we show that the v-src oncogene is a potent effector of epithelial differentiation and invasiveness. MDCK epithelial cells transformed with a temperature-sensitive mutant of v-src exhibit a strictly epithelial phenotype at the nonpermissive temperature for pp60v-src activity (40.5 degrees C) but rapidly loose cell-to-cell contacts and acquire a fibroblast-like morphology after culture at the permissive temperature (35 degrees C). Furthermore, the invasiveness of the cells into collagen gels or into chick heart fragments was increased at the permissive temperature. The profound effects of v-src on intercellular adhesion were not linked to changes in the levels of expression of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Rather, we observed an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin and, in particular, of the associated protein beta-catenin. These results suggest a mechanism by which v-src counteracts junctional assembly and thereby promotes invasiveness and dedifferentiation of epithelial cells through phosphorylation of the E-cadherin/catenin complex. PMID:8425900

  15. Ewing sarcoma EWS protein regulates midzone formation by recruiting Aurora B kinase to the midzone.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyewon; Turkalo, Timothy K; Nelson, Kayla; Folmsbee, Stephen Sai; Robb, Caroline; Roper, Brittany; Azuma, Mizuki

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a malignant bone cancer that primarily occurs in children and adolescents. Eighty-five percent of Ewing sarcoma is characterized by the presence of the aberrant chimeric EWS/FLI1 fusion gene. Previously, we demonstrated that an interaction between EWS/FLI1 and wild-type EWS led to the inhibition of EWS activity and mitotic dysfunction. Although defective mitosis is considered to be a critical step in cancer initiation, it is unknown how interference with EWS contributes to Ewing sarcoma formation. Here, we demonstrate that EWS/FLI1- and EWS-knockdown cells display a high incidence of defects in the midzone, a midline structure located between segregating chromatids during anaphase. Defects in the midzone can lead to the failure of cytokinesis and can result in the induction of aneuploidy. The similarity among the phenotypes of EWS/FLI1- and EWS siRNA-transfected HeLa cells points to the inhibition of EWS as the key mechanism for the induction of midzone defects. Supporting this observation, the ectopic expression of EWS rescues the high incidence of midzone defects observed in Ewing sarcoma A673 cells. We discovered that EWS interacts with Aurora B kinase, and that EWS is also required for recruiting Aurora B to the midzone. A domain analysis revealed that the R565 in the RGG3 domain of EWS is essential for both Aurora B interaction and the recruitment of Aurora B to the midzone. Here, we propose that the impairment of EWS-dependent midzone formation via the recruitment of Aurora B is a potential mechanism of Ewing sarcoma development.

  16. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials.

  17. Quantum dot-based quantification revealed differences in subcellular localization of EGFR and E-cadherin between EGFR-TKI sensitive and insensitive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dong-hai; Su, Ling; Peng, Xiang-hong; Zhang, Hongzheng; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Shin, Dong M.; Chen, Zhuo

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticle quantum dots (QDs) provide sharper and more photostable fluorescent signals than organic dyes, allowing quantification of multiple biomarkers simultaneously. In this study, we quantified the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin (E-cad) in the same cells simultaneously by using secondary antibody-conjugated QDs with two different emission wavelengths (QD605 and QD565) and compared the cellular distribution of EGFR and E-cad between EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-insensitive and -sensitive lung and head and neck cancer cell lines. Relocalization of EGFR and E-cad upon treatment with the EGFR-TKI erlotinib in the presence of EGF was visualized and analyzed quantitatively. Our results showed that QD-immunocytochemistry (ICC)-based technology can not only quantify basal levels of multiple biomarkers but also track the localization of the biomarkers upon biostimulation. With this new technology we found that in EGFR-TKI-insensitive cells, EGFR and E-cad were located mainly in the cytoplasm; while in sensitive cells, they were found mainly on the cell membrane. After induction with EGF, both EGFR and E-cad internalized to the cytoplasm, but the internalization capability in sensitive cells was greater than that in insensitive cells. Quantification also showed that inhibition of EGF-induced EGFR and E-cad internalization by erlotinib in the sensitive cells was stronger than that in the insensitive cells. These studies demonstrate substantial differences between EGFR-TKI-insensitive and -sensitive cancer cells in EGFR and E-cad expression and localization both at the basal level and in response to EGF and erlotinib. QD-based analysis facilitates the understanding of the features of EGFR-TKI-insensitive versus -sensitive cancer cells and may be used in the prediction of patient response to EGFR-targeted therapy.

  18. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced.

  19. Retinoic acid receptors inhibit AP1 activation by regulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase and CBP recruitment to an AP1-responsive promoter.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, Madjid; Brand, Céline; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-07-01

    Retinoids exhibit antineoplastic activities that may be linked to retinoid receptor-mediated transrepression of activating protein 1 (AP1), a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of fos- and jun-related proteins. Here we show that transcriptional activation of an AP1-regulated gene through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (MAPK(ERK)) is characterized, in intact cells, by a switch from a fra2-junD dimer to a junD-fosB dimer loading on its promoter and by simultaneous recruitment of ERKs, CREB-binding protein (CBP), and RNA polymerase II. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) receptor (RAR) was tethered constitutively to the AP1 promoter. AP1 transrepression by retinoic acid was concomitant to glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation, negative regulation of junD hyperphosphorylation, and to decreased RNA polymerase II recruitment. Under these conditions, fra1 loading to the AP1 response element was strongly increased. Importantly, CBP and ERKs were excluded from the promoter in the presence of atRA. AP1 transrepression by retinoids was RAR and ligand dependent, but none of the functions required for RAR-mediated transactivation was necessary for AP1 transrepression. These results indicate that transrepressive effects of retinoids are mediated through a mechanism unrelated to transcriptional activation, involving the RAR-dependent control of transcription factors and cofactor assembly on AP1-regulated promoters.

  20. Hierarchical recruitment of Plk4 and regulation of centriole biogenesis by two centrosomal scaffolds, Cep192 and Cep152.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Sung; Park, Jung-Eun; Shukla, Anil; Choi, Sunho; Murugan, Ravichandran N; Lee, Jin H; Ahn, Mija; Rhee, Kunsoo; Bang, Jeong K; Kim, Bo Y; Loncarek, Jadranka; Erikson, Raymond L; Lee, Kyung S

    2013-12-10

    Centrosomes play an important role in various cellular processes, including spindle formation and chromosome segregation. They are composed of two orthogonally arranged centrioles, whose duplication occurs only once per cell cycle. Accurate control of centriole numbers is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Although it is well appreciated that polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4) plays a central role in centriole biogenesis, how it is recruited to centrosomes and whether this step is necessary for centriole biogenesis remain largely elusive. Here we showed that Plk4 localizes to distinct subcentrosomal regions in a temporally and spatially regulated manner, and that Cep192 and Cep152 serve as two distinct scaffolds that recruit Plk4 to centrosomes in a hierarchical order. Interestingly, Cep192 and Cep152 competitively interacted with the cryptic polo box of Plk4 through their homologous N-terminal sequences containing acidic-α-helix and N/Q-rich motifs. Consistent with these observations, the expression of either one of these N-terminal fragments was sufficient to delocalize Plk4 from centrosomes. Furthermore, loss of the Cep192- or Cep152-dependent interaction with Plk4 resulted in impaired centriole duplication that led to delayed cell proliferation. Thus, the spatiotemporal regulation of Plk4 localization by two hierarchical scaffolds, Cep192 and Cep152, is critical for centriole biogenesis.

  1. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production. PMID:25738355

  2. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production.

  3. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  4. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-11-24

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER-mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal.

  5. Sigma-1 receptor mediates cocaine-induced transcriptional regulation by recruiting chromatin-remodeling factors at the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Yi A.; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Shan; Wang, Xiao-fei; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Bonci, Antonello; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in cellular regulation. Here we found a new function of Sig-1R, in that it translocates from the ER to the nuclear envelope (NE) to recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules and regulate the gene transcription thereof. Sig-1Rs mainly reside at the ER–mitochondrion interface. However, on stimulation by agonists such as cocaine, Sig-1Rs translocate from ER to the NE, where Sig-1Rs bind NE protein emerin and recruit chromatin-remodeling molecules, including lamin A/C, barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), and histone deacetylase (HDAC), to form a complex with the gene repressor specific protein 3 (Sp3). Knockdown of Sig-1Rs attenuates the complex formation. Cocaine was found to suppress the gene expression of monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) in the brain of wild-type but not Sig-1R knockout mouse. A single dose of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in rats suppresses the level of MAOB at nuclear accumbens without affecting the level of dopamine transporter. Daily injections of cocaine in rats caused behavioral sensitization. Withdrawal from cocaine in cocaine-sensitized rats induced an apparent time-dependent rebound of the MAOB protein level to about 200% over control on day 14 after withdrawal. Treatment of cocaine-withdrawn rats with the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl completely alleviated the behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Our results demonstrate a role of Sig-1R in transcriptional regulation and suggest cocaine may work through this newly discovered genomic action to achieve its addictive action. Results also suggest the MAOB inhibitor deprenyl as a therapeutic agent to block certain actions of cocaine during withdrawal. PMID:26554014

  6. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26785849

  7. Acetylation of steroidogenic factor 1 protein regulates its transcriptional activity and recruits the coactivator GCN5.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A L; Lund, J; Martinez, P; Hedin, L

    2001-10-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays an essential role in the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both sexes. SF-1 belongs to the hormone nuclear receptor superfamily and possesses an N-terminal DNA binding domain and a C-terminal ligand binding domain. Activation function domain 2 is located C-terminal of the ligand binding domain of SF-1 and is important for the transactivation of target genes. Coactivators with histone acetyltransferase activity such as cAMP response element-binding protein-binding protein and steroid receptor coactivator 1 interact and increase SF-1-mediated transcriptional activity. In this study we demonstrate that SF-1 is acetylated in vivo. Histone acetyltransferase GCN5 acetylates SF-1 in vitro. Moreover, we found that SF-1 recruited a novel coactivator GCN5, which can be a newly identified coactivator for SF-1. Acetylation of SF-1 stimulates its transcriptional activity. Inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, increased SF-1-mediated transactivation and stabilized and induced the nuclear export of the SF-1 protein.

  8. Persistent STAT5 activation in myeloid neoplasms recruits p53 into gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Girardot, M; Pecquet, C; Chachoua, I; Van Hees, J; Guibert, S; Ferrant, A; Knoops, L; Baxter, E J; Beer, P A; Giraudier, S; Moriggl, R; Vainchenker, W; Green, A R; Constantinescu, S N

    2015-03-01

    STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) transcription factors are constitutively activated in most hematopoietic cancers. We previously identified a target gene, LPP/miR-28 (LIM domain containing preferred translocation partner in lipoma), induced by constitutive activation of STAT5, but not by transient cytokine-activated STAT5. miR-28 exerts negative effects on thrombopoietin receptor signaling and platelet formation. Here, we demonstrate that, in transformed hematopoietic cells, STAT5 and p53 must be synergistically bound to chromatin for induction of LPP/miR-28 transcription. Genome-wide association studies show that both STAT5 and p53 are co-localized on the chromatin at 463 genomic positions in proximal promoters. Chromatin binding of p53 is dependent on persistent STAT5 activation at these proximal promoters. The transcriptional activity of selected promoters bound by STAT5 and p53 was significantly changed upon STAT5 or p53 inhibition. Abnormal expression of several STAT5-p53 target genes (LEP, ATP5J, GTF2A2, VEGFC, NPY1R and NPY5R) is frequently detected in platelets of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients, but not in platelets from healthy controls. In conclusion, persistently active STAT5 can recruit normal p53, like in the case of MPN cells, but also p53 mutants, such as p53 M133K in human erythroleukemia cells, leading to pathologic gene expression that differs from canonical STAT5 or p53 transcriptional programs.

  9. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  10. Enhanced G2/M Arrest, Caspase Related Apoptosis and Reduced E-Cadherin Dependent Intercellular Adhesion by Trabectedin in Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Ruchan; Kara, Mikail; Soner, Burak Cem; Oktem, Gulperi

    2015-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis, ET-743) is a marine-derived tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid. It is originally derived from the Caribbean marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata and currently produced synthetically. Trabectedin is active against a variety of tumor cell lines growing in culture. The present study focused on the effect of trabectedin in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis and spheroid formation in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Cluster of differentiation (CD) 133+high/CD44+high prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line through flow cytometry. We studied the growth-inhibitory effects of trabectedin and its molecular mechanisms on human prostate CSCs and non-CSCs. DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs were treated with 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h and the growth inhibition rates were examined using the sphere-forming assay. Annexin-V assay and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the detection of the cell death. Concentration-dependent effects of trabectedin on the cell cycle were also evaluated. The cells were exposed to the different doses of trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h to evaluate the effect of trabectedin on the number and diameter of spheroids. According to the results, trabectedin induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis at the IC50 dose, resulting in a significant increase expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, p53 and decrease expression of bcl-2 in dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analyses revealed that trabectedin induces dose-dependent G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, particularly at high-dose treatments. Three-dimensional culture studies showed that trabectedin reduced the number and diameter of spheroids of DU145 and PC3 CSCs. Furthermore, we have found that trabectedin disrupted cell-cell interactions via E-cadherin in prostasphere of DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs. Our results showed that trabectedin inhibits cellular proliferation and accelerates apoptotic events in

  11. Enhanced G2/M Arrest, Caspase Related Apoptosis and Reduced E-Cadherin Dependent Intercellular Adhesion by Trabectedin in Prostate Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Eda; Guven, Ummu; Duzagac, Fahriye; Uslu, Ruchan; Kara, Mikail; Soner, Burak Cem; Oktem, Gulperi

    2015-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis, ET-743) is a marine-derived tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid. It is originally derived from the Caribbean marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata and currently produced synthetically. Trabectedin is active against a variety of tumor cell lines growing in culture. The present study focused on the effect of trabectedin in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis and spheroid formation in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Cluster of differentiation (CD) 133+high/CD44+high prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line through flow cytometry. We studied the growth-inhibitory effects of trabectedin and its molecular mechanisms on human prostate CSCs and non-CSCs. DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs were treated with 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h and the growth inhibition rates were examined using the sphere-forming assay. Annexin-V assay and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the detection of the cell death. Concentration-dependent effects of trabectedin on the cell cycle were also evaluated. The cells were exposed to the different doses of trabectedin for 24, 48 and 72 h to evaluate the effect of trabectedin on the number and diameter of spheroids. According to the results, trabectedin induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis at the IC50 dose, resulting in a significant increase expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, p53 and decrease expression of bcl-2 in dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analyses revealed that trabectedin induces dose-dependent G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, particularly at high-dose treatments. Three-dimensional culture studies showed that trabectedin reduced the number and diameter of spheroids of DU145 and PC3 CSCs. Furthermore, we have found that trabectedin disrupted cell-cell interactions via E-cadherin in prostasphere of DU-145 and PC-3 CSCs. Our results showed that trabectedin inhibits cellular proliferation and accelerates apoptotic events in

  12. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-09-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA.

  13. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  14. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  15. HNF1beta/TCF2 mutations impair transactivation potential through altered co-regulator recruitment.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Elena; Chalkiadaki, Angeliki; Masdeu, Christelle; Haumaitre, Cécile; Lokmane, Ludmilla; Loirat, Chantal; Cloarec, Sylvie; Talianidis, Iannis; Bellanne-Chantelot, Christine; Cereghini, Silvia

    2004-12-15

    Mutations in the HNF1beta gene, encoding the dimeric POU-homeodomain transcription factor HNF1beta (TCF2 or vHNF1), cause various phenotypes including maturity onset diabetes of the young 5 (MODY5), and abnormalities in kidney, pancreas and genital tract development. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes and into the structure of HNF1beta, we functionally characterized eight disease-causing mutations predicted to produce protein truncations, amino acids substitutions or frameshift deletions in different domains of the protein. Truncated mutations, retaining the dimerization domain, displayed defective nuclear localization and weak dominant-negative activity when co-expressed with the wild-type protein. A frameshift mutation located within the C-terminal QSP-rich domain partially reduced transcriptional activity, whereas selective deletion of this domain abolished transactivation. All five missense mutations, which concern POU-specific and homeodomain residues, were correctly expressed and localized to the nucleus. Although having different effects on DNA-binding capacity, which ranged from complete loss to a mild reduction, these mutations exhibited a severe reduction in their transactivation capacity. The transcriptional impairment of those mutants, whose DNA-binding activity was weakly or not affected, correlated with the loss of association with one of the histone-acetyltransferases CBP or PCAF. In contrast to wild-type HNF1beta, whose transactivation potential depends on the synergistic action of CBP and PCAF, the activity of these mutants was not increased by the synergistic action of these two coactivators or by treatment with the specific histone-deacetylase inhibitor TSA. Our findings suggest that the complex syndrome associated with HNF1beta-MODY5 mutations arise from either defective DNA-binding or transactivation function through impaired coactivator recruitment. PMID:15509593

  16. Stromal ETS2 Regulates Chemokine Production and Immune Cell Recruitment during Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Jason R; Liu, Xin; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Mace, Thomas A; Donohue, Sydney; Nayak, Sunayana G; Qu, Chunjing; Lee, James; Woelke, Sarah A; Trela, Stefan; LaPak, Kyle; Yu, Lianbo; McElroy, Joseph; Rosol, Thomas J; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Lesinski, Gregory B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment both inhibits and promotes tumor development and growth. Here we establish the role of stromal fibroblasts during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initiating event in pancreatic cancer formation. The transcription factor V-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) was elevated in smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patient tissue samples relative to normal pancreatic controls. LSL-Kras(G12D/+); LSL-Trp53(R172H/+); Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice showed that ETS2 expression initially increased in fibroblasts during ADM and remained elevated through progression to PDAC. Conditional ablation of Ets-2 in pancreatic fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse ADM model decreased the amount of ADM events. ADMs from fibroblast Ets-2-deleted animals had reduced epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, fibroblast Ets-2 deletion significantly altered immune cell infiltration into the stroma, with an increased CD8+ T-cell population, and decreased presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and mature macrophages. The mechanism involved ETS2-dependent chemokine ligand production in fibroblasts. ETS2 directly bound to regulatory sequences for Ccl3, Ccl4, Cxcl4, Cxcl5, and Cxcl10, a group of chemokines that act as potent mediators of immune cell recruitment. These results suggest an unappreciated role for ETS2 in fibroblasts in establishing an immune-suppressive microenvironment in response to oncogenic Kras(G12D) signaling during the initial stages of tumor development. PMID:27659014

  17. Macrophage dynamics are regulated by local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment in injured pancreas.

    PubMed

    Van Gassen, Naomi; Van Overmeire, Eva; Leuckx, Gunter; Heremans, Yves; De Groef, Sofie; Cai, Ying; Elkrim, Yvon; Gysemans, Conny; Stijlemans, Benoît; Van de Casteele, Mark; De Baetselier, Patrick; De Leu, Nico; Heimberg, Harry; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2015-05-01

    Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL) activates a healing response, encompassing β-cell neogenesis and proliferation. Macrophages (MΦs) were recently shown to promote β-cell proliferation after PDL, but they remain poorly characterized. We assessed myeloid cell diversity and the factors driving myeloid cell dynamics following acute pancreas injury by PDL. In naive and sham-operated pancreas, the myeloid cell compartment consisted mainly of two distinct tissue-resident MΦ types, designated MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) MΦs, the latter being predominant. MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) pancreas MΦs differed at the molecular level, with MHC-II(lo) MΦs being more M2-activated. After PDL, there was an early surge of Ly6C(hi) monocyte infiltration in the pancreas, followed by a transient MHC-II(lo) MΦ peak and ultimately a restoration of the MHC-II(hi) MΦ-dominated steady-state equilibrium. These intricate MΦ dynamics in PDL pancreas depended on monocyte recruitment by C-C chemokine receptor 2 and macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor as well as on macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor-dependent local MΦ proliferation. Functionally, MHC-II(lo) MΦs were more angiogenic. We further demonstrated that, at least in C-C chemokine receptor 2-KO mice, tissue MΦs, rather than Ly6C(hi) monocyte-derived MΦs, contributed to β-cell proliferation. Together, our study fully characterizes the MΦ subsets in the pancreas and clarifies the complex dynamics of MΦs after PDL injury.

  18. Endogenous thrombospondin-1 regulates leukocyte recruitment and activation and accelerates death from systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Manso, Gema; Navarathna, Dhammika H M L P; Galli, Susana; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Kuznetsova, Svetlana A; Tsokos, Maria; Roberts, David D

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated Candida albicans infection results in high morbidity and mortality despite treatment with existing antifungal drugs. Recent studies suggest that modulating the host immune response can improve survival, but specific host targets for accomplishing this goal remain to be identified. The extracellular matrix protein thrombospondin-1 is released at sites of tissue injury and modulates several immune functions, but its role in C. albicans pathogenesis has not been investigated. Here, we show that mice lacking thrombospondin-1 have an advantage in surviving disseminated candidiasis and more efficiently clear the initial colonization from kidneys despite exhibiting fewer infiltrating leukocytes. By examining local and systemic cytokine responses to C. albicans and other standard inflammatory stimuli, we identify a crucial function of phagocytes in this enhanced resistance. Subcutaneous air pouch and systemic candidiasis models demonstrated that endogenous thrombospondin-1 enhances the early innate immune response against C. albicans and promotes activation of inflammatory macrophages (inducible nitric oxide synthase⁺, IL-6(high), TNF-α(high), IL-10(low)), release of the chemokines MIP-2, JE, MIP-1α, and RANTES, and CXCR2-driven polymorphonuclear leukocytes recruitment. However, thrombospondin-1 inhibited the phagocytic capacity of inflammatory leukocytes in vivo and in vitro, resulting in increased fungal burden in the kidney and increased mortality in wild type mice. Thus, thrombospondin-1 enhances the pathogenesis of disseminated candidiasis by creating an imbalance in the host immune response that ultimately leads to reduced phagocytic function, impaired fungal clearance, and increased mortality. Conversely, inhibitors of thrombospondin-1 may be useful drugs to improve patient recovery from disseminated candidiasis.

  19. RACK1 regulates mesenchymal cell recruitment during sexual and asexual reproduction of budding tunicates.

    PubMed

    Tatzuke, Yuki; Sunanaga, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Shigeki; Kawamura, Kaz

    2012-08-15

    A homolog of receptor for activated protein kinase C1 (RACK1) was cloned from the budding tunicate Polyandrocarpa misakiensis. By RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses, PmRACK1 showed biphasic gene expression during asexual and sexual reproduction. In developing buds, the signal was exclusively observed in the multipotent atrial epithelium and undifferentiated mesenchymal cells that contributed to morphogenesis by the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). In juvenile zooids, the signal was first observable in germline precursor cells that arose as mesenchymal cell aggregated in the ventral hemocoel. In mature zooids, the germinal epithelium in the ovary and the pharynx were the most heavily stained parts. GFP reporter assay indicated that the ovarian expression of PmRACK1 was constitutive from germline precursor cells to oocytes. To elucidate the in vivo function of PmRACK1, RNA interference was challenged. When growing buds were incubated with 5 nmol/mL siRNA, most mesenchymal cells remained round and appeared to have no interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), causing lower activity of MET without any apparent effects on cell proliferation. The resultant zooids became growth-deficient. The dwarf zooids did not form buds or mature gonads. Prior to RNAi, buds were treated with human BMP4 that could induce PmRACK1 expression, which resulted in MET activity. We conclude that in P. misakiensis, PmRACK1 plays roles in mesenchymal cell recruitment during formation of somatic and gonad tissues, which contributes to zooidal growth and sexual and asexual reproduction.

  20. The recruitment of AMP-activated protein kinase to glycogen is regulated by autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I; Gooley, Paul R; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-05-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins.

  1. The Recruitment of AMP-activated Protein Kinase to Glycogen Is Regulated by Autophosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F.; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I.; Gooley, Paul R.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. PMID:25792737

  2. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  3. FOG-2 mediated recruitment of the NuRD complex regulates cardiomyocyte proliferation during heart development.

    PubMed

    Garnatz, Audrey S; Gao, Zhiguang; Broman, Michael; Martens, Spencer; Earley, Judy U; Svensson, Eric C

    2014-11-01

    FOG-2 is a multi-zinc finger protein that binds the transcriptional activator GATA4 and modulates GATA4-mediated regulation of target genes during heart development. Our previous work has demonstrated that the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex physically interacts with FOG-2 and is necessary for FOG-2 mediated repression of GATA4 activity in vitro. However, the relevance of this interaction for FOG-2 function in vivo has remained unclear. In this report, we demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/NuRD interaction through the generation and characterization of mice homozygous for a mutation in FOG-2 that disrupts NuRD binding (FOG-2(R3K5A)). These mice exhibit a perinatal lethality and have multiple cardiac malformations, including ventricular and atrial septal defects and a thin ventricular myocardium. To investigate the etiology of the thin myocardium, we measured the rate of cardiomyocyte proliferation in wild-type and FOG-2(R3K5A) developing hearts. We found cardiomyocyte proliferation was reduced by 31±8% in FOG-2(R3K5A) mice. Gene expression analysis indicated that the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a (p21(cip1)) is up-regulated 2.0±0.2-fold in FOG-2(R3K5A) hearts. In addition, we demonstrate that FOG-2 can directly repress the activity of the Cdkn1a gene promoter, suggesting a model by which FOG-2/NuRD promotes ventricular wall thickening by repression of this cell cycle inhibitor. Consistent with this notion, the genetic ablation of Cdkn1a in FOG-2(R3K5A) mice leads to an improvement in left ventricular function and a partial rescue of left ventricular wall thickness. Taken together, our results define a novel mechanism in which FOG-2/NuRD interaction is required for cardiomyocyte proliferation by directly down-regulating the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a during heart development.

  4. TIE2-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of H4 regulates DNA damage response by recruiting ABL1

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Shifat, Rehnuma; Johnson, David G.; Bedford, Mark T.; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad R.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Luo, Xuemei; Lu, Zhimin; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Sulman, Erik P.; Jiang, Hong; Li, Shawn S. C.; Lang, Frederick F.; Tyler, Jessica; Hung, Mien-Chie; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair pathways enable cancer cells to survive DNA damage induced after genotoxic therapies. Tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) have been reported as regulators of the DNA repair machinery. TIE2 is a TKR overexpressed in human gliomas at levels that correlate with the degree of increasing malignancy. Following ionizing radiation, TIE2 translocates to the nucleus, conferring cells with an enhanced nonhomologous end-joining mechanism of DNA repair that results in a radioresistant phenotype. Nuclear TIE2 binds to key components of DNA repair and phosphorylates H4 at tyrosine 51, which, in turn, is recognized by the proto-oncogene ABL1, indicating a role for nuclear TIE2 as a sensor for genotoxic stress by action as a histone modifier. H4Y51 constitutes the first tyrosine phosphorylation of core histones recognized by ABL1, defining this histone modification as a direct signal to couple genotoxic stress with the DNA repair machinery.

  5. EMMPRIN regulates tumor growth and metastasis by recruiting bone marrow-derived cells through paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanke; Gou, Xingchun; Kong, Derek Kai; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Jianhui; Chen, Zeming; Huang, Chen; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2015-10-20

    EMMPRIN, a cell adhesion molecule highly expressed in a variety of tumors, is associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Mechanistically, EMMPRIN has been characterized to contribute to tumor development and progression by controlling the expression of MMPs and VEGF. In the present study, by using fluorescently labeled bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), we found that the down-regulation of EMMPRIN expression in cancer cells reduces tumor growth and metastasis, and is associated with the reduced recruitment of BMDCs. Further protein profiling studies suggest that EMMPRIN controls BMDC recruitment through regulating the secretion of soluble factors, notably, VEGF and SDF-1. We demonstrate that the expression and secretion of SDF-1 in tumor cells are regulated by EMMPRIN. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which EMMPRIN promotes tumor growth and metastasis by recruitment of BMDCs through controlling secretion and paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

  6. Leptin recruits Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 to improve hyperglycemia in insulin-deficient diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun Hyang; Szabo, Andras; King, Emily M.; Ayala, Jennifer; Ayala, Julio E.; Altarejos, Judith Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin alleviates hyperglycemia in rodent models of Type 1 diabetes by activating leptin receptors within the central nervous system. Here we delineate whether non-canonical leptin signaling through the Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 (Crtc1) contributes to leptin-dependent improvements in diabetic glucose metabolism. Methods We employed mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Crtc1, tracer dilution techniques and neuroanatomical studies to interrogate whether Crtc1 enables leptin to improve glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes. Results Here we show that leptin improves diabetic glucose metabolism through Crtc1-dependent and independent mechanisms. We find that leptin reduces diabetic hyperglycemia, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and selectively increases glucose disposal to brown adipose tissue and heart, in STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT mice but not Crtc1+/− mice. By contrast, leptin decreases circulating glucagon levels in both STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT and Crtc1+/− mice. We also demonstrate that leptin promotes Crtc1 nuclear translocation in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and non-Pomc neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Accordingly, leptin's ability to induce Pomc gene expression in the ARC is blunted in STZ-diabetic Crtc1+/− mice. Conclusions Our study reveals that Crtc1 functions as a conduit for leptin's glucoregulatory actions in insulin-dependent diabetes. This study also highlights a new role for Crtc1 in modulating peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:25737949

  7. UV-sensitive syndrome protein UVSSA recruits USP7 to regulate transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Schwertman, Petra; Lagarou, Anna; Dekkers, Dick H W; Raams, Anja; van der Hoek, Adriana C; Laffeber, Charlie; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Fousteri, Maria; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled nucleotide-excision repair (TC-NER) is a subpathway of NER that efficiently removes the highly toxic RNA polymerase II blocking lesions in DNA. Defective TC-NER gives rise to the human disorders Cockayne syndrome and UV-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S). NER initiating factors are known to be regulated by ubiquitination. Using a SILAC-based proteomic approach, we identified UVSSA (formerly known as KIAA1530) as part of a UV-induced ubiquitinated protein complex. Knockdown of UVSSA resulted in TC-NER deficiency. UVSSA was found to be the causative gene for UV(S)S, an unresolved NER deficiency disorder. The UVSSA protein interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II, localizes specifically to UV-induced lesions, resides in chromatin-associated TC-NER complexes and is implicated in stabilizing the TC-NER master organizing protein ERCC6 (also known as CSB) by delivering the deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 to TC-NER complexes. Together, these findings indicate that UVSSA-USP7–mediated stabilization of ERCC6 represents a critical regulatory mechanism of TC-NER in restoring gene expression. PMID:22466611

  8. Therapeutic intervention of silymarin on the migration of non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with the axis of multiple molecular targets including class 1 HDACs, ZEB1 expression, and restoration of miR-203 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and its metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality world-wide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 90% of total lung cancer cases. Despite advancements in therapeutic approaches, only limited improvement has been achieved. Therefore, alternative strategies are required for the management of lung cancer. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effect of silymarin, a phytochemical from milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), on NSCLC cell migration using metastatic human NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1299 and H460) together with the molecular targets underlying these effects. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we found that treatment of human NSCLC cells (A549, H1299 and H460) with silymarin (0, 5, 10 and 20 µg/mL) for 24 h resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and reduced levels of class 1 HDAC proteins (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC8) and concomitant increases in the levels of histone acetyltransferase activity (HAT). Known HDAC inhibitors (sodium butyrate and trichostatin A) exhibited similar patterns of therapeutic effects on the lung cancer cells. Treatment of A549 and H460 cells with silymarin reduced the expression of the transcription factor ZEB1 and restored expression of E-cadherin. The siRNA knockdown of ZEB1 also reduced the expression of HDAC proteins and enhanced re-expression of the levels of E-cadherin in NSCLC cells. MicroRNA-203 (miR-203) acts as a tumor suppressor, regulates tumor cell invasion and is repressed by ZEB1 in cancer cells. Silymarin treatment restored the levels of miR-203 in NSCLC cells. These findings indicate that silymarin can effectively inhibit lung cancer cell migration and provide a coherent model of its mechanism of action suggesting that silymarin may be an important therapeutic option for the prevention or treatment of lung cancer metastasis when administered either

  9. Insulin and AMPK regulate FA translocase/CD36 plasma membrane recruitment in cardiomyocytes via Rab GAP AS160 and Rab8a Rab GTPase.

    PubMed

    Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Xu, Yingcheng; Abumrad, Nada A; Stahl, Philip D

    2012-04-01

    The FA translocase cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) facilitates FA uptake by the myocardium, and its surface recruitment in cardiomyocytes is induced by insulin, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), or contraction. Dysfunction of CD36 trafficking contributes to disordered cardiac FA utilization and promotes progression to disease. The Akt substrate 160 (AS160) Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) is a key regulator of vesicular trafficking, and its activity is modulated via phosphorylation. Our study documents that AS160 mediates insulin or AMPK-stimulated surface translocation of CD36 in cardiomyocytes. Knock-down of AS160 redistributes CD36 to the surface and abrogates its translocation by insulin or the AMPK agonist 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR). Conversely, overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient AS160 mutant (AS160 4P) suppresses the stimulated membrane recruitment of CD36. The AS160 substrate Rab8a GTPase is shown via overexpression and knock-down studies to be specifically involved in insulin/AICAR-induced CD36 membrane recruitment. Our findings directly demonstrate AS160 regulation of CD36 trafficking. In myocytes, the AS160 pathway also mediates the effect of insulin, AMPK, or contraction on surface recruitment of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Thus, AS160 constitutes a point of convergence for coordinating physiological regulation of CD36 and GLUT4 membrane recruitment.

  10. Community regulation: the relative importance of recruitment and predation intensity of an intertidal community dominant in a seascape context.

    PubMed

    Rilov, Gil; Schiel, David R

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the strength and context-dependency of species interactions across multiple scales is a core area in ecology. This is especially challenging in the marine environment, where populations of most predators and prey are generally open, because of their pelagic larval phase, and recruitment of both is highly variable. In this study we use a comparative-experimental approach on small and large spatial scales to test the relationship between predation intensity and prey recruitment and their relative importance in shaping populations of a dominant rocky intertidal space occupier, mussels, in the context of seascape (availability of nearby subtidal reef habitat). Predation intensity on transplanted mussels was tested inside and outside cages and recruitment was measured with standard larval settlement collectors. We found that on intertidal rocky benches with contiguous subtidal reefs in New Zealand, mussel larval recruitment is usually low but predation on recruits by subtidal consumers (fish, crabs) is intense during high tide. On nearby intertidal rocky benches with adjacent sandy subtidal habitats, larval recruitment is usually greater but subtidal predators are typically rare and predation is weaker. Multiple regression analysis showed that predation intensity accounts for most of the variability in the abundance of adult mussels compared to recruitment. This seascape-dependent, predation-recruitment relationship could scale up to explain regional community variability. We argue that community ecology models should include seascape context-dependency and its effects on recruitment and species interactions for better predictions of coastal community dynamics and structure. PMID:21887351

  11. Community Regulation: The Relative Importance of Recruitment and Predation Intensity of an Intertidal Community Dominant in a Seascape Context

    PubMed Central

    Rilov, Gil; Schiel, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the strength and context-dependency of species interactions across multiple scales is a core area in ecology. This is especially challenging in the marine environment, where populations of most predators and prey are generally open, because of their pelagic larval phase, and recruitment of both is highly variable. In this study we use a comparative-experimental approach on small and large spatial scales to test the relationship between predation intensity and prey recruitment and their relative importance in shaping populations of a dominant rocky intertidal space occupier, mussels, in the context of seascape (availability of nearby subtidal reef habitat). Predation intensity on transplanted mussels was tested inside and outside cages and recruitment was measured with standard larval settlement collectors. We found that on intertidal rocky benches with contiguous subtidal reefs in New Zealand, mussel larval recruitment is usually low but predation on recruits by subtidal consumers (fish, crabs) is intense during high tide. On nearby intertidal rocky benches with adjacent sandy subtidal habitats, larval recruitment is usually greater but subtidal predators are typically rare and predation is weaker. Multiple regression analysis showed that predation intensity accounts for most of the variability in the abundance of adult mussels compared to recruitment. This seascape-dependent, predation-recruitment relationship could scale up to explain regional community variability. We argue that community ecology models should include seascape context-dependency and its effects on recruitment and species interactions for better predictions of coastal community dynamics and structure. PMID:21887351

  12. Central serotonergic neurons activate and recruit thermogenic brown and beige fat and regulate glucose and lipid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    McGlashon, Jacob M.; Gorecki, Michelle C.; Kozlowski, Amanda E.; Thirnbeck, Caitlin K.; Markan, Kathleen R.; Leslie, Kirstie L.; Kotas, Maya E.; Potthoff, Matthew J.; Richerson, George B.; Gillum, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thermogenic brown and beige adipocytes convert chemical energy to heat by metabolizing glucose and lipids. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the central nervous system are essential for thermoregulation and accordingly may control metabolic activity of thermogenic fat. To test this, we generated mice in which the human diphtheria toxin receptor was selectively expressed in central 5-HT neurons. Treatment with diphtheria toxin eliminated 5-HT neurons and caused loss of thermoregulation, brown adipose tissue (BAT) steatosis, and a >50% decrease in uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression in BAT and inguinal white adipose tissue (WAT). In parallel, blood glucose increased 3.5-fold, free fatty acids 13.4-fold and triglycerides 6.5-fold. Similar BAT and beige fat defects occurred in Lmx1bf/f/p mice, in which 5-HT neurons fail to develop in utero. We conclude 5-HT neurons play a major role in regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis, in part through recruitment and metabolic activation of brown and beige adipocytes. PMID:25955206

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion membrane protein CT228 recruits elements of the myosin phosphatase pathway to regulate release mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, Erika I.; Barger, Alexandra C.; Nair, Vinod; Hackstadt, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a membrane bound compartment termed an inclusion. The inclusion membrane is modified by the insertion of multiple proteins known as Incs. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, an interaction was found between the inclusion membrane protein CT228 and MYPT1, a subunit of myosin phosphatase. MYPT1 was recruited peripherally around the inclusion while the phosphorylated inactive form was localized to active Src-family kinase-rich microdomains. Phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and myosin IIA and IIB also colocalized with inactive MYPT1. The role of these proteins was examined in the context of host-cell exit mechanisms; cell lysis or extrusion of intact inclusions. Inhibition of myosin II or siRNA depletion of myosin IIA and IIB, MLC2, or MLCK reduced chlamydial extrusion thus favoring lytic events as the primary means of release. These studies provide insights into regulation of egress mechanisms by C. trachomatis. PMID:23727243

  14. Human RNA Polymerase II Promoter Recruitment in Vitro Is Regulated by O-Linked N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase (OGT).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian A; Burlingame, Alma L; Myers, Samuel A

    2016-07-01

    Although the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain was described 20 years ago, the function of this RNA polymerase II (pol II) species is not known. We show here that an O-GlcNAcylated pol II species (pol IIγ) exists on promoters in vitro Inhibition of O-GlcNAc-transferase activity and O-GlcNAcylation prevents pol II entry into the promoter, and O-GlcNAc removal from pol II is an ATP-dependent step during initiation. These data indicate that O-GlcNAc-transferase activity is essential for RNA pol II promoter recruitment and that pol II goes through a cycling of O-GlcNAcylation at the promoter. Mass spectrometry shows that serine residues 2 and 5 of the pol II C-terminal domain are O-GlcNAcylated, suggesting an overlap with the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH)-dependent serine 5 phosphorylation events during initiation and P-TEFb (positive transcriptional elongation factor b) events during elongation. These data provide unexpected and important insights into the role of a previously ill-defined species of RNA polymerase II in regulating transcription.

  15. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor regulates glucocorticoid receptor activity and is essential for prolactin-mediated maternal instinct.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Amanda C; Choleris, Elena; Gillis, Daniel J; Armstrong, John N; Amor, Talya R; McCluggage, Adam R R; Turner, Patricia V; Liang, Genqing; Cai, Kimberly; Lu, Ray

    2012-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system in animal responses to stress. It is known that the HPA axis is attenuated at parturition to prevent detrimental effects of glucocorticoid secretion including inhibition of lactation and maternal responsiveness. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor (LRF) was identified as a negative regulator of CREB3 which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Here, we report a LRF gene knockout mouse line that has a severe maternal behavioral defect. LRF(-/-) females lacked the instinct to tend pups; 80% of their litters died within 24 h, while most pups survived if cross-fostered. Prolactin levels were significantly repressed in lactating LRF(-/-) dams, with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling markedly augmented. In cell culture, LRF repressed transcriptional activity of GR and promoted its protein degradation. LRF was found to colocalize with the known GR repressor, RIP140/NRIP1, which inhibits the activity by GR within specific nuclear punctates that are similar to LRF nuclear bodies. Furthermore, administration of prolactin or the GR antagonist RU486 restored maternal responses in mutant females. We thus postulate that LRF plays a critical role in the attenuation of the HPA axis through repression of glucocorticoid stress signaling during parturition and the postpartum period.

  16. Luman/CREB3 Recruitment Factor Regulates Glucocorticoid Receptor Activity and Is Essential for Prolactin-Mediated Maternal Instinct

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, Amanda C.; Choleris, Elena; Gillis, Daniel J.; Armstrong, John N.; Amor, Talya R.; McCluggage, Adam R. R.; Turner, Patricia V.; Liang, Genqing; Cai, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a major part of the neuroendocrine system in animal responses to stress. It is known that the HPA axis is attenuated at parturition to prevent detrimental effects of glucocorticoid secretion including inhibition of lactation and maternal responsiveness. Luman/CREB3 recruitment factor (LRF) was identified as a negative regulator of CREB3 which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Here, we report a LRF gene knockout mouse line that has a severe maternal behavioral defect. LRF−/− females lacked the instinct to tend pups; 80% of their litters died within 24 h, while most pups survived if cross-fostered. Prolactin levels were significantly repressed in lactating LRF−/− dams, with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling markedly augmented. In cell culture, LRF repressed transcriptional activity of GR and promoted its protein degradation. LRF was found to colocalize with the known GR repressor, RIP140/NRIP1, which inhibits the activity by GR within specific nuclear punctates that are similar to LRF nuclear bodies. Furthermore, administration of prolactin or the GR antagonist RU486 restored maternal responses in mutant females. We thus postulate that LRF plays a critical role in the attenuation of the HPA axis through repression of glucocorticoid stress signaling during parturition and the postpartum period. PMID:23071095

  17. Oxidative stress regulates IGF1R expression in vascular smooth-muscle cells via p53 and HDAC recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Kavurma, Mary M.; Figg, Nichola; Bennett, Martin R.; Mercer, John; Khachigian, Levon M.; Littlewood, Trevor D.

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis of VSMCs (vascular smooth-muscle cells) leads to features of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We have demonstrated previously that plaque-derived VSMCs have reduced IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) signalling, resulting from a decrease in the expression of IGF1R (IGF1 receptor) compared with normal aortic VSMCs [Patel, Zhang, Siddle, Soos, Goddard, Weissberg and Bennett (2001) Circ. Res. 88, 895–902]. In the present study, we show that apoptosis induced by oxidative stress is inhibited by ectopic expression of IGF1R. Oxidative stress repressed IGF1R expression at multiple levels, and this was also blocked by mutant p53. Oxidative stress also induced p53 phosphorylation and apoptosis in VSMCs. p53 negatively regulated IGF1R promoter activity and expression and, consistent with this, p53−/− VSMCs demonstrated increased IGF1R expression, both in vitro and in advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Oxidative-stress-induced interaction of endogenous p53 with TBP (TATA-box-binding protein) was dependent on p53 phosphorylation. Oxidative stress also increased the association of p53 with HDAC1 (histone deacetylase 1). Trichostatin A, a specific HDAC inhibitor, or p300 overexpression relieved the repression of IGF1R following oxidative stress. Furthermore, acetylated histone-4 association with the IGF1R promoter was reduced in cells subjected to oxidative stress. These results suggest that oxidative-stress-induced repression of IGF1R is mediated by the association of phosphorylated p53 with the IGF1R promoter via TBP, and by the subsequent recruitment of chromatin-modifying proteins, such as HDAC1, to the IGF1R promoter–TBP–p53 complex. PMID:17600529

  18. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  19. Yeast Protein Phosphatase 2A-Cdc55 Regulates the Transcriptional Response to Hyperosmolarity Stress by Regulating Msn2 and Msn4 Chromatin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Wolfgang; Klopf, Eva; De Wever, Veerle; Anrather, Dorothea; Petryshyn, Andriy; Roetzer, Andreas; Niederacher, Gerhard; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Dohnal, Ilse; Görner, Wolfram; Mechtler, Karl; Brocard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    We have identified Cdc55, a regulatory B subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), as an essential activating factor for stress gene transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The presence of PP2A-Cdc55 is required for full activation of the environmental stress response mediated by the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4. We show that PP2A-Cdc55 contributes to sustained nuclear accumulation of Msn2 and Msn4 during hyperosmolarity stress. PP2A-Cdc55 also enhances Msn2-dependent transactivation, required for extended chromatin recruitment of the transcription factor. We analyzed a possible direct regulatory role for PP2A-Cdc55 on the phosphorylation status of Msn2. Detailed mass spectrometric and genetic analysis of Msn2 showed that stress exposure causes immediate transient dephosphorylation of Msn2 which is not dependent on PP2A-Cdc55 activity. Furthermore, the Hog1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is not influenced by PP2A-Cdc55. We therefore propose that the PP2A-Cdc55 phosphatase is not involved in cytosolic stress signal perception but is involved in a specific intranuclear mechanism to regulate Msn2 and Msn4 nuclear accumulation and chromatin association under stress conditions. PMID:23275436

  20. Monoclonal Antibody against the Ectodomain of E-Cadherin (DECMA-1) Suppresses Breast Carcinogenesis: Involvement of the HER/PI3K/Akt/mTOR and IAP Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brouxhon, Sabine M.; Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Teng, Xiaofei; Raja, Veena; O’Banion, M. Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Byers, Stephen; Silberfeld, Andrew; Tornos, Carmen; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although targeted therapies against HER2 have been one of the most successful therapeutic strategies for breast cancer, patients eventually developed acquired resistance from compensatory upregulation of alternate HERs and mitogen-activated protein kinase–phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling. As we and others have shown that the soluble ectodomain fragment of E-cadherin exerts prooncogenic effects via HER1/2–mediated binding and activation of downstream prosurvival pathways, we explored whether targeting this ectodomain [DECMA-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb)] was effective in the treatment of HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancers. Experimental Design MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice and HER2+/E-cadherin–positive MCF-7 and BT474 trastuzumab-resistant (TtzmR) cells were treated with the DECMA-1 mAb. Antitumor responses were assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, apoptosis, and necrosis. The underlying intracellular prooncogenic pathways were explored using subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, fluorescence microscopy, and immunoblotting. Results Treatment with DECMA-1 mAb significantly delayed tumor onset and attenuated tumor burden in MMTV-PyMT mice by reducing tumor cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis without any detectable cytotoxicity to mice or end-organs. In vitro treatment of MCF-7 and BT474 TtzmR cells reduced proliferation and induced cancer cell apoptosis. Importantly, this inhibition of breast tumorigenesis was due to concomitant downregulation, via ubiquitin-mediated degradation through the lysosome and proteasome pathways, of all HER family members, components of downstream PI3K/Akt/mTOR prosurvival signaling and suppression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Conclusions Our results establish that the E-cadherin ectodomain-specific mAb DECMA-1 inhibits Ecad+/HER2+ breast cancers by hindering tumor growth and inducing apoptosis via downregulation of key oncogenic pathways involved in trastuzumab resistance, thereby

  1. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Kimberly L; Yackulic, Charles B; Kennedy, Theodore A; Budy, Phaedra

    2015-12-01

    Rainbow and brown trout have been intentionally introduced into tailwaters downriver of dams globally and provide billions of dollars in economic benefits. At the same time, recruitment and maximum length of trout populations in tailwaters often fluctuate erratically, which negatively affects the value of fisheries. Large recruitment events may increase dispersal downriver where other fish species may be a priority (e.g., endangered species). There is an urgent need to understand the drivers of trout population dynamics in tailwaters, in particular the role of flow management. Here, we evaluate how flow, fish density, and other physical factors of the river influence recruitment and mean adult length in tailwaters across western North America, using data from 29 dams spanning 1-19 years. Rainbow trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high annual, summer, and spring flow and dam latitude, and positively correlated with high winter flow, subadult brown trout catch, and reservoir storage capacity. Brown trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high water velocity and daily fluctuations in flow (i.e., hydropeaking) and positively correlated with adult rainbow trout catch. Among these many drivers, rainbow trout recruitment was primarily correlated with high winter flow combined with low spring flow, whereas brown trout recruitment was most related to high water velocity. The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics

  2. Platelets Regulate the Migration of Keratinocytes via Podoplanin/CLEC-2 Signaling during Cutaneous Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Asai, Jun; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Kishida, Tsunao; Wada, Makoto; Nakamura, Naomi; Takenaka, Hideya; Mazda, Osam; Urano, Tetsumei; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Tokura, Yoshiki; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is an endogenous ligand for C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2), which is expressed on platelets. Recent evidence indicates that this specific marker of lymphatic endothelial cells is also expressed by keratinocytes at the edge of wounds. However, whether podoplanin or platelets play a role in keratinocyte activity during wound healing remains unknown. We evaluated the effect of podoplanin expression levels on keratinocyte motility using cultured primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Down-regulation of podoplanin in NHEKs via transfection with podoplanin siRNA inhibited their migration, indicating that podoplanin plays a mandatory role in this process. In addition, down-regulation of podoplanin was correlated with up-regulation of E-cadherin, suggesting that podoplanin-mediated stimulation of keratinocyte migration is associated with a loss of E-cadherin. Both the addition of platelets and treatment with CLEC-2 inhibited the migration of NHEKs. The down-regulation of RhoA activity and the up-regulation of E-cadherin in keratinocytes were also induced by CLEC-2. In conclusion, these results suggest that podoplanin/CLEC-2 signaling regulates keratinocyte migration via modulating E-cadherin expression through RhoA signaling. Altering the regulation of keratinocyte migration by podoplanin might be a novel therapeutic approach to improve wound healing. PMID:26597882

  3. Single cell analysis of RNA-mediated histone H3.3 recruitment to a cytomegalovirus promoter-regulated transcription site.

    PubMed

    Newhart, Alyshia; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Yang, Tian; Joo, Lucy M; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Lopez-Jones, Melissa; Singer, Robert H; Showe, Louise C; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Janicki, Susan M

    2013-07-01

    Unlike the core histones, which are incorporated into nucleosomes concomitant with DNA replication, histone H3.3 is synthesized throughout the cell cycle and utilized for replication-independent (RI) chromatin assembly. The RI incorporation of H3.3 into nucleosomes is highly conserved and occurs at both euchromatin and heterochromatin. However, neither the mechanism of H3.3 recruitment nor its essential function is well understood. Several different chaperones regulate H3.3 assembly at distinct sites. The H3.3 chaperone, Daxx, and the chromatin-remodeling factor, ATRX, are required for H3.3 incorporation and heterochromatic silencing at telomeres, pericentromeres, and the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. By evaluating H3.3 dynamics at a CMV promoter-regulated transcription site in a genetic background in which RI chromatin assembly is blocked, we have been able to decipher the regulatory events upstream of RI nucleosomal deposition. We find that at the activated transcription site, H3.3 accumulates with sense and antisense RNA, suggesting that it is recruited through an RNA-mediated mechanism. Sense and antisense transcription also increases after H3.3 knockdown, suggesting that the RNA signal is amplified when chromatin assembly is blocked and attenuated by nucleosomal deposition. Additionally, we find that H3.3 is still recruited after Daxx knockdown, supporting a chaperone-independent recruitment mechanism. Sequences in the H3.3 N-terminal tail and αN helix mediate both its recruitment to RNA at the activated transcription site and its interaction with double-stranded RNA in vitro. Interestingly, the H3.3 gain-of-function pediatric glioblastoma mutations, G34R and K27M, differentially affect H3.3 affinity in these assays, suggesting that disruption of an RNA-mediated regulatory event could drive malignant transformation. PMID:23689370

  4. Recruiter's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael; Recio, Manuel

    The manual assists both experienced and inexperienced personnel in defining and completing the entire range of tasks associated with the position of Pennsylvania Migrant Education Recruiter. The recruiter's primary responsibilities are to identify migrant children in the area and enroll those children eligible under Title I ESEA (Elementary and…

  5. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  6. Regulation of Embryonic Cell Adhesion by the Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Yvonne; Geiss, Corinna; Luncz, Lydia; Thomanetz, Venus; Stuermer, Claudia A. O

    2009-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrPs) are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1) mediates Ca+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2) modulates Ca+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin–based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development. PMID:19278297

  7. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  8. A Light-Regulated Genetic Module Was Recruited to Carpel Development in Arabidopsis following a Structural Change to SPATULA[W

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, Mathieu C.; Brunoud, Géraldine; Chauvet, Aurélie; Martínez-Garcia, Jaime F.; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Monéger, Françoise; Scutt, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    A key innovation of flowering plants is the female reproductive organ, the carpel. Here, we show that a mechanism that regulates carpel margin development in the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana was recruited from light-regulated processes. This recruitment followed the loss from the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPATULA (SPT) of a domain previously responsible for its negative regulation by phytochrome. We propose that the loss of this domain was a prerequisite for the light-independent expression in female reproductive tissues of a genetic module that also promotes shade avoidance responses in vegetative organs. Striking evidence for this proposition is provided by the restoration of wild-type carpel development to spt mutants by low red/far-red light ratios, simulating vegetation shade, which we show to occur via phytochrome B, PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), and PIF5. Our data illustrate the potential of modular evolutionary events to generate rapid morphological change and thereby provide a molecular basis for neo-Darwinian theories that describe this nongradualist phenomenon. Furthermore, the effects shown here of light quality perception on carpel development lead us to speculate on the potential role of light-regulated mechanisms in plant organs that, like the carpel, form within the shade of surrounding tissues. PMID:22851763

  9. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dibble, Kimberly L.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Budy, Phaedra E.

    2015-01-01

    The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics, whereas brown trout length was mainly related to large cohorts recruiting to the adult size class. Species-specific responses to flow management are likely attributable to differences in seasonal timing of key life history events such as spawning, egg hatching, and fry emergence.

  10. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs. PMID:26296975

  11. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  12. PAR1 signaling regulates the retention and recruitment of EPCR-expressing bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Itkin, Tomer; Chakrabarty, Sagarika; Graf, Claudine; Kollet, Orit; Ludin, Aya; Golan, Karin; Kalinkovich, Alexander; Ledergor, Guy; Wong, Eitan; Niemeyer, Elisabeth; Porat, Ziv; Erez, Ayelet; Sagi, Irit; Esmon, Charles T; Ruf, Wolfram; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2016-01-01

    Retention of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) in the bone marrow is essential for hematopoiesis and for protection from myelotoxic injury. We report that signaling cascades that are traditionally viewed as coagulation-related also control retention of EPCR+ LT-HSCs in the bone marrow and their recruitment to the blood via two different protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated pathways. Thrombin-PAR1 signaling induces nitric oxide (NO) production, leading to TACE-mediated EPCR shedding, enhanced CXCL12-CXCR4-induced motility, and rapid stem and progenitor cell mobilization. Conversely, bone marrow blood vessels provide a microenvironment enriched with protein C that retain EPCR+ LT-HSCs by limiting NO generation, reducing Cdc42 activity and enhancing VLA4 affinity and adhesion. Inhibition of NO production by activated protein C (aPC)-EPCR-PAR1 signaling reduces progenitor cell egress, increases NOlow bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs retention and protects mice from chemotherapy-induced hematological failure and death. Our study reveals new roles for PAR1 and EPCR that control NO production to balance maintenance and recruitment of bone marrow EPCR+ LT-HSCs with clinical relevance. PMID:26457757

  13. Octamer-binding protein 4 affects the cell biology and phenotypic transition of lung cancer cells involving β-catenin/E-cadherin complex degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Shu; Ling, Dong-Jin; Zhang, Yang-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Shi, Tian-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Clinical studies have reported evidence for the involvement of octamer‑binding protein 4 (Oct4) in the tumorigenicity and progression of lung cancer; however, the role of Oct4 in lung cancer cell biology in vitro and its mechanism of action remain to be elucidated. Mortality among lung cancer patients is more frequently due to metastasis rather than their primary tumors. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a prominent biological event for the induction of epithelial cancer metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Oct4 had the capacity to induce lung cancer cell metastasis via the promoting the EMT in vitro. Moreover, the effect of Oct4 on the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex, associated with EMT, was examined using immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays as well as western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that Oct4 enhanced cell invasion and adhesion accompanied by the downregulation of epithelial marker cytokeratin, and upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N‑cadherin. Furthermore, Oct4 induced EMT of lung cancer cells by promoting β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex degradation and regulating nuclear localization of β‑catenin. In conclusion, the present study indicated that Oct4 affected the cell biology of lung cancer cells in vitro through promoting lung cancer cell metastasis via EMT; in addition, the results suggested that the association and degradation of the β‑catenin/E‑cadherin complex was regulated by Oct4 during the process of EMT.

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates the Recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ Myeloid Cells and Regulates Bax/Bcl-2 Signaling in Myocardial Ischemia Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youen; Li, Hua; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Aijun; Zong, Nobel C.; Li, Zhaofeng; Zhu, Hongming; Zou, Yunzeng; Yang, Xiangdong; Ge, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an endogenous signaling molecule, plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Using a mouse model of myocardial infarction, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). The results demonstrated that the administration of NaHS improved survival, preserved left ventricular function, limited infarct size, and improved H2S levels in cardiac tissue to attenuate the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and to regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 pathway. Furthermore, the cardioprotective effects of NaHS were enhanced by inhibiting the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells from the spleen into the blood and by attenuating post-infarction inflammation. These observations suggest that the novel mechanism underlying the cardioprotective function of H2S is secondary to a combination of attenuation the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and regulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 apoptotic signaling. PMID:24758901

  15. PER1 prevents excessive innate immune response during endotoxin-induced liver injury through regulation of macrophage recruitment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, S; Du, Jie; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    The severity of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with the hepatic innate immune response. The core circadian molecular clock modulates the innate immune response by controlling rhythmic pathogen recognition by the innate immune system and daily variations in cytokine gene expression. However, the molecular link between circadian genes and the innate immune system has remained unclear. Here, we showed that mice lacking the clock gene Per1 (Period1) are more susceptible to LPS/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced macrophage-dependent ALF compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Per1 deletion caused a remarkable increase in the number of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the liver, resulting in an elevation of the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS treatment. Loss of Per1 had no effect on the proliferation or apoptosis of macrophages; however, it enhanced the recruitment of macrophages, which was associated with an increase in CC chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) expression levels in monocytes/macrophages. Deletion of Ccr2 rescued d-GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in Per1−/− mice. We demonstrated that the upregulation of Ccr2 expression by Per1 deletion could be reversed by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist GW9662. Further analysis indicated that PER1 binds to PPAR-γ on the Ccr2 promoter and enhanced the inhibitory effect of PPAR-γ on Ccr2 expression. These results reveal that Per1 reduces hepatic macrophage recruitment through interaction with PPAR-γ and prevents an excessive innate immune response in endotoxin-induced liver injury. PMID:27054331

  16. PER1 prevents excessive innate immune response during endotoxin-induced liver injury through regulation of macrophage recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Wang, Z; Yang, P; Xia, L; Zhou, M; Wang, S; Du, Jie; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    The severity of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is associated with the hepatic innate immune response. The core circadian molecular clock modulates the innate immune response by controlling rhythmic pathogen recognition by the innate immune system and daily variations in cytokine gene expression. However, the molecular link between circadian genes and the innate immune system has remained unclear. Here, we showed that mice lacking the clock gene Per1 (Period1) are more susceptible to LPS/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN)-induced macrophage-dependent ALF compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Per1 deletion caused a remarkable increase in the number of Kupffer cells (KCs) in the liver, resulting in an elevation of the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines after LPS treatment. Loss of Per1 had no effect on the proliferation or apoptosis of macrophages; however, it enhanced the recruitment of macrophages, which was associated with an increase in CC chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) expression levels in monocytes/macrophages. Deletion of Ccr2 rescued d-GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in Per1(-/-) mice. We demonstrated that the upregulation of Ccr2 expression by Per1 deletion could be reversed by the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist GW9662. Further analysis indicated that PER1 binds to PPAR-γ on the Ccr2 promoter and enhanced the inhibitory effect of PPAR-γ on Ccr2 expression. These results reveal that Per1 reduces hepatic macrophage recruitment through interaction with PPAR-γ and prevents an excessive innate immune response in endotoxin-induced liver injury. PMID:27054331

  17. Actin Recruitment to the Chlamydia Inclusion Is Spatiotemporally Regulated by a Mechanism That Requires Host and Bacterial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Elizabeth; Kirker, Kelly; Zuck, Meghan; James, Garth; Hybiske, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The ability to exit host cells at the end of their developmental growth is a critical step for the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia. One exit strategy, extrusion, is mediated by host signaling pathways involved with actin polymerization. Here, we show that actin is recruited to the chlamydial inclusion as a late event, occurring after 20 hours post-infection (hpi) and only within a subpopulation of cells. This event increases significantly in prevalence and extent from 20 to 68 hpi, and actin coats strongly correlated with extrusions. In contrast to what has been reported for other intracellular pathogens, actin nucleation on Chlamydia inclusions did not ‘flash’, but rather exhibited moderate depolymerization dynamics. By using small molecule agents to selectively disrupt host signaling pathways involved with actin nucleation, modulate actin polymerization dynamics and also to disable the synthesis and secretion of chlamydial proteins, we further show that host and bacterial proteins are required for actin coat formation. Transient disruption of either host or bacterial signaling pathways resulted in rapid loss of coats in all infected cells and a reduction in extrusion formation. Inhibition of Chlamydia type III secretion also resulted in rapid loss of actin association on inclusions, thus implicating chlamydial effector proteins(s) as being central factors for engaging with host actin nucleating factors, such as formins. In conclusion, our data illuminate the host and bacterial driven process by which a dense actin matrix is dynamically nucleated and maintained on the Chlamydia inclusion. This late stage event is not ubiquitous for all infected cells in a population, and escalates in prevalence and extent throughout the developmental cycle of Chlamydia, culminating with their exit from the host cell by extrusion. The initiation of actin recruitment by Chlamydia appears to be novel, and may serve as an upstream determinant of the extrusion mechanism. PMID

  18. The chemokine CXCL13 is a key regulator of B cell recruitment to the cerebrospinal fluid in acute Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The chemokine CXCL13 is known to dictate homing and motility of B cells in lymphoid tissue and has been implicated in the formation of ectopic lymphoid tissue in chronic inflammation. Whether it influences B cell trafficking during acute infection, is largely unclear. In previous studies, we showed that (I) CXCL13 levels are markedly increased in the B cell-rich cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with acute Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), and (II) CXCL13 is released by monocytes upon recognition of borrelial outer surface proteins by Toll-like receptor 2. Here, we assessed the role of CXCL13 - in comparison to other chemokines - in the recruitment of B cells to the CSF of patients with acute LNB. Methods Measurement of chemokines was done by ELISA. B cells were isolated from whole blood using magnetic cell separation (MACS). For migration experiments, a modified Boyden chamber assay was used and the migrated B cells were further analysed by FACS. The migration was inhibited either by preincubation of the CSF samples with neutralizing antibodies, heating to 60°C, removal of proteins >3 kDa, or by pre-treatment of the B cells with pertussis toxin. The principal statistical tests used were one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test (chemokine measurements) as well as paired Student's t-test (migration experiments). Results Measurements of chemokine levels revealed an increase in three of the four known major B cell chemoattractants CXCL13, CCL19 and CXCL12 in LNB CSF. The CXCL13 CSF:serum ratio, as a measure of the chemotactic gradient, was substantially higher than that of CCL19 and CXCL12. Moreover, the chemotactic activity of LNB CSF was reduced up to 56% after preincubation with a neutralizing CXCL13 antibody, while combined preincubation with antibodies against CXCL13, CCL19, and CXCL12 did not lead to further reduction. Since treatment with pertussis toxin, heating to 60°C, and removal of proteins >3 kDa abrogated the chemotactic activity

  19. CEACAM1 negatively regulates IL-1β production in LPS activated neutrophils by recruiting SHP-1 to a SYK-TLR4-CEACAM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongze; Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2012-01-01

    LPS-activated neutrophils secrete IL-1β by activation of TLR-4. Based on studies in macrophages, it is likely that ROS and lysosomal destabilization regulated by Syk activation may also be involved. Since neutrophils have abundant expression of the ITIM-containing co-receptor CEACAM1 and Gram-negative bacteria such as Neisseria utilize CEACAM1 as a receptor that inhibits inflammation, we hypothesized that the overall production of IL-1β in LPS treated neutrophils may be negatively regulated by CEACAM1. We found that LPS treated neutrophils induced phosphorylation of Syk resulting in the formation of a complex including TLR4, p-Syk, and p-CEACAM1, which in turn, recruited the inhibitory phosphatase SHP-1. LPS treatment leads to ROS production, lysosomal damage, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in neutrophils. The absence of this regulation in Ceacam1⁻/⁻ neutrophils led to hyper production of IL-1β in response to LPS. The hyper production of IL-1β was abrogated by in vivo reconstitution of wild type but not ITIM-mutated CEACAM1 bone marrow stem cells. Blocking Syk activation by kinase inhibitors or RNAi reduced Syk phosphorylation, lysosomal destabilization, ROS production, and caspase-1 activation in Ceacam1⁻/⁻ neutrophils. We conclude that LPS treatment of neutrophils triggers formation of a complex of TLR4 with pSyk and pCEACAM1, which upon recruitment of SHP-1 to the ITIMs of pCEACAM1, inhibits IL-1β production by the inflammasome. Thus, CEACAM1 fine-tunes IL-1β production in LPS treated neutrophils, explaining why the additional utilization of CEACAM1 as a pathogen receptor would further inhibit inflammation.

  20. Recruitment of Tup1p and Cti6p regulates heme-deficient expression of Aft1p target genes

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Robert J; Adkins, Erika M; Kimmel, Emily; Kaplan, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription of genes encoding for the high-affinity iron (FET3, FTR1) and copper (CTR1) transporters does not occur in the absence of heme. We show that the Aft1p binding region of the FET3 promoter or the Mac1p binding region of the CTR1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to mediate heme-deficient repression. Transcription is repressed in the absence of heme, and a genetic screen identified Tup1p and Hda1p as being required for transcriptional repression. In contrast to FET3 and CTR1, Aft1p target genes ARN1 and FIT1 are transcribed in the absence of heme. A 14 bp sequence in the ARN1 promoter is necessary and sufficient to permit transcription in the absence of heme. Transcription in the absence of heme required the presence of Cti6p to overcome the effect of Tup1p, and Cti6p was recruited to the ARN1 promoter in the absence of heme. We hypothesize that transcription of the siderophore transporter ARN1 permits yeast to accumulate iron in the absence of oxygen and to deny iron to competing organisms. PMID:16437160

  1. Different levels of various glucocorticoid-regulated genes in corticotroph adenomas.

    PubMed

    Evang, Johan Arild; Bollerslev, Jens; Casar-Borota, Olivera; Lekva, Tove; Ramm-Pettersen, Jon; Berg, Jens Petter

    2013-08-01

    Recently, correlations between corticotroph tumor dedifferentiation and both E-cadherin immunostaining and reduced mRNA expression of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) have been demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to explore whether tumor dedifferentiation correlated with glucocorticoid resistance and whether the resistance was associated with both positively and negatively regulated genes. Tumor material from 20 patients with verified Cushing's disease or Nelson's syndrome operated on at Rikshospitalet, Oslo. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of genes such as E-cadherin (CDH1), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), and thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) was performed. The correlations between the expression of the GILZ, TXNIP, and POMC genes in different stages of corticotroph adenomas, the E-cadherin mRNA expression and staining pattern, and the preoperative 24-h cortisol excretion were examined. The GILZ and TXNIP expression levels were positively correlated to the CDH1 expression and were highest in microadenomas and in tumors with a high membranous E-cadherin reactivity. In contrast, the POMC expression was not significantly different between the groups. This divergence between the genes that were positively and negatively regulated by glucocorticoids could not be supported by other gene expression analyses. No correlations to urinary cortisol were found. The expression of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes POMC, GILZ, and TXNIP in corticotroph adenomas showed a remarkable variation. The pattern and variability of glucocorticoid resistance in corticotroph adenomas seem to correlate with a loss of the epithelial phenotype associated with corticotroph tumor dedifferentiation.

  2. HSCARG Negatively Regulates the Cellular Antiviral RIG-I Like Receptor Signaling Pathway by Inhibiting TRAF3 Ubiquitination via Recruiting OTUB1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanyan; Xu, Ruidan; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) recognize cytosolic viral RNA and initiate innate immunity; they increase the production of type I interferon (IFN) and the transcription of a series of antiviral genes to protect the host organism. Accurate regulation of the RLR pathway is important for avoiding tissue injury induced by excessive immune response. HSCARG is a newly reported negative regulator of NF-κB. Here we demonstrated that HSCARG participates in innate immunity. HSCARG inhibited the cellular antiviral response in an NF-κB independent manner, whereas deficiency of HSCARG had an opposite effect. After viral infection, HSCARG interacted with tumor necrosis receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and inhibited its ubiquitination by promoting the recruitment of OTUB1 to TRAF3. Knockout of HSCARG attenuated the de-ubiquitination of TRAF3 by OTUB1, and knockdown of OTUB1 abolished the effect of HSCARG. HSCARG also interacted with Ikappa-B kinase epsilon (IKKε) after viral infection and impaired the association between TRAF3 and IKKε, which further decreased the phosphorylation of IKKε and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3), thus suppressed the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3. Moreover, knockdown of TRAF3 dampened the inhibitory effect of IFN-β transcription by HSCARG, suggesting that TRAF3 is necessary for HSCARG to down-regulate RLR pathway. This study demonstrated that HSCARG is a negative regulator that enables balanced antiviral innate immunity. PMID:24763515

  3. Lifeguard/neuronal membrane protein 35 regulates Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis in neurons via microdomain recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Miriam; Segura, Miguel F; Solé, Carme; Colino, Alicia; Comella, Joan X; Ceña, Valentín

    2007-10-01

    Fas ligand (FasL)-receptor system plays an essential role in regulating cell death in the developing nervous system, and it has been implicated in neurodegenerative and inflammatory responses in the CNS. Lifeguard (LFG) is a protein highly expressed in the hippocampus and the cerebellum, and it shows a particularly interesting regulation by being up-regulated during postnatal development and in the adult. We show that over-expression of LFG protected cortical neurons from FasL-induced apoptosis and decreased caspase-activation. Reduction of endogenous LFG expression by small interfering RNA sensitized cerebellar granular neurons to FasL-induced cell death and caspase-8 activation, and also increased sensitivity of cortical neurons. In differentiated cerebellar granular neurons, protection from FasL-induced cell death could be attributed exclusively to LFG and appears to be independent of FLICE inhibitor protein. Thus, LFG is an endogenous inhibitor of FasL-mediated neuronal death and it mediates the FasL resistance of CNS differentiated neurons. Finally, we also demonstrate that LFG is detected in lipid rafts microdomains, where it may interact with Fas receptor and regulate FasL-activated signaling pathways.

  4. Phosphorylation of Def Regulates Nucleolar p53 Turnover and Cell Cycle Progression through Def Recruitment of Calpain3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ting; Shi, Hui; Lo, Li Jan; Wang, Yingchun; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Digestive organ expansion factor (Def) is a nucleolar protein that plays dual functions: it serves as a component of the ribosomal small subunit processome for the biogenesis of ribosomes and also mediates p53 degradation through the cysteine proteinase calpain-3 (CAPN3). However, nothing is known about the exact relationship between Def and CAPN3 or the regulation of the Def function. In this report, we show that CAPN3 degrades p53 and its mutant proteins p53A138V, p53M237I, p53R248W, and p53R273P but not the p53R175H mutant protein. Importantly, we show that Def directly interacts with CAPN3 in the nucleoli and determines the nucleolar localisation of CAPN3, which is a prerequisite for the degradation of p53 in the nucleolus. Furthermore, we find that Def is modified by phosphorylation at five serine residues: S50, S58, S62, S87, and S92. We further show that simultaneous phosphorylations at S87 and S92 facilitate the nucleolar localisation of Capn3 that is not only essential for the degradation of p53 but is also important for regulating cell cycle progression. Hence, we propose that the Def-CAPN3 pathway serves as a nucleolar checkpoint for cell proliferation by selective inactivation of cell cycle-related substrates during organogenesis. PMID:27657329

  5. EPB41L5 functions to post-transcriptionally regulate cadherin and integrin during epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Mariko; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Sabe, Hisataka; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    EPB41L5 belongs to the band 4.1 superfamily. We investigate here the involvement of EPB41L5 in epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) during mouse gastrulation. EPB41L5 expression is induced during TGFβ-stimulated EMT, whereas silencing of EPB41L5 by siRNA inhibits this transition. In EPB41L5 mutants, cell–cell adhesion is enhanced, and EMT is greatly impaired during gastrulation. Moreover, cell attachment, spreading, and mobility are greatly reduced by EPB41L5 deficiency. Gene transcription regulation during EMT occurs normally at the mRNA level; EPB41L5 siRNA does not affect either the decrease in E-cadherin or the increase in integrin expression. However, at the protein level, the decrease in E-cadherin and increase in integrin are inhibited in both EPB41L5 siRNA-treated NMuMG cells and mutant mesoderm. We find that EPB41L5 binds p120ctn through its N-terminal FERM domain, inhibiting p120ctn–E-cadherin binding. EPB41L5 overexpression causes E-cadherin relocalization into Rab5-positive vesicles in epithelial cells. At the same time, EPB41L5 binds to paxillin through its C terminus, enhancing integrin/paxillin association, thereby stimulating focal adhesion formation. PMID:18794329

  6. EPB41L5 functions to post-transcriptionally regulate cadherin and integrin during epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mariko; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Sabe, Hisataka; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2008-09-22

    EPB41L5 belongs to the band 4.1 superfamily. We investigate here the involvement of EPB41L5 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during mouse gastrulation. EPB41L5 expression is induced during TGFbeta-stimulated EMT, whereas silencing of EPB41L5 by siRNA inhibits this transition. In EPB41L5 mutants, cell-cell adhesion is enhanced, and EMT is greatly impaired during gastrulation. Moreover, cell attachment, spreading, and mobility are greatly reduced by EPB41L5 deficiency. Gene transcription regulation during EMT occurs normally at the mRNA level; EPB41L5 siRNA does not affect either the decrease in E-cadherin or the increase in integrin expression. However, at the protein level, the decrease in E-cadherin and increase in integrin are inhibited in both EPB41L5 siRNA-treated NMuMG cells and mutant mesoderm. We find that EPB41L5 binds p120ctn through its N-terminal FERM domain, inhibiting p120ctn-E-cadherin binding. EPB41L5 overexpression causes E-cadherin relocalization into Rab5-positive vesicles in epithelial cells. At the same time, EPB41L5 binds to paxillin through its C terminus, enhancing integrin/paxillin association, thereby stimulating focal adhesion formation. PMID:18794329

  7. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  9. Recruitment of CREB1 and Histone Deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) to the Mouse Ltbp-1 Promoter Regulates its Constitutive Expression in a Dioxin Receptor-dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Duran, Aurea; Ballestar, Esteban; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Puga, Alvaro; Esteller, Manel; Fernandez-Salguero, Pedro M.

    2010-01-01

    Latent TGFβ-binding protein 1 (LTBP-1) is a key regulator of TGFβ targeting and activation in the extracellular matrix. LTBP-1 is recognized as a major docking molecule to localize, and possibly to activate, TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. Despite this relevant function, the molecular mechanisms regulating Ltbp-1 transcription remain largely unknown. Previous results from our laboratory revealed that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) lacking dioxin receptor (AhR) had increased Ltbp-1 mRNA expression and elevated TGFβ activity, suggesting that AhR repressed Ltbp-1 transcription. Here, we have cloned the mouse Ltbp-1 gene promoter and analysed its mechanism of transcriptional repression by AhR. Reporter gene assays, AhR over-expression and site-directed mutagenesis showed that basal Ltbp-1 transcription is AhR-dependent. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that AhR regulates Ltbp-1 transcription by a mechanism involving recruitment of co-activators such as CREB1 and co-repressors such as HDAC2 to the Ltbp-1 promoter. In AhR-expressing (AhR+/+) MEF cells, the recruitment of HDAC1, 2 and 4 correlated with decreased K8H4 acetylation and impaired binding of pCREBSer133 to the Ltbp-1 promoter, likely maintaining a constitutive repressed state. AhR−/− MEF cells had the opposite pattern of HDACs and pCREB1Ser133 binding to Ltbp-1 promoter, and therefore, over-expressed Ltbp-1 mRNA. In agreement, siRNA for HDAC2 increased Ltbp-1 expression and K8H4 acetylation in AhR+/+ but not in AhR−/− MEF cells. We suggest that HDAC2 binding keeps Ltbp-1 promoter repressed in AhR+/+ MEF cells, whereas in AhR-null MEF cells the absence of HDAC2 and the binding of pCREBSer133 allow Ltbp-1 transcription. Thus, epigenetics can contribute to constitutive Ltbp-1 repression by a mechanism requiring AhR activity. PMID:18508077

  10. APETALA2 negatively regulates multiple floral organ identity genes in Arabidopsis by recruiting the co-repressor TOPLESS and the histone deacetylase HDA19

    PubMed Central

    Krogan, Naden T.; Hogan, Kendra; Long, Jeff A.

    2012-01-01

    The development and coordination of complex tissues in eukaryotes requires precise spatial control of fate-specifying genes. Although investigations of such control have traditionally focused on mechanisms of transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression has emerged as being equally important in the establishment of gene expression territories. In the angiosperm flower, specification of lateral organ fate relies on the spatial regulation of the ABC floral organ identity genes. Our understanding of how the boundaries of these expression domains are controlled is not complete. Here, we report that the A-class organ identity gene APETALA2 (AP2), which is known to repress the C-class gene AGAMOUS, also regulates the expression borders of the B-class genes APETALA3 and PISTILLATA, and the E-class gene SEPALLATA3. We show that AP2 represses its target genes by physically recruiting the co-repressor TOPLESS and the histone deacetylase HDA19. These results demonstrate that AP2 plays a broad role in flower development by controlling the expression domains of numerous floral organ identity genes. PMID:23034631

  11. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain is regulated by MAPK/PI3K and confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P. Y.; Mak, D. H.; Mu, H.; Shi, Y.; Ruvolo, P.; Ruvolo, V.; Jacamo, R.; Burks, J. K.; Wei, W.; Huang, X.; Kornblau, S. M.; Andreeff, M.; Carter, B. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein is known to suppress both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. We previously reported that ARC expression is a strong, independent adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the regulation and role of ARC in AML. ARC expression is upregulated in AML cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and suppressed by inhibition of MAPK and PI3K signaling. AML patient samples with RAS mutations (N = 64) expressed significantly higher levels of ARC than samples without RAS mutations (N = 371) (P = 0.016). ARC overexpression protected and ARC knockdown sensitized AML cells to cytarabine and to agents that selectively induce intrinsic (ABT-737) or extrinsic (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) apoptosis. NOD-SCID mice harboring ARC-overexpressing KG-1 cells had significantly shorter survival than mice injected with control cells (median 84 versus 111 days) and significantly fewer leukemia cells were present when NOD/SCID IL2R null mice were injected with ARC knockdown as compared to control Molm13 cells (P = 0.005 and 0.03 at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively). Together, these findings demonstrate that MSCs regulate ARC in AML through activation of MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways. ARC confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML in vitro and in vivo, suggesting ARC as a novel target in AML therapy. PMID:24337870

  12. Threonine 393 of beta-catenin regulates interaction with Axin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Symes, Karen; Seldin, David C; Dominguez, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    CK2 is a regulatory kinase implicated in embryonic development and in cancer. Among the CK2 substrates is beta-catenin, a protein with dual function in Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Previously, we reported that CK2 activity is required for beta-catenin stability and we identified threonine (T) 393 as a major CK2 phosphorylation site in beta-catenin. However, it is not known whether phosphorylation at T393 increases beta-catenin stability and if so, what is the mechanism. In this study we investigate the molecular mechanism of beta-catenin stabilization through phosphorylation at T393. We found that pseudophosphorylation of beta-catenin at T393 resulted in a stable activated form of beta-catenin with decreased affinity for Axin in vitro. This phosphomimetic mutant also displayed decreased regulation by Axin in vivo in a bioassay in Xenopus laevis embryos. In contrast, the binding of T393 pseudophosphorylated beta-catenin to E-cadherin was unaffected. Further analysis showed that pseudophosphorylation at T393 did not prevent beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3beta. Interestingly, we found that in the presence of pseudophophorylated beta-catenin and another activated form of beta-catenin, the recruitment of GSK3beta to Axin is enhanced. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of T393 by CK2 may affect the stability of beta-catenin through decreased binding to Axin. In addition, the increased recruitment of GSK3beta to the destruction complex in the presence of activated beta-catenin mutants could be a feedback mechanism to suppress overactive Wnt signaling.

  13. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, Inez; Zarember, Kol A.; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein–protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  14. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones.

    PubMed

    Rogatsky, I; Zarember, K A; Yamamoto, K R

    2001-11-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein-protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  15. Balancing spatially regulated β-actin translation and dynamin-mediated endocytosis is required to assemble functional epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Lissette A; Vedula, Pavan; Gutierrez, Natasha; Shah, Neel; Rodriguez, Steven; Ayee, Brian; Davis, Justin; Rodriguez, Alexis J

    2015-12-01

    Regulating adherens junction complex assembly/disassembly is critical to maintaining epithelial homeostasis in healthy epithelial tissues. Consequently, adherens junction structure and function is often perturbed in clinically advanced tumors of epithelial origin. Some of the most studied factors driving adherens junction complex perturbation in epithelial cancers are transcriptional and epigenetic down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. However, numerous reports demonstrate that post-translational regulatory mechanisms such as endocytosis also regulate early phases of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastatic progression. In already assembled healthy epithelia, E-cadherin endocytosis recycles cadherin-catenin complexes to regulate the number of mature adherens junctions found at cell-cell contact sites. However, following de novo epithelial cell-cell contact, endocytosis negatively regulates adherens junction assembly by removing E-cadherin from the cell surface. By contrast, following de novo epithelial cell-cell contact, spatially localized β-actin translation drives cytoskeletal remodeling and consequently E-cadherin clustering at cell-cell contact sites and therefore positively regulates adherens junction assembly. In this report we demonstrate that dynamin-mediated endocytosis and β-actin translation-dependent cadherin-catenin complex anchoring oppose each other following epithelial cell-cell contact. Consequently, the final extent of adherens junction assembly depends on which of these processes is dominant following epithelial cell-cell contact. We expressed β-actin transcripts impaired in their ability to properly localize monomer synthesis (Δ3'UTR) in MDCK cells to perturb actin filament remodeling and anchoring, and demonstrate the resulting defect in adherens junction structure and function is rescued by inhibiting dynamin mediated endocytosis. Therefore, we demonstrate balancing spatially regulated β-actin translation and dynamin

  16. The Integrin β1 Subunit Regulates Paracellular Permeability of Kidney Proximal Tubule Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Bertha C.; Mathew, Sijo; Srichai, Manakan B.; Palamuttam, Riya; Bulus, Nada; Mernaugh, Glenda; Singh, Amar B.; Sanders, Charles R.; Harris, Raymond C.; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract and kidney have different abilities to facilitate paracellular and transcellular transport of water and solutes. In the kidney, the proximal tubule allows both transcellular and paracellular transport, while the collecting duct primarily facilitates transcellular transport. The claudins and E-cadherin are major structural and functional components regulating paracellular transport. In this study we present the novel finding that the transmembrane matrix receptors, integrins, play a role in regulating paracellular transport of renal proximal tubule cells. Deleting the integrin β1 subunit in these cells converts them from a “loose” epithelium, characterized by low expression of E-cadherin and claudin-7 and high expression of claudin-2, to a “tight” epithelium with increased E-cadherin and claudin-7 expression and decreased claudin-2 expression. This effect is mediated by the integrin β1 cytoplasmic tail and does not entail β1 heterodimerization with an α-subunit or its localization to the cell surface. In addition, we demonstrate that deleting the β1 subunit in the proximal tubule of the kidney results in a major urine-concentrating defect. Thus, the integrin β1 tail plays a key role in regulating the composition and function of tight and adherens junctions that define paracellular transport properties of terminally differentiated renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:24509849

  17. Regulation of cochlear convergent extension by the vertebrate planar cell polarity pathway is dependent on p120-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Ren, Dongdong; Reynolds, Albert B; Chi, Fanglu; Chen, Ping

    2012-03-01

    The vertebrate planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway consists of conserved PCP and ciliary genes. During development, the PCP pathway regulates convergent extension (CE) and uniform orientation of sensory hair cells in the cochlea. It is not clear how these diverse morphogenetic processes are regulated by a common set of PCP genes. Here, we show that cellular contacts and geometry change drastically and that the dynamic expression of N-cadherin and E-cadherin demarcates sharp boundaries during cochlear extension. The conditional knockout of a component of the adherens junctions, p120-catenin, leads to the reduction of E-cadherin and N-cadherin and to characteristic cochlear CE defects but not misorientation of hair cells. The specific CE defects in p120-catenin mutants are in contrast to associated CE and hair cell misorientation defects observed in common PCP gene mutants. Moreover, the loss-of-function of a conserved PCP gene, Vangl2, alters the dynamic distribution of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in the cochlea and causes similar abnormalities in cellular morphology to those found in p120-catenin mutants. Conversely, we found that Pcdh15 interacts genetically with PCP genes to regulate the formation of polar hair bundles, but not CE defects in the cochlea. Together, these results indicate that the vertebrate PCP pathway regulates CE and hair cell polarity independently and that a p120-catenin-dependent mechanism regulates CE of the cochlea. PMID:22318628

  18. Regulation of Intracellular Structural Tension by Talin in the Axon Growth and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dingyu, Wang; Fanjie, Meng; Zhengzheng, Ding; Baosheng, Huang; Chao, Yang; Yi, Pan; Huiwen, Wu; Jun, Guo; Gang, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Intracellular tension is the most important characteristic of neuron polarization as well as the growth and regeneration of axons, which can be generated by motor proteins and conducted along the cytoskeleton. To better understand this process, we created Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tension probes that can be incorporated into microfilaments to provide a real-time measurement of forces in neuron cytoskeletons. We found that our probe could be used to assess the structural tension of neuron polarity. Nerve growth factor (NGF) upregulated structural forces, whereas the glial-scar inhibitors chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and aggrecan weakened such forces. Notably, the tension across axons was distributed uniformly and remarkably stronger than that in the cell body in NGF-stimulated neurons. The mechanosensors talin/vinculin could antagonize the effect of glial-scar inhibitors via structural forces. However, E-cadherin was closely associated with glial-scar inhibitor-induced downregulation of structural forces. Talin/vinculin was involved in the negative regulation of E-cadherin transcription through the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. Collectively, this study clarified the mechanism underlying intracellular tension in the growth and regeneration of axons which, conversely, can be regulated by talin and E-cadherin.

  19. Differential Regulation of CD4 Lymphocyte Recruitment between the Upper and Lower Regions of the Genital Tract during Chlamydia trachomatis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kathleen A.; Walker, Jennifer C.; Jameel, Shimul H.; Gray, Heather L.; Rank, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis results in both the local recruitment of protective immune responses and an inflammatory infiltrate that may also participate in tubal pathology. As a beginning to understanding the etiology of immune system-mediated tubal pathology, we evaluated the regional recruitment of lymphocyte subsets to different areas of the female genital tract (GT) over the course of a murine infection with the mouse pneumonitis agent of Chlamydia trachomatis (MoPn). Using flow cytometric techniques we found that the CD4 lymphocyte subset was preferentially recruited to the upper GT (oviduct and uterine horn) over the lower GT (cervical-vaginal region) throughout the course of MoPn infection. The influx of CD4 cells also correlated with the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ECAMs) and in vitro lymphocyte adherence in the upper GT. Interestingly, the expression of ECAMs in the lower GT was not maintained longer than 7 days after infection, even in the presence of viable chlamydiae. Taken together, these data suggest that regulatory mechanisms of lymphocyte recruitment differ between the upper and lower regions of the GT and may influence the clearance of chlamydiae and the development of tubal pathology. PMID:10678969

  20. The Atg1 Kinase Complex Is Involved in the Regulation of Protein Recruitment to Initiate Sequestering Vesicle Formation for Nonspecific Autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Heesun; Nair, Usha; Geng, Jiefei

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is the major degradative process for recycling cytoplasmic constituents and eliminating unnecessary organelles in eukaryotic cells. Most autophagy-related (Atg) proteins are recruited to the phagophore assembly site (PAS), a proposed site for vesicle formation during either nonspecific or specific types of autophagy. Therefore, appropriate recruitment of Atg proteins to this site is critical for their function in autophagy. Atg11 facilitates PAS recruitment for the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway, which is a specific, autophagy-like process that occurs under vegetative conditions. In contrast, it is not known how Atg proteins are recruited to the PAS, nor which components are involved in PAS formation under nonspecific autophagy-inducing, starvation conditions. Here, we studied PAS assembly during nonspecific autophagy, using an atg11Δ mutant background to eliminate the PAS formation that occurs during vegetative growth. We found that protein complexes containing the Atg1 kinase have two roles for PAS formation during nonspecific autophagy. The Atg1 C terminus mediates an interaction with Atg13 and Atg17, facilitating a structural role of Atg1 that is needed to efficiently organize an initial step of PAS assembly, whereas Atg1 kinase activity affects the dynamics of protein movement at the PAS involved in Atg protein cycling. PMID:18077553

  1. 48 CFR 731.774 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas recruitment incentive. 731.774 Section 731.774 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Organizations 731.774 Overseas recruitment incentive. USAID's policies regarding overseas recruitment...

  2. 48 CFR 731.774 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas recruitment incentive. 731.774 Section 731.774 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Organizations 731.774 Overseas recruitment incentive. USAID's policies regarding overseas recruitment...

  3. 5 CFR 330.402 - Direct recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Direct recruitment. 330.402 Section 330.402 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Positions Restricted to Preference Eligibles § 330.402 Direct...

  4. 5 CFR 330.402 - Direct recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Direct recruitment. 330.402 Section 330.402 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Positions Restricted to Preference Eligibles § 330.402 Direct...

  5. Slug down-regulation by RNA interference inhibits invasion growth in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. We assessed the relevance of Slug in measuring the invasive potential of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Methods We utilized RNA interference to knockdown Slug gene expression, and effects on survival and invasive carcinoma were evaluated using a Boyden chamber transwell assay in vitro. We evaluated the effect of Slug siRNA-transfection and Slug cDNA-transfection on E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression in ESCC cells. A pseudometastatic model of ESCC in immunodeficient mice was used to assess the effects of Slug siRNA transfection on tumor metastasis development. Results The EC109 cell line was transfected with Slug-siRNA to knockdown Slug expression. The TE13 cell line was transfected with Slug-cDNA to increase Slug expression. EC109 and TE13 cell lines were tested for the expression of apoptosis-related genes bcl-2 and metastasis-related gene E-cadherin identified previously as Slug targets. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug cDNA-transfected TE13 cells. Invasion of Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells was reduced and apoptosis was increased whereas invasion was greater in Slug cDNA-transfected cells. Animals injected with Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells exhihited fewer seeded nodes and demonstrated more apoptosis. Conclusions Slug down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and decreases invasion capability in vitro and in vivo. Slug inhibition may represent a novel strategy for treatment of metastatic ESCC. PMID:21599940

  6. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  7. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  8. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis.

  9. Recruitment by Brainstorming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Joseph N.

    1982-01-01

    Reports on Westchester Community College's (WCC's) campuswide brainstorming meetings which prepared strategies, programs, and recommendations for realizing recruitment goals. Includes a draft of WCC's 1981 Marketing Recruitment Plan, which covers programs and instruction, services, admissions office and processes, publications, and…

  10. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  11. Recruitment: Some Unanswered Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, Robert W.

    1974-01-01

    The author summarizes various past studies on job recruitment methods and raises further unanswered questions, especially important to policy-makers, pertaining to the: (1) impact on employers, workers, and society; (2) level of sophistication of employer recruitment method selection; (3) major factors influencing a recruitment selection method;…

  12. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  13. Jarid2 is a PRC2 component in embryonic stem cells required for multi-lineage differentiation and recruitment of PRC1 and RNA Polymerase II to developmental regulators.

    PubMed

    Landeira, David; Sauer, Stephan; Poot, Raymond; Dvorkina, Maria; Mazzarella, Luca; Jørgensen, Helle F; Pereira, C Filipe; Leleu, Marion; Piccolo, Francesco M; Spivakov, Mikhail; Brookes, Emily; Pombo, Ana; Fisher, Cynthia; Skarnes, William C; Snoek, Tim; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Klose, Robert J; Casanova, Miguel; Tavares, Ligia; Brockdorff, Neil; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2010-06-01

    Polycomb Repressor Complexes (PRCs) are important regulators of embryogenesis. In embryonic stem (ES) cells many genes that regulate subsequent stages in development are enriched at their promoters for PRC1, PRC2 and Ser 5-phosphorylated RNA Polymerase II (RNAP), and contain domains of 'bivalent' chromatin (enriched for H3K4me3; histone H3 di- or trimethylated at Lys 4 and H3K27me3; histone H3 trimethylated at Lys 27). Loss of individual PRC components in ES cells can lead to gene de-repression and to unscheduled differentiation. Here we show that Jarid2 is a novel subunit of PRC2 that is required for the co-recruitment of PRC1 and RNAP to genes that regulate development in ES cells. Jarid2-deficient ES cells showed reduced H3K4me2/me3 and H3K27me3 marking and PRC1/PRC2 recruitment, and did not efficiently establish Ser 5-phosporylated RNAP at target genes. ES cells lacking Jarid2, in contrast to previously characterized PRC1 and PRC2 mutants, did not inappropriately express PRC2 target genes. Instead, they show a severely compromised capacity for successful differentiation towards neural or mesodermal fates and failed to correctly initiate lineage-specific gene expression in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that transcriptional priming of bivalent genes in pluripotent ES cells is Jarid2-dependent, and suggests that priming is critical for subsequent multi-lineage differentiation.

  14. A protein interaction map for cell-cell adhesion regulators identifies DUSP23 as a novel phosphatase for β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Lisa Leon; Ng, Mei Rosa; Sowa, Mathew E.; Selfors, Laura M.; White, Anne; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Singh, Pragya; Dhakal, Sabin; Harper, J. Wade; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is central to morphogenesis and maintenance of epithelial cell state. We previously identified 27 candidate cell-cell adhesion regulatory proteins (CCARPs) whose down-regulation disrupts epithelial cell-cell adhesion during collective migration. Using a protein interaction mapping strategy, we found that 18 CCARPs link to core components of adherens junctions or desmosomes. We further mapped linkages between the CCARPs and other known cell-cell adhesion proteins, including hits from recent screens uncovering novel components of E-cadherin adhesions. Mechanistic studies of one novel CCARP which links to multiple cell-cell adhesion proteins, the phosphatase DUSP23, revealed that it promotes dephosphorylation of β-catenin at Tyr 142 and enhances the interaction between α- and β-catenin. DUSP23 knockdown specifically diminished adhesion to E-cadherin without altering adhesion to fibronectin matrix proteins. Furthermore, DUSP23 knockdown produced “zipper-like” cell-cell adhesions, caused defects in transmission of polarization cues, and reduced coordination during collective migration. Thus, this study identifies multiple novel connections between proteins that regulate cell-cell interactions and provides evidence for a previously unrecognized role for DUSP23 in regulating E-cadherin adherens junctions through promoting the dephosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:27255161

  15. Bub1 in Complex with LANA Recruits PCNA To Regulate Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Replication and DNA Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent DNA replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) initiates at the terminal repeat (TR) element and requires trans-acting elements, both viral and cellular, such as ORCs, MCMs, and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). However, how cellular proteins are recruited to the viral genome is not very clear. Here, we demonstrated that the host cellular protein, Bub1, is involved in KSHV latent DNA replication. We show that Bub1 constitutively interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a highly conserved PIP box motif within the kinase domain. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bub1 can form a complex with LANA and PCNA in KSHV-positive cells. This strongly indicated that Bub1 serves as a scaffold or molecular bridge between LANA and PCNA. LANA recruited PCNA to the KSHV genome via Bub1 to initiate viral replication in S phase and interacted with PCNA to promote its monoubiquitination in response to UV-induced damage for translesion DNA synthesis. This resulted in increased survival of KSHV-infected cells. IMPORTANCE During latency in KSHV-infected cells, the viral episomal DNA replicates once each cell cycle. KSHV does not express DNA replication proteins during latency. Instead, KSHV LANA recruits the host cell DNA replication machinery to the replication origin. However, the mechanism by which LANA mediates replication is uncertain. Here, we show that LANA is able to form a complex with PCNA, a critical protein for viral DNA replication. Furthermore, our findings suggest that Bub1, a spindle checkpoint protein, serves as a scaffold or molecular bridge between LANA and PCNA. Our data further support a role for Bub1 and LANA in PCNA-mediated cellular DNA replication processes as well as monoubiquitination of PCNA in response to UV damage. These data reveal a therapeutic target for inhibition of KSHV persistence in malignant cells. PMID:26223641

  16. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-05-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally.

  17. H19 Long Noncoding RNA Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via MicroRNA 675 by Interacting with RNA-Binding Protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tongtong; Jaladanki, Suraj K.; Liu, Lan; Xiao, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Wang, Jun-Yao; Xu, Yan; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function occurs commonly in various pathologies, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. The H19 long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) regulates the expression of different genes and has been implicated in human genetic disorders and cancer. Here, we report that H19 plays an important role in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier function by serving as a precursor for microRNA 675 (miR-675). H19 overexpression increased the cellular abundance of miR-675, which in turn destabilized and repressed the translation of mRNAs encoding tight junction protein ZO-1 and adherens junction E-cadherin, resulting in the dysfunction of the epithelial barrier. Increasing the level of the RNA-binding protein HuR in cells overexpressing H19 prevented the stimulation of miR-675 processing from H19, promoted ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression, and restored the epithelial barrier function to a nearly normal level. In contrast, the targeted deletion of HuR in intestinal epithelial cells enhanced miR-675 production in the mucosa and delayed the recovery of the gut barrier function after exposure to mesenteric ischemia/reperfusion. These results indicate that H19 interacts with HuR and regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function via the H19-encoded miR-675 by altering ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression posttranscriptionally. PMID:26884465

  18. Regulation of the MicroRNA 200b (miRNA-200b) by Transcriptional Regulators PEA3 and ELK-1 Protein Affects Expression of Pin1 Protein to Control Anoikis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xusen; Zhang, Bailin; Gao, Jidong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) 200s regulate E-cadherin by directly targeting ZEB1/ZEB2, which are transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin. Decreased expression of E-cadherin results in cancer cells losing interaction with the extracellular matrix and detaching from the primary tumor. Normally, cells will undergo anoikis after losing interaction with the extracellular matrix. Cancer cells must, therefore, possess the ability to resist anoikis during the process of metastasis. Here we show that miRNA-200b regulates anoikis by directly targeting the 3′ UTR of Pin1 mRNA and regulating Pin1 expression at the translational level. We found that down-regulation of miRNA-200b promotes cancer cells survival during metastasis, and the homeless state of these cells resulted in decreased expression of miRNA-200b in the MCF-7 cell line. We also found that expression of miRNA-200b is down-regulated in human breast cancer during lymph node metastasis, which has a significant negative correlation with Pin1 expression. Two members of the ETS (E-26) family (PEA3 and ELK-1) regulate the expression of miRNA-200b. PEA3 promotes the expression of miRNA-200b, and ELK-1 is a transcriptional repressor of miRNA-200b. In addition, miRNA-200b regulates the activity of PEA3 and ELK-1 via the Pin1-pERK pathway and forms self-regulated feedback loops. This study characterizes the role of miRNA-200b in the regulation of anoikis and demonstrates the regulation of its own expression in the process of metastasis. PMID:24072701

  19. 20 CFR 655.15 - Required pre-filing recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... implementing regulations at 8 CFR 274a.6. (j) Recruitment report. (1) No fewer than 2 calendar days after the... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required pre-filing recruitment. 655.15... States (H-2B Workers) § 655.15 Required pre-filing recruitment. (a) Time of filing of application....

  20. 48 CFR 731.205-70 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas recruitment... Organizations 731.205-70 Overseas recruitment incentive. Note: the term employee as used in this section means... recruitment incentive (ORI), to the extent the ORI: Is authorized by the contractor's normal policy...

  1. 48 CFR 731.205-70 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas recruitment... Organizations 731.205-70 Overseas recruitment incentive. Note: the term employee as used in this section means... recruitment incentive (ORI), to the extent the ORI: Is authorized by the contractor's normal policy...

  2. 48 CFR 731.373 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas recruitment... Educational Institutions 731.373 Overseas recruitment incentive. USAID's policies regarding overseas recruitment incentives are set forth in AIDAR 731.205-70. These policies are also applicable to contracts...

  3. 48 CFR 731.373 - Overseas recruitment incentive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas recruitment... Educational Institutions 731.373 Overseas recruitment incentive. USAID's policies regarding overseas recruitment incentives are set forth in AIDAR 731.205-70. These policies are also applicable to contracts...

  4. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Singh, Rajnish K.; Sahu, Sushil K.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  5. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain.

    PubMed

    Jattani, Rakhi P; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-04-15

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth.

  6. Pygo2 functions as a prognostic factor for glioma due to its up-regulation of H3K4me3 and promotion of MLL1/MLL2 complex recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cefan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Zhou, Mengzhou; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Pygo2 has been discovered as an important Wnt signaling component contributing to the activation of Wnt-target gene transcription. In the present study, we discovered that Pygo2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the majority of (152/209) human brain glioma tissues and five glioma cell lines, and significantly correlated with the age, the WHO tumor classification and poor patient survival. The histone methyltransferase complex components (WDR5, Ash2, and menin, but not CXCC1 or NCOA6) were down-regulated at the promoter loci of Wnt target genes after Pygo2 knockdown, and this was accompanied by the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Further, we demonstrated that the involvement of Pygo2 in the activation of the Wnt pathway in human glioma progression is through up-regulation of the H3K4me3 (but not H3K4me2) by promoting the recruitment of the histone methyltransferase MLL1/MLL2 complex to Wnt target gene promoters. Thus, our study provided evidence that Pygo2 functions as a novel prognostic marker and represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26902498

  7. Pygo2 functions as a prognostic factor for glioma due to its up-regulation of H3K4me3 and promotion of MLL1/MLL2 complex recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cefan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Zhou, Mengzhou; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Pygo2 has been discovered as an important Wnt signaling component contributing to the activation of Wnt-target gene transcription. In the present study, we discovered that Pygo2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the majority of (152/209) human brain glioma tissues and five glioma cell lines, and significantly correlated with the age, the WHO tumor classification and poor patient survival. The histone methyltransferase complex components (WDR5, Ash2, and menin, but not CXCC1 or NCOA6) were down-regulated at the promoter loci of Wnt target genes after Pygo2 knockdown, and this was accompanied by the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Further, we demonstrated that the involvement of Pygo2 in the activation of the Wnt pathway in human glioma progression is through up-regulation of the H3K4me3 (but not H3K4me2) by promoting the recruitment of the histone methyltransferase MLL1/MLL2 complex to Wnt target gene promoters. Thus, our study provided evidence that Pygo2 functions as a novel prognostic marker and represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26902498

  8. New Role for Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Induced Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Histone Modification and Retinoic Acid Receptor α Recruitment to Gene Promoters: Relevance to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Differentiation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cassinat, B.; Zassadowski, F.; Ferry, C.; Llopis, L.; Bruck, N.; Lainey, E.; Duong, V.; Cras, A.; Despouy, G.; Chourbagi, O.; Beinse, G.; Fenaux, P.; Rochette Egly, C.; Chomienne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The induction of the granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells by all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been a major breakthrough in terms of survival for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here we highlight the synergism and the underlying novel mechanism between RA and the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to restore differentiation of RA-refractory APL blasts. First, we show that in RA-refractory APL cells (UF-1 cell line), PML-RA receptor alpha (RARα) is not released from target promoters in response to RA, resulting in the maintenance of chromatin repression. Consequently, RARα cannot be recruited, and the RA target genes are not activated. We then deciphered how the combination of G-CSF and RA successfully restored the activation of RA target genes to levels achieved in RA-sensitive APL cells. We demonstrate that G-CSF restores RARα recruitment to target gene promoters through the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the subsequent derepression of chromatin. Thus, combinatorial activation of cytokines and RARs potentiates transcriptional activity through epigenetic modifications induced by specific signaling pathways. PMID:21262770

  9. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Hippocampal Neuronal pH by Recruiting Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE5 to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z.; Numata, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-01-01

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H+-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress. PMID:24936055

  10. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  11. Cullin 4B is recruited to tristetraprolin-containing messenger ribonucleoproteins and regulates TNF-α mRNA polysome loading.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Jason R; Brooks, Seth A

    2012-02-15

    TNF-α is a central mediator of inflammation and critical for host response to infection and injury. TNF-α biosynthesis is controlled by transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms allowing for rapid, transient production. Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an AU-rich element binding protein that regulates the stability of the TNF-α mRNA. Using a screen to identify TTP-interacting proteins, we identified Cullin 4B (Cul4B), a scaffolding component of the Cullin ring finger ligase family of ubiquitin E3 ligases. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of Cul4B results in a significant reduction in TNF-α protein and mRNA in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells as well as a reduction in TTP protein. TNF-α message t(1/2) was reduced from 69 to 33 min in LPS-stimulated cells. TNF-3' untranslated region luciferase assays utilizing wild-type and mutant TTP-AA (S52A, S178A) indicate that TTP function is enhanced in Cul4B short hairpin RNA cells. Importantly, the fold induction of TNF-α mRNA polysome loading in response to LPS stimulation is reduced by Cul4B knockdown. Cul4B is present on the polysomes and colocalizes with TTP to exosomes and processing bodies, which are sites of mRNA decay. We conclude that Cul4B licenses the TTP-containing TNF-α messenger ribonucleoprotein for loading onto polysomes, and reduction of Cul4B expression shunts the messenger ribonucleoproteins into the degradative pathway.

  12. Researching participant recruitment times.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachel; Black, Polly

    2015-11-01

    Conducting research in emergency departments is relatively new, and there are a number of ethical and practical challenges to recruiting patients in these settings. In 2008, the Emergency Medicine Research Group Edinburgh (EMERGE) was set up at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh emergency department to support researchers and encourage the growth of research in emergency medicine. As part of a review of their working methods, the group's clinical nurse researchers undertook a small study to identify participant recruitment times. The results showed a significant difference between perceived and actual recruitment times, which has implications for planning staff numbers and budgets. This article describes the evaluation process and methods of data collection, and discusses the results. PMID:26542924

  13. MiR-888 regulates side population properties and cancer metastasis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengjian; Chen, Liangbiao

    2014-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been reported to possess properties related to cancer metastasis. However, the mechanism by which microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate these properties remains unclear. This study aims to investigate a correlation between miRNAs and the side population (SP) of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 with CSC properties. miR-888 was found in our previous study to be up-regulated in SP cells and predicted to target E-Cadherin directly, indicating a potential role in maintaining SP properties and regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer metastasis. After the over-expression of miR-888 in MCF-7 cells and knock-down of its expression in SP cells, we found that miR-888 played a role in maintaining CSC-related properties. Next, miR-888 was found to regulate the EMT process by targeting related gene expression. Lastly, MCF-7 cells over-expressing miR-888 exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to adhere to the extracellular matrix and an increased potential for migration and invasion, whereas knock-down of miR-888 expression in SP cells reversed these trends. In conclusion, miR-888 maintains SP properties and regulates EMT and metastasis in MCF-7 cells, potentially by targeting E-Cadherin expression.

  14. 5 CFR 575.107 - Agency recruitment incentive plan and approval levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency recruitment incentive plan and... SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Recruitment Incentives § 575.107 Agency recruitment incentive plan...

  15. 5 CFR 575.107 - Agency recruitment incentive plan and approval levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency recruitment incentive plan and... SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Recruitment Incentives § 575.107 Agency recruitment incentive plan...

  16. eHealth Recruitment Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Debbe; Canada, Ashanti; Bhatt, Riddhi; Davis, Jennifer; Plesko, Lisa; Baranowski, Tom; Cullen, Karen; Zakeri, Issa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about effective eHealth recruitment methods. This paper presents recruitment challenges associated with enrolling African-American girls aged 8-10 years in an eHealth obesity prevention program, their effect on the recruitment plan, and potential implications for eHealth research. Although the initial recruitment strategy was…

  17. Essential Role of Cooperative NF-κB and Stat3 Recruitment to ICAM-1 Intronic Consensus Elements in the Regulation of Radiation-induced Invasion and Migration in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kesanakurti, Divya; Chetty, Chandramu; Maddirela, Dilip Rajasekhar; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2013-01-01

    Although radiotherapy improves survival in patients, GBMs tend to relapse with augmented tumor migration and invasion even after irradiation (IR). Aberrant NF-κB and Stat3 activation and interaction has been suggested in several human tumors. However, possible NF-κB/Stat3 interaction and the role of Stat3 in maintenance of NF-κB nuclear retention in glioblastoma (GBM) still remain unknown. Stat3 and NF-κB (p65) physically interact with one another in the nucleus in glioma tumors. Most importantly, GST pull-down assays identified that Stat3 binds to the p65 transactivation domain (TAD) and is present in the NF-κB DNA-binding complex. Irradiation significantly elevated nuclear phospho-p65/phospho-Stat3 interaction in correlation with increased ICAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels, migration and invasion in human glioma xenograft cell lines 4910 and 5310. ChIP and promoter luciferase activity assays confirmed the critical role of adjacent NF-κB (+399) and Stat3 (+479) binding motifs in the proximal intron-1 in elevating IR-induced ICAM-1 expression. Specific inhibition of Stat3 and NF-κB with Stat3.siRNA or JSH-23 severely inhibited IR-induced p65 recruitment onto ICAM-1 intron-1 and suppressed migratory properties in both cell lines. On the other hand, Stat3C- or IR-induced Stat3 promoter recruitment was significantly decreased in p65-knockdown cells, thereby suggesting the reciprocal regulation between p65 and Stat3. We also observed a significant increase in NF-κB enrichment on ICAM-1 intron-1 and ICAM-1 transactivation in Stat3C overexpressing cells. In in vivo orthotopic experiments, suppression of tumor growth in Stat3.si+IR-treated mice was associated with the inhibition of IR-induced p-p65/p-Stat3 nuclear-colocalization and ICAM-1 levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the crucial role of NF-κB/Stat3 nuclear association in IR-induced ICAM-1 regulation and implies that targeting NF-κB/Stat3 interaction may have future therapeutic significance

  18. Recruiting Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Resources Network, Manhattan, KS.

    This document is the first nationwide compilation of successful recruiting techniques for students in adult basic education, literacy, General Educational Development classes, and adult high school degree programs. Information for the publication was gathered from a literature search and other sources, especially "Reaching the Least Educated," a…

  19. Recruitment and Information Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebergott, Harvey

    1976-01-01

    The Bureau of Education for the Handicapped's Recruitment and Information Program provides parents and other interested individuals with information on the educational needs of handicapped children through such activities as the National Information Center for the Handicapped ("Closer Look"), pamphlets on various subjects, and media campaigns that…

  20. Recruiting Seminary Trustees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warford, Malcolm

    1985-01-01

    The important role played by trustees of seminaries and the recruitment of these leaders are considered. The serious financial problems facing the board of directors has focused attention on the role and scope of seminary trusteeship. Leadership is needed by trustees to address issues of declining enrollments, curricula that address theological…

  1. Graduate Student Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Patricia B.

    1987-01-01

    A study of graduate student recruitment practices was conducted in the spring of 1986 to determine the current practice of graduate schools and to determine the extent to which they are using marketing techniques. The members of the Council of Graduate Schools were surveyed; 250 graduate schools responded (69% response rate). Questions concerned…

  2. Recruitment. Hello, goodbye.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2008-07-10

    The UK is "moving to a policy of self-sufficiency" according to the Department of Health. The numbers of new overseas entrants into healthcare, including doctors, nurses and midwives has slumped. Several other countries, including Canada, the US and Australia, are aggressively recruiting from overseas, including from the UK. There is an increasing perception the UK does not want overseas staff.

  3. 45 CFR 83.12 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION REGULATION FOR THE ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF SECTIONS 799A AND 845 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ACT Discrimination in Admissions Prohibited... each of its training programs, make comparable efforts to recruit members of each sex in the...

  4. 45 CFR 618.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION... overcome the effects of such past or present discrimination. (b) Recruitment patterns. A recipient shall... members of one sex if such actions have the effect of discriminating on the basis of sex in violation...

  5. Predator nonconsumptive effects on prey recruitment weaken with recruit density.

    PubMed

    Ellrich, Julius A; Scrosati, Ricardo A; Molis, Markus

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the nonconsumptive effects (NCEs) of predatory dogwhelks (Nucella lapillus) on intertidal barnacle (Semibalanus balanoides) recruitment through field experiments on the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast and the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, Canada. We studied the recruitment seasons (May-June) of 2011 and 2013. In 2011, the Gulf coast had five times more nearshore phytoplankton (food for barnacle larvae and recruits) during the recruitment season and yielded a 58% higher barnacle recruit density than the Atlantic coast at the end of the recruitment season. In 2013, phytoplankton levels and barnacle recruit density were similar on both coasts and also lower than for the Gulf coast in 2011. Using the comparative-experimental method, the manipulation of dogwhelk presence (without allowing physical contact with prey) revealed that dogwhelk cues limited barnacle recruitment under moderate recruit densities (Atlantic 2011/2013 and Gulf 2013) but had no effect under a high recruit density (Gulf 2011). Barnacle recruits attract settling larvae through chemical cues. Thus, the highest recruit density appears to have neutralized dogwhelk effects. This study suggests that the predation risk perceived by settling larvae may decrease with increasing recruit density and that prey food supply may indirectly influence predator NCEs on prey recruitment. PMID:26236858

  6. Mitochondrial regulation of cancer associated nuclear DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Chenghui; Naito, Akihiro; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Evans, Teresa T.; Douglas, Michael G.; Cooney, Craig A.; Fan Chunyang; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2007-12-21

    The onset and progression of cancer is associated with the methylation-dependent silencing of specific genes, however, the mechanism and its regulation have not been established. We previously demonstrated that reduction of mitochondrial DNA content induces cancer progression. Here we found that mitochondrial DNA-deficient LN{rho}0-8 activates the hypermethylation of the nuclear DNA promoters including the promoter CpG islands of the endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin. These are unmethylated and the corresponding gene products are expressed in the parental LNCaP containing mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA induced DNA methyltransferase 1 expression which was responsible for the methylation patterns observed. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase eliminated hypermethylation and expressed gene products in LN{rho}0-8. These studies demonstrate loss or reduction of mitochondrial DNA resulted in the induction of DNA methyltransferase 1, hypermethylation of the promoters of endothelin B receptor, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, and E-cadherin, and reduction of the corresponding gene products.

  7. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  8. STAT3 regulates hypoxia-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in oesophageal squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    CUI, YAO; LI, YUN-YUN; LI, JIAN; ZHANG, HONG-YAN; WANG, FENG; BAI, XUE; LI, SHAN-SHAN

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia plays a key role in tumour initiation and metastasis; one of the mechanisms is to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is involved in EMT by regulating the transcriptional regulators of E-cadherin, the biomarker of EMT. Until now, however, few studies have focused on the effects of STAT3 in hypoxia-induced EMT in tumour cells. The goal of this study was to investigate the roles of STAT3 in hypoxia-induced EMT in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The ESCC cells, TE-1 and EC-1, were incubated in normoxia, or in CoCl2, which was used to mimic hypoxia. With CoCl2, the ESCC cells showed increased migration and invasion abilities, accompanied with upregulation of HIF-1α, STAT3, and vimentin, and downregulation of E-cadherin. Knockdown of STAT3 inhibited EMT of ESCC cells and downregulated HIF-1α in vitro and in vivo. In ChIP assays, STAT3 bound to the promoter of HIF-1α, suggesting that STAT3 regulates transcription of HIF-1α. In conclusion, hypoxia induces EMT of ESCC, and STAT3 regulates this process by promoting HIF-1α expression. PMID:27220595

  9. Single-molecule tracking in live Vibrio cholerae reveals that ToxR recruits the membrane-bound virulence regulator TcpP to the toxT promoter.

    PubMed

    Haas, Beth L; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J; Biteen, Julie S

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes the human disease cholera by producing a potent toxin. The V. cholerae virulence pathway involves an unusual transcription step: the bitopic inner-membrane proteins TcpP and ToxR activate toxT transcription. As ToxT is the primary direct transcription activator in V. cholerae pathogenicity, its regulation by membrane-localized activators is key in the disease process. However, the molecular mechanisms by which membrane-localized activators engage the transcription process have yet to be uncovered in live cells. Here we report the use of super-resolution microscopy, single-molecule tracking, and gene knockouts to examine the dynamics of individual TcpP proteins in live V. cholerae cells with < 40 nm spatial resolution on a 50 ms timescale. Single-molecule trajectory analysis reveals that TcpP diffusion is heterogeneous and can be described by three populations of TcpP motion: one fast, one slow, and one immobile. By comparing TcpP diffusion in wild-type V. cholerae to that in mutant strains lacking either toxR or the toxT promoter, we determine that TcpP mobility is greater in the presence of its interaction partners than in their absence. Our findings support a mechanism in which ToxR recruits TcpP to the toxT promoter for transcription activation.

  10. 48 CFR 31.205-34 - Recruitment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment costs. 31.205... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-34 Recruitment costs. (a) Subject to paragraph (b) of this subsection, the following costs...

  11. 48 CFR 31.205-34 - Recruitment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment costs. 31.205... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-34 Recruitment costs. (a) Subject to paragraph (b) of this subsection, the following costs...

  12. The Students-Recruiting-Students Undergraduate Engineering Recruiting Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattis, Carol; Nachtmann, Heather; Youngblood, Alisha D.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Students-Recruiting-Students (SRS) program developed to recruit high school students into the Industrial Engineering Department at the University of Arkansas. Presents four phases of the program along with seven years of program results. Encourages successful development of similar recruiting programs. (KHR)

  13. The Recruiter's Guidebook for Identification and Recruitment. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. for Management and Planning Services.

    A uniform understanding of the identification and recruitment component of the Wisconsin Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I Migrant Education Program is the purpose of this recruiter's guidebook which can be an aid to recruiters, administrators, site coordinators, teachers, and parents in meeting the special educational needs of…

  14. Recruiting and Selecting New Teachers: The Recruitment Budgeting Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The recruitment budgeting cycle (RBC) places teacher-recruitment activities on a more systematic, professional plane. RBC action steps include reviewing and updating recruitment goals and activities, identifying the previous year's activities, defining outcome criteria for determining cost effectiveness, ranking activity costs, evaluating…

  15. Minimum recruitment frequency in plants with episodic recruitment.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Kerstin; Jeltsch, Florian; Ward, David

    2004-10-01

    There is concern about the lack of recruitment of Acacia trees in the Negev desert of Israel. We have developed three models to estimate the frequency of recruitment necessary for long-term population survival (i.e. positive average population growth for 1,000 years and < 10% probability of extinction). Two models assume purely episodic recruitment based on the general notion that recruitment in arid environments is highly episodic. They differ in that the deterministic model investigates average dynamics while the stochastic model does not. Studies indicating that recruitment episodes in arid environments have been overemphasized motivated the development of the third model. This semi-stochastic model simulates a mixture of continuous and episodic recruitment. Model analysis was done analytically for the deterministic model and via running model simulations for the stochastic and semi-stochastic models. The deterministic and stochastic models predict that, on average, 2.2 and 3.7 recruitment events per century, respectively, are necessary to sustain the population. According to the semi-stochastic model, 1.6 large recruitment events per century and an annual probability of 50% that a small recruitment event occurs are needed. A consequence of purely episodic recruitment is that all recruitment episodes produce extremely large numbers of recruits (i.e. at odds with field observations), an evaluation that holds even when considering that rare events must be large. Thus, the semi-stochastic model appears to be the most realistic model. Comparing the prediction of the semi-stochastic model to field observations in the Negev desert shows that the absence of observations of extremely large recruitment events is no reason for concern. However, the almost complete absence of small recruitment events is a serious reason for concern. The lack of recruitment may be due to decreased densities of large mammalian herbivores and might be further exacerbated by possible changes

  16. Preparing Alumni for Student Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Brian

    As recruitment budgets continue to tighten and with fewer colleges reporting application increases for their freshmen classes, enrollment managers must continue to explore all potential sources of recruitment talent. Alumni are often an underutilized or sometimes poorly utilized resource in recruitment efforts. Younger alumni, for example, may…

  17. Nichelle Nichols, NASA Recruiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Actress Nichelle Nichols was born in Robbins, Illinois on December 29, 1936. She played Lieutenant Uhura the Communications Officer on the U.S.S. Enterprise in the original series, Star Trek. Nichols stayed with the show and has appeared in six Star Trek movies. Her portrayal of Uhura on Star Trek marked one of the first non-stereotypical roles assigned to an African-American actress. She also provided the voice for Lt. Uhura on the Star Trek animated series in 1974-75. Before joining the crew on Star Trek, she sang and danced with Duke Ellington's band. Nichols was always interested in space travel. She flew aboard the C-141 Astronomy Observatory, which analyzed the atmospheres of Mars and Saturn on an eight hour, high altitude mission. From the late 1970's until the late 1980's, NASA employed Nichelle Nichols to recruit new astronaut candidates. Many of her new recruits were women or members of racial and ethnic minorities, including Guion Bluford (the first African-American astronaut), Sally Ride (the first female American astronaut), Judith Resnik (one of the original set of female astronauts, who perished during the launch of the Challenger on January 28, 1986), and Ronald McNair (the second African-American astronaut, and another victim of the Challenger accident). Currently Nichelle Nichols is actively involved in movies and special appearances. She is also a spokesperson for her favorite charity, 'The Kwanzaa Foundation.'

  18. Proinsulin C-peptide antagonizes the profibrotic effects of TGF-beta1 via up-regulation of retinoic acid and HGF-related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hills, Claire E; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2010-04-01

    Novel signaling roles for C-peptide have recently been discovered with evidence that it can ameliorate complications of type 1 diabetes. Here we sought to identify new pathways regulated by C-peptide of relevance to the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Microarray analysis was performed to identify genes regulated by either C-peptide and/or TGF-beta1 in a human proximal tubular cell line, HK-2. Expression of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII), vimentin, E-cadherin, Snail, and beta-catenin was assessed by immunoblotting. The cellular localization of vimentin and beta-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry. Changes in cell morphology were assessed by phase contrast microscopy. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of 953 and 1458 genes after C-peptide exposure for 18 h or 48 h, respectively. From these, members of the antifibrotic retinoic acid (RA)- and HGF-signaling pathways were selected. Immunoblotting demonstrated that C-peptide increased RARbeta, CRABPII, and HGF. We confirmed a role for RA in reversal of TGF-beta1-induced changes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including expression changes in Snail, E-cadherin, vimetin, and redistribution of beta-catenin. Importantly, these TGF-beta1-induced changes were inhibited by C-peptide. Further, effects of TGF-beta1 on Snail and E-cadherin expression were blocked by HGF, and inhibitory effects of C-peptide were removed by blockade of HGF activity. This study identifies a novel role for HGF as an effector of C-peptide, possibly via an RA-signaling pathway, highlighting C-peptide as a potential therapy for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:20197308

  19. Cancer Cell Invasion in Three-dimensional Collagen Is Regulated Differentially by Gα13 Protein and Discoidin Domain Receptor 1-Par3 Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Christina R; Ebine, Kazumi; Knab, Lawrence M; Bentrem, David J; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G

    2016-01-22

    Cancer cells can invade in three-dimensional collagen as single cells or as a cohesive group of cells that require coordination of cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton. To examine the role of Gα13, a G12 family heterotrimeric G protein, in regulating cellular invasion in three-dimensional collagen, we established a novel method to track cell invasion by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-expressing cancer cells. We show that knockdown of Gα13 decreased membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-driven proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen and enhanced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin knockdown reversed Gα13 siRNA-induced cell-cell adhesion but failed to reverse the effect of Gα13 siRNA on proteolytic invasion. Instead, concurrent knockdown of E-cadherin and Gα13 led to an increased number of single cells rather than groups of cells. Significantly, knockdown of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-binding protein that also co-localizes to cell-cell junctions, reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Knockdown of the polarity protein Par3, which can function downstream of DDR1, also reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, we show that Gα13 and DDR1-Par3 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton to mediate invasion in three-dimensional collagen.

  20. 5 CFR 532.801 - Payment of unrestricted rates for recruitment or retention purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... recruitment or retention purposes. 532.801 Section 532.801 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Payment of Unrestricted Rates for Recruitment or Retention Purposes § 532.801 Payment of unrestricted rates for recruitment or retention purposes. (a)...

  1. 5 CFR 532.801 - Payment of unrestricted rates for recruitment or retention purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... recruitment or retention purposes. 532.801 Section 532.801 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Payment of Unrestricted Rates for Recruitment or Retention Purposes § 532.801 Payment of unrestricted rates for recruitment or retention purposes. (a)...

  2. 6 CFR 17.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recruitment. 17.310 Section 17.310 Domestic... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  3. 41 CFR 101-4.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Recruitment. 101-4.310... Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 101-4.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  4. 41 CFR 101-4.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recruitment. 101-4.310... Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 101-4.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  5. 40 CFR 5.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recruitment. 5.310 Section 5.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 5.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  6. 6 CFR 17.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 17.310 Section 17.310 Domestic... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  7. 15 CFR 8a.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recruitment. 8a.310 Section 8a.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 8a.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  8. 43 CFR 41.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment. 41.310 Section 41.310 Public... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 41.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  9. 28 CFR 54.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recruitment. 54.310 Section 54.310... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A... recruitment and admission of students. A recipient may be required to undertake additional recruitment...

  10. Tubulin nucleotide status controls Sas-4-dependent pericentriolar material recruitment.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayachandran; Chim, Yiu-Cheung Frederick; Ha, Andrew; Basiri, Marcus L; Lerit, Dorothy A; Rusan, Nasser M; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2012-08-01

    Regulated centrosome biogenesis is required for accurate cell division and for maintaining genome integrity. Centrosomes consist of a centriole pair surrounded by a protein network known as pericentriolar material (PCM). PCM assembly is a tightly regulated, critical step that determines the size and capability of centrosomes. Here, we report a role for tubulin in regulating PCM recruitment through the conserved centrosomal protein Sas-4. Tubulin directly binds to Sas-4; together they are components of cytoplasmic complexes of centrosomal proteins. A Sas-4 mutant, which cannot bind tubulin, enhances centrosomal protein complex formation and has abnormally large centrosomes with excessive activity. These results suggest that tubulin negatively regulates PCM recruitment. Whereas tubulin-GTP prevents Sas-4 from forming protein complexes, tubulin-GDP promotes it. Thus, the regulation of PCM recruitment by tubulin depends on its GTP/GDP-bound state. These results identify a role for tubulin in regulating PCM recruitment independent of its well-known role as a building block of microtubules. On the basis of its guanine-bound state, tubulin can act as a molecular switch in PCM recruitment.

  11. Diversity employment and recruitment sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

  12. Three Keys to Better Recruiting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazington, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Recruitment is an expensive business: In 2010-2011, the median cost to recruit an undergraduate was $2,185 among private colleges and universities, according to Noel-Levitz, an enrollment management consultancy. In these tough fiscal times, admissions departments are under pressure to keep those costs down even as they pursue higher enrollment and…

  13. Teachers, Recruitment and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degazon-Johnson, Roli

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a critical review and evaluation of the statutory environment in which recruitment agencies and businesses ply their trade in the United Kingdom (UK), with specific reference to the employment of overseas teachers. It focuses especially on teachers recruited from the Commonwealth over the period 1999-2005, a significant time…

  14. Recruiting Mexican American Adoptive Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Robert S.; Serpe, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with 591 Mexican Americans to determine adoption interest and create recruiting practices for prospective parents. Approximately one-third of sample reported an interest in adoption, but many perceived both structural and cultural obstacles to adoption. Based on findings, recommendations for increasing recruitment of…

  15. Recruiting Migrant Students Reference Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Leon, Ed.

    This document reports on a study evaluating the practices of identification and recruitment of migrant students. Guided by a 14-state advisory council, data were collected by ethnographic research of practice in migrant recruitment and focus-group studies of migrant families. The document consists of five sections each written by a different…

  16. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho . E-mail: keesh@korea.ac.kr

    2005-08-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3{beta} activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death.

  17. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  18. Mechanics Regulates Fate Decisions of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yubing; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Chen, Weiqiang; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Fu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has attracted much attention given their great potential for tissue regenerative therapy and fundamental developmental biology studies. Yet, there is still limited understanding of how mechanical signals in the local cellular microenvironment of hESCs regulate their fate decisions. Here, we applied a microfabricated micromechanical platform to investigate the mechanoresponsive behaviors of hESCs. We demonstrated that hESCs are mechanosensitive, and they could increase their cytoskeleton contractility with matrix rigidity. Furthermore, rigid substrates supported maintenance of pluripotency of hESCs. Matrix mechanics-mediated cytoskeleton contractility might be functionally correlated with E-cadherin expressions in cell-cell contacts and thus involved in fate decisions of hESCs. Our results highlighted the important functional link between matrix rigidity, cellular mechanics, and pluripotency of hESCs and provided a novel approach to characterize and understand mechanotransduction and its involvement in hESC function. PMID:22615930

  19. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  20. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  1. CCN6 knockdown disrupts acinar organization of breast cells in three-dimensional cultures through up-regulation of type III TGF-β receptor.

    PubMed

    Pal, Anupama; Huang, Wei; Toy, Kathy A; Kleer, Celina G

    2012-11-01

    While normal cells in the human breast are organized into acinar structures, disruption of the acinar architecture is a hallmark of cancer. In a three-dimensional model of morphogenesis, we show that down-regulation of the matrix-associated tumor suppressor protein CCN6 (WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 3) disrupts breast epithelial cell polarity and organization into acini through up-regulation of the type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII or betaglycan). Down-regulation of CCN6 in benign breast cells led to loss of tissue polarity and resulted in cellular disorganization with loss of α6 integrin-rich basement membrane and the basolateral polarity protein E-cadherin. Silencing of TβRIII with shRNA and siRNA rescued the ability of breast epithelial cells to form polarized acinar structures with reduced matrix invasion and restored the correct expression of α6 integrin and E-cadherin. Conversely, CCN6 overexpression in aggressive breast cancer cells reduced TβRIII in vitro and in a xenograft model of CCN6 overexpression. The relevance of our studies to human breast cancer is highlighted by the finding that CCN6 protein levels are inversely associated with TβRIII protein in 64%of invasive breast carcinomas. These results reveal a novel function of the matricellular protein CCN6 and establish a mechanistic link between CCN6 and TβRIII in maintaining acinar organization in the breast.

  2. G9a orchestrates PCL3 and KDM7A to promote histone H3K27 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Li-Tzong; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3-lysine 9 (H3K9) and H3K27 by the methyltransferase G9a and polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) inhibits transcription of target genes. A crosstalk between G9a and PRC2 via direct physical interaction has been shown recently. Here, we demonstrate an alternative mechanism by which G9a promotes H3K27 methylation. Overexpression of G9a increases both H3K9 and H3K27 methylation, reduces E-cadherin expression, and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Conversely, the depletion of G9a or ectopic expression of methyltransferase-dead G9a in G9a-overexpressing gemcitabine-resistant PANC-1-R cells exhibits opposite effects. G9a promotes H3K27 methylation of the E-cadherin promoter by upregulating PCL3 to increase PRC2 promoter recruitment and by downregulating the H3K27 demethylase KDM7A to silence E-cadherin gene. The depletion of PCL3 or overexpression of KDM7A elevated expression of E-cadherin in PANC-1-R cells while ectopic expression of PCL3 or knockdown of KDM7A downregulated E-cadherin in PANC-1 cells. Collectively, we provide evidence that G9a orchestrates the dynamic balance within histone-modifying enzymes to regulate H3K27 methylation and gene expression. PMID:26688070

  3. 49 CFR 25.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 25.310 Section 25.310 Transportation... Recruitment Prohibited § 25.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 25.300 through 25.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and admission...

  4. 22 CFR 146.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recruitment. 146.310 Section 146.310 Foreign... Recruitment Prohibited § 146.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 146.300 through 146.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  5. 22 CFR 229.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recruitment. 229.310 Section 229.310 Foreign... and Recruitment Prohibited § 229.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 229.300 through 229.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment...

  6. 10 CFR 1042.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 1042.310 Section 1042.310 Energy DEPARTMENT... Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 1042.300 through 1042.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  7. 49 CFR 25.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment. 25.310 Section 25.310 Transportation... Recruitment Prohibited § 25.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 25.300 through 25.310 apply shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and admission...

  8. Student Recruitment: The Hard Sell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Tony

    1975-01-01

    Presents the pros and cons concerning advertising for recruitment using three modes of analyses - economics, ethics, and law. The author concludes that advertising is an invaluable technique for information dispersal in higher education. (Author/PG)

  9. MUC16 mucin (CA125) regulates the formation of multicellular aggregates by altering β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Giannakouros, Panagiota; Comamala, Marina; Matte, Isabelle; Rancourt, Claudine; Piché, Alain

    2015-01-01

    After shedding from the primary tumor site, ovarian cancer cells form three-dimensional multicellular aggregates that serve as vehicle for cancer cell dissemination in the peritoneal cavity. MUC16 mucin (CA125) is aberrantly expressed by most advanced serous ovarian cancers and can promote proliferation, migration and metastasis. MUC16 associates with E-cadherin and β-catenin, two proteins involved in regulation of cell adhesion and the formation of multicellular aggregates. However, the role of MUC16 in the formation of multicellular aggregates remains to be defined. Here, we show that MUC16 alters E-cadherin cellular localization and expression. Consistent with this, MUC16 knockdown inhibited the formation of multicellular aggregates and, conversely, forced expression of MUC16 C-terminal domain (CTD) enhanced the formation of multicellular aggregates. MUC16 knockdown induces β-catenin relocation from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, decreases its expression by increasing degradation and decreases β-catenin target gene expression. MUC16 CTD inhibits GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin, leading to increased β-catenin levels. Importantly, knockdown of β-catenin inhibited multicellular aggregation. These findings indicate that MUC16 promotes the formation of multicellular aggregates by inhibiting β-catenin degradation. PMID:25628932

  10. The Pitx2:miR-200c/141:noggin pathway regulates Bmp signaling and ameloblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huojun; Jheon, Andrew; Li, Xiao; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Jianbo; Florez, Sergio; Zhang, Zichao; McManus, Michael T.; Klein, Ophir D.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse incisor is a remarkable tooth that grows throughout the animal’s lifetime. This continuous renewal is fueled by adult epithelial stem cells that give rise to ameloblasts, which generate enamel, and little is known about the function of microRNAs in this process. Here, we describe the role of a novel Pitx2:miR-200c/141:noggin regulatory pathway in dental epithelial cell differentiation. miR-200c repressed noggin, an antagonist of Bmp signaling. Pitx2 expression caused an upregulation of miR-200c and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed endogenous Pitx2 binding to the miR-200c/141 promoter. A positive-feedback loop was discovered between miR-200c and Bmp signaling. miR-200c/141 induced expression of E-cadherin and the dental epithelial cell differentiation marker amelogenin. In addition, miR-203 expression was activated by endogenous Pitx2 and targeted the Bmp antagonist Bmper to further regulate Bmp signaling. miR-200c/141 knockout mice showed defects in enamel formation, with decreased E-cadherin and amelogenin expression and increased noggin expression. Our in vivo and in vitro studies reveal a multistep transcriptional program involving the Pitx2:miR-200c/141:noggin regulatory pathway that is important in epithelial cell differentiation and tooth development. PMID:23863486

  11. ASPP2 controls epithelial plasticity and inhibits metastasis through β-catenin-dependent regulation of ZEB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Bu, Fangfang; Royer, Christophe; Serres, Sébastien; Larkin, James R; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R; Salter, Victoria; Fritzsche, Florian; Turnquist, Casmir; Koch, Sofia; Zak, Jaroslav; Zhong, Shan; Wu, Guobin; Liang, Anmin; Olofsen, Patricia A; Moch, Holger; Hancock, David C; Downward, Julian; Goldin, Robert D; Zhao, Jian; Tong, Xin; Guo, Yajun; Lu, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the reverse mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), are known examples of epithelial plasticity that are important in kidney development and cancer metastasis. Here we identify ASPP2, a haploinsufficient tumour suppressor, p53 activator and PAR3 binding partner, as a molecular switch of MET and EMT. ASPP2 contributes to MET in mouse kidney in vivo. Mechanistically, ASPP2 induces MET through its PAR3-binding amino-terminus, independently of p53 binding. ASPP2 prevents β-catenin from transactivating ZEB1, directly by forming an ASPP2-β-catenin-E-cadherin ternary complex and indirectly by inhibiting β-catenin's N-terminal phosphorylation to stabilize the β-catenin-E-cadherin complex. ASPP2 limits the pro-invasive property of oncogenic RAS and inhibits tumour metastasis in vivo. Reduced ASPP2 expression results in EMT, and is associated with poor survival in hepatocellular carcinoma and breast cancer patients. Hence, ASPP2 is a key regulator of epithelial plasticity that connects cell polarity to the suppression of WNT signalling, EMT and tumour metastasis.

  12. Recruiting Students into Nursing: Prior Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Opal S.

    1983-01-01

    Raises fundamental questions regarding student recruitment: (1) why recruit students into nursing? (2) what are the issues that determine whether a school should have a nursing program? and (3) what are students being recruited into? (JOW)

  13. Impact of HIPAA on Subject Recruitment and Retention

    PubMed Central

    Wipke-Tevis, Deidre D.; Pickett, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining an adequate sample of subjects is critical to the success of any research project involving human subjects. Recent reports indicate the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy rule has adversely impacted research. Few resources are available to help researchers and their staff navigate the challenges to subject recruitment and retention after the implementation of the HIPAA Privacy rule. This article will address obstacles to subject recruitment in prospective, clinical research studies related specifically to the HIPAA Privacy rule as well as HIPAA compliant strategies to enhance subject recruitment and retention. Recruitment challenges discussed include evolving interpretations of the HIPAA regulations, inability to directly contact potential subjects, complexity of the HIPAA required documents, the increased cost of subject recruitment, and an expanding administrative burden. Among the strategies addressed are preparatory research reviews, use of clinical collaborators/staff liaisons, pre-screening of potential subjects, minimizing subject burden during the consent process, enhancing follow-up of subjects, facilitating recruitment for future studies and streamlining compliance training for research staff. PMID:17551087

  14. Forkhead transcription factor FOXF1 is a novel target gene of the p53 family and regulates cancer cell migration and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Sasaki, Y; Koyama, R; Takeda, K; Idogawa, M; Tokino, T

    2014-10-01

    p53 is an established tumor suppressor that can activate the transcription of multiple target genes. Recent evidence suggests that p53 may contribute to the regulation of cell invasion and migration. In this study, we show that the forkhead box transcription factor FOXF1 is a novel target of the p53 family because FOXF1 is upregulated by p53, TAp73 and TAp63. We show that FOXF1 is induced upon DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified a response element located within the FOXF1 gene that is responsive to wild-type p53, TAp73β and TAp63γ. The ectopic expression of FOXF1 inhibited cancer cell invasion and migration, whereas the inactivation of FOXF1 stimulated cell invasion and migration. We also show that FOXF1 regulates the transcriptional activity of E-cadherin (CDH1) by acting on its FOXF1 consensus binding site located upstream of the E-cadherin gene. Collectively, our results show that FOXF1 is a p53 family target gene, and our data suggest that FOXF1 and p53 form a portion of a regulatory transcriptional network that appears to have an important role in cancer cell invasion and migration.

  15. Effects of Arg-Gly-Asp-modified elastin-like polypeptide on pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in controlling the β-cell morphology, survival and insulin secretary functions. An RGD-modified elastin-like polypeptide (RGD-ELP), TGPG[VGRGD(VGVPG)(6)](20)WPC, has been reported previously as a bioactive matrix. In this study, to investigate whether RGD-ELP affects β-cell growth characteristics and insulin secretion, β-TC6 cells were cultured on the RGD-ELP coatings prepared via thermally induced phase transition. On RGD-ELP, β-TC6 cells clustered into an islet-like architecture with high cell viability. Throughout 7days' culture, the proliferation rate of the cells within a pseudoislet was similar to that of monolayer culture. Under high glucose (25mM), β-TC6 pseudoislets showed up-regulated insulin gene expression and exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the mRNA and protein abundances of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) E-cadherin and connexin-36 were much higher in pseudoislets than in monolayer cells. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin or connexin-36 expression severely limited pseudoislet formation. In addition, the mRNA levels of collagen types I and IV, fibronectin and laminin were significantly elevated in pseudoislets. The results suggest that RGD-ELP promotes pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of the CAM and ECM components. The functional roles of RGD-ELP are discussed in respect of its molecular composition.

  16. Wetland dynamics influence mid-continent duck recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Pearse, Aaron T.; Szymankski, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment is a key factor influencing duck population dynamics. Understanding what regulates recruitment of ducks is a prerequisite to informed habitat and harvest management. Quantity of May ponds (MP) has been linked to recruitment and population size (Kaminski and Gluesing 1987, Raveling and Heitmeyer 1989). However, wetland productivity (quality) is driven by inter-annual hydrological fluctuations. Periodic drying of wetlands due to wet-dry climate cycles releases nutrients and increases invertebrate populations when wet conditions return (Euliss et al. 1999). Wetlands may also become wet or dry within a breeding season. Accordingly, inter-annual and intra-seasonal hydrologic variation potentially influence duck recruitment. Here, we examined influences of wetland quantity, quality, and intra-seasonal dynamics on recruitment of ducks. We indexed duck recruitment by vulnerability-corrected age ratios (juveniles/adult females) for mid-continent Gadwall (Anas strepera). We chose Gadwall because the majority of the continental population breeds in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), where annual estimates of MP exist since 1974. We indexed wetland quality by calculating change in MP (?MP) over the past two years (?MP = 0.6[MPt – MPt-1] + 0.4[MPt – MPt-2]). We indexed intra-seasonal change in number of ponds by dividing the PPR mean standardized precipitation index for July by MP (hereafter summer index). MP and ?MP were positively correlated (r = 0.65); therefore, we calculated residual ?MP (?MPr) with a simple linear regression using MP, creating orthogonal variables. Finally, we conducted a multiple regression to examine how MP, ?MPr, and summer index explained variation in recruitment of Gadwall from 1976–2010. Our model explained 67% of the variation in mid-continent Gadwall recruitment and all three hydrologic indices were positively correlated with recruitment (Figure 1). Type II semi-partial R2 estimates indicated that MP accounted for 41%, ?MPr

  17. Spatial synchrony in cisco recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Jared T.; Yule, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael L.; Ahrenstorff, Tyler D.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Ebener, Mark P.; Berglund, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the spatial scale of recruitment variability for disparate cisco (Coregonus artedi) populations in the Great Lakes (n = 8) and Minnesota inland lakes (n = 4). We found that the scale of synchrony was approximately 400 km when all available data were utilized; much greater than the 50-km scale suggested for freshwater fish populations in an earlier global analysis. The presence of recruitment synchrony between Great Lakes and inland lake cisco populations supports the hypothesis that synchronicity is driven by climate and not dispersal. We also found synchrony in larval densities among three Lake Superior populations separated by 25–275 km, which further supports the hypothesis that broad-scale climatic factors are the cause of spatial synchrony. Among several candidate climate variables measured during the period of larval cisco emergence, maximum wind speeds exhibited the most similar spatial scale of synchrony to that observed for cisco. Other factors, such as average water temperatures, exhibited synchrony on broader spatial scales, which suggests they could also be contributing to recruitment synchrony. Our results provide evidence that abiotic factors can induce synchronous patterns of recruitment for populations of cisco inhabiting waters across a broad geographic range, and show that broad-scale synchrony of recruitment can occur in freshwater fish populations as well as those from marine systems.

  18. Predicting crappie recruitment in Ohio reservoirs with spawning stock size, larval density, and chlorophyll concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, David B.; Hale, R. Scott; Vanni, Michael J.; Stein, Roy A.

    2006-01-01

    Stock-recruit models typically use only spawning stock size as a predictor of recruitment to a fishery. In this paper, however, we used spawning stock size as well as larval density and key environmental variables to predict recruitment of white crappies Pomoxis annularis and black crappies P. nigromaculatus, a genus notorious for variable recruitment. We sampled adults and recruits from 11 Ohio reservoirs and larvae from 9 reservoirs during 1998-2001. We sampled chlorophyll as an index of reservoir productivity and obtained daily estimates of water elevation to determine the impact of hydrology on recruitment. Akaike's information criterion (AIC) revealed that Ricker and Beverton-Holt stock-recruit models that included chlorophyll best explained the variation in larval density and age-2 recruits. Specifically, spawning stock catch per effort (CPE) and chlorophyll explained 63-64% of the variation in larval density. In turn, larval density and chlorophyll explained 43-49% of the variation in age-2 recruit CPE. Finally, spawning stock CPE and chlorophyll were the best predictors of recruit CPE (i.e., 74-86%). Although larval density and recruitment increased with chlorophyll, neither was related to seasonal water elevation. Also, the AIC generally did not distinguish between Ricker and Beverton-Holt models. From these relationships, we concluded that crappie recruitment can be limited by spawning stock CPE and larval production when spawning stock sizes are low (i.e., CPE , 5 crappies/net-night). At higher levels of spawning stock sizes, spawning stock CPE and recruitment were less clearly related. To predict recruitment in Ohio reservoirs, managers should assess spawning stock CPE with trap nets and estimate chlorophyll concentrations. To increase crappie recruitment in reservoirs where recruitment is consistently poor, managers should use regulations to increase spawning stock size, which, in turn, should increase larval production and recruits to the fishery.

  19. Human AP-endonuclease (APE1/Ref-1) and its acetylation regulate YB-1/p300 recruitment and RNA polymerase II loading in the drug induced activation of multidrug resistance gene MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mantha, Anil K.; Mitra, Sankar; Bhakat, Kishor K.

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of human AP-endonuclease (APE1/Ref-1), a key enzyme in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, is often associated with tumor cell resistance to various anticancer drugs. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of transcriptional regulatory (non repair) function of APE1 in promoting resistance to certain types of drugs. We have recently shown that APE1 stably interacts with Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), and acts as its coactivator for the expression of multidrug resistance gene MDR1, thereby causing drug-resistance. Here we show for the first time that APE1 is stably associated with the basic transcription factor RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the coactivator p300 on the endogenous MDR1 promoter. APE1’s depletion significantly reduces YB-1/p300 recruitment to the promoter, resulting in reduced RNA pol II loading. Drug-induced APE1 acetylation which is mediated by p300 enhances formation of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1)/YB-1/p300 complex on the MDR1 promoter. Enhanced recruitment of this complex increases MDR1 promoter dependent luciferase activity and its endogenous expression. Using APE1 downregulated cells and cells overexpressing wild type APE1 or its nonacetylable mutant we have demonstrated that the loss of APE1’s acetylation impaired MDR1 activation and sensitizes the cells to cisplatin or etoposide. We have thus established the basis for APE1’s acetylation-dependent regulatory function in inducing MDR1-mediated drug resistance. PMID:20856196

  20. 38 CFR 23.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recruitment. 23.310... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 23.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 23.300 through 23.310 apply shall not discriminate on...

  1. 29 CFR 36.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Recruitment. 36.510 Section 36.510 Labor Office of the... Activities Prohibited § 36.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient...

  2. 18 CFR 1317.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment. 1317.310... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 1317.300 through 1317.310 apply shall not discriminate on...

  3. 7 CFR 15a.23 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recruitment. 15a.23 Section 15a.23 Agriculture Office... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 15a.23 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which this subpart applies...

  4. 18 CFR 1317.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recruitment. 1317.310... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 1317.300 through 1317.310 apply shall not discriminate on...

  5. 44 CFR 19.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment. 19.510 Section... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where...

  6. 7 CFR 15a.53 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 15a.53 Section 15a.53 Agriculture Office... Activities Prohibited § 15a.53 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient...

  7. 34 CFR 106.53 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recruitment. 106.53 Section 106.53 Education... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be...

  8. 45 CFR 2555.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment. 2555.510 Section 2555.510 Public... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be...

  9. 22 CFR 229.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recruitment. 229.510 Section 229.510 Foreign... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  10. 49 CFR 25.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 25.510 Section 25.510 Transportation... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of...

  11. 34 CFR 106.53 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recruitment. 106.53 Section 106.53 Education... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be...

  12. 32 CFR 196.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recruitment. 196.510 Section 196.510 National... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be...

  13. 41 CFR 101-4.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Recruitment. 101-4.510... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and...

  14. 45 CFR 2555.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 2555.510 Section 2555.510 Public... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be...

  15. 20 CFR 655.156 - Recruitment report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recruitment report. 655.156 Section 655.156... the United States (H-2A Workers) Post-Acceptance Requirements § 655.156 Recruitment report. (a) Requirements of a recruitment report. The employer must prepare, sign, and date a written recruitment...

  16. 22 CFR 146.510 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recruitment. 146.510 Section 146.510 Foreign... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.510 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of...

  17. 45 CFR 2555.310 - Recruitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recruitment. 2555.310 Section 2555.310 Public... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 2555.310 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment. A recipient to which §§ 2555.300 through 2555.310 apply shall not discriminate on...

  18. 18 CFR 1317.510 - Recruitment.