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Sample records for regulate membrane surface

  1. Membrane Supply and Demand Regulates F-Actin in a Cell Surface Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Wang, Mengyu; Zheng, Liuliu; Golding, Ido; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2016-05-09

    Cells store membrane in surface reservoirs of pits and protrusions. These membrane reservoirs facilitate cell shape change and buffer mechanical stress, but we do not know how reservoir dynamics are regulated. During cellularization, the first cytokinesis in Drosophila embryos, a reservoir of microvilli unfolds to fuel cleavage furrow ingression. We find that regulated exocytosis adds membrane to the reservoir before and during unfolding. Dynamic F-actin deforms exocytosed membrane into microvilli. Single microvilli extend and retract in ∼20 s, while the overall reservoir is depleted in sync with furrow ingression over 60-70 min. Using pharmacological and genetic perturbations, we show that exocytosis promotes microvillar F-actin assembly, while furrow ingression controls microvillar F-actin disassembly. Thus, reservoir F-actin and, consequently, reservoir dynamics are regulated by membrane supply from exocytosis and membrane demand from furrow ingression.

  2. Membrane tension homeostasis of epithelial cells through surface area regulation in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Pietuch, Anna; Brückner, Bastian R; Janshoff, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Osmotic stress poses one of the most fundamental challenges to living cells. Particularly, the largely inextensible plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells easily ruptures under in-plane tension calling for sophisticated strategies to readily respond to osmotic stress. We describe how epithelial cells react and adapt mechanically to the exposure to hypotonic and hypertonic solutions in the context of a confluent monolayer. Site-specific indentation experiments in conjunction with tether pulling on individual cells have been carried out with an atomic force microscope to reveal spatio-temporal changes in membrane tension and surface area. We found that cells compensate for an increase in lateral tension due to hypoosmotic stress by sacrificing excess of membrane area stored in protrusions and invaginations such as microvilli and caveolae. At mild hypotonic conditions lateral tension increases partly compensated by surface are regulation, i.e. the cell sacrifices some of its membrane reservoirs. A loss of membrane-actin contacts occurs upon exposure to stronger hypotonic solutions giving rise to a drop in lateral tension. Tension release recovers on longer time scales by an increasing endocytosis, which efficiently removes excess membrane from the apical side to restore the initial pre-stress. Hypertonic solutions lead to shrinkage of cells and collapse of the apical membrane onto the cortex. Exposure to distilled water leads to stiffening of cells due to removal of excess surface area and tension increase due to elevated osmotic pressure across the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  4. Alternative routes to the cell surface underpin insulin-regulated membrane trafficking of GLUT4.

    PubMed

    Kioumourtzoglou, Dimitrios; Pryor, Paul R; Gould, Gwyn W; Bryant, Nia J

    2015-07-15

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporters (GLUT4, also known as SLC2A4) from specialized intracellular GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) to the surface of fat and muscle cells is central to whole-body glucose regulation. This translocation and subsequent internalization of GLUT4 back into intracellular stores transits through numerous small membrane-bound compartments (internal GLUT4-containing vesicles; IGVs) including GSVs, but the function of these different compartments is not clear. Cellugyrin (also known as synaptogyrin-2) and sortilin define distinct populations of IGV; sortilin-positive IGVs represent GSVs, but the function of cellugyrin-containing IGVs is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a role for cellugyrin in intracellular sequestration of GLUT4 in HeLa cells and have used a proximity ligation assay to follow changes in pairwise associations between cellugyrin, sortilin, GLUT4 and membrane trafficking machinery following insulin-stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipoctyes. Our data suggest that insulin stimulates traffic from cellugyrin-containing to sortilin-containing membranes, and that cellugyrin-containing IGVs provide an insulin-sensitive reservoir to replenish GSVs following insulin-stimulated exocytosis of GLUT4. Furthermore, our data support the existence of a pathway from cellugyrin-containing membranes to the surface of 3T3-L1 adipocytes that bypasses GSVs under basal conditions, and that insulin diverts traffic away from this into GSVs.

  5. Alternative routes to the cell surface underpin insulin-regulated membrane trafficking of GLUT4

    PubMed Central

    Kioumourtzoglou, Dimitrios; Pryor, Paul R.; Gould, Gwyn W.; Bryant, Nia J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporters (GLUT4, also known as SLC2A4) from specialized intracellular GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) to the surface of fat and muscle cells is central to whole-body glucose regulation. This translocation and subsequent internalization of GLUT4 back into intracellular stores transits through numerous small membrane-bound compartments (internal GLUT4-containing vesicles; IGVs) including GSVs, but the function of these different compartments is not clear. Cellugyrin (also known as synaptogyrin-2) and sortilin define distinct populations of IGV; sortilin-positive IGVs represent GSVs, but the function of cellugyrin-containing IGVs is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a role for cellugyrin in intracellular sequestration of GLUT4 in HeLa cells and have used a proximity ligation assay to follow changes in pairwise associations between cellugyrin, sortilin, GLUT4 and membrane trafficking machinery following insulin-stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipoctyes. Our data suggest that insulin stimulates traffic from cellugyrin-containing to sortilin-containing membranes, and that cellugyrin-containing IGVs provide an insulin-sensitive reservoir to replenish GSVs following insulin-stimulated exocytosis of GLUT4. Furthermore, our data support the existence of a pathway from cellugyrin-containing membranes to the surface of 3T3-L1 adipocytes that bypasses GSVs under basal conditions, and that insulin diverts traffic away from this into GSVs. PMID:26071524

  6. Surface-structure-regulated penetration of nanoparticles across a cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Xuejin; Li, Zhonghua; Gao, Huajian

    2012-05-01

    The cell uptake rate of nanoparticles (NPs) coated with mixed hydrophilic/hydrophobic ligands is known to be strongly influenced by the ligand pattern on the nanoparticle surface. To help reveal the physical mechanism behind this intriguing phenomenon, here we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to analyze the evolution of free energy as the ligand-coated NPs pierce through a lipid bilayer. Four characteristic ligand patterns are considered: striated NPs with alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups compared to NPs with randomly mixed ligands at the same hydrophilic to hydrophobic ratio, as well as NPs coated with homogeneous hydrophilic or hydrophobic ligands. The free energy analysis indicates that among the four ligand patterns under study, the striated NP encounters the lowest energy barrier during translocation across the membrane. Further analysis reveals that the translocation of the striated NP is facilitated by the constraint of its rotational degree of freedom by the anisotropic ligand pattern, which prevented the free energy of the system from sinking to a deeper valley as the NP passes through the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Finally, the critical forces required for almost instant penetration of these patterned NPs across the bilayer are calculated and shown to be consistent with the free energy analysis. These findings provide useful guidelines for the molecular design of patterned NPs for controllable cell penetrability.The cell uptake rate of nanoparticles (NPs) coated with mixed hydrophilic/hydrophobic ligands is known to be strongly influenced by the ligand pattern on the nanoparticle surface. To help reveal the physical mechanism behind this intriguing phenomenon, here we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to analyze the evolution of free energy as the ligand-coated NPs pierce through a lipid bilayer. Four characteristic ligand patterns are considered: striated NPs with alternating hydrophilic and

  7. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M.; Thornton, Aaron W.; Hill, Anita J.; Guiver, Michael D.; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks (‘nanocracks’) in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance.

  8. Nanocrack-regulated self-humidifying membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Hoon; Lee, So Young; Hwang, Doo Sung; Shin, Dong Won; Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, Kang Hyuck; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Lee, Mokwon; Kim, Deok-Soo; Doherty, Cara M; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Anita J; Guiver, Michael D; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-04-28

    The regulation of water content in polymeric membranes is important in a number of applications, such as reverse electrodialysis and proton-exchange fuel-cell membranes. External thermal and water management systems add both mass and size to systems, and so intrinsic mechanisms of retaining water and maintaining ionic transport in such membranes are particularly important for applications where small system size is important. For example, in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, where water retention in the membrane is crucial for efficient transport of hydrated ions, by operating the cells at higher temperatures without external humidification, the membrane is self-humidified with water generated by electrochemical reactions. Here we report an alternative solution that does not rely on external regulation of water supply or high temperatures. Water content in hydrocarbon polymer membranes is regulated through nanometre-scale cracks ('nanocracks') in a hydrophobic surface coating. These cracks work as nanoscale valves to retard water desorption and to maintain ion conductivity in the membrane on dehumidification. Hydrocarbon fuel-cell membranes with surface nanocrack coatings operated at intermediate temperatures show improved electrochemical performance, and coated reverse-electrodialysis membranes show enhanced ionic selectivity with low bulk resistance.

  9. Immersed surfaces and membranes transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Monastyrsky, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Physical and biological observation methods provide a variety of bilayer membranes’ shapes and their transformations. Besides, the topological and geometrical methods allow us to deduce a classification of all possible membrane surfaces. This double-sided approach leads to a deeper insight into membranes properties. Our goal is to apply an appropriate mathematical technique for classifying vesicles (closed surfaces in mathematical terminology) and for their transformation ways. The problem turned out to be an intricate one, and to our knowledge no mathematical techniques have been applied to its solution. We find that all vesicles can be decomposed in a small number of universality classes generated by a few ‘bricks’: a torus, a screwed torus, and the real projective plane. We consider several ways of transforming membrane surfaces, bearing in mind that they possess an additional extremal property. Our method exploits different constructions of minimal surfaces in S3. We estimate energetic barrier for transformation of minimal membrane surfaces using the so-called doubling procedure. This problem is far from being a pure theoretical exercise. For instance, almost all cells’ biological functions, or tumor progression, are accompanied by apparently singular cell membrane transformations.

  10. Diffusion on ruffled membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Naji, Ali; Brown, Frank L H

    2007-06-21

    We present a position Langevin equation for overdamped particle motion on rough two-dimensional surfaces. A Brownian dynamics algorithm is suggested to evolve this equation numerically, allowing for the prediction of effective (projected) diffusion coefficients over corrugated surfaces. In the case of static surface roughness, we find that a simple area-scaling prediction for the projected diffusion coefficient leads to seemingly quantitative agreement with numerical results. To study the effect of dynamic surface evolution on the diffusive process, we consider particle diffusion over a thermally fluctuating elastic membrane. Surface fluctuation has the effect of increasing the effective diffusivity toward a limiting annealed-surface value discussed previously. We argue that protein motion over cell surfaces spans a variety of physical regimes, making it impossible to identify a single approximation scheme appropriate to all measurements of interest.

  11. Zwitterionic materials for antifouling membrane surface construction.

    PubMed

    He, Mingrui; Gao, Kang; Zhou, Linjie; Jiao, Zhiwei; Wu, Mengyuan; Cao, Jialin; You, Xinda; Cai, Ziyi; Su, Yanlei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    Membrane separation processes are often perplexed by severe and ubiquitous membrane fouling. Zwitterionic materials, keeping electric neutrality with equivalent positive and negative charged groups, are well known for their superior antifouling properties and have been broadly utilized to construct antifouling surfaces for medical devices, biosensors and marine coatings applications. In recent years, zwitterionic materials have been more and more frequently utilized for constructing antifouling membrane surfaces. In this review, the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials as well as their biomimetic prototypes in cell membranes will be discussed, followed by the survey of common approaches to incorporate zwitterionic materials onto membrane surfaces including surface grafting, surface segregation, biomimetic adhesion, surface coating and so on. The potential applications of these antifouling membranes are also embedded. Finally, we will present a brief perspective on the future development of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Membrane fouling is a severe problem hampering the application of membrane separation technology. The properties of membrane surfaces play a critical role in membrane fouling and antifouling behavior/performance. Antifouling membrane surface construction has evolved as a hot research issue for the development of membrane processes. Zwitterionic modification of membrane surfaces has been recognized as an effective strategy to resist membrane fouling. This review summarizes the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials inspired by cell membranes as well as the popular approaches to incorporate them onto membrane surfaces. It can help form a comprehensive knowledge about the principles and methods of modifying membrane surfaces with zwitterionic materials. Finally, we propose the possible future research directions of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  12. Fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijia; Chen, Jianrong; Ma, Yuanjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, fractal reconstruction of rough membrane surface with a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function was conducted. The topography of rough membrane surface was measured by an atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the results showed that the membrane surface was isotropous. Accordingly, the fractal dimension and roughness of membrane surface were calculated by the power spectrum method. The rough membrane surface was reconstructed on the MATLAB platform with the parameter values acquired from raw AFM data. The reconstructed membrane was much similar to the real membrane morphology measured by AFM. The parameters (including average roughness and root mean square (RMS) roughness) associated with membrane morphology for the model and real membrane were calculated, and a good match of roughness parameters between the reconstructed surface and real membrane was found, indicating the feasibility of the new developed method. The reconstructed membrane surface can be potentially used for interaction energy evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  14. Regulation of basal and reserve cardiac pacemaker function by interactions of cAMP mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling with surface membrane channels

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Decades of intensive research of primary cardiac pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, have established potential roles of specific membrane channels in the generation of the diastolic depolarization, the major mechanism allowing sinoatrial node cells generate spontaneous beating. During the last three decades, multiple studies made either in the isolated sinoatrial node or sinoatrial node cells have demonstrated a pivotal role of Ca2+ and, specifically Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, for spontaneous beating of cardiac pacemaker. Recently, spontaneous, rhythmic local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases from ryanodine receptors during late half of the diastolic depolarization have been implicated as a vital factor in the generation of sinoatrial node cells spontaneous firing. Local Ca2+ releases are driven by a unique combination of high basal cAMP production by adenylyl cyclases, high basal cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterases and a high level of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent phosphorylation. These local Ca2+ releases activate an inward Na+-Ca2+ exchange current which accelerates the terminal diastolic depolarization rate and, thus, controls the spontaneous pacemaker firing. Both the basal primary pacemaker beating rate and its modulation via β-adrenergic receptor stimulation appear to be critically dependent upon intact RyR function and local subsarcolemmal sarcoplasmic reticulum generated Ca2+ releases. This review aspires to integrate the traditional viewpoint that has emphasized the supremacy of the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels in spontaneous firing of the primary cardiac pacemaker, and these novel perspectives of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling in regulation of the heart pacemaker clock, both in the basal state and during β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. PMID:19573534

  15. Surface Modification of Water Purification Membranes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel J; Dreyer, Daniel R; Bielawski, Christopher W; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-04-18

    Polymeric membranes are an energy-efficient means of purifying water, but they suffer from fouling during filtration. Modification of the membrane surface is one route to mitigating membrane fouling, as it helps to maintain high levels of water productivity. Here, a series of common techniques for modification of the membrane surface are reviewed, including surface coating, grafting, and various treatment techniques such as chemical treatment, UV irradiation, and plasma treatment. Historical background on membrane development and surface modification is also provided. Finally, polydopamine, an emerging material that can be easily deposited onto a wide variety of substrates, is discussed within the context of membrane modification. A brief summary of the chemistry of polydopamine, particularly as it may pertain to membrane development, is also described.

  16. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms. PMID:27054048

  17. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  18. The T-tubule is a cell-surface target for insulin-regulated recycling of membrane proteins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Rosemblatt, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Thoidis, G; Pilch, P F; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    (1) In this study we have determined the distribution of various membrane proteins involved in insulin-activated glucose transport in T-tubules and in sarcolemma from rat skeletal muscle. Two independent experimental approaches were used to determine the presence of membrane proteins in T-tubules: (i) the purification of T-tubules free from sarcolemmal membranes by lectin agglutination, and (ii) T-tubule vesicle immunoadsorption. These methods confirmed that T-tubules from rat skeletal muscle were enriched with dihydropyridine receptors and tt28 protein and did not contain the sarcolemmal markers dystrophin or beta 1-integrin. Both types of experiments revealed an abundant content of GLUT4 glucose carriers, insulin receptors and SCAMPs (secretory carrier membrane proteins) in T-tubule membranes. (2) Acute administration in vivo of insulin caused an increased abundance of GLUT4 in T-tubules and sarcolemma. On the contrary, insulin led to a 50% reduction in insulin receptors present in T-tubules and in sarcolemma, demonstrating that insulin-induced insulin receptor internalization affects T-tubules in the muscle fibre. The alteration in the content of GLUT4 and insulin receptors in T-tubules was a consequence of insulin-induced redistribution of these proteins. SCAMPs also redistributed in muscle membranes in response to insulin. They were recruited by insulin from intracellular high-density fractions to intracellular lighter-density fractions and to the cell surface, showing a pattern of insulin-induced cellular redistribution distinct from those of GLUT4 and the insulin receptor. (3) In conclusion, the T-tubule is a cell-surface target for membrane proteins involved in recycling such as SCAMPs or for membrane proteins that acutely redistribute in response to insulin such as GLUT4 or insulin receptors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8526847

  19. Surface selective membranes for carbon dioxide separation

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, hybrid membranes have been developed for the selective separation of CO2 from mixtures containing H2. Beginning with commercially available Pall alumina membrane tubes with nominal pore diameter of 5 nm, hybrids were produced by silation with a variety of functionalities designed to facilitate the selective adsorption of CO2 onto the pore surface. The goal is to produce a membrane which can harness the power of surface diffusion to give the selectivity of polymer membranes with the permeance of inorganic membranes.

  20. Membrane tension regulates clathrin-coated pit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular organization depends on close communication between the extracellular environment and a network of cytoskeleton filaments. The interactions between cytoskeletal filaments and the plasma membrane lead to changes in membrane tension that in turns help regulate biological processes. Endocytosis is thought to be stimulated by low membrane tension and the removal of membrane increases membrane tension. While it is appreciated that the opposing effects of exocytosis and endocytosis have on keeping plasma membrane tension to a set point, it is not clear how membrane tension affects the dynamics of clathrin-coated pits (CCPs), the individual functional units of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, although it was recently shown that actin dynamics counteracts membrane tension during CCP formation, it is not clear what roles plasma membrane tension plays during CCP initiation. Based on the notion that plasma membrane tension is increased when the membrane area increases during cell spreading, we designed micro-patterned surfaces of different sizes to control the cell spreading sizes. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of living cells and high content image analysis were used to quantify the dynamics of CCPs. We found that there is an increased proportion of CCPs with short (<20s) lifetime for cells on larger patterns. Interestingly, cells on larger patterns have higher CCP initiation density, an effect unexpected based on the conventional view of decreasing endocytosis with increasing membrane tension. Furthermore, by analyzing the intensity profiles of CCPs that were longer-lived, we found CCP intensity decreases with increasing cell size, indicating that the CCPs are smaller with increasing membrane tension. Finally, disruption of actin dynamics significantly increased the number of short-lived CCPs, but also decreased CCP initiation rate. Together, our study reveals new mechanistic insights into how plasma membrane tension regulates

  1. Electrodiffusion of lipids on membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. C.

    2012-05-01

    Lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when the random lateral motion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Although the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membranes of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregation and the evolution to the electrostatically favorable states remain largely undetermined. Here we propose an electrodiffusion model, based on the variational principle of the free energy functional, for the self-consistent lateral drift-diffusion of multiple species of charged lipids on membrane surfaces. Finite sizes of lipids are modeled to enforce the geometrical constraint of the lipid concentration on membrane surfaces. A surface finite element method is developed to appropriate the Laplace-Beltrami operators in the partial differential equations of the model. Our model properly describes the saturation of lipids on membrane surfaces, and correctly predicts that the MARCKS peptide can consistently sequester three multivalent phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids through its basic amino acid residues, regardless of a wide range of the percentage of monovalent phosphatidylserine in the membrane.

  2. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  3. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  4. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  5. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change. PMID:24844289

  6. Capillary origami and superhydrophobic membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldi, N. R.; Ouali, F. F.; Morris, R. H.; McHale, G.; Newton, M. I.

    2013-05-01

    Capillary origami uses surface tension to fold and shape solid films and membranes into three-dimensional structures. It uses the fact that solid surfaces, no matter how hydrophobic, will tend to adhere to and wrap around the surface of a liquid. In this work, we report that a superhydrophobic coating can be created, which can completely suppress wrapping as a contacting water droplet evaporates. We also show that using a wetting azeotropic solution of allyl alcohol, which penetrates the surface features, can enhance liquid adhesion and create more powerful Capillary Origami. These findings create the possibility of selectively shaping membrane substrates.

  7. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  8. DMSO Induces Dehydration near Lipid Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H.H.; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw. PMID:26200868

  9. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw.

  10. Porous polymer membranes via selectively wetted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Magerl, Annemarie; Goedel, Werner A

    2012-04-03

    Here, we show that porous polymeric membranes can be prepared using the principles of offset printing: an offset printing plate is structured into hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions with the help of photolithography and is selectively wetted with a solution of calcium chloride in water at the hydrophilic regions. Then, a polymer solution (poly(methyl methacrylate) in chloroform) is applied to this surface and forms a hydrophobic layer that is structured by the aqueous droplets. Deviating from standard offset printing, this layer is not transferred to another surface in its liquid state but is solidified and subsequently is separated from the printing plate. The thickness of the polymer film is chosen in such a way that the aqueous droplets on the surface protrude from the film. Thus, we obtain polymer membranes with pores in the size of the protruding aqueous droplets. These membranes are then characterized by the filtration of model dispersions.

  11. Actin cortex architecture regulates cell surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Priyamvada; Clark, Andrew G; Smith, Matthew B; Cassani, Davide A D; Dierkes, Kai; Ragab, Anan; Roux, Philippe P; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2017-06-01

    Animal cell shape is largely determined by the cortex, a thin actin network underlying the plasma membrane in which myosin-driven stresses generate contractile tension. Tension gradients result in local contractions and drive cell deformations. Previous cortical tension regulation studies have focused on myosin motors. Here, we show that cortical actin network architecture is equally important. First, we observe that actin cortex thickness and tension are inversely correlated during cell-cycle progression. We then show that the actin filament length regulators CFL1, CAPZB and DIAPH1 regulate mitotic cortex thickness and find that both increasing and decreasing thickness decreases tension in mitosis. This suggests that the mitotic cortex is poised close to a tension maximum. Finally, using a computational model, we identify a physical mechanism by which maximum tension is achieved at intermediate actin filament lengths. Our results indicate that actin network architecture, alongside myosin activity, is key to cell surface tension regulation.

  12. Fluctuation of surface charge in membrane pores.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C Lindsay; Alder, Glenn M; Pasternak, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Surface charge in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with narrow pores has been probed with a fluorescent cationic dye (3,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diO-C2-(3))) using confocal microscopy. Staining of negatively charged PET membranes with diO-C2-(3) is a useful measure of surface charge for the following reasons: 1) the dye inhibits K(+) currents through the pores and reduces their selectivity for cations; 2) it inhibits [3H]-choline+ transport and promotes 36Cl- transport across the membrane in a pH- and ionic-strength-dependent fashion; and 3) staining of pores by diO-C2-(3) is reduced by low pH and by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Zn2+. Measurement of the time dependence of cyanine staining of pores shows fluctuations of fluorescence intensity that occur on the same time scale as do fluctuations of ionic current in such pores. These data support our earlier proposal that fluctuations in ionic current across pores in synthetic and biological membranes reflect fluctuations in the surface charge of the pore walls in addition to molecular changes in pore proteins. PMID:11916860

  13. The plasma membrane: Penultimate regulator of ADAM sheddase function.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Karina; Bhakdi, Sucharit

    2017-11-01

    ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the best characterized members of the ADAM (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase) - family of transmembrane proteases. Both are involved diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes. ADAMs are known to be regulated by posttranslational mechanisms. However, emerging evidence indicates that the plasma membrane with its unique dynamic properties may additionally play an important role in controlling sheddase function. Membrane events that could contribute to regulation of ADAM-function are summarized. Surface expression of peptidolytic activity should be differentiated from ADAM-sheddase function since the latter additionally requires that the protease finds its substrate in the lipid bilayer. We propose that this is achieved through horizontal and vertical reorganization of membrane nanoarchitecture coordinately occurring at the sites of sheddase activation. Reshuffling of nanodomains thereby guides traffic of enzyme and substrate to each other. For ADAM17 phosphatidylserine exposure is required to then induce its shedding function. The novel concept that physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer govern the action of ADAM-proteases may be extendable to other functional proteins that act at the cell surface. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Relating Silica Scaling in Reverse Osmosis to Membrane Surface Properties.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tiezheng; Zhao, Song; Boo, Chanhee; Hashmi, Sara M; Elimelech, Menachem

    2017-04-18

    We investigated the relationship between membrane surface properties and silica scaling in reverse osmosis (RO). The effects of membrane hydrophilicity, free energy for heterogeneous nucleation, and surface charge on silica scaling were examined by comparing thin-film composite polyamide membranes grafted with a variety of polymers. Results show that the rate of silica scaling was independent of both membrane hydrophilicity and free energy for heterogeneous nucleation. In contrast, membrane surface charge demonstrated a strong correlation with the extent of silica scaling (R(2) > 0.95, p < 0.001). Positively charged membranes significantly facilitated silica scaling, whereas a more negative membrane surface charge led to reduced scaling. This observation suggests that deposition of negatively charged silica species on the membrane surface plays a critical role in silica scale formation. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms governing silica scaling in reverse osmosis and highlight the potential of membrane surface modification as a strategy to reduce silica scaling.

  15. Salmonellae PhoPQ regulation of the outer membrane to resist innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellae sense host cues to regulate properties important for bacterial survival and replication within host tissues. The PhoPQ two-component regulatory system senses phagosome acidification and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) to regulate the protein and lipid contents of the bacterial envelope that comprises an inner and outer membrane. PhoPQ-regulated lipid components of the outer membrane include lipopolysaccharides and glycerophospholipids. Envelope proteins regulated by PhoPQ, include: components of virulence associated secretion systems, the flagellar apparatus, membrane transport systems, and proteins that are likely structural components of the outer membrane. PhoPQ alteration of the bacterial surface results in increased bacterial resistance to CAMP and decreased detection by the innate immune system. This review details the molecular complexity of the bacterial cell envelope and highlights the outer membrane lipid bilayer as an environmentally regulated bacterial organelle.

  16. Polymeric membranes: surface modification for minimizing (bio)colloidal fouling.

    PubMed

    Kochkodan, Victor; Johnson, Daniel J; Hilal, Nidal

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an overview on recent developments in surface modification of polymer membranes for reduction of their fouling with biocolloids and organic colloids in pressure driven membrane processes. First, colloidal interactions such as London-van der Waals, electrical, hydration, hydrophobic, steric forces and membrane surface properties such as hydrophilicity, charge and surface roughness, which affect membrane fouling, have been discussed and the main goals of the membrane surface modification for fouling reduction have been outlined. Thereafter the recent studies on reduction of (bio)colloidal of polymer membranes using ultraviolet/redox initiated surface grafting, physical coating/adsorption of a protective layer on the membrane surface, chemical reactions or surface modification of polymer membranes with nanoparticles as well as using of advanced atomic force microscopy to characterize (bio)colloidal fouling have been critically summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Small membranes under negative surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Yotam Y.; Farago, Oded

    2015-03-01

    We use computer simulations and a simple free energy model to study the response of a bilayer membrane to the application of a negative (compressive) mechanical tension. Such a tension destabilizes the long wavelength undulation modes of giant vesicles, but it can be sustained when small membranes and vesicles are considered. Our negative tension simulation results reveal two regimes—(i) a weak negative tension regime characterized by stretching-dominated elasticity and (ii) a strong negative tension regime featuring bending-dominated elastic behavior. This resembles the findings of the classic Evans and Rawicz micropipette aspiration experiment in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) [E. Evans and W. Rawicz, Phys, Rev. Lett. 64, 2094 (1990)]. However, in GUVs the crossover between the two elasticity regimes occurs at a small positive surface tension, while in smaller membranes it takes place at a moderate negative tension. Another interesting observation concerning the response of a small membrane to negative surface tension is related to the relationship between the mechanical and fluctuation tensions, which are equal to each other for non-negative values. When the tension decreases to negative values, the fluctuation tension γ drops somewhat faster than the mechanical tension τ in the small negative tension regime, before it saturates (and becomes larger than τ) for large negative tensions. The bending modulus exhibits an "opposite" trend. It remains almost unchanged in the stretching-dominated elastic regime, and decreases in the bending-dominated regime. Both the amplitudes of the thermal height undulations and the projected area variations diverge at the onset of mechanical instability.

  18. Posttranslational Regulation of Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in Mouse PTEN Null Prostate Cancer Cells: Enhanced Surface Expression and Differential O-Glycosylation of MT1-MMP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seaho; Huang, Wei; Mottillo, Emilio P.; Sohail, Anjum; Ham, Yoon-Ah; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; Kim, Chong Jai; Tzivion, Guri; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi; Wang, Shihua; Chen, Yong Q.; Fridman, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Membrane type 1 (MT1)-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-tethered MMP that has been shown to play a key role in promoting cancer cell invasion. MT1-MMP is highly expressed in bone metastasis of prostate cancer (PC) patients and promotes intraosseous tumor growth of PC cells in mice. The majority of metastatic prostate cancers harbor loss-of-function mutations or deletions of the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten). However, the role of PTEN inactivation in MT1-MMP expression in PC cells has not been examined. In this study, prostate epithelial cell lines derived from mice that are either heterozygous (PTEN+/-) or homozygous (PTEN-/-) for PTEN deletion or harboring a wild type PTEN (PTEN+/+) were used to investigate the expression of MT1-MMP. We found that biallelic loss of PTEN is associated with posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP protein in mouse PC cells. PTEN-/- PC cells display higher levels of MT1-MMP at the cell surface when compared to PTEN+/+ and PTEN+/- cells and consequently exhibited enhanced migratory and collagen-invasive activities. MT1-MMP displayed by PTEN-/- cells is differentially O-glycosylated and exhibits a slow rate of turnover. MT1-MMP expression in PTEN-/- cells is under control of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, as determined using pharmacological inhibitors. Interestingly, rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, up-regulates MT1-MMP expression in PTEN+/+ cells via PI3K activity. Collectively, these data in a mouse prostate cell system uncover for the first time a novel and complex relationship between PTEN loss-mediated PI3K/AKT activation and posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP, which may play a role in PC progression. PMID:20620173

  19. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  20. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown.

  1. Surface engineering: molecularly imprinted affinity membranes by photograft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuschewski, Heike; Sergeyeva, Tatiana A.; Bendig, Juergen; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Ulbricht, Matthies; Schedler, Uwe

    2001-02-01

    Commercial polymer microfiltration membranes were surface-modified with a graft copolymer of a functional monomer and a crosslinker in the presence of a template (triazine-herbicide). As result, membranes covered with a thin layer of imprinted polymer (MIP) selective to the template were obtained. The influence of the polymerization conditions on membrane recognition properties was studied by membranes

  2. Effects of fractal roughness of membrane surfaces on interfacial interactions associated with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shushu; Yu, Genying; Cai, Xiang; Eulade, Mahoro; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong; Liu, Yong; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Fractal roughness is one of the most important properties of a fractal surface. In this study, it was found that, randomly rough membrane surface was a fractal surface, which could be digitally modeled by a modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function. Fractal roughness of membrane surfaces has a typical power function relation with the statistical roughness of the modeled surface. Assessment of interfacial interactions showed that an increase in fractal roughness of membrane surfaces will strengthen and prolong the interfacial interactions between membranes and foulants, and under conditions in this study, will significantly increase the adhesion propensity of a foulant particle on membrane surface. This interesting result can be attributed to that increase in fractal roughness simultaneously improves separation distance and interaction surface area for adhesion of a foulant particle. This study gives deep insights into interfacial interactions and membrane fouling in MBRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Inositol trisphosphate regulation of photoreceptor membrane currents.

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, M; Alkon, D L; Neary, J T; Heldman, E; Gould, R

    1986-01-01

    In previous studies elevation of intracellular Ca2+ was shown to cause prolonged reduction of two voltage-dependent K+ currents (IA and ICa2+-K+) across the membrane of the isolated Hermissenda photoreceptor, the type B cell (Alkon et al., 1982b; Alkon and Sakakibara, 1985). Here we show that iontophoretic injection of inositol trisphosphate (IP3), but not inositol monophosphate, also caused prolonged reduction of IA and ICa2+-K+. IP3 injection also caused reduction of a light-induced K+ current (also ICa2+-K+) but did not affect the voltage-dependent Ca2+ current, ICa2+, or the light-induced inward current, INa+, of the type B cell. IP3 injection caused similar effects on the K+ currents of the other type of Hermissenda photoreceptor, the type A cell. INA+ of the type A cell, unlike that of the type B cell, was, however, markedly increased following IP3 injection. The differences of IP3 effects on the two types of photoreceptors may be related to differences in regulation of ionic currents by endogenous IP3 as reflected by clear differences (before injection) in the magnitude of IA, ICa2+-K+, and INa+ between the two cell types. PMID:3491632

  4. Experimental Study of a Membrane Antenna Surface Adaptive Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Quijano, U.; Bach, V.; Hill, J.; Wang, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their ultra lightweight and high packaging efficiency, membrane reflectors are getting more and more attentions for mission architectures that need extremely large inspace deployable antennas. However how to maintain the surface shape of a membrane reflector to the instrument precision requirements is a very challenging problem. This experimental study investigated using PVDF membrane piezoelectric material as actuators to control the surface figures of membrane reflectors. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by several sets of test results.

  5. Experimental Study of a Membrane Antenna Surface Adaptive Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, H.; Quijano, U.; Bach, V.; Hill, J.; Wang, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their ultra lightweight and high packaging efficiency, membrane reflectors are getting more and more attentions for mission architectures that need extremely large inspace deployable antennas. However how to maintain the surface shape of a membrane reflector to the instrument precision requirements is a very challenging problem. This experimental study investigated using PVDF membrane piezoelectric material as actuators to control the surface figures of membrane reflectors. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by several sets of test results.

  6. The plasma membrane flattens out to fuel cell surface growth during Drosophila cellularization

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Xu, Heng; Garcia, Hernan G.; Golding, Ido; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cell shape change demands cell surface growth, but how growth is fueled and choreographed is still debated. Here, we use cellularization, the first complete cytokinetic event in Drosophila embryos, to show that cleavage furrow ingression is kinetically coupled to the loss of surface microvilli. We modulate furrow kinetics with RNAi against the Rho1-GTPase regulator slam, and show that furrow ingression controls the rate of microvillar depletion. Finally, we directly track microvillar membrane and see it move along the cell surface and into ingressing furrows, independent of endocytosis. Together, our results demonstrate that the kinetics of the ingressing furrow regulate the utilization of a microvillar membrane reservoir. Since the membrane of the furrow and microvilli are contiguous, we suggest that ingression drives unfolding of the microvilli and incorporation of microvillar membrane into the furrow. We conclude that plasma membrane folding/unfolding can contribute to the cell shape changes that promote embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:24316147

  7. Alternate pleckstrin homology domain orientations regulate dynamin-catalyzed membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Niharika; Nichols, Justin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembling GTPase dynamin catalyzes endocytic vesicle scission via membrane insertion of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PH domain-dependent membrane fission remain obscure. Membrane-curvature-sensing and membrane-curvature-generating properties have been attributed, but it remains to be seen whether the PH domain is involved in either process independent of dynamin self-assembly. Here, using multiple fluorescence spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, we demonstrate that the isolated PH domain does not act to bend membranes but instead senses high membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion into the membrane bilayer. Furthermore, we use a complementary set of short- and long-distance Förster resonance energy transfer approaches to distinguish PH-domain orientation from proximity at the membrane surface in full-length dynamin. We reveal, in addition to the GTP-sensitive "hydrophobic mode," the presence of an alternate, GTP-insensitive "electrostatic mode" of PH domain-membrane interactions that retains dynamin on the membrane surface during the GTP hydrolysis cycle. Stabilization of this alternate orientation produces dramatic variations in the morphology of membrane-bound dynamin spirals, indicating that the PH domain regulates membrane fission through the control of dynamin polymer dynamics.

  8. Alternate pleckstrin homology domain orientations regulate dynamin-catalyzed membrane fission

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Niharika; Nichols, Justin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembling GTPase dynamin catalyzes endocytic vesicle scission via membrane insertion of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PH domain–dependent membrane fission remain obscure. Membrane-curvature–sensing and membrane-curvature–generating properties have been attributed, but it remains to be seen whether the PH domain is involved in either process independent of dynamin self-assembly. Here, using multiple fluorescence spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, we demonstrate that the isolated PH domain does not act to bend membranes but instead senses high membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion into the membrane bilayer. Furthermore, we use a complementary set of short- and long-distance Förster resonance energy transfer approaches to distinguish PH-domain orientation from proximity at the membrane surface in full-length dynamin. We reveal, in addition to the GTP-sensitive “hydrophobic mode,” the presence of an alternate, GTP-insensitive “electrostatic mode” of PH domain–membrane interactions that retains dynamin on the membrane surface during the GTP hydrolysis cycle. Stabilization of this alternate orientation produces dramatic variations in the morphology of membrane-bound dynamin spirals, indicating that the PH domain regulates membrane fission through the control of dynamin polymer dynamics. PMID:24478459

  9. Cell surface membrane proteins as personalized biomarkers: where we stand and where we are headed.

    PubMed

    Várady, György; Cserepes, Judit; Németh, Adrienn; Szabó, Edit; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2013-10-01

    Personalized medicine requires the development of a wide array of biomarker diagnostic assays, reflecting individual variations and thus allowing tailored therapeutic interventions. Membrane proteins comprise approximately 30% of total human proteins; they play a key role in various physiological functions and pathological conditions, although, currently, only a limited number of membrane proteins are applied as biomarkers. In many normal tissues, cell surface membrane proteins are not easily accessible for diagnostic sampling, and tumor-derived membrane preparations - while serving as potential tumor biomarkers - may not reflect physiological protein expression. In addition to post-translational modifications, which may include glycosylation, phosphorylation and lipid modifications, the trafficking of membrane proteins is also regulated. Moreover, a tight cellular quality control monitors membrane protein maturation, and continuous removal and reinsertion, involving special signaling systems, occurs in many cases. However, cell surface membrane proteins already serve as valuable prognostic and predicative biomarkers, for example, in hematological and immunological diseases, by the determination of the cluster of differentiation markers. In this review, we demonstrate the relevance of cell surface membrane biomarkers in various diseases and call attention to the potential application of red blood cell (erythrocyte) membrane proteins in this regard. Surprisingly, red blood cells express hundreds of membrane proteins, which seem to reflect a general genetic and regulatory background, and may serve as relatively stable and easily accessible personalized membrane biomarkers. Quantitative membrane protein detection in red blood cells by flow cytometry may bring a breakthrough in this regard.

  10. Lipids: architects and regulators of membrane dynamics and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    We have recently shown that an inhibition of sterol synthesis by fenpropimorph leads to an accumulation of sterol precursors, hydroxypalmitic acid-containing glucosylceramides and detergent resistant membranes in the Golgi bodies instead of the plasma membrane, suggesting that the individual molecules or the microdomains were blocked in the Golgi. These results and others from several eukaryotic models link lipid metabolism with membrane morphodynamics that are involved in membrane trafficking. Focus has been expanded to other lipid families, and numerous evidences are given showing lipids and lipid-modifying enzymes as key regulators of membrane homeostasis which can strongly regulate membrane morphodynamics and therefore trafficking. Beside protein-based machineries, lipid-based machineries are also shown as crucial regulatory forces involved in protein transport and sorting.

  11. Biofouling behavior and performance of forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification in osmotic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Cheng, Qianxun; Tian, Qing; Yang, Bo; Chen, Qianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) has received considerable interest for water and energy related applications in recent years. Biofouling behavior and performance of cellulose triacetate (CTA) forward osmosis membranes with bioinspired surface modification via polydopamine (PD) coating and poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting (PD-g-PEG) in a submerged osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) were investigated in this work. The modified membranes exhibited lower flux decline than the pristine one in OMBR, confirming that the bioinspired surface modification improved the antifouling ability of the CTA FO membrane. The result showed that the decline of membrane flux related to the increase of the salinity and MLSS concentration of the mixed liquid. It was concluded that the antifouling ability of modified membranes ascribed to the change of surface morphology in addition to the improvement of membrane hydrophilicity. The bioinspired surface modifications might improve the anti-adhesion for the biopolymers and biocake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    PubMed

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  13. Composite Membrane with Underwater-Oleophobic Surface for Anti-Oil-Fouling Membrane Distillation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangxin; Hou, Deyin; Lin, Shihong

    2016-04-05

    In this study, we fabricated a composite membrane for membrane distillation (MD) by modifying a commercial hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane with a nanocomposite coating comprising silica nanoparticles, chitosan hydrogel and fluoro-polymer. The composite membrane exhibits asymmetric wettability, with the modified surface being in-air hydrophilic and underwater oleophobic, and the unmodified surface remaining hydrophobic. By comparing the performance of the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in direct contact MD experiments using a saline emulsion with 1000 ppm crude oil (in water), we showed that the fabricated composite membrane was significantly more resistant to oil fouling compared to the pristine hydrophobic PVDF membrane. Force spectroscopy was conducted for the interaction between an oil droplet and the membrane surface using a force tensiometer. The difference between the composite membrane and the pristine PVDF membrane in their interaction with an oil droplet served to explain the difference in the fouling propensities between these two membranes observed in MD experiments. The results from this study suggest that underwater oleophobic coating can effectively mitigate oil fouling in MD operations, and that the fabricated composite membrane with asymmetric wettability can enable MD to desalinate hypersaline wastewater with high concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants.

  14. Printing-assisted surface modifications of patterned ultrafiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wardrip, Nathaniel C.; Dsouza, Melissa; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem; Snyder, Seth W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Arnusch, Christopher J.

    2016-10-17

    Understanding and restricting microbial surface attachment will enhance wastewater treatment with membranes. We report a maskless lithographic patterning technique for the generation of patterned polymer coatings on ultrafiltration membranes. Polyethylene glycol, zwitterionic, or negatively charged hydrophilic polymer compositions in parallel- or perpendicular-striped patterns with respect to feed flow were evaluated using wastewater. Membrane fouling was dependent on the orientation and chemical composition of the coatings. Modifications reduced alpha diversity in the attached microbial community (Shannon indices decreased from 2.63 to 1.89) which nevertheless increased with filtration time. Sphingomonas species, which condition membrane surfaces and facilitate cellular adhesion, were depleted in all modified membranes. Microbial community structure was significantly different between control, different patterns, and different chemistries. Lastly, this study broadens the tools for surface modification of membranes with polymer coatings and for understanding and optimization of antifouling surfaces.

  15. Printing-assisted surface modifications of patterned ultrafiltration membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Wardrip, Nathaniel C.; Dsouza, Melissa; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem; ...

    2016-10-17

    Understanding and restricting microbial surface attachment will enhance wastewater treatment with membranes. We report a maskless lithographic patterning technique for the generation of patterned polymer coatings on ultrafiltration membranes. Polyethylene glycol, zwitterionic, or negatively charged hydrophilic polymer compositions in parallel- or perpendicular-striped patterns with respect to feed flow were evaluated using wastewater. Membrane fouling was dependent on the orientation and chemical composition of the coatings. Modifications reduced alpha diversity in the attached microbial community (Shannon indices decreased from 2.63 to 1.89) which nevertheless increased with filtration time. Sphingomonas species, which condition membrane surfaces and facilitate cellular adhesion, were depleted inmore » all modified membranes. Microbial community structure was significantly different between control, different patterns, and different chemistries. Lastly, this study broadens the tools for surface modification of membranes with polymer coatings and for understanding and optimization of antifouling surfaces.« less

  16. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  17. Influence of membrane surface roughness on interfacial interactions with sludge flocs in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the interfacial interactions between sludge flocs and a rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor were investigated. Models describing these interfacial interactions were firstly proposed based on the surface element integration (SEI) method. Surface properties of sludge flocs and membrane were experimentally determined to simulate the models through composite Simpson's rule. It was found that, roughness on membrane surface significantly decreased interaction strength, which enabled the sludge flocs to more easily attach on and detach from the rough membrane surface. Further analysis showed that the value of total interaction energy increased with asperity radius, while the strength of total interaction energy decreased with asperity height. Results also demonstrated that increase in floc size would significantly decrease the attractive specific total interaction with rough membrane surface. It was revealed that there existed a critical asperity radius above which the total interaction energy in certain separation distance coverage was continuously repulsive, facilitating membrane fouling control in MBRs. This study demonstrated the possibility to mitigate membrane fouling by "tailoring" membrane surface roughness.

  18. Membrane-Mediated Regulation of Vascular Identity

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Tsuneki, Masayuki; Foster, Trenton R.; Santana, Jeans M.; Bai, Hualong; Wang, Mo; Hu, Haidi; Hanisch, Jesse J.; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Vascular diseases span diverse pathology, but frequently arise from aberrant signaling attributed to specific membrane-associated molecules, particularly the Eph-ephrin family. Originally recognized as markers of embryonic vessel identity, Eph receptors and their membrane-associated ligands, ephrins, are now known to have a range of vital functions in vascular physiology. Interactions of Ephs with ephrins at cell-to-cell interfaces promote a variety of cellular responses such as repulsion, adhesion, attraction, and migration, and frequently occur during organ development, including vessel formation. Elaborate coordination of Eph- and ephrin-related signaling among different cell populations is required for proper formation of the embryonic vessel network. There is growing evidence supporting the idea that Eph and ephrin proteins also have postnatal interactions with a number of other membrane-associated signal transduction pathways, coordinating translation of environmental signals into cells. This article provides an overview of membrane-bound signaling mechanisms that define vascular identity in both the embryo and the adult, focusing on Eph- and ephrin-related signaling. We also discuss the role and clinical significance of this signaling system in normal organ development, neoplasms, and vascular pathologies. PMID:26992081

  19. Regulation & Development of Membrane Transport Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-15

    conducted studies on the regulation of a variety of trans- port processes as a function of cell cycle, growth phase, malignant transfor- mation, hormone ...fertilization of ideas. The contributions dealt with regulatory processes evoked by two kinds of stim- uli: (1) external stimuli, such as hormones or...Mineralocorticoid Regulation of Sodium and Potassium Transport by the Cortical Collecting Duct 89 Bruce M. Koeppen and Gerhard H. Giebisch 6. Hormonal Regulation of

  20. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  1. Surface engineering of polymer membrane for air separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himma, Nurul Faiqotul; Wenten, I. Gede

    2017-05-01

    Gas separation has been an important process in chemical industries. Polymer membranes have been widely developed for gas separation due to the main advantages such as light weight, low cost, and easy preparation procedure. However, a trade-off between permeability and selectivity of the polymer membrane becomes a significant hurdle for its application in gas separation. Moreover, in the case of air separation where the oxygen and nitrogen molecules have a very close diameter, a high selectivity is more difficult to be achieved. Therefore, numerous researches were directed to improve the performance of the polymer membrane. Surface modification is an attractive way to enhance the selectivity while maintaining the high permeability of the base membrane. This paper provides a review of surface modification of polymer membrane which aims to enhance the air separation performance. The discussion includes surface engineering strategies of polymer membrane and their performances in air separation. In the end, the conclusions and future directions are pointed out.

  2. Spatial Regulation of Membrane Fusion Controlled by Modification of Phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Fabrice; Byrne, Richard D.; Vincent, Ben; Hobday, Tina M. C.; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2010-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in many cell processes from vesicular transport to nuclear envelope reconstitution at mitosis but the mechanisms that underlie fusion of natural membranes are not well understood. Studies with synthetic membranes and theoretical considerations indicate that accumulation of lipids characterised by negative curvature such as diacylglycerol (DAG) facilitate fusion. However, the specific role of lipids in membrane fusion of natural membranes is not well established. Nuclear envelope (NE) assembly was used as a model for membrane fusion. A natural membrane population highly enriched in the enzyme and substrate needed to produce DAG has been isolated and is required for fusions leading to nuclear envelope formation, although it contributes only a small amount of the membrane eventually incorporated into the NE. It was postulated to initiate and regulate membrane fusion. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach including subcellular membrane purification, fluorescence spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to demonstrate that initiation of vesicle fusion arises from two unique sites where these vesicles bind to chromatin. Fusion is subsequently propagated to the endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranes that make up the bulk of the NE to ultimately enclose the chromatin. We show how initiation of multiple vesicle fusions can be controlled by localised production of DAG and propagated bidirectionally. Phospholipase C (PLCγ), GTP hydrolysis and (phosphatidylinsositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) are required for the latter process. We discuss the general implications of membrane fusion regulation and spatial control utilising such a mechanism. PMID:20808914

  3. Cell cycle regulation of Golgi membrane dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is a membranous organelle in the cell that plays essential roles in protein and lipid trafficking, sorting, processing and modification. Its basic structure is a stack of closely aligned flattened cisternae. In mammalian cells, dozens of Golgi stacks are often laterally linked into a ribbon-like structure. Biogenesis of the Golgi during cell division occurs through a sophisticated disassembly and reassembly process that can be divided into three distinct but cooperative steps, including the deformation and reformation of the Golgi cisternae, stacks and ribbon. Here, we review our current understanding of the protein machineries that control these three steps in the cycle of mammalian cell division: GRASP65 and GRASP55 in Golgi stack and ribbon formation; ubiquitin and AAA ATPases in post-mitotic Golgi membrane fusion; and golgins and cytoskeleton in Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:23453991

  4. MEMBRANE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Micevych, Paul E.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the decades, our understanding of estrogen receptor (ER) function has evolved. Today we are confronted by at least two nuclear ERs: ERα and ERβ; and a number of putative membrane ERs, including ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 and Gq-mER. These receptors all bind estrogens or at least estrogenic compounds and activate intracellular signaling pathways. In some cases, a well-defined pharmacology, and physiology has been discovered. In other cases, the identity or the function remains to be elucidated. This mini-review attempts to synthesize our understanding of 17β-estradiol membrane signaling within hypothalamic circuits involved in homeostatic functions focusing on reproduction and energy balance. PMID:22538318

  5. Origin of subdiffusion of water molecules on cell membrane surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Water molecules play an important role in providing unique environments for biological reactions on cell membranes. It is widely believed that water molecules form bridges that connect lipid molecules and stabilize cell membranes. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that translational and rotational diffusion of water molecules on lipid membrane surfaces exhibit subdiffusion and aging. Moreover, we provide evidence that both divergent mean trapping time (continuous-time random walk) and long-correlated noise (fractional Brownian motion) contribute to this subdiffusion. These results suggest that subdiffusion on cell membranes causes the water retardation, an enhancement of cell membrane stability, and a higher reaction efficiency. PMID:24739933

  6. Influence of surface properties of RO membrane on membrane fouling for treating textile secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhonglong; Yang, Cheng; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2017-07-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a promising technology for treating and reusing textile secondary effluent (SE). To better understand the effect of membrane surface properties on membrane fouling, the performances of three commercial polyamide thin-film composite RO membranes (BW30-4040, CPA2-4040, and RE-4040-FEN) with different roughness and hydrophilicity were investigated for treating textile SE. The RO membranes were characterized by ATR-FTIR, SEM, AFM, and contact angle, respectively. The results showed that the flux increased with an increase in the surface hydrophilicity of membrane. CPA2-4040 had the highest hydrophilic surface and thus the largest initial flux. There was a strong correlation between the membrane fouling and the surface roughness; the fouling increased with an increase in the surface roughness. The roughest surface of CPA2-4040 led to the most significantly flux decline. However, the fouling reversibility was not related directly to surface roughness. BW30-4040 with the secondary roughness and the most hydrophobic surface had the highest fouling reversibility. This was mainly due to the primary hydrophilicity of textile SE in nature. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) showed that hydrophilic neutral protein-like matters and soluble microbial products (SMP) were the main foulants, thus stronger affinity with hydrophilic surface of membrane. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  7. Surface chemical studies of anodically oxidised aluminium membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treverton, J. A.; West, R.; Johnson, D.; Thornton, M.

    1993-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fast atom bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (FAB-SIMS) have been used to study the surfaces of inorganic microfiltration membranes produced by controlled removal of anodic films formed on aluminium in phosphoric and oxalic acid electrolytes. The results are compared with those of similar analyses of membranes produced from anodic films formed in mixed oxalic/phosphoric acid electrolyte. Both techniques established that phosphates were concentrated on the surface of membranes formed in phosphoric acid and oxalic/phosphoric acid and that oxalate ions were present on the surfaces of membranes formed in oxalic acid. The low intensity of the AlO -x fragments implies that all of the aluminium ions in the surface are coordinated to phosphates or oxalates. However, any differences its the chemical state of the aluminium on the different membranes were not detectable by either technique.

  8. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known regulator of polarized trafficking in epithelial cells, and given its presence in OLGs it was therefore of interest to investigate whether MAL played a similar role in PLP transport in OLGs, taking into account its timely expression in these cells. Our data revealed that premature expression of mCherry-MAL in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells interfered with terminal OLG differentiation, although myelin membrane formation per se was not impaired. In fact, also PLP transport to myelin membranes via the cell body plasma membrane was unaffected. However, the typical shift of PLP from TX-100-insoluble membrane domains to CHAPS-resistant, but TX-100-soluble membrane domains, seen in the absence of MAL expression, is substantially reduced upon expression of the MAL protein. Interestingly, not only in vitro, but also in developing brain a strongly diminished shift from TX-100 resistant to TX-100 soluble domains was observed. Consistently, the MAL-expression mediated annihilation of the typical membrane microdomain shift of PLP is also reflected by a loss of the characteristic surface expression profile of conformation-sensitive anti-PLP antibodies. Hence, these findings suggest that MAL is not involved in vesicular PLP trafficking to either the plasma membrane and/or the myelin membrane as such. Rather, we propose that MAL may regulate PLP’s distribution into distinct membrane microdomains that allow for lateral diffusion of PLP, directly from the plasma membrane to the myelin membrane once the myelin sheath has been assembled. PMID:27171274

  9. Reduced fouling of ultrafiltration membranes via surface fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Sedath, R.H.; Yates, S.F.; Li, N.N.

    1993-03-01

    Surface fluorination can affect significantly the performance of an ultrafiltration membrane used to concentrate a food-related stream. Membranes fluorinated and tested as flat sheets exhibit higher initial fluxes, and do not foul as rapidly as untreated membranes. This improvement is linked to increased surface hydrophilicity, as shown in decreased contact angle with water. This increased hydrophilicity, in turn, is linked to the addition of fluorine and oxygen to the surface. The pilot plant study did-not show the difference in membrane flux and fouling observed in the flat sheet study. Instead, fluorinated and unfluorinated modules behaved similarly. Fouling by potato waste feed was severe and resulted in formation of an extensive gel layer within the module on the membrane surface. XPS, SEM and FTIR indicate that buildup of organic material occurred on both fluorinated and unfluorinated membranes, but SEM indicates that a fibrous mat of material was observed only on the nonfluorinated membrane. We conclude that in the pilot study, membrane fouling and gel formation were so extensive that the surface interaction effect was overwhelmed.

  10. Reduced fouling of ultrafiltration membranes via surface fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Sedath, R.H.; Yates, S.F.; Li, N.N.

    1993-03-01

    Surface fluorination can affect significantly the performance of an ultrafiltration membrane used to concentrate a food-related stream. Membranes fluorinated and tested as flat sheets exhibit higher initial fluxes, and do not foul as rapidly as untreated membranes. This improvement is linked to increased surface hydrophilicity, as shown in decreased contact angle with water. This increased hydrophilicity, in turn, is linked to the addition of fluorine and oxygen to the surface. The pilot plant study did-not show the difference in membrane flux and fouling observed in the flat sheet study. Instead, fluorinated and unfluorinated modules behaved similarly. Fouling by potato waste feed was severe and resulted in formation of an extensive gel layer within the module on the membrane surface. XPS, SEM and FTIR indicate that buildup of organic material occurred on both fluorinated and unfluorinated membranes, but SEM indicates that a fibrous mat of material was observed only on the nonfluorinated membrane. We conclude that in the pilot study, membrane fouling and gel formation were so extensive that the surface interaction effect was overwhelmed.

  11. Signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2011-03-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises the involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly-defined signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms could be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Nolan J.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly defined signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms may be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. PMID:21216617

  13. Adducin forms a bridge between the erythrocyte membrane and its cytoskeleton and regulates membrane cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Anong, William A.; Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Weis, Tahlia L.; Devlin, Emily E.; Bodine, David M.; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla

    2009-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane skeleton is the best understood cytoskeleton. Because its protein components have homologs in virtually all other cells, the membrane serves as a fundamental model of biologic membranes. Modern textbooks portray the membrane as a 2-dimensional spectrin-based membrane skeleton attached to a lipid bilayer through 2 linkages: band 3–ankyrin–β-spectrin and glycophorin C–protein 4.1–β-spectrin.1–7 Although evidence supports an essential role for the first bridge in regulating membrane cohesion, rupture of the glycophorin C–protein 4.1 interaction has little effect on membrane stability.8 We demonstrate the existence of a novel band 3–adducin–spectrin bridge that connects the spectrin/actin/protein 4.1 junctional complex to the bilayer. As rupture of this bridge leads to spontaneous membrane fragmentation, we conclude that the band 3–adducin–spectrin bridge is important to membrane stability. The required relocation of part of the band 3 population to the spectrin/actin junctional complex and its formation of a new bridge with adducin necessitates a significant revision of accepted models of the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:19567882

  14. High Surface Area Inorganic Membrane for Water Removal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to demonstrate the fabrication and performance advantages of minichannel planar membrane modules made of porous metallic supports of surface area packing density one order of magnitude higher than the conventional membrane tube. The new, transformational, ceramic/metallic, hybrid membrane technology will be used for water/ethanol separations and reduce energy consumption by >20% over distillation and adsorption.

  15. Membrane surface functionalization via theophylline derivative coating and streptavidin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Hierrezuelo, J; Romero, V; Benavente, J; Rico, R; López-Romero, J Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and regenerated cellulose (RC) membranes were surface-modified by the adsorption of one adenosine receptor antagonist: the theophylline-oligo(ethylene glycol)-alkene derivative, Theo1. Surface modification was carried out by immersion of the membrane in a dichloromethane solution of Theo1 (PVDF+Theo1 and RC+Theo1 samples). Membrane surfaces with partial coverage by theophylline and/or its inclusion in the membrane structures were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR), impedance spectroscopy (IS) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The Theo1 orientation was inferred from the data. Streptavidin (SA) was immobilized onto the membrane/Theo1 hybrid material. The protein-theophylline Theo1 interaction was visualized with bright field microscopy (BFM).

  16. Structural mechanisms for regulation of membrane traffic by rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabe; Mishra, Ashwini; Lambright, David G

    2009-10-01

    In all eukaryotic organisms, Rab GTPases function as critical regulators of membrane traffic, organelle biogenesis and maturation, and related cellular processes. The numerous Rab proteins have distinctive yet overlapping subcellular distributions throughout the endomembrane system. Intensive investigation has clarified the underlying molecular and structural mechanisms for several ubiquitous Rab proteins that control membrane traffic between tubular-vesicular organelles in the exocytic, endocytic and recycling pathways. In this review, we focus on structural insights that inform our current understanding of the organization of the Rab family as well as the mechanisms for membrane targeting and activation, interaction with effectors, deactivation and specificity determination.

  17. Regulation of photosynthetic membrane components in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of this proposal were two-fold: (1) to analyze the impact of mutations in the Mn-stabilizing protein (MSP) on O{sub 2}- evolution; and (2) to analyze the effect of iron deficiency on membrane assembly in cyanobacteria. We have made important progress in both projects, and I will discuss each of them in turn. The mutations in the psbO gene were performed in the transformable and photoheterotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803; this strain allows PSII mutations to be propagated under nonphotosynthetic conditions. The research with iron deficiency was performed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, which is transformable and which has been used previously for all our nutritional-deficiency research. 5 figs.

  18. Binding assays with artificial tethered membranes using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Wiltschi, Birgit; Knoll, Wolfgang; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2006-06-01

    Surface sensitive optical techniques based on surface plasmon resonance have become interesting for biosciences in the context of biorecognition and binding studies at functional surfaces. We use surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPS) in combination with surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) for the characterization of interaction processes associated with biomembranes. The biological membrane is mimicked by a tethered membrane consisting of a planar lipid bilayer attached to a gold surface via a hydrophilic anchor peptide. The interaction between membrane-bound hydrophobic compounds and free hydrophilic molecules is monitored in real-time and with high sensitivity and selectivity by combined SPS/SPFS. In this review we shortly discuss the principles of surface plasmon resonance and its utilization in SPS and SPFS. A detailed description of the required instrumentation for combined SPS and SPFS is presented. Furthermore, we outline the design of a binding assay with a tethered bilayer and the procedure of the artificial membrane system built-up is delineated. We also present examples that demonstrate the potential of combined SPS/SPFS assays with artificial tethered membranes. The method provides insight into the interaction of integral membrane proteins with various hydrophilic ligands and the specific recognition of small lipophilic molecules by soluble proteins.

  19. Leukocyte Cell Surface Proteinases: Regulation of Expression, Functions, and Mechanisms of Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: 1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinase by cells; 2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or 3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: 1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; 2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; 3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; 4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and 5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes. PMID:18329945

  20. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  1. Phosphatidate phosphatase regulates membrane phospholipid synthesis via phosphatidylserine synthase.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Han, Gil-Soo

    2017-08-16

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as a model eukaryote to elucidate the regulation of lipid metabolism. In exponentially growing yeast, a diverse set of membrane lipids are synthesized from the precursor phosphatidate via the liponucleotide intermediate CDP-diacylglycerol. As cells exhaust nutrients and progress into the stationary phase, phosphatidate is channeled via diacylglycerol to the synthesis of triacylglycerol. The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, which catalyzes the committed step in membrane phospholipid synthesis via CDP-diacylglycerol, and the PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the committed step in triacylglycerol synthesis are regulated throughout cell growth by genetic and biochemical mechanisms to control the balanced synthesis of membrane phospholipids and triacylglycerol. The loss of phosphatidate phosphatase activity (e.g., pah1Δ mutation) increases the level of phosphatidate and its conversion to membrane phospholipids by inducing Cho1 expression and phosphatidylserine synthase activity. The regulation of the CHO1 expression is mediated through the inositol-sensitive upstream activation sequence (UASINO), a cis-acting element for the phosphatidate-controlled Henry (Ino2-Ino4/Opi1) regulatory circuit. Consequently, phosphatidate phosphatase activity regulates phospholipid synthesis through the transcriptional regulation of the phosphatidylserine synthase enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Membranes with Surface-Enhanced Antifouling Properties for Water Purification

    PubMed Central

    Shahkaramipour, Nima; Tran, Thien N.; Ramanan, Sankara; Lin, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Membrane technology has emerged as an attractive approach for water purification, while mitigation of fouling is key to lower membrane operating costs. This article reviews various materials with antifouling properties that can be coated or grafted onto the membrane surface to improve the antifouling properties of the membranes and thus, retain high water permeance. These materials can be separated into three categories, hydrophilic materials, such as poly(ethylene glycol), polydopamine and zwitterions, hydrophobic materials, such as fluoropolymers, and amphiphilic materials. The states of water in these materials and the mechanisms for the antifouling properties are discussed. The corresponding approaches to coat or graft these materials on the membrane surface are reviewed, and the materials with promising performance are highlighted. PMID:28273869

  3. Study on surface properties of gamma-alumina catalytic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mengchenu Lu; Guoxing Xiong; Bauser, H.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, preparation and separation applications of gamma-alumina membranes have been extensively studied. In catalysis research field, this membrane can be used not only as a separating medium but also as a catalyst or catalyst support. In this paper, a gamma-alumina catalytic membrane was prepared by a sol-gel technique, then special attention was paid to its surface properties related to catalysis, its surface acidity, hydroxyl, microstructure and pore properties was studied by IR with pyridine adsorption, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption at low temperature, 1-butanol dehydration as a probe reaction was used to study its reaction property.

  4. Construction of Hierarchical Fouling Resistance Surfaces onto Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes for Combating Membrane Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Hu, Xuefeng; Cai, Tao

    2017-05-09

    Owing to the highly hydrophobic nature, fluoropolymer membranes usually suffer from serious fouling problem, and therefore largely limited their practical applications. Also, the development of environmentally benign and nonreleasing antifouling coatings onto the inert fluoropolymer membranes remains a great challenge and is of prime importance for various scientific interests and industrial applications. In the present work, a facile and effective approach for the construction of hierarchical fouling resistance surfaces onto the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes was developed. Graft copolymers of PVDF with poly(hyperbranched polyglycerol methacrylamide) side chains (PVDF-g-PHPGMA copolymers) were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) graft copolymerization of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFMA) with the ozone-preactivated PVDF, followed by activated ester-amine reaction of PPFMA chains with amino-terminated hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-NH2). The copolymers could be simply processed into microfiltration (MF) membranes with surface-tethered PHPGMA side chains on the membrane and pore surfaces by nonsolvent induced phase inversion. Furthermore, the PVDF-g-PHPGMA-g-PSBMA membrane was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of zwitterionic monomer, N-(3-sulfopropyl)-N-(methacryloxyethyl)-N,N-dimethylammonium betaine (SBMA) from the PVDF-g-PHPGMA membrane and pore surfaces. Arise from a synergistic effect of the dendritic architecture of PHPGMA branches and "superhydrophilic" nature of PSBMA brushes, the PVDF-g-PHPGMA-g-PSBMA membranes exhibit superior resistance to protein and bacteria adhesion with insignificant cytotoxicity effects, making the membranes potentially useful for water treatment and biomedical applications. One may find the present study a general and effective method for the fabrication of antifouling fluoropolymer membranes in a controllable and green manner.

  5. Development of nanocomposite membranes with photocatalytic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, I; Keuter, V; Gross, F

    2012-12-01

    In 2030, 47% of the world population will be living in areas of high water stress (UN World Water Development Report 3, 2009). The global water shortage results in an emerging need for novel, more efficient and cost saving water purification methods. Membrane technology with its very low use of chemical substances and secure retention of contaminants represents a promising water cleaning method. The approach presented focuses on the application of nanocoating procedures to membrane processes which aims at reducing the fouling potential of membranes and destroying water contaminants. Photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanoparticles are applied. Novel suitable microsieves including a homogeneous pore size distribution and high robustness were developed from metallic material. An appropriate multilayer coating system was developed and applied on a new nanocomposite filter resulting in high photocatalytic activities with maximum photon efficiencies of 0.0733. The coating layer do not have a negative influence on the permeate flux. The effectiveness of the nanocomposite filter was proven in a 12 days biofouling experiment with activated sludge suspensions.

  6. Probing a Membrane Matrix Regulating Hormone Action

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Takashi; Stowe, Bruce B.

    1973-01-01

    heptadecylbenzene is added after 6 hours. Applied ethylene even at concentrations much above those produced by the tissue itself fails to stimulate or inhibit short term pea stem section growth. It is concluded that the effect of oleanmins on growth is not mediated by ethylene. The similarities in concentration and molecular dimensions of these structurally diverse lipids which simultaneously stimulate respiration, growth, and ethylene formation, suggest a single site of action located in a regulatory membrane. PMID:16658394

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Membrane Lipid Homeostasis in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kun; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O.

    2009-01-01

    The biophysical properties of membrane phospholipids are controlled by the composition of their constituent fatty acids and are tightly regulated in Escherichia coli. The FabR (fatty acid biosynthesis repressor) transcriptional repressor controls the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in the membrane by regulating the expression of the fabB (β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase I) and fabA (β-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP dehydratase/isomerase) genes. FabR binding to a DNA palindrome located within the promoters of the fabB and fabA genes required the presence of an unsaturated acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) or acyl-CoA and was antagonized by saturated acyl-ACP or acyl-CoA. The FabR-dependent repression of fabB and fabA by exogenous unsaturated fatty acids confirmed the role for FabR in responding to the acyl-CoA pool composition, and the perturbation of the unsaturated:saturated acyl-ACP ratio using a specific inhibitor of lipid A formation verified FabR-dependent regulation of fabB by the acyl-ACP composition in vivo. Thus, FabR plays a key role in controlling the membrane biophysical properties by regulating gene expression in response to the composition of the long-chain acyl-thioester pool. This mechanism ensures that a balanced composition of fatty acids is available for incorporation into the membrane via the PlsB/PlsC acyltransferases. PMID:19854834

  8. Chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins: regulation, function and potential vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Stojanov, Milos; Greub, Gilbert; Baud, David

    2016-01-01

    Pmps (Polymorphic Membrane Proteins) are a group of membrane bound surface exposed chlamydial proteins that have been characterized as autotransporter adhesins and are important in the initial phase of chlamydial infection. These proteins all contain conserved GGA (I, L, V) and FxxN tetrapeptide motifs in the N-terminal portion of each protein. All chlamydial species express Pmps. Even in the chlamydia-related bacteria Waddlia chondrophila, a Pmp-like adhesin has been identified, demonstrating the importance of Pmps in Chlamydiales biology. Chlamydial species vary in the number of pmp genes and their differentially regulated expression during the infectious cycle or in response to stress. Studies have also demonstrated that Pmps are able to induce innate immune functional responses in infected cells, including production of IL-8, IL-6 and MCP-1, by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Human serum studies have indicated that although anti-Pmp specific antibodies are produced in response to a chlamydial infection, the response is variable depending on the Pmp protein. In C. trachomatis, PmpB, PmpC, PmpD and PmpI were the proteins eliciting the strongest immune response among adolescents with and without pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). In contrast, PmpA and PmpE elicited the weakest antibody response. Interestingly, there seems to be a gender bias for Pmp recognition with a stronger anti-Pmp reactivity in male patients. Furthermore, anti-PmpA antibodies might contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes, at least among women with PID. In vitro studies indicated that dendritic cells infected with C. muridarum were able to present PmpG and PmpF on their MHC class II receptors and T cells were able to recognize the MHC class-II bound peptides. In addition, vaccination with PmpEFGH and Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) significantly protected mice against a genital tract C. muridarum infection, suggesting that Pmps may be an important component of a multi

  9. Physicochemical correlations between membrane surface hydrophilicity and adhesive fouling in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liguo; Wang, Xuena; Li, Renjie; Yu, Haiying; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    36 membrane material cases used in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) covering wide range of hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity were used to calculate thermodynamic interactions between membranes and foulants. It was found that adhesive fouling can be represented by the total interaction energy at minimum separation distance (h0). No functional relationship between membrane hydrophilicity and adhesive fouling can be deduced. However, membrane hydrophilicity, in terms of water contact angle or interaction energy between two identical surfaces at h0 in water (ΔGsws), had high statistical correlations with adhesive fouling. This statistical correlations should be attributed to the major role of acid-base interaction in total interaction associated with adhesion in most of membrane cases. Moreover, the statistical correlations were independent of the changes in membrane surface roughness or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of foulants. These findings satisfactorily explained the inconsistent conclusions in the literature regarding effects of membrane hydrophilicity on adhesive fouling, giving implications for membrane fouling mitigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improved surface property of PVDF membrane with amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer as membrane additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hua; Li, Mi-Zi; Miao, Jing; Wang, Jia-Bin; Shao, Xi-Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2012-06-01

    An attempt to improve hydrophilicity and anti-fouling properties of PVDF membranes, a novel amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PVDF-g-PSBMA) was firstly synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used as amphiphilic copolymer additive in the preparation of PVDF membranes. The PVDF-g-PSBMA/PVDF blend membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation process. Fourier transform infrared attenuated reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed that PSBMA brushes from amphiphilic additives were preferentially segregated to membrane-coagulant interface during membrane formation. The morphology of membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of PVDF membranes was improved significantly with the increasing of amphiphilic copolymer PVDF-g-PSBMA in cast solution. Protein static adsorption experiment and dynamic fouling resistance experiment revealed that the surface enrichment of PSBMA brush endowed PVDF blend membrane great improvement of surface anti-fouling ability.

  11. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change.

  12. Kinetics of Membrane Flux Decline: The Role of Natural Colloids and Mitigation via Membrane Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilduff, James E.; Mattaraj, Supatpong; Zhou, Mingyan; Belfort, Georges

    2005-10-01

    Applications of membrane technologies for potable water production have been expanding significantly, leading to increased efforts to control membrane fouling, which can significantly reduce membrane performance, increase operating costs, and shorten membrane life. Natural organic matter is ubiquitous in all water supplies and has been implicated as a major contributor to fouling during filtration of natural water. In this review, we discuss factors that influence NOM fouling, including hydrodynamics; properties of the feed constituents such as size, hydrophobicity, charge density and isoelectric point; properties of the membrane including hydrophobicity, charge density, surface roughness, and porosity; and properties of the solution phase such as pH, ionic strength and concentration of metals. We review approaches to identify and mathematically describe fouling kinetics, including effects of pore blockage, cake formation, and osmotic pressure. Finally, we discuss strategies to mitigate fouling, with a focus on strategies that involve a modification of the nanostructure of membrane surfaces, via UV-assisted graft polymerization of hydrophilic monomers to increase surface wettability and reduce interactions between NOM and the membrane surface.

  13. Analysis of diffusion in curved surfaces and its application to tubular membranes.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Colin James Stockdale; Raghunathan, Krishnan; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion of particles in curved surfaces is inherently complex compared with diffusion in a flat membrane, owing to the nonplanarity of the surface. The consequence of such nonplanar geometry on diffusion is poorly understood but is highly relevant in the case of cell membranes, which often adopt complex geometries. To address this question, we developed a new finite element approach to model diffusion on curved membrane surfaces based on solutions to Fick's law of diffusion and used this to study the effects of geometry on the entry of surface-bound particles into tubules by diffusion. We show that variations in tubule radius and length can distinctly alter diffusion gradients in tubules over biologically relevant timescales. In addition, we show that tubular structures tend to retain concentration gradients for a longer time compared with a comparable flat surface. These findings indicate that sorting of particles along the surfaces of tubules can arise simply as a geometric consequence of the curvature without any specific contribution from the membrane environment. Our studies provide a framework for modeling diffusion in curved surfaces and suggest that biological regulation can emerge purely from membrane geometry. © 2016 Klaus, Raghunathan, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Analysis of diffusion in curved surfaces and its application to tubular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Colin James Stockdale; Raghunathan, Krishnan; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion of particles in curved surfaces is inherently complex compared with diffusion in a flat membrane, owing to the nonplanarity of the surface. The consequence of such nonplanar geometry on diffusion is poorly understood but is highly relevant in the case of cell membranes, which often adopt complex geometries. To address this question, we developed a new finite element approach to model diffusion on curved membrane surfaces based on solutions to Fick’s law of diffusion and used this to study the effects of geometry on the entry of surface-bound particles into tubules by diffusion. We show that variations in tubule radius and length can distinctly alter diffusion gradients in tubules over biologically relevant timescales. In addition, we show that tubular structures tend to retain concentration gradients for a longer time compared with a comparable flat surface. These findings indicate that sorting of particles along the surfaces of tubules can arise simply as a geometric consequence of the curvature without any specific contribution from the membrane environment. Our studies provide a framework for modeling diffusion in curved surfaces and suggest that biological regulation can emerge purely from membrane geometry. PMID:27733625

  15. Surface modification of polypropylene membrane by polyethylene glycol graft polymerization.

    PubMed

    Abednejad, Atiye Sadat; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Ghaee, Azadeh

    2014-09-01

    Polypropylene hollow fiber microporous membranes have been used in a wide range of applications, including blood oxygenator. The hydrophobic feature of the polypropylene surface causes membrane fouling. To minimize fouling, a modification consisting of three steps: surface activation in H2 and O2 plasma, membrane immersion in polyethylene glycol (PEG) and plasma graft polymerization was performed. The membranes were characterized by contact angle measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), tensile test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Oxygen transfer of modified membranes was also tested. The stability of grafted PEG was measured in water and in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at 37°C. Blood compatibility of modified surfaces was evaluated by the platelet adhesion method. Water contact angel reduction from 110° to 72° demonstrates the enhanced hydrophilicity, and XPS results verify the presence of oxygenated functional groups due to the peak existence in 286 eV as a result of PEG grafting. The results clearly indicate that plasma graft-polymerization of PEG is an effective way for antifouling improvement of polypropylene membranes. Also, the results show that oxygen transfer changes in PEG grafted membranes are not significant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Geometrical membrane curvature as an allosteric regulator of membrane protein structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tonnesen, Asger; Christensen, Sune M; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2014-01-07

    Transmembrane proteins are embedded in cellular membranes of varied lipid composition and geometrical curvature. Here, we studied for the first time the allosteric effect of geometrical membrane curvature on transmembrane protein structure and function. We used single-channel optical analysis of the prototypic transmembrane β-barrel α-hemolysin (α-HL) reconstituted on immobilized single small unilamellar liposomes of different diameter and therefore curvature. Our data demonstrate that physiologically abundant geometrical membrane curvatures can enforce a dramatic allosteric regulation (1000-fold inhibition) of α-HL permeability. High membrane curvatures (1/diameter ~1/40 nm(-1)) compressed the effective pore diameter of α-HL from 14.2 ± 0.8 Å to 11.4 ± 0.6 Å. This reduction in effective pore area (~40%) when combined with the area compressibility of α-HL revealed an effective membrane tension of ~50 mN/m and a curvature-imposed protein deformation energy of ~7 kBT. Such substantial energies have been shown to conformationally activate, or unfold, β-barrel and α-helical transmembrane proteins, suggesting that membrane curvature could likely regulate allosterically the structure and function of transmembrane proteins in general. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anomalous surface diffusion of protons on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Maarten G; Grubmüller, Helmut; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-07-01

    The cellular energy machinery depends on the presence and properties of protons at or in the vicinity of lipid membranes. To asses the energetics and mobility of a proton near a membrane, we simulated an excess proton near a solvated DMPC bilayer at 323 K, using a recently developed method to include the Grotthuss proton shuttling mechanism in classical molecular dynamics simulations. We obtained a proton surface affinity of -13.0 ± 0.5 kJ mol(-1). The proton interacted strongly with both lipid headgroup and linker carbonyl oxygens. Furthermore, the surface diffusion of the proton was anomalous, with a subdiffusive regime over the first few nanoseconds, followed by a superdiffusive regime. The time- and distance dependence of the proton surface diffusion coefficient within these regimes may also resolve discrepancies between previously reported diffusion coefficients. Our simulations show that the proton anomalous surface diffusion originates from restricted diffusion in two different surface-bound states, interrupted by the occasional bulk-mediated long-range surface diffusion. Although only a DMPC membrane was considered in this work, we speculate that the restrictive character of the on-surface diffusion is highly sensitive to the specific membrane conditions, which can alter the relative contributions of the surface and bulk pathways to the overall diffusion process. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the energy machinery.

  18. Anomalous Surface Diffusion of Protons on Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Maarten G.; Grubmüller, Helmut; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    The cellular energy machinery depends on the presence and properties of protons at or in the vicinity of lipid membranes. To asses the energetics and mobility of a proton near a membrane, we simulated an excess proton near a solvated DMPC bilayer at 323 K, using a recently developed method to include the Grotthuss proton shuttling mechanism in classical molecular dynamics simulations. We obtained a proton surface affinity of −13.0 ± 0.5 kJ mol−1. The proton interacted strongly with both lipid headgroup and linker carbonyl oxygens. Furthermore, the surface diffusion of the proton was anomalous, with a subdiffusive regime over the first few nanoseconds, followed by a superdiffusive regime. The time- and distance dependence of the proton surface diffusion coefficient within these regimes may also resolve discrepancies between previously reported diffusion coefficients. Our simulations show that the proton anomalous surface diffusion originates from restricted diffusion in two different surface-bound states, interrupted by the occasional bulk-mediated long-range surface diffusion. Although only a DMPC membrane was considered in this work, we speculate that the restrictive character of the on-surface diffusion is highly sensitive to the specific membrane conditions, which can alter the relative contributions of the surface and bulk pathways to the overall diffusion process. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the energy machinery. PMID:24988343

  19. Regulation of ROCKII membrane localization through its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kher, Swapnil S; Worthylake, Rebecca A

    2011-12-10

    RhoA activated kinases (ROCKs) are potent effectors of RhoA signaling for regulation of the cytoskeleton. ROCKs have been shown to be localized to several different subcellular locations, suggesting that its localization is context specific and regulated. However, the signaling mechanisms that control ROCK localization have not been clearly described. In this study we measured ROCKII localization following stimulation with the chemokine CXCL12 or adhesion to collagen 1. Strikingly, each of these extracellular signals targeted ROCKII to membrane protrusions. We further determined that both RhoA and PI3-kinase signaling are required for these stimuli to induce efficient membrane localization. Furthermore, we used a mutational approach to show that two separate domains predicted to respond to these localization signals, the Rho Binding Domain (RBD) and the Pleckstrin Homology domain (PH). Unexpectedly, we found that these two domains work synergistically to lead to membrane localization. This suggests a novel mechanism for controlling ROCKII localization at the membrane, in which the ROCKII C-terminus acts as a coincidence detector for spatial regulatory signals. In other words, efficient membrane targeting requires the ROCKII RBD to receive the RhoA signal and the PH domain to receive the phospholipid signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatiotemporal Analysis of Differential Akt Regulation in Plasma Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxin

    2008-01-01

    As a central kinase in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, Akt has been the subject of extensive research; yet, spatiotemporal regulation of Akt in different membrane microdomains remains largely unknown. To examine dynamic Akt activity in membrane microdomains in living cells, we developed a specific and sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based Akt activity reporter, AktAR, through systematic testing of different substrates and fluorescent proteins. Targeted AktAR reported higher Akt activity with faster activation kinetics within lipid rafts compared with nonraft regions of plasma membrane. Disruption of rafts attenuated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated Akt activity in rafts without affecting that in nonraft regions. However, in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF)-1 stimulation, Akt signaling in nonraft regions is dependent on that in raft regions. As a result, cholesterol depletion diminishes Akt activity in both regions. Thus, Akt activities are differentially regulated in different membrane microdomains, and the overall activity of this oncogenic pathway is dependent on raft function. Given the increased abundance of lipid rafts in some cancer cells, the distinct Akt-activating characteristics of PDGF and IGF-1, in terms of both effectiveness and raft dependence, demonstrate the capabilities of different growth factor signaling pathways to transduce differential oncogenic signals across plasma membrane. PMID:18701703

  1. Membrane curvature regulates ligand-specific membrane sorting of GPCRs in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rosholm, Kadla R; Leijnse, Natascha; Mantsiou, Anna; Tkach, Vadym; Pedersen, Søren L; Wirth, Volker F; Oddershede, Lene B; Jensen, Knud J; Martinez, Karen L; Hatzakis, Nikos S; Bendix, Poul Martin; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2017-07-01

    The targeted spatial organization (sorting) of Gprotein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for their biological function and often takes place in highly curved membrane compartments such as filopodia, endocytic pits, trafficking vesicles or endosome tubules. However, the influence of geometrical membrane curvature on GPCR sorting remains unknown. Here we used fluorescence imaging to establish a quantitative correlation between membrane curvature and sorting of three prototypic class A GPCRs (the neuropeptide Y receptor Y2, the β1 adrenergic receptor and the β2 adrenergic receptor) in living cells. Fitting of a thermodynamic model to the data enabled us to quantify how sorting is mediated by an energetic drive to match receptor shape and membrane curvature. Curvature-dependent sorting was regulated by ligands in a specific manner. We anticipate that this curvature-dependent biomechanical coupling mechanism contributes to the sorting, trafficking and function of transmembrane proteins in general.

  2. Surface modification of PVDF hollow fiber membrane and its application in membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR).

    PubMed

    Hou, Feifei; Li, Baoan; Xing, Minghao; Wang, Qin; Hu, Liang; Wang, Shichang

    2013-07-01

    A novel composite hollow fiber membrane for membrane aerated biofilm rector (MABR) was prepared by coating L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) on the surface of PVDF membrane. MABR process study was conducted to test the performances of the original and modified membranes for 166 days. The results indicate that coated membrane showed 2 times higher gas flux, lower water contact angle (declined from 86.5° to 52°), and significantly improved surface roughness. The modified membrane displayed an excellent MABR performance. Its COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies were kept above 90%, 98.8% and 84.2% during the first 4-month experiment. By tracking experiment at 0.01 MPa, to achieve COD removal efficiency of 85.9%, half an hour is required with the modified membrane, instead of 6h using the original one. Besides, faster NH4(+)-N and TN removal at 0.01 MPa were also achieved with DOPA composite membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of interfacial interactions between a rough sludge floc and membrane surface in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Zhang, Meijia; Yang, Lining; Lin, Hongjun; Wu, Xilin; He, Yiming; Shen, Liguo

    2017-03-15

    Interfacial interactions between foulants and membrane directly determine foulant adhesion and membrane fouling. In this study, surface of sludge foulant particles (flocs) was found to be rough, and could be modeled by a sinusoidal sphere function. A novel method, which combined surface element integration (SEI) method, differential geometry and composite Simpson's rule, was developed to quantify the interfacial interactions between the modeled rough floc surface and membrane surface. Application of the novel method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) provides broad profiles of quantitative interactions with rough floc surface with separation distance. It is also found that increase in the scaled amplitude of floc surface significantly reduced the interaction strength. Derjaguin's approximation (DA) can be regarded as a special case of the novel method, indicating the extensive application prospect of the novel method. The novel method for interaction calculation was verified to be correct and feasible. Finally, roles of the novel method in membrane fouling research were discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient wastewater treatment by membranes through constructing tunable antifouling membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Su, Yanlei; Peng, Jinming; Zhao, Xueting; Jiang, Zhongyi; Dong, Yanan; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yangui; Liu, Jiazhen

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, a facile in situ approach for constructing tunable amphiphilic or hydrophilic antifouling membrane surfaces was demonstrated by exquisitely manipulating the microphase separation and surface segregation behavior of the tailor-made ternary amphiphilic block copolymers during the commonly utilized wet phase inversion membrane-formation process. Under dead-end filtration for oily wastewater treatment, the membrane with amphiphilic surface exhibited over 99.5% retention ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD) without appreciable membrane fouling: the water permeation flux was slightly decreased during operation (total flux decline was 6.8%) and almost completely recovered to the initial value (flux recovery ratio was more than 99.0%) after simple hydraulic washing. While for the proteins-containing wastewater treatment, the membrane with hydrophilic surface exhibited about 52.6% COD retention ratio and superior antifouling performance: only 17.0% total flux decline and also more than 99.0% flux recovery ratio. Hopefully, the present approach can be developed as a competitive platform technology for the preparation of robust and versatile antifouling membrane, leading to the high process efficiency of wastewater treatments.

  6. Membrane Vibration Tests Using Surface-Bonded Piezoelectric Patch Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasper, James L.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the status of on-going work at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure the dynamics of thin membranes. The test article is a one-meter square pre-tensioned Kapton membrane that incorporates small surface-bonded piezoelectric patches strategically positioned to excite many modes. It is shown that PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) and MFC (macro fiber composite) piezoelectric patch actuators provide adequate excitation energy to obtain modal frequencies and mode shapes. Results from modal tests performed on the membrane using piezoelectric patches of different sizes and positions are discussed.

  7. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL) 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC) adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and flotillin-1 (FLOT1), were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa) and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle). Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary hEEC and ECC-1 whilst

  8. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y.

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Cell cycle regulation of dynein association with membranes modulates microtubule-based organelle transport.

    PubMed

    Niclas, J; Allan, V J; Vale, R D

    1996-05-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a minus end-directed microtubule motor that performs distinct functions in interphase and mitosis. In interphase, dynein transports organelles along microtubules, whereas in metaphase this motor has been implicated in mitotic spindle formation and orientation as well as chromosome segregation. The manner in which dynein activity is regulated during the cell cycle, however, has not been resolved. In this study, we have examined the mechanism by which organelle transport is controlled by the cell cycle in extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs. Here, we show that photocleavage of the dynein heavy chain dramatically inhibits minus end-directed organelle transport and that purified dynein restores this motility, indicating that dynein is the predominant minus end-directed membrane motor in Xenopus egg extracts. By measuring the amount of dynein associated with isolated membranes, we find that cytoplasmic dynein and its activator dynactin detach from the membrane surface in metaphase extracts. The sevenfold decrease in membrane-associated dynein correlated well with the eightfold reduction in minus end-directed membrane transport observed in metaphase versus interphase extracts. Although dynein heavy or intermediate chain phosphorylation did not change in a cell cycle-dependent manner, the dynein light intermediate chain incorporated approximately 12-fold more radiolabeled phosphate in metaphase than in interphase extracts. These studies suggest that cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic dynein may regulate organelle transport by modulating the association of this motor with membranes.

  10. Salmonella Rapidly Regulates Membrane Permeability To Survive Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joris; Reynolds, Lisa A; Deng, Wanyin; Mills, Allan; Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Foster, Leonard J; Duong, Franck; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-08-09

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides protection against toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreased OM permeability can promote bacterial survival under harsh circumstances and protects against antibiotics. To better understand the regulation of OM permeability, we studied the real-time influx of hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella bacteria and discovered two novel mechanisms by which they rapidly control OM permeability. We found that pores in two major OM proteins, OmpA and OmpC, could be rapidly opened or closed when oxidative stress is encountered and that the underlying mechanisms rely on the formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasmic domain of OmpA and TrxA, respectively. Additionally, we found that a Salmonella mutant showing increased OM permeability was killed more effectively by treatment with antibiotics. Together, these results demonstrate that Gram-negative bacteria regulate the influx of ROS for defense against oxidative stress and reveal novel targets that can be therapeutically targeted to increase bacterial killing by conventional antibiotics. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved ways to circumvent inflammatory immune responses. A decrease in bacterial outer membrane permeability during infection helps protect bacteria from toxic molecules produced by the host immune system and allows for effective colonization of the host. In this report, we reveal molecular mechanisms that rapidly alter outer membrane pores and their permeability in response to hydrogen peroxide and oxidative stress. These mechanisms are the first examples of pores that are rapidly opened or closed in response to reactive oxygen species. Moreover, one of these mechanisms can be targeted to artificially increase membrane permeability and thereby increase bacterial killing by the antibiotic cefotaxime during in vitro experiments and in a mouse model of infection. We envision that a better understanding of the regulation of membrane

  11. Surface functionalization of thin-film composite membranes with copper nanoparticles for antimicrobial surface properties.

    PubMed

    Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Zodrow, Katherine R; Genggeng, Qi; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling is a major operational challenge in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination, motivating a search for improved biofouling control strategies. Copper, long known for its antibacterial activity and relatively low cost, is an attractive potential biocidal agent. In this paper, we present a method for loading copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) on the surface of a thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide RO membrane. Cu-NPs were synthesized using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a capping agent, resulting in particles with an average radius of 34 nm and a copper content between 39 and 49 wt.%. The positive charge of the Cu-NPs imparted by the PEI allowed a simple electrostatic functionalization of the negatively charged RO membrane. We confirmed functionalization and irreversible binding of the Cu-NPs to the membrane surface with SEM and XPS after exposing the membrane to bath sonication. We also demonstrated that Cu-NP functionalization can be repeated after the Cu-NPs dissolve from the membrane surface. The Cu-NP functionalization had minimal impact on the intrinsic membrane transport parameters. Surface hydrophilicity and surface roughness were also maintained, and the membrane surface charge became positive after functionalization. The functionalized membrane exhibited significant antibacterial activity, leading to an 80-95% reduction in the number of attached live bacteria for three different model bacterial strains. Challenges associated with this functionalization method and its implementation in RO desalination are discussed.

  12. Hollow fiber membranes with different external corrugated surfaces for desalination by membrane distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Loreto; García-Payo, Carmen; Khayet, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) hollow fiber membranes were prepared using the phase inversion spinning technique under a wet gap mode. Different corrugated outer surfaces were obtained by means of a micro-engineered spinneret, spraying the external coagulant on the nascent fiber along gap, and different spinning parameters, namely, the gap distance and the external coagulant flow rate. A quantitative evaluation of the corrugation size and shape was carried out by electron scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The effect of the corrugation size and shape on the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) performance has been studied. The corrugated outer surface acted as micro-turbulence promoters mitigating the temperature polarization effect and enhanced the external effective surface area for condensation. Both factors improved the DCMD permeability of the hollow fiber membranes. However, corrugations with V-shaped valleys depths greater than about 30 μm did not always improve the DCMD permeate flux. It was found that the membrane prepared with the spray wetting mode exhibited the best desalination performance. The salt rejection factor of all prepared hollow fiber membranes was greater than 99.9% and the highest DCMD permeate flux of this study was greater than those reported so far for the PVDF-HFP hollow fiber membranes.

  13. An Ion Switch Regulates Fusion of Charged Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Evgenios; Lutz, Silke; Meyer, Sylke; Panzner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify the recruitment of solvent ions to lipid membranes as the dominant regulator of lipid phase behavior. Our data demonstrate that binding of counterions to charged lipids promotes the formation of lamellar membranes, whereas their absence can induce fusion. The mechanism applies to anionic and cationic liposomes, as well as the recently introduced amphoteric liposomes. In the latter, an additional pH-dependent lipid salt formation between anionic and cationic lipids must occur, as indicated by the depletion of membrane-bound ions in a zone around pH 5. Amphoteric liposomes fuse under these conditions but form lamellar structures at both lower and higher pH values. The integration of these observations into the classic lipid shape theory yielded a quantitative link between lipid and solvent composition and the physical state of the lipid assembly. The key parameter of the new model, κ(pH), describes the membrane phase behavior of charged membranes in response to their ion loading in a quantitative way. PMID:21575575

  14. Detachment of surface membrane invagination systems by cationic amphiphilic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Sangar; Taylor, Kirk A.; Allcock, Natalie; Rainbow, Richard D.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Several cell types develop extensive plasma membrane invaginations to serve a specific physiological function. For example, the megakaryocyte demarcation membrane system (DMS) provides a membrane reserve for platelet production and muscle transverse (T) tubules facilitate excitation:contraction coupling. Using impermeant fluorescent indicators, capacitance measurements and electron microscopy, we show that multiple cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) cause complete separation of the DMS from the surface membrane in rat megakaryocytes. This includes the calmodulin inhibitor W-7, the phospholipase-C inhibitor U73122, and anti-psychotic phenothiazines. CADs also caused loss of T tubules in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes and the open canalicular system of human platelets. Anionic amphiphiles, U73343 (a less electrophilic U73122 analogue) and a range of kinase inhibitors were without effect on the DMS. CADs are known to accumulate in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane where they bind to anionic lipids, especially PI(4,5)P2. We therefore propose that surface detachment of membrane invaginations results from an ability of CADs to interfere with PI(4,5)P2 interactions with cytoskeletal or BAR domain proteins. This establishes a detubulating action of a large class of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:26725955

  15. Surface precision of optical membranes with curvature.

    PubMed

    Marker, D; Jenkins, C

    1997-11-24

    Space-based inflatable technology is of current interest to NASA and DOD, and in particular to the Air Force and Phillips Laboratory. Potentially large gains in lowering launch costs, through reductions in structure mass and volume, are driving this activity. Diverse groups are researching and developing this technology for radio and radar antennae, optical telescopes, and solar power and propulsion applications. Regardless of the use, one common requirement for successful application is the accuracy of the inflated surface shape. The work reported here concerns the shape control of an inflated thin circular disk through use of a nonlinear finite element analysis. First, a review of the important associated Hencky problem is given. Then we discuss a shape modification, achieved through enforced boundary displacements, which resulted in moving the inflated shape towards a desired parabolic profile. Minimization of the figure error is discussed and conclusions are drawn.

  16. Interfacial polymerization on hydrophobic PVDF UF membranes surface: Membrane wetting through pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Sung; Lee, Hyun Ho; Seo, Jin Ah; Park, Hyun Sic; Park, Jinwon; Min, Byoung Ryul

    2015-11-01

    PVDF is widely used in water treatment membranes because of it high chemical resistance and thermal stability levels, and desirable mechanical properties. On the other hand, it is seldom used as support membrane for RO membranes, as it is difficult to undertake interfacial polymerization by traditional methods due to characteristic of hydrophobic surface. However, if the MPD solution is applied at pressures which exceed the pressure at which the PVDF membrane pushes water away, then it can be wetted within the membrane and PA/PVDF composite membrane can be prepared through the reaction of the wetted MPD and TMC. The theoretical penetration pressure needed to wet MPD solution in PVDF with pore size of 10 nm, calculated using Jurin's Law, is 8.8 bar. In this study, PVDF membrane was immersed in MPD solution for 4 h at pressures higher than theoretical penetration pressure using N2 gas at 25 °C. Interfacial polymerization with TMC was undertaken with surface of the PVDF membrane wetted in MPD solution in this manner to form a thin but consistent PA layer, which was verified through FT-IR and SEM. Salt rejection and permeation flux measurements for NaCl 5000 ppm was conducted for the PA/PVDF membranes prepared in this manner at 25 °C, 30 bar using cross-flow water permeation system. PA/PVDF composite membrane wetted with MPD solution and interfacial polymerization undertaken at 10, 16 and 20 bar with N2 gas displayed salt rejection ratio of 37.94, 41.79 and 51.03%, and permeation flux of 7.38, 5.26 and 7.94LMH, respectively. The salt rejection ratio for membrane wetted with MPD at 16 bar with CO2 gas displayed salt rejection ratio of 78.26% and permeation flux of 4.91LMH. The results confirmed the possibility of using PVDF UF membrane of superior properties as support membrane for NF and RO.

  17. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T.; Eckert, Debra M.; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity. PMID:23530241

  18. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T; Eckert, Debra M; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M

    2013-04-09

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity.

  19. Surface-Localized Spermidine Protects the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane from Antibiotic Treatment and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lori; Mulcahy, Heidi; Kanevets, Uliana; Shi, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA acts as a cation chelator and induces the expression of antibiotic resistance genes regulated by Mg2+ levels. Here we report the characterization of novel DNA-induced genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are annotated as homologs of the spermidine synthesis genes speD (PA4773) and speE (PA4774). The addition of sublethal concentrations of DNA and membrane-damaging antibiotics induced expression of the genes PA4773 to PA4775, as shown using transcriptional lux fusions and quantitative RT-PCR. Exogenous polyamine addition prevented DNA- and peptide-mediated gene induction. Mutation of PA4774 resulted in an increased outer membrane (OM) susceptibility phenotype upon polymyxin B, CP10A, and gentamicin treatment. When the membrane-localized fluorescent probe C11-BODIPY581/591 was used as an indicator of peroxidation of membrane lipids, the PA4774::lux mutant demonstrated an increased susceptibility to oxidative membrane damage from H2O2 treatment. Addition of exogenous polyamines protected the membranes of the PA4774::lux mutant from polymyxin B and H2O2 treatment. Polyamines from the outer surface were isolated and shown to contain putrescine and spermidine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The PA4774::lux mutant did not produce spermidine on the cell surface, but genetic complementation restored surface spermidine production as well as the antibiotic and oxidative stress resistance phenotypes of the membrane. We have identified new functions for spermidine on the cell surface and propose that polyamines are produced under Mg2+-limiting conditions as an organic polycation to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to stabilize and protect the outer membrane against antibiotic and oxidative damage. PMID:22155771

  20. Desalination by Membrane Distillation using Electrospun Polyamide Fiber Membranes with Surface Fluorination by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Servi, Amelia; Liu, Andong; Gleason, Karen K; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2015-04-22

    Fibrous membranes of poly(trimethyl hexamethylene terephthalamide) (PA6(3)T) were fabricated by electrospinning and rendered hydrophobic by applying a conformal coating of poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) (PPFDA) using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). A set of iCVD-treated electrospun PA6(3)T fiber membranes with fiber diameters ranging from 0.25 to 1.8 μm were tested for desalination using the air gap membrane distillation configuration. Permeate fluxes of 2-11 kg/m2/h were observed for temperature differentials of 20-45 °C between the feed stream and condenser plate, with rejections in excess of 99.98%. The liquid entry pressure was observed to increase dramatically, from 15 to 373 kPa with reduction in fiber diameter. Contrary to expectation, for a given feed temperature the permeate flux was observed to increase for membranes of decreasing fiber diameter. The results for permeate flux and salt rejection show that it is possible to construct membranes for membrane distillation even from intrinsically hydrophilic materials after surface modification by iCVD and that the fiber diameter is shown to play an important role on the membrane distillation performance in terms of permeate flux, salt rejection, and liquid entry pressure.

  1. How sterol tilt regulates properties and organization of lipid membranes and membrane insertions

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Harries, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Serving as a crucial component of mammalian cells, cholesterol critically regulates the functions of biomembranes. This review focuses on a specific property of cholesterol and other sterols: the tilt modulus χ that quantifies the energetic cost of tilting sterol molecules inside the lipid membrane. We show how χ is involved in determining properties of cholesterol-containing membranes, and detail a novel approach to quantify its value from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, we link χ with other structural, thermodynamic, and mechanical properties of cholesterol-containing lipid membranes, and delineate how this useful parameter can be obtained from the sterol tilt probability distributions derived from relatively small-scale unbiased MD simulations. We demonstrate how the tilt modulus quantitatively describes the aligning field that sterol molecules create inside the phospholipid bilayers, and we relate χ to the bending rigidity of the lipid bilayer through effective tilt and splay energy contributions to the elastic deformations. Moreover, we show how χ can conveniently characterize the “condensing effect” of cholesterol on phospholipids. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of this cholesterol aligning field to the proper folding and interactions of membrane peptides. Given the relative ease of obtaining the tilt modulus from atomistic simulations, we propose that χ can be routinely used to characterize the mechanical properties of sterol/lipid bilayers, and can also serve as a required fitting parameter in multi-scaled simulations of lipid membrane models to relate the different levels of coarse-grained details. PMID:23291283

  2. Outer membrane machinery and alginate synthesis regulators control membrane vesicle production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Sakai, Ryosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Sawada, Isao; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2009-12-01

    The opportunistic human bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces membrane vesicles (MVs) in its surrounding environment. Several features of the P. aeruginosa MV production mechanism are still unknown. We previously observed that depletion of Opr86, which has a role in outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly, resulted in hypervesiculation. In this study, we showed that the outer membrane machinery and alginate synthesis regulatory machinery are closely related to MV production in P. aeruginosa. Depletion of Opr86 resulted in increased expression of the periplasmic serine protease MucD, suggesting that the accumulation of misfolded OMPs in the periplasm is related to MV production. Indeed, the mucD mutant showed a mucoid phenotype and the mucD mutation caused increased MV production. Strains with the gene encoding alginate synthetic regulator AlgU, MucA, or MucB deleted also caused altered MV production. Overexpression of either MucD or AlgW serine proteases resulted in decreased MV production, suggesting that proteases localized in the periplasm repress MV production in P. aeruginosa. Deletion of mucD resulted in increased MV proteins, even in strains with mutations in the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), which serves as a positive regulator of MV production. This study suggests that misfolded OMPs may be important for MV production, in addition to PQS, and that these regulators act in independent pathways.

  3. Membrane organization and regulation of cellular Cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Garda, Horacio A; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Gonzalez, Marina C.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2010-01-01

    An excess of intracellular free Cholesterol (Chol) is cytotoxic, and its homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Apolipoprotein A–I (apoA-I) is a highly efficient Chol acceptor as it activates complex cellular pathways that tend to mobilize and export Chol from cellular depots. Here we hypothesize that membrane composition and/or organization is strongly involved in Chol homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a cell line over expressing Stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD-cells), which modifies plasma membrane (PM) composition by the enrichment of monounsaturated fatty,acids and determined this effect on membrane properties, cell viability and cholesterol homeostasis. PM in SCD-cells has a higher phospholipids/sphingomyelin ratio and is slightly enriched in Chol. These cells showed an increase in the cholesteryl esters/free Chol ratio, they were more resistant to Chol toxicity and in addition, they exported more caveolin than Control cells. The data suggest that cell functionality is preserved by regulating membrane fluidity and Chol exportation and storage. PMID:20336284

  4. Membrane organization and regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jaureguiberry, María S; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Garda, Horacio A; Finarelli, Gabriela S; Gonzalez, Marina C; Rimoldi, Omar J

    2010-04-01

    An excess of intracellular free cholesterol (Chol) is cytotoxic, and its homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a highly efficient Chol acceptor because it activates complex cellular pathways that tend to mobilize and export Chol from cellular depots. We hypothesize that membrane composition and/or organization is strongly involved in Chol homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a cell line overexpressing stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase (SCD cells), which modifies plasma membrane (PM) composition by the enrichment of monounsaturated fatty acids, and determined this effect on membrane properties, cell viability, and Chol homeostasis. PM in SCD cells has a higher ratio of phospholipids to sphingomyelin and is slightly enriched in Chol. These cells showed an increase in the ratio of cholesteryl esters to free Chol; they were more resistant to Chol toxicity, and they exported more caveolin than control cells. The data suggest that cell functionality is preserved by regulating membrane fluidity and Chol exportation and storage.

  5. Regulation of cellular pH: From molecules to membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabe, Michael David

    granules (MSGs) (3 x 10 -4 cm/s). This drop in permeability is accompanied by an increase in the V-ATPase density. An elastic energy model of in cubo protein crystallization is presented in the third chapter. I identify the relevant energetics involved in this process and calculate the elastic energy cost of implanting membrane proteins into the highly curved Pn3m cubic phase. The dependence of this energy on the geometry of the Pn3m phase was understood through the D minimal surface, a mathematical surface thought to model the interface geometry of the Pn3m phase. I show that salt-induced shrinkage of the cubic phase increases the energetic cost of proteins in the bulk cubic phase. This energy drives the growth of protein crystals in the flattened lamellar regions where the membrane can accommodate the presence of proteins without creating elastic deformations. A statistical model of this process is developed, and kinetic equations for crystal growth are obtained. Key model parameters were determined by analyzing the growth of bacteriorhodopsin crystals at different lattice parameters. I show how the time required for crystal growth depends on the physical characteristics of the protein and the state of the cubic phase. Thus, the model provides a rational basis for optimizing the experimental procedure for proteins that have not been crystallized.

  6. Cadherin tales: Regulation of cadherin function by endocytic membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Chantel M; Su, Wenji; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-12-01

    Cadherins are the primary adhesion molecules in adherens junctions and desmosomes and play essential roles in embryonic development. Although significant progress has been made in understanding cadherin structure and function, we lack a clear vision of how cells confer plasticity upon adhesive junctions to allow for cellular rearrangements during development, wound healing and metastasis. Endocytic membrane trafficking has emerged as a fundamental mechanism by which cells confer a dynamic state to adhesive junctions. Recent studies indicate that the juxtamembrane domain of classical cadherins contains multiple endocytic motifs, or "switches," that can be used by cellular membrane trafficking machinery to regulate adhesion. The cadherin-binding protein p120-catenin (p120) appears to be the master regulator of access to these switches, thereby controlling cadherin endocytosis and turnover. This review focuses on p120 and other cadherin-binding proteins, ubiquitin ligases, and growth factors as key modulators of cadherin membrane trafficking. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Protein binding properties of surface-modified porous polyethylene membranes.

    PubMed

    Greene, George; Radhakrishna, Harish; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we quantified the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein onto several polyelectrolyte-modified sintered porous polyethylene (PPE) membranes. The polymer surfaces had both cationic and anionic charges obtained via the adsorption of polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively, onto plasma-activated PPE. The amount of IgG adsorption was determined by measuring the gamma radiation emitted by [125I]-IgG radio labeled protein. By studying the impact of pH and ionic strength on IgG adsorption, we attempted to characterize the role and nature of the electrostatic interactions involved in the adsorption process to better understand how these interactions were influenced by the charge and structure of immobilized polyelectrolyte complexes at modified membrane surfaces. We were able to show that surface modification of PPE membranes with adsorbed PEI monolayers and PEI-PAA bilayers can greatly improve the IgG binding ability of the membrane under optimized conditions. We also showed that the observed improvement in the IgG binding is derived from electrostatic interactions between IgG and the polyelectrolyte surface. In addition, we found that the greatest IgG adsorption occurred when the IgG and the surface possessed predominantly opposite charges, rather than when the surface possessed the greatest electrostatic charge. Finally, we have found that the molecular weight of the terminating polyelectrolyte has a noticeable effect upon the electrostatic interactions between IgG and the PEI-PAA bilayer-modified PPE surfaces.

  8. Interaction between surface shape and intra-surface viscous flow on lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Agrawal, Ashutosh; Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Oster, George; Steigmann, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The theory of intra-surface viscous flow on lipid bilayers is developed by combining the equations for flow on a curved surface with those that describe the elastic resistance of the bilayer to flexure. The model is derived directly from balance laws and augments an alternative formulation based on a variational principle. Conditions holding along an edge of the membrane are emphasized and the coupling between flow and membrane shape is simulated numerically. PMID:23086137

  9. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  10. Surface functionalization of metal organic frameworks for mixed matrix membranes

    DOEpatents

    Albenze, Erik; Lartey, Michael; Li, Tao; Luebke, David R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Venna, Surendar R.

    2017-03-21

    Mixed Matrix Membrane (MMM) are composite membranes for gas separation and comprising a quantity of inorganic filler particles, in particular metal organic framework (MOF), dispersed throughout a polymer matrix comprising one or more polymers. This disclosure is directed to MOF functionalized through addition of a pendant functional group to the MOF, in order to improve interaction with a surrounding polymer matrix in a MMM. The improved interaction aids in avoiding defects in the MMM due to incompatible interfaces between the polymer matrix and the MOF particle, in turn increasing the mechanical and gas separation properties of the MMM. The disclosure is also directed to a MMM incorporating the surface functionalized MOF.

  11. Differential regulation of membrane and secretory mu chain synthesis in human beta cell lines. Regulation of membrane mu or secreted mu

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of membrane and secretory mu synthesis was examined in human lymphoblastoid cell lines representing various stages of differentiation. Immunoglobulin phenotype was determined by surface and cytoplasmic staining with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of anti-mu precipitable cellular products. The thymidine analogue, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BUdR), which inhibits differentiation-specific proteins in a variety of systems, was used to examine regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. We found that BUdR had a differential effect on membrane (mum) and secretory (mus) type mu heavy chains. Ig production in pre-B and plasma cell-like lines, which make mus, was unaffected by BUdR. However, surface expression of IgM (mum) in B cell lines was drastically inhibited at similar doses of BUdR without diminishing total Ig or protein synthesis. Examination of labeled mu chains from control and BUdR-treated B cell lines by SDS- PAGE revealed the production of two sizes of mu (mum and mus) in control cells and only the smaller size (mus) in BUdR-treated cells. This size difference could not be attributed to alterations in glycosylation of the molecules. These data show that BUdR inhibits the production of membrane mu chains without diminishing secretory mu chain synthesis in the same cell. Our findings suggest that thymidine-rich regions of the genome are involved in the regulation of mum vs. mus during B cell differentiation. PMID:6816895

  12. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  13. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  14. Membrane solubilization by a hydrophobic polyelectrolyte: surface activity and membrane binding.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J L; Barton, S W; Tirrell, D A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously observed that the hydrophobic polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethylacrylic acid) solubilizes lipid membranes in a pH-dependent manner, and we have exploited this phenomenon to prepare lipid vesicles that release their contents in response to pH, light, or glucose (Thomas, J. L., and D. A. Tirrell. Acc. Chem. Res. 25:336-342, 1992). The physical basis for the interaction between poly(2-ethylacrylic acid) and lipid membranes has been explored using surface tensiometry and fluorimetry. Varying the polymer concentration results in changes in surface activity and membrane binding that correlate with shifts in the critical pH for membrane solubilization. Furthermore, the binding affinity is reduced as the amount of bound polymer increases. These results are consistent with a hydrophobically driven micellization process, similar to those observed with apolipoproteins, melittin, and other amphiphilic alpha-helix-based polypeptides. The absence of specific secondary structure in the synthetic polymer suggests that amphiphilicity, rather than structure, is the most important factor in membrane micellization by macromolecules. PMID:7811920

  15. Shape Selection of Surface-Bound Helical Filaments: Biopolymers on Curved Membranes.

    PubMed

    Quint, David A; Gopinathan, Ajay; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-10-04

    Motivated to understand the behavior of biological filaments interacting with membranes of various types, we employ a theoretical model for the shape and thermodynamics of intrinsically helical filaments bound to curved membranes. We show that filament-surface interactions lead to a host of nonuniform shape equilibria, in which filaments progressively unwind from their native twist with increasing surface interaction and surface curvature, ultimately adopting uniform-contact curved shapes. The latter effect is due to nonlinear coupling between elastic twist and bending of filaments on anisotropically curved surfaces such as the cylindrical surfaces considered here. Via a combination of numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of shape equilibria, we show that filament conformations are critically sensitive to the surface curvature in both the strong- and weak-binding limits. These results suggest that local structure of membrane-bound chiral filaments is generically sensitive to the curvature radius of the surface to which it is bound, even when that radius is much larger than the filament's intrinsic pitch. Typical values of elastic parameters and interaction energies for several prokaryotic and eukaryotic filaments indicate that biopolymers are inherently very sensitive to the coupling between twist, interactions, and geometry and that this could be exploited for regulation of a variety of processes such as the targeted exertion of forces, signaling, and self-assembly in response to geometric cues including the local mean and Gaussian curvatures. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors.

    PubMed

    Khater, M M; Issa, Y M; Hassib, H B; Mohammed, S H

    2015-05-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L(-1) for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01-10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes.

  17. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors

    PubMed Central

    Khater, M.M.; Issa, Y.M.; Hassib, H.B.; Mohammed, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L−1 for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01–10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  18. Surface analysis of new chlorpromazinium plastic membrane electrodes.

    PubMed

    Al-Shatti, L A; Marafie, H M; Shoukry, A F

    2008-01-22

    New chlorpromazinium (Cp) plastic membrane electrodes of the conventional type were constructed and characterized. They are based on incorporation of Cp-reineckate (CpRn) ion pair, Cp-phosphotungstate (Cp3PT), or Cp-phosphomolybdate (Cp3PM) ion associate into poly(vinyl chloride) membrane. The electrodes exhibited calibration graph slopes of 49.83, 52.87, and 61.30 mV/Cp concentration decade over life spans of 1, 5, and 3 days, respectively. All electrodes proved to be selective for Cp and have been applied to the assay of a pharmaceutical preparation. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the limitation of the lifetime of the electrodes is attributed to leaching of the ion exchanger from the membrane into the test solution in addition to deformation of the surface.

  19. Regulation Mechanism of the Lateral Diffusion of Band 3 in Erythrocyte Membranes by the Membrane Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Tomishige, Michio; Sako, Yasushi; Kusumi, Akihiro

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the movement of a membrane spanning protein band 3 in erythrocyte ghosts were investigated at the level of a single or small groups of molecules using single particle tracking with an enhanced time resolution (0.22 ms). Two-thirds of band 3 undergo macroscopic diffusion: a band 3 molecule is temporarily corralled in a mesh of 110 nm in diameter, and hops to an adjacent mesh an average of every 350 ms. The rest (one-third) of band 3 exhibited oscillatory motion similar to that of spectrin, suggesting that these band 3 molecules are bound to spectrin. When the membrane skeletal network was dragged and deformed/translated using optical tweezers, band 3 molecules that were undergoing hop diffusion were displaced toward the same direction as the skeleton. Mild trypsin treatment of ghosts, which cleaves off the cytoplasmic portion of band 3 without affecting spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1, increased the intercompartmental hop rate of band 3 by a factor of 6, whereas it did not change the corral size and the microscopic diffusion rate within a corral. These results indicate that the cytoplasmic portion of band 3 collides with the membrane skeleton, which causes temporal confinement of band 3 inside a mesh of the membrane skeleton. PMID:9722611

  20. Surface monofunctionalized polymethyl pentene hollow fiber membranes by plasma treatment and hemocompatibility modification for membrane oxygenators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Weiping; Zheng, Zhi; Fan, Wenling; Mao, Chun; Shi, Jialiang; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The hemocompatibility of polymethyl pentene (PMP) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) was improved through surface modification for membrane oxygenator applications. The modification was performed stepwise with the following: (1) oxygen plasma treatment, (2) functionalization of monosort hydroxyl groups through NaBH4 reduction, and (3) grafting 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) or heparin. SEM, ATR-FTIR, and XPS analyses were conducted to confirm successful grafting during the modification. The hemocompatibility of PMP HFMs was analyzed and compared through protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and coagulation tests. Pure CO2 and O2 permeation rates, as well as in vitro gas exchange rates, were determined to evaluate the mass transfer properties of PMP HFMs. SEM results showed that different nanofibril topographies were introduced on the HFM surface. ATR-FTIR and XPS spectra indicated the presence of functionalization of monosort hydroxyl group and the grafting of MPC and heparin. Hemocompatibility evaluation results showed that the modified PMP HFMs presented optimal hemocompatibility compared with pristine HFMs. Gas permeation results revealed that gas permeation flux increased in the modified HFMs because of dense surface etching during the plasma treatment. The results of in vitro gas exchange rates showed that all modified PMP HFMs presented decreased gas exchange rates because of potential surface fluid wetting. The proposed strategy exhibits a potential for fabricating membrane oxygenators for biomedical applications to prevent coagulation formation and alter plasma-induced surface topology and composition.

  1. Golgi sorting regulates organization and activity of GPI-proteins at apical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tivodar, Simona; Formiggini, Fabio; Ossato, Giulia; Gratton, Enrico; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Here, we combined classical biochemistry with novel biophysical approaches to study with high spatial and temporal resolution the organization of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) at the plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We show that in polarized MDCK cells, following sorting in the Golgi, each GPI-AP reaches the apical surface in homo-clusters. Golgi-derived homo-clusters are required for their subsequent plasma membrane organization into cholesterol-dependent hetero-clusters. By contrast, in non-polarized MDCK cells GPI-APs are delivered to the surface as monomers in an unpolarized manner and are not able to form hetero-clusters. We further demonstrate that this GPI-AP organization is regulated by the content of cholesterol in the Golgi apparatus and is required to maintain the functional state of the protein at the apical membrane. Thus, different from fibroblasts, in polarized epithelial cells a selective cholesterol-dependent sorting mechanism in the Golgi regulates both the organization and the function of GPI-APs at the apical surface. PMID:24681536

  2. Membrane mimetic surface functionalization of nanoparticles: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Weingart, Jacob; Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Sun, Xue-Long

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), due to their size-dependent physical and chemical properties, have shown remarkable potential for a wide range of applications over the past decades. Particularly, the biological compatibilities and functions of NPs have been extensively studied for expanding their potential in areas of biomedical application such as bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery. In doing so, surface functionalization of NPs by introducing synthetic ligands and/or natural biomolecules has become a critical component in regards to the overall performance of the NP system for its intended use. Among known examples of surface functionalization, the construction of an artificial cell membrane structure, based on phospholipids, has proven effective in enhancing biocompatibility and has become a viable alternative to more traditional modifications, such as direct polymer conjugation. Furthermore, certain bioactive molecules can be immobilized onto the surface of phospholipid platforms to generate displays more reminiscent of cellular surface components. Thus, NPs with membrane-mimetic displays have found use in a range of bioimaging, biosensing, and drug delivery applications. This review herein describes recent advances in the preparations and characterization of integrated functional NPs covered by artificial cell membrane structures and their use in various biomedical applications. PMID:23688632

  3. AMPK Enhances Insulin-Stimulated GLUT4 Regulation via Lowering Membrane Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Habegger, Kirk M.; Hoffman, Nolan J.; Ridenour, Colin M.; Brozinick, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) enhances glucose transporter GLUT4 regulation. AMPK also suppresses energy-consuming pathways such as cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, recent in vitro and in vivo data suggest that excess membrane cholesterol impairs GLUT4 regulation. Therefore, this study tested whether a beneficial, GLUT4-regulatory aspect of AMPK stimulation involved cholesterol lowering. Using L6 myotubes stably expressing an exofacial myc-epitope-tagged-GLUT4, AMPK stimulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR; 45 min, 1 mm) or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP; 30 min, 200 μm) increased cell surface GLUT4myc labeling by approximately ∼25% (P < 0.05). Insulin (20 min, 100 nm) also increased GLUT4myc labeling by about 50% (P < 0.05), which was further enhanced (∼25%, P < 0.05) by AICAR or DNP. Consistent with AMPK-mediated suppression of cholesterol synthesis, AICAR and DNP decreased membrane cholesterol by 20–25% (P < 0.05). Whereas AMPK knockdown prevented the enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated GLUT4myc labeling by AICAR and DNP, cholesterol replenishment only blocked the AMPK-associated enhancement in insulin action. Cells cultured in a hyperinsulinemic milieu, resembling conditions in vivo that promote the progression/worsening of insulin resistance, displayed an increase in membrane cholesterol. This occurred concomitantly with a loss of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) and defects in GLUT4 regulation by insulin. These derangements were prevented by AMPK stimulation. Examination of skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant Zucker rats revealed a similar elevation in membrane cholesterol and loss of F-actin. Lowering cholesterol to control levels restored F-actin structure and insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, these data suggest a novel aspect of GLUT4 regulation by AMPK involves membrane cholesterol lowering. Moreover, this AMPK-mediated process protected against hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance. PMID

  4. AMPK enhances insulin-stimulated GLUT4 regulation via lowering membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Kirk M; Hoffman, Nolan J; Ridenour, Colin M; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2012-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) enhances glucose transporter GLUT4 regulation. AMPK also suppresses energy-consuming pathways such as cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, recent in vitro and in vivo data suggest that excess membrane cholesterol impairs GLUT4 regulation. Therefore, this study tested whether a beneficial, GLUT4-regulatory aspect of AMPK stimulation involved cholesterol lowering. Using L6 myotubes stably expressing an exofacial myc-epitope-tagged-GLUT4, AMPK stimulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR; 45 min, 1 mm) or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP; 30 min, 200 μm) increased cell surface GLUT4myc labeling by approximately ≈ 25% (P < 0.05). Insulin (20 min, 100 nm) also increased GLUT4myc labeling by about 50% (P < 0.05), which was further enhanced (≈ 25%, P < 0.05) by AICAR or DNP. Consistent with AMPK-mediated suppression of cholesterol synthesis, AICAR and DNP decreased membrane cholesterol by 20-25% (P < 0.05). Whereas AMPK knockdown prevented the enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated GLUT4myc labeling by AICAR and DNP, cholesterol replenishment only blocked the AMPK-associated enhancement in insulin action. Cells cultured in a hyperinsulinemic milieu, resembling conditions in vivo that promote the progression/worsening of insulin resistance, displayed an increase in membrane cholesterol. This occurred concomitantly with a loss of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) and defects in GLUT4 regulation by insulin. These derangements were prevented by AMPK stimulation. Examination of skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant Zucker rats revealed a similar elevation in membrane cholesterol and loss of F-actin. Lowering cholesterol to control levels restored F-actin structure and insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, these data suggest a novel aspect of GLUT4 regulation by AMPK involves membrane cholesterol lowering. Moreover, this AMPK-mediated process protected against hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance.

  5. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  6. Membrane microenvironment regulation of carnitine palmitoyltranferases I and II.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Khosrow; Mynatt, Randall L; Park, Edwards A; Cook, George A

    2011-06-01

    CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1 and CPT2 regulate fatty acid oxidation. Recombinant rat CPT2 was isolated from the soluble fractions of bacterial extracts and expressed in Escherichia coli. The acyl-CoA chain-length-specificity of the recombinant CPT2 was identical with that of the purified enzyme from rat liver mitochondrial inner membranes. The Km for carnitine for both the mitochondrial preparation and the recombinant enzyme was identical. In isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, cardiolipin (diphosphatidylglycerol) increased CPT1 activity 4-fold and the Km for carnitine 6-fold. It decreased the Ki for malonyl-CoA inhibition 60-fold, but had no effect on the apparent Km for myristoyl-CoA. Cardiolipin also activated recombinant CPT2 almost 4-fold, whereas phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine activated the enzyme 3-, 2- and 2-fold respectively. Most of the recombinant CPT2 was found to have substantial interaction with cardiolipin. A model is proposed whereby cardiolipin may hold the fatty-acid-oxidizing enzymes in the active functional conformation between the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes in conjunction with the translocase and the acyl-CoA synthetase, thus combining all four enzymes into a functional unit.

  7. Surface response methodology for the study of supported membrane formation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Claire; Briand, Elisabeth; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Chopineau, Joël

    2007-07-05

    We report on the investigations of the formation of the tethered lipid bilayer by vesicle deposition on amine-functionalized surfaces. The tethered bilayer was created by the deposition of egg-PC vesicles containing 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-poly-(ethyleneglycol)-N-hydroxysuccinimide as anchoring molecules on an amine-coated surface. This approach is an easy route for the formation of a biomimetic-supported membrane. A Doelhert experimental design was applied to determine the conditions leading to the formation of a continuous and defect-free tethered bilayer on different surfaces (gold and glass). Doehlert designs allow modeling of the experimental responses by second-order polynomial equations as a function of experimental factors. Four factors expected to influence bilayer formation were studied: the lipid concentration in the vesicle suspension, the mass percentage of anchoring molecules in the vesicles, the contact time between the vesicles and the surface, and the resting time of the membrane after buffer rinse. The optimization of the membrane preparation parameters was achieved by monitoring lipid assembly formation using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on gold and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching on glass. Three characteristic responses were systematically measured: the bilayer thickness, the lipid diffusion coefficient, and the lipid mobile fraction. The simultaneous inspection of the three characteristics revealed that a restricted experimental domain leads to properties that are in accordance with a bilayer presence. The factors of this domain are a lipid concentration from 0.1 to 1 mg/mL, 4-8% of anchoring molecules in the vesicles, 1-4 h of contact time between vesicles and surface, and 21-24 h of resting time after buffer rinse. Under these conditions, a membrane having a lipid mass per surface between 545 +/- 5 and 590 +/- 10 ng/cm2, a diffusion coefficient of between 2.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(-8) and 3.60 +/- 0.5 x

  8. PhoPQ regulates acidic glycerophospholipid content of the Salmonella Typhimurium outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Matamouros, Susana; Whittington, Dale; Bishop, Russell E; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-04

    Gram-negative bacteria have two lipid membranes separated by a periplasmic space containing peptidoglycan. The surface bilayer, or outer membrane (OM), provides a barrier to toxic molecules, including host cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). The OM comprises an outer leaflet of lipid A, the bioactive component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and an inner leaflet of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). The structure of lipid A is environmentally regulated in a manner that can promote bacterial infection by increasing bacterial resistance to CAMP and reducing LPS recognition by the innate immune system. The gastrointestinal pathogen, Salmonella Typhimurium, responds to acidic pH and CAMP through the PhoPQ two-component regulatory system, which stimulates lipid A remodeling, CAMP resistance, and intracellular survival within acidified phagosomes. Work here demonstrates that, in addition to regulating lipid A structure, the S. Typhimurium PhoPQ virulence regulators also regulate acidic GPL by increasing the levels of cardiolipins and palmitoylated acylphosphatidylglycerols within the OM. Triacylated palmitoyl-PG species were diminished in strains deleted for the PhoPQ-regulated OM lipid A palmitoyltransferase enzyme, PagP. Purified PagP transferred palmitate to PG consistent with PagP acylation of both lipid A and PG within the OM. Therefore, PhoPQ coordinately regulates OM acidic GPL with lipid A structure, suggesting that GPLs cooperate with lipid A to form an OM barrier critical for CAMP resistance and intracellular survival of S. Typhimurium.

  9. Membrane on a chip: a functional tethered lipid bilayer membrane on silicon oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Vladimir; Knorr, Nikolaus; Duran, Randolph S; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Köper, Ingo

    2005-09-01

    Tethered membranes have been proven during recent years to be a powerful and flexible biomimetic platform. We reported in a previous article on the design of a new architecture based on the self-assembly of a thiolipid on ultrasmooth gold substrates, which shows extremely good electrical sealing properties as well as functionality of a bilayer membrane. Here, we describe the synthesis of lipids for a more modular design and the adaptation of the linker part to silane chemistry. We were able to form a functional tethered bilayer lipid membrane with good electrical sealing properties covering a silicon oxide surface. We demonstrate the functional incorporation of the ion carrier valinomycin and of the ion channel gramicidin.

  10. Membrane on a Chip: A Functional Tethered Lipid Bilayer Membrane on Silicon Oxide Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Vladimir; Knorr, Nikolaus; Duran, Randolph S.; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Köper, Ingo

    2005-01-01

    Tethered membranes have been proven during recent years to be a powerful and flexible biomimetic platform. We reported in a previous article on the design of a new architecture based on the self-assembly of a thiolipid on ultrasmooth gold substrates, which shows extremely good electrical sealing properties as well as functionality of a bilayer membrane. Here, we describe the synthesis of lipids for a more modular design and the adaptation of the linker part to silane chemistry. We were able to form a functional tethered bilayer lipid membrane with good electrical sealing properties covering a silicon oxide surface. We demonstrate the functional incorporation of the ion carrier valinomycin and of the ion channel gramicidin. PMID:16127170

  11. Haemocompatibility of paediatric membrane oxygenators with heparin-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wendel, H P; Scheule, A M; Eckstein, F S; Ziemer, G

    1999-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in paediatric patients with heparin-coated oxygenation systems is rarely investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate, preclinically, the haemocompatibility of paediatric membrane oxygenators with heparin-coated surfaces. We compared 16 paediatric membrane oxygenators (Minimax, Medtronic) in an in vitro heart-lung machine model with fresh human blood. Eight of these oxygenation systems had a covalent heparin coating (Carmeda bioactive surface). After 90 min simulated ECC, the heparin-coated systems showed significantly higher platelet count, lower platelet-factor 4 release, reduced contact activation (factor XIIa and kallikrein), and lower neutrophil elastase levels (p < 0.05), compared to the noncoated oxygenator group. More biocompatible materials for paediatric operations may ameliorate the various postperfusion syndromes arising from ECC procedures, particularly unspecific inflammation, hyperfibrinolysis and blood loss.

  12. Engineering Surface Energy and Nanostructure of Microporous Films for Expanded Membrane Distillation Applications.

    PubMed

    Boo, Chanhee; Lee, Jongho; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-08-02

    We investigated the factors that determine surface omniphobicity of microporous membranes and evaluated the potential application of these membranes in desalination of low surface tension wastewaters by membrane distillation (MD). Specifically, the effects of surface morphology and surface energy on membrane surface omniphobicity were systematically investigated by evaluating wetting resistance to low surface tension liquids. Single and multilevel re-entrant structures were achieved by using cylindrical glass fibers as a membrane substrate and grafting silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on the fibers. Surface energy of the membrane was tuned by functionalizing the fiber substrate with fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) having two different lengths of fluoroalkyl chains. Results show that surface omniphobicity of the modified fibrous membrane increased with higher level of re-entrant structure and with lower surface energy. The secondary re-entrant structure achieved by SiNP coating on the cylindrical fibers was found to play a critical role in enhancing the surface omniphobicity. Membranes coated with SiNPs and chemically modified by the FAS with a longer fluoroalkyl chain (or lower surface energy) exhibited excellent surface omniphobicity and showed wetting resistance to low surface tension liquids such as ethanol (22.1 mN m(-1)). We further evaluated performance of the membranes in desalination of saline feed solutions with varying surface tensions by membrane distillation (MD). The engineered membranes exhibited stable MD performance with low surface tension feed waters, demonstrating the potential application omniphobic membranes in desalinating complex, high salinity industrial wastewaters.

  13. HER2 signaling regulates HER2 localization and membrane retention

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaekwang; Kim, Wonnam; Kim, Lark Kyun; VanHouten, Joshua; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2017-01-01

    ErbB2/HER2/Neu is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed in 25–30% of human breast cancers, usually associated with amplification of the ERBB2 gene. HER2 has no recognized ligands and heterodimers between HER2 and EGFR (ErbB1/HER1) or HER2 and ErbB3/HER3 are important in breast cancer. Unlike other ErbB family members, HER2 is resistant to internalization and degradation, and remains at the cell surface to signal for prolonged periods after it is activated. Although the mechanisms underlying retention of HER2 at the cell surface are not fully understood, prior studies have shown that, in order to avoid internalization, HER2 must interact with the chaperone, HSP90, and the calcium pump, PMCA2, within specific plasma membrane domains that protrude from the cell surface. In this report, we demonstrate that HER2 signaling, itself, is important for the formation and maintenance of membrane protrusions, at least in part, by maintaining PMCA2 expression and preventing increased intracellular calcium concentrations. Partial genetic knockdown of HER2 expression or pharmacologic inhibition of HER2 signaling causes the depletion of membrane protrusions and disruption of the interactions between HER2 and HSP90. This is associated with the ubiquitination of HER2, its internalization with EGFR or HER3, and its degradation. These results suggest a model by which some threshold of HER2 signaling is required for the formation and/or maintenance of multi-protein signaling complexes that reinforce and prolong HER2/EGFR or HER2/HER3 signaling by inhibiting HER2 ubiquitination and internalization. PMID:28369073

  14. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism.

  15. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K.; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A.; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism. PMID:26657863

  16. Regulation of PutA-Membrane Associations by FAD Reduction †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weimin; Zhou, Yuzhen; Becker, Donald F.

    2005-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli is a multifunctional flavoprotein that is both a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization (put) genes and a membrane-associated enzyme which catalyzes the 4e- oxidation of proline to glutamate. Previously, proline was shown to induce PutA-membrane binding and alter the intracellular location and function of PutA. To distinguish the roles of substrate binding and FAD reduction in the mechanism of how PutA changes from a DNA-binding protein to a membrane-bound enzyme, the kinetic parameters of PutA-membrane binding were measured under different conditions using model lipid bilayers and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The effects of proline, FAD reduction, and proline analogues on PutA-membrane associations were determined. Oxidized PutA shows no binding to E. coli polar lipid vesicles. In contrast, proline and sodium dithionite induce tight binding of PutA to the lipid bilayer with indistinguishable kinetic parameters and an estimated dissociation constant (KD) of < 0.01 nM (pH 7.4) for the reduced PutA-lipid complex. Proline analogues such as L-THFA and DL-P5C also stimulate PutA binding to E. coli polar lipid vesicles with KD values ranging from about 3.6 – 34 nM (pH 7.4) for the PutA-lipid complex. The greater PutA-membrane binding affinity (> 300-fold) generated by FAD reduction relative to the nonreducing ligands demonstrates that FAD reduction controls PutA-membrane associations. On the basis of SPR kinetic analysis with differently charged lipid bilayers, the driving force for PutA-membrane binding is primarily hydrophobic. In the SPR experiments membrane-bound PutA did not bind put control DNA confirming that the membrane-binding and DNA-binding activities of PutA are mutually exclusive. A model for the regulation of PutA is described in which the overall translocation of PutA from the cytoplasm to the membrane is driven by FAD reduction and the subsequent energy difference (∼ 24 k

  17. Membrane surface engineering for protein separations: experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zizhao; Du, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Qian, Xianghong

    2014-09-09

    A bisphosphonate derived ligand was successfully synthesized and grafted from the surface of regenerated cellulose membrane using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for protein separations. This ligand has a remarkable affinity for arginine (Arg) residues on protein surface. Hydrophilic residues N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) was copolymerized to enhance the flexibility of the copolymer ligand and further improve specific protein adsorption. The polymerization of bisphosphonate derivatives was successful for the first time using ATRP. Static and dynamic binding capacities were determined for binding and elution of Arg rich lysozyme. The interaction mechanism between the copolymer ligand and lysozyme was elucidated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  18. Efficient thrombin generation requires molecular phosphatidylserine, not a membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rinku; Weinreb, Gabriel; Lentz, Barry R

    2005-12-27

    Activation of prothrombin to thrombin is catalyzed by a "prothrombinase" complex, traditionally viewed as factor X(a) (FX(a)) in complex with factor V(a) (FV(a)) on a phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membrane surface, which is widely regarded as required for efficient activation. Activation involves cleavage of two peptide bonds and proceeds via one of two released intermediates or through "channeling" (activation without the release of an intermediate). We ask here whether the PS molecule itself and not the membrane surface is sufficient to produce the fully active human "prothrombinase" complex in solution. Both FX(a) and FV(a) bind soluble dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine (C6PS). In the presence of sufficient C6PS to saturate both FX(a) and FV(a2) (light isoform of FV(a)), these proteins form a tight (Kd = 0.6 +/- 0.09 nM at 37 degrees C) soluble complex. Complex assembly occurs well below the critical micelle concentration of C6PS, as established in the presence of the proteins by quasi-elastic light scattering and pyrene fluorescence. Ferguson analysis of native gels shows that the complex migrates with an apparent molecular mass only slightly larger than that expected for one FX(a) and one FV(a2), further ruling out complex assembly on C6PS micelles. Human prothrombin activation by this complex occurs at nearly the same overall rate (2.2 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) and via the same reaction pathway (50-60% channeling, with the rest via the meizothrombin intermediate) as the activation catalyzed by a complex assembled on PS-containing membranes (4.4 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). These results question the accepted role of PS membranes as providing "dimensionality reduction" and favor a regulatory role for platelet-membrane-exposed PS.

  19. Antimicrobial metallic copper surfaces kill Staphylococcus haemolyticus via membrane damage

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Quaranta, Davide; Grass, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Recently, copper (Cu) in its metallic form has regained interest for its antimicrobial properties. Use of metallic Cu surfaces in worldwide hospital trials resulted in remarkable reductions in surface contaminations. Yet, our understanding of why microbes are killed upon contact to the metal is still limited and different modes of action have been proposed. This knowledge, however, is crucial for sustained use of such surfaces in hospitals and other hygiene-sensitive areas. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus is inactivated by metallic Cu. Staphylococcus haemolyticus was killed within minutes on Cu but not on stainless steel demonstrating the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic Cu. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and in vivo staining with Coppersensor-1 indicated that cells accumulated large amounts of Cu ions from metallic Cu surfaces contributing to lethal damage. Mutation rates of Cu- or steel-exposed cells were similarly low. Instead, live/dead staining indicated cell membrane damage in Cu- but not steel-exposed cells. These findings support a model of the cellular targets of metallic Cu toxicity in bacteria, which suggests that metallic Cu is not genotoxic and does not kill via DNA damage. In contrast, membranes constitute the likely Achilles’ heel of Cu surface-exposed cells. PMID:22950011

  20. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  1. Major Membrane Protein TDE2508 Regulates Adhesive Potency in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Yuki; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation and genetic manipulation of Treponema denticola, a Gram-negative oral spirochaeta associated with periodontal diseases, is still challenging. In this study, we formulated a simple medium based on a commercially available one, and established a transformation method with high efficiency. We then analyzed proteins in a membrane fraction in T. denticola and identified 16 major membrane-associated proteins, and characterized one of them, TDE2508, whose biological function was not yet known. Although this protein, which exhibited a complex conformation, was presumably localized in the outer membrane, we did not find conclusive evidence that it was exposed on the cell surface. Intriguingly, a TDE2508-deficient mutant exhibited significantly increased biofilm formation and adherent activity on human gingival epithelial cells. However, the protein deficiency did not alter autoaggregation, coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis, hemagglutination, cell surface hydrophobicity, motility, or expression of Msp which was reported to be an adherent molecule in this bacteria. In conclusion, the major membrane protein TDE2508 regulates biofilm formation and the adhesive potency of T. denticola, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:24586498

  2. Generalized Boussinesq-Scriven surface fluid model with curvature dissipation for liquid surfaces and membranes.

    PubMed

    Aguilar Gutierrez, Oscar F; Herrera Valencia, Edtson E; Rey, Alejandro D

    2017-10-01

    Curvature dissipation is relevant in synthetic and biological processes, from fluctuations in semi-flexible polymer solutions, to buckling of liquid columns, tomembrane cell wall functioning. We present a micromechanical model of curvature dissipation relevant to fluid membranes and liquid surfaces based on a parallel surface parameterization and a stress constitutive equation appropriate for anisotropic fluids and fluid membranes.The derived model, aimed at high curvature and high rate of change of curvature in liquid surfaces and membranes, introduces additional viscous modes not included in the widely used 2D Boussinesq-Scriven rheological constitutive equation for surface fluids.The kinematic tensors that emerge from theparallel surface parameterization are the interfacial rate of deformation and the surface co-rotational Zaremba-Jaumann derivative of the curvature, which are used to classify all possibledissipative planar and non-planar modes. The curvature dissipation function that accounts for bending, torsion and twist rates is derived and analyzed under several constraints, including the important inextensional bending mode.A representative application of the curvature dissipation model to the periodic oscillation in nano-wrinkled outer hair cells show how and why curvature dissipation decreases with frequency, and why the 100kHz frequency range is selected. These results contribute to characterize curvature dissipation in membranes and liquid surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of membrane surface properties on the behavior of initial bacterial adhesion and biofilm development onto nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Myint, Aye Aye; Lee, Wonil; Mun, Sungmin; Ahn, Chang Hoon; Lee, Seockheon; Yoon, Jeyong

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate biofouling problems, the fundamental behaviors of initial bacterial adhesion and biofilm development on four different nanofiltration (NF) membranes were evaluated using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a model bacterial strain. Initial cell adhesion was considerably higher on an aromatic polyamide-based NF membrane with a hydrophobic and rough surface, whereas cell aggregation on a polypiperazine-based NF membrane with a relatively hydrophilic and smooth surface was lower. Moreover, significant differences in the structural heterogeneity of the biofilms were observed among the four NF membranes. This study shows that the surface roughness and hydrophobicity of a membrane play an important role in determining initial cell adhesion, aggregation and favorable localization sites for colony formation. In addition, it was found that biofilm development was strongly influenced by the surface morphology of a membrane.

  4. Hotspots for allosteric regulation on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kimberly A.; McLaughlin, Richard N.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Recent work indicates a general architecture for proteins in which sparse networks of physically contiguous and co-evolving amino acids underlie basic aspects of structure and function. These networks, termed sectors, are spatially organized such that active sites are linked to many surface sites distributed throughout the structure. Using the metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase as a model system, we show that (1) the sector is strongly correlated to a network of residues undergoing millisecond conformational fluctuations associated with enzyme catalysis and (2) sector-connected surface sites are statistically preferred locations for the emergence of allosteric control in vivo. Thus, sectors represent an evolutionarily conserved “wiring” mechanism that can enable perturbations at specific surface positions to rapidly initiate conformational control over protein function. These findings suggest that sectors enable the evolution of intermolecular communication and regulation. PMID:22196731

  5. Substrate-supported phospholipid membranes studied by surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Keiko; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2005-10-01

    Substrate-supported planar lipid bilayer membranes are attractive model cellular membranes for biotechnological applications such as biochips and sensors. However, reliable fabrication of the lipid membranes on solid surfaces still poses significant technological challenges. In this study, simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) measurements were applied to the monitoring of adsorption and subsequent reorganization of phospholipid vesicles on solid substrates. The fluorescence intensity of SPFS depends very sensitively on the distance between the gold substrate and the fluorophore because of the excitation energy transfer to gold. By utilizing this distance dependency, we could obtain information about the topography of the adsorbed membranes: Adsorbed vesicles could be clearly distinguished from planar bilayers due to the high fluorescence intensity. SPSF can also incorporate various analytical techniques to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the adsorbed membranes. As an example, we demonstrated that the lateral mobility of lipid molecules could be estimated by observing the recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching. Combined with the film thickness information obtained by SPR, SPR-SPFS proved to be a highly informative technique to monitor the lipid membrane assembly processes on solid substrates.

  6. Substrate-Supported Phospholipid Membranes Studied by Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Keiko; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    Substrate-supported planar lipid bilayer membranes are attractive model cellular membranes for biotechnological applications such as biochips and sensors. However, reliable fabrication of the lipid membranes on solid surfaces still poses significant technological challenges. In this study, simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) measurements were applied to the monitoring of adsorption and subsequent reorganization of phospholipid vesicles on solid substrates. The fluorescence intensity of SPFS depends very sensitively on the distance between the gold substrate and the fluorophore because of the excitation energy transfer to gold. By utilizing this distance dependency, we could obtain information about the topography of the adsorbed membranes: Adsorbed vesicles could be clearly distinguished from planar bilayers due to the high fluorescence intensity. SPSF can also incorporate various analytical techniques to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the adsorbed membranes. As an example, we demonstrated that the lateral mobility of lipid molecules could be estimated by observing the recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching. Combined with the film thickness information obtained by SPR, SPR-SPFS proved to be a highly informative technique to monitor the lipid membrane assembly processes on solid substrates. PMID:16040759

  7. Roles of the reproductive tract in modifications of the sperm membrane surface

    PubMed Central

    KUO, Yu-Wen; LI, Sheng-Hsiang; MAEDA, Kei-Ichiro; GADELLA, Bart M.; TSAI, Pei Shiue J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful fertilization requires viable and functional spermatozoa to recognize and fuse with the oocyte. In most mammalian species, mature spermatozoa are not capable of fertilizing the oocytes immediately after ejaculation. However, unlike somatic cells, spermatozoa, after leaving the testis, are transcriptionally and translationally silent; therefore, upon completion of spermiogenesis, spermatozoa carry only a minimal amount of essential proteins on their membranes as well as within their restricted volume of cytoplasm. To develop into a fully functional and competent sperm that is capable of successful fertilization, modifications of the sperm membrane surface during its transit in the reproductive tracts is critical. These post-spermatogenesis modifications advance the maturation of epididymal spermatozoa. In addition, components secreted into the lumen of the reproductive tracts that are later added onto the sperm membrane surface also regulate (inhibit or activate) the functions of the spermatozoa. This acquisition of additional proteins from the reproductive tracts may compensate for the inactivity of morphologically mature spermatozoa. In this review, we discuss the contributions of the male and female genital tracts to modifications of the sperm membrane surface at different stages of fertilization. PMID:27009019

  8. Chemically inhibited ATP synthesis promoted detachment of different-age biofilms from membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huijuan; Teo, Kaiwen; Neo, Huiling; Liu, Yu

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the response of different-age biofilms developed on membrane surface to a chemical uncoupler 3, 3', 4', 5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS). Results showed that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) dissipation caused by TCS would promote different-age biofilms detachment, whereas chemically inhibited cellular ATP synthesis subsequently suppressed autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production. The extent of biofilm detachment was found to be closely related to AI-2-regulated EPS contents of bacteria. It was revealed that energy dissipation induced biofilm detachability was controlled by AI-2 regulated cellular communication via AI-2-mediated EPS secretion. This study would lead to a new cleaning strategy of biologically fouled membrane.

  9. Membrane events in the acrosomal reaction of Limulus sperm. Membrane fusion, filament-membrane particle attachment, and the source and formation of new membrane surface

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The membranes of Limulus (horseshoe crab) sperm were examined before and during the acrosomal reaction by using the technique of freeze- fracturing and thin sectioning. We focused on three areas. First, we examined stages in the fusion of the acrosomal vacuole with the cell surface. Fusion takes place in a particle-free zone which is surrounded by a circlet of particles on the P face of the plasma membrane and an underlying circlet of particles on the P face of the acrosomal vauole membrane. These circlets of particles are present before induction. Up to nine focal points of fusion occur within the particle-free zone. Second, we describe a system of fine filaments, each 30 A in diameter, which lies between the acrosomal vacuole and the plasma membrane. These filaments change their orientation as the vacuole opens, a process that takes place in less than 50 ms. Membrane particles seen on the P face of the acrosomal vacuole membrane change their orientation at the same time and in the same way as do the filaments, thus indicating that the membrane particles and filaments are probably connected. Third, we examined the source and the point of fusion of new membrane needed to cover the acrosomal process. This new membrane is almost certainly derived from the outer nuclear envelope and appears to insert into the plasma membrane in a particle-free area adjacent to an area rich in particles. The latter is the region where the particles are probably connected to the cytoplasmic filaments. The relevance of these observations in relation to the process of fertilization of this fantastic sperm is discussed. PMID:582596

  10. Interaction energy evaluation of soluble microbial products (SMP) on different membrane surfaces: role of the reconstructed membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Yu; Cao, Chu-qing; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhi-neng

    2012-05-15

    Soluble microbial products (SMP), a majority of organic matter in effluents, play a key role in membrane fouling. A series of filtration experiments were conducted, and demonstrated that the flux decrement rate was in order of cellulose acetate membrane (CA, 65.4%), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF, 47.9%) and polyether sulfones (PES, 29.2%). Results showed that the fouling behavior of membrane should be predicted from the combined knowledge of solution chemistry, surface chemical properties and surface morphology. To better understand the interactions between the SMP and different membranes, a technique for reconstructing the membrane surface topology was developed on the basis of statistical parameters obtained from atomic force microscopy. The interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, was calculated by surface element integration, allowing exploring the interaction energy profiles for different surfaces and providing considerable insights into the role of such interactions on the macroscopic fouling behavior. The resulting interaction energy differed considerably from the corresponding interaction between perfectly smooth surfaces. The great influence of protrusion on the membrane surface was to reduce the primary energy barrier height, thus rendering rough surface more favorable for deposition. An attractive energy region was immediately surrounded by each positive asperity as demonstrated in the roughness-engendered interaction energy maps. As the SMP approached closer to the membrane, they had a high probability of getting trapped in the attractive energy region, leading to a more rapid loss of flux than smooth membrane.

  11. BACE1 activity regulates cell surface contactin-2 levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although BACE1 is a major therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), potential side effects of BACE1 inhibition are not well characterized. BACE1 cleaves over 60 putative substrates, however the majority of these cleavages have not been characterized. Here we investigated BACE1-mediated cleavage of human contactin-2, a GPI-anchored cell adhesion molecule. Results Our initial protein sequence analysis showed that contactin-2 harbors a strong putative BACE1 cleavage site close to its GPI membrane linker domain. When we overexpressed BACE1 in CHO cells stably transfected with human contactin-2, we found increased release of soluble contactin-2 in the conditioned media. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of BACE1 in CHO cells expressing human contactin-2 and mouse primary neurons decreased soluble contactin-2 secretion. The BACE1 cleavage site mutation 1008MM/AA dramatically impaired soluble contactin-2 release. We then asked whether contactin-2 release induced by BACE1 expression would concomitantly decrease cell surface levels of contactin-2. Using immunofluorescence and surface-biotinylation assays, we showed that BACE1 activity tightly regulates contactin-2 surface levels in CHO cells as well as in mouse primary neurons. Finally, contactin-2 levels were decreased in Alzheimer’s disease brain samples correlating inversely with elevated BACE1 levels in the same samples. Conclusion Our results clearly demonstrate that mouse and human contactin-2 are physiological substrates for BACE1. BACE1-mediated contactin-2 cleavage tightly regulates the surface expression of contactin-2 in neuronal cells. Given the role of contactin-2 in cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, our data suggest that BACE1 may play an important role in these physiological processes by regulating contactin-2 surface levels. PMID:24405708

  12. Regulation of AKAP-membrane interactions by calcium.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Shumay, Elena; McLaughlin, Stuart; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2006-08-18

    The AKAP gravin is a scaffold for protein kinases, phosphatases, and adaptor molecules obligate for resensitization and recycling of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Gravin binds to the receptor through well characterized protein-protein interactions. These interactions are facilitated approximately 1000-fold when gravin is anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Although the N-terminal region (approximately 550 residues) is highly negatively charged and probably natively unfolded, it could anchor gravin to the inner leaflet through hydrophobic insertion of its N-terminal myristate and electrostatic binding of three short positively charged domains (PCDs). Loss of the site of N-myristoylation was found to affect neither AKAP macroscopic localization nor AKAP function. Synthetic peptides corresponding to PCD1-3 bound in vitro to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with high affinity, a binding reversed by calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. In vivo gravin localization is regulated by intracellular Ca2+, a function mapping to the N terminus of the protein harboring PCD1, PCD2, and PCD3. Mutation of any two PCDs eliminates membrane association of the non-myristoylated gravin, the sensitivity to Ca2+/calmodulin, and the ability of this scaffold to catalyze receptor resensitization and recycling.

  13. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  14. Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Lim, Ki-Taek; Tian, Chunjie; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

  15. Src regulates membrane trafficking of the Kv3.1b channel.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Han; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Seok Kyo; Choi, Jin Sung; Park, Kang-Sik

    2014-01-03

    The Kv3.1 channel plays a crucial role in regulating the high-frequency firing properties of neurons. Here, we determined whether Src regulates the subcellular distributions of the Kv3.1b channel. Co-expression of active Src induced a dramatic redistribution of Kv3.1b to the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, co-expression of the Kv3.1b channel with active Src induced a remarkable decrease in the pool of Kv3.1b at the cell surface. Moreover, the co-expression of active Src results in a significant decrease in the peak current densities of the Kv3.1b channel, and a substantial alteration in the voltage dependence of its steady-state inactivation. Taken together, these results indicate that Src kinase may play an important role in regulating membrane trafficking of Kv3.1b channels.

  16. Intermonolayer Friction and Surface Shear Viscosity of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    den Otter, W. K.; Shkulipa, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The flow behavior of lipid bilayer membranes is characterized by a surface viscosity for in-plane shear deformations, and an intermonolayer friction coefficient for slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. Both properties have been studied for a variety of coarse-grained double-tailed model lipids, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For lipids with two identical tails, the surface shear viscosity rises rapidly with tail length, while the intermonolayer friction coefficient is less sensitive to the tail length. Interdigitation of lipid tails across the bilayer midsurface, as observed for lipids with two distinct tails, strongly enhances the intermonolayer friction coefficient, but hardly affects the surface shear viscosity. The simulation results are compared against the available experimental data. PMID:17468168

  17. Modeling the effect of dynamic surfaces on membrane penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    The development of nanoscale materials for targeted drug delivery is an important current pursuit in materials science. One task of drug carriers is to release therapeutic agents within cells by bypassing the cell membrane to maximize the effectiveness of their payload and minimize bodily exposure. In this work, we use coarse-grained simulations to study nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands that rearrange in response to the amphiphilic lipid bilayer. We demonstrate that this dynamic surface permits the NP to spontaneously penetrate to the bilayer midplane when the surface ligands are near an order-disorder transition. We believe that this work will lead to the design of new drug carriers capable of non-specifically accessing cell interiors based solely on their dynamic surface properties. Our work is motivated by existing nanoscale systems such as micelles, or NPs grafted with highly mobile ligands or polymer brushes.

  18. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Luminal fluid tonicity regulates airway ciliary beating by altering membrane stretch and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Horváth, György; Sorscher, Eric J

    2008-06-01

    The coordinated, directional beating of airway cilia drives airway mucociliary clearance. Here we explore the hypothesis that airway surface liquid osmolarity is a key regulator of ciliary beating. Cilia in freshly isolated human and murine airways visualized with streaming video-microscopy exhibited a reciprocal dependence on a physiological range of luminal fluid osmolarities, across the entire range of ciliary activity (0-20 beats per sec). Increasing osmolarity slowed or completely abrogated, while lower osmolarity dramatically stimulated ciliary beating. In parallel, epithelial cell height and importantly, intracellular calcium levels (as judged by fluorescence imaging) also changed. Moreover, ciliary beating was stimulated by isosmotic solutions containing membrane permeant osmolytes, suggesting that cell size and membrane stretch (governed by apical fluid tonicity), rather than osmolarity itself, contribute to the activation. These findings shed light on the pathophysiology of diseases of mucociliary clearance such as cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. A nanopore membrane regulator device for laser modulated flow after glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jeffrey L; Bhandari, Ramanath; Groman-Lupa, Sergio; Velez-Montoya, Raul

    2015-10-01

    Glaucoma, the second most common cause of blindness in the world, is a multifactorial disease with several risk factors, of which intraocular pressure (IOP) is a primary contributing factor. Filtration surgery is one of the most effective means to significantly lower IOP compared to medical or laser treatments, and it is typically reserved for advanced disease. However, there are high rates of postoperative complications associated with the procedure, often from over- or under-filtration. To address these problems, the glaucoma drainage device regulator (GDDR) implant was developed to allow post-operative control of aqueous flow and IOP. The device, a tube with a nanopore membrane, is placed beneath the scleral flap. Postoperatively, the membrane surface can be ruptured with a laser to augment flow through the system. This feature allows adjustable control of aqueous flow and diminishes the risk of hypotony in the early postoperative period.

  1. A conserved phosphatase cascade that regulates nuclear membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjun; Gentry, Matthew S; Harris, Thurl E; Wiley, Sandra E; Lawrence, John C; Dixon, Jack E

    2007-04-17

    A newly emerging family of phosphatases that are members of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily contains the catalytic motif DXDX(T/V). A member of this DXDX(T/V) phosphatase family known as Dullard was recently shown to be a potential regulator of neural tube development in Xenopus [Satow R, Chan TC, Asashima M (2002) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 295:85-91]. Herein, we demonstrate that human Dullard and the yeast protein Nem1p perform similar functions in mammalian cells and yeast cells, respectively. In addition to similarity in primary sequence, Dullard and Nem1p possess similar domains and show similar substrate preferences, and both localize to the nuclear envelope. Additionally, we show that human Dullard can rescue the aberrant nuclear envelope morphology of nem1Delta yeast cells, functionally replacing Nem1p. Finally, Nem1p, has been shown to deposphorylate the yeast phosphatidic acid phosphatase Smp2p [Santos-Rosa H, Leung J, Grimsey N, Peak-Chew S, Siniossoglou S (2005) EMBO J 24:1931-1941], and we show that Dullard dephosphorylates the mammalian phospatidic acid phosphatase, lipin. Therefore, we propose that Dullard participates in a unique phosphatase cascade regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis, and that this cascade is conserved from yeast to mammals.

  2. Salmonella Rapidly Regulates Membrane Permeability To Survive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Joris; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Deng, Wanyin; Mills, Allan; Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Foster, Leonard J.; Duong, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides protection against toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreased OM permeability can promote bacterial survival under harsh circumstances and protects against antibiotics. To better understand the regulation of OM permeability, we studied the real-time influx of hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella bacteria and discovered two novel mechanisms by which they rapidly control OM permeability. We found that pores in two major OM proteins, OmpA and OmpC, could be rapidly opened or closed when oxidative stress is encountered and that the underlying mechanisms rely on the formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasmic domain of OmpA and TrxA, respectively. Additionally, we found that a Salmonella mutant showing increased OM permeability was killed more effectively by treatment with antibiotics. Together, these results demonstrate that Gram-negative bacteria regulate the influx of ROS for defense against oxidative stress and reveal novel targets that can be therapeutically targeted to increase bacterial killing by conventional antibiotics. PMID:27507830

  3. Temporal changes in extracellular polymeric substances on hydrophobic and hydrophilic membrane surfaces in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Matar, Gerald; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Maab, Husnul; Nunes, Suzana; Le-Clech, Pierre; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-05-15

    Membrane surface hydrophilic modification has always been considered to mitigating biofouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). Four hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membranes (pore sizes ∼0.1 μm) differing only in hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface characteristics were operated at a permeate flux of 10 L/m(2) h in the same lab-scale MBR fed with synthetic wastewater. In addition, identical membrane modules without permeate production (0 L/m(2) h) were operated in the same lab-scale MBR. Membrane modules were autopsied after 1, 10, 20 and 30 days of MBR operation, and total extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) accumulated on the membranes were extracted and characterized in detail using several analytical tools, including conventional colorimetric tests (Lowry and Dubois), liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), fluorescence excitation - emission matrices (FEEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The transmembrane pressure (TMP) quickly stabilized with higher values for the hydrophobic membranes than hydrophilic ones. The sulfonated polysulfone (SPSU) membrane had the highest negatively charged membrane surface, accumulated the least amount of foulants and displayed the lowest TMP. The same type of organic foulants developed with time on the four membranes and the composition of biopolymers shifted from protein dominance at early stages of filtration (day 1) towards polysaccharides dominance during later stages of MBR filtration. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling of LC-OCD data showed that biofilm samples clustered according to the sampling event (time) regardless of the membrane surface chemistry (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) or operating mode (with or without permeate flux). These results suggest that EPS composition may not be the dominant parameter for evaluating membrane performance and possibly other parameters such as biofilm thickness, porosity, compactness and structure should be

  4. MST1-dependent vesicle trafficking regulates neutrophil transmigration through the vascular basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Angela R.M.; Pruenster, Monika; Rohwedder, Ina; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Schäfer, Kerstin; Harrison, Ute; Nussbaum, Claudia; Immler, Roland; Wiessner, Johannes R.; Lim, Dae-Sik; Walzog, Barbara; Dietzel, Steffen; Moser, Markus; Klein, Christoph; Vestweber, Dietmar; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils need to penetrate the perivascular basement membrane for successful extravasation into inflamed tissue, but this process is incompletely understood. Recent findings have associated mammalian sterile 20–like kinase 1 (MST1) loss of function with a human primary immunodeficiency disorder, suggesting that MST1 may be involved in immune cell migration. Here, we have shown that MST1 is a critical regulator of neutrophil extravasation during inflammation. Mst1-deficient (Mst1–/–) neutrophils were unable to migrate into inflamed murine cremaster muscle venules, instead persisting between the endothelium and the basement membrane. Mst1–/– neutrophils also failed to extravasate from gastric submucosal vessels in a murine model of Helicobacter pylori infection. Mechanistically, we observed defective translocation of VLA-3, VLA-6, and neutrophil elastase from intracellular vesicles to the surface of Mst1–/– neutrophils, indicating that MST1 is required for this crucial step in neutrophil transmigration. Furthermore, we found that MST1 associates with the Rab27 effector protein synaptotagmin-like protein 1 (JFC1, encoded by Sytl1 in mice), but not Munc13-4, thereby regulating the trafficking of Rab27-positive vesicles to the cellular membrane. Together, these findings highlight a role for MST1 in vesicle trafficking and extravasation in neutrophils, providing an additional mechanistic explanation for the severe immune defect observed in patients with MST1 deficiency. PMID:27701149

  5. Regulation of caveolin-1 membrane trafficking by the Na/K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ting; Wang, Haojie; Chen, Yiliang; Liu, Lijun; Gunning, William T; Quintas, Luis Eduardo M.; Xie, Zi-Jian

    2008-01-01

    Here, we show that the Na/K-ATPase interacts with caveolin-1 (Cav1) and regulates Cav1 trafficking. Graded knockdown of Na/K-ATPase decreases the plasma membrane pool of Cav1, which results in a significant reduction in the number of caveolae on the cell surface. These effects are independent of the pumping function of Na/K-ATPase, and instead depend on interaction between Na/K-ATPase and Cav1 mediated by an N-terminal caveolin-binding motif within the ATPase α1 subunit. Moreover, knockdown of the Na/K-ATPase increases basal levels of active Src and stimulates endocytosis of Cav1 from the plasma membrane. Microtubule-dependent long-range directional trafficking in Na/K-ATPase–depleted cells results in perinuclear accumulation of Cav1-positive vesicles. Finally, Na/K-ATPase knockdown has no effect on processing or exit of Cav1 from the Golgi. Thus, the Na/K-ATPase regulates Cav1 endocytic trafficking and stabilizes the Cav1 plasma membrane pool. PMID:18794328

  6. Theory and simulations of adhesion receptor dimerization on membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-03-19

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    PubMed

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  8. WNK4 inhibits plasma membrane targeting of NCC through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo Young; Park, Hyun Woo; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2013-12-01

    WNK4, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the expression of membrane proteins in the cell surface; however, the underlying mechanism of WNK4 is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that WNK4 inhibits the fusion of plasma membrane delivering vesicle with sorting/recycling endosome through disrupting SNARE formation of syntaxin13, an endosomal t-SNARE and VAMP2, the v-SNARE in plasma membrane delivering vesicle. Their interaction and co-localization were enhanced by hyperosmotic stimulation which is known for WNK4 activation. The kinase domain of WNK4 interacts with the transmembrane domain (TM) of syntaxin13 and this interaction was abolished when the TM was replaced with that of syntaxin16. Interestingly, cell fractionation using sucrose gradients revealed that WNK4 inhibited the formation of the syntaxin13/VAMP2 SNARE complex in the endosomal compartment, but not syntaxin16/VAMP2 or syntaxin13/VAMP7. Syntaxin13 was not phosphorylated by WNK4 and WNK4KI also showed the same binding strength and similar inhibitory regulation on SNARE formation of syntaxin13. Physiological relevance of this mechanism was proved with the expression of NCC (Na(+) C1(-) co-transporter) in the cell surface. The inhibiting activity of WNK4 on surface expression of NCC was abolished by syntaxin13 siRNA transfection. These results suggest that WNK4 attenuates PM targeting of NCC proteins through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE complex formation with VAMP2 in recycling and sorting endosome. © 2013.

  9. Tailored surface free energy of membrane diffusers to minimize microbial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Wang, S.; Müller-Steinhagen, H.

    2004-05-01

    Biofouling is considered to be the limiting factor of the majority of membrane processes. Since microbial adhesion is a prerequisite for membrane biofouling, prevention of microbial adhesion and colonization on the membrane surfaces will have a major impact in preventing biofouling. In this paper the effects of surface free energies on bacterial adhesion were investigated and the optimum surface free energy of membranes on which bacterial adhesion force is minimal was obtained. A graded nickel-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coating technique was used to tailor the surface free energy of membrane diffusers to the optimum value. Initial experimental results showed that these coatings reduced microbial adhesion by 68-94%.

  10. Sialidases as regulators of bioengineered cellular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Cristina Y; Ryan, Matthew J; d'Alarcao, Marc; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Human sialidases (NEUs) catalyze the removal of N-acetyl neuraminic acids from the glycome of the cell and regulate a diverse repertoire of nominal cellular functions, such as cell signaling and adhesion. A greater understanding of their substrate permissivity is of interest in order to discern their physiological functions in disease states and in the design of specific and effective small molecule inhibitors. Towards this, we have synthesized soluble fluorogenic reporters of mammalian sialidase activity bearing unnatural sialic acids commonly incorporated into the cellular glycocalyx via metabolic glycoengineering. We found cell-surface sialidases in Jurkat capable of cleaving unnatural sialic acids with differential activities toward a variety of R groups on neuraminic acid. In addition, we observed modulated structure-activity relationships when cell-surface sialidases were presented glycans with unnatural bulky, hydrophobic or fluorinated moieties incorporated directly via glycoengineering. Our results confirm the importance of cell-surface sialidases in glycoengineering incorporation data. We demonstrate the flexibility of human NEUs toward derivatized sugars and highlight the importance of native glycan presentation to sialidase binding and activity. These results stand to inform not only metabolic glycoengineering efforts but also inhibitor design.

  11. Sialidases as regulators of bioengineered cellular surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Cristina Y; Ryan, Matthew J; d'Alarcao, Marc; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Human sialidases (NEUs) catalyze the removal of N-acetyl neuraminic acids from the glycome of the cell and regulate a diverse repertoire of nominal cellular functions, such as cell signaling and adhesion. A greater understanding of their substrate permissivity is of interest in order to discern their physiological functions in disease states and in the design of specific and effective small molecule inhibitors. Towards this, we have synthesized soluble fluorogenic reporters of mammalian sialidase activity bearing unnatural sialic acids commonly incorporated into the cellular glycocalyx via metabolic glycoengineering. We found cell-surface sialidases in Jurkat capable of cleaving unnatural sialic acids with differential activities toward a variety of R groups on neuraminic acid. In addition, we observed modulated structure–activity relationships when cell-surface sialidases were presented glycans with unnatural bulky, hydrophobic or fluorinated moieties incorporated directly via glycoengineering. Our results confirm the importance of cell-surface sialidases in glycoengineering incorporation data. We demonstrate the flexibility of human NEUs toward derivatized sugars and highlight the importance of native glycan presentation to sialidase binding and activity. These results stand to inform not only metabolic glycoengineering efforts but also inhibitor design. PMID:25795684

  12. Realization of quantifying interfacial interactions between a randomly rough membrane surface and a foulant particle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Zhang, Meijia; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of interfacial interaction with randomly rough surface is the prerequisite to quantitatively understand and control the interface behaviors such as adhesion, flocculation and membrane fouling. In this study, it was found that membrane surface was randomly rough with obvious fractal characteristics. The randomly rough surface of membrane could be well reconstructed by the fractal geometry represented by a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function. A novel method, which combined composite Simpson's approach, surface element integration method and approximation by computer programming, was developed. By using this method, this study provided the first realization of quantifying interfacial energy between randomly rough surface of membrane and a foulant particle. The calculated interactions with randomly rough surface of membrane were significantly different from those with smooth surface of membrane, indicating the significant effect of surface topography on interactions. This proposed method could be also potentially used to investigate various natural interface environmental phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane-bound transcription factors: regulated release by RIP or RUP.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, T; Rape, M; Jentsch, S

    2001-06-01

    Regulated nuclear transport of transcription factors from cytoplasmic pools is a major route by which eukaryotes control gene expression. Exquisite examples are transcription factors that are kept in a dormant state in the cytosol by membrane anchors; such proteins are released from membranes by proteolytic cleavage, which enables these transcription factors to enter the nucleus. Cleavage can be mediated either by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) catalysed by specific membrane-bound proteases or by regulated ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent processing (RUP). In both cases processing can be controlled by cues that originate at or in the vicinity of the membrane.

  14. Proteomic approaches to identify cold-regulated plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Nakayama, Takato; Miki, Yushi; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane is the primary determinant of freezing tolerance in plants because of its central role in freeze-thaw cycle. Changes in the plasma membrane proteins have been one of the major research areas in plant cold acclimation. To obtain comprehensive profiles of the plasma membrane proteomes and their changes during the cold acclimation process, a plasma membrane purification method using a dextran-polyethylene glycol two polymer system and a mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics method using nano-LC-MS/MS for the plasma membrane proteins are described. The proteomic results obtained are further applied to label-free protein semiquantification.

  15. Membrane and integrative nuclear fibroblastic growth factor receptor (FGFR) regulation of FGF-23.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaobin; Xiao, Zhousheng; Quarles, L Darryl

    2015-04-17

    Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling pathways are implicated in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription, but the molecular pathways remain poorly defined. We used low molecular weight (LMW, 18 kDa) FGF-2 and high molecular weight (HMW) FGF-2 isoforms, which, respectively, activate cell surface FGF receptors and intranuclear FGFR1, to determine the roles of membrane FGFRs and integrative nuclear FGFR1 signaling (INFS) in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription in osteoblasts. We found that LMW-FGF-2 induced NFAT and Ets1 binding to conserved cis-elements in the proximal FGF-23 promoter and stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity through PLCγ/calcineurin/NFAT and MAPK pathways in SaOS-2 and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In contrast, HMW-FGF-2 stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity in osteoblasts through a cAMP-dependent binding of FGFR1 and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) to a conserved cAMP response element (CRE) contiguous with the NFAT binding site in the FGF-23 promoter. Mutagenesis of the NFAT and CRE binding sites, respectively, inhibited the effects of LMW-FGF-2 and HMW-FGF-23 to stimulate FGF-23 promoter activity. FGF-2 activation of both membrane FGFRs and INFS-dependent FGFR1 pathways may provide a means to integrate systemic and local regulation of FGF-23 transcription under diverse physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Membrane and Integrative Nuclear Fibroblastic Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) Regulation of FGF-23*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Xiao, Zhousheng; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblastic growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) signaling pathways are implicated in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription, but the molecular pathways remain poorly defined. We used low molecular weight (LMW, 18 kDa) FGF-2 and high molecular weight (HMW) FGF-2 isoforms, which, respectively, activate cell surface FGF receptors and intranuclear FGFR1, to determine the roles of membrane FGFRs and integrative nuclear FGFR1 signaling (INFS) in the regulation of FGF-23 gene transcription in osteoblasts. We found that LMW-FGF-2 induced NFAT and Ets1 binding to conserved cis-elements in the proximal FGF-23 promoter and stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity through PLCγ/calcineurin/NFAT and MAPK pathways in SaOS-2 and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In contrast, HMW-FGF-2 stimulated FGF-23 promoter activity in osteoblasts through a cAMP-dependent binding of FGFR1 and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) to a conserved cAMP response element (CRE) contiguous with the NFAT binding site in the FGF-23 promoter. Mutagenesis of the NFAT and CRE binding sites, respectively, inhibited the effects of LMW-FGF-2 and HMW-FGF-23 to stimulate FGF-23 promoter activity. FGF-2 activation of both membrane FGFRs and INFS-dependent FGFR1 pathways may provide a means to integrate systemic and local regulation of FGF-23 transcription under diverse physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25752607

  17. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-06

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  18. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  19. Effects of fluid flow on elution of hydrophilic modifier from dialysis membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Masato; Sato, Mika; Sakata, Hiroki; Ogawa, Takahisa; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Yakushiji, Taiji; Fukuda, Makoto; Miyasaka, Takehiro; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2008-01-01

    When uremic blood flows through dialyzers during hemodialysis, dialysis membrane surfaces are exposed to shear stress and internal filtration, which may affect the surface characteristics of the dialysis membranes. In the present study, we evaluated changes in the characteristics of membrane surfaces caused by shear stress and internal filtration using blood substitutes: water purified by reverse osmosis and 6.7 wt% dextran70 solution. We focused on the levels of a hydrophilic modifier, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), on the membrane surface measured by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments involving 4 h dialysis, 0-144 h shear-stress loading, and 4 h dead-end filtration were performed using polyester-polymer alloy (PEPA) and polysulfone (PS) membranes. After the dialysis experiments with accompanying internal filtration, average PVP retention on the PEPA membrane surface was 93.7% in all areas, whereas that on the PS membrane surface was 98.9% in all areas. After the shear-stress loading experiments, PVP retention on the PEPA membrane surface decreased as shear-stress loading time and the magnitude of shear stress increased. However, with the PS membrane, PVP retention scarcely changed. After the dead-end filtration experiments, PVP retention decreased in all areas for both PEPA and PS membranes, but PVP retention on the PEPA membrane surface was lower than that on the PS membrane surface. PVP on the PEPA membrane surface was eluted by both shear stress and internal filtration, while that on the PS membrane surface was eluted only by internal filtration.

  20. River regulation and interactions groundwater - surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleuille, H.; Wong, W. K.; Dimakis, P.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2003-04-01

    The determination of a minimum acceptable flow in a river affected by regulation is a major task in management of hydropower development. The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE), responsible for administrating the nation's water resources, requires an objective system that takes into account the needs of the developer and the rivers environment such as water quality, river biota, landscape, erosion and groundwater. A research project has been initiated with focus on interactions between groundwater and surface water. The purpose of the project is to provide the licensing authorities with tools for quantitative assessment of the effects of regulation on groundwater resources and at the same time the effect of groundwater abstraction on river flows. A small, urbanised alluvial plain (2 km^2) by the river Glomma in Central Southern Norway is used as a case study. The local aquifer consists of heterogeneous glaciofluvial and fluvial deposit, mainly sand and gravel. Two three-dimensional numerical models (Visual Modflow 3.0 and Feflow 5.0) have been used for this study. The models were calibrated with hydro-geological data collected in the field. Aquifer and river sediment has been examined by use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and soil samples collection. Preferential flow has been examined by tracer tests. Water level, temperature and electric conductivity have been recorded in both aquifer and river. Hydro-climatic regime has been analysed by statistical tools. The first task of the project is to carry out water balance studies in order to estimate the change in rate of groundwater recharge from and to the river along a normal hydrologic year with snowmelting, flood, and baseflow. The second task is to analyse the potential effect of change in the river water regime (due to regulation and consecutive clogging) on groundwater resources and their interaction with stream water.

  1. Hematopoietic protein-1 regulates the actin membrane skeleton and membrane stability in murine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Maia M; Wooden, Jason M; Tsang, Mark; Gilligan, Diana M; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Finney, Greg L; Rynes, Eric; Maccoss, Michael; Ramirez, Julita A; Park, Heon; Iritani, Brian M

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic protein-1 (Hem-1) is a hematopoietic cell specific member of the WAVE (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome verprolin-homologous protein) complex, which regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) polymerization in many cell types including immune cells. However, the roles of Hem-1 and the WAVE complex in erythrocyte biology are not known. In this study, we utilized mice lacking Hem-1 expression due to a non-coding point mutation in the Hem1 gene to show that absence of Hem-1 results in microcytic, hypochromic anemia characterized by abnormally shaped erythrocytes with aberrant F-actin foci and decreased lifespan. We find that Hem-1 and members of the associated WAVE complex are normally expressed in wildtype erythrocyte progenitors and mature erythrocytes. Using mass spectrometry and global proteomics, Coomassie staining, and immunoblotting, we find that the absence of Hem-1 results in decreased representation of essential erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins including α- and β- spectrin, dematin, p55, adducin, ankyrin, tropomodulin 1, band 3, and band 4.1. Hem1⁻/⁻ erythrocytes exhibit increased protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of adducin at Ser724, which targets adducin family members for dissociation from spectrin and actin, and subsequent proteolysis. Increased adducin Ser724 phosphorylation in Hem1⁻/⁻ erythrocytes correlates with decreased protein expression of the regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which is required for PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation of PKC targets. These results reveal a novel, critical role for Hem-1 in the homeostasis of structural proteins required for formation and stability of the actin membrane skeleton in erythrocytes.

  2. Hematopoietic Protein-1 Regulates the Actin Membrane Skeleton and Membrane Stability in Murine Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Maia M.; Wooden, Jason M.; Tsang, Mark; Gilligan, Diana M.; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Finney, Greg L.; Rynes, Eric; MacCoss, Michael; Ramirez, Julita A.; Park, Heon; Iritani, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic protein-1 (Hem-1) is a hematopoietic cell specific member of the WAVE (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome verprolin-homologous protein) complex, which regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) polymerization in many cell types including immune cells. However, the roles of Hem-1 and the WAVE complex in erythrocyte biology are not known. In this study, we utilized mice lacking Hem-1 expression due to a non-coding point mutation in the Hem1 gene to show that absence of Hem-1 results in microcytic, hypochromic anemia characterized by abnormally shaped erythrocytes with aberrant F-actin foci and decreased lifespan. We find that Hem-1 and members of the associated WAVE complex are normally expressed in wildtype erythrocyte progenitors and mature erythrocytes. Using mass spectrometry and global proteomics, Coomassie staining, and immunoblotting, we find that the absence of Hem-1 results in decreased representation of essential erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins including α- and β- spectrin, dematin, p55, adducin, ankyrin, tropomodulin 1, band 3, and band 4.1. Hem1−/− erythrocytes exhibit increased protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of adducin at Ser724, which targets adducin family members for dissociation from spectrin and actin, and subsequent proteolysis. Increased adducin Ser724 phosphorylation in Hem1−/− erythrocytes correlates with decreased protein expression of the regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which is required for PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation of PKC targets. These results reveal a novel, critical role for Hem-1 in the homeostasis of structural proteins required for formation and stability of the actin membrane skeleton in erythrocytes. PMID:23424621

  3. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. W.; Li, J. X.; Gao, C. Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-10-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of the key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate regulates the formation of the basolateral plasma membrane in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gassama-Diagne, Ama; Yu, Wei; ter Beest, Martin; Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Kierbel, Arlinet; Engel, Joanne; Mostov, Keith

    2006-09-01

    Polarity is a central feature of eukaryotic cells and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) has a central role in the polarization of neurons and chemotaxing cells. In polarized epithelial cells, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is stably localized at the basolateral plasma membrane, but excluded from the apical plasma membrane, as shown by localization of GFP fused to the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-binding pleckstrin-homology domain of Akt (GFP-PH-Akt), a fusion protein that indicates the location of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Here, we ectopically inserted exogenous PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 into the apical plasma membrane of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Within 5 min many cells formed protrusions that extended above the apical surface. These protrusions contained basolateral plasma membrane proteins and excluded apical proteins, indicating that their plasma membrane was transformed from apical to basolateral. Addition of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to the basolateral surface of MDCK cells grown as cysts caused basolateral protrusions. MDCK cells grown in the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor had abnormally short lateral surfaces, indicating that PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 regulates the formation of the basolateral surface.

  5. [The surface membrane charge of bacteria and its role in serine proteinase secretion by Bacillus subtilis cells].

    PubMed

    Artemov, A V; Barskiĭ, E L; Melikhovskiĭ, V A; Nazarenko, A V; Samuilov, V D; Khakimov, S A

    1990-01-01

    Univalent, bivalent and trivalent metal cations increase the fluorescence yield of 9-aminoacridine in the suspensions of chromatophores of the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum isolated thylakoid membranes and cells of cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, cells Bacillus subtilis. The active cation concentrations increase about in 10 times with the decrease of their valency by one. It points to the fact that the changes in 9-aminoacridine fluorescence serve for the monitoring of the surface charge of bacterial membranes. The negative surface charge of B. subtilis cells increases before the onset of the serine protease secretion. The metal cations stimulate the serine protease secretion by B. subtilis cells, the stimulating effect correlates with the action of cations on the 9-aminoacridine fluorescence yield. It is suggested that the surface charge of cytoplasmic membrane regulates the formation and release of serine protease by the cells of B. subtilis.

  6. The double effects of silver nanoparticles on the PVDF membrane: Surface hydrophilicity and antifouling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hua; Shao, Xi-Sheng; Zhou, Qing; Li, Mi-Zi; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles were used to endow poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane with excellent surface hydrophilicity and outstanding antifouling performance. Silver nanoparticles were successfully immobilized onto PVDF membrane surface under the presence of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The double effects of silver nanoparticles on PVDF membrane, i.e., surface hydrophilicity and anti-fouling performance, were systematically investigated. Judging from result of water static contact measurement, silver nanoparticles had provided a significant improvement in PVDF membrane surface hydrophilicity. And the possible explanation on the improvement of PVDF membrane surface hydrophilicity with silver nanoparticles was firstly proposed in this study. Membrane permeation and anti-bacterial tests were carried out to characterize the antifouling performance of PVDF membrane. Flux recovery ratio (FRR) increased about 40% after the presence of silver nanoparticles on the PVDF membrane surface, elucidating the anti-organic fouling performance of PVDF membrane was elevated by silver nanoparticles. Simultaneously, anti-bacterial test confirmed that PVDF membrane showed superior anti-biofouling activity because of silver nanoparticles. The above-mentioned results clarified that silver nanoparticles can endow PVDF membrane with both excellent surface hydrophilicity and outstanding antifouling performance in this study.

  7. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  8. Biglycan and decorin differentially regulate signaling in the fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiping; Horgan, Casie E; Carr, Olivia; Owens, Rick T; Iozzo, Renato V; Lechner, Beatrice E

    2014-04-01

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of newborn mortality in the United States and about one third of cases are caused by preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes, a complication that is frequently observed in patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Notably, a subtype of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by expression of abnormal biglycan and decorin proteoglycans. As compound deficiency of these two small leucine-rich proteoglycans is a model of preterm birth, we investigated the fetal membranes of Bgn(-/-); Dcn(-/-) double-null and single-null mice. Our results showed that biglycan signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling during early gestation in the absence of concomitant changes in TGFβ levels. In late gestation, biglycan signaling acted in a TGFβ-dependent manner to aid in membrane stabilization. In contrast, decorin signaling supported fetal membrane remodeling at early stages of gestation in a TGFβ-dependent manner, and fetal membrane stabilization at later stages of gestation without changes in TGFβ levels. Furthermore, exogenous soluble decorin was capable of rescuing the TGFβ signaling pathway in fetal membrane mesenchymal cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel targets for manipulation of fetal membrane extracellular matrix stability and could represent novel targets for research on preventive strategies for preterm premature rupture of fetal membranes. Copyright © 2013 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface interactions and fouling properties of Micrococcus luteus with microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Li, Xiufen; Song, Ping; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate microbial adhesion of Micrococcus luteus to polypropylene (PP) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes in relation to the variation of the interfacial energies in the membrane-bacteria systems, for revealing effects of short-range surface interactions on filtration behavior. Both the membranes and M. luteus showed typical strong electron donors and hydrophilic properties. The AB component was dominant in the interfacial energies of the two membrane-bacteria systems. M. luteus presented larger negative U(mlb)(XDLVO) to the PP membrane than to the PVDF membrane. The adhesion experiments also proved that M. luteus had higher adhesion percentage to the PP membrane. This study demonstrated that the adhesion potentials of M. luteus to the PP and PVDF membranes might be explained in terms of bacterium, membrane, and intervening medium surface properties, which are mainly determined by the interfacial energies in the systems according to the XDLVO theory.

  10. Integrated antimicrobial and antifouling ultrafiltration membrane by surface grafting PEO and N-chloramine functional groups.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuhua; Xing, Jialin; Dong, Xue; Zheng, Jifu; Li, Shenghai

    2017-08-15

    Ultrafiltration membranes with integrated antimicrobial and antifouling properties were fabricated using an engineering thermoplastic (carboxylated cardopoly(aryl ether ketone, PEK-COOH). Different molecular weights of PEO (Mw: 120, 350, 550) were grafted to the PEK-COOH membrane surface via EDC/NHS methodology. N-chloramine modified membranes then were prepared by simple exposure to dilute sodium hypochlorite solution. The surface grafting processes were all performed in water (i.e. without organic solvent). With this surface modification, the hydrophilicity of membranes improved significantly and the pure water flux increased compared to the unmodified PEK-COOH membrane. Furthermore, the PEO and N-chloramine modified membranes were resistant not only to both protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion, but also to microbial proliferation. The results of this work suggest that PEO and N-chloramine modified membranes are promising as fouling-resistant membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface Properties and Permeability of Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride)-Clays (PVDF/Clays) Composite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramono, E.; Ahdiat, M.; Simamora, A.; Pratiwi, W.; Radiman, C. L.; Wahyuningrum, D.

    2017-07-01

    Surface properties are important factors that determine the performance of ultrafiltration membranes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of clay addition on the surface properties and membrane permeability of PVDF (poly-vinylidene fluoride) membranes. Three types of clay with different particle size were used in this study, namely montmorillonite-MMT, bentonite-BNT and cloisite 15A-CLS. The PVDF-clay composite membranes were prepared by phase inversion method using PEG as additive. The hydrophobicity of membrane surface was characterized by contact angle. The membrane permeability was determined by dead- end ultrafiltration with a trans-membrane pressure of 2 bars. In contact angle measurement, water contact angle of composite membranes is higher than PVDF membrane. The addition of clays decreased water flux but increased of Dextran rejection. The PVDF-BNT composite membranes reach highest Dextran rejection value of about 93%. The type and particle size of clay affected the hydrophobicity of membrane surface and determined the resulting membrane structure as well as the membrane performance.

  12. Enhanced biofouling resistance of polyethersulfone membrane surface modified with capsaicin derivative and itaconic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Gao, Xueli; Wang, Qun; Sun, Haijing; Wang, Xiaojuan; Gao, Congjie

    2015-11-01

    The culprit of biofouling is the reproduction of viable microorganisms on the membrane surface. Recently, functionalization of membrane surface with natural antibacterial agents has drawn great attention. This work presents the fabrication of antibiofouling polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes by UV-assisted photo grafting of capsaicin derivative (N-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzyl)-acrylamide, HMBA) and itaconic acid (IA) on the surface of PES membrane. Results of FTIR-ATR, water static contact angle (WSCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed the successful grafting of HMBA and IA on the membrane surface. We investigated the antifouling and antibacterial properties of these membranes using BSA and Escherichia coli as the test model, respectively. During a 150-min test, the modified membranes show much lower flux decline (42.7% for PES-g-1H0I, 22.2% for PES-g-1H1I and 7.7% for PES-g-1H5I) when compared with the pristine membrane (flux declined by 77%). The modified membranes exhibit excellent antibacterial activity (nearly 100%) when UV irradiation time was 6 min. The morphological study suggested that the E. coli on the pristine membrane showed a regular and smooth surface while that on the modified membrane was disrupted, which validated the antibacterial activity of the modified membranes.

  13. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schmitz, Patrick; Bota, Marian; Gerber, Ursula; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Fuss, Christian; Enachescu, Marius; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences. PMID:24064603

  14. Sar1 GTPase Activity Is Regulated by Membrane Curvature.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Michael G; Mela, Ioanna; Wang, Lei; Henderson, Robert M; Chapman, Edwin R; Edwardson, J Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2016-01-15

    The majority of biosynthetic secretory proteins initiate their journey through the endomembrane system from specific subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum. At these locations, coated transport carriers are generated, with the Sar1 GTPase playing a critical role in membrane bending, recruitment of coat components, and nascent vesicle formation. How these events are appropriately coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Sar1 acts as the curvature-sensing component of the COPII coat complex and highlight the ability of Sar1 to bind more avidly to membranes of high curvature. Additionally, using an atomic force microscopy-based approach, we further show that the intrinsic GTPase activity of Sar1 is necessary for remodeling lipid bilayers. Consistent with this idea, Sar1-mediated membrane remodeling is dramatically accelerated in the presence of its guanine nucleotide-activating protein (GAP), Sec23-Sec24, and blocked upon addition of guanosine-5'-[(β,γ)-imido]triphosphate, a poorly hydrolysable analog of GTP. Our results also indicate that Sar1 GTPase activity is stimulated by membranes that exhibit elevated curvature, potentially enabling Sar1 membrane scission activity to be spatially restricted to highly bent membranes that are characteristic of a bud neck. Taken together, our data support a stepwise model in which the amino-terminal amphipathic helix of GTP-bound Sar1 stably penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, promoting local membrane deformation. As membrane bending increases, Sar1 membrane binding is elevated, ultimately culminating in GTP hydrolysis, which may destabilize the bilayer sufficiently to facilitate membrane fission. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. An Unrecognized Function of Cholesterol: Regulating the Mechanism Controlling Membrane Phospholipid Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Koshino, Ichiro; Kamata, Kotoe; Hale, John; Mohandas, Narla; Manno, Sumie; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    An asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the membrane bilayer is inseparable from physiological functions, including shape preservation and survival of erythrocytes, and by implication other cells. Aminophospholipids, notably phosphatidylserine (PS), are confined to the inner leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane lipid bilayer by the ATP-dependent flippase enzyme, ATP11C, counteracting the activity of an ATP-independent scramblase. Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), a single-transmembrane protein, was previously reported to possess scrambling activity in erythrocytes. However, its function was cast in doubt by the retention of scramblase activity in erythrocytes of knockout mice lacking this protein. We show that in the human erythrocyte PLSCR1 is the predominant scramblase and by reconstitution into liposomes that its activity resides in the transmembrane domain. At or below physiological intracellular calcium concentrations, total suppression of flippase activity nevertheless leaves the membrane asymmetry undisturbed. When liposomes or erythrocytes are depleted of cholesterol (a reversible process in the case of erythrocytes), PS quickly appears at the outer surface, implying that cholesterol acts in the cell as a powerful scramblase inhibitor. Thus, our results bring to light a previously unsuspected function of cholesterol in regulating phospholipid scrambling. PMID:27267274

  16. Tuning the resistance of polycarbonate membranes by plasma-induced graft surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Lukas; Hegemann, Dirk; de Courten, Damien; Wolf, Martin; Rossi, René M.; Meier, Wolfgang P.; Scherer, Lukas J.

    2013-03-01

    To tune the permeability resistance of porous polycarbonate (PC) membranes for caffeine, their surfaces were plasma modified with different monomers in a grafting from process. These coatings provided characteristic surface hydrophilicities. It was found that membranes with more hydrophilic surfaces have lower resistances to let caffeine pass through than membranes with hydrophobic surfaces. Additionally, it was possible to post-modify a poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) (AEMA) coated PC membrane with octanoic acid (Oct) under mild conditions. This post modification allowed transforming a slightly hydrophilic PC-AEMA membrane with a moderate permeability resistance into a hydrophobic PC-AEMA-Oct membrane with a high permeability resistance. Overall, it was possible to tune the PC membrane resistance for caffeine in a range from 5100 up to 15,100 s/cm.

  17. Rab 7: an important regulator of late endocytic membrane traffic

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rab5 and rab7 proteins belong to a superfamily of small molecular weight GTPases known to be associated with early and late endosomes, respectively. The rab5 protein plays an important regulatory role in early endocytosis, yet the function of rab7 protein was previously uncharacterized. This question was addressed by comparing the kinetics of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein internalization in baby hamster kidney cells overexpressing wild-type or dominant negative mutant forms of the rab7 protein (rab7N125I and rab7T22N). Overexpression of wild-type rab7 protein allowed normal transport to late endosomes (mannose 6-phosphate receptor positive), while the rab7N125I mutant caused the VSV G protein to accumulate specifically in early (transferrin receptor positive) endosomes. Horseradish peroxidase and paramyxovirus SV5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) were used in quantitative biochemical assays to further demonstrate that rab7 function was not required for early internalization events, but was crucial in downstream degradative events. The characteristic cleavage of SV5 HN in the late endosome distinguishes internalization from transport to later stages of the endocytic pathway. Mutant rab7N125I or rab7T22N proteins had no effect on the internalization of either horseradish peroxidase or SV5 HN protein. In contrast, the mutant proteins markedly inhibited the subsequent cleavage of the SV5 HN protein. Taken together, these data support a key role for rab7, downstream of rab5, in regulating membrane transport leading from early to late endosomes. We compare our findings to those obtained for the yeast homologues Ypt51p, Ypt52p, Ypt53p, and Ypt7p. PMID:8522602

  18. Membrane regulation of the stress response from prokaryotic models to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vigh, Laszlo; Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Landry, Jacques; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio; Harwood, John L; Horvath, Ibolya

    2007-10-01

    "Membrane regulation" of stress responses in various systems is widely studied. In poikilotherms, membrane rigidification could be the first reaction to cold perception: reducing membrane fluidity of membranes at physiological temperatures is coupled with enhanced cold inducibility of a number of genes, including desaturases (see J.L. Harwood's article in this Proceedings volume). A similar role of changes in membrane physical state in heat (oxidative stress, etc.) sensing- and signaling gained support recently from prokaryotes to mammalian cells. Stress-induced remodeling of membrane lipids could influence generation, transduction, and deactivation of stress signals, either through global effects on the fluidity of the membrane matrix, or by specific interactions of boundary (or raft) lipids with receptor proteins, lipases, ion channels, etc. Our data point to membranes not only as targets of stress, but also as sensors in activating a stress response.

  19. Hollow fiber membrane diffusive permeability regulates encapsulated cell line biomass, proliferation, and small molecule release.

    PubMed

    Broadhead, Kelly W; Biran, Roy; Tresco, Patrick A

    2002-12-01

    Using histological and HPLC methods, we examined the influence of hollow fiber membrane transport properties on encapsulated PC12 cell biomass, proliferation and the release of dopamine over 4 weeks in culture. Our data indicated that encapsulated cell biomass, the number of proliferating cells, and the quantity of dopamine released increased as a function of increasing hollow fiber encapsulation membrane diffusive permeability. Overall the percentage of viable cells and the biomass architecture, however, was not significantly affected by differences in membrane transport. When compared to membrane sieving properties, membrane diffusive transport and membrane hydraulic permeability were better indicators of biomass size, proliferating cell number, and dopamine release from encapsulated cells. Studies examining the sustained release of DA from membranes of differing permeability suggest that membrane diffusive permeability can be used to regulate the quantity of small molecules released per unit time at steady state, and should be considered when dosing is an important determinant of implant efficacy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Regulation of cytokinesis by membrane trafficking involving small GTPases and the ESCRT machinery.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, cells undergo membrane remodeling to achieve changes in their size and shape. In addition, cell division entails local delivery and retrieval of membranes and specific proteins as well as remodeling of cytoskeletons, in particular, upon cytokinetic abscission. Accumulating lines of evidence highlight that endocytic membrane removal from and subsequent membrane delivery to the plasma membrane are crucial for the changes in cell size and shape, and that trafficking of vesicles carrying specific proteins to the abscission site participate in local remodeling of membranes and cytoskeletons. Furthermore, the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery has been shown to play crucial roles in cytokinetic abscission. Here, the author briefly overviews membrane-trafficking events early in cell division, and subsequently focus on regulation and functional significance of membrane trafficking involving Rab11 and Arf6 small GTPases in late cytokinesis phases and assembly of the ESCRT machinery in cytokinetic abscission.

  1. A RhoA and Rnd3 cycle regulates actin reassembly during membrane blebbing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kana; Maeda, Fumiyo; Nagasako, Tomoya; Mochizuki, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Ikenouchi, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    The actin cytoskeleton usually lies beneath the plasma membrane. When the membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton is transiently disrupted or the intracellular pressure is increased, the plasma membrane detaches from the cortex and protrudes. Such protruded membrane regions are called blebs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane blebbing are poorly understood. This study revealed that epidermal growth factor receptor kinase substrate 8 (Eps8) and ezrin are important regulators of rapid actin reassembly for the initiation and retraction of protruded blebs. Live-cell imaging of membrane blebbing revealed that local reassembly of actin filaments occurred at Eps8- and activated ezrin-positive foci of membrane blebs. Furthermore, we found that a RhoA-ROCK-Rnd3 feedback loop determined the local reassembly sites of the actin cortex during membrane blebbing.

  2. Improved antifouling properties of polyamide nanofiltration membranes by reducing the density of surface carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yinghui; Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Adout, Atar; Huang, Xia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-12-18

    Carboxyls are inherent functional groups of thin-film composite polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which may play a role in membrane performance and fouling. Their surface presence is attributed to incomplete reaction of acyl chloride monomers during the membrane active layer synthesis by interfacial polymerization. In order to unravel the effect of carboxyl group density on organic fouling, NF membranes were fabricated by reacting piperazine (PIP) with either isophthaloyl chloride (IPC) or the more commonly used trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Fouling experiments were conducted with alginate as a model hydrophilic organic foulant in a solution, simulating the composition of municipal secondary effluent. Improved antifouling properties were observed for the IPC membrane, which exhibited lower flux decline (40%) and significantly greater fouling reversibility or cleaning efficiency (74%) than the TMC membrane (51% flux decline and 40% cleaning efficiency). Surface characterization revealed that there was a substantial difference in the density of surface carboxyl groups between the IPC and TMC membranes, while other surface properties were comparable. The role of carboxyl groups was elucidated by measurements of foulant-surface intermolecular forces by atomic force microscopy, which showed lower adhesion forces and rupture distances for the IPC membrane compared to TMC membranes in the presence of calcium ions in solution. Our results demonstrated that a decrease in surface carboxyl group density of polyamide membranes fabricated with IPC monomers can prevent calcium bridging with alginate and, thus, improve membrane antifouling properties.

  3. Covalent binding of single-walled carbon nanotubes to polyamide membranes for antimicrobial surface properties.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Vecitis, Chad D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    We propose an innovative approach to impart nanomaterial-specific properties to the surface of thin-film composite membranes. Specifically, biocidal properties were obtained by covalently binding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the membrane surface. The SWNTs were first modified by purification and ozonolysis to increase their sidewall functionalities, maximize cytotoxic properties, and achieve dispersion in aqueous solution. A tailored reaction protocol was developed to exploit the inherent moieties of hand-cast polyamide membrane surfaces and create covalent amide bonds with the functionalized SWNTs. The reaction is entirely aqueous-based and entails activation of the carboxylate groups of both the membrane and the nanomaterials to maximize reaction with ethylenediamine. The presence of SWNTs was verified after sonication of the membranes, confirming the strength of the bond between the SWNTs and the membrane surface. Characterization of the SWNT-functionalized surfaces demonstrated the attainment of membranes with novel properties that continued to exhibit high performance in water separation processes. The presence of surface-bound antimicrobial SWNTs was confirmed by experiments using E. coli cells that demonstrated an enhanced bacterial cytotoxicity for the SWNT-coated membranes. The SWNT membranes were observed to achieve up to 60% inactivation of bacteria attached to the membrane within 1 h of contact time. Our results suggest the potential of covalently bonded SWNTs to delay the onset of membrane biofouling during operation.

  4. Membrane structure and surface coat of Entamoeba histolytica. Topochemistry and dynamics of the cell surface: cap formation and microexudate.

    PubMed

    Silva, P P; Martínez-Palomo, A; Gonzalez-Robles, A

    1975-03-01

    Treatment of living entamoeba histolytica cells with low concentrations of concanavalin A (con A) and peroxidase results in redistribution of the plasma membrane con A receptors to one pole of the cell where a morphologically distinct region--the uroid--is formed. Capping of con A receptors is not accompanied by parallel accumulation of ruthenium red-stainable components. In capped cells, the pattern of distribution of acidic sites ionized at pH 1.8 (labeled by colloidal iron) at the outer surface and of membrane particles (integral membrane components revealed by freeze-fracture) is not altered over the uroid region. Cytochemistry of substrate-attached microexudate located in regions adjacent to E. histolytica cells demonstrates the presence of con A binding sites and ruthenium red- and alcian blue-stainable components and the absent of colloidal iron binding sites. In a previous report we demonstrated that glycerol-induced aggregation of the plasma membrane particles is accompanied by a discontinuous distribution of colloidal iron binding sites, while con A receptors and acidic sites ionized at pH 4.0 remain uniformly distributed over the cell surface. Taken together, our experiments show that, in E. histolytica cells, peripheral membrane components may move independently of integral components and, also, that certain surface determinants may redistribute independently of others. These results point to the complexity of the membrane structure-cell surface relationship in E. histolytica plasma membranes relative to the membrane of the erythrocyte ghost where integral components (the membrane-intercalated particles) contain all antigens, receptors, and anionic sites labeled so far. We conclude that fluidity of integral membrane components (integral membrane fluidity) cannot be inferred from the demonstration of the mobility of surface components nor, conversely, can the fluidity of peripheral membrane components (peripheral membrane fluidity) be assumed from

  5. Investigation on surface molecular conformations and pervaporation performance of the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhennan; Wang, Xinping

    2009-05-01

    A simple method of changing pre-treatment temperature in the course of film formation was used to tune the surface structures of PVA membranes. Surface structure and property of the resulting membranes were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements. The results show that PVA have different molecular conformations at the membrane surface while those membranes were prepared at different pre-treatment temperature. At higher pre-treatment temperatures, polar acetoxyl residues and hydroxyl groups of the PVA chains oriented in a more orderly fashion, as induced by the faster evaporation of water. When the membranes were in air, CH(3) groups adjacent to the acetoxyl groups covered the surface in order to minimize the surface free energy, while backbones of the PVA were rarely observed. These surfaces exhibited a hydrophilic nature upon contact with water due to rapid surface reconstruction. Conversely, at lower pre-treatment temperatures, the backbone CH(2) groups dominated the surface, forming a less hydrophilic surface. When the PVA membranes were employed to separate ethanol/water mixtures, it was found that the PVA membranes with more hydrophilic surface exhibited higher water selectivity. Our investigation indicates that molecular conformations on the membrane surface have considerable influence on pervaporation performance.

  6. MICAL-like Regulates Fasciclin II Membrane Cycling and Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Minyeop; Park, Sunyoung; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Seungbok

    2016-01-01

    Fasciclin II (FasII), the Drosophila ortholog of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), plays a critical role in synaptic stabilization and plasticity. Although this molecule undergoes constitutive cycling at the synaptic membrane, how its membrane trafficking is regulated to ensure proper synaptic development remains poorly understood. In a genetic screen, we recovered a mutation in Drosophila mical-like that displays an increase in bouton numbers and a decrease in FasII levels at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Similar phenotypes were induced by presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, knockdown of mical-like expression. FasII trafficking assays revealed that the recycling of internalized FasII molecules to the cell surface was significantly impaired in mical-like-knockdown cells. Importantly, this defect correlated with an enhancement of endosomal sorting of FasII to the lysosomal degradation pathway. Similarly, synaptic vesicle exocytosis was also impaired in mical-like mutants. Together, our results identify Mical-like as a novel regulator of synaptic growth and FasII endocytic recycling. PMID:27770767

  7. Activation of a heat-stable cytolytic protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-01-01

    Surface membrane-enriched fractions of Naegleria fowleri obtained after isopycnic centrifugation experiments contain a potent cytolytic activity as determined by hemolysis and 51Cr release assays. This surface membrane cytolysin was unaffected by a treatment at 75 degrees C for 30 min and accounted for 70 to 90% of cytolysis by whole-cell lysates of amoebae. This heat resistance as well as intimate membrane association distinguished the surface membrane cytolytic activity from a second heat-labile cytolytic activity which appears to be latent within lysosomes. The surface membrane cytolysin was found to be specifically activated by diluted samples of lysosomal fractions. The possible role of this surface membrane cytotoxin in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri is discussed. PMID:4055029

  8. Tunable Surface Hydrophobicity and Fluid Transport through Nanoporous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph H. J.

    There are more than three billion people across the globe that struggle to obtain clean drinkable water. One of the most promising avenues for generating potable water is through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Both solutions require a semipermeable membrane that prohibits passage of unwanted solute particles but allows passage of the solvent. Atomically thin two-dimensional membranes based on porous graphene show great promise as semipermeable materials, but modeling fluid flow on length scales between the microscopic (nanometer and smaller) and macroscopic (micron and larger) regimes presents formidable challenges. This thesis explores both equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of this problem and develops new methodology for simulating systems away from thermal equilibrium. First, we hypothesize that there is a wetting penalty for water as it tries to breach a sheet of graphene that should be naturally hydrophobic. By using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the hydrophobicity depends sensitively on the degree of electrical doping, offering an opportunity to tune the hydrophobic effect of graphene using small amounts of doping. The wetting contact angle, a measure of hydrophobicity, changes dramatically with the voltage applied to single layer graphene. We find that the sensitivity of the hydrophobic effect to voltage depends not on hydrogen bonding motifs at the interface between graphene and water, but instead on a phenomenon known as electrowetting. The theory of electrowetting predicts that the difference in surface tensions that defines the contact angle is quartic in the voltage, rather than quadratic, as it would be in bilayer graphene or in a two-dimensional metal. To explore the nonequilibrium aspects of fluid passage through atomically thin membranes, we developed a molecular dynamics methodology for simulating fluid flow at constant flux based on Gauss's principle of least constraint. This method develops microscopic

  9. LapF and Its Regulation by Fis Affect the Cell Surface Hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Lahesaare, Andrio; Ainelo, Hanna; Teppo, Annika; Kivisaar, Maia; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Teras, Riho

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to regulate cell surface hydrophobicity is important for the adaptation to different environmental conditions. The hydrophobicity of cell surface can be determined by several factors, including outer membrane and surface proteins. In this study, we report that an adhesin LapF influences cell surface hydrophobicity of Pseudomonas putida. Cells lacking LapF are less hydrophobic than wild-type cells in stationary growth phase. Moreover, the overexpression of the global regulator Fis decreases surface hydrophobicity by repressing the expression of lapF. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that bacteria producing LapF are more viable when confronted with methanol (a hydrophilic compound) but are more susceptible to 1-octanol (a hydrophobic compound). Thus, these results revealed that LapF is the hydrophobicity factor for the cell surface of P. putida. PMID:27812186

  10. Annexins as Overlooked Regulators of Membrane Trafficking in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konopka-Postupolska, Dorota; Clark, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Annexins are an evolutionary conserved superfamily of proteins able to bind membrane phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. Their physiological roles are still being intensively examined and it seems that, despite their general structural similarity, individual proteins are specialized toward specific functions. However, due to their general ability to coordinate membranes in a calcium-sensitive fashion they are thought to participate in membrane flow. In this review, we present a summary of the current understanding of cellular transport in plant cells and consider the possible roles of annexins in different stages of vesicular transport. PMID:28422051

  11. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane with highly effective blood compatibility via atmospheric plasma-induced surface copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung; Chang, Wan-Ju; Shih, Yu-Ju; Wei, Ta-Chin; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2011-04-01

    Development of nonfouling membranes to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is critical for many biomedical applications. It is always a challenge to control the surface graft copolymerization of a highly polar monomer from the highly hydrophobic surface of a fluoropolymer membrane. In this work, the blood compatibility of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes with surface-grafted electrically neutral zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA), from atmospheric plasma-induced surface copolymerization, was studied. The effect of surface composition and graft morphology, electrical neutrality, hydrophilicity and hydration capability on blood compatibility of the membranes were determined. Blood compatibility of the zwitterionic PVDF membranes was systematically evaluated by plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, plasma-clotting time, and blood cell hemolysis. It was found that the nonfouling nature and hydration capability of grafted PSBMA polymers can be effectively controlled by regulating the grafting coverage and charge balance of the PSBMA layer on the PVDF membrane surface. Even a slight charge bias in the grafted zwitterionic PSBMA layer can induce electrostatic interactions between proteins and the membrane surfaces, leading to surface protein adsorption, platelet activation, plasma clotting and blood cell hemolysis. Thus, the optimized PSBMA surface graft layer in overall charge neutrality has a high hydration capability and the best antifouling, anticoagulant, and antihemolytic activities when comes into contact with human blood.

  12. STIM1 regulates Ca2+ entry via arachidonate-regulated Ca2+-selective (ARC) channels without store depletion or translocation to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Mignen, Olivier; Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2007-03-15

    Recent studies have indicated a critical role for STIM (stromal interacting molecule) proteins in the regulation of the store-operated mode of receptor-activated Ca2+ entry. Current models emphasize the role of STIM located in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, where a Ca2+-binding EF-hand domain within the N-terminal of the protein lies within the lumen and is thought to represent the sensor for the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Dissociation of Ca2+ from this domain induces the aggregation of STIM to regions of the ER immediately adjacent to the plasma membrane where it acts to regulate the activity of store-operated Ca2+ channels. However, the possible effects of STIM on other modes of receptor-activated Ca2+ entry have not been examined. Here we show that STIM1 also regulates the arachidonic-acid-regulated Ca2+-selective (ARC) channels - receptor-activated Ca2+ entry channels whose activation is entirely independent of store depletion. Regulation of the ARC channels by STIM1 does not involve dissociation of Ca2+ from the EF-hand, or any translocation of STIM1. Instead, a critical role of STIM1 resident in the plasma membrane is indicated. Thus, exposure of intact cells to an antibody targeting the extracellular N-terminal domain of STIM1 inhibits ARC channel activity without significantly affecting the store-operated channels. A similar specific inhibition of the ARC channels is seen in cells expressing a STIM1 construct in which the N-linked glycosylation sites essential for the constitutive cell surface expression of STIM1, were mutated. We conclude that, in contrast to store-operated channels, regulation of ARC channels by STIM1 depends exclusively on the pool of STIM1 constitutively residing in the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate that STIM1 is a more universal regulator of Ca2+ entry pathways than previously thought, and appears to have multiple modes of action.

  13. Effect of Swelling on Performance of Surface-Imprinted Composite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, N. C.; Chen, Q.; Zhu, L. P.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. J.

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted composite membranes (MIMs) are developed by thermally initiated copolymerization on the surface of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes for the selective binding to levofloxacin. The prepared membranes, before and after surface polymerization, are characterized by SEM and FT-IR. The water flux, swelling changes and selectivity of the membranes are evaluated. The highest specific separation factor of about 1.27 is achieved for MIMs to separate levofloxacin and ofloxacin. The results show that imprinted polymerization has obvious influence on the performance of membranes and swelling results in the decrease of specific recognition.

  14. O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan nanofiltration membrane surface functionalized with graphene oxide nanosheets for enhanced desalting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Gao, Xueli; Wang, Jian; Wei, Yi; Li, Zhaokui; Gao, Congjie

    2015-02-25

    A novel O-(carboxymethyl)-chitosan (OCMC) nanofiltration (NF) membrane is developed via surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to enhance desalting properties. Using ring-opening polymerization between epoxy groups of GO nanosheets and amino groups of OCMC active layer, GO nanosheets are irreversibly bound to the membrane. The OCMC NF membranes surface-functionalized with GO nanosheets are characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle analyzer, and zeta potential analyzer. The membranes exhibit not only higher permeability but also better salt rejections than the pristine membranes and the commercial NF membranes; besides, the desalting properties are enhanced with the concentration of GO nanosheets increasing. Furthermore, the transport mechanism of GO-OCMC NF membranes reveals that the nanoporous structure of GO-OCMC functional layer and size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion of water nanochannels formed by GO nanosheets lead to the membranes possessing enhanced desalting properties.

  15. Highly hydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-09-26

    Thin-film composite polyamide membranes are state-of-the-art materials for membrane-based water purification and desalination processes, which require both high rejection of contaminants and high water permeabilities. However, these membranes are prone to fouling when processing natural waters and wastewaters, because of the inherent surface physicochemical properties of polyamides. The present work demonstrates the fabrication of forward osmosis polyamide membranes with optimized surface properties via facile and scalable functionalization with fine-tuned nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles are coated with superhydrophilic ligands possessing functional groups that impart stability to the nanoparticles and bind irreversibly to the native carboxyl moieties on the membrane selective layer. The tightly tethered layer of nanoparticles tailors the surface chemistry of the novel composite membrane without altering the morphology or water/solute permeabilities of the membrane selective layer. Surface characterization and interfacial energy analysis confirm that highly hydrophilic and wettable membrane surfaces are successfully attained. Lower intermolecular adhesion forces are measured between the new membrane materials and model organic foulants, indicating the presence of a bound hydration layer at the polyamide membrane surface that creates a barrier for foulant adhesion.

  16. [Interaction of surface-active base with fraction of membrane-bound Williams's protons].

    PubMed

    Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Motovilov, K A; Volkov, E M; Eremeev, S A

    2013-01-01

    In the process of mitochondrial respiratory H(+)-pumps functioning, the fraction membrane-bound protons (R-protons), which have an excess of free energy is formed. According to R.J. Williams this fraction is included as energy source in the reaction of ATP synthesis. Previously, in our laboratory was found the formation of this fraction was found in the mitochondria and on the outer surface of mitoplast. On the mitoslast model we strictly shown that non-equilibrium R-proton fraction is localized on the surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane. In this paper a surface-active compound--anion of 2,4,6-trichloro-3-pentadecylphenol (TCP-C15) is described, which selectively interacts with the R-protons fraction in mitochondria. A detailed description of the specific interaction of the TCP-C15 with R-protons fraction in mitochondria is presented. Moreover, in this work it was found that phosphate transport system reacts with the R-protons fraction in mitochondria and plays the role of the endogenous volume regulation system of this fraction. The results of experiments are discussed in the terms of a local coupling model of the phosphorylation mechanism.

  17. The surface charge density of plant cell membranes: an attempt to resolve conflicting values for intrinsic s.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The electrical potentials at membrane surfaces (Psi) may be computed with electrostatic models incorporating the intrinsic surface charge density of the membrane (Sigma), the ion composition of the bathing medium, and ion binding to the membrane. Ion activities at membrane surfaces may be computed ...

  18. Mixing Water, Transducing Energy, and Shaping Membranes: Autonomously Self-Regulating Giant Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ho, James C S; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-03-08

    Giant lipid vesicles are topologically closed compartments bounded by semipermeable flexible shells, which isolate femto- to picoliter quantities of the aqueous core from the surrounding bulk. Although water equilibrates readily across vesicular walls (10(-2)-10(-3) cm(3) cm(-2) s(-1)), the passive permeation of solutes is strongly hindered. Furthermore, because of their large volume compressibility (∼10(9)-10(10) N m(-2)) and area expansion (10(2)-10(3) mN m(-1)) moduli, coupled with low bending rigidities (10(-19) N m), vesicular shells bend readily but resist volume compression and tolerate only a limited area expansion (∼5%). Consequently, vesicles experiencing solute concentration gradients dissipate the available chemical energy through the osmotic movement of water, producing dramatic shape transformations driven by surface-area-volume changes and sustained by the incompressibility of water and the flexible membrane interface. Upon immersion in a hypertonic bath, an increased surface-area-volume ratio promotes large-scale morphological remodeling, reducing symmetry and stabilizing unusual shapes determined, at equilibrium, by the minimal bending-energy configurations. By contrast, when subjected to a hypotonic bath, walls of giant vesicles lose their thermal undulation, accumulate mechanical tension, and, beyond a threshold swelling, exhibit remarkable oscillatory swell-burst cycles, with the latter characterized by damped, periodic oscillations in vesicle size, membrane tension, and phase behavior. This cyclical pattern of the osmotic influx of water, pressure, membrane tension, pore formation, and solute efflux suggests quasi-homeostatic self-regulatory behavior allowing vesicular compartments produced from simple molecular components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids, to sense and regulate their microenvironment in a negative feedback loop.

  19. Physiological Changes of Surface Membrane in Lactobacillus with Prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mingfang; Kumaree, Kishore K; Shah, Nagendra P

    2017-03-01

    Synbiotics are always considered to be beneficial in healthy manipulation of gut environment; however, the purpose of this research was to investigate the dominance of synbiotic over the individual potential of probiotics and prebiotics. Four different types of prebiotics, fructo-oligosaccharides, raffinose, inulin, and cellobiose, were evaluated based on their varying degree of polymerization, combined each with 2 different Lactobacilli strains, including Lactobacillus paracasei 276 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. The effects of synbiotics combination on the surface structure were evaluated by analyzing auto-aggregation, membrane hydrophobicity, and adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Our results showed that both Lactobacilli exhibited significantly greater degree of attachment to Caco-2 cells (23.31% and 16.85%, respectively) when using cellobiose as a substrate than with other prebiotics (P < 0.05). Intestinal adhesion ability was in correlation with the percent of auto-aggregation, both Lactobacillus exhibited higher percent of auto-aggregation in cellobiose compared to other prebiotics. These behavioral changes in terms of attachment and auto-aggregation were further supported with the changes noticed from infrared spectra (FT-IR). © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. CO2 permeability of cell membranes is regulated by membrane cholesterol and protein gas channels.

    PubMed

    Itel, Fabian; Al-Samir, Samer; Öberg, Fredrik; Chami, Mohamed; Kumar, Manish; Supuran, Claudiu T; Deen, Peter M T; Meier, Wolfgang; Hedfalk, Kristina; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations that some membrane proteins act as gas channels seem surprising in view of the classical concept that membranes generally are highly permeable to gases. Here, we study the gas permeability of membranes for the case of CO(2), using a previously established mass spectrometric technique. We first show that biological membranes lacking protein gas channels but containing normal amounts of cholesterol (30-50 mol% of total lipid), e.g., MDCK and tsA201 cells, in fact possess an unexpectedly low CO(2) permeability (P(CO2)) of ∼0.01 cm/s, which is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the P(CO2) of pure planar phospholipid bilayers (∼1 cm/s). Phospholipid vesicles enriched with similar amounts of cholesterol also exhibit P(CO2) ≈ 0.01 cm/s, identifying cholesterol as the major determinant of membrane P(CO2). This is confirmed by the demonstration that MDCK cells depleted of or enriched with membrane cholesterol show dramatic increases or decreases in P(CO2), respectively. We demonstrate, furthermore, that reconstitution of human AQP-1 into cholesterol-containing vesicles, as well as expression of human AQP-1 in MDCK cells, leads to drastic increases in P(CO2), indicating that gas channels are of high functional significance for gas transfer across membranes of low intrinsic gas permeability.

  1. Preparation of PES ultrafiltration membranes with natural amino acids based zwitterionic antifouling surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Liu, Xiaojiu; Xie, Binbin; Yao, Chen; Hu, Wenhan; Li, Yi; Li, Xinsong

    2016-11-01

    In this report, a simple and facile approach to enhance the antifouling property of poly(ether sulfone) (PES) ultrafiltration membrane was developed by grafting natural amino acids onto surface. First of all, poly(ether sulfone) composite membranes blended with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) were fabricated by phase inversion method followed by grafting of different types of natural amino acids onto the membrane surface through epoxy ring opening reaction. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified the substantial enrichment of amino acids onto the surface of PES membranes. The hydrophilicity of the PES membranes was improved after grafting amino acids. The mechanical property and morphologies of the PES membranes proved that their basic performances were not obviously affected by grafting reaction, and these parameters were all still in the typical range for ultrafiltration membranes. The antifouling property of the grafted PES membranes against bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme (Lyz) was investigated in detail. It was found that PES membranes incorporated with neutral amino acids exhibited higher fouling resistance to both BSA and Lyz than the parent PES membrane. It can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic structure on the surface consisting of protonated secondary amino cations and carboxyl anions. Meanwhile, PES membranes grafted with charged amino acids had better antifouling properties against protein with same electric charges and improved adsorption related to protein with opposite electric charges. Furthermore, the ultrafiltration performance of the zwitterionic PES membranes was evaluated. The results showed that the modified membranes possessed of enhanced pure water flux, relative flux recovery and mildly lower rejection. The Darcy's Law analysis illustrated that the acidic amino acid grafted PES membranes had much lower permeation

  2. Nonlinear conductance and heterogeneity of voltage-gated ion channels allow defining electrical surface domains in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    The membrane potential of a cell measured by typical electrophysiological methods is only an average magnitude and experimental techniques allowing a more detailed mapping of the cell surface have shown the existence of spatial domains with locally different electric potentials and currents. Electrical potentials in non-neural cells are regulated by the nonlinear conductance of membrane ion channels. Voltage-gated potassium channels participate in cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes and control the electrical signals over the cell surface, constituting good candidates to study basic biological questions on a more simplified scale than the complex cell membrane. These channels show also a high heterogeneity, making it possible to analyze the effects of diversity in the electrical responses of channels localized on spatial domains. We use a phenomenological approach of voltage gating that reproduces the observed rectification characteristics of inward rectifying potassium channels and relate the threshold voltage heterogeneity of the channels to the establishment of spatial domains with different electrical sensitivities. Although our model is only a limited picture of the whole cell membrane, it shows that domains with different ion channels may permit or suppress steady state bioelectrical signals over the cell surface according to their particular voltage sensitivity. Also, the nonlinear electrical coupling of channels with different threshold potentials can lead to a rich variety of bioelectrical phenomena, including regions of membrane potential bi-stability.

  3. Insulin-regulated Glut4 translocation: membrane protein trafficking with six distinctive steps.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Romenskaia, Irina; Mastick, Cynthia Corley; Coster, Adelle C F

    2014-06-20

    The trafficking kinetics of Glut4, the transferrin (Tf) receptor, and LRP1 were quantified in adipocytes and undifferentiated fibroblasts. Six steps were identified that determine steady state cell surface Glut4: (i) endocytosis, (ii) degradation, (iii) sorting, (iv) sequestration, (v) release, and (vi) tethering/docking/fusion. Endocytosis of Glut4 is 3 times slower than the Tf receptor in fibroblasts (ken = 0.2 min(-1) versus 0.6 min(-1)). Differentiation decreases Glut4 ken 40% (ken = 0.12 min(-1)). Differentiation also decreases Glut4 degradation, increasing total and cell surface Glut4 3-fold. In fibroblasts, Glut4 is recycled from endosomes through a slow constitutive pathway (kex = 0.025-0.038 min(-1)), not through the fast Tf receptor pathway (kex = 0.2 min(-1)). The kex measured in adipocytes after insulin stimulation is similar (kex = 0.027 min(-1)). Differentiation decreases the rate constant for sorting into the Glut4 recycling pathway (ksort) 3-fold. In adipocytes, Glut4 is also sorted from endosomes into a second exocytic pathway through Glut4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Surprisingly, transfer from endosomes into GSVs is highly regulated; insulin increases the rate constant for sequestration (kseq) 8-fold. Release from sequestration in GSVs is rate-limiting for Glut4 exocytosis in basal adipocytes. AS160 regulates this step. Tethering/docking/fusion of GSVs to the plasma membrane is regulated through an AS160-independent process. Insulin increases the rate of release and fusion of GSVs (kfuseG) 40-fold. LRP1 cycles with the Tf receptor and Glut4 in fibroblasts but predominantly with Glut4 after differentiation. Surprisingly, AS160 knockdown accelerated LRP1 exocytosis in basal and insulin-stimulated adipocytes. These data indicate that AS160 may regulate trafficking into as well as release from GSVs.

  4. Study of the Effect of Nanoparticles and Surface Morphology on Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration Membrane Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuming; Duranceau, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) surface morphology on membrane performance, productivity experiments were conducted using flat-sheet membranes and three different nanoparticles, which included SiO2, TiO2 and CeO2. In this study, the productivity rate was markedly influenced by membrane surface morphology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of membrane surfaces revealed that the higher productivity decline rates associated with polyamide RO membranes as compared to that of a cellulose acetate NF membrane was due to the inherent ridge-and-valley morphology of the active layer. The unique polyamide active layer morphology was directly related to the surface roughness, and was found to contribute to particle accumulation in the valleys causing a higher flux decline than in smoother membranes. Extended RO productivity experiments using laboratory grade water and diluted pretreated seawater were conducted to compare the effect that different nanoparticles had on membrane active layers. Membrane flux decline was not affected by particle type when the feed water was laboratory grade water. On the other hand, membrane productivity was affected by particle type when pretreated diluted seawater served as feed water. It was found that CeO2 addition resulted in the least observable flux decline, followed by SiO2 and TiO2. A productivity simulation was conducted by fitting the monitored flux data into a cake growth rate model, where the model was modified using a finite difference method to incorporate surface thickness variation into the analysis. The ratio of cake growth term (k1) and particle back diffusion term (k2) was compared in between different RO and NF membranes. Results indicated that k2 was less significant for surfaces that exhibited a higher roughness. It was concluded that the valley areas of thin-film membrane surfaces have the ability to capture particles, limiting particle back diffusion. PMID:24956946

  5. Study of the effect of nanoparticles and surface morphology on reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membrane productivity.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuming; Duranceau, Steven J

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the significance of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) surface morphology on membrane performance, productivity experiments were conducted using flat-sheet membranes and three different nanoparticles, which included SiO2, TiO2 and CeO2. In this study, the productivity rate was markedly influenced by membrane surface morphology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of membrane surfaces revealed that the higher productivity decline rates associated with polyamide RO membranes as compared to that of a cellulose acetate NF membrane was due to the inherent ridge-and-valley morphology of the active layer. The unique polyamide active layer morphology was directly related to the surface roughness, and was found to contribute to particle accumulation in the valleys causing a higher flux decline than in smoother membranes. Extended RO productivity experiments using laboratory grade water and diluted pretreated seawater were conducted to compare the effect that different nanoparticles had on membrane active layers. Membrane flux decline was not affected by particle type when the feed water was laboratory grade water. On the other hand, membrane productivity was affected by particle type when pretreated diluted seawater served as feed water. It was found that CeO2 addition resulted in the least observable flux decline, followed by SiO2 and TiO2. A productivity simulation was conducted by fitting the monitored flux data into a cake growth rate model, where the model was modified using a finite difference method to incorporate surface thickness variation into the analysis. The ratio of cake growth term (k1) and particle back diffusion term (k2) was compared in between different RO and NF membranes. Results indicated that k2 was less significant for surfaces that exhibited a higher roughness. It was concluded that the valley areas of thin-film membrane surfaces have the ability to capture particles, limiting particle back diffusion.

  6. Enhancing performance and surface antifouling properties of polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes with salicylate-alumoxane nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Samaneh; Rahimpour, Ahmad; Shamsabadi, Ahmad Arabi; Habibzadeh, Setareh; Soroush, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    To improve the hydrophilicity and antifouling properties of polysulfone (PS) ultrafiltration membranes, we studied the use of salicylate-alumoxane (SA) nanoparticles as a novel hydrophilic additive. The effects of SA nanoparticles on the membrane characteristics and performance were investigated in terms of membrane structure, permeation flux, solute rejection, hydrophilicity, and antifouling ability. The new mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs) possess asymmetric structures. They have smaller finger-like pores and smoother surfaces than the neat PS membranes. The embedment of SA nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and the improvement of surface hydrophilicity were investigated. Ultrafiltration experiments indicated that the pure-water flux of the new MMMs initially increases with SA nanoparticles loading followed by a decrease at high loadings. Higher BSA solution flux was achieved for the MMMs compared to the neat PS membranes. Membranes with 1 wt.% SA nanoparticles exhibit the highest flux recovery ratio of 87% and the lowest irreversible fouling of 13%.

  7. Adaptive regulation of membrane lipids and fluidity during thermal acclimation in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The free-living eukaryotic protozoan Tetrahymena is a potentially useful model for the thermoadaptive membrane regulation because of easy growth in the axenic culture, systematic isolation of subcellular organelles, and quick response to temperature stress. Exposure of Tetrahymena cells to the cold temperature induces marked alterations in the lipid composition and the physical properties (fluidity) of various membranes. The increase in fatty acid unsaturation of membrane phospholipids is required to preserve the proper fluidity. In this homeoviscous adaptive response, acyl-CoA desaturase plays a pivotal role and its activity is regulated by induction of the enzyme via transcriptional activation.

  8. Adaptive regulation of membrane lipids and fluidity during thermal acclimation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    NOZAWA, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The free-living eukaryotic protozoan Tetrahymena is a potentially useful model for the thermoadaptive membrane regulation because of easy growth in the axenic culture, systematic isolation of subcellular organelles, and quick response to temperature stress. Exposure of Tetrahymena cells to the cold temperature induces marked alterations in the lipid composition and the physical properties (fluidity) of various membranes. The increase in fatty acid unsaturation of membrane phospholipids is required to preserve the proper fluidity. In this homeoviscous adaptive response, acyl-CoA desaturase plays a pivotal role and its activity is regulated by induction of the enzyme via transcriptional activation. PMID:21986311

  9. Regulation of membrane-shape transitions induced by I-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiming; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2015-07-21

    regulate membrane curvature. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid exchange between membranes: effects of membrane surface charge, composition, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-09-01

    Intermembrane lipid exchange is critical to membrane functions and pharmaceutical applications. The exchange process is not fully understood and it is explored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitor method in this research. It is found that intermembrane lipid exchange is accelerated with the decrease of vesicle size and the increase of charge and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. Vesicle adsorption rate, membrane lateral pressure gradient, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficient are inferred to be critical in deciding the lipid exchange kinetics between membranes. Besides that, the membrane contact situation during lipid exchange is also studied. The maximum total membrane contact area is found to increase with the decrease of vesicle size, charged and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. A competition mechanism between the vesicle adsorption rate and the intermembrane lipid exchange rate was proposed to control the maximum total membrane contact area.

  11. Surface modification of cellulose acetate membrane using thermal annealing to enhance produced water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kusworo, T. D. Aryanti, N. Firdaus, M. M. H.; Sukmawati, H.

    2015-12-29

    This study is performed primarily to investigate the effect of surface modification of cellulose acetate using thermal annealing on the enhancement of membrane performance for produced water treatment. In this study, Cellulose Acetate membranes were casted using dry/wet phase inversion technique. The effect of additive and post-treatment using thermal annealing on the membrane surface were examined for produced water treatment. Therma annealing was subjected to membrane surface at 60 and 70 °C for 5, 10 and 15 second, respectively. Membrane characterizations were done using membrane flux and rejection with produced water as a feed, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) analysis. Experimental results showed that asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane can be made by dry/wet phase inversion technique. The results from the Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis was also confirmed that polyethylene glycol as additivie in dope solution and thermal annealing was affected the morphology and membrane performance for produced water treatment, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the selective layer and the substructure of membrane became denser and more compact after the thermal annealing processes. Therefore, membrane rejection was significantly increased while the flux was slighty decreased, respectively. The best membrane performance is obtained on the composition of 18 wt % cellulose acetate, poly ethylene glycol 5 wt% with thermal annealing at 70° C for 15 second.

  12. Surface modification of cellulose acetate membrane using thermal annealing to enhance produced water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusworo, T. D.; Aryanti, N.; Firdaus, M. M. H.; Sukmawati, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study is performed primarily to investigate the effect of surface modification of cellulose acetate using thermal annealing on the enhancement of membrane performance for produced water treatment. In this study, Cellulose Acetate membranes were casted using dry/wet phase inversion technique. The effect of additive and post-treatment using thermal annealing on the membrane surface were examined for produced water treatment. Therma annealing was subjected to membrane surface at 60 and 70 °C for 5, 10 and 15 second, respectively. Membrane characterizations were done using membrane flux and rejection with produced water as a feed, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) analysis. Experimental results showed that asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane can be made by dry/wet phase inversion technique. The results from the Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis was also confirmed that polyethylene glycol as additivie in dope solution and thermal annealing was affected the morphology and membrane performance for produced water treatment, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the selective layer and the substructure of membrane became denser and more compact after the thermal annealing processes. Therefore, membrane rejection was significantly increased while the flux was slighty decreased, respectively. The best membrane performance is obtained on the composition of 18 wt % cellulose acetate, poly ethylene glycol 5 wt% with thermal annealing at 70° C for 15 second.

  13. Surface patterning of polymeric separation membranes and its influence on the filtration performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruf, Sajjad

    Polymeric membrane based separation technologies are crucial for addressing the global issues such as water purification. However, continuous operations of these processes are often hindered by fouling which increases mass transport resistance of the membrane to permeation and thus the energy cost, and eventually replacement of the membrane in the system. In comparison to other anti-fouling strategies, the use of controlled surface topography to mitigate fouling has not been realized mainly due to the lack of methods to create targeted topography on the porous membrane surface. This thesis aims to develop a new methodology to create surface-patterned polymeric separation membrane to improve their anti-fouling characteristics during filtration. First, successful fabrication of sub-micron surface patterns directly on a commercial ultrafiltration (UF) membrane surface using nanoimprint lithographic (NIL) technique was demonstrated. Comprehensive filtration studies revealed that the presence of these sub-micron surface patterns mitigates not only the onset of colloidal particle deposition, but also lowers the rate of growth of cake layer after initial deposition, in comparison with un-patterned membranes. The anti-fouling effects were also observed for model protein solutions. Staged filtration experiments, with backwash cleaning, revealed that the permeate flux of the patterned membrane after protein fouling was considerably higher than that of the pristine or un-patterned membrane. In addition to the surface-patterning of UF membranes, successful fabrication of a surface-patterned thin film composite (TFC) membrane was shown for the first time. A two-step fabrication process was carried out by (1) nanoimprinting a polyethersulfone (PES) support using NIL, and (2) forming a thin dense film atop the PES support via interfacial polymerization (IP). Fouling experiments suggest that the surface patterns alter the hydrodynamics at the membrane-feed interface, which is

  14. Regulated membrane protein entry into flagella is facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules and does not require IFT.

    PubMed

    Belzile, Olivier; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J

    2013-08-05

    The membrane protein composition of the primary cilium, a key sensory organelle, is dynamically regulated during cilium-generated signaling [1, 2]. During ciliogenesis, ciliary membrane proteins, along with structural and signaling proteins, are carried through the multicomponent, intensely studied ciliary diffusion barrier at the base of the organelle [3-8] by intraflagellar transport (IFT) [9-18]. A favored model is that signaling-triggered accumulation of previously excluded membrane proteins in fully formed cilia [19-21] also requires IFT, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, in studies of regulated entry of a membrane protein into the flagellum of Chlamydomonas, we show that cells use an IFT-independent mechanism to breach the diffusion barrier at the flagellar base. In resting cells, a flagellar signaling component [22], the integral membrane polypeptide SAG1-C65, is uniformly distributed over the plasma membrane and excluded from the flagellar membrane. Flagellar adhesion-induced signaling triggers rapid, striking redistribution of the protein to the apical ends of the cells concomitantly with entry into the flagella. Protein polarization and flagellar enrichment are facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules. Using a conditional anterograde IFT mutant, we demonstrate that the IFT machinery is not required for regulated SAG1-C65 entry into flagella. Thus, integral membrane proteins can negotiate passage through the ciliary diffusion barrier without the need for a motor.

  15. Facile surface modification of anion-exchange membranes for improvement of diffusion dialysis performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Park, Han-Sol; Seo, Seok-Jun; Park, Jin-Soo; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Choi, Young-Woo; Jiong, Young Su; Kim, Dong Hee; Kang, Moon-Sung

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a facile membrane modification method by spin-coating of pyrrole (Py) monomers dissolved in a volatile solvent followed by an interfacial polymerization is proposed. The surface of a commercial anion-exchange membrane (i.e., Neosepta-AFX, Astom Corp., Japan) was successfully modified with polypyrrole (Ppy) to improve the acid recovery performance in diffusion dialysis (DD). The result of DD experiments revealed that both the acid and metal ion transports are significantly influenced by the surface modification. The metal crossover through the membranes was largely reduced while mostly maintaining the acid permeability by introducing a thin Ppy layer with excellent repelling property to cations on the membrane surface. As a result, the anion-exchange membrane modified with the optimum content of Py monomer (5 vol.%) exhibited excellent acid dialysis coefficient (KAcid) and selectivity (KAcid/KMetal) which is approximately twice as high as that of the pristine membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. A specific role of AGS3 in the surface expression of plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Groves, B; Gong, Q; Xu, Z; Huntsman, C; Nguyen, C; Li, D; Ma, D

    2007-11-13

    Activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3), originally identified in a functional screen for mammalian proteins that activate heterotrimeric G protein signaling, is known to be involved in drug-seeking behavior and is up-regulated during cocaine withdrawal in animal models. These observations indicate a potential role for AGS3 in the formation or maintenance of neural plasticity. We have found that the overexpression of AGS3 alters the surface-to-total ratios of a subset of heterologously expressed plasma membrane receptors and channels. Further analysis of the endocytic trafficking of one such protein by a biotin-based internalization assay suggests that overexpression of AGS3 moderately affects the internalization or recycling of surface proteins. Moreover, AGS3 overexpression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of AGS3 both result in the dispersal of two endogenously expressed trans-Golgi network (TGN)-associated cargo proteins without influencing those in the cis- or medial-Golgi compartments. Finally, adding a TGN-localization signal to a CD4-derived reporter renders the trafficking of fusion protein sensitive to AGS3. Taken together, our data support a model wherein AGS3 modulates the protein trafficking along the TGN/plasma membrane/endosome loop.

  18. Plasma membrane microdomains regulate turnover of transport proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Guido; Malinsky, Jan; Stahlschmidt, Wiebke; Loibl, Martin; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Frommer, Wolf B.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Tanner, Widmar

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether the stable segregation of proteins and lipids within the yeast plasma membrane serves a particular biological function. We show that 21 proteins cluster within or associate with the ergosterol-rich membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC). However, proteins of the endocytic machinery are excluded from MCC. In a screen, we identified 28 genes affecting MCC appearance and found that genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and vesicle transport are significantly overrepresented. Deletion of Pil1, a component of eisosomes, or of Nce102, an integral membrane protein of MCC, results in the dissipation of all MCC markers. These deletion mutants also show accelerated endocytosis of MCC-resident permeases Can1 and Fur4. Our data suggest that release from MCC makes these proteins accessible to the endocytic machinery. Addition of arginine to wild-type cells leads to a similar redistribution and increased turnover of Can1. Thus, MCC represents a protective area within the plasma membrane to control turnover of transport proteins. PMID:19064668

  19. Membrane-Associated Molecules Regulate the Formation of Layer-Specific Cortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Valerie; Bolz, Jurgen

    1997-06-01

    The columnar organization of the mammalian neocortex is based on radially oriented axon collaterals which precisely link cells from distinct cortical layers. During development, these interlaminar connections are specific from their initial outgrowth: collaterals form only in the target layers and there are no transient axonal collaterals in the nontarget layers. To examine whether positional cues within individual cortical layers regulate the laminar specificity of collateral formation, explants of cells destined for different cortical layers were cultured on membranes prepared from target and nontarget layers. Axonal growth and branching were examined on homogeneous membrane substrates and on alternating stripes of membranes from different layers. Results show that axons branch preferentially on membrane substrates from those layers that they would target in vivo. In addition, when cortical axons were given a choice to grow on membranes from either their target or their nontarget layer, they exhibited a clear preference for the target layers. This indicates that membrane-associated cues confined to individual layers regulate the formation of collaterals of cortical axons and restrict their growth to their target layers. Heat inactivation of membranes from target layers resulted in reduced axonal branching. The same manipulation of membranes from nontarget layers increased axonal branching for one population of cortical neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that membrane-associated molecules confined to individual layers induce and prevent the formation of axon collaterals in distinct populations of cortical neurons. Thus, the expression of layer-specific cues provides important constraints for the remodeling of local circuits during cortical development.

  20. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration.

  1. Preparation of Light-responsive Membranes by a Combined Surface Grafting and Postmodification Process

    PubMed Central

    Schöller, Katrin; Baumann, Lukas; Hegemann, Dirk; De Courten, Damien; Wolf, Martin; Rossi, René M.; Scherer, Lukas J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to modify the surface tension of commercial available track-edged polymer membranes, a procedure of surface-initiated polymerization is presented. The polymerization from the membrane surface is induced by plasma treatment of the membrane, followed by reacting the membrane surface with a methanolic solution of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Special attention is given to the process parameters for the plasma treatment prior to the polymerization on the surface. For example, the influence of the plasma-treatment on different types of membranes (e.g. polyester, polycarbonate, polyvinylidene fluoride) is studied. Furthermore, the time-dependent stability of the surface-grafted membranes is shown by contact angle measurements. When grafting poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) in this way, the surface can be further modified by esterification of the alcohol moiety of the polymer with a carboxylic acid function of the desired substance. These reactions can therefore be used for the functionalization of the membrane surface. For example, the surface tension of the membrane can be changed or a desired functionality as the presented light-responsiveness can be inserted. This is demonstrated by reacting PHEMA with a carboxylic acid functionalized spirobenzopyran unit which leads to a light-responsive membrane. The choice of solvent plays a major role in the postmodification step and is discussed in more detail in this paper. The permeability measurements of such functionalized membranes are performed using a Franz cell with an external light source. By changing the wavelength of the light from the visible to the UV-range, a change of permeability of aqueous caffeine solutions is observed. PMID:24686898

  2. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  3. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-02-04

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo.

  4. MYADM regulates Rac1 targeting to ordered membranes required for cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Juan F.; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Kremer, Leonor; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Calvo, María; Enrich, Carlos; Correas, Isabel; Millán, Jaime; Alonso, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane organization into condensed domains or rafts provides molecular platforms for selective recruitment of proteins. Cell migration is a general process that requires spatiotemporal targeting of Rac1 to membrane rafts. The protein machinery responsible for making rafts competent to recruit Rac1 remains elusive. Some members of the MAL family of proteins are involved in specialized processes dependent on this type of membrane. Because condensed membrane domains are a general feature of the plasma membrane of all mammalian cells, we hypothesized that MAL family members with ubiquitous expression and plasma membrane distribution could be involved in the organization of membranes for cell migration. We show that myeloid-associated differentiation marker (MYADM), a protein with unique features within the MAL family, colocalizes with Rac1 in membrane protrusions at the cell surface and distributes in condensed membranes. MYADM knockdown (KD) cells had altered membrane condensation and showed deficient incorporation of Rac1 to membrane raft fractions and, similar to Rac1 KD cells, exhibited reduced cell spreading and migration. Results of rescue-of-function experiments by expression of MYADM or active Rac1L61 in cells knocked down for Rac1 or MYADM, respectively, are consistent with the idea that MYADM and Rac1 act on parallel pathways that lead to similar functional outcomes. PMID:21325632

  5. Chemical surface, diffusional, electrical and elastic characterizations of two different dense regenerated cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M I; de Lara, R; Benavente, J

    2008-12-15

    A comparison of NaCl transport across two dense cellulosic membranes from different suppliers is presented. Hydraulic and diffusional permeabilities were determined from volume flow-applied pressure and concentration-time relationships, while cation transport number and membrane conductivity were determined from electromotrice force and impedance spectroscopy measurements, respectively. Chemical surface differences between both membranes are correlated to transport parameters and morphology, but differences in elastic properties of both membranes might also be considered in order to get a more complete picture of membrane behaviors and to obtain structural-transport parameters correlations.

  6. A model for surface diffusion of trans-membrane proteins on lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashutosh; Steigmann, David J.

    2011-06-01

    The equilibrium theory of lipid membranes is modified to include the effects of a continuous distribution of trans-membrane proteins. These influence membrane shape and evolve in accordance with a diffusive balance law. The model is purely mechanical in the absence of the proteins. Conditions ensuring energy dissipation in the presence of diffusion are given and an example constitutive function is used to simulate the coupled inertia-less interplay between membrane shape and protein distribution. The work extends an earlier continuum theory of equilibrium configurations of composite lipid-protein membranes to accommodate surface diffusion.

  7. Super-hydrophobic surfaces of layer-by-layer structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Tasuku; Ding, Bin; Sone, Yuji; Shiratori, Seimei

    2007-04-01

    We have recently fabricated super-hydrophobic membrane surfaces based on the inspiration of self-cleaning silver ragwort leaves. This biomimetic super-hydrophobic surface was composed of fluoroalkylsilane (FAS)-modified layer-by-layer (LBL) structured film-coated electrospun nanofibrous membranes. The rough fibre surface caused by the electrostatic LBL coating of TiO2 nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to imitate the rough surface of nanosized grooves along the silver ragwort leaf fibre axis. The results showed that the FAS modification was the key process for increasing the surface hydrophobicity of the fibrous membranes. Additionally, the dependence of the hydrophobicity of the membrane surfaces upon the number of LBL coating bilayers was affected by the membrane surface roughness. Moreover, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further indicated that the surface of LBL film-coated fibres absorbed more fluoro groups than the fibre surface without the LBL coating. A (TiO2/PAA)10 film-coated cellulose acetate nanofibrous membrane with FAS surface modification showed the highest water contact angle of 162° and lowest water-roll angle of 2°.

  8. Modification of biomaterials surface by mimetic cell membrane to improve biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei; Tan, Guo-Xin; Ning, Cheng-Yun

    2014-12-01

    Modification of biomaterials surface by mimetic cell membrane for improving biocompatibility, to imitate the excellent biological and physiological properties of the natural cell membrane, is an important research area in materials science. Numerous studies have been attempted to construct a mimetic cell membrane biointerface composed of phosphorylcholine (PC)-containing polymers or other phospholipid analogues on biomaterials surface. PC-containing biointerfaces show outstanding characteristics, especially in biological aspects such as blood compatibility and antifouling property. In this mini-review, the strategies of membrane mimetic modification of biomaterials and their antifouling applications are summarized.

  9. Determination of surface density of nonporous membranes with air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, T. P.

    2015-03-01

    The surface density or mass per unit area of a membrane is an important material property often used in acoustics and ultrasonics. In this paper, a new measurement and analysis technique for estimating the surface density as a function of frequency for a nonporous membrane or foil is introduced. This new, broadband technique is derived from the Thompson-Gray measurement model which can be simplified to the fluid layer transfer function commonly used in acoustics. The fluid layer transfer function can be further simplified to the limp-wall mass law for acoustically 'thin' membranes whose thickness is much less than a wavelength. The transfer function of the membrane can be efficiently measured with commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers from which the surface density can be computed. Surface density estimates are presented for four membrane-like materials: aluminum foil, brass shim, polyester and polyethylene sheets.

  10. Scanning force microscopy of synthetic membranes in air and under water: surfaces, cross sections, and fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Peter; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Inacker, Otto; Lehmann, Hans-Dieter; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to image surfaces and cross sections of different types of microporous membranes used for ultrafiltration and dialysis. Characteristic surface structures with funnel-shaped pores could be detected with resolution better than 10 nm. Ultrafiltration membranes with molecular weight cutoff values between 5,000 and 100,000 show wide variations in homogeneity, roughness, size and density of pores, but with a basic network-like fine structure. Cross sections allow one to compare inner structure and surface. An evident change of the surface of one membrane was observed after using the membrane over a long time for clearfiltration of juice. Cellulosic dialysis membranes with different biocompatibility were compared in air and under water. Structural differences could be observed between modified and unmodified type. Under water the structures are considerably changed due to swelling processes.

  11. Regulation of the inner membrane mitochondrial permeability transition by the outer membrane translocator protein (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor).

    PubMed

    Sileikyte, Justina; Petronilli, Valeria; Zulian, Alessandra; Dabbeni-Sala, Federica; Tognon, Giuseppe; Nikolov, Peter; Bernardi, Paolo; Ricchelli, Fernanda

    2011-01-14

    We studied the properties of the permeability transition pore (PTP) in rat liver mitochondria and in mitoplasts retaining inner membrane ultrastructure and energy-linked functions. Like mitochondria, mitoplasts readily underwent a permeability transition following Ca(2+) uptake in a process that maintained sensitivity to cyclosporin A. On the other hand, major differences between mitochondria and mitoplasts emerged in PTP regulation by ligands of the outer membrane translocator protein of 18 kDa, TSPO, formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. Indeed, (i) in mitoplasts, the PTP could not be activated by photo-oxidation after treatment with dicarboxylic porphyrins endowed with protoporphyrin IX configuration, which bind TSPO in intact mitochondria; and (ii) mitoplasts became resistant to the PTP-inducing effects of N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide and of other selective ligands of TSPO. Thus, the permeability transition is an inner membrane event that is regulated by the outer membrane through specific interactions with TSPO.

  12. Fluid-membrane tethers: Minimal surfaces and elastic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas R.; Huber, Greg; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2002-04-01

    Thin cylindrical tethers are common lipid bilayer membrane structures, arising in situations ranging from micromanipulation experiments on artificial vesicles to the dynamic structure of the Golgi apparatus. We study the shape and formation of a tether in terms of the classical soap-film problem, which is applied to the case of a membrane disk under tension subject to a point force. A tether forms from the elastic boundary layer near the point of application of the force, for sufficiently large displacement. Analytic results for various aspects of the membrane shape are given.

  13. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A.; Fraser, Mark E.; Scott, Jordan L.; Soni, Smita P.; Jones, Keaton R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. IMPORTANCE The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. PMID

  14. Endocytosis regulates membrane localization and function of the fusogen EFF-1.

    PubMed

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2016-07-28

    Cell fusion is essential for sexual reproduction and formation of muscles, bones, and placenta. Two families of cell fusion proteins (Syncytins and FFs) have been identified in eukaryotes. Syncytins have been shown to form the giant syncytial trophoblasts in the placenta. The FFs are essential to fuse cells in the skin, reproductive, excretory, digestive and nervous systems in nematodes. EFF-1 (Epithelial Fusion Failure 1), a member of the FF family, is a type I membrane glycoprotein that is essential for most cell fusions in C. elegans. The crystal structure of EFF-1 ectodomain reveals striking structural similarity to class II fusion glycoproteins from enveloped viruses (e.g. dengue and rubella) that mediate virus to cell fusion. We found EFF-1 to be present on the plasma membrane and in RAB-5-positive early endosomes, with EFF-1 recycling between these 2 cell compartments. Only when EFF-1 proteins transiently arrive to the surfaces of 2 adjacent cells do they dynamically interact in trans and mediate membrane fusion. EFF-1 is continuously internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis via the activity of 2 small GTPases: RAB-5 and Dynamin. Here we propose a model that explains how EFF-1 endocytosis together with interactions in trans can control cell-cell fusion. Kontani et al. showed that vacuolar ATPase (vATPase) mutations result in EFF-1-dependent hyperfusion. (1) We propose that vATPase is required for normal degradation of EFF-1. Failure to degrade EFF-1 results in delayed hyperfusion and mislocalization to organelles that appear to be recycling endosomes. EFF-1 is also required to fuse neurons as part of the repair mechanism following injury and to prune dendrites. We speculate that EFF-1 may regulate neuronal tree like structures via endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis of cell-cell fusion proteins functions to prevent merging of cells and to sculpt organs and neurons.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Surface Difference Effect on Gas Separation by Zeolite Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Koichi; Kobayashi, Yasunori; Morito, Hideaki; Takami, Seiichi; Kubo, Momoji; Belosludov, Rodion; Miyamoto, Akira

    2000-07-01

    The permeation of CO2/N2 gas mixture through zeolite membranes was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) study. MD calculation successfully reproduced the experimental results of CO2/N2 separation by NaY membrane. Furthermore, the surface difference effect on gas separation was examined using the NaA zeolite (100) surface and its (111) surface. The CO2/N2 separation factor of the (111) surface was much lower than that of the (100) surface. This was caused by the difference in surface structure, since the pore structures of both models were the same.

  16. Normal-mode analysis of lateral diffusion on a bounded membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Koppel, D E

    1985-01-01

    The normal-mode analysis of fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, introduced for the characterization of lateral diffusion on spherical membrane surfaces, has been generalized and extended to other surface geometries. Theoretical expressions are derived for the characteristic values and orthogonal characteristic functions of the diffusion equations for cylindrical surfaces, ellipsoids of revolution and dimpled discoidal surfaces. On the basis of these results, a simple analytical function is proposed as an empirical solution for the analysis of photobleaching data on a variety of discoidal surfaces. Special experimental and computational methods for determining the surface-diffusion coefficient are described, and demonstrated with data for lipid diffusion in erythrocyte membranes. PMID:3978205

  17. Regulation of a muralytic enzyme by dynamic membrane topology

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingan; Kuty, Gabriel F.; Arockiasamy, Arulandu; Xu, Min; Young, Ry; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-08-16

    R{sup 21}, the lysozyme of coliphage 21, has an N-terminal signal-anchor-release (SAR) domain that directs its secretion in a membrane-tethered, inactive form and then its release and activation in the periplasm. Both genetic and crystallographic studies show that the SAR domain, once extracted from the bilayer, refolds into the body of the enzyme and effects muralytic activation by repositioning one residue of the canonical lysozyme catalytic triad.

  18. Early regulation of membrane excitability by ras oncogene proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Collin, C; Papageorge, A G; Sakakibara, M; Huddie, P L; Lowy, D R; Alkon, D L

    1990-01-01

    Two electrode voltage clamp conditions were used to study the early effects on ionic membrane channels of the intracellularly injected proto-oncogenic form of c-Ha-ras (c-ras) and its oncogenic counterpart v-Ha-ras (v-ras). These experiments were conducted on isolated somata of identified fully differentiated neurons of the sea snail Hermissenda. 20 min after c-ras, and 10 min after v-ras intracellular injections into type B medial photoreceptors of Hermissenda, the peak amplitude of two outward potassium currents (IA and IC), across the isolated Type B soma membrane begin to decrease. These two currents have been previously isolated by differences in activation and inactivation kinetics and their response to pharmacological blockers. c- or v-ras injections did not have any effect on a voltage-dependent inward calcium current. Reduction of IA preceded that of IC. Current reductions due to c-ras, but not to v-ras injection reversed spontaneously after 40 min. The voltage dependence of the steady state inactivation of IA shifted toward more negative potentials with ras injections. Ras-mediated cell transformations therefore, could involve, perhaps as initial events, prolonged modification of membrane currents. PMID:2207264

  19. Characterization of perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC surface modified with halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A.; Afonin, D.; Kononenko, N.; Shkirskaya, S.

    2015-10-01

    The electrical conductivity and diffusion permeability through perfluorinated cation-exchange membranes MF-4SC (Russian analog of the Nafion-type membrane), whose surface is modified by nanotubes of halloysite using short exposures of low temperature microwave plasma, are theoretically investigated using the Nernst-Planck approach. The method of quantitative evaluation of physicochemical parameters (individual and averaged diffusion coefficients and averaged distribution coefficients of ion pairs in the membrane) of the systems `electrolyte solution - bi-layer ion-exchange membrane - water/electrolyte solution', which was proposed by us earlier, is further developed. The aforementioned parameters of modified MF-4SC/halloysite membranes were found using the least squares method. For this purpose we used electrical conductivity as well as diffusion permeability data experimentally obtained for NaCl and HCl solutions of different concentration. A new model of bi-layer membrane system can be used for refining the calculated results by taking into account the difference between co- and counter-ion diffusivities inside the membrane layers. We showed that grafting the layer of halloysite nanotubes onto the membrane surface noticeably affects the exchange capacity as well as the structural and transport characteristics of the original perfluorinated membrane. In particular, such a membrane may show weak asymmetry of diffusion permeability when its position inside a measuring cell is changed. Hybrid MF-4SC/halloysite membranes can thus be productively used in fuel cells and catalysis.

  20. Anti-biofouling property of vanillin on Aeromonas hydrophila initial biofilm on various membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, K; Kappachery, S; Thekeettle, M; Song, J H; Kweon, J H

    2013-09-01

    Biofouling is a serious problem on filter membranes of water purification systems due to formation of bacterial biofilms, which can be detrimental to the membrane performance. Biofouling occurs on membrane surface and therefore greatly influences the physical and chemical aspects of the surface. Several membranes including microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were used to learn about the anti-biofouling properties of vanillin affecting the membrane performances. Vanillin has been recognized as a potential quorum quenching compound for Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms. The initial attachment and dynamics of biofilm growth were monitored using scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm quantities were measured using a plate count method and total protein determinations. Vanillin addition was effective in the prevention of biofilm formation on the tested membrane surfaces. Among the membranes, RO membranes made with cellulose acetate showed the most substantial reduction of biofilm formation by addition of vanillin. The biofilm reduction was confirmed by the results of surface coverage, biomass and protein accumulation. The HPLC spectrum of the spent culture with vanillin addition showed that vanillin may interfere with quorum sensing molecules and thus prevent the formation of the biofilms.

  1. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E; McClafferty, Heather; Ashley, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP) with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells) after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded) β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS) domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP's topology, could provide

  2. Functionalization of nylon membranes via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xu, F J; Zhao, J P; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G; Li, J

    2007-07-31

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of nylons is of crucial importance to their widespread applications. In this work, surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is employed to tailor the functionality of the nylon membrane and pore surfaces in a well-controlled manner. A simple two-step method, involving the activation of surface amide groups with formaldehyde and the reaction of the resulting N-methylol polyamide with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, was first developed for the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on the nylon membrane and its pore surfaces. Functional polymer brushes of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(ethylene glycol)monomethacrylate (PEGMA) were prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the nylon membranes. A kinetics study revealed that the chain growth from the membranes was consistent with a "controlled" process. The dormant chain ends of the grafted HEMA polymer (P(HEMA)) and PEGMA polymer (P(PEGMA)) on the nylon membranes could be reactivated for the consecutive surface-initiated ATRP to produce the corresponding nylon membranes functionalized by P(HEMA)-b-P(PEGMA) and P(PEGMA)-b-P(HEMA) diblock copolymer brushes. In addition, membranes with grafted P(HEMA) and P(PEGMA) brushes exhibited good resistance to protein adsorption and fouling under continuous-flow conditions.

  3. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  4. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nady, Norhan

    2016-04-18

    A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled "green surface modification". This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers-ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)-is presented.

  5. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO2 permeability and decreased CO2/H2 selectivity, CO2/CH4 selectivity, and CO2/N2 selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO2 permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  6. The key role of the surface membrane in why gastropod nacre grows in towers

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2009-01-01

    The nacre of gastropod molluscs is intriguingly stacked in towers. It is covered by a surface membrane, which protects the growing nacre surface from damage when the animal withdraws into its shell. The surface membrane is supplied by vesicles that adhere to it on its mantle side and secretes interlamellar membranes from the nacre side. Nacre tablets rapidly grow in height and later expand sideways; the part of the tablet formed during this initial growth phase is here called the core. During initial growth, the tips of the cores remain permanently submerged within the surface membrane. The interlamellar membranes, which otherwise separate the nacre tablet lamellae, do not extend across cores, which are aligned in stacked tablets forming the tower axis, and thus towers of nacre tablets are continuous along the central axis. We hypothesize that in gastropod nacre growth core formation precedes that of the interlamellar membrane. Once the core is complete, a new interlamellar membrane, which covers the area of the tablet outside the core, detaches from the surface membrane. In this way, the tower-like growth of gastropod nacre becomes comprehensible. PMID:19116274

  7. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nady, Norhan

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled “green surface modification”. This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers—ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)—is presented. PMID:27096873

  8. Dynamics of Pinned Membranes with Application to Protein Diffusion on the Surface of Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence C.-L.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment and simulation algorithm for the dynamics of Helfrich elastic membrane surfaces in the presence of general harmonic perturbations and hydrodynamic coupling to the surrounding solvent. In the limit of localized and strong interactions, this harmonic model can be used to pin the membrane to intracellular/intercellular structures. We consider the case of pinning to the cytoskeleton and use such a model to estimate the macroscopic diffusion constant for band 3 protein on the surface of human erythrocytes. Comparison to experimental results suggests that thermal undulations of the membrane surface should play a significant role in protein mobility on the red blood cell. PMID:14747313

  9. High-Performance Water Filtration Membranes using Surface Modification and New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinwei

    Water scarcity is one of the most critical challenges faced by mankind and it is only getting worse due to source pollution and rising population. There is critical need for the development of water filtration membranes in order to treat polluted water and turn water from non-potable sources such as waste waster and ocean water into freshwater for human consumption and agricultural irrigation. Filtration Membranes are generally classified into four categories: microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), with decreasing pore size for rejecting different sized substances. Commercial filtration membranes are able to provide decent flux and rejection for their targeted applications. However, most of them suffer from fouling issues when the microorganisms and organic matter such as proteins and polysaccharides in the water source deposit onto the membrane surface, impeding the permeation of water and lowering the flux. Therefore, it is of high demand to develop membranes that are anti-fouling. Foulants such as protein particles adhere to the membrane surface via hydrophobic interactions. In order to minimize such effects, a typical way is to increase the hydrophilicity of the membrane by surface modification or by utilizing hydrophilic membrane materials. Foulants also tend to get trapped in the open "pores" on a rough membrane surface with ridges and valleys. It is then expected that a smoother membrane surface tend to lessen such effects. Incorporating antimicrobial properties into the membrane is also an effective way to reduce fouling as this inhibits the growth of microorganisms on the membrane surfaces. New materials are also used to fabricate membranes with improved performance. Conducting polymers have recently been discovered as a new category of membrane-making materials that are hydrophilic and low-fouling. A new type of polyaniline derivative has been used to fabricate UF membranes that demonstrate chlorine

  10. Glycocardiolipin modulates the surface interaction of the proton pumped by bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane preparations.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Saponetti, Matilde Sublimi; Leopold, Andreas; Dencher, Norbert A

    2007-09-01

    Glycocardiolipin is an archaeal analogue of mitochondrial cardiolipin, having an extraordinary affinity for bacteriorhodopsin, the photoactivated proton pump in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. Here purple membranes have been isolated by osmotic shock from either cells or envelopes of Hbt. salinarum. We show that purple membranes isolated from envelopes have a lower content of glycocardiolipin than standard purple membranes isolated from cells. The properties of bacteriorhodopsin in the two different purple membrane preparations are compared; although some differences in the absorption spectrum and the kinetic of the dark adaptation process are present, the reduction of native membrane glycocardiolipin content does not significantly affect the photocycle (M-intermediate rise and decay) as well as proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin. However, interaction of the pumped proton with the membrane surface and its equilibration with the aqueous bulk phase are altered.

  11. Amphiphilic components of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite - Surface properties and membrane formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Pashley, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that the amphiphilic compounds in carbonaceous meteorites whose physicochemical properties are presently studied may represent sources of lipidlike compounds which could have evolved as membrane components in primitive cells is investigated in samples of the Murchison CM2 chondrite. Surface properties and membrane formation are obtained for three fractions isolated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. It is concluded that a small, undefined fraction of Murchison components exhibits amphiphilic properties which allow assembly into boundary membranes.

  12. FIG4 regulates lysosome membrane homeostasis independent of phosphatase function

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Cunningham, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Ke; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    FIG4 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in several diseases including Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 4J (CMT4J) and Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS). To investigate the mechanism of disease pathogenesis, we generated Drosophila models of FIG4-related diseases. Fig4 null mutant animals are viable but exhibit marked enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in muscle cells and neurons, accompanied by an age-related decline in flight ability. Transgenic animals expressing Drosophila Fig4 missense mutations corresponding to human pathogenic mutations can partially rescue lysosomal expansion phenotypes, consistent with these mutations causing decreased FIG4 function. Interestingly, Fig4 mutations predicted to inactivate FIG4 phosphatase activity rescue lysosome expansion phenotypes, and mutations in the phosphoinositide (3) phosphate kinase Fab1 that performs the reverse enzymatic reaction also causes a lysosome expansion phenotype. Since FIG4 and FAB1 are present together in the same biochemical complex, these data are consistent with a model in which FIG4 serves a phosphatase-independent biosynthetic function that is essential for lysosomal membrane homeostasis. Lysosomal phenotypes are suppressed by genetic inhibition of Rab7 or the HOPS complex, demonstrating that FIG4 functions after endosome-to-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, disruption of the retromer complex, implicated in recycling from the lysosome to Golgi, does not lead to similar phenotypes as Fig4, suggesting that the lysosomal defects are not due to compromised retromer-mediated recycling of endolysosomal membranes. These data show that FIG4 plays a critical noncatalytic function in maintaining lysosomal membrane homeostasis, and that this function is disrupted by mutations that cause CMT4J and YVS. PMID:26662798

  13. FIG4 regulates lysosome membrane homeostasis independent of phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Cunningham, Kathleen M; Zhang, Ke; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2016-02-15

    FIG4 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in several diseases including Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease 4J (CMT4J) and Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS). To investigate the mechanism of disease pathogenesis, we generated Drosophila models of FIG4-related diseases. Fig4 null mutant animals are viable but exhibit marked enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in muscle cells and neurons, accompanied by an age-related decline in flight ability. Transgenic animals expressing Drosophila Fig4 missense mutations corresponding to human pathogenic mutations can partially rescue lysosomal expansion phenotypes, consistent with these mutations causing decreased FIG4 function. Interestingly, Fig4 mutations predicted to inactivate FIG4 phosphatase activity rescue lysosome expansion phenotypes, and mutations in the phosphoinositide (3) phosphate kinase Fab1 that performs the reverse enzymatic reaction also causes a lysosome expansion phenotype. Since FIG4 and FAB1 are present together in the same biochemical complex, these data are consistent with a model in which FIG4 serves a phosphatase-independent biosynthetic function that is essential for lysosomal membrane homeostasis. Lysosomal phenotypes are suppressed by genetic inhibition of Rab7 or the HOPS complex, demonstrating that FIG4 functions after endosome-to-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, disruption of the retromer complex, implicated in recycling from the lysosome to Golgi, does not lead to similar phenotypes as Fig4, suggesting that the lysosomal defects are not due to compromised retromer-mediated recycling of endolysosomal membranes. These data show that FIG4 plays a critical noncatalytic function in maintaining lysosomal membrane homeostasis, and that this function is disrupted by mutations that cause CMT4J and YVS.

  14. Antibody Distance from the Cell Membrane Regulates Antibody Effector Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Kirstie L S; Chan, H T Claude; James, Sonja; Glennie, Martin J; Cragg, Mark S

    2017-05-15

    Immunotherapy using mAbs, such as rituximab, is an established means of treating hematological malignancies. Abs can elicit a number of mechanisms to delete target cells, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis. The inherent properties of the target molecule help to define which of these mechanisms are more important for efficacy. However, it is often unclear why mAb binding to different epitopes within the same target elicits different levels of therapeutic activity. To specifically address whether distance from the target cell membrane influences the aforementioned effector mechanisms, a panel of fusion proteins consisting of a CD20 or CD52 epitope attached to various CD137 scaffold molecules was generated. The CD137 scaffold was modified through the removal or addition of cysteine-rich extracellular domains to produce a panel of chimeric molecules that held the target epitope at different distances along the protein. It was shown that complement-dependent cytotoxicity and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity favored a membrane-proximal epitope, whereas Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis favored an epitope positioned further away. These findings were confirmed using reagents targeting the membrane-proximal or -distal domains of CD137 itself before investigating these properties in vivo, where a clear difference in the splenic clearance of transfected tumor cells was observed. Together, this work demonstrates how altering the position of the Ab epitope is able to change the effector mechanisms engaged and facilitates the selection of mAbs designed to delete target cells through specific effector mechanisms and provide more effective therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. The Role of the Membrane Potential in Chondrocyte Volume Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Asplin, Katie E; Bruce, Gareth; Dart, Caroline; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Many cell types have significant negative resting membrane potentials (RMPs) resulting from the activity of potassium-selective and chloride-selective ion channels. In excitable cells, such as neurones, rapid changes in membrane permeability underlie the generation of action potentials. Chondrocytes have less negative RMPs and the role of the RMP is not clear. Here we examine the basis of the chondrocyte RMP and possible physiological benefits. We demonstrate that maintenance of the chondrocyte RMP involves gadolinium-sensitive cation channels. Pharmacological inhibition of these channels causes the RMP to become more negative (100 µM gadolinium: ΔVm = −30 ± 4 mV). Analysis of the gadolinium-sensitive conductance reveals a high permeability to calcium ions (PCa/PNa ≈80) with little selectivity between monovalent ions; similar to that reported elsewhere for TRPV5. Detection of TRPV5 by PCR and immunohistochemistry and the sensitivity of the RMP to the TRPV5 inhibitor econazole (ΔVm = −18 ± 3 mV) suggests that the RMP may be, in part, controlled by TRPV5. We investigated the physiological advantage of the relatively positive RMP using a mathematical model in which membrane stretch activates potassium channels allowing potassium efflux to oppose osmotic water uptake. At very negative RMP potassium efflux is negligible, but at more positive RMP it is sufficient to limit volume increase. In support of our model, cells clamped at −80 mV and challenged with a reduced osmotic potential swelled approximately twice as much as cells at +10 mV. The positive RMP may be a protective adaptation that allows chondrocytes to respond to the dramatic osmotic changes, with minimal changes in cell volume. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2979–2986, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21328349

  16. Surface pH controls purple-to-blue transition of bacteriorhodopsin. A theoretical model of purple membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Szundi, I; Stoeckenius, W

    1989-08-01

    We have developed a surface model of purple membrane and applied it in an analysis of the purple-to-blue color change of bacteriorhodopsin which is induced by acidification or deionization. The model is based on dissociation and double layer theory and the known membrane structure. We calculated surface pH, ion concentrations, charge density, and potential as a function of bulk pH and concentration of mono- and divalent cations. At low salt concentrations, the surface pH is significantly lower than the bulk pH and it becomes independent of bulk pH in the deionized membrane suspension. Using an experimental acid titration curve for neutral, lipid-depleted membrane, we converted surface pH into absorption values. The calculated bacteriohodopsin color changes for acidification of purple, and titrations of deionized blue membrane with cations or base agree well with experimental results. No chemical binding is required to reproduce the experimental curves. Surface charge and potential changes in acid, base and cation titrations are calculated and their relation to the color change is discussed. Consistent with structural data, 10 primary phosphate and two basic surface groups per bacteriorhodopsin are sufficient to obtain good agreement between all calculated and experimental curves. The results provide a theoretical basis for our earlier conclusion that the purple-to-blue transition must be attributed to surface phenomena and not to cation binding at specific sites in the protein.

  17. Iron-regulated expression and membrane localization of the magA protein in Magnetospirillum sp. strain AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, C; Kikuchi, T; Burgess, J G; Matsunaga, T

    1995-07-01

    The magA gene from Magnetospirillum sp. strain AMB-1 is required for the synthesis of bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). This gene has been cloned, sequenced and found to encode a protein which is homologous to the Escherichia coli potassium efflux membrane-binding protein, KefC. By using the firefly luciferase gene (luc) cloned downstream of the magA promoter, the effect of iron on regulation of magA expression was investigated, and transcription of magA was found to be enhanced by low concentrations of iron. Intracellular localization of the MagA protein was studied using magA-luc fusion proteins. The luc gene was cloned downstream of the magA hydrophilic C-terminal domain. Detection of luciferase activity in the cytoplasm, cell membrane, and magnetic particle membrane subcellular fractions confirmed that the MagA fusion protein was localized in the cell membrane. The fusion protein was also detected on the surface of the lipid bilayer covering the magnetic particles. These results suggest that MagA is a membrane-bound protein, the expression of which is enhanced at low iron concentrations.

  18. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast differentiation and survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Prasad, Vikram; Hyung, Seok-Won; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Bhargava, Aditi; Pearce, David; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2012-12-24

    The precise regulation of Ca(2+) dynamics is crucial for proper differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Here we show the involvement of plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) isoforms 1 and 4 in osteoclastogenesis. In immature/undifferentiated cells, PMCAs inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Interestingly, nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) directly stimulated PMCA transcription, whereas the PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) efflux prevented NFATc1 activation, forming a negative regulatory loop. PMCA4 also had an anti-osteoclastogenic effect by reducing NO, which facilitates preosteoclast fusion. In addition to their role in immature cells, increased expression of PMCAs in mature osteoclasts prevented osteoclast apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Mice heterozygous for PMCA1 or null for PMCA4 showed an osteopenic phenotype with more osteoclasts on bone surface. Furthermore, PMCA4 expression levels correlated with peak bone mass in premenopausal women. Thus, our results suggest that PMCAs play important roles for the regulation of bone homeostasis in both mice and humans by modulating Ca(2+) signaling in osteoclasts.

  19. Electrokinetic and surface chemical characterizations of an irradiated microfiltration polysulfone membrane: comparison of two irradiation doses.

    PubMed

    de Lara, R; Benavente, J

    2007-06-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the surface and electrokinetic characteristic parameters for a porous membrane of pore size 0.2 mum is determined and correlated with the irradiation dose (10 and 80 J/kg). Changes in NaCl permeability and membrane system electrical resistance determined from diffusion and impedance spectroscopy measurements are consistent with the increase of membrane pore radii/porosity, in agreement with SEM micrographs and reported results. Low irradiation dose seems to clean the membrane surface of impurities, according to XPS results, but the increase of irradiation doses could affect surface roughness. Due to the relatively high pore radius, ion transport numbers are practically independent of radiation and dose, but irradiation slightly modifies the membrane solution interface by increasing its weakly electronegative character, which could be of interest in the ultrafiltration of proteins or macromolecules.

  20. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, James A; Whitehead, Timothy A; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-04

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion.

  1. Real-time measurements of membrane surface dynamics on macrophages and the phagocytosis of Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Coelho Neto, José; Agero, Ubirajara; Oliveira, Diogo C P; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Mesquita, Oscar N

    2005-02-15

    Defocusing microscopy was used for real-time observation and quantification of membrane surface dynamics in murine bone marrow macrophages. Small random membrane fluctuations (SRMF), possibly metabolic driven, were detected uniformly over all membrane surface. Morphological and dynamical parameters of ruffles, such as shape, dimensions, and velocity of propagation, were analyzed. Optical tweezers were used to promote phagocytosis of single Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes by selected macrophages. Analysis of ruffling activity on the macrophages before and during phagocytosis of the parasites indicated that increased ruffling response near forming phagosomes, most likely induced by the parasite, accelerates phagocytosis. The effects of temperature decrease on the dynamics of membrane surface fluctuations and on the phagocytosis of parasites were used to determine the overall activation energies involved in these processes. The values obtained support the existence of strong correlation between membrane motility and phagocytic capacity.

  2. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion. PMID:26199411

  3. Surface-Bound Membrane-Mimetic Assemblies: Electrostatic Attributes of Integral Membrane Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-31

    other than bovine rhodopsin, we have used analogous techniques with a second retinal-containing protein, bacteriorhodopsin . This protein is found in the...purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium and serves as a light-driven proton pump to generate a transmembrane proton gradient used by the bacterium...and characterized by its absorption spectra. Figure 3 compares the spectra of bacteriorhodopsin in the natural purple membrane with that from protein

  4. Argon Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization of PEGMA on Chitosan Membrane Surface for Cell Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shiheng; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2013-10-01

    For its biocompatibility and biodegradability, chitosan has had considerable attention for biomedical applications in recent years. In this paper, polymerization of poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto chitosan membrane surface through argon plasma-induced graft polymerization. The surface properties after modification were characterized by contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The results indicated that PEGMA can be grafted successfully onto chitosan membrane surface. The surface hydrophilicity and free energy were improved and the surface roughness increased after modification. The adhesion of a human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) on chitosan membrane surface was enhanced due to improvement of surface free energy and roughness.

  5. Asymmetric PTEN Distribution Regulated by Spatial Heterogeneity in Membrane-Binding State Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Satomi; Shibata, Tatsuo; Ueda, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric PTEN distribution at the posterior of polarized motile cells and regulate anterior pseudopod formation were addressed by novel single-molecule tracking analysis. Heterogeneity in the lateral mobility of PTEN on a membrane indicated the existence of three membrane-binding states with different diffusion coefficients and membrane-binding lifetimes. The stochastic state transition kinetics of PTEN among these three states were suggested to be regulated spatially along the cell polarity such that only the stable binding state is selectively suppressed at the anterior membrane to cause local PTEN depletion. By incorporating experimentally observed kinetic parameters into a simple mathematical model, the asymmetric PTEN distribution can be explained quantitatively to illustrate the regulatory mechanisms for cellular asymmetry based on an essential causal link between individual stochastic reactions and stable localizations of the ensemble. PMID:23326224

  6. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (approximately 12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  7. Regulation of Ras signaling and function by plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E; Michael, James V

    2017-02-07

    Together H-, N- and KRAS mutations are major contributors to ~30% of all human cancers. Thus, Ras inhibition remains an important anti-cancer strategy. The molecular mechanisms of isotypic Ras oncogenesis are still not completely understood. Monopharmacological therapeutics have not been successful in the clinic. These disappointing outcomes have led to attempts to target elements downstream of Ras, mainly targeting either the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) or Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. While several such approaches are moderately effective, recent efforts have focused on preclinical evaluation of combination therapies to improve efficacies. This review will detail current understanding of the contributions of plasma membrane microdomain targeting of Ras to mitogenic and tumorigenic signaling and tumor progression. Moreover, this review will outline novel approaches to target Ras in cancers, including targeting schemes for new drug development, as well as putative re-purposing of drugs in current use to take advantage of blunting Ras signaling by interfering with Ras plasma membrane microdomain targeting and retention.

  8. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed.

  9. A novel approach for quantitative evaluation of the physicochemical interactions between rough membrane surface and sludge foulants in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongjun; Zhang, Meijia; Mei, Rongwu; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang

    2014-11-01

    This study proposed a novel approach for quantitative evaluation of the physicochemical interactions between a particle and rough surface. The approach adopts the composite Simpson's rule to numerically calculate the double integrals in the surface element integration of these physicochemical interactions. The calculation could be achieved by a MATLAB program based on this approach. This approach was then applied to assess the physicochemical interactions between rough membrane surface and sludge foulants in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR). The results showed that, as compared with smooth membrane surface, rough membrane surface had a much lower strength of interactions with sludge foulants. Meanwhile, membrane surface morphology significantly affected the strength and properties of the interactions. This study showed that the newly developed approach was feasible, and could serve as a primary tool for investigating membrane fouling in MBRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  11. Regulation of the V-ATPase along the Endocytic Pathway Occurs through Reversible Subunit Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Céline; Sobo, Komla; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Garin, Jérome; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2008-01-01

    The lumen of endosomal organelles becomes increasingly acidic when going from the cell surface to lysosomes. Luminal pH thereby regulates important processes such as the release of internalized ligands from their receptor or the activation of lysosomal enzymes. The main player in endosomal acidification is the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit transmembrane complex that pumps protons from the cytoplasm to the lumen of organelles, or to the outside of the cell. The active V-ATPase is composed of two multi-subunit domains, the transmembrane V0 and the cytoplasmic V1. Here we found that the ratio of membrane associated V1/Vo varies along the endocytic pathway, the relative abundance of V1 being higher on late endosomes than on early endosomes, providing an explanation for the higher acidity of late endosomes. We also found that all membrane-bound V-ATPase subunits were associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from late endosomes, raising the possibility that association with lipid-raft like domains also plays a role in regulating the activity of the proton pump. In support of this, we found that treatment of cells with U18666A, a drug that leads to the accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, affected acidification of late endosome. Altogether our findings indicate that the activity of the vATPase in the endocytic pathway is regulated both by reversible association/dissociation and the interaction with specific lipid environments. PMID:18648502

  12. Regulation of the V-ATPase along the endocytic pathway occurs through reversible subunit association and membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Lafourcade, Céline; Sobo, Komla; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Garin, Jérome; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2008-07-23

    The lumen of endosomal organelles becomes increasingly acidic when going from the cell surface to lysosomes. Luminal pH thereby regulates important processes such as the release of internalized ligands from their receptor or the activation of lysosomal enzymes. The main player in endosomal acidification is the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit transmembrane complex that pumps protons from the cytoplasm to the lumen of organelles, or to the outside of the cell. The active V-ATPase is composed of two multi-subunit domains, the transmembrane V(0) and the cytoplasmic V(1). Here we found that the ratio of membrane associated V(1)/Vo varies along the endocytic pathway, the relative abundance of V(1) being higher on late endosomes than on early endosomes, providing an explanation for the higher acidity of late endosomes. We also found that all membrane-bound V-ATPase subunits were associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from late endosomes, raising the possibility that association with lipid-raft like domains also plays a role in regulating the activity of the proton pump. In support of this, we found that treatment of cells with U18666A, a drug that leads to the accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, affected acidification of late endosome. Altogether our findings indicate that the activity of the vATPase in the endocytic pathway is regulated both by reversible association/dissociation and the interaction with specific lipid environments.

  13. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  14. SEPARATION PROPERTIES OF SURFACE MODIFIED SILICA SUPPORTED LIQUID MEMBRANES FOR DIVALENT METAL REMOVAL/RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis and separation properties of a mesoporous silica supported liquid membrane (SLM) were studied. The membranes consisted of a silica layer, from dip-coated colloidal silica, on a a-alumina support, modified with DCDMS (dichlorodimethyl silane) to add surface methyl g...

  15. 40 CFR 63.942 - Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards-Surface impoundment floating membrane cover. 63.942 Section 63.942 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... fabricated from a synthetic membrane material that is either: (i) High density polyethylene (HDPE) with...

  16. Calcium-Modulating Cyclophilin Ligand Regulates Membrane Trafficking of Postsynaptic GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xu; Yao, Jun; Norris, David; Tran, David D.; Bram, Richard J.; Chen, Gong; Luscher, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) at GABAergic synapses requires the cytoplasmic loop region and C-terminal transmembrane domain of the receptor γ2 subunit. We here report a novel interaction of γ2 with Calcium-Modulating cyclophilin Ligand (CAML), an integral membrane protein that regulates this mechanism. Interaction of GABAARs with CAML depends on both the cytoplasmic region and fourth transmembrane domain of the γ2 subunit, CAML immunoprecipitates with GABAARs from transfected cells and brain lysates and colocalizes with γ2 in ER vesicles in soma and dendrites of neurons. CAML shRNA treatment results in reduced expression of postsynaptic GABAARs, along with significant reductions in GABA-evoked whole-cell currents and GABAergic synaptic function, while glutamatergic transmission is unaffected. Reduced surface expression of GABAARs in CAML mutant neurons is associated with selective deficits in recycling of endocytosed GABAARs to the cell surface. Our results indicate a specific role of CAML in functional expression and endocytic recycling of postsynaptic GABAARs. PMID:18424167

  17. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  18. The Membrane Mucin Msb2 Regulates Invasive Growth and Plant Infection in Fusarium oxysporum[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Nadales, Elena; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Fungal pathogenicity in plants requires a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade homologous to the yeast filamentous growth pathway. How this signaling cascade is activated during infection remains poorly understood. In the soil-borne vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum, the orthologous MAPK Fmk1 (Fusarium MAPK1) is essential for root penetration and pathogenicity in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Here, we show that Msb2, a highly glycosylated transmembrane protein, is required for surface-induced phosphorylation of Fmk1 and contributes to a subset of Fmk1-regulated functions related to invasive growth and virulence. Mutants lacking Msb2 share characteristic phenotypes with the Δfmk1 mutant, including defects in cellophane invasion, penetration of the root surface, and induction of vascular wilt symptoms in tomato plants. In contrast with Δfmk1, Δmsb2 mutants were hypersensitive to cell wall targeting compounds, a phenotype that was exacerbated in a Δmsb2 Δfmk1 double mutant. These results suggest that the membrane mucin Msb2 promotes invasive growth and plant infection upstream of Fmk1 while contributing to cell integrity through a distinct pathway. PMID:21441438

  19. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  20. Membrane proteins as 14-3-3 clients in functional regulation and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J; Daut, Jürgen; Schwappach, Blanche

    2011-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate the function and subcellular sorting of membrane proteins. Often, 14-3-3 binding to client proteins requires phosphorylation of the client, but the relevant kinase is unknown in most cases. We summarize current progress in identifying kinases that target membrane proteins with 14-3-3 binding sites and discuss the molecular mechanisms of 14-3-3 action. One of the kinases involved is Akt/PKB, which has recently been shown to activate the 14-3-3-dependent switch in a number of client membrane proteins.

  1. An Unconventional Diacylglycerol Kinase That Regulates Phospholipid Synthesis and Nuclear Membrane Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gil-Soo; O'Hara, Laura; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2008-01-01

    Changes in nuclear size and shape during the cell cycle or during development require coordinated nuclear membrane remodeling, but the underlying molecular events are largely unknown. We have shown previously that the activity of the conserved phosphatidate phosphatase Pah1p/Smp2p regulates nuclear structure in yeast by controlling phospholipid synthesis and membrane biogenesis at the nuclear envelope. Two screens for novel regulators of phosphatidate led to the identification of DGK1. We show that Dgk1p is a unique diacylglycerol kinase that uses CTP, instead of ATP, to generate phosphatidate. DGK1 counteracts the activity of PAH1 at the nuclear envelope by controlling phosphatidate levels. Overexpression of DGK1 causes the appearance of phosphatidate-enriched membranes around the nucleus and leads to its expansion, without proliferating the cortical endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Mutations that decrease phosphatidate levels decrease nuclear membrane growth in pah1Δ cells. We propose that phosphatidate metabolism is a critical factor determining nuclear structure by regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis. PMID:18458075

  2. Science review: Cell membrane expression (connectivity) regulates neutrophil delivery, function and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Andrew JE; Pascual, José L; Christou, Nicolas V

    2003-01-01

    As the principal cellular component of the inflammatory host defense and contributor to host injury after severe physiologic insult, the neutrophil is inherently coupled to patient outcome in both health and disease. Extensive research has focused on the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil delivery, function, and clearance from the inflammatory microenvironment. The neutrophil cell membrane mediates the interaction of the neutrophil with the extracellular environment; it expresses a complex array of adhesion molecules and receptors for various ligands, including mediators, cytokines, immunoglobulins, and membrane molecules on other cells. This article presents a review and analysis of the evidence that the neutrophil membrane plays a central role in regulating neutrophil delivery (production, rolling, adhesion, diapedesis, and chemotaxis), function (priming and activation, microbicidal activity, and neutrophil-mediated host injury), and clearance (apoptosis and necrosis). In addition, we review how change in neutrophil membrane expression is synonymous with change in neutrophil function in vivo. Employing a complementary analysis of the neutrophil as a complex system, neutrophil membrane expression may be regarded as a measure of neutrophil connectivity, with altered patterns of connectivity representing functionally distinct neutrophil states. Thus, not only does the neutrophil membrane mediate the processes that characterize the neutrophil lifecycle, but characterization of neutrophil membrane expression represents a technology with which to evaluate neutrophil function. PMID:12930553

  3. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is a Key Regulator of Membrane Fluidity in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Noyon, Caroline; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-02-12

    Adequate membrane fluidity is required for a variety of key cellular processes and in particular for proper function of membrane proteins. In most eukaryotic cells, membrane fluidity is known to be regulated by fatty acid desaturation and cholesterol, although some cells, such as insect cells, are almost devoid of sterol synthesis. We show here that insect and mammalian cells present similar microviscosity at their respective physiological temperature. To investigate how both sterols and phospholipids control fluidity homeostasis, we quantified the lipidic composition of insect SF9 and mammalian HEK 293T cells under normal or sterol-modified condition. As expected, insect cells show minimal sterols compared with mammalian cells. A major difference is also observed in phospholipid content as the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) is inverted (4 times higher in SF9 cells). In vitro studies in liposomes confirm that both cholesterol and PE can increase rigidity of the bilayer, suggesting that both can be used by cells to maintain membrane fluidity. We then show that exogenously increasing the cholesterol amount in SF9 membranes leads to a significant decrease in PE:PC ratio whereas decreasing cholesterol in HEK 293T cells using statin treatment leads to an increase in the PE:PC ratio. In all cases, the membrane fluidity is maintained, indicating that both cell types combine regulation by sterols and phospholipids to control proper membrane fluidity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A palmitoylation switch mechanism regulates Rac1 function and membrane organization

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Perales, Sara; Calvo, María; Rentero, Carles; Zheng, Yi; Enrich, Carlos; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays important roles in many processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, cell-cycle progression and gene expression. The initiation of Rac1 signalling requires at least two mechanisms: GTP loading via the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP) cycle, and targeting to cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms governing this specific compartmentalization. We show that Rac1 can incorporate palmitate at cysteine 178 and that this post-translational modification targets Rac1 for stabilization at actin cytoskeleton-linked ordered membrane regions. Palmitoylation of Rac1 requires its prior prenylation and the intact C-terminal polybasic region and is regulated by the triproline-rich motif. Non-palmitoylated Rac1 shows decreased GTP loading and lower association with detergent-resistant (liquid-ordered) membranes (DRMs). Cells expressing no Rac1 or a palmitoylation-deficient mutant have an increased content of disordered membrane domains, and markers of ordered membranes isolated from Rac1-deficient cells do not correctly partition in DRMs. Importantly, cells lacking Rac1 palmitoylation show spreading and migration defects. These data identify palmitoylation as a mechanism for Rac1 function in actin cytoskeleton remodelling by controlling its membrane partitioning, which in turn regulates membrane organization. PMID:22157745

  5. Surface-coupled proton exchange of a membrane-bound proton acceptor.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Tor; Salomonsson, Lina; Brzezinski, Peter; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-03-02

    Proton-transfer reactions across and at the surface of biological membranes are central for maintaining the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradients involved in cellular energy conversion. In this study, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to measure the local protonation and deprotonation rates of single pH-sensitive fluorophores conjugated to liposome membranes, and the dependence of these rates on lipid composition and ion concentration. Measurements of proton exchange rates over a wide proton concentration range, using two different pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pK(a)s, revealed two distinct proton exchange regimes. At high pH (> 8), proton association increases rapidly with increasing proton concentrations, presumably because the whole membrane acts as a proton-collecting antenna for the fluorophore. In contrast, at low pH (< 7), the increase in the proton association rate is slower and comparable to that of direct protonation of the fluorophore from the bulk solution. In the latter case, the proton exchange rates of the two fluorophores are indistinguishable, indicating that their protonation rates are determined by the local membrane environment. Measurements on membranes of different surface charge and at different ion concentrations made it possible to determine surface potentials, as well as the distance between the surface and the fluorophore. The results from this study define the conditions under which biological membranes can act as proton-collecting antennae and provide fundamental information on the relation between the membrane surface charge density and the local proton exchange kinetics.

  6. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V. Hassanein, Ahmed; Partenskii, Michael B. Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-06-21

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane’s hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)].

  7. Crystalline polymorphism induced by charge regulation in ionic membranes.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Palmer, Liam C; Kewalramani, Sumit; Qiao, Baofu; Stupp, Samuel I; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-10-08

    The crystallization of molecules with polar and hydrophobic groups, such as ionic amphiphiles and proteins, is of paramount importance in biology and biotechnology. By coassembling dilysine (+2) and carboxylate (-1) amphiphiles of various tail lengths into bilayer membranes at different pH values, we show that the 2D crystallization process in amphiphile membranes can be controlled by modifying the competition of long-range and short-range interactions among the polar and the hydrophobic groups. The pH and the hydrophobic tail length modify the intermolecular packing and the symmetry of their crystalline phase. For hydrophobic tail lengths of 14 carbons (C14), we observe the coassembly into crystalline bilayers with hexagonal molecular ordering via in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. As the tail length increases, the hexagonal lattice spacing decreases due to an increase in van der Waals interactions, as demonstrated by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. For C16 and C18 we observe a reentrant crystalline phase transition sequence, hexagonal-rectangular-C-rectangular-P-rectangular-C-hexagonal, as the solution pH is increased from 3 to 10.5. The stability of the rectangular phases, which maximize tail packing, increases with increasing tail length. As a result, for very long tails (C22), the possibility of observing packing symmetries other than rectangular-C phases diminishes. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to systematically exchange chemical and mechanical energy by changing the solution pH value within a range of physiological conditions at room temperature in bilayers of molecules with ionizable groups.

  8. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Saeui, Christopher T.; Mathew, Mohit P.; Liu, Lingshui; Urias, Esteban; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life—a single cell—and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate “functional biomaterial”. To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies—as they rapidly mature—hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels. PMID:26096148

  9. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications.

    PubMed

    Saeui, Christopher T; Mathew, Mohit P; Liu, Lingshui; Urias, Esteban; Yarema, Kevin J

    2015-06-18

    Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life-a single cell-and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate "functional biomaterial". To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies-as they rapidly mature-hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels.

  10. Peptides at Membrane Surfaces and their Role in Prebiotic Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Chipot, Christophe; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protocells had to transport ions and organic matter across membranes separating the interior of the cell from the environment, capture and utilize energy and transduce environmental signals. In a series of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we show how these peptides in contact with membranes can acquire ordered structures and functions. We have investigated the stability of a simple alpha-helical peptide containing Leucine (L) and Serine (S) of the form (LSLLLSL)3 in a model membrane system. The parallel in-plane state is the most stable configuration. The transmembrane state is metastable, and about 15 kcal/mol is required to insert the peptide into the membrane. We investigated dimes of both (LSLLLSL)3 and glycophorin A, and show how the free energy of helix association can, at least partially, offset the free energy of insertion. We have also investigated the transmembrane pore of the influenza M2 protein. This aggregate of four identical alpha-helices, each built of 25 amino acids, forms an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism, which can involve strands of hydrogen-bonded water through the pore or proton transfer through tautomerization of protein residues. The channel can be re-engineered to act as a simple proton pump.

  11. Surface modification of poly(ether sulfone) membrane with a synthesized negatively charged copolymer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Qin, Hui; Shi, Wenbin; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-11-18

    In this study, we provide a new method to modify poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membrane with good biocompatibility, for which diazotized PES (PES-N2(+)) membrane is covalently coated by a negatively charged copolymer of sodium sulfonated poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (NaSPS-MA). First, aminated PES (PES-NH2) is synthesized by nitro reduction reaction of nitro-PES (PES-NO2), and then blends with pristine PES to prepare PES/PES-NH2 membrane; then the membrane is treated with NaNO2 aqueous solution at acid condition; after surface diazo reaction, surface positively charged PES/PES-N2(+) membrane is prepared. Second, poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PS-alt-MA) is synthesized, then sulfonated and treated by sodium hydroxide solution to obtain sodium sulfonated (PS-alt-MA) (NaSPS-MA). Finally, the negatively charged NaSPS-MA copolymer is coated onto the surface positively charged PES/PES-N2(+) membrane via electrostatic interaction; after UV-cross-linking, the linkage between the PES-N2(+) and NaSPS-MA changes to a covalent bond. The surface-modified PES membrane is characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses, and surface zeta potential analyses. The modified membrane exhibits good hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility, and the improved biocompatibility might have resulted from the existence of the hydrophilic groups (sodium carboxylate (-COONa) and sodium sulfonate (-SO3Na)). Moreover, the stability of the modified membrane is also investigated. The results indicated that the modified PES membrane using negatively charged copolymers had a lot of potential in blood purification fields and bioartificial liver supports for a long time.

  12. Surface Segregation in a PdCu Alloy Hydrogen Separation Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.B.; Matranga, C.S.; Gellman, A.J.

    2007-06-01

    Separation of hydrogen from mixed gas streams is an important step for hydrogen generation technologies, including hydrocarbon reforming and coal/biomass gasification. Dense palladium-based membranes have received significant attention for this application because of palladium’s ability to dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at its surface for subsequent transport of hydrogen atoms through its bulk. Alloying palladium with minor components, like copper, has been shown to improve both the membrane’s structural characteristics and resistance to poisoning of its catalytic surface [1]. Surface segregation—a composition difference between the bulk material and its surface—is common in alloys and can affect important surface processes. Rational design of alloy membranes requires that surface segregation be understood, and possibly controlled. In this work, we examine surface segregation in a polycrystalline Pd70Cu30 hydrogen separation membrane as a function of thermal treatment and adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

  13. Comparison of bacterial communities of biofilms formed on different membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Hong, Ted Inpyo; Kim, Bongchul; Hong, Seungkwan; Park, Hee-Deung

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial biofilm communities formed on different membrane surfaces were investigated based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The biofilm communities were distinct from those of mixed-liquor and consisted mainly of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Sequences of Xathomonas and Aquabacterium were mostly retrieved from the biofilm samples rather than from the mixed liquor. Furthermore, statistical analyses demonstrated the importance of a physico-chemical property of membrane, surface roughness, in structuring the bacterial biofilm communities.

  14. Iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins of Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; Heilbronner, Simon; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is the only coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species with a locus encoding iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins. In Staphylococcus aureus, the Isd proteins capture heme from hemoglobin and transfer it across the wall to a membrane-bound transporter, which delivers it into the cytoplasm, where heme oxygenases release iron. The Isd proteins of S. lugdunensis are expressed under iron-restricted conditions. We propose that S. lugdunensis IsdB and IsdC proteins perform the same functions as those of S. aureus. S. lugdunensis IsdB is the only hemoglobin receptor within the isd locus. It specifically binds human hemoglobin with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 23 nM and transfers heme on IsdC. IsdB expression promotes bacterial growth in an iron-limited medium containing human hemoglobin but not mouse hemoglobin. This correlates with weak binding of IsdB to mouse hemoglobin in vitro. Unlike IsdB and IsdC, the proteins IsdJ and IsdK are not sorted to the cell wall in S. lugdunensis. In contrast, IsdJ expressed in S. aureus and Lactococcus lactis is anchored to peptidoglycan, suggesting that S. lugdunensis sortases may differ in signal recognition or could be defective. IsdJ and IsdK are present in the culture supernatant, suggesting that they could acquire heme from the external milieu. The IsdA protein of S. aureus protects bacteria from bactericidal lipids due to its hydrophilic C-terminal domain. IsdJ has a similar region and protected S. aureus and L. lactis as efficiently as IsdA but, possibly due to its location, was less effective in its natural host.

  15. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase activity is regulated by actin oligomers through direct interaction.

    PubMed

    Dalghi, Marianela G; Fernández, Marisa M; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Strehler, Emanuel E; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2013-08-09

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca(2+) with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[(125)I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca(2+) and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  16. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  17. Membrane fouling in a submerged membrane bioreactor: An unified approach to construct topography and to evaluate interaction energy between two randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Shen, Liguo; Zhang, Meijia; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun

    2017-11-01

    Quantitatively evaluating interaction energy between two randomly rough surfaces is the prerequisite to quantitatively understand and control membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). In this study, a new unified approach to construct rough topographies and to quantify interaction energy between a randomly rough particle and a randomly rough membrane was proposed. It was found that, natural rough topographies of both foulants and membrane could be well constructed by a modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function included in fractal theory. Spatial differential relationships between two constructed surfaces were accordingly established. Thereafter, a new approach combining these relationships, surface element integration (SEI) approach and composite Simpson's rule was deduced to calculate the interaction energy between two randomly rough surfaces in a submerged MBR. The obtained results indicate the profound effects of surface morphology on interaction energy and membrane fouling. This study provided a basic approach to investigate membrane fouling and interface behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and effect of biofouling on polyamide reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohiuddin Md Taimur; Stewart, Philip S; Moll, David J; Mickols, William E; Nelson, Sara E; Camper, Anne K

    2011-02-01

    Biofouling is a major reason for flux decline in the performance of membrane-based water and wastewater treatment plants. Initial biochemical characterization of biofilm formation potential and biofouling on two commercially available membrane surfaces from FilmTec Corporation were investigated without filtration in laboratory rotating disc reactor systems. These surfaces were polyamide aromatic thin-film reverse osmosis (RO) (BW30) and semi-aromatic nanofiltration (NF270) membranes. Membrane swatches were fixed on removable coupons and exposed to water with indigenous microorganisms supplemented with 1.5 mg l(-1) organic carbon under continuous flow. After biofilms formed, the membrane swatches were removed for analyses. Staining and epifluorescence microscopy revealed more cells on the RO than on the NF surface. Based on image analyses of 5-μm thick cryo-sections, the accumulation of hydrated biofoulants on the RO and NF surfaces exceeded 0.74 and 0.64 μm day(-1), respectively. As determined by contact angle the biofoulants increased the hydrophobicity up to 30° for RO and 4° for NF surfaces. The initial difference between virgin RO and NO hydrophobicities was ∼5°, which increased up to 25° after biofoulant formation. The initial roughness of RO and NF virgin surfaces (75.3 nm and 8.2 nm, respectively) increased to 48 nm and 39 nm after fouling. A wide range of changes of the chemical element mass percentages on membrane surfaces was observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The initial chemical signature on the NF surface was better restored after cleaning than the RO membrane. All the data suggest that the semi-aromatic NF surface was more biofilm resistant than the aromatic RO surface. The morphology of the biofilm and the location of active and dead cell zones could be related to the membrane surface properties and general biofouling accumulation was associated with changes in the surface chemistry of the membranes, suggesting the validity of

  19. Surface characterization of the chitosan membrane after oxygen plasma treatment and its aging effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Yin, Shiheng; Ren, Li; Zhao, Lianna

    2009-06-01

    Chitosan has received considerable attention for biomedical applications in recent years because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this paper, angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) was carried out to investigate the chemical groups' spatial orientation on the chitosan membrane surface. Oxygen plasma treatment was also employed to improve the surface hydrophilicity of the chitosan membrane. The results of ARXPS revealed the distribution of surface polar groups, such as-OH and O=CNH(2) toward the membrane bulk, which was the origin of the chitosan membrane surface hydrophobicity. The contact angle measurements and XPS results indicated that oxygen plasma treatment can markedly improve the surface hydrophilicity and surface energy of the chitosan membrane by incorporating oxygen-containing polar groups. With the existence of the aging process, the influence of plasma treatment was not permanent, it faded with storage time. The ARXPS result discovered that the reorientation of polar functional groups generated by plasma treatment toward the membrane bulk was primarily responsible for the aging effect.

  20. Growth of ZnO nanowires on polypropylene membrane surface-Characterization and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarska, Marta; Nowak, Bartosz; Skowroński, Jarosław; Piątkiewicz, Wojciech; Gradoń, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Need for a new membrane is clearly visible in recent studies, mostly due to the fouling phenomenon. Authors, focused on problem of biofouling caused by microorganisms that are present in water environment. An attempt to form a new membrane with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires was made; where plasma treatment was used as a first step of modification followed by chemical bath deposition. Such membrane will exhibit additional reactive properties. ZnO, because of its antibacterial and photocatalytic properties, is more and more often used in commercial applications. The authors used SEM imaging, measurement of the contact angle, XRD and the FT-IR analysis for membrane characterization. Amount of ZnO deposited on membrane surface was also investigated by dithizone method. Photocatalytic properties of such membranes were examined through methylene blue and humic acid degradation in laboratory scale modules with LEDs as either: wide range white or UV light source. Antibacterial and antifouling properties of polypropylene membranes modified with ZnO nanowires were examined through a series of tests involving microorganisms: model gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The obtained results showed that it is possible to modify the membrane surface in such a way, that additional reactive properties will be given. Thus, not only did the membrane become a physical barrier, but also turned out to be a reactive one.

  1. The distribution of surface antigens during fractionation of mouse liver plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gurd, James W.; Evans, W. H.; Perkins, Harold R.

    1972-01-01

    1. Antiserum to purified mouse liver plasma membranes was prepared and the partially purified γ-globulin antibody fraction was iodinated with 125I. The reaction of the 125I-labelled γ-globulin antibody with isolated mouse liver plasma membranes was studied. 2. The γglobulin antibody bound specifically to mouse liver plasma membranes and there was little reaction with mouse liver intracellular membranes or with surface-membrane fractions from either rat liver or pig lymphocytes. 3. `Light' and `heavy' mouse liver plasma-membrane subfractions bound similar amounts of γ-globulin antibody, and this is consistent with a surface origin for the light fraction. 5. Plasma membranes were fractionated by sequential extraction with 50mm-NaHCO3–Na2CO3 buffer, pH10.2, containing 10mm-EDTA and aq. 33% (v/v) pyridine. The alkali-soluble and -insoluble fractions and the pyridine-soluble and -insoluble fractions all reacted with the antiserum, and the cross-reactivity among the various fractions and with the total plasma membranes was investigated. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the arrangement of the antigenic determinants within the membrane. PMID:4120434

  2. T-lymphocyte passive deformation is controlled by unfolding of membrane surface reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Lionel; Babataheri, Avin; Saitakis, Michael; Bohineust, Armelle; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Hivroz, Claire; Barakat, Abdul I.; Husson, Julien

    2016-01-01

    T-lymphocytes in the human body routinely undergo large deformations, both passively, when going through narrow capillaries, and actively, when transmigrating across endothelial cells or squeezing through tissue. We investigate physical factors that enable and limit such deformations and explore how passive and active deformations may differ. Employing micropipette aspiration to mimic squeezing through narrow capillaries, we find that T-lymphocytes maintain a constant volume while they increase their apparent membrane surface area upon aspiration. Human resting T-lymphocytes, T-lymphoblasts, and the leukemic Jurkat T-cells all exhibit membrane rupture above a critical membrane area expansion that is independent of either micropipette size or aspiration pressure. The unfolded membrane matches the excess membrane contained in microvilli and membrane folds, as determined using scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, during transendothelial migration, a form of active deformation, we find that the membrane surface exceeds by a factor of two the amount of membrane stored in microvilli and folds. These results suggest that internal membrane reservoirs need to be recruited, possibly through exocytosis, for large active deformations to occur. PMID:27605708

  3. Visualizing and quantifying the nanoscale hydrophobicity and chemical distribution of surface modified polyethersulfone (PES) membranes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wanyi; Carbrello, Christina; Wu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Wen

    2017-10-06

    Chemical modifications bring unique properties into polymeric membranes that may have enhanced filtration or separation efficiencies, antifouling, antimicrobial activity and selectivity. However, there is a lack of nanoscale characterization of the chemical additive distribution and the impacts of chemical modifiers or additives on membrane surface properties, especially those at the nanoscale. In this study, a series of industrially relevant polyethersulfone (PES) membranes modified with poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were analysed systematically. Particularly, hydrophobicity and chemical distribution were scrutinized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM coupled with infrared analysis capability (AFM-IR) for the first time that successfully resolved nanoscale structural and chemical properties of the chemically modified PES membranes. Our results indicated the heterogeneous spatial distribution of PVP and PEG based on their characteristic IR bands and the resulting hydrophobicity distribution on modified membrane surfaces at the nanoscale. Particularly, we established a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.9449) between the measured adhesion force and water contact angles, which enabled the examination of local surface hydrophobicity. The PES membranes became more hydrophilic with the increasing blend of PVP and PEG. With AFM-IR, trace amounts (1-4%) of PVP could be identified sensitively on PES membranes based on their unique characteristic IR bands, which were not achieved by FTIR or IR mapping. Overall, these novel characterization approaches hold paramount importance for the design and quality control of polymer membrane modification and manufacturing.

  4. Corona-induced graft polymerization for surface modification of porous polyethersulfone membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li-Ping; Zhu, Bao-Ku; Xu, Li; Feng, Yong-Xiang; Liu, Fu; Xu, You-Yi

    2007-05-01

    Graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto porous polyethersulfone (PES) membrane surfaces was developed using corona discharge in atmospheric ambience as an activation process followed by polymerization of AA in aqueous solution. The effects of the corona parameters and graft polymerization conditions on grafting yield (GY) of AA were investigated. The grafting of AA on the PES membranes was confirmed by ATR-FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Porosimetry measurements indicate the average pore diameters and porosities of the modified membranes decrease with the increase of the GY. The hydrophilicity and surface wetting properties of the original and modified membranes were evaluated by observing the dynamic changes of water contact angles. It is found that the grafting of AA occurs not only on the membrane surfaces, but also on the pore walls of the cells inside the membrane. The permeability experiments of protein solution reveal that the grafting of PAA endows the modified membranes with enhanced fluxes and anti-fouling properties. The optimized GY of AA is in the range of 150-200 μg/cm 2. In addition, the tensile experiments show the corona discharge treatment with the power lower than 150 W yields little damage to the mechanical strength of the membranes.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure plasma activation and surface characterization on polyethylene membrane separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-Chien; Li, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Chun

    2017-01-01

    The surface hydrophilic activation of a polyethylene membrane separator was achieved using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. The surface of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator was found to be highly hydrophilic realized by adjusting the plasma power input. The variations in membrane separator chemical structure were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Chemical analysis showed newly formed carbonyl-containing groups and high surface concentrations of oxygen-containing species on the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated polymeric separator surface. It also showed that surface hydrophilicity primarily increased from the polar component after atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment. The surface and pore structures of the polyethylene membrane separator were examined by scanning electron microscopy, revealing a slight alteration in the pore structure. As a result of the incorporation of polar functionalities by atmospheric-pressure plasma activation, the electrolyte uptake and electrochemical impedance of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator improved. The investigational results show that the separator surface can be controlled by atmospheric-pressure plasma surface treatment to tailor the hydrophilicity and enhance the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries.

  6. Tuning surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of hydrocarbon proton exchange membranes (PEMs).

    PubMed

    He, Chenfeng; Mighri, Frej; Guiver, Michael D; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2016-03-15

    The effect of annealing on the surface hydrophilicity of various representative classes of hydrocarbon-based proton exchange membranes (PEMs) is investigated. In all cases, a more hydrophilic membrane surface develops after annealing at elevated temperatures. The annealing time also had some influence, but in different ways depending on the class of PEM. Longer annealing times resulted in more hydrophilic membrane surfaces for copolymerized sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK-HQ), while the opposite behavior occurred in sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (Ph-SPEEK), sulfonated poly(aryl ether ether ketone ketone) (Ph-m-SPEEKK) and sulfonated poly (aryl ether ether nitrile) (SPAEEN-B). Increased surface hydrophilicity upon annealing results from ionic cluster decomposition, according to the "Eisenberg-Hird-Moore model" (EHM). The increased surface hydrophilicity is supported by contact angle (CA) measurements, and the cluster decomposition is auxiliarily supported by probing the level of atomic sulfur (sulfonic acid) within different surface depths using angle-dependent XPS as well as ATR-FTIR. Membrane acidification leads to more hydrophilic surfaces by elimination of the hydrogen bonding that occurs between strongly-bound residual solvent (dimethylacetamide, DMAc) and PEM sulfonic acid groups. The study of physicochemical tuning of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of PEMs by annealing and acidification provides insights for improving membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabrication in fuel cell (FC).

  7. Functionality in Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Based on Fiber's Size, Surface Area, and Molecular Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Electrospinning is a versatile method for forming continuous thin fibers based on an electrohydrodynamic process. This method has the following advantages: (i) the ability to produce thin fibers with diameters in the micrometer and nanometer ranges; (ii) one-step forming of the two- or three-dimensional nanofiber network assemblies (nanofibrous membranes); and (iii) applicability for a broad spectrum of molecules, such as synthetic and biological polymers and polymerless sol-gel systems. Electrospun nanofibrous membranes have received significant attention in terms of their practical applications. The major advantages of nanofibers or nanofibrous membranes are the functionalities based on their nanoscaled-size, highly specific surface area, and highly molecular orientation. These functionalities of the nanofibrous membranes can be controlled by their fiber diameter, surface chemistry and topology, and internal structure of the nanofibers. This report focuses on our studies and describes fundamental aspects and applications of electrospun nanofibrous membranes. PMID:24957735

  8. A taste sensor based on surface imprinted TiO2 membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenxiang; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Xingguo; Zhao, Hongtian; Chu, Fugang; Hou, Hongbin

    2012-03-01

    Surface imprinted TiO2 membranes had been prepared and used as sensing membranes for basic tastes discrimination. Four basic taste molecules (citric acid, D-glucose, quinine hydrochloride and sodium L-glutamate for sour, sweet, bitter and umami respectively) were used as templates for imprinting. The sensor was fabricated in light-addressable potentiometric principle. Experimental results show that membranes imprinted by citric acid and quinine hydrochloride exhibit similar response behaviors towards four taste substances, that is citric acid > quinine hydrochloride > sodium L-glutamate > D-glucose. Membrane imprinted by sodium L-glutamate is sensitive towards quinine hydrochloride. Except for D-glucose imprinting membrane, other three membranes are inert to glucose. Combined with principal component analysis, four basic tastes can be well distinguished.

  9. A taste sensor based on surface imprinted TiO2 membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenxiang; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Xingguo; Zhao, Hongtian; Chu, Fugang; Hou, Hongbin

    2011-11-01

    Surface imprinted TiO2 membranes had been prepared and used as sensing membranes for basic tastes discrimination. Four basic taste molecules (citric acid, D-glucose, quinine hydrochloride and sodium L-glutamate for sour, sweet, bitter and umami respectively) were used as templates for imprinting. The sensor was fabricated in light-addressable potentiometric principle. Experimental results show that membranes imprinted by citric acid and quinine hydrochloride exhibit similar response behaviors towards four taste substances, that is citric acid > quinine hydrochloride > sodium L-glutamate > D-glucose. Membrane imprinted by sodium L-glutamate is sensitive towards quinine hydrochloride. Except for D-glucose imprinting membrane, other three membranes are inert to glucose. Combined with principal component analysis, four basic tastes can be well distinguished.

  10. Vacuolar H+-ATPase in the nuclear membranes regulates nucleo-cytosolic proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julianna Maria; Martínez-Zaguilán, Raul; Facanha, Arnoldo Rocha; Hussain, Fazle; Sennoune, Souad R

    2016-10-01

    The regulation of the luminal pH of each organelle is crucial for its function and must be controlled tightly. Nevertheless, it has been assumed that the nuclear pH is regulated by the cytoplasmic proton transporters via the diffusion of H(+) across the nuclear pores because of their large diameter. However, it has been demonstrated that ion gradients exist between cytosol and nucleus, suggesting that the permeability of ions across the nuclear pores is restricted. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-H(+)-ATPase) is responsible for the creation and maintenance of trans-membrane electrochemical gradient. We hypothesize that V-H(+)-ATPase located in the nuclear membranes functions as the primary mechanism to regulate nuclear pH and generate H(+) gradients across the nuclear envelope. We studied the subcellular heterogeneity of H(+) concentration in the nucleus and cytosol using ratio imaging microscopy and SNARF-1, a pH indicator, in prostate cells. Our results indicate that there are proton gradients across the nuclear membranes that are generated by V-H(+)-ATPase located in the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We demonstrated that these gradients are mostly dissipated by inhibiting V-H(+)-ATPase. Immunoblots and V-H(+)-ATPase activity corroborated the existence of V-H(+)-ATPase in the nuclear membranes. This study demonstrates that V-H(+)-ATPase is functionally expressed in nuclear membranes and is responsible for nuclear H(+) gradients that may promote not only the coupled transport of substrates, but also most electrochemically driven events across the nuclear membranes. This study represents a paradigm shift that the nucleus can regulate its own pH microenvironment, providing new insights into nuclear ion homeostasis and signaling.

  11. Improved blood compatibility of polyethersulfone membrane with a hydrophilic and anionic surface.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shengqiang; Xue, Jimin; Lu, Yi; Liu, Yeqiu; Wang, Dongsheng; Sun, Shudong; Ran, Fen; Zhao, Changsheng

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a novel triblock copolymer of poly (styrene-co-acrylic acid)-b-poly (vinyl pyrrolidone)-b-poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (P(St-co-AA)-b-PVP-b-P(St-co-AA)) is synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and used for the modification of blood contacting surface of polyethersulfone (PES) membrane to improve blood compatibility. The synthesized block copolymer can be directly blended with PES to prepare PES membranes by a liquid-liquid phase separation technique. The compositions and structure of the PES membranes are characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ATR-FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the surface charge density of the modified PES membrane was measured by Zeta-potential; the blood compatibility of the PES membranes was assessed by detecting bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine serum fibrinogen (BFG) adsorption, platelet adhesion, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet activation, and thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT) generation. The results indicated that the blood compatibility of the modified PES membrane was improved due to the membrane surface modification by blending the amphiphilic block copolymer and the surface segregation of the block copolymer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) to probe monolayers of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ataka, Kenichi; Stripp, Sven Timo; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) represents a variation of conventional infrared spectroscopy and exploits the signal enhancement exerted by the plasmon resonance of nano-structured metal thin films. The surface enhancement decays in about 10nm with the distance from the surface and is, thus, perfectly suited to selectively probe monolayers of biomembranes. Peculiar to membrane proteins is their vectorial functionality, the probing of which requires proper orientation within the membrane. To this end, the metal surface used in SEIRAS is chemically modified to generate an oriented membrane protein film. Monolayers of uniformly oriented membrane proteins are formed by tethering His-tagged proteins to a nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) modified gold surface and SEIRAS commands molecular sensitivity to probe each step of surface modification. The solid surface used as plasmonic substrate for SEIRAS, can also be employed as an electrode to investigate systems where electron transfer reactions are relevant, like e.g. cytochrome c oxidase or plant-type photosystems. Furthermore, the interaction of these membrane proteins with water-soluble proteins, like cytochrome c or hydrogenase, is studied on the molecular level by SEIRAS. The impact of the membrane potential on protein functionality is verified by monitoring light-dark difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin (SRII) at different applied potentials. It is demonstrated that the interpretations of all of these experiments critically depend on the orientation of the solid-supported membrane protein. Finally, future directions of SEIRAS including cellular systems are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies.

  13. Surface characterization of dialyzer polymer membranes by imaging ToF-SIMS and quantitative XPS line scans

    PubMed Central

    Holzweber, Markus; Lippitz, Andreas; Krueger, Katharina; Jankowski, Joachim; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of polymeric dialyzer membranes consisting of polysulfone and poly-vinylpyrrolidone were investigated regarding the lateral distribution and quantitative surface composition using time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Knowledge of the distribution and composition on the outer surface region is of utmost importance for understanding the biocompatibility of such dialyzer membranes. Both flat membranes and hollow fiber membranes were studied. PMID:25711334

  14. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Immune Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Smith, Jayden A.; Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The brain is characterized by a complex and integrated network of interacting cells in which cell-to-cell communication is critical for proper development and function. Initially considered as an immune privileged site, the brain is now regarded as an immune specialized system. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of immune components in the brain, as well as extensive bidirectional communication that takes place between the nervous and the immune system both under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In recent years the secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) has been described as a new and evolutionary well-conserved mechanism of cell-to-cell communication, with EMVs influencing the microenvironment through the traffic of bioactive molecules that include proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that EMVs are a promising candidate to study cross-boundary cell-to-cell communication pathways. Herein we review the role of EMVs secreted by neural cells in modulating the immune response(s) within the brain under physiological and pathological circumstances. PMID:22557978

  15. Sutureless Fixation of Amniotic Membrane for Therapy of Ocular Surface Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kotomin, Ilya; Valtink, Monika; Hofmann, Kai; Frenzel, Annika; Morawietz, Henning; Werner, Carsten; Funk, Richard H. W.; Engelmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic membrane is applied to the diseased ocular surface to stimulate wound healing and tissue repair, because it releases supportive growth factors and cytokines. These effects fade within about a week after application, necessitating repeated application. Generally, amniotic membrane is fixed with sutures to the ocular surface, but surgical intervention at the inflamed or diseased site can be detrimental. Therefore, we have developed a system for the mounting of amniotic membrane between two rings for application to a diseased ocular surface without surgical intervention (sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation). With this system, AmnioClip, amniotic membrane can be applied like a large contact lens. First prototypes were tested in an experiment on oneself for wearing comfort. The final system was tested on 7 patients in a pilot study. A possible influence of the ring system on the biological effects of amniotic membrane was analyzed by histochemistry and by analyzing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF 2) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) from amniotic membranes before and after therapeutic application. The final product, AmnioClip, showed good tolerance and did not impair the biological effects of amniotic membrane. VEGF-A and PEDF mRNA was expressed in amniotic membrane after storage and mounting before transplantation, but was undetectable after a 7-day application period. Consequently, transplantation of amniotic membranes with AmnioClip provides a sutureless and hence improved therapeutic strategy for corneal surface disorders. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02168790 PMID:25955359

  16. Clathrin sheets on the protoplasmic surface of ventral membranes of osteoclasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Akisaka, Toshitaka; Yoshida, Hisaho; Suzuki, Reiko; Shimizu, Kouichi; Takama, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    Physical cell-shearing resulted in various degrees of disruption of the basolateral (upper) membranes, cytoskeletons or cell organelles and exposed the protoplasmic surface of ventral (adhesion) membranes of osteoclasts that were attached to the underlying substratum, such as coverslips, mica or synthetic apatite plates. Freeze-dried replicas of the ventral membranes left behind on the substratum after cell-shearing provided three-dimensional information on the ultrastructure of the protoplasmic membrane surface of cultured osteoclasts. An extensive area of the protoplasmic surface and various amounts of cytoskeletal structures attached to the adherent ventral surface of the plasma membrane were visible. In particular, the most characteristic finding of the present study is that numerous clathrin sheets displaying various sizes, shapes and curvature were revealed on the ventral membrane. The polygon substructures of the clathrin lattices appeared to be composed of hexagons with a few pentagons interspersed. They were seen at the peripheral membranes where they were situated at the sites of close contact with the underlying substratum. In addition, clathrin lattices were never observed on the basolateral (upper) membranes. In favourable stereo views, most cytoskeletons were not in direct contact with the clathrin sheets. However, a few observations indicated possible remnants of cytoskeletons attached to clathrin lattices. Podosomes did not have a direct structural relationship to clathrin lattices. Although it is generally accepted that cytoskeletal podosomes in motile cells, such as osteoclasts, play a major role in cell adhesion, the present study indicates that membrane-associated clathrin might also function during attachment to the substrate. In this regard, clathrin is thought to be required for receptor-mediated endocytosis, but whether it might also function in cell attachment is still a matter for debate. This type of clathrin-related adhesion appears to

  17. Cortical cytoskeleton dynamics regulates plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform-2 (PMCA2) activity.

    PubMed

    Dalghi, Marianela G; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Montalbetti, Nicolás; Simonin, Alexandre; Strehler, Emanuel E; Hediger, Matthias A; Rossi, Juan Pablo

    2017-08-01

    We have previously shown that purified actin can directly bind to human plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase 4b (hPMCA4b) and exert a dual modulation on its Ca(2+)-ATPase activity: F-actin inhibits PMCA while short actin oligomers may contribute to PMCA activation. These studies had to be performed with purified proteins given the nature of the biophysical and biochemical approaches used. To assess whether a functional interaction between the PMCAs and the cortical cytoskeleton is of physiological relevance, we characterized this phenomenon in the context of a living cell by monitoring in real-time the changes in the cytosolic calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]CYT). In this study, we tested the influence of drugs that change the actin and microtubule polymerization state on the activity and membrane expression of the PMCA transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, which allowed us to observe and quantify these relationships in a live cell, for the first time. We found that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D significantly increased PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) extrusion (~50-100%) whereas pre-treatment with the F-actin stabilizing agent jasplakinolide caused its full inhibition. When the microtubule network was disrupted by pretreatment of the cells with colchicine, we observed a significant decrease in PMCA activity (~40-60% inhibition) in agreement with the previously reported role of acetylated tubulin on the calcium pump. In none of these cases was there a difference in the level of expression of the pump at the cell surface, thus suggesting that the specific activity of the pump was the regulated parameter. Our results indicate that PMCA activity is profoundly affected by the polymerization state of the cortical cytoskeleton in living cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Stabilization of membrane necks by adhesive particles, substrate surfaces, and constriction forces.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-10-21

    Membrane remodelling processes involving the formation and fission of small buds require the formation and closure of narrow membrane necks, both for biological membranes and for model membranes such as lipid bilayers. The conditions required for the stability of such necks are well understood in the context of budding of vesicles with bilayer asymmetry and/or intramembrane domains. In many cases, however, the necks form in the presence of an adhesive surface, such as a solid particle or substrate, or the cellular cortex itself. Examples of such processes in biological cells include endocytosis, exocytosis and phagocytosis of solid particles, the formation of extracellular and outer membrane vesicles by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, as well as the closure of the cleavage furrow in cytokinesis. Here, we study the interplay of curvature elasticity, membrane-substrate adhesion, and constriction forces to obtain generalized stability conditions for closed necks which we validate by numerical energy minimization. We then explore the consequences of these stability conditions in several experimentally accessible systems such as particle-filled membrane tubes, supported lipid bilayers, giant plasma membrane vesicles, bacterial outer membrane vesicles, and contractile rings around necks. At the end, we introduce an intrinsic engulfment force that directly describes the interplay between curvature elasticity and membrane-substrate adhesion.

  19. Altered Membrane Structure and Surface Potential in Homozygous Hemoglobin C Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Nardone, Glenn A.; Ostera, Graciela R.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Beaudry, Steven D.; Hayakawa, Eri; Dvorak, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin C differs from normal hemoglobin A by a glutamate-to-lysine substitution at position 6 of beta globin and is oxidatively unstable. Compared to homozygous AA erythrocytes, homozygous CC erythrocytes contain higher levels of membrane-associated hemichromes and more extensively clustered band 3 proteins. These findings suggest that CC erythrocytes have a different membrane matrix than AA erythrocytes. Methodology and Findings We found that AA and CC erythrocytes differ in their membrane lipid composition, and that a subset of CC erythrocytes expresses increased levels of externalized phosphatidylserine. Detergent membrane analyses for raft marker proteins indicated that CC erythrocyte membranes are more resistant to detergent solubilization. These data suggest that membrane raft organization is modified in CC erythrocytes. In addition, the average zeta potential (a measure of surface electrochemical potential) of CC erythrocytes was ≈2 mV lower than that of AA erythrocytes, indicating that substantial rearrangements occur in the membrane matrix of CC erythrocytes. We were able to recapitulate this low zeta potential phenotype in AA erythrocytes by treating them with NaNO2 to oxidize hemoglobin A molecules and increase levels of membrane-associated hemichromes. Conclusion Our data support the possibility that increased hemichrome deposition and altered lipid composition induce molecular rearrangements in CC erythrocyte membranes, resulting in a unique membrane structure. PMID:19503809

  20. Interaction of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with human red blood cell membranes: size and surface effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Guannan; Trewyn, Brian G; Slowing, Igor I; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2011-02-22

    The interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) of different particle sizes and surface properties with human red blood cell (RBC) membranes were investigated by membrane filtration, flow cytometry, and various microscopic techniques. Small MCM-41-type MSNs (∼100 nm) were found to adsorb to the surface of RBCs without disturbing the membrane or morphology. In contrast, adsorption of large SBA-15-type MSNs (∼600 nm) to RBCs induced a strong local membrane deformation leading to spiculation of RBCs, internalization of the particles, and eventual hemolysis. In addition, the relationship between the degree of MSN surface functionalization and the degree of its interaction with RBC, as well as the effect of RBC-MSN interaction on cellular deformability, were investigated. The results presented here provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC-MSN interaction and the hemolytic activity of MSNs and will assist in the rational design of hemocompatible MSNs for intravenous drug delivery and in vivo imaging.

  1. Elmo2 Is a Regulator of Insulin-dependent Glut4 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingmin; Côté, Jean-François; Du, Keyong

    2016-07-29

    Elmo2, a member of the Elmo protein family, has been implicated in the regulation of Rac1 and Akt activation. Recently, we found that Elmo2 specifically interacts with ClipR-59. Because Akt and Rac1 have been implicated in insulin dependent Glut4 membrane translocation, we hypothesize here that Elmo2 may play a role in insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation. Accordingly, we found that overexpression of Elmo2 enhanced, whereas its knockdown suppressed, insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 skeletal muscle cells. We also examined whether Elmo2 contributes to the insulin-mediated activation of Rac1 and Akt. We found that Elmo2 is required for insulin-induced Rac1 GTP loading, but not AKT activation, in L6 cells induced by insulin. Instead, Elmo2 is required to promote the insulin-induced membrane association of Akt. Together, our studies demonstrate that Elmo2 is a new regulator of insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation through modulating Rac1 activity and Akt membrane compartmentalization.

  2. Differential regulation of the lateral mobility of plasma membrane phospholipids by the extracellular matrix and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ramprasad, O G; Rangaraj, Nandini; Srinivas, G; Thiery, Jean Paul; Dufour, Sylvie; Pande, Gopal

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we compared qualitative and quantitative changes in the lateral mobility of phospholipid molecules in the plasma membrane of intact cells under various conditions of specific interaction of integrins in the cell membrane with two extracellular matrix (ECM) components viz. fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). We found a strong and specific correlation between the lower lateral mobility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and higher lateral mobility of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) when cells were expressing high levels of alpha5beta1 integrin and thus were adherent and motile on FN. The interaction between PC and FN in alpha5 integrin expressing cells was aided by the strong affinity of alpha5 integrin to the FN matrix. Cholesterol was involved in regulating the lateral mobility of PC to a great extent and of PE to a lesser extent without affecting the overall microviscosity of the plasma membrane or the distribution of caveolin-marked domains. The distribution and mobility of PC and PE molecules in the lamellipodial regions differed from that in the rest of the membrane and also in the more motile and in the less motile cells. We propose that these differences in distribution of PC and PE in different regions of cell membrane and their respective lateral mobility are observed due to the specific interaction of PC molecules with FN molecules in the ECM. Our results outline a new role of integrin-matrix interactions in the regulation of membrane phospholipid behavior. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Differential Regulation of Clathrin and Its Adaptor Proteins during Membrane Recruitment for Endocytosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianwei; Yan, Xu; Meng, Tingting; Wang, Yutong; Wang, Qingmei; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Gu, Ying; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Gadeyne, Astrid; Lin, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    In plants, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is dependent on the function of clathrin and its accessory heterooligomeric adaptor protein complexes, ADAPTOR PROTEIN2 (AP-2) and the TPLATE complex (TPC), and is negatively regulated by the hormones auxin and salicylic acid (SA). The details for how clathrin and its adaptor complexes are recruited to the plasma membrane (PM) to regulate CME, however, are poorly understood. We found that SA and the pharmacological CME inhibitor tyrphostin A23 reduce the membrane association of clathrin and AP-2, but not that of the TPC, whereas auxin solely affected clathrin membrane association, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic and pharmacological experiments revealed that loss of AP2μ or AP2σ partially affected the membrane association of other AP-2 subunits and that the AP-2 subunit AP2σ, but not AP2μ, was required for SA- and tyrphostin A23-dependent inhibition of CME. Furthermore, we show that although AP-2 and the TPC are both required for the PM recruitment of clathrin in wild-type cells, the TPC is necessary for clathrin PM association in AP-2-deficient cells. These results indicate that developmental signals may differentially modulate the membrane recruitment of clathrin and its core accessory complexes to regulate the process of CME in plant cells. PMID:26945051

  4. Enhancement of the flux for polypropylene hollow fiber membrane in a submerged membrane-bioreactor by surface modification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-yin; Lei, Hao; Xu, Zhi-kang

    2006-01-01

    To improve its limiting flux and antifouling characteristics in a submerged membrane-bioreactor (SMBR) for wastewater treatment, polypropylene hollow fiber microporous membrane (PPHFMM) was surface-modified by the plasma-induced immobilization of poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) and the plasma treatment with different gases respectively. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR/ATR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the structural and morphological changes on the membrane surface. Water contact angle was measured by the sessile drop method. It was found that the water contact angle was 128.8, 72.3, 62.7, 74.4, 79.1, 86.3, and 71.3 degrees for the nascent, PVP-immobilized, air, O2, Ar, CO2 and H2O plasma treated PPHFMM, respectively. The SMBR was operated at fixed transmembrane pressure to determine the limiting flux for the PPHFMM before and after surface modification. Results showed that the limiting flux appeared to be 103, 159, 117, 133, 136, 121 and 152 L/(m(2)x h) for the nascent, PVP-immobilized, air, 02, Ar, CO2 and H2O plasma treated PPHFMM, respectively. After continuous operation for about 50 h in the SMBR, the antifouling characteristics were improved to some extent.

  5. Polyamide desalination membrane characterization and surface modification to enhance fouling resistance.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Mukul M.; Freeman, Benny D.; Van Wagner, Elizabeth M.; Hickner, Michael A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-08-01

    The market for polyamide desalination membranes is expected to continue to grow during the coming decades. Purification of alternative water sources will also be necessary to meet growing water demands. Purification of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, is of interest due to its dual potential to provide water for beneficial use as well as to reduce wastewater disposal costs. However, current polyamide membranes are prone to fouling, which decreases water flux and shortens membrane lifetime. This research explored surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE) to improve the fouling resistance of commercial polyamide membranes. Characterization of commercial polyamide membrane performance was a necessary first step before undertaking surface modification studies. Membrane performance was found to be sensitive to crossflow testing conditions. Concentration polarization and feed pH strongly influenced NaCl rejection, and the use of continuous feed filtration led to higher water flux and lower NaCl rejection than was observed for similar tests performed using unfiltered feed. Two commercial polyamide membranes, including one reverse osmosis and one nanofiltration membrane, were modified by grafting PEGDE to their surfaces. Two different PEG molecular weights (200 and 1000) and treatment concentrations (1% (w/w) and 15% (w/w)) were studied. Water flux decreased and NaCl rejection increased with PEGDE graft density ({micro}g/cm{sup 2}), although the largest changes were observed for low PEGDE graft densities. Surface properties including hydrophilicity, roughness and charge were minimally affected by surface modification. The fouling resistance of modified and unmodified membranes was compared in crossflow filtration studies using model foulant solutions consisting of either a charged surfactant or an oil in water emulsion containing n-decane and a charged surfactant. Several PEGDE-modified membranes demonstrated improved

  6. Binding of AP-2 adaptor complex to brain membrane is regulated by phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alberdi, A. . E-mail: aalberdi@fcm.uncu.edu.ar; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2005-05-13

    Phosphorylation of proteins appears as a key process in early steps of clathrin coated vesicle formation. Here, we report that treatment of post-nuclear fraction with alkaline phosphatase induced redistribution of {alpha} subunits of AP-2 adaptor complex to cytosol and this effect was higher in the {alpha}2 subunit. A high serine phosphorylation status of {alpha} subunits correlated with the higher affinity of AP-2 to membranes. Using a simple binding assay, where membranes were incubated with either purified adaptors or cytosols, we observed an inhibitory effect of tyrphostin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the binding of AP-2 to membranes, but also an unexpected decrease induced by the phosphatase inhibitor cyclosporine. We also show an inhibitory effect of ATP mediated by cytosolic proteins, although it could not be related to the phosphorylation of AP-2, suggesting an action upstream a cascade of phosphorylations that participate in the regulation of the assembly of AP-2 to membranes.

  7. Erythrocyte adducin: A structural regulator of the red blood cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Franco, T.; Low, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Adducin is an α, β heterotetramer that performs multiple important functions in the human erythrocyte membrane. First, adducin forms a bridge that connects the spectrin–actin junctional complex to band 3, the major membrane-spanning protein in the bilayer. Rupture of this bridge leads to membrane instability and spontaneous fragmentation. Second, adducin caps the fast growing (barbed) end of actin filaments, preventing the tetradecameric protofilaments from elongating into macroscopic F-actin microfilaments. Third, adducin stabilizes the association between actin and spectrin, assuring that the junctional complex remains intact during the mechanical distortions experienced by the circulating cell. And finally, adducin responds to stimuli that may be important in regulating the global properties of the cell, possibly including cation transport, cell morphology and membrane deformability. The text below summarizes the structural properties of adducin, its multiple functions in erythrocytes, and the consequences of engineered deletions of each of adducin subunits in transgenic mice. PMID:20655268

  8. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  9. Yeast mitochondrial fission proteins induce antagonistic Gaussian membrane curvatures to regulate apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michelle; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic and interconnected network, which disintegrates during apoptosis to generate numerous smaller mitochondrial fragments. This process is at present not well understood. Yeast mitochondrial fission machinery proteins, Dnm1 and Fis1, are believed to regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Yeast Dnm1 has been previously shown to promote mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation characteristic of apoptotic cells, while yeast Fis1 inhibits cell death by limiting the mitochondrial fission induced by Dnm1 [Fannjiang et al, Genes & Dev. 2004. 18: 2785-2797]. To better understand the mechanisms of these antagonistic fission proteins, we use synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate their interaction with model cell membranes. The relationship between each protein, Dnm1 and Fis1, and protein-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. Through the comparison of the membrane rearrangement and phase behavior induced by each protein, we will discuss their respective roles in the regulation of mitochondrial fission.

  10. Plasma Membrane Targeting of Protocadherin 15 Is Regulated by the Golgi-Associated Chaperone Protein PIST.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongyun; Liu, Yueyue; Yin, Xiaolei; Cao, Huiren; Wang, Yanfei; Xiong, Wei; Lin, Yushuang; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) is a core component of hair cell tip-links and crucial for proper function of inner ear hair cells. Mutations of PCDH15 gene cause syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing loss. At present, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transportation of PCDH15 largely remain unknown. Here we show that PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacts with PCDH15. The interaction is mediated by the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI) of PCDH15. Through this interaction, PIST retains PCDH15 in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and reduces the membrane expression of PCDH15. We have previously showed that PIST regulates the membrane expression of another tip-link component, cadherin 23 (CDH23). Taken together, our finding suggests that PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and membrane targeting of the tip-link proteins CDH23 and PCDH15.

  11. Fluid flow facilitates inward rectifier K(+) current by convectively restoring [K(+)] at the cell membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Gon; Park, Sang Woong; Byun, Doyoung; Choi, Wahn Soo; Sung, Dong Jun; Shin, Kyung Chul; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Leem, Young-Eun; Kang, Jong-Sun; Cho, Hana; Kim, Bokyung; Cho, Sung I; Bae, Young Min

    2016-12-22

    The inward rectifier Kir2.1 current (IKir2.1) was reported to be facilitated by fluid flow. However, the mechanism underlying this facilitation remains uncertain. We hypothesized that during K(+) influx or efflux, [K(+)] adjacent to the outer mouth of the Kir2.1 channel might decrease or increase, respectively, compared with the average [K(+)] of the bulk extracellular solution, and that fluid flow could restore the original [K(+)] and result in the apparent facilitation of IKir2.1. We recorded the IKir2.1 in RBL-2H3 cells and HEK293T cells that were ectopically over-expressed with Kir2.1 channels by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Fluid-flow application immediately increased the IKir2.1, which was not prevented by either the pretreatment with inhibitors of various protein kinases or the modulation of the cytoskeleton and caveolae. The magnitudes of the increases of IKir2.1 by fluid flow were driving force-dependent. Simulations performed using the Nernst-Planck mass equation indicated that [K(+)] near the membrane surface fell markedly below the average [K(+)] of the bulk extracellular solution during K(+) influx, and, notably, that fluid flow restored the decreased [K(+)] at the cell surface in a flow rate-dependent manner. These results support the "convection-regulation hypothesis" and define a novel interpretation of fluid flow-induced modulation of ion channels.

  12. Fluid flow facilitates inward rectifier K+ current by convectively restoring [K+] at the cell membrane surface

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Gon; Park, Sang Woong; Byun, Doyoung; Choi, Wahn Soo; Sung, Dong Jun; Shin, Kyung Chul; Kim, Hyun-ji; Leem, Young-Eun; Kang, Jong-Sun; Cho, Hana; Kim, Bokyung; Cho, Sung I; Bae, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    The inward rectifier Kir2.1 current (IKir2.1) was reported to be facilitated by fluid flow. However, the mechanism underlying this facilitation remains uncertain. We hypothesized that during K+ influx or efflux, [K+] adjacent to the outer mouth of the Kir2.1 channel might decrease or increase, respectively, compared with the average [K+] of the bulk extracellular solution, and that fluid flow could restore the original [K+] and result in the apparent facilitation of IKir2.1. We recorded the IKir2.1 in RBL-2H3 cells and HEK293T cells that were ectopically over-expressed with Kir2.1 channels by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Fluid-flow application immediately increased the IKir2.1, which was not prevented by either the pretreatment with inhibitors of various protein kinases or the modulation of the cytoskeleton and caveolae. The magnitudes of the increases of IKir2.1 by fluid flow were driving force-dependent. Simulations performed using the Nernst-Planck mass equation indicated that [K+] near the membrane surface fell markedly below the average [K+] of the bulk extracellular solution during K+ influx, and, notably, that fluid flow restored the decreased [K+] at the cell surface in a flow rate-dependent manner. These results support the “convection-regulation hypothesis” and define a novel interpretation of fluid flow-induced modulation of ion channels. PMID:28004830

  13. Morphological, Chemical Surface, and Diffusive Transport Characterizations of a Nanoporous Alumina Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, María I.; Romero, Virgina; Vega, Victor; García, Javier; Prida, Victor M.; Hernando, Blanca; Benavente, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of a nanoporous alumina membrane (NPAM) by the two-step anodization method and its morphological and chemical surface characterization by analyzing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) micrographs and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) spectra is reported. Influence of electrical and diffusive effects on the NaCl transport across the membrane nanopores is determined from salt diffusion measurements performed with a wide range of NaCl concentrations, which allows the estimation of characteristic electrochemical membrane parameters such as the NaCl diffusion coefficient and the concentration of fixed charges in the membrane, by using an appropriated model and the membrane geometrical parameters (porosity and pore length). These results indicate a reduction of ~70% in the value of the NaCl diffusion coefficient through the membrane pores with respect to solution. The transport number of ions in the membrane pores (Na+ and Cl−, respectively) were determined from concentration potential measurements, and the effect of concentration-polarization at the membrane surfaces was also considered by comparing concentration potential values obtained with stirred solutions (550 rpm) and without stirring. From both kinds of results, a value higher than 0.05 M NaCl for the feed solution seems to be necessary to neglect the contribution of electrical interactions in the diffusive transport. PMID:28347115

  14. Endophilin A1 induces different membrane shapes using a conformational switch that is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ambroso, Mark R; Hegde, Balachandra G; Langen, Ralf

    2014-05-13

    Membrane remodeling is controlled by proteins that can promote the formation of highly curved spherical or cylindrical membranes. How a protein induces these different types of membrane curvature and how cells regulate this process is still unclear. Endophilin A1 is a protein involved in generating endocytotic necks and vesicles during synaptic endocytosis and can transform large vesicles into lipid tubes or small and highly curved vesicles in vitro. By using EM and electron paramagnetic resonance of endophilin A1, we find that tubes are formed by a close interaction with endophilin A1's BIN/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain and deep insertion of its amphipathic helices. In contrast, vesicles are predominantly stabilized by the shallow insertion of the amphipathic helical wedges with the BAR domain removed from the membrane. By showing that the mechanism of membrane curvature induction is different for vesiculation and tubulation, these data also explain why previous studies arrived at different conclusions with respect to the importance of scaffolding and wedging in the membrane curvature generation of BAR proteins. The Parkinson disease-associated kinase LRRK2 phosphorylates S75 of endophilin A1, a position located in the acyl chain region on tubes and the aqueous environment on vesicles. We find that the phosphomimetic mutation S75D favors vesicle formation by inhibiting this conformational switch, acting to regulate endophilin A1-mediated curvature. As endophilin A1 is part of a protein superfamily, we expect these mechanisms and their regulation by posttranslational modifications to be a general means for controlling different types of membrane curvature in a wide range of processes in vivo.

  15. Endophilin A1 induces different membrane shapes using a conformational switch that is regulated by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambroso, Mark R.; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Langen, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Membrane remodeling is controlled by proteins that can promote the formation of highly curved spherical or cylindrical membranes. How a protein induces these different types of membrane curvature and how cells regulate this process is still unclear. Endophilin A1 is a protein involved in generating endocytotic necks and vesicles during synaptic endocytosis and can transform large vesicles into lipid tubes or small and highly curved vesicles in vitro. By using EM and electron paramagnetic resonance of endophilin A1, we find that tubes are formed by a close interaction with endophilin A1’s BIN/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain and deep insertion of its amphipathic helices. In contrast, vesicles are predominantly stabilized by the shallow insertion of the amphipathic helical wedges with the BAR domain removed from the membrane. By showing that the mechanism of membrane curvature induction is different for vesiculation and tubulation, these data also explain why previous studies arrived at different conclusions with respect to the importance of scaffolding and wedging in the membrane curvature generation of BAR proteins. The Parkinson disease-associated kinase LRRK2 phosphorylates S75 of endophilin A1, a position located in the acyl chain region on tubes and the aqueous environment on vesicles. We find that the phosphomimetic mutation S75D favors vesicle formation by inhibiting this conformational switch, acting to regulate endophilin A1-mediated curvature. As endophilin A1 is part of a protein superfamily, we expect these mechanisms and their regulation by posttranslational modifications to be a general means for controlling different types of membrane curvature in a wide range of processes in vivo. PMID:24778241

  16. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  17. Hydrophilic modification of polyethersulfone porous membranes via a thermal-induced surface crosslinking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Zhen

    2009-05-01

    A thermal-induced surface crosslinking process was employed to perform a hydrophilic surface modification of PES porous membranes. Difunctional poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) was used as the main crosslinking modifier. The addition of trifunctional trimethylolpropane trimethylacrylate (TMPTMA) into the reaction solutions accelerated the crosslinking progress of PEGDA on PES membranes. The membrane surface morphology and chemical composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. The mass gains (MG) of the modified membranes could be conveniently modulated by varying the PEGDA concentration and crosslinking time. The measurements of water contact angle showed that the hydrophilicity of PES membranes was remarkably enhanced by the coating of crosslinked PEGDA layer. When a moderate mass gain of about 150 μg/cm 2 was reached, both the permeability and anti-fouling ability of PES membranes could be significantly improved. Excessive mass gain not only contributed little to the anti-fouling ability, but also brought a deteriorated permeability to PES membranes.

  18. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  19. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  20. Surface molecular imprinted layer-by-layer film attached to a porous membrane for selective filtration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Yi, Yu; Gauczinski, Jan; Xu, Huaping; Schönhoff, Monika; Zhang, Xi

    2011-10-04

    A surface molecular imprinted layer-by-layer (SMILbL) film was fabricated on a polyethersulfone (PES) porous membrane substrate for selective filtration of cations and anions. The LbL deposition procedure and the ultraviolet (UV) cross-linking of the modified membrane were monitored by attenuated total reflection-infrared (ATR-IR) spectra. The SMILbL-PES membrane with 4.5 bilayers of diazoresin (DAR)/poly(acrylic acid) complexed with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin tetratosylate (PAA-Por(4+)) effectively reduced the permeation velocity of Por(4+) after washing the Por(4+) template out. In comparison to a control film DAR/PAA-modified PES membrane (ConLbL-PES) in a dialysis experiment, the SMILbL-PES membrane exhibited better selectivity for permeation of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine-p,p',p″,p‴-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium hydrate (Por(4-)) against permeation of Por(4+). In pressure-driven transport experiments, the SMILbL-PES membrane showed a much longer blocking time for Por(4+) than for Por(4-), indicating the selective loading of Por(4+) into the SMILbL film. The surface charge of the SMILbL-PES membrane after Por(4+) loading was higher than that of other membranes, resulting in an enhanced rejection ability of the SMILbL-PES membrane to Por(4+) caused by Coulomb repulsion. A possible mechanism was proposed as follows. The binding sites generated through imprinting in the SMILbL-PES membrane enable loading of a larger amount of Por(4+). The stronger repulsion between Por(4+) and the SMILbL film may cause the main contribution to the selective rejection of Por(4+). It can be easily imagined that this concept can be extended to the construction of composite membranes from other imprinting systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Protonation Dynamics on Lipid Nanodiscs: Influence of the Membrane Surface Area and External Buffers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Öjemyr, Linda Näsvik; Bergstrand, Jan; Brzezinski, Peter; Widengren, Jerker

    2016-05-10

    Lipid membrane surfaces can act as proton-collecting antennae, accelerating proton uptake by membrane-bound proton transporters. We investigated this phenomenon in lipid nanodiscs (NDs) at equilibrium on a local scale, analyzing fluorescence fluctuations of individual pH-sensitive fluorophores at the membrane surface by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The protonation rate of the fluorophores was ∼100-fold higher when located at 9- and 12-nm diameter NDs, compared to when in solution, indicating that the proton-collecting antenna effect is maximal already for a membrane area of ∼60 nm(2). Fluorophore-labeled cytochrome c oxidase displayed a similar increase when reconstituted in 12 nm NDs, but not in 9 nm NDs, i.e., an acceleration of the protonation rate at the surface of cytochrome c oxidase is found when the lipid area surrounding the protein is larger than 80 nm(2), but not when below 30 nm(2). We also investigated the effect of external buffers on the fluorophore proton exchange rates at the ND membrane-water interfaces. With increasing buffer concentrations, the proton exchange rates were found to first decrease and then, at millimolar buffer concentrations, to increase. Monte Carlo simulations, based on a simple kinetic model of the proton exchange at the membrane-water interface, and using rate parameter values determined in our FCS experiments, could reconstruct both the observed membrane-size and the external buffer dependence. The FCS data in combination with the simulations indicate that the local proton diffusion coefficient along a membrane is ∼100 times slower than that observed over submillimeter distances by proton-pulse experiments (Ds ∼ 10(-5)cm(2)/s), and support recent theoretical studies showing that proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is time- and length-scale dependent. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling Study of the Effects of Membrane Surface Charge on Calcium Microdomains and Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Franciolini, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Synchronous neurotransmitter release is mediated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the build-up of submembrane Ca2+ microdomains. Previous models of Ca2+ microdomains have neglected possible electrostatic interactions between Ca2+ ions and negative surface charges on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. To address the effects of these interactions, we built a computational model of ion electrodiffusion described by the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations. We found that inclusion of a negative surface charge significantly alters the spatial characteristics of Ca2+ microdomains. Specifically, close to the membrane, Ca2+ ions accumulate, as expected from the strong electrostatic attraction exerted on positively charged Ca2+ ions. Farther away from the membrane, increasing the surface charge density results in a reduction of the Ca2+ concentration because of the preferential spread of Ca2+ ions along lateral directions. The model also predicts that the negative surface charge will decrease the spatial gradient of the Ca2+ microdomain in the lateral direction, resulting in increased overlap of microdomains originating from different Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that surface charge increases the probability of vesicle release if the Ca2+ sensor is located within the electrical double layer, whereas this probability is decreased if the Ca2+ sensor lies at greater distances from the membrane. Our data suggest that membrane surface charges exert a significant influence on the profile of Ca2+ microdomains, and should be taken into account in models of neurotransmitter release. PMID:18502810

  3. Effects of magnetic ion exchange pretreatment on low pressure membrane filtration of natural surface water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiou; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Schwab, Kellogg J; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) pretreatment has been increasingly employed by water treatment plants for removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In this study, the effects of MIEX pretreatment on low pressure membrane filtration of natural surface water were investigated under different feedwater qualities, membrane properties, and MIEX dosing conditions. Regardless of feedwater DOC, moderate decrease in the total and hydraulically irreversible fouling was observed for a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane and a polyethersulfone ultrafiltration (UF) membrane after MIEX pretreatment, which was coincident with moderate removals of high molecular weight DOC in the feedwaters. Comparatively, the fouling of a PVDF UF membrane did not decrease after MIEX pretreatment, revealing the impact of membrane properties on membrane fouling in the presence of MIEX pretreatment. Reuse of virgin or regenerated MIEX resulted in similar membrane fouling as observed with single use of the virgin MIEX. The level of DOC removal by MIEX was similar to the removal of MS2 bacteriophage spiked in the feedwater, suggesting a potential similarity in the removal of organic and microbial particles. In conclusion, MIEX pretreatment was effective for DOC removal, but less effective in controlling short-term membrane fouling or removing viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a “protocell,” was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral’s isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena. PMID:28266537

  5. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-03-01

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a “protocell,” was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral’s isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena.

  6. Mineral Surface Chemistry and Nanoparticle-aggregation Control Membrane Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sahai, Nita; Kaddour, Hussein; Dalai, Punam; Wang, Ziqiu; Bass, Garrett; Gao, Min

    2017-03-07

    The self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes to enclose functional biomolecules, thus defining a "protocell," was a seminal moment in the emergence of life on Earth and likely occurred at the micro-environment of the mineral-water interface. Mineral-lipid interactions are also relevant in biomedical, industrial and technological processes. Yet, no structure-activity relationships (SARs) have been identified to predict lipid self-assembly at mineral surfaces. Here we examined the influence of minerals on the self-assembly and survival of vesicles composed of single chain amphiphiles as model protocell membranes. The apparent critical vesicle concentration (CVC) increased in the presence of positively-charged nanoparticulate minerals at high loadings (mg/mL) suggesting unfavorable membrane self-assembly in such situations. Above the CVC, initial vesicle formation rates were faster in the presence of minerals. Rates were correlated with the mineral's isoelectric point (IEP) and reactive surface area. The IEP depends on the crystal structure, chemical composition and surface hydration. Thus, membrane self-assembly showed rational dependence on fundamental mineral properties. Once formed, membrane permeability (integrity) was unaffected by minerals. Suggesting that, protocells could have survived on rock surfaces. These SARs may help predict the formation and survival of protocell membranes on early Earth and other rocky planets, and amphiphile-mineral interactions in diverse other phenomena.

  7. Plasma Membrane Sterol Distribution Resembles the Surface Topography of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cellular membranes. It has been suggested that cholesterol segregates into sterol-rich and -poor domains in the plasma membrane, although clear evidence for this is lacking. By fluorescence imaging of the natural sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE), the lateral sterol distribution has been visualized in living cells. The spatial labeling pattern of DHE coincided with surface structures such as ruffles, microvilli, and filopodia with correlation lengths in the range of 0.8–2.5 μm. DHE staining of branched tubules and of nanotubes connecting two cells was detected. Dynamics of DHE in folded and plane membrane regions was comparable as determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. DHE colocalized with fluid membrane-preferring phospholipids in surface structures and at sites of cell attachment as well as in the cleavage furrow of dividing cells, but it was not particularly enriched in those regions. Fluorescent sterol showed homogeneous staining in membrane blebs induced by F-actin disruption. Cross-linking the ganglioside GM1—a putative raft marker—did not affect the cell surface distribution of DHE. The results suggest that spatial heterogeneities of plasma membrane staining of DHE resolvable by light microscopy reflect the cell surface topography but not phase-separated sterol domains in the bilayer plane. PMID:17065557

  8. All-nanoparticle layer-by-layer surface modification of micro- and ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Ferrand, Luis; Li, Diya; Lee, Daeyeon; Durning, Christopher J

    2014-05-20

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition using primarily inorganic silica nanoparticles is employed for surface modification of polymeric micro- and ultrafiltration (MF/UF) membranes to produce novel thin film composite (TFC) membranes intended for nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) applications. A wide variety of porous substrate membranes with different surface characteristics are successfully employed. This report gives detailed results for polycarbonate track etched (PCTE), polyethersulfone (PES), and sulfonated PES (SPEES) MF/UF substrates. Both spherical (cationic/anionic) and eccentric elongated (anionic) silica nanoparticles are deposited using conditions similar to those in prior works for solid substrates (e.g., Lee et al.). Appropriate selection of the pH for anionic and cationic particle deposition enables construction of nanoparticle-only layers 100-1200 nm in thickness atop the original porous membrane substrates. The surface layer thickness appears to vary linearly with the number of bilayers deposited, i.e., with the number of anionic/cationic deposition cycles. The deposition process is optimized to eliminate drying-induced cracking and improve mechanical durability via thickness control and postdeposition hydrothermal treatment. "Dead-end" permeation tests using dextran standards reveal the hydraulic characteristics and separations capability for the PCTE-based TFC membranes. The results show that nanoparticle-based LbL surface modification of MF and UF rated media can produce TFC membranes with NF capabilities.

  9. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  10. Tunable cell membrane mimetic surfaces prepared with a novel phospholipid polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ming; Yang, Shan; Ma, Jia-ni; Zhang, Shi-ping; Winnik, Françoise M.; Gong, Yong-kuan

    2008-11-01

    A novel method to fabricate and tune cell membrane mimetic surfaces was developed based on the use of an amphiphilic random copolymer bearing phosphorylcholine (PC), stearyl and crosslinkable trimethoxysilylpropyl groups synthesized by free radical copolymerization. The polymer was coated on glass coverslips by dip-coating. The coated films were treated in water allowing reorganization of the surface groups to mimic the structure of cell outer membranes. This structure was fixed by crosslinking of the trimethoxysilylpropyl groups linked to the copolymer chains, as ascertained by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) measurements. Our results indicate that the surface structure can be tuned to a great extent to obtain a stable outer membrane mimetic surface/interface.

  11. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B.; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible, yet limited to single molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact to a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes, including the demonstration of bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  12. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-08-27

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible yet limited to a single-molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact onto a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes including a demonstration of the bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of the interfacial interactions between a randomly rough sludge floc and membrane surface in a membrane bioreactor based on fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijia; Zhou, Xiaoling; Shen, Liguo; Cai, Xiang; Wang, Fangyuan; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Li, Renjie; Wu, Xilin; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of interfacial interactions between a randomly rough particle and membrane surface was proposed. It was found that sludge flocs in a membrane bioreactor were of apparent fractal characteristics, and could be modeled by the modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function. By combining the surface element integration (SEI) method, differential geometry and composite Simpson's rule, the quantitation method for calculating such interfacial interactions was further developed. The correctness and feasibility of the new method were verified. This method was then applied to evaluate the interfacial interactions between a randomly rough particle and membrane surface. It was found that, randomly rough particle possesses stronger interaction strength than regularly rough particle but weaker strength than smooth particle with membrane surface, indicating significant effects of surface morphology and roughness. The proposed method in this study has broad application prospect in membrane fouling study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reactive oxygen species produced via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase regulate anthocyanin synthesis in apple peel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangli; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Di; Li, Houhua; Li, Pengmin; Ma, Fengwang

    2014-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation regulates anthocyanin synthesis in apple peel by modulating the production of reactive oxygen species via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase instead of other pathways. The synthesis of anthocyanin in apple peels is dependent upon solar irradiation. Using 3-mm commercial glass to attenuate solar UV-A and UV-B light, we confirmed that solar UV irradiation regulated anthocyanin synthesis in apple peels after exposing previously bagged fruit to sunlight. During sunlight exposure, UV attenuation did not affect the expression of MdHY5, MdCOP1, or MdCRY2, but significantly lowered plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide anion concentrations. UV attenuation also reduced the expression levels of MdMYB10, MdPAL, MdCHS, MdF3H, MdDFR, MdANS and MdUFGT1, UDP-glycose:flavonoid 3-O-glycosyltransferase (UFGT) activity, and local concentrations of anthocyanin and quercetin-3-glycoside. In contrast, exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide could enhance anthocyanin and quercetin-3-glycoside synthesis. Xanthophyll cycle pool size on a chlorophyll basis was higher but its de-epoxidation was lower under direct sunlight irradiation than that under UV-attenuating conditions. This suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in chloroplast are not major contributors to anthocyanin synthesis regulation. Inhibition of plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity lowered the production of ROS through this mechanism, significantly inhibited the synthesis of anthocyanin, and increased the total production of ROS in apple peel under direct sunlight irradiation, suggesting that ROS produced via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase regulates anthocyanin synthesis. In summary, solar UV irradiation regulated anthocyanin synthesis in apple peels by modulating the production of ROS via plasma membrane NADPH oxidase.

  15. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Regulates Angiogenesis Independently of VEGF during Ocular Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christina L.; Caromile, Leslie A.; Durrani, Khayyam; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Claffey, Kevin P.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aberrant growth of blood vessels in the eye forms the basis of many incapacitating diseases and currently the majority of patients respond to anti-angiogenic therapies based on blocking the principal angiogenic growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). While highly successful, new therapeutic targets are critical for the increasing number of individuals susceptible to retina-related pathologies in our increasingly aging population. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface peptidase that is absent on normal tissue vasculature but is highly expressed on the neovasculature of most solid tumors, where we have previously shown to regulate angiogenic endothelial cell invasion. Because pathologic angiogenic responses are often triggered by distinct signals, we sought to determine if PSMA also contributes to the pathologic angiogenesis provoked by hypoxia of the retina, which underlies many debilitating retinopathies. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy, we found that while developmental angiogenesis is normal in PSMA null mice, hypoxic challenge resulted in decreased retinal vascular pathology when compared to wild type mice as assessed by avascular area and numbers of vascular tufts/glomeruli. The vessels formed in the PSMA null mice were more organized and highly perfused, suggesting a more ‘normal’ phenotype. Importantly, the decrease in angiogenesis was not due to an impaired hypoxic response as levels of pro-angiogenic factors are comparable; indicating that PSMA regulation of angiogenesis is independent of VEGF. Furthermore, both systemic and intravitreal administration of a PSMA inhibitor in wild type mice undergoing OIR mimicked the PSMA null phenotype resulting in improved retinal vasculature. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that PSMA plays a VEGF-independent role in retinal angiogenesis and that the lack of or inhibition of PSMA may represent a novel

  16. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    PubMed

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14.

  17. Formation of Disulfide Bridges Drives Oligomerization, Membrane Pore Formation, and Translocation of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 to Cell Surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Hans-Michael; Steringer, Julia P.; Wegehingel, Sabine; Bleicken, Stephanie; Münster, Maximilian; Dimou, Eleni; Unger, Sebastian; Weidmann, Georg; Andreas, Helena; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Nickel, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a key signaling molecule in tumor-induced angiogenesis. FGF2 is secreted by an unconventional secretory mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent insertion of FGF2 oligomers into the plasma membrane. This process is regulated by Tec kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Molecular interactions driving FGF2 monomers into membrane-inserted FGF2 oligomers are unknown. Here we identify two surface cysteines that are critical for efficient unconventional secretion of FGF2. They represent unique features of FGF2 as they are absent from all signal-peptide-containing members of the FGF protein family. We show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent FGF2 oligomerization concomitant with the generation of membrane pores depends on FGF2 surface cysteines as either chemical alkylation or substitution with alanines impairs these processes. We further demonstrate that the FGF2 variant forms lacking the two surface cysteines are not secreted from cells. These findings were corroborated by experiments redirecting a signal-peptide-containing FGF family member from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway into the unconventional secretory pathway of FGF2. Cis elements known to be required for unconventional secretion of FGF2, including the two surface cysteines, were transplanted into a variant form of FGF4 without signal peptide. The resulting FGF4/2 hybrid protein was secreted by unconventional means. We propose that the formation of disulfide bridges drives membrane insertion of FGF2 oligomers as intermediates in unconventional secretion of FGF2. PMID:25694424

  18. Formation of disulfide bridges drives oligomerization, membrane pore formation, and translocation of fibroblast growth factor 2 to cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hans-Michael; Steringer, Julia P; Wegehingel, Sabine; Bleicken, Stephanie; Münster, Maximilian; Dimou, Eleni; Unger, Sebastian; Weidmann, Georg; Andreas, Helena; García-Sáez, Ana J; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Nickel, Walter

    2015-04-03

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a key signaling molecule in tumor-induced angiogenesis. FGF2 is secreted by an unconventional secretory mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent insertion of FGF2 oligomers into the plasma membrane. This process is regulated by Tec kinase-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Molecular interactions driving FGF2 monomers into membrane-inserted FGF2 oligomers are unknown. Here we identify two surface cysteines that are critical for efficient unconventional secretion of FGF2. They represent unique features of FGF2 as they are absent from all signal-peptide-containing members of the FGF protein family. We show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent FGF2 oligomerization concomitant with the generation of membrane pores depends on FGF2 surface cysteines as either chemical alkylation or substitution with alanines impairs these processes. We further demonstrate that the FGF2 variant forms lacking the two surface cysteines are not secreted from cells. These findings were corroborated by experiments redirecting a signal-peptide-containing FGF family member from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway into the unconventional secretory pathway of FGF2. Cis elements known to be required for unconventional secretion of FGF2, including the two surface cysteines, were transplanted into a variant form of FGF4 without signal peptide. The resulting FGF4/2 hybrid protein was secreted by unconventional means. We propose that the formation of disulfide bridges drives membrane insertion of FGF2 oligomers as intermediates in unconventional secretion of FGF2.

  19. Surface charge dynamics in photosynthetic membranes and the structural consequences.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; van Oort, Bart; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2017-03-06

    The strict stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes into granal structures plays a vital role in energy conversion. The molecular forces that lead to grana stacking, however, are poorly understood. Here we evaluate the interplay between repulsive electrostatic (Fel) and attractive van der Waals (FvdWaals) forces in grana stacking. In contrast to previous reports, we find that the physicochemical balance between attractive and repulsive forces fully explains grana stacking. Extending the force balance analysis to lateral interactions within the oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII)-light harvesting complex II (LHCII) supercomplex reveals that supercomplex stability is very sensitive to Fel changes. Fel is highly dynamic, increasing up to 1.7-fold on addition of negative charges by phosphorylation of grana-hosted proteins. We show that this leads to specific destabilization of the supercomplex, and that changes in Fel have contrasting effects on vertical stacking and lateral intramembrane organization. This enables discrete biological control of these central structural features.

  20. Influence of membrane surface shape change on the performance characteristics of a fiber optic microphone.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Xiao, Wen

    2010-12-10

    At a reflective intensity modulated fiber optic microphone (RIM-FOM), the acoustic signal makes a membrane vibrate and modulate the reflected intensity. In the existing models of the RIM-FOM, the offset of all points of the membrane, due to the vibration, is assumed to be equal. However, this assumption does not represent the actual vibration of the membrane, which follows a continuous surface shape change caused by the acoustic signal. We establish a revised theoretical model in which the influence of the actual membrane surface shape change on the reflective intensity modulation is considered. Experiments show that there is a discrepancy between the experimental optimum operating distance and the analytical result from the existing model, while our new model gives a better agreement with the experimental results. In particular, our analysis shows that, in using the existing model, the other microphone performance characteristics are misestimated, while our revised model can provide a closer solution.

  1. Membrane Surface Nanostructures and Adhesion Property of T Lymphocytes Exploited by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yangzhe; Lu, Hongsong; Cai, Jiye; He, Xianhui; Hu, Yi; Zhao, Hongxia; Wang, Xiaoping

    2009-08-01

    The activation of T lymphocytes plays a very important role in T-cell-mediated immune response. Though there are many related literatures, the changes of membrane surface nanostructures and adhesion property of T lymphocytes at different activation stages have not been reported yet. However, these investigations will help us further understand the biophysical and immunologic function of T lymphocytes in the context of activation. In the present study, the membrane architectures of peripheral blood T lymphocytes were obtained by AFM, and adhesion force of the cell membrane were measured by acquiring force-distance curves. The results indicated that the cell volume increased with the increases of activation time, whereas membrane surface adhesion force decreased, even though the local stiffness for resting and activated cells is similar. The results provided complementary and important data to further understand the variation of biophysical properties of T lymphocytes in the context of in vitro activation.

  2. Surface modification of polypropylene macroporous membrane to improve its antifouling characteristics in a submerged membrane-bioreactor: H(2)O plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Yin; Tang, Zhao-Qi; Huang, Lei; Cheng, Gang; Li, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Yan, Meng-Gang; Gu, Jia-Shan; Wei, Xian-Wen

    2008-10-01

    To improve the antifouling characteristics of polypropylene hollow fiber macroporous membranes in a submerged membrane-bioreactor for wastewater treatment, the membranes were surface modified by H(2)O plasma treatment. Structural and morphological changes on the membrane surface were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The change of surface wettability was monitored by contact angle measurement. The static water contact angle of the modified membrane reduced obviously with the increase of plasma treatment time. The total surface free energy and its dispersive component decreased, while the polar component increased with the increase of treatment time. The relative pure water flux for the modified membranes increased gradually with the increase of plasma treatment time. The tensile strength and the tensile elongation at break for the membranes decreased after plasma treatment. After continuous operation in a submerged membrane-bioreactor for about 68 h, flux recovery after water and caustic cleaning, flux ratio after fouling were improved by 2.0, 3.6 and 22.0%, while reduction of flux was reduced by 1.1% for the 1 min H(2)O plasma treated membrane, compared to those of the unmodified membrane.

  3. Otoferlin is a calcium sensor that directly regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Colin P.

    2010-01-01

    Otoferlin is a large multi–C2 domain protein proposed to act as a calcium sensor that regulates synaptic vesicle exocytosis in cochlear hair cells. Although mutations in otoferlin have been associated with deafness, its contribution to neurotransmitter release is unresolved. Using recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin sense calcium with apparent dissociation constants that ranged from 13–25 µM; in the presence of membranes, these apparent affinities increase by up to sevenfold. Using a reconstituted membrane fusion assay, we found that five of the six C2 domains of otoferlin stimulate membrane fusion in a calcium-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that a calcium binding–deficient form of the C2C domain is incapable of stimulating membrane fusion, further underscoring the importance of calcium for the protein’s function. These results demonstrate for the first time that otoferlin is a calcium sensor that can directly regulate soluble N-ethyl-maleimide sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor–mediated membrane fusion reactions. PMID:20921140

  4. Concise Review: Plasma and Nuclear Membranes Convey Mechanical Information to Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Uzer, Gunes; Fuchs, Robyn K; Rubin, Janet; Thompson, William R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous factors including chemical, hormonal, spatial, and physical cues determine stem cell fate. While the regulation of stem cell differentiation by soluble factors is well-characterized, the role of mechanical force in the determination of lineage fate is just beginning to be understood. Investigation of the role of force on cell function has largely focused on "outside-in" signaling, initiated at the plasma membrane. When interfaced with the extracellular matrix, the cell uses integral membrane proteins, such as those found in focal adhesion complexes to translate force into biochemical signals. Akin to these outside-in connections, the internal cytoskeleton is physically linked to the nucleus, via proteins that span the nuclear membrane. Although structurally and biochemically distinct, these two forms of mechanical coupling influence stem cell lineage fate and, when disrupted, often lead to disease. Here we provide an overview of how mechanical coupling occurs at the plasma and nuclear membranes. We also discuss the role of force on stem cell differentiation, with focus on the biochemical signals generated at the cell membrane and the nucleus, and how those signals influence various diseases. While the interaction of stem cells with their physical environment and how they respond to force is complex, an understanding of the mechanical regulation of these cells is critical in the design of novel therapeutics to combat diseases associated with aging, cancer, and osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1455-1463. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Towards Enhanced Performance Thin-film Composite Membranes via Surface Plasma Modification

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F.; Tardy, Blaise L.; Dagastine, Raymond; Orbell, John D.; Schutz, Jürg A.; Duke, Mikel C.

    2016-01-01

    Advancing the design of thin-film composite membrane surfaces is one of the most promising pathways to deal with treating varying water qualities and increase their long-term stability and permeability. Although plasma technologies have been explored for surface modification of bulk micro and ultrafiltration membrane materials, the modification of thin film composite membranes is yet to be systematically investigated. Here, the performance of commercial thin-film composite desalination membranes has been significantly enhanced by rapid and facile, low pressure, argon plasma activation. Pressure driven water desalination tests showed that at low power density, flux was improved by 22% without compromising salt rejection. Various plasma durations and excitation powers have been systematically evaluated to assess the impact of plasma glow reactions on the physico-chemical properties of these materials associated with permeability. With increasing power density, plasma treatment enhanced the hydrophilicity of the surfaces, where water contact angles decreasing by 70% were strongly correlated with increased negative charge and smooth uniform surface morphology. These results highlight a versatile chemical modification technique for post-treatment of commercial membrane products that provides uniform morphology and chemically altered surface properties. PMID:27363670

  6. Towards Enhanced Performance Thin-film Composite Membranes via Surface Plasma Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F.; Tardy, Blaise L.; Dagastine, Raymond; Orbell, John D.; Schutz, Jürg A.; Duke, Mikel C.

    2016-07-01

    Advancing the design of thin-film composite membrane surfaces is one of the most promising pathways to deal with treating varying water qualities and increase their long-term stability and permeability. Although plasma technologies have been explored for surface modification of bulk micro and ultrafiltration membrane materials, the modification of thin film composite membranes is yet to be systematically investigated. Here, the performance of commercial thin-film composite desalination membranes has been significantly enhanced by rapid and facile, low pressure, argon plasma activation. Pressure driven water desalination tests showed that at low power density, flux was improved by 22% without compromising salt rejection. Various plasma durations and excitation powers have been systematically evaluated to assess the impact of plasma glow reactions on the physico-chemical properties of these materials associated with permeability. With increasing power density, plasma treatment enhanced the hydrophilicity of the surfaces, where water contact angles decreasing by 70% were strongly correlated with increased negative charge and smooth uniform surface morphology. These results highlight a versatile chemical modification technique for post-treatment of commercial membrane products that provides uniform morphology and chemically altered surface properties.

  7. Towards Enhanced Performance Thin-film Composite Membranes via Surface Plasma Modification.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rackel; Dumée, Ludovic F; Tardy, Blaise L; Dagastine, Raymond; Orbell, John D; Schutz, Jürg A; Duke, Mikel C

    2016-07-01

    Advancing the design of thin-film composite membrane surfaces is one of the most promising pathways to deal with treating varying water qualities and increase their long-term stability and permeability. Although plasma technologies have been explored for surface modification of bulk micro and ultrafiltration membrane materials, the modification of thin film composite membranes is yet to be systematically investigated. Here, the performance of commercial thin-film composite desalination membranes has been significantly enhanced by rapid and facile, low pressure, argon plasma activation. Pressure driven water desalination tests showed that at low power density, flux was improved by 22% without compromising salt rejection. Various plasma durations and excitation powers have been systematically evaluated to assess the impact of plasma glow reactions on the physico-chemical properties of these materials associated with permeability. With increasing power density, plasma treatment enhanced the hydrophilicity of the surfaces, where water contact angles decreasing by 70% were strongly correlated with increased negative charge and smooth uniform surface morphology. These results highlight a versatile chemical modification technique for post-treatment of commercial membrane products that provides uniform morphology and chemically altered surface properties.

  8. Immobilized heparin and its anti-coagulation effect on polysulfone membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoshuai; Xu, Ling; Xu, Jianxia; Zhu, Peizhi; Zuo, Li; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-01-01

    Polysulfone has been widely used as hemodialysis membrane material because of its excellent physiochemical performance. There is still a need to further improve its anti-coagulation property in clinical practice. In this work, we covalently immobilized heparin onto polysulfone membrane to improve its anti-coagulation performance. Low temperature plasma technique with environmentally friendly nitrogen as the gas source, as well as N-ethyl-N'-[3-dimethylaminopropy] carbodiimide hydrochloride/hydroxy-2,5-dioxopyrolidine-3-sulfonicacid sodium chemistry were utilized to immobilize heparin onto the surface of polysulfone membrane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as water contact angle results confirmed successful binding of heparin to the membrane surface. Only slight permeability differences were observed between the immobilized surface and the unmodified surface, while the polysulfone membrane had become more hydrophilic after immobilization. The blood coagulation time was greatly prolonged after modification and less platelets adhesion was observed on the heparin immobilized surface. Also, compared with heparin injection doses in clinical, the heparinized process in our work consumed less heparin. Our study suggests that the immobilized heparin has local anti-coagulation effect, while reducing the doses.

  9. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  10. Mechano-regulated surface for manipulating liquid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xin; Zhu, Pingan; Tian, Ye; Zhou, Xuechang; Kong, Tiantian; Wang, Liqiu

    2017-04-01

    The effective transfer of tiny liquid droplets is vital for a number of processes such as chemical and biological microassays. Inspired by the tarsi of meniscus-climbing insects, which can climb menisci by deforming the water/air interface, we developed a mechano-regulated surface consisting of a background mesh and a movable microfibre array with contrastive wettability. The adhesion of this mechano-regulated surface to liquid droplets can be reversibly switched through mechanical reconfiguration of the microfibre array. The adhesive force can be tuned by varying the number and surface chemistry of the microfibres. The in situ adhesion of the mechano-regulated surface can be used to manoeuvre micro-/nanolitre liquid droplets in a nearly loss-free manner. The mechano-regulated surface can be scaled up to handle multiple droplets in parallel. Our approach offers a miniaturized mechano-device with switchable adhesion for handling micro-/nanolitre droplets, either in air or in a fluid that is immiscible with the droplets.

  11. Surface-dependent transitions during self-assembly of phospholipid membranes on mica, silica, and glass.

    PubMed

    Benes, Martin; Billy, Didier; Benda, Ales; Speijer, Han; Hof, Martin; Hermens, Wim Th

    2004-11-09

    Formation of supported membranes by exposure of solid surfaces to phospholipid vesicles is a much-used technique in membrane research. Freshly cleaved mica, because of its superior flatness, is a preferred support, and we used ellipsometry to study membrane formation kinetics on mica. Neutral dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and negatively charged dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine/dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (20% DOPS/80% DOPC) vesicles were prepared by sonication. Results were compared with membrane formation on silica and glass, and the influence of stirring, buffer, and calcium was assessed. Without calcium, DOPC vesicles had a low affinity (Kd approximately 30 microM) for mica, and DOPS/DOPC vesicles hardly adsorbed. Addition of calcium promptly caused condensation of the adhering vesicles, with either loss of excess lipid or rapid additional lipid adsorption up to full surface coverage. Vesicle-mica interactions dominate the adsorption process, but vesicle-vesicle interactions also seem to be required for the condensation process. Membranes on mica proved unstable in Tris-HCl buffer. For glass, transport-limited adsorption of DOPC and DOPS/DOPC vesicles with immediate condensation into bilayers was observed, with and without calcium. For silica, vesicle adsorption was also rapid, even in the absence of calcium, but the transition to condensed layers required a critical surface coverage of about 50% of bilayer mass, indicating vesicle-vesicle interaction. For all three surfaces, additional adsorption of DOPC (but not DOPS/DOPC) vesicles to condensed membranes was observed. DOPC membranes on mica were rapidly degraded by phospholipase A2 (PLA2), which pleads against the role of membrane defects as initial PLA2 targets. During degradation, layer thickness remained unchanged while layer density decreased, in accordance with recent atomic force microscopy measurements of gel-phase phospholipid degradation by PLA2.

  12. Biomolecular Stress-Sensitive Gauges: Surface-Mediated Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Biomolecular Stress-Sensitive Gauges: Surface-Mediated Immobilization of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein...biomolecular gauges.1 Studies of a mechanosensitive protein of large conductance (MscL) had shown that a dramatic change in the protein conformation

  13. Eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong X.; Douglas, Lois M.; Veselá, Petra; Rachel, Reinhard; Malinsky, Jan; Konopka, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans forms a protective barrier that also mediates many processes needed for virulence, including cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, and nutrient uptake. Because compartmentalization of the plasma membrane is believed to coordinate these diverse activities, we examined plasma membrane microdomains termed eisosomes or membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC), which correspond to ∼200-nm-long furrows in the plasma membrane. A pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant failed to form eisosomes and displayed strong defects in plasma membrane organization and morphogenesis, including extensive cell wall invaginations. Mutation of eisosome proteins Slm2, Pkh2, and Pkh3 did not cause similar cell wall defects, although pkh2∆ cells formed chains of furrows and pkh3∆ cells formed wider furrows, identifying novel roles for the Pkh protein kinases in regulating furrows. In contrast, the sur7∆ mutant formed cell wall invaginations similar to those for the pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant even though it could form eisosomes and furrows. A PH-domain probe revealed that the regulatory lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate was enriched at sites of cell wall invaginations in both the sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells, indicating that this contributes to the defects. The sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutants displayed differential susceptibility to various types of stress, indicating that they affect overlapping but distinct functions. In support of this, many mutant phenotypes of the pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells were rescued by overexpressing SUR7. These results demonstrate that C. albicans eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization. PMID:27009204

  14. A Phenotypic High-Content Screening Assay to Identify Regulators of Membrane Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorey K; Thomas, Daniel W; Simpson, Kaylene J; Humbert, Patrick O

    2016-10-01

    Correct subcellular localization of proteins is a requirement for appropriate function. This is especially true in epithelial cells, which rely on the precise localization of a diverse array of epithelial polarity and cellular adhesion proteins. Loss of cell polarity and adhesion is a hallmark of cancer, and mislocalization of core polarity proteins, such as Scribble, is observed in a range of human epithelial tumors and is prognostic of poor survival. Despite this, little is known about how Scribble membrane localization is regulated. Here, we describe the development and application of a phenotypic high-content screening assay that is designed to specifically quantify membrane levels of Scribble to identify regulators of its membrane localization. A screening platform that is capable of resolving individual cells and quantifying membrane protein localization in confluent epithelial monolayers was developed by using the cytoplasm-to-cell-membrane bioapplication integrated with the Cellomics ArrayScan high-content imaging platform. Application of this method to a boutique human epithelial polarity and signaling small interfering RNA (siRNA) library resulted in highly robust coefficient-of-variance and Z' factor values. As proof of concept, we present two candidate genes whose depletion specifically reduces Scribble protein levels at the membrane. Data mining revealed that these proteins interact with components of the Scribble polarity complex, providing support for the utility of the screening approach. This method is broadly applicable to genome-wide and large-scale compound screening of membrane-bound proteins, and when coupled with pathway analysis the dataset becomes even more valuable and can provide predictive mechanistic insight.

  15. Microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xian; Liu, Zhimeng; Deng, Cheng; Zhu, Mengfu; Wang, Deyin; Li, Kui; Deng, Yu; Jiang, Mingming

    2016-12-15

    A novel microporous nano-MgO/diatomite ceramic membrane with high positive surface charge was prepared, including synthesis of precursor colloid, dip-coating and thermal decomposition. Combined SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS studies show the nano-MgO is irregularly distributed on the membrane surface or pore walls and forms a positively charged nano coating. And the nano-MgO coating is firmly attached to the diatomite membrane via SiO chemical bond. Thus the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane behaves strong electropositivity with the isoelectric point of 10.8. Preliminary filtration tests indicate that the as-prepared nano-MgO/diatomite membrane could remove approximately 99.7% of tetracycline in water through electrostatic adsorption effect. The desirable electrostatic property enables the nano-MgO/diatomite membrane to be a candidate for removal of organic pollutants from water. And it is convinced that there will be a great application prospect of charged ceramic membrane in water treatment field.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic assessment on surface morphology of preserved human amniotic membrane after gamma sterilisation.

    PubMed

    Ab Hamid, Suzina Sheikh; Zahari, Nor Kamalia; Yusof, Norimah; Hassan, Asnah

    2014-03-01

    Human amniotic membrane that has been processed and sterilised by gamma irradiation is widely used as a biological dressing in surgical applications. The morphological structure of human amniotic membrane was studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess effects of gamma radiation on human amniotic membrane following different preservation methods. The amniotic membrane was preserved by either air drying or submerged in glycerol before gamma irradiated at 15, 25 and 35 kGy. Fresh human amniotic membrane, neither preserved nor irradiated was used as the control. The surface morphology of glycerol preserved amnion was found comparable to the fresh amniotic membrane. The cells of the glycerol preserved was beautifully arranged, homogonous in size and tended to round up. The cell structure in the air dried preserved amnion seemed to be flattened and dehydrated. The effects of dehydration on intercellular channels and the microvilli on the cell surface were clearly seen at higher magnifications (10,000×). SEM revealed that the changes of the cell morphology of the glycerol preserved amnion were visible at 35 kGy while the air dried already changed at 25 kGy. Glycerol preservation method is recommended for human amniotic membrane as the cell morphological structure is maintained and radiation doses lower than 25 kGy for sterilization did not affect the appearance of the preserved amnion.

  17. PTEN Hopping on the Cell Membrane Is Regulated via a Positively-Charged C2 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Masato; Matsuoka, Satomi; Ueda, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    PTEN, a tumor suppressor that is frequently mutated in a wide spectrum of cancers, exerts PI(3,4,5)P3 phosphatase activities that are regulated by its dynamic shuttling between the membrane and cytoplasm. Direct observation of PTEN in the interfacial environment can offer quantitative information about the shuttling dynamics, but remains elusive. Here we show that positively charged residues located in the cα2 helix of the C2 domain are necessary for the membrane localization of PTEN via stable electrostatic interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule imaging analyses revealed that PTEN molecules moved distances much larger than expected had they been caused by lateral diffusion, a phenomenon we call “hopping.” Our novel single-particle tracking analysis method found that the cα2 helix aids in regulating the hopping and stable-binding states. The dynamically established membrane localization of PTEN was revealed to be essential for developmental processes and clarified a fundamental regulation mechanism of the protein quantity and activity on the plasma membrane. PMID:25211206

  18. Cell cycle-regulated membrane binding of NuMA contributes to efficient anaphase chromosome separation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Wan, Qingwen; Meixiong, Gerry; Du, Quansheng

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is critical for faithful cell division. It has been proposed that cortical dynein-generated pulling forces on astral microtubules contribute to anaphase spindle elongation and chromosome separation. In mammalian cells, however, definitive evidence for the involvement of cortical dynein in chromosome separation is missing. It is believed that dynein is recruited and anchored at the cell cortex during mitosis by the α subunit of heterotrimeric G protein (Gα)/mammalian homologue of Drosophila Partner of Inscuteable/nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) ternary complex. Here we uncover a Gα/LGN-independent lipid- and membrane-binding domain at the C-terminus of NuMA. We show that the membrane binding of NuMA is cell cycle regulated-it is inhibited during prophase and metaphase by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-mediated phosphorylation and only occurs after anaphase onset when CDK1 activity is down-regulated. Further studies indicate that cell cycle-regulated membrane association of NuMA underlies anaphase-specific enhancement of cortical NuMA and dynein. By replacing endogenous NuMA with membrane-binding-deficient NuMA, we can specifically reduce the cortical accumulation of NuMA and dynein during anaphase and demonstrate that cortical NuMA and dynein contribute to efficient chromosome separation in mammalian cells.

  19. Chromatin Architecture and Transcription Factor Binding Regulate Expression of Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Laurie A.; Maksimova, Yelena; Schulz, Vincent; Wong, Clara; Raha, Debasish; Mahajan, Milind C.; Weissman, Sherman M.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2009-01-01

    Erythrocyte membrane protein genes serve as excellent models of complex gene locus structure and function, but their study has been complicated by both their large size and their complexity. To begin to understand the intricate interplay of transcription, dynamic chromatin architecture, transcription factor binding, and genomic organization in regulation of erythrocyte membrane protein genes, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with microarray analysis and ChIP coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing in both erythroid and nonerythroid cells. Unexpectedly, most regions of GATA-1 and NF-E2 binding were remote from gene promoters and transcriptional start sites, located primarily in introns. Cooccupancy with FOG-1, SCL, and MTA-2 was found at all regions of GATA-1 binding, with cooccupancy of SCL and MTA-2 also found at regions of NF-E2 binding. Cooccupancy of GATA-1 and NF-E2 was found frequently. A common signature of histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4, GATA-1, NF-E2, FOG-1, SCL, and MTA-2 binding and consensus GATA-1-E-box binding motifs located 34 to 90 bp away from NF-E2 binding motifs was found frequently in erythroid cell-expressed genes. These results provide insights into our understanding of membrane protein gene regulation in erythropoiesis and the regulation of complex genetic loci in erythroid and nonerythroid cells and identify numerous candidate regions for mutations associated with membrane-linked hemolytic anemia. PMID:19687298

  20. A model of plasma membrane flow and cytosis regulation in growing pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés; Yejie, Du

    2011-09-21

    A model of cytosis regulation in growing pollen tubes is developed and simulations presented. The authors address the question on the minimal assumptions needed to describe the pattern of exocytosis and endocytosis reported recently by experimental biologists. Biological implications of the model are also treated. Concepts of flow and conservation of membrane material are used to pose an equation system, which describes the movement of plasma membrane in the tip of growing pollen tubes. After obtaining the central equations, relations describing the rates of endocytosis and exocytosis are proposed. Two cytosis receptors (for exocytosis and endocytosis), which have different recycling rates and activation times, suffice to describe a stable growing tube. Simulations show a very good spatial separation between endocytosis and exocytosis, in which separation is shown to depend strongly on exocytic vesicle delivery. In accordance to measurements, most vesicles in the clear zone are predicted to be endocytic. Membrane flow is essential to maintain cell polarity, and bi-directional flow seems to be a natural consequence of the proposed mechanism. For the first time, a model addressing plasma membrane flow and cytosis regulation were posed. Therefore, it represents a missing piece in an integrative model of pollen tube growth, in which cell wall mechanics, hydrodynamic fluxes and regulation mechanisms are combined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbonized-leaf Membrane with Anisotropic Surfaces for Sodium-ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbian; Shen, Fei; Luo, Wei; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Chen, Yanan; Yao, Yonggang; Zhu, Hongli; Fu, Kun; Hitz, Emily; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-01-27

    A simple one-step thermal pyrolysis route has been developed to prepare carbon membrane from a natural leaf. The carbonized leaf membrane possesses anisotropic surfaces and internal hierarchical porosity, exhibiting a high specific capacity of 360 mAh/g and a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 74.8% as a binder-free, current-collector-free anode for rechargeable sodium ion batteries. Moreover, large-area carbon membranes with low contact resistance are fabricated by simply stacking and carbonizing leaves, a promising strategy toward large-scale sodium-ion battery developments.

  2. Tracking inorganic foulants irreversibly accumulated on low-pressure membranes for treating surface water.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Katsuki; Higuchi, Kumiko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ding, Qing; Hafuka, Akira

    2015-12-15

    While low-pressure membrane filtration processes (i.e., microfiltration and ultrafiltration) can offer precise filtration than sand filtration, they pose the problem of reduced efficiency due to membrane fouling. Although many studies have examined membrane fouling by organic substances, there is still not enough data available concerning membrane fouling by inorganic substances. The present research investigated changes in the amounts of inorganic components deposited on the surface of membrane filters over time using membrane specimens sampled thirteen times at arbitrary time intervals during pilot testing in order to determine the mechanism by which irreversible fouling by inorganic substances progresses. The experiments showed that the inorganic components that primarily contribute to irreversible fouling vary as filtration continues. It was discovered that, in the initial stage of operation, the main membrane-fouling substance was iron, whereas the primary membrane-fouling substances when operation finished were manganese, calcium, and silica. The amount of iron accumulated on the membrane increased up to the thirtieth day of operation, after which it reached a steady state. After the accumulation of iron became static, subsequent accumulation of manganese was observed. The fact that the removal rates of these inorganic components also increased gradually shows that the size of the exclusion pores of the membrane filter narrows as operation continues. Studying particle size distributions of inorganic components contained in source water revealed that while many iron particles are approximately the same size as membrane pores, the fraction of manganese particles slightly smaller than the pores in diameter was large. From these results, it is surmised that iron particles approximately the same size as the pores block them soon after the start of operation, and as the membrane pores narrow with the development of fouling, they become further blocked by manganese

  3. Characterization of charge properties of an ultrafiltration membrane modified by surface grafting of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Dejeu, J; Lakard, B; Fievet, P; Lakard, S

    2009-05-01

    A polyethersulfone ultrafiltration membrane was functionalized by a cationic polyelectrolyte, the poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH). The influence of the time of adsorption of PAH on the membrane charge properties was studied. Several characterization techniques were used to investigate the membrane modification. Tangential and transmembrane streaming potential measurements were conducted to characterize the outer and inner surfaces of the membrane, respectively. Both techniques indicated that the surface modification of the membrane was efficient. The charge of the outer surface was reversed (from negative values for the unmodified membrane to positive values for the modified membrane) and the charge of the inner surface was neutralized after adsorption of the cationic polyelectrolyte onto the pore walls. The modification of both the outer surface of the membrane and the pore walls was also put in evidence with membrane potential measurements. It was found that the charge of the PAH-modified membrane is affected by the time of immersion in PAH solution. Experimental data seem to show a fast modification of the membrane for the first 15 min; nevertheless, the modification was more pronounced after 24 h of PAH adsorption. Diffusion experiments carried out with unmodified and modified membranes for four salts (KCl, NaCl, MgCl, and CaCl(2)) showed a decrease in the salt permeability after functionalization of the membrane. The permeability decrease was greater for 2:1 salts than for 1:1 salts. This decrease was explained by electrostatic interactions.

  4. Sorting Nexin 11 Regulates Lysosomal Degradation of Plasma Membrane TRPV3.

    PubMed

    Li, Caiyue; Ma, Wenbo; Yin, Shikui; Liang, Xin; Shu, Xiaodong; Pei, Duanqing; Egan, Terrance M; Huang, Jufang; Pan, Aihua; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-05-01

    The trafficking of ion channels to/from the plasma membrane is considered an important mechanism for cellular activity and an interesting approach for disease therapies. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) ion channel is widely expressed in skin keratinocytes, and its trafficking mechanism to/from the plasma membrane is unknown. Here, we report that the vesicular trafficking protein sorting nexin 11 (SNX11) downregulates the level of the TRPV3 plasma membrane protein. Overexpression of SNX11 causes a decrease in the level of TRPV3 current and TRPV3 plasma membrane protein in TRPV3-transfected HEK293T cells. Subcellular localizations and western blots indicate that SNX11 interacts with TRPV3 and targets it to lysosomes for degradation, which is blocked by the lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and leupeptin. Both TRPV3 and SNX11 are highly expressed in HaCaT cells. We show that TRPV3 agonists-activated Ca(2+) influxes and the level of native TRPV3 total protein in HaCaT cells are decreased by overexpression of SNX11 and increased by knockdown of SNX11. Our findings reveal that SNX11 promotes the trafficking of TRPV3 from the plasma membrane to lysosomes for degradation via protein-protein interactions, which demonstrates a previously unknown function of SNX11 as a regulator of TRPV3 trafficking from the plasma membrane to lysosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. New insights into the regulation of cholesterol efflux from the sperm membrane.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Tamara; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of the mammalian plasma membrane because it promotes membrane stability without comprising membrane fluidity. Given this important cellular role, cholesterol levels are tightly controlled at multiple levels. It has been clearly shown that cholesterol redistribution and depletion from the sperm membrane is a key part of the spermatozoon's preparation for fertilization. Some factors that regulate these events are described (e.g., bicarbonate, calcium) but the mechanisms underlying cholesterol export are poorly understood. How does a hydrophobic cholesterol molecule inserted in the sperm plasma membrane enter the energetically unfavorable aqueous surroundings? This review will provide an overview of knowledge in this area and highlight our gaps in understanding. The overall aim is to better understand cholesterol redistribution in the sperm plasma membrane, its relation to the possible activation of a cholesterol transporter and the role of cholesterol acceptors. Armed with such knowledge, sperm handling techniques can be adapted to better prepare spermatozoa for in vitro and in vivo fertilization.

  6. VAMP7 regulates constitutive membrane incorporation of the cold-activated channel TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Pinto, Silvia; Danglot, Lydia; Vandewauw, Ine; Segal, Andrei; Van Ranst, Nele; Benoit, Melissa; Janssens, Annelies; Vennekens, Rudi; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Galli, Thierry; Vriens, Joris; Voets, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The cation channel TRPM8 plays a central role in the somatosensory system, as a key sensor of innocuously cold temperatures and cooling agents. Although increased functional expression of TRPM8 has been implicated in various forms of pathological cold hypersensitivity, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms that determine TRPM8 abundance at the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate constitutive transport of TRPM8 towards the plasma membrane in atypical, non-acidic transport vesicles that contain lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and provide evidence that vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) mediates fusion of these vesicles with the plasma membrane. In line herewith, VAMP7-deficient mice exhibit reduced functional expression of TRPM8 in sensory neurons and concomitant deficits in cold avoidance and icilin-induced cold hypersensitivity. Our results uncover a cellular pathway that controls functional plasma membrane incorporation of a temperature-sensitive TRP channel, and thus regulates thermosensitivity in vivo. PMID:26843440

  7. Nanostructural surface engineering of grafted polymers on inorganic oxide substrates for membrane separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Wayne Hiroshi

    Nanostructural engineering of inorganic substrates by free radical graft polymerization was studied with the goal of developing new membrane materials for pervaporation. Graft polymerization consisted of modification of surface hydroxyls with vinyl trimethoxysilane, followed by solution graft polymerization reaction using either vinyl acetate (VAc) or vinyl pyrrolidone (VP). The topology of the modified surfaces was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on both atomically smooth silicon wafer substrates and microporous inorganic membrane supports in order to deduce the effects of modification on the nanostructural properties of the membrane. While unmodified wafers showed a root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness of 0.21 +/- 0.03 nm, roughness increased to 3.15 +/- 0.23 nm upon silylation. Under poor solvent conditions (i.e., air), surfaces modified with higher poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) or poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) polymer graft yields displayed lateral inhomogeneities in the polymer layer. Although RMS surface roughness was nearly identical (0.81--0.85 nm) for PVAc-modified surfaces grafted at different monomer concentrations, the skewness of the height distribution decreased from 2.22 to 0.78 as polymer graft yield increased from 0.8 to 3.5 mg/m2. The polymer-modified surfaces were used to create inorganic pervaporation membranes consisting of a single macromolecular separation layer formed by graft polymerization. PVAc grafted silica membranes (500A native pore size) were found selective for MTBE in the separation of 0.1--1% (v/v) MTBE from water, achieving MTBE enrichment factors as high as 371 at a permeate flux of 0.38 l/m2 hr and a Reynolds number of 6390; however, these membranes could not separate anhydrous organic mixtures. Pervaporative separation of methanol/MTBE mixtures was possible with PVAc and PVP-modified alumina supports of 50A native pore size, where the separation layer consisted of grafted polymer chains with estimated radius of

  8. Imaging Single Virus Particles on the Surface of Cell Membranes by High-Resolution Scanning Surface Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Hobson, Phil; Lab, Max J.; Klenerman, David; Krauzewicz, Nina; Korchev, Yuri E.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a high-resolution scanning surface confocal microscopy technique capable of imaging single virus-like particles (VLPs) on the surfaces of cells topographically and by fluorescence. The technique combines recently published single-molecule-resolution ion-conductance microscopy that acquires topographical data with confocal microscopy providing simultaneous fluorescent imaging. In our experiments we have demonstrated that the cell membrane exhibits numerous submicrometer-sized surface structures that could be topographically confused with virus particles. However, simultaneous acquisition of confocal images allows the positions of fluorescently tagged particles to be identified. Using this technique, we have, for the first time, visualized single polyoma VLPs adsorbed onto the cell membrane. Observed VLPs had a mean width of 108 ± 16 nm. The particles were randomly distributed across the cell membrane, and no specific interactions were seen with cell membrane structures such as microvilli. These experiments demonstrate the utility of this new microscope for imaging the interactions of nanoparticles with the cell surface to provide novel insights into the earliest interactions of viruses and other nanoparticles such as gene therapy vectors with the cell. PMID:18199668

  9. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  10. FIP200 regulates targeting of Atg16L1 to the isolation membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Taki; Kaizuka, Takeshi; Cadwell, Ken; Sahani, Mayurbhai H; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Virgin, Herbert W; Mizushima, Noboru

    2013-03-01

    Autophagosome formation is a dynamic process that is strictly controlled by autophagy-related (Atg) proteins. However, how these Atg proteins are recruited to the autophagosome formation site or autophagic membranes remains poorly understood. Here, we found that FIP200, which is involved in proximal events, directly interacts with Atg16L1, one of the downstream Atg factors, in an Atg14- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent manner. Atg16L1 deletion mutants, which lack the FIP200-interacting domain, are defective in proper membrane targeting. Thus, FIP200 regulates not only early events but also late events of autophagosome formation through direct interaction with Atg16L1.

  11. [Surface modification of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane by using the zwitterionic substance].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gui-Hu; Xiao, Feng; Xiao, Ping; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Duan, Jin-Ming'; Shi, Jian; Zang, Li

    2013-10-01

    In order to enhance the hydrophilicity of the membrane and improve the antifouling properties, poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacry-late) (poly(HEMA)) was grafted to the surface of the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane by using the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. After that, ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) as the initiator, N, N'-methylene bisacrylamide as a cross-linking agent, a zwitterionic polymer, poly (3-( methacryloylamino) propyl-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (poly(MPDSAH)) were successfully grafted onto the membrane surface by radical polymerization reaction. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and contact angle measuring were employed to analyze the property and the morphology of structures before and after the membrane surface-modification. The grafting density (GD) gradually increased, with the grafting time increasing, the pore size of the membrane became smaller, and the porosity decreased, but the surface hydrophilicity of membrane was significantly enhanced at the same time. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) tests and filtration experiments were carried out to investigate anti-fouling performances of membrane before and after modification. With the GD increasing, the amount of adsorption on the film surface significantly reduced in the high-concentration BSA solution. The water contact angle (CA) decreased most, from 77. 2 degrees to 41.7 degrees within 5 s to 0, and a flux recovery ratio up to 94. 961% , when the GD reached 288. 340 microg.cm-2. Therefore, the optimal grafting time was 2 h, with the grafting density of 288. 340 microg.cm-2.

  12. Surface modification of commercial seawater reverse osmosis membranes by grafting of hydrophilic monomer blended with carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatanpour, Vahid; Zoqi, Naser

    2017-02-01

    In this study, modification of commercial seawater reverse osmosis membranes was carried out with simultaneous use of surface grafting and nanoparticle incorporation. Membrane grafting with a hydrophilic acrylic acid monomer and thermal initiator was used to increase membrane surface hydrophilicity. The used nanomaterial was carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which were dispersed in the grafting solution and deposited on membrane surface to reduce fouling by creating polymer brushes and hydrodynamic resistance. Effectiveness of the grafting process (formation of graft layer on membrane surface) was proved by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. Increase of membrane surface hydrophilicity was approved with contact angle test. First, the grafting was performed on the membrane surfaces with different monomer concentrations, various contact times and several membrane curing times (three variables for optimization). The modified membranes were tested by a cross-flow setup using saline solution for permeability and rejection tests, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution for fouling test. The results showed that the modified membranes with 0.75 M of monomer, 3 min contact time and 80 min curing time in an oven at 50 °C presented the highest flux and lowest rejection decline related to the commercial reverse osmosis membrane. In the next step, the optimum grafting condition was selected and the nanotubes with different weight percentages were dispersed in the acrylic acid monomer solution. The membrane containing 0.25 wt% COOH-MWCNTs showed the highest fouling resistance.

  13. Adsorption of pH-responsive amphiphilic copolymer micelles and gel on membrane surface as an approach for antifouling coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Ravikumar; Rana, Harpalsinh H.; Devi, Sadhna; Jewrajka, Suresh K.

    2013-03-01

    A new approach for the surface modification of polymer membranes prepared by phase inversion technique for antifouling properties is reported. Direct deposition of poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMA-b-PMMA-b-PDMA) copolymer micelles (core-shell) and gel formed from mixture of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PDMA-b-PMMA-b-PDMA on the polysulfone (PSf-virgin) ultrafiltration membrane surface successfully provides modified membranes with improved antifouling properties and pH-responsive behaviour during both water and protein filtrations. Successful deposition and adsorption of such type of micelle and gel particles on the membrane surface was assessed by combination of SEM, AFM, contact angle, ATR-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The micelle and gel particles preferentially remained on the membranes surface due to their bigger size than the pores on the skin layer and also due to adsorption on the membrane surface by hydrophobic interaction. The modified membranes exhibited much higher rejection of macromolecules and almost steady trend in flux compared to corresponding virgin membranes during filtration operation. The major advantage of this protocol is that the deposited micelles and gel remained on the membrane surface even after filtration and storage of the membrane in water and the modified membranes retained similar performance. The effect of all the micelles and gel components on the membrane performance has been elucidated.

  14. The BglF sensor recruits the BglG transcription regulator to the membrane and releases it on stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lopian, Livnat; Nussbaum-Shochat, Anat; O'Day-Kerstein, Kathryn; Wright, Andrew; Amster-Choder, Orna

    2003-06-10

    The Escherichia coli BglF protein is a sugar-sensor that controls the activity of the transcriptional antiterminator BglG by reversibly phosphorylating it, depending on beta-glucoside availability. BglF is a membrane-bound protein, whereas BglG is a soluble protein, and they are both present in the cell in minute amounts. How do BglF and BglG find each other to initiate signal transduction efficiently? Using bacterial two-hybrid systems and the Far-Western technique, we demonstrated unequivocally that BglG binds to BglF and to its active site-containing domain in vivo and in vitro. Measurements by surface plasmon resonance corroborated that the affinity between these proteins is high enough to enable their stable binding. To visualize the subcellular localization of BglG, we used fluorescence microscopy. In cells lacking BglF, the BglG-GFP fusion protein was evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm. In contrast, in cells producing BglF, BglG-GFP was localized to the membrane. On addition of beta-glucoside, BglG-GFP was released from the membrane, becoming evenly distributed throughout the cell. Using mutant proteins and genetic backgrounds that impede phosphorylation of the Bgl proteins, we demonstrated that BglG-BglF binding and recruitment of BglG to the membrane sensor requires phosphorylation but does not depend on the individual phosphorylation sites of the Bgl proteins. We suggest a mechanism for rapid response to environmental changes by preassembly of signaling complexes, which contain transcription regulators recruited by their cognate sensors-kinases, under nonstimulating conditions, and release of the regulators to the cytoplasm on stimulation. This mechanism might be applicable to signaling cascades in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. The HIV coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Infection by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. HIV gp120 enlarged, and stabilized the structure of lipid rafts on neuronal dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that enhanced the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by promoting a PKA-dependent phopshorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (that masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses, and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse, and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced three-fold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from enhancing the surface localization and clustering of NMDA receptors, while disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize following gp120. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV-infection by interfering with the traffic of NMDA receptors. PMID:22114277

  16. The human immunodeficiency virus coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph P; Haughey, Norman J

    2011-11-23

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Although the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for this effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. gp120 enlarged and stabilized the structure of lipid microdomains on dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that accelerated the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by a PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced by threefold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from accelerating the surface localization of NMDA receptors. Disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains after gp120 treatments restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV infection by interfering with NMDA receptor trafficking.

  17. Enhanced Adhesion of Campylobacter jejuni to Abiotic Surfaces Is Mediated by Membrane Proteins in Oxygen-Enriched Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sulaeman, Sheiam; Hernould, Mathieu; Schaumann, Annick; Coquet, Laurent; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Dé, Emmanuelle; Tresse, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the major foodborne bacterial enteritis in humans. In contradiction with its fastidious growth requirements, this microaerobic pathogen can survive in aerobic food environments, suggesting that it must employ a variety of protection mechanisms to resist oxidative stress. For the first time, C. jejuni 81–176 inner and outer membrane subproteomes were analyzed separately using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis (2-DE) of oxygen-acclimated cells and microaerobically grown cells. LC-MS/MS analyses successfully identified 42 and 25 spots which exhibited a significantly altered abundance in the IMP-enriched fraction and in the OMP-enriched fraction, respectively, in response to oxidative conditions. These spots corresponded to 38 membrane proteins that could be grouped into different functional classes: (i) transporters, (ii) chaperones, (iii) fatty acid metabolism, (iv) adhesion/virulence and (v) other metabolisms. Some of these proteins were up-regulated at the transcriptional level in oxygen-acclimated cells as confirmed by qRT-PCR. Downstream analyses revealed that adhesion of C. jejuni to inert surfaces and swarming motility were enhanced in oxygen-acclimated cells or paraquat-stressed cells, which could be explained by the higher abundance of membrane proteins involved in adhesion and biofilm formation. The virulence factor CadF, over-expressed in the outer membrane of oxygen-acclimated cells, contributes to the complex process of C. jejuni adhesion to inert surfaces as revealed by a reduction in the capability of C. jejuni 81–176 ΔCadF cells compared to the isogenic strain. Taken together, these data demonstrate that oxygen-enriched conditions promote the over-expression of membrane proteins involved in both the biofilm initiation and virulence of C. jejuni. PMID:23029510

  18. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Prevents Endothelial Cell Membrane Resealing and Regulates F-actin Remodeling in a β-Catenin-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Leonov, Sergey; Howard, Amber Cyan; Xiong, Shan; Zhang, Bin; Mei, Lin; McNeil, Paul; Simon, Sylvia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), an immunoglobin superfamily cell surface receptor, contributes to the vascular pathology associated with multiple disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD), diabetic complications, and inflammatory conditions. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, using the human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (ECV-304) expressing human RAGE, we report that RAGE expression leads to an altered F-actin organization and impaired membrane resealing. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we showed that RAGE expression increases β-catenin level, which decreases F-actin stress fibers and attenuates plasma membrane resealing. These results thus suggest a negative function for RAGE in endothelial cell membrane repair and reveal a new mechanism underlying RAGE regulation of F-actin remodeling and membrane resealing. PMID:21844192

  19. Integrated angular tracking and plasmonic membrane surfaces for a point of a care refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bay, Marie-Claude; Eckert, Rolf; Grenet, Eric; Stanley, Ross P.; Franzi, Edo; Heinzelmann, Harry; Ozdemir, Cenk I.; Altug, Hatice; Dunbar, L. Andrea

    2016-02-01

    We present an optical system which integrates a plasmonic sensing surface and an angular tracking system to enable a compact refractive index measurement. A refractive index change at the surface of the sensing membrane causes a change in the angle at which monochromatic light is transmitted through the membrane. This transmission angle is measured by the angular tracking system. We show good theoretical and experimental agreement of the transmission of the plasmonic sensing surface at different angular illumination of the membranes. Using this compact optical setup the embedded angular tracking system has an accuracy of <10-4 deg. This corresponds to a sensitivity <10-5 refractive index units. Finally we demonstrate this measurement technique using different concentrations of saline solution.

  20. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Canul, Ángel de la Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite's cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane. PMID:28656101

  1. Surface modification of dense membranes using radical graft polymerization enhanced by monomer filtration.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Roy; Belfer, Sofia; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2010-07-20

    Surface graft polymerization is a promising way to modify membranes for improved performance. Redox-initiated graft polymerization of vinyl monomers is a facile and inexpensive method carried out at room temperature in aqueous media; however, its use is often limited by slow kinetics, low surface specificity, and excessive consumption of chemicals on undesired homopolymerization. It is shown that in the case of RO or NF membranes these drawbacks may be eliminated by utilizing the selectivity of the membranes toward monomers and carrying out the polymerization while applying pressure, i.e., under filtration conditions. Concentration polarization that ensues raises the concentration of reagents near the membrane surface and thereby drastically increases the rate of reaction and preferentially directs it towards surface grafting. Grafting experiments using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and other monomers and characterization of modified membranes using permeability measurements, ATR-FTIR, AFM, XPS, and contact angle demonstrate that the required monomer concentrations can be drastically reduced, particularly when a small fraction of a cross-linker is added. As an additional benefit, this approach enables broadening the spectrum of utilizable monomers to sparingly soluble hydrophobic, charged, and macro-monomers, as was demonstrated using sparingly soluble ethyl methacrylate and 2-ethoxyethyl methacrylate and other monomers. Even though the kinetics of the process is substantially complicated by evolution and concentration polarization of oligomeric and polymeric species, especially in the presence of a cross-linker, it is well offset by the benefits of higher rate, specificity, and reduced monomer consumption.

  2. Biomimetic Phospholipid Membrane Organization on Graphene and Graphene Oxide Surfaces: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Willems, Nathalie; Urtizberea, Ainhoa; Verre, Andrea F; Iliut, Maria; Lelimousin, Mickael; Hirtz, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Sansom, Mark S P

    2017-02-28

    Supported phospholipid membrane patches stabilized on graphene surfaces have shown potential in sensor device functionalization, including biosensors and biocatalysis. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography (L-DPN) is a method useful in generating supported membrane structures that maintain lipid functionality, such as exhibiting specific interactions with protein molecules. Here, we have integrated L-DPN, atomic force microscopy, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation methods to characterize the molecular properties of supported lipid membranes (SLMs) on graphene and graphene oxide supports. We observed substantial differences in the topologies of the stabilized lipid structures depending on the nature of the surface (polar graphene oxide vs nonpolar graphene). Furthermore, the addition of water to SLM systems resulted in large-scale reorganization of the lipid structures, with measurable effects on lipid lateral mobility within the supported membranes. We also observed reduced lipid ordering within the supported structures relative to free-standing lipid bilayers, attributed to the strong hydrophobic interactions between the lipids and support. Together, our results provide insight into the molecular effects of graphene and graphene oxide surfaces on lipid bilayer membranes. This will be important in the design of these surfaces for applications such as biosensor devices.

  3. Rab11 regulates trafficking of trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane through the contractile vacuole complex of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Sayantanee; Mucci, Juan; Campetella, Oscar; Docampo, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Although this is not a free-living organism it has conserved a contractile vacuole complex (CVC) to regulate its osmolarity. This obligate intracellular pathogen is, in addition, dependent on surface proteins to invade its hosts. Here we used a combination of genetic and biochemical approaches to delineate the contribution of the CVC to the traffic of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins to the plasma membrane of the parasite and promote host invasion. While T. cruzi Rab11 (GFP-TcRab11) localized to the CVC, a dominant negative (DN) mutant tagged with GFP (GFP-TcRab11DN) localized to the cytosol, and epimastigotes expressing this mutant were less responsive to hyposmotic and hyperosmotic stress. Mutant parasites were still able to differentiate into metacyclic forms and infect host cells. GPI-anchored trans-sialidase (TcTS), mucins of the 60-200 KDa family, and trypomastigote small surface antigen (TcTSSA II) co-localized with GFP-TcRab11 to the CVC during transformation of intracellular amastigotes into trypomastigotes. Mucins of the gp35/50 family also co-localized with the CVC during metacyclogenesis. Parasites expressing GFP-TcRab11DN prevented TcTS, but not other membrane proteins, from reaching the plasma membrane, and were less infective as compared to wild type cells. Incubation of these mutants in the presence of exogenous recombinant active, but not inactive, TcTS, and a sialic acid donor, before infecting host cells, partially rescued infectivity of trypomastigotes. Taking together these results reveal roles of TcRab11 in osmoregulation and trafficking of trans-sialidase to the plasma membrane, the role of trans-sialidase in promoting infection, and a novel unconventional mechanism of GPI-anchored protein secretion.

  4. Membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase ATL15 functions in sugar-responsive growth regulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shoki; Terada, Saki; Sanagi, Miho; Hasegawa, Yoko; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Chiba, Yukako; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2017-09-09

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in regulating various cellular processes by modulating the protein function of specific ubiquitination targets. The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family is a group of plant-specific RING-type ubiquitin ligases that localize to membranes via their N-terminal transmembrane-like domains. To date, 91 ATL isoforms have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, with several ATLs reported to be involved in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. However, the functions of most ATLs remain unknown. This study, involving transcriptome database analysis, identifies ATL15 as a sugar responsive ATL gene in Arabidopsis. ATL15 expression was rapidly down-regulated in the presence of sugar. The ATL15 protein showed ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and localized to plasma membrane and endomembrane compartments. Further genetic analyses demonstrated that the atl15 knockout mutants are insensitive to high glucose concentrations, whereas ATL15 overexpression depresses plant growth. In addition, endogenous glucose and starch amounts were reciprocally affected in the atl15 knockout mutants and the ATL15 overexpressors. These results suggest that ATL15 protein plays a significant role as a membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase that regulates sugar-responsive plant growth in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  6. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    SciTech Connect