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Sample records for regulates cyclin d1

  1. Cyclin D1 regulates hepatic estrogen and androgen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Hanse, Eric A; Romano, Andrea; Blomquist, Charles H; Mason, J Ian; Delvoux, Bert; Anttila, Chelsea; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2010-06-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle control protein that plays an important role in regenerating liver and many types of cancer. Previous reports have shown that cyclin D1 can directly enhance estrogen receptor activity and inhibit androgen receptor activity in a ligand-independent manner and thus may play an important role in hormone-responsive malignancies. In this study, we examine a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 regulates sex steroid signaling, via altered metabolism of these hormones at the tissue and cellular level. In male mouse liver, ectopic expression of cyclin D1 regulated genes involved in the synthesis and degradation of sex steroid hormones in a pattern that would predict increased estrogen and decreased androgen levels. Indeed, hepatic expression of cyclin D1 led to increased serum estradiol levels, increased estrogen-responsive gene expression, and decreased androgen-responsive gene expression. Cyclin D1 also regulated the activity of several key enzymatic reactions in the liver, including increased oxidation of testosterone to androstenedione and decreased conversion of estradiol to estrone. Similar findings were seen in the setting of physiological cyclin D1 expression in regenerating liver. Knockdown of cyclin D1 in HuH7 cells produced reciprocal changes in steroid metabolism genes compared with cyclin D1 overexpression in mouse liver. In conclusion, these studies establish a novel link between the cell cycle machinery and sex steroid metabolism and provide a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 may regulate hormone signaling. Furthermore, these results suggest that increased cyclin D1 expression, which occurs in liver regeneration and liver diseases, may contribute to the feminization seen in these settings.

  2. Differential regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 in hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rickheim, David G; Nelsen, Christopher J; Fassett, John T; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Hansen, Linda K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2002-07-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in the control of the hepatocyte cell cycle in response to mitogenic stimuli, whereas the closely related protein cyclin D3 has not been extensively evaluated. In the current study, we examined the regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 during hepatocyte proliferation in vivo after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) and in culture. In contrast to cyclin D1, which was nearly undetectable in quiescent liver and substantially up-regulated after PH, cyclin D3 was constitutively expressed and induced only modestly. In the regenerating liver, the concentration of cyclin D3 was only about 10% of that of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 formed complexes primarily with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), which were markedly activated in the regenerating liver and readily sequestered the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21 and p27. Cyclin D3 bound to both cdk4 and cdk6. Cyclin D3/cdk6 activity was readily detectable in quiescent liver and changed little after PH, and this complex appeared to play a minor role in sequestering p21 and p27. In cultured hepatocytes, epidermal growth factor or insulin had little effect, but the combination of these agents substantially induced cyclin D1 and cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Mek1 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase markedly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and replication. In contrast, cyclin D3 was expressed in the absence of mitogens and was only modestly affected by these manipulations. In addition, growth-inhibitory extracellular matrix conditions inhibited cyclin D1 but not cyclin D3 expression. In conclusion, these results support the concept that cyclin D1 is critically regulated by extracellular stimuli that control proliferation, whereas cyclin D3 is regulated through different pathways and plays a distinct role in the liver.

  3. Regulation of Exit from Quiescence by p27 and Cyclin D1-CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Mohamed H.; Lee, Kwang Y.; Upton, Todd M.; Reed, Michael F.; Ewen, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of cyclin D1 and its assembly with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) to form an active complex is a rate-limiting step in progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Using an activated allele of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), we show that this kinase plays a significant role in positively regulating the expression of cyclin D1. This was found both in quiescent serum-starved cells and in cells expressing dominant-negative Ras. Despite the observation that cyclin D1 is a target of MEK1, in cycling cells, activated MEK1, but not cyclin D1, is capable of overcoming a G1 arrest induced by Ras inactivation. Either wild-type or catalytically inactive CDK4 cooperates with cyclin D1 in reversing the G1 arrest induced by inhibition of Ras activity. In quiescent NIH 3T3 cells expressing either ectopic cyclin D1 or activated MEK1, cyclin D1 is able to efficiently associate with CDK4; however, the complex is inactive. A significant percentage of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes are associated with p27 in serum-starved activated MEK1 or cyclin D1 cell lines. Reduction of p27 levels by expression of antisense p27 allows for S-phase entry from quiescence in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ectopic cyclin D1, but not in parental cells. PMID:9774675

  4. The regulation of cyclin D1 degradation: roles in cancer development and the potential for therapeutic invention

    PubMed Central

    Alao, John P

    2007-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of cell cycle progression and can function as a transcriptionl co-regulator. The overexpression of cyclin D1 has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. Deregulated cyclin D1 degradation appears to be responsible for the increased levels of cyclin D1 in several cancers. Recent findings have identified novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of cyclin D1 stability. A number of therapeutic agents have been shown to induce cyclin D1 degradation. The therapeutic ablation of cyclin D1 may be useful for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In this review, current knowledge on the regulation of cyclin D1 degradation is discussed. Novel insights into cyclin D1 degradation are also discussed in the context of ablative therapy. A number of unresolved questions regarding the regulation of cellular cyclin D1 levels are also addressed. PMID:17407548

  5. Cyclin D1 in the Liver: Role of Noncanonical Signaling in Liver Steatosis and Hormone Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Kelley G.; Gonzalez-Rosario, Janet; Thevenot, Paul T.; Cohen, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 is an important protein for cell cycle progression; however, functions independent of the cell cycle have been described in the liver. Cyclin D1 is also involved in DNA repair, is overexpressed in many cancers, and functions as a proto-oncogene. The lesser-known roles of Cyclin D1, specifically in hepatocytes, impact liver steatosis and hormone regulation in the liver. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed was conducted using the keywords Cyclin D1, steatosis, lipogenesis, and liver transplantation. In this article, we review the results from this literature search, with a focus on the role of Cyclin D1 in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, as well as the impact and function of this protein in hepatic steatosis. Results: Cyclin D1 represses carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and results in a decrease in transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC). Cyclin D1 also inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) which is involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Cyclin D1 inhibits both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) and represses transcription of lipogenic genes FAS and liver-type pyruvate kinase (Pklr), along with the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 represses multiple proteins involved in both lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Targeting Cyclin D1 to decrease hepatic steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or alcoholic fatty liver disease may help improve patient health and the quality of the donor liver pool. PMID:28331449

  6. Tight function zonula occludens-3 regulates cyclin D1-dependent cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capaldo, Christopher T; Koch, Stefan; Kwon, Michael; Laur, Oskar; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2011-05-15

    Coordinated regulation of cell proliferation is vital for epithelial tissue homeostasis, and uncontrolled proliferation is a hallmark of carcinogenesis. A growing body of evidence indicates that epithelial tight junctions (TJs) play a role in these processes, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a novel plasma membrane pool of cyclin D1 with cell-cycle regulatory functions. We have determined that the zonula occludens (ZO) family of TJ plaque proteins sequesters cyclin D1 at TJs during mitosis, through an evolutionarily conserved class II PSD-95, Dlg, and ZO-1 (PDZ)-binding motif within cyclin D1. Disruption of the cyclin D1/ZO complex through mutagenesis or siRNA-mediated suppression of ZO-3 resulted in increased cyclin D1 proteolysis and G(0)/G(1) cell-cycle retention. This study highlights an important new role for ZO family TJ proteins in regulating epithelial cell proliferation through stabilization of cyclin D1 during mitosis.

  7. BRCA1-IRIS regulates cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakuci, Enkeleda; Mahner, Sven; DiRenzo, James; ElShamy, Wael M. . E-mail: wael_elshamy@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-10-01

    The regulator of cell cycle progression, cyclin D1, is up-regulated in breast cancer cells; its expression is, in part, dependent on ER{alpha} signaling. However, many ER{alpha}-negative tumors and tumor cell lines (e.g., SKBR3) also show over-expression of cyclin D1. This suggests that, in addition to ER{alpha} signaling, cyclin D1 expression is under the control of other signaling pathways; these pathways may even be over-expressed in the ER{alpha}-negative cells. We previously noticed that both ER{alpha}-positive and -negative cell lines over-express BRCA1-IRIS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, the level of over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in ER{alpha}-negative cell lines even exceeded its over-expression level in ER{alpha}-positive cell lines. In this study, we show that: (1) BRCA1-IRIS forms complex with two of the nuclear receptor co-activators, namely, SRC1 and SRC3 (AIB1) in an ER{alpha}-independent manner. (2) BRCA1-IRIS alone, or in connection with co-activators, is recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter through its binding to c-Jun/AP1 complex; this binding activates the cyclin D1 expression. (3) Over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in breast cells over-activates JNK/c-Jun; this leads to the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cellular proliferation. (4) BRCA1-IRIS activation of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 appears to account for this, because in cells that were depleted from BRCA1-IRIS, JNK remained inactive. However, depletion of SRC1 or SRC3 instead reduced c-Jun expression. Our data suggest that this novel signaling pathway links BRCA1-IRIS to cellular proliferation through c-Jun/AP1 nuclear pathway; finally, this culminates in the increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene.

  8. A developmentally regulated switch directs regenerative growth of Schwann cells through cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Kim, H A; Pomeroy, S L; Whoriskey, W; Pawlitzky, I; Benowitz, L I; Sicinski, P; Stiles, C D; Roberts, T M

    2000-05-01

    Sciatic nerve axons in cyclin D1 knockout mice develop normally, become properly ensheathed by Schwann cells, and appear to function normally. However, in the Wallerian degeneration model of nerve injury, the mitotic response of Schwann cells is completely inhibited. The mitotic block is Schwann cell autonomous and developmentally regulated. Rescue analysis (by "knockin" of cyclin E) indicates that D1 protein, rather than regulatory elements of the D1 gene, provides the essential Schwann cell function. Genetic inhibition of the Schwann cell cycle shows that neuronal responses to nerve injury are surprisingly independent of Schwann cell mitotic responses. Even axonal regrowth into the distal zone of a nerve crush injury is not markedly impaired in cyclin D1-/- mice.

  9. IKKα Regulates Mitogenic Signaling through Transcriptional Induction of Cyclin D1 via Tcf

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Chris; Wu, Kongming; D'Amico, Mark; Jarrett, Christy; Joyce, David; Hughes, Julian; Hulit, James; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Fu, Maofu; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.; Lamberti, Carmela; Verma, Udit; Gaynor, Richard B.; Byers, Stephen W.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin/Tcf and IκB/NF-κB cascades are independent pathways involved in cell cycle control, cellular differentiation, and inflammation. Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling occurs in certain cancers from mutation of components of the pathway and from activating growth factor receptors, including RON and MET. The resulting accumulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin interacts with the Tcf/LEF transcription factors to induce target genes. The IκB kinase complex (IKK) that phosphorylates IκB contains IKKα, IKKβ, and IKKγ. Here we show that the cyclin D1 gene functions as a point of convergence between the Wnt/β-catenin and IκB pathways in mitogenic signaling. Mitogenic induction of G1-S phase progression and cyclin D1 expression was PI3K dependent, and cyclin D1−/− cells showed reduced PI3K-dependent S-phase entry. PI3K-dependent induction of cyclin D1 was blocked by inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/IκB/IKKα or β-catenin signaling. A single Tcf site in the cyclin D1 promoter was required for induction by PI3K or IKKα. In IKKα−/− cells, mitogen-induced DNA synthesis, and expression of Tcf-responsive genes was reduced. Reintroduction of IKKα restored normal mitogen induction of cyclin D1 through a Tcf site. In IKKα−/− cells, β-catenin phosphorylation was decreased and purified IKKα was sufficient for phosphorylation of β-catenin through its N-terminus in vitro. Because IKKα but not IKKβ induced cyclin D1 expression through Tcf activity, these studies indicate that the relative levels of IKKα and IKKβ may alter their substrate and signaling specificities to regulate mitogen-induced DNA synthesis through distinct mechanisms. PMID:12589056

  10. The Rho GTPase effector ROCK regulates cyclin A, cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 levels by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F

    2006-06-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. However, the mechanisms by which ROCK signaling promotes cell cycle progression have not been thoroughly characterized. Using a conditionally activated ROCK-estrogen receptor fusion protein, we found that ROCK activation is sufficient to stimulate G1/S cell cycle progression in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Further analysis revealed that ROCK acts via independent pathways to alter the levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins: cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) elevation via Ras and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, increased cyclin A via LIM kinase 2, and reduction of p27(Kip1) protein levels. Therefore, the influence of ROCK on cell cycle regulatory proteins occurs by multiple independent mechanisms.

  11. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Geng, Y; Whoriskey, W; Park, M Y; Bronson, R T; Medema, R H; Li, T; Weinberg, R A; Sicinski, P

    1999-06-11

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expression pattern of human cyclin E faithfully reproduces that normally associated with mouse cyclin D1. The replacement of cyclin D1 with cyclin E rescues all phenotypic manifestations of cyclin D1 deficiency and restores normal development in cyclin D1-dependent tissues. Thus, cyclin E can functionally replace cyclin D1. Our analyses suggest that cyclin E is the major downstream target of cyclin D1.

  12. αB-crystallin is mutant B-RAF regulated and contributes to cyclin D1 turnover in melanocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The serine/threonine kinase, B-RAF, is frequently mutated in melanoma and is required for cell proliferation. Proteasomal turnover of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors via E3 ubiquitin ligases regulates cell cycle progression. We previously showed that B-RAF regulates Cks1, a co-factor for the F-box protein Skp2. Recently, a second F-box protein cofactor was identified, αB-crystallin, that binds Fbx4 and promotes cyclin D1 degradation. Here, we demonstrate that αB-crystallin is down-regulated in mutant B-RAF melanoma cells compared to melanocytes in a B-RAF and MEK-dependent manner. In a subset of lines, MEK inhibition was sufficient to up-regulate αB-crystallin protein levels; whereas in other lines combined MEK and proteasome inhibition was required. αB-crystallin knockdown partially stabilized cyclin D1 in melanocytes. Expression of αB-crystallin in mutant B-RAF melanoma cells did not promote cyclin D1 turnover under normal conditions, but did enhance turnover following etoposide-induced DNA damage. Together, these data show that αB-crystallin is highly expressed in melanocytes contributing, in part, to cyclin D1 turnover. Furthermore, αB-crystallin is down-regulated in a B-RAF-dependent manner in melanoma cells and its re-expression regulates cyclin D1 turnover after DNA damage. Significance αB-crystallin has been implicated in cellular functions as a heat shock protein and, more recently, as a cofactor for an E3 ligase ubiquitin ligase complex that degrades the cell cycle protein, cyclin D1. In this study we identify αB-crystallin as a target of aberrant B-RAF-MEK signaling that is hyper-activated in the majority of melanomas through mutation of B-RAF. Furthermore, we provide evidence for a functional role of αB-crystallin in contributing to the turnover of cyclin D1 in melanocytes and in melanoma cells following DNA damage inducing signals. These findings further our understanding of the regulation of cyclin D1 in melanocytic

  13. DICER1 regulated let-7 expression levels in p53-induced cancer repression requires cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Tang, Shou-Ching; Xu, Chongwen; Wang, Chenguang; Qin, Sida; Du, Ning; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Fei; Ren, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Let-7 miRNAs act as tumour suppressors by directly binding to the 3′UTRs of downstream gene products. The regulatory role of let-7 in downstream gene expression has gained much interest in the cancer research community, as it controls multiple biological functions and determines cell fates. For example, one target of the let-7 family is cyclin D1, which promotes G0/S cell cycle progression and oncogenesis, was correlated with endoribonuclease DICER1, another target of let-7. Down-regulated let-7 has been identified in many types of tumours, suggesting a feedback loop may exist between let-7 and cyclin D1. A potential player in the proposed feedback relationship is Dicer, a central regulator of miRNA expression through sequence-specific silencing. We first identified that DICER1 is the key downstream gene for cyclin D1-induced let-7 expression. In addition, we found that let-7 miRNAs expression decreased because of the p53-induced cell death response, with deregulated cyclin D1. Our results also showed that cyclin D1 is required for Nutlin-3 and TAX-induced let-7 expression in cancer repression and the cell death response. For the first time, we provide evidence that let-7 and cyclin D1 form a feedback loop in regulating therapy response of cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and importantly, that alteration of let-7 expression, mainly caused by cyclin D1, is a sensitive indicator for better chemotherapies response. PMID:25702703

  14. Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihara, Takashi; Collado, Denise; Hamaguchi, Masaaki . E-mail: hamaguchi@fordham.edu

    2007-07-13

    The expression of tumor suppressor gene DBC2 causes certain breast cancer cells to stop growing [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. Recently, DBC2 was found to participate in diverse cellular functions such as protein transport, cytoskeleton regulation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control [V. Siripurapu, J.L. Meth, N. Kobayashi, M. Hamaguchi, DBC2 significantly influences cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeleton, and membrane trafficking pathways. J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 83-89]. Its tumor suppression mechanism, however, remains unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that DBC2 suppresses breast cancer proliferation through down-regulation of Cyclin D1 (CCND1). Additionally, the constitutional overexpression of CCND1 prevented the negative impact of DBC2 expression on their growth. Under a CCND1 promoter, the expression of CCNE1 exhibited the same protective effect. Our results indicate that the down-regulation of CCND1 is an essential step for DBC2's growth suppression of cancer cells. We believe that this discovery contributes to a better understanding of DBC2's tumor suppressor function.

  15. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E.; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C.; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3′ UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  16. MicroRNA-193b Represses Cell Proliferation and Regulates Cyclin D1 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamin; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Paré, Geneviève C.; Zhang, Xiao; Pemberton, Joshua G.W.; Garady, Cherif; Lai, Dulcie; Yang, Xiaolong; Tron, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive form of human skin cancer characterized by high metastatic potential and poor prognosis. To better understand the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in melanoma, the expression of 470 miRNAs was profiled in tissue samples from benign nevi and metastatic melanomas. We identified 31 miRNAs that were differentially expressed (13 up-regulated and 18 down-regulated) in metastatic melanomas relative to benign nevi. Notably, miR-193b was significantly down-regulated in the melanoma tissues examined. To understand the role of miR-193b in melanoma, functional studies were undertaken. Overexpression of miR-193b in melanoma cell lines repressed cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling identified 314 genes down-regulated by overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells. Eighteen of these down-regulated genes, including cyclin D1 (CCND1), were also identified as putative miR-193b targets by TargetScan. Overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells down-regulated CCND1 mRNA and protein by ≥50%. A luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-193b directly regulates CCND1 by binding to the 3′untranslated region of CCND1 mRNA. These studies indicate that miR-193b represses cell proliferation and regulates CCND1 expression and suggest that dysregulation of miR-193b may play an important role in melanoma development. PMID:20304954

  17. Cytoplasmic cyclin D1 regulates cell invasion and metastasis through the phosphorylation of paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Noel P.; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Cemeli, Tània; Mirantes, Cristina; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Colomina, Neus; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) together with its binding partner Cdk4 act as a transcriptional regulator to control cell proliferation and migration, and abnormal Ccnd1·Cdk4 expression promotes tumour growth and metastasis. While different nuclear Ccnd1·Cdk4 targets participating in cell proliferation and tissue development have been identified, little is known about how Ccnd1·Cdk4 controls cell adherence and invasion. Here, we show that the focal adhesion component paxillin is a cytoplasmic substrate of Ccnd1·Cdk4. This complex phosphorylates a fraction of paxillin specifically associated to the cell membrane, and promotes Rac1 activation, thereby triggering membrane ruffling and cell invasion in both normal fibroblasts and tumour cells. Our results demonstrate that localization of Ccnd1·Cdk4 to the cytoplasm does not simply act to restrain cell proliferation, but constitutes a functionally relevant mechanism operating under normal and pathological conditions to control cell adhesion, migration and metastasis through activation of a Ccnd1·Cdk4-paxillin-Rac1 axis. PMID:27181366

  18. Upregulation of ATF-3 is correlated with prognosis and proliferation of laryngeal cancer by regulating Cyclin D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiapeng; Sun, Qingfeng; Wu, Tianyi; Lu, Jianguang; Qu, Lingmei; Sun, Yanan; Tian, Linli; Zhang, Binghui; Li, Dandan; Liu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the expression and significance of ATF-3 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Methods: Expression of ATF-3 was examined using immunohistochemistry methods in samples from 83 cases of LSCC carcinoma. MTT assay was used to detect proliferation of Hep-2 cells after ATF-3 knocked down by siRNA lentivirus. A mouse model was used to investigate the inhibitive role of ATF-3 siRNA in LSCC xenografts. Realtime RCR was used to detect Cyclin D1 expression after ATF-3 downregulation in Hep-2 cells. Results: The expression of ATF-3 was positively detected in all the 83 cases of LSCC cancer tissues while Only 4 cases of adjacent non-neoplastic tissues were detected with positive ATF-3 expression. The ATF-3 expression was statistically related with T stage, neck nodal metastasis, clinical stage and prognosis of LSCC. Both cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo were suppressed after ATF-3 knockdown. Furthermore, the expression of Cyclin D1 was decreased after ATF-3 downregulation in Hep-2 cells. Conclusion: ATF-3 is involved in the progress of LSCC, and may provide clinical information for evaluation of prognosis of LSCC. The oncologic role of ATF-3 may be correlated with Cyclin D1 regulation. PMID:24133584

  19. Upregulation of ATF-3 is correlated with prognosis and proliferation of laryngeal cancer by regulating Cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiapeng; Sun, Qingfeng; Wu, Tianyi; Lu, Jianguang; Qu, Lingmei; Sun, Yanan; Tian, Linli; Zhang, Binghui; Li, Dandan; Liu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression and significance of ATF-3 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Expression of ATF-3 was examined using immunohistochemistry methods in samples from 83 cases of LSCC carcinoma. MTT assay was used to detect proliferation of Hep-2 cells after ATF-3 knocked down by siRNA lentivirus. A mouse model was used to investigate the inhibitive role of ATF-3 siRNA in LSCC xenografts. Realtime RCR was used to detect Cyclin D1 expression after ATF-3 downregulation in Hep-2 cells. The expression of ATF-3 was positively detected in all the 83 cases of LSCC cancer tissues while Only 4 cases of adjacent non-neoplastic tissues were detected with positive ATF-3 expression. The ATF-3 expression was statistically related with T stage, neck nodal metastasis, clinical stage and prognosis of LSCC. Both cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo were suppressed after ATF-3 knockdown. Furthermore, the expression of Cyclin D1 was decreased after ATF-3 downregulation in Hep-2 cells. ATF-3 is involved in the progress of LSCC, and may provide clinical information for evaluation of prognosis of LSCC. The oncologic role of ATF-3 may be correlated with Cyclin D1 regulation.

  20. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Ravinal, R C; Costa, R S; Lima, M S; Tucci, S; Muglia, V F; Reis, R B dos; Silva, G E B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  1. Cyclin D1 Is Transcriptionally Down-Regulated by ZO-2 via an E Box and the Transcription Factor c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Miriam; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Tapia, Rocío; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Ramírez, Leticia; Recillas-Targa, Félix; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated the participation of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation. Here, we have studied the role of zona occludens (ZO)-2, a TJ peripheral protein, in the regulation of cyclin D1 transcription. We found that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner. To understand how ZO-2 represses cyclin D1 promoter activity, we used deletion analyses and found that ZO-2 negatively regulates cyclin D1 transcription via an E box and that it diminishes cell proliferation. Because ZO-2 does not associate directly with DNA, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay were used to identify the transcription factors mediating the ZO-2–repressive effect. c-Myc was found to bind the E box present in the cyclin D1 promoter, and the overexpression of c-Myc augmented the inhibition generated by ZO-2 transfection. The presence of ZO-2 and c-Myc in the same complex was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. ChIP and reporter gene assays using histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors demonstrated that HDACs are necessary for ZO-2 repression and that HDAC1 is recruited to the E box. We conclude that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription by interacting with the c-Myc/E box element and by recruiting HDAC1. PMID:17881732

  2. Cyclin D1 is transcriptionally down-regulated by ZO-2 via an E box and the transcription factor c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Miriam; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Tapia, Rocío; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Ramírez, Leticia; Recillas-Targa, Félix; González-Mariscal, Lorenza; López-Bayghen, Esther

    2007-12-01

    Recent reports have indicated the participation of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation. Here, we have studied the role of zona occludens (ZO)-2, a TJ peripheral protein, in the regulation of cyclin D1 transcription. We found that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner. To understand how ZO-2 represses cyclin D1 promoter activity, we used deletion analyses and found that ZO-2 negatively regulates cyclin D1 transcription via an E box and that it diminishes cell proliferation. Because ZO-2 does not associate directly with DNA, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay were used to identify the transcription factors mediating the ZO-2-repressive effect. c-Myc was found to bind the E box present in the cyclin D1 promoter, and the overexpression of c-Myc augmented the inhibition generated by ZO-2 transfection. The presence of ZO-2 and c-Myc in the same complex was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. ChIP and reporter gene assays using histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors demonstrated that HDACs are necessary for ZO-2 repression and that HDAC1 is recruited to the E box. We conclude that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription by interacting with the c-Myc/E box element and by recruiting HDAC1.

  3. Altered expression of cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1, p14, p16, CDK4 and Rb in nodular melanomas.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Ingeborg M; Straume, Oddbjørn; Akslen, Lars A

    2004-12-01

    Cell cycle regulating proteins are important in tumour development. To investigate whether alterations in Cyclin D1, p14, CDK4 and Rb are associated with tumour cell proliferation, tumour progression and patient survival in malignant melanoma, we examined 202 vertical growth phase tumours and 68 corresponding metastases for expression of Cyclin D1, p14, CDK4 and Rb, and compared the results with Ki-67 expression, p16 and p53 expression, clinico-pathological variables, and survival data. Nuclear staining of Cyclin D1 was strong in 35% of cases, and correlated with high levels of Rb (p=0.05), but not with survival or other markers tested. Strong staining of p14 was found in 63% of nodular melanomas and was associated with strong p53 expression (p=0.014), and with high levels of CDK4 (p<0.0001). Low p14 expression was associated with increased tumour thickness (p=0.008) and increasing level of invasion (p=0.020). Strong nuclear staining for CDK4 was found in 81% of cases and was associated with tumour thickness below the median value of 3.7 mm and improved survival (log-rank test, p=0.024). Further, 56% of the tumours showed strong nuclear staining for Rb, and these cases were significantly associated with absent/low levels of p16 staining (p=0.030), high levels of p14 (p=0.010), as well as high Ki-67 expression (p=0.005). Our results seem to confirm that the p16-Rb pathway plays an important role in tumour progression and prognosis in vertical growth phase melanomas, whereas alterations in the p14-p53 pathway might be less important.

  4. MiR-15b Targets Cyclin D1 to Regulate Proliferation and Apoptosis in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guan; Shi, Lei; Yan, Shushan; Wan, Zhengqiang; Jiang, Nan; Fu, Linshan; Li, Min; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role and mechanism of miR-15b in the proliferation and apoptosis of glioma. Methods. The miR-15b mimics were transfected into human glioma cells to upregulate the miR-15b expression. Cyclin D1 was determined by both western blotting analysis and luciferase reporter assay. Methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometry were employed to detect the cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Results. Overexpression of miR-15b inhibits proliferation by arrested cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis, possibly by directly targeting Cyclin D1. Both luciferase assay and bioinformatics search revealed a putative target site of miR-15b binding to the 3′-UTR of Cyclin D1. Moreover, expression of miR-15b in glioma tissues was found to be inversely correlated with Cyclin D1 expression. Enforced Cyclin D1 could abrogate the miR-15b-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings identified that miR-15b may function as a glioma suppressor by targeting the Cyclin D1, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of glioma. PMID:24995320

  5. Malnutrition suppresses cell cycle progression of hematopoietic progenitor cells in mice via cyclin D1 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Karina; Crisma, Amanda R; Silva, Graziela B; Rogero, Marcelo M; Fock, Ricardo A; Borelli, Primavera

    2014-01-01

    Protein malnutrition (PM) often is associated with changes in bone marrow (BM) microenvironment leading to an impaired hematopoiesis; however, the mechanism involved is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to compare the cell cycle progression of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and evaluate the cell cycle signaling in malnourished mice to assess the mechanism of cell cycle arrest. C57Bl/6J mice were randomly assigned in control and malnourished groups receiving normoproteic and hypoproteic diets (12% and 2% protein, respectively) over a 5-wk period. Nutritional and hematologic parameters were assessed and BM immunophenotypic analysis was performed. Cell cycle of HPC (Lin(-)) and HSC (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) were evaluated after 6 h of in vivo 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrDU) incorporation. Cell cycle regulatory protein expression of HPC was assessed by Western blot. Malnourished mice showed lower levels of serum protein, albumin, glucose, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, and higher levels of serum corticosterone. PM also caused a reduction of BM myeloid compartment resulting in anemia and leukopenia. After 6 h of BrDU incorporation, malnourished mice showed G0-G1 arrest of HPC without changes of HSC proliferation kinetics. HPC of malnourished mice showed reduced expression of proteins that induce cell cycle (cyclin D1, cyclin E, pRb, PCNA, Cdc25a, Cdk2, and Cdk4) and increased expression of inhibitory proteins (p21 and p27) with no significant difference in p53 expression. PM suppressed cell cycle progression mainly of HPC. This occurred via cyclin D1 down-regulation and p21/p27 overexpression attesting that BM microenvironment commitment observed in PM is affecting cell interactions compromising cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNA-155 inhibits proliferation and migration of human extravillous trophoblast derived HTR-8/SVneo cells via down-regulating cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Dai, Y; Qiu, Z; Diao, Z; Shen, L; Xue, P; Sun, H; Hu, Y

    2012-10-01

    MiR-155 is known to participate in various cellular processes by targeting gene expression. We previously revealed a link between miR-155 and perturbation of trophoblast invasion and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the target molecule(s) of miR-155 on the influence on the proliferation and migration of trophoblast cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that, at the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of cyclin D1, six bases are complementary to the seed region of miR-155. Luciferase assays and cyclin D1 3'UTR transfection assays validated that cyclin D1 3'UTR was the target of miR-155 in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Overexpression of miR-155 in HTR-8/SVneo cells reduced the level of cyclin D1 protein, decreased cell proliferation and invasion, and increased cell number at the G1 stage. Furthermore, the increased expression of miR-155 also regulated the protein levels of kinase inhibitory protein p27 and phosphorylated cytoskeletal protein filamin A. In conclusion, we found that cyclin D1 may be a target of miR-155 in HTR-8/SVneo cells, and demonstrated a negative regulatory role of miR-155 involved in cyclin D1/p27 pathway in proliferation and migration of the cells.

  7. Distinct Nongenomic Signal Transduction Pathways Controlled by 17β-Estradiol Regulate DNA Synthesis and Cyclin D1 Gene Transcription in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo; Bresciani, Francesco; Weisz, Alessandro; Trentalance, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Estrogens induce cell proliferation in target tissues by stimulating progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Activation of cyclin D1 gene expression is a critical feature of this hormonal action. The existence of rapid/nongenomic estradiol-regulated protein kinase C (PKC-α) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathways, their cross talk, and role played in DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 gene transcription have been studied herein in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. 17β-Estradiol was found to rapidly activate PKC-α translocation and ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in this cell line. These actions were independent of each other, preceding the increase of thymidine incorporation into DNA and cyclin D1 expression, and did not involve DNA binding by estrogen receptor. The results obtained with specific inhibitors indicated that PKC-α pathway is necessary to mediate the estradiol-induced G1-S progression of HepG2 cells, but it does not exert any effect(s) on cyclin D1 gene expression. On the contrary, ERK-2 cascade was strongly involved in both G1-S progression and cyclin D1 gene transcription. Deletion of its activating protein-1 responsive element motif resulted in attenuation of cyclin D1 promoter responsiveness to estrogen. These results indicate that estrogen-induced cyclin D1 transcription can occur in HepG2 cells independently of the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptor, sustaining the pivotal role played by nongenomic pathways of estrogen action in hormone-induced proliferation. PMID:12388769

  8. The ω-3 epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits endothelial cell proliferation by p38 MAP kinase activation and cyclin D1/CDK4 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Pei H; Petrovic, Nenad; Murray, Michael

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dietary intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreases cancer risk, while arachidonic acid and other ω-6 PUFAs increase risk, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxides contribute to enhanced tumourigenesis due to ω-6 PUFA intake. Thus, ω-6 arachidonic acid epoxides (EETs) inhibit apoptosis and stimulate proliferation by up-regulating cyclin D1 expression in cells. The present study evaluated the corresponding ω-3 PUFA epoxides and assessed their role in the regulation of cell proliferation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Four chemically stable EPA epoxides (formed at the 8,9-, 11,12-, 14,15- and 17,18-olefinic bonds) were synthesized and tested against growth-related signalling pathways in brain microvascular endothelial bEND.3 cells. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry and cyclin gene expression by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. The role of the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in cyclin D1 dysregulation was assessed using specific inhibitors and dominant-negative expression plasmids. KEY RESULTS The ω-3 17,18-epoxide of EPA decreased cell proliferation, interrupted the cell cycle in S-phase and down-regulated the cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4 complex, whereas the 8,9-, 11,12- and 14,15-epoxides were either inactive or enhanced proliferation. Cyclin D1 down-regulation by 17,18-epoxy-EPA was mediated by activation of the growth-suppressing p38 MAP kinase, but the alternate EPA-epoxides were inactive. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present findings suggest that the epoxide formed by CYP enzymes at the ω-3 olefinic bond may contribute to the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFA by down-regulating cyclin D1 and suppressing cell proliferation. PMID:21077851

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin D1 promoter by STAT5: its involvement in cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, I; Kitamura, T; Wakao, H; Tanaka, H; Hashimoto, K; Albanese, C; Downward, J; Pestell, R G; Kanakura, Y

    1999-01-01

    STAT5 is a member of a family of transcription factors that participate in the signal transduction pathways of many hormones and cytokines. Although STAT5 is suggested to play a crucial role in the biological effects of cytokines, its downstream target(s) associated with cell growth control is largely unknown. In a human interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line F-36P-mpl, the induced expression of dominant-negative (dn)-STAT5 and of dn-ras led to inhibition of IL-3-dependent cell growth, accompanying the reduced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. Also, both constitutively active forms of STAT5A (1*6-STAT5A) and ras (H-rasG12V) enabled F-36P-mpl cells to proliferate without added growth factors. In NIH 3T3 cells, 1*6-STAT5A and H-rasG12V individually and cooperatively transactivated the cyclin D1 promoter in luciferase assays. Both dn-STAT5 and dn-ras suppressed IL-3-induced cyclin D1 promoter activities in F-36P-mpl cells. Using a series of mutant cyclin D1 promoters, 1*6-STAT5A was found to transactivate the cyclin D1 promoter through the potential STAT-binding sequence at -481 bp. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, STAT5 bound to the element in response to IL-3. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dn-STAT5 on IL-3-dependent growth was restored by expression of cyclin D1. Thus STAT5, in addition to ras signaling, appears to mediate transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1, thereby contributing to cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells. PMID:10064602

  10. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (Cdk4/6) to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (RB) family proteins, relieving E2F/DPs from the negative restraint of RB proteins and histone deacetylases. The cyclin D-Cdk4/6 complexes activate cyclin E/Cdk2 through titration of the Cdk inhibitors p21Cip1/p27Kip1. Cyclin E/Cdk2 further phosphorylates RBs, thereby activating E2F/DPs, and cells enter the S phase of the cell cycle. Cyclin D-Cdk4/6 also phosphorylates MEP50 subunit of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), which cooperates with cyclin D1 to drive lymphomagenesis in vivo. Activated PRMPT5 causes arginine methylation of p53 to suppress expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative target genes, explaining the molecular mechanism for tumorigenesis. Cyclin D1 physically interacts with transcription factors such as estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, and Myb family proteins to regulate gene expression in Cdk-independent fashion. Dmp1 is a Myb-like protein that quenches the oncogenic signals from activated Ras or HER2 by inducing Arf/p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Cyclin D1 binds to Dmp1α to activate both Arf and Ink4a promoters to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in non-transformed cells to prevent them from neoplastic transformation. Dmp1-deficiency significantly accelerates mouse mammary tumorigenesis with reduced apoptosis and increased metastasis. Cyclin D1 interferes with ligand activation of PPARγ involved in cellular differentiation; it also physically interacts with histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 to repress gene expression. It has also been shown that cyclin D1 accelerates tumorigenesis through transcriptional activation of miR-17/20 and Dicer1 which, in turn, represses cyclin D1 expression. Identification of cyclin D1-binding proteins/promoters will be essential for further clarification of its biological activities. PMID:28090171

  11. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and cyclin D1 compose a positive feedback loop contributing to tumor growth in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Sakamoto, Kei; Hikiba, Yohko; Kinoshita, Hiroto; Nakata, Wachiko; Takahashi, Ryota; Tateishi, Keisuke; Tada, Motohisa; Akanuma, Masao; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori; Omata, Masao; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate multiple cellular functions and are highly active in many types of human cancers. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is an upstream MAPK involved in apoptosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. This study investigated the role of ASK1 in the development of gastric cancer. In human gastric cancer specimens, we observed increased ASK1 expression, compared to nontumor epithelium. Using a chemically induced murine gastric tumorigenesis model, we observed increased tumor ASK1 expression, and ASK1 knockout mice had both fewer and smaller tumors than wild-type (WT) mice. ASK1 siRNA inhibited cell proliferation through the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle, and reduced cyclin D1 expression in gastric cancer cells, whereas these effects were uncommon in other cancer cells. ASK1 overexpression induced the transcription of cyclin D1, through AP-1 activation, and ASK1 levels were regulated by cyclin D1, via the Rb–E2F pathway. Exogenous ASK1 induced cyclin D1 expression, followed by elevated expression of endogenous ASK1. These results indicate an autoregulatory mechanism of ASK1 in the development of gastric cancer. Targeting this positive feedback loop, ASK1 may present a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:21187402

  12. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional down-regulation of cyclin D1 contributes to C6 glioma cell differentiation induced by forskolin.

    PubMed

    He, Songmin; Zhu, Wenbo; Zhou, Yuxi; Huang, Yijun; Ou, Yanqiu; Li, Yan; Yan, Guangmei

    2011-09-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal intracranial tumors, and differentiation therapy shows great potential to be a promising candidate for their treatment. Here, we have elaborated that a PKA activator, forskolin, represses cell growth via cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and induces cell differentiation characteristic with elongated processes and restoration of GFAP expression. In mechanisms, we verified that forskolin significantly diminishes the mRNA and protein level of a key cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, and maintenance of low cyclin D1 expression level was required for forskolin-induced proliferation inhibition and differentiation by gain and loss of function approaches. In addition, that forskolin down-regulated the cyclin D1 by proteolytic (post-transcriptional) mechanisms was dependent on GSK-3β activation at Ser9. The pro-differentiation activity of forskolin and related molecular mechanisms imply that forskolin can be developed into a candidate for the future in differentiation therapy of glioma, and cyclin D1 is a promising target for pro-differentiation strategy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 is independent of phosphorylation on threonine 286.

    PubMed

    Germain, D; Russell, A; Thompson, A; Hendley, J

    2000-04-21

    Cyclin D1 binds and regulates the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6. Phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein by cyclin D1.CDK4/6 complexes during the G(1) phase of the cell cycle promotes entry into S phase. Cyclin D1 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26 S proteasome. Previous studies have demonstrated that cyclin D1 ubiquitination is dependent on its phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) on threonine 286 and that this phosphorylation event is greatly enhanced by binding to CDK4 (Diehl, J. A., Cheng, M. G., Roussel, M. F., and Sherr, C. J. (1998) Genes Dev. 12, 3499-3511). We now report an additional pathway for the ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 (unbound to CDKs). We show that, when unbound to CDK4, a cyclin D1-T286A mutant is ubiquitinated. Further, we show that a mutant of cyclin D1 that cannot bind to CDK4 (cyclin D1-KE) is also ubiquitinated in vivo. Our results demonstrate that free cyclin D1 is ubiquitinated independently of its phosphorylation on threonine 286 by GSK-3beta, suggesting that, as has been shown for cyclin E, distinct pathways of ubiquitination lead to the degradation of free and CDK-bound cyclin D1. The pathway responsible for ubiquitination of free cyclin D1 may be important in limiting the effects of cyclin D1 overexpression in a variety of cancers.

  14. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  15. Mig-6 is down-regulated in HCC and inhibits the proliferation of HCC cells via the P-ERK/Cyclin D1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Qu, Lianyue; Luo, Wenting; Tian, Yulong; Zhai, Huan; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Hongshan

    2017-06-01

    The ablation of Mig-6 has been shown to induce tumor formation in various tissues. However, the relationships between Mig-6 expression, clinical pathological factors, and prognosis have not been clarified in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and the mechanism by which Mig-6 regulates the proliferation of HCC cells has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of the loss of Mig-6 expression in HCC and the mechanism underlying the inhibition of cell proliferation by Mig-6. The down-regulation of Mig-6 correlated significantly with large tumors, a more advanced BCLC stage, and a more advanced TNM stage, and low Mig-6 expression predicted significantly reduced survival. Low Mig-6 expression and high Cyclin D1 expression were independent predictors for survival. The overexpression of Mig-6 led to significant G1 arrest and growth inhibition in HCC cells, possibly through the inhibition P-ERK and Cyclin D1. These results indicate that Mig-6 expression is low in HCC, which predicts a poor prognosis. Mig-6 may regulate cell proliferation and the cell cycle through the P-ERK/Cyclin D1 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An update on the implications of cyclin D1 in oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-García, P; Gil-Montoya, J A; Scully, C; Ayén, A; González-Ruiz, L; Navarro-Triviño, F J; González-Moles, M A

    2017-10-01

    Cyclin D1 promotes cell cycle progression during G1 phase, a key event in G1-S transition. The protein is encoded by gene CCND1, located in chromosomal band 11q13. Cyclin D1 plays key roles in cell biology, including cell proliferation and growth regulation, mitochondrial activity modulation, DNA repair, and cell migration control. CCND1 gene and its protein cyclin D1 are frequently altered by different molecular mechanisms, including amplification, chromosomal translocations, mutations, and activation of the pathways involved in cyclin D1 expression, alterations which appear to be essential in the development of human cancers, including oral carcinoma. This is the first published review of the specific features of cyclin D1 overexpression in oral oncogenesis. Starting with the physiological regulation of cyclin D1, there is an evaluation of its functions, overexpression mechanisms, and the implications of the oncogenic activation of CCND1/cyclin D1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. The potential diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclin D1 is reviewed. The influence of CCND1/cyclin D1 on tumor size and clinical stage is reported, and an update is provided on the utilization of cyclin D1 as therapeutic target and on the combination of cyclin D1 inhibitors with cytotoxic agents. Future research lines in this field are also proposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cyclin D1 promotes BRCA2-Rad51 interaction by restricting cyclin A/B-dependent BRCA2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalermrujinanant, C; Michowski, W; Sittithumcharee, G; Esashi, F; Jirawatnotai, S

    2016-06-02

    BRCA2 has an important role in the maintenance of genome stability by interacting with RAD51 recombinase through its C-terminal domain. This interaction is abrogated by cyclin A-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA2 at serine 3291 (Ser3291). Recently, we showed that cyclin D1 facilitates RAD51 recruitment to BRCA2-containing DNA repair foci, and that downregulation of cyclin D1 leads to inefficient homologous-mediated DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin D1, via amino acids 20-90, interacts with the C-terminal domain of BRCA2, and that this interaction is increased in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, CDK4-cyclin D1 does not phosphorylate Ser3291. Instead, cyclin D1 bars cyclin A from the C-terminus of BRCA2, prevents cyclin A-CDK2-dependent Ser3291 phosphorylation and facilitates RAD51 binding to the C-terminal domain of BRCA2. These findings indicate that the interplay between cyclin D1 and other cyclins such as cyclin A regulates DNA integrity through RAD51 interaction with the BRCA2 C-terminal domain.

  18. p16( INK4a) positively regulates cyclin D1 and E2F1 through negative control of AUF1.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Colak, Dilek; Al-Saif, Maher; Al-Bakheet, Albandary; Hendrayani, Siti-Faujiah; Al-Yousef, Nujoud; Kaya, Namik; Khabar, Khalid S; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2011-01-01

    The cyclin-D/CDK4,6/p16(INK4a)/pRB/E2F pathway, a key regulator of the critical G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle, is universally disrupted in human cancer. However, the precise function of the different members of this pathway and their functional interplay are still not well defined. We have shown here that the tumor suppressor p16(INK4a) protein positively controls the expression of cyclin D1 and E2F1 in both human and mouse cells. p16(INK4a) stabilizes the mRNAs of the corresponding genes through negative regulation of the mRNA decay-promoting AUF1 protein. Immunoprecipitation of AUF1-associated RNAs followed by RT-PCR indicated that endogenous AUF1 binds to the cyclin D1 and E2F1 mRNAs. Furthermore, AUF1 down-regulation increased the expression levels of these genes, while concurrent silencing of AUF1 and p16(INK4a), using specific siRNAs, restored normal expression of both cyclinD1 and E2F1. Besides, we have shown the presence of functional AU-rich elements in the E2F1 3'UTR, which contributed to p16/AUF1-mediated regulation of E2F1 post-transcriptional events in vivo. Importantly, genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis revealed the presence of a large number of genes differentially expressed in a p16(INK4a) -dependent manner, and several of these genes are also members of the AUF1 and E2F1 regulons. We also present evidence that E2F1 mediates p16-dependent regulation of several pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and the consequent induction of spontaneous as well as doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These findings show that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16( INK4a) is also a modulator of transcription and apoptosis through controlling the expression of two major transcription regulators, AUF1 and E2F1.

  19. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Mashek, Mara T.; Hendrickson, Anna M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:27351284

  20. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Becker, Jennifer R; Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Mashek, Mara T; Hendrickson, Anna M; Mullany, Lisa K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-26

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation.

  1. BMP6 Regulates Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Sertoli Cells Via Smad2/3 and Cyclin D1 Pathway and DACH1 and TFAP2A Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Yuan, Qingqing; Sun, Min; Niu, Minghui; Wen, Liping; Fu, Hongyong; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Zheng; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Shen, Ruinan; Lin, Qisheng; Liu, Wenjie; Jia, Ruobing; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2017-01-01

    Sertoli cells are essential for regulating normal spermatogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying human Sertoli cell development remain largely elusive. Here we examined the function and signaling pathways of BMP6 in regulating human Sertoli cells. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blots revealed that BMP6 and its multiple receptors were expressed in human Sertoli cells. CCK-8 and EDU assays showed that BMP6 promoted the proliferation of Sertoli cells. Conversely, BMP6 siRNAs inhibited the division of these cells. Annexin V/PI assay indicated that BMP6 reduced the apoptosis in human Sertoli cells, whereas BMP6 knockdown assumed reverse effects. BMP6 enhanced the expression levels of ZO1, SCF, GDNF and AR in human Sertoli cells, and ELISA assay showed an increase of SCF by BMP6 and a reduction by BMP6 siRNAs. Notably, Smad2/3 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 were enhanced by BMP6 and decreased by BMP6 siRNAs in human Sertoli cells. The levels of DACH1 and TFAP2A were increased by BMP6 and reduced by BMP6 siRNAs, and the growth of human Sertoli cells was inhibited by these siRNAs. Collectively, these results suggest that BMP6 regulates the proliferation and apoptosis of human Sertoli cells via activating the Smad2/3/cyclin D1 and DACH1 and TFAP2A pathway. PMID:28387750

  2. Peculiarities of cyclin D1 expression in reproductive and menopausal women with cervical hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Chogovadze, N K; Dzhugeli, M K; Kachechiladze, M G; Burkadze, G M

    2013-10-01

    Morphological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN) lesions sometimes requires an additional study of molecular markers. Cyclin D1 is a key regulatory protein, which regulates cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Disruption of G1/S regulatory mechanisms is basic mechanism of HPV mediated malignant transformation of cervical epithelium. The aim of the research was to study the peculiarities of cyclin D1 protein expression in reproductive and menopausal women with cervical hyperkeratosis. We examined cyclin D1 protein expression in 381 reproductive and 233 menopausal women with cyto-colposcopically detected and histologically proved hyperkeratosis, using immunohistochemical method. Monoclonal ready to use (RTU) antibody against cyclin D1 antigen (Dako) was used. Cyclin D1 positivity in ≤50% of cells considered as low and in ≥50% - as high expression. High expression of cyclin D1 was present in CIN1 of 93,3% reproductive and 66,7% menopausal women, whilst in CINII the high expression was revealed in 53,3% and 43,8% respectively. The weak expression of cyclin D1 was present in only one cases of CINIII, other CINIII cases were all negative. The expression of cyclin D1 protein in cervical intraepithelial neoplastic lesions is not regular, however the overexpression of cyclin D1 is almost always present in CIN1 of reproductive women, in which it might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker.

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells.

  4. p14ARF post-transcriptional regulation of nuclear cyclin D1 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: discrimination between a good and bad prognosis?

    PubMed

    McGowan, Eileen M; Tran, Nham; Alling, Nikki; Yagoub, Daniel; Sedger, Lisa M; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta

    2012-01-01

    As part of a cell's inherent protection against carcinogenesis, p14ARF is upregulated in response to hyperproliferative signalling to induce cell cycle arrest. This property makes p14ARF a leading candidate for cancer therapy. This study explores the consequences of reactivating p14ARF in breast cancer and the potential of targeting p14ARF in breast cancer treatment. Our results show that activation of the p14ARF-p53-p21-Rb pathway in the estrogen sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells induces many hallmarks of senescence including a large flat cell morphology, multinucleation, senescence-associated-β-gal staining, and rapid G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. P14ARF also induces the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1, which is most often associated with a transition from G1-S phase and is highly expressed in breast cancers with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, siRNA knockdown of cyclin D1, p21 and p53 show p21 plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of high cyclin D1 expression, cell cycle and growth arrest post-p14ARF induction. High p53 and p14ARF expression and low p21/cyclin D1 did not cause cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of cyclin D1 stops proliferation but does not reverse senescence-associated cell growth. Furthermore, cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus post-p14ARF activation correlated with a rapid loss of nucleolar Ki-67 protein and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Latent effects of the p14ARF-induced cellular processes resulting from high nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation included a redistribution of Ki-67 into the nucleoli, aberrant nuclear growth (multinucleation), and cell proliferation. Lastly, downregulation of cyclin D1 through inhibition of ER abrogated latent recurrence. The mediation of these latent effects by continuous expression of p14ARF further suggests a novel mechanism whereby dysregulation of cyclin D1 could have a double-edged effect. Our results suggest that p14ARF induced-senescence is related to late-onset breast cancer in

  5. Translokin (Cep57) interacts with cyclin D1 and prevents its nuclear accumulation in quiescent fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Miró, Maria; Colomina, Neus; Fernández, Rita M H; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 because of altered trafficking or degradation is thought to contribute directly to neoplastic transformation and growth. Mechanisms of cyclin D1 localization in S phase have been studied in detail, but its control during exit from the cell cycle and quiescence is poorly understood. Here we report that translokin (Tlk), a microtubule-associated protein also termed Cep57, interacts with cyclin D1 and controls its nucleocytoplasmic distribution in quiescent cells. Tlk binds to regions of cyclin D1 also involved in binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), and a fraction of cyclin D1 associates to the juxtanuclear Tlk network in the cell. Downregulation of Tlk levels results in undue nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 and increased Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB under quiescence conditions. In turn, overexpression of Tlk prevents proper cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus of proliferating cells in an interaction-dependent manner, inhibits Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB and hinders cell cycle progression to S phase. We propose that the Tlk acts as a key negative regulator in the pathway that drives nuclear import of cyclin D1, thus contributing to prevent pRB inactivation and to maintain cellular quiescence.

  6. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  7. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  8. Plasma cell myeloma with lymphoplasmacytic morphology and cyclin D1 expression, an uncommon variant

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2017-01-01

    The genetic complexity of multiple myeloma is due in part to the accumulation of mutations, with primary and secondary events. One such secondary event is the development of a gene mutation that may result in overexpression of cyclin D1. The pathway involving cyclin D1 is intricately involved in cell cycle regulation from the G1 to S phase, and alterations may contribute to tumorigenesis. We present a case of cyclin D1–positive multiple myeloma with lymphoplasmacytic morphology and discuss potential diagnostic pitfalls and effects on prognosis. PMID:28405079

  9. Expression of cyclin D1 correlates with malignancy in human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, F.; Cagnoli, M.; Ragni, N.; Pedullà, F.; Foglia, G.; Alama, A.

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle regulator of G1 progression that has been suggested to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of several human cancer types. In the current study, the expression of cyclin D1 has been investigated in a series of 33 patients, with benign (10 patients), borderline (five patients) and malignant (18 patients) ovarian disease. Cyclin D1 protein and mRNA content were analysed by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction respectively. The levels of cyclin D1 protein were undetectable in patients with benign disease, detectable in the majority of patients with borderline disease and elevated in those with ovarian carcinomas, being significantly related to the degree of malignancy (carcinoma vs benign, P = 0.0001; benign vs borderline, P = 0.0238). A significant relationship between cyclin D1 expression and tumour proliferative activity was also found (P = 0.000001). Moreover, eight benign lesions, two borderline tumours and 11 carcinomas proved to be suitable for the analysis of cyclin D1 transcript, and emerging data demonstrated significant agreement between protein abundance and mRNA expression. Results from the current study suggest that cyclin D1 expression is associated with the degree of transformation and most probably plays a role in the early development of ovarian malignancy. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9155044

  10. Cyclin D1 is an essential mediator of apoptotic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kranenburg, O; van der Eb, A J; Zantema, A

    1996-01-01

    Many neurons in the developing nervous system undergo programmed cell death, or apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is largely unknown. In the present report, we present evidence that the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is involved in the regulation of neuronal cell death. During neuronal apoptosis, cyclin D1-dependent kinase activity is stimulated, due to an increase in cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, artificial elevation of cyclin D1 levels is sufficient to induce apoptosis, even in non-neural cell types. Cyclin D1-induced apoptosis, like neuronal apoptosis, can be inhibited by 21 kDa E1B, Bcl2 and pRb, but not by 55 kDa E1B. Most importantly, however, overexpression of the cyclin D-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4 protects neurons from apoptotic cell death, demonstrating that activation of endogenous cyclin D1-dependent kinases is essential during neuronal apoptosis. These data support a model in which neuronal apoptosis results from an aborted attempt to activate the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons. Images PMID:8598205

  11. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) regulation of cyclin D1 protein expression and cancer cell anchorage-independent growth via its E3 ligase-mediated protein phosphatase 2A/c-Jun axis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruowen; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Jingjie; Gao, Jimin; Chen, Jingyuan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2013-07-12

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a well known potent inhibitor of apoptosis; however, it is also involved in other cancer cell biological behavior. In the current study, we discovered that XIAP and its E3 ligase played a crucial role in regulation of cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells. We found that deficiency of XIAP expression resulted in a marked reduction in cyclin D1 expression. Consistently, cell cycle transition and anchorage-independent cell growth were also attenuated in XIAP-deficient cancer cells compared with those of the parental wild-type cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that E3 ligase activity within the RING domain of XIAP is crucial for its ability to regulate cyclin D1 transcription, cell cycle transition, and anchorage-independent cell growth by up-regulating transactivation of c-Jun/AP-1. Moreover, we found that E3 ligase within RING domain was required for XIAP inhibition of phosphatase PP2A activity by up-regulation of PP2A phosphorylation at Tyr-307 in its catalytic subunit. Such PP2A phosphorylation and inactivation resulted in phosphorylation and activation of its downstream target c-Jun in turn leading to cyclin D1 expression. Collectively, our studies uncovered a novel function of E3 ligase activity of XIAP in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, providing significant insight into the understanding of the biomedical significance of overexpressed XIAP in cancer development, further offering a new molecular basis for utilizing XIAP E3 ligase as a cancer therapeutic target.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin D1 expression in cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsoo; Lee, Myunghwa; Kim, Dae Woon; Hong, Seo Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a pluripotent protein kinase involved in the development of cancers through regulation of numerous oncogenic molecules. Cyclin D1, an important regulator of G1 to S phase transition in various cells, is one of target proteins that GSK3β regulate. Our objective was to assess the expression of GSK3β and cyclin D1 in cervical neoplasm of different histologic grades and to identify their correlation in cervical carcinogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of GSK3β and cyclin D1 was performed in a total of 137 patients with 12 normal, 62 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (31 CIN1 and 31 CIN3) and 63 invasive cancers including 56 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 adenocarcinomas. Results The expression of GSK3β increased in parallel with the lesion grade, while that of cyclin D1 decreased with severity of the lesion (P<0.001). There was a significant inverse correlation between GSK3β and cyclin D1 expression in overall cervical neoplasia (Φ=-0.413, P<0.001). GSK3β expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma (P=0.049). Conclusion These results suggest that the expressional increase in GSK3β plays a role in cervical carcinogenesis and has inverse correlation with cyclin D1 expression in this process. In addition, GSK3β expression appears to be associated with the histologic type of cervical cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27896249

  13. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  14. The prognostic significance and value of cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Peurala, Emmi; Koivunen, Peppi; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Bloigu, Risto; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja

    2013-01-21

    Loss of the retinoblastoma protein tumor suppressor gene (RB) coding for a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates the cell cycle is found in many human cancers and probably leads to disruption of the p16-cyclin D1-CDK4/6-RB pathway. Cyclin D1 is known to activate CDK4, which then phosphorylates the RB protein, leading to cell cycle progression. p16 inhibits CDK4, keeping RB hypophosphorylated and preventing cell cycle progression. The significance of these three markers, cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16, for breast cancer and carcinogenesis is nevertheless still controversial. The material consisted of 102 formalin-fixed human breast cancer samples, in which cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. The amounts of cyclin D1 mRNA present were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR. High cyclin D1 expression statistically significantly correlated with lower tumor grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and lower proliferation activity in breast tumors and increased breast cancer-specific survival and overall survival. Tumors with high cyclin D1 protein had 1.8 times higher expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. CDK4 expression did not correlate with cyclin D1 expression or the survival data. p16 expression was associated with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) negativity and increased breast cancer-specific survival and disease-free survival. No statistical correlations between cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 were found. Cyclin D1 was associated with a good breast cancer prognosis but functioned independently of CDK4. High cyclin D1 expression may be partially due to increased CCND1 transcription. p16 correlated with a better prognosis and may function without CDK4. In conclusion, it appears that cyclin D1, CDK4 and p16 function independently in human breast cancer.

  15. Cyclin D1 inhibits hepatic lipogenesis via repression of carbohydrate response element binding protein and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Becker, Jennifer R; Solmonson, Ashley D; Mullany, Lisa K; Mashek, Mara T; Towle, Howard C; Chau, Anhtung T; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2012-07-15

    Following acute hepatic injury, the metabolic capacity of the liver is altered during the process of compensatory hepatocyte proliferation by undefined mechanisms. In this study, we examined the regulation of de novo lipogenesis by cyclin D1, a key mediator of hepatocyte cell cycle progression. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 significantly impaired lipogenesis in response to glucose stimulation. Cyclin D1 inhibited the glucose-mediated induction of key lipogenic genes, and similar effects were seen using a mutant (D1-KE) that does not activate cdk4 or induce cell cycle progression. Cyclin D1 (but not D1-KE) inhibited the activity of the carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) by regulating the glucose-sensing motif of this transcription factor. Because changes in ChREBP activity could not fully explain the effect of cyclin D1, we examined hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), which regulates numerous differentiated functions in the liver including lipid metabolism. We found that both cyclins D1 and D1-KE bound to HNF4α and significantly inhibited its recruitment to the promoter region of lipogenic genes in hepatocytes. Conversely, knockdown of cyclin D1 in the AML12 hepatocyte cell line promoted HNF4α activity and lipogenesis. In mouse liver, HNF4α bound to a central domain of cyclin D1 involved in transcriptional repression. Cyclin D1 inhibited lipogenic gene expression in the liver following carbohydrate feeding. Similar findings were observed in the setting of physiologic cyclin D1 expression in the regenerating liver. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cyclin D1 represses ChREBP and HNF4α function in hepatocytes via Cdk4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These findings provide a direct link between the cell cycle machinery and the transcriptional control of metabolic function of the liver.

  16. Rsf-1 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers and regulates cyclinD1 expression and ERK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingchang; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 expression is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion inhibits proliferation and increased apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion decreases the level of cyclinD1 and phosphor-ERK expression. -- Abstract: Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 in primary lung cancer and its biological roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in NSCLC tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0220) and poor differentiation (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in H1299 and H460 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression resulted in a decrease of colony formation ability and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Rsf-1 knockdown also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin D1 expression and phospho-ERK levels. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin D1 and ERK modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  17. ClC-3 Chloride Channel Proteins Regulate the Cell Cycle by Up-regulating cyclin D1-CDK4/6 through Suppressing p21/p27 Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dong; Luo, Hai; Lai, Zhouyi; Zou, Lili; Zhu, Linyan; Mao, Jianwen; Jacob, Tim; Ye, Wencai; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    It was shown in this study that knockdown of ClC-3 expression by ClC-3 siRNA prevented the activation of hypotonicity-induced chloride currents, and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells. Reconstitution of ClC-3 expression with ClC-3 expression plasmids could rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest caused by ClC-3 siRNA treatments. Transfection of cells with ClC-3 siRNA decreased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin dependent kinase 4 and 6, and increased the expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs), p21 and p27. Pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs depleted the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the expression of CDK4 and CDK6, but not on that of cyclin D1, indicating the requirement of p21 and p27 for the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on CDK4 and CDK6 expression. ClC-3 siRNA inhibited cells to progress from the G1 phase to the S phase, but pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs abolished the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the cell cycle progress. Our data suggest that ClC-3 may regulate cell cycle transition between G0/G1 and S phases by up-regulation of the expression of CDK4 and CDK6 through suppression of p21 and p27 expression. PMID:27451945

  18. ClC-3 Chloride Channel Proteins Regulate the Cell Cycle by Up-regulating cyclin D1-CDK4/6 through Suppressing p21/p27 Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dong; Luo, Hai; Lai, Zhouyi; Zou, Lili; Zhu, Linyan; Mao, Jianwen; Jacob, Tim; Ye, Wencai; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-07-25

    It was shown in this study that knockdown of ClC-3 expression by ClC-3 siRNA prevented the activation of hypotonicity-induced chloride currents, and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells. Reconstitution of ClC-3 expression with ClC-3 expression plasmids could rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest caused by ClC-3 siRNA treatments. Transfection of cells with ClC-3 siRNA decreased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin dependent kinase 4 and 6, and increased the expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs), p21 and p27. Pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs depleted the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the expression of CDK4 and CDK6, but not on that of cyclin D1, indicating the requirement of p21 and p27 for the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on CDK4 and CDK6 expression. ClC-3 siRNA inhibited cells to progress from the G1 phase to the S phase, but pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs abolished the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the cell cycle progress. Our data suggest that ClC-3 may regulate cell cycle transition between G0/G1 and S phases by up-regulation of the expression of CDK4 and CDK6 through suppression of p21 and p27 expression.

  19. Silymarin induces cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via its phosphorylation of threonine-286 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2015-01-01

    Silymarin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) plant has been reported to show anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects. For anti-cancer activity, silymarin is known to regulate cell cycle progression through cyclin D1 downregulation. However, the mechanism of silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation still remains unanswered. The current study was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cyclin D1 downregulation by silymarin in human colorectal cancer cells. The treatment of silymarin suppressed the cell proliferation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and decreased cellular accumulation of exogenously-induced cyclin D1 protein. However, silymarin did not change the level of cyclin D1 mRNA. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation by MG132 attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in the cells treated with silymarin. In addition, silymarin increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation. Inhibition of NF-κB by a selective inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by silymarin. From these results, we suggest that silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation may result from proteasomal degradation through its threonine-286 phosphorylation via NF-κB activation. The current study provides new mechanistic link between silymarin, cyclin D1 downregulation and cell growth in human colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impaired nuclear export of tumor-derived c-terminal truncated cyclin D1 mutant in ESCC cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Meili; Chen, Xiangmei; Zhang, Ting; Shen, Tao; Xie, Qing; Xing, Xiujuan; Gu, Hongxi; Lu, Fengmin

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 is a significant regulator of the G1- to S-phase transition and is often aberrant in human tumors of various origins. Although cancer-derived cyclin D1 mutants are potent oncogenes in vitro and in vivo, the mechanisms by which they contribute to neoplasia remaind to be elucidated. We previously identified a cyclin D1 mutation (Δ266-295) in esophageal cancer with deleted codons from 266 to 295 of wild-type cyclin D1, the critical COOH-terminal regulatory sequences necessary for cyclin D1 nuclear export. In the present study, this cancer-derived cyclin D1-Δ266-295 was shown to be a constitutively nuclear cyclin D1 protein with a significantly increased oncogenic potential. Moreover, the cancer-derived cyclin D1-Δ266-295 mutant was found to retain its ability to bind to and activate CDK4, which in turn phosphorylates and inactivates the pRb protein and promotes cell cycle progression. In comparison to wild-type cyclin D1a, D1-Δ266-295 exhibited enforced nuclear accumulation. In addition, the transient transfection and ectopic expression of this nuclear localized D1-Δ266-295 up-regulated endogenous Notch1 expression, indicating that the mutant retained its ability as a transcriptional regulator. Furthermore, data from the flow cytometry assay showed that D1-Δ266-295 fractionally increased >4N cell accumulation, and further analysis suggested the retriggering of DNA replication relevant to its inhibition of Cdt1 proteolysis. Therefore, the inappropriate nuclear localization of this cyclin D1 mutant may interfere with DNA replication in cultured cells, thereby contributing to genomic instability.

  1. Nicotine induces cell proliferation in association with cyclin D1 up-regulation and inhibits cell differentiation in association with p53 regulation in a murine pre-osteoblastic cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tsuyoshi Abe, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Koshikiya, Noboru; Nojima, Junya; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2008-12-05

    Recent studies have suggested that nicotine critically affects bone metabolism. Many studies have examined the effects of nicotine on proliferation and differentiation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We examined cell cycle regulators involved in the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Nicotine induced cell proliferation in association with p53 down-regulation and cyclin D1 up-regulation. In differentiated cells, nicotine reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, p53 expression was sustained in nicotine-treated cells during differentiation. These findings indicate that nicotine promotes the cell cycle and inhibits differentiation in association with p53 regulation in pre-osteoblastic cells.

  2. D1 dopamine receptor regulation of the levels of the cell-cycle-controlling proteins, cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1, in cerebral cortical precursor cells is mediated through cAMP-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Bai, Jie; Undie, Ashiwel S; Bergson, Clare; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) agonists inhibit epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced passage of mouse fetal cerebral cortical precursor cells from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. Here, we report that this action of D1R agonists may involve regulation of cyclin D, and P27, which respectively promote and suppress the G1 to S transition. Furthermore, regulation of Raf-1, a component of the receptor tyrosine kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway engaged in the mitogenic activity of EGF, may also be involved. Specifically, levels of cyclin D and Raf-1 decrease, whereas those of P27 first increase and then decrease in a dose-dependent fashion in response to the D1R agonist, SKF38393. This agonist also promotes Raf-1 phosphorylation on serine 338 residue, suggesting increased activation of this protein. Only the latter effect can be blocked by adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, and mimicked by agonists of the cAMP signaling pathway. Another D1R agonist, SKF83959, which stimulates phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) but not AC, reduces levels of Raf-1 and cyclin D similar to SKF38393. However, we detected only down-regulation of P27 by this agonist. Additionally, the concentration-dependent patterns of both SKF38393- and SKF83959-induced alterations in the levels of P27 closely resemble the effects of these ligands on the levels of the D1R-PLCbeta-associated second-messenger cascades linker, calcyon. These findings suggest that D1R-induced suppression of the cell cycle progression in EGF-supported fetal cortical precursor cells represents a net effect of competing cell cycle promoting and inhibiting molecular changes, which involve cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1. The data also show that cAMP second messenger cascade is not engaged in the D1R-induced regulation of the levels of these three proteins. Such regulation probably involves PLCbeta-associated pathways.

  3. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression in normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Shevra, CR; Ghosh, A; Kumar, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells are regulated by various cell cycle promoting and inhibiting factors. Our knowledge about these proteins and mechanisms regulating cell cycle progression has increased dramatically in recent years. Aim: The present study was undertaken to examine the expression profile of cell cycle regulatory proteins in normal proliferative endometrium, hyperplasias (simple, complex and atypical) and endometrial carcinoma in a quantitative approach as also to assess correlations of Cyclin D1 expression with Ki-67 a proliferation marker. Settings and Design: A retrospective case control study in a tertiary referral centre. Materials and Methods: We evaluated and compared the expression profile of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expressions in 61 endometrial samples submitted as either endometrial curetting or hysterectomy specimens, which were diagnosed as simple hyperplasia (n =11), complex hyperplasia (n = 13), atypical hyperplasia (n = 7), and endometrial carcinoma (n = 20). Results: There was increased expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in patients with endometrial carcinoma relative to proliferative endometrium and simple hyperplasia, but there was no such difference between cases of atypical hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma. Cyclin D1 expression had a positive correlation with Ki-67 expression. Cyclin D1 together with Ki-67 may be a marker for endometrial carcinogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25511212

  4. v-Src Oncogene Induces Trop2 Proteolytic Activation via Cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaoming; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ertel, Adam; Casimiro, Mathew C; Di Sante, Gabriele; Deng, Shengqiong; Li, Zhiping; Di Rocco, Agnese; Zhan, Tingting; Hawkins, Adam; Stoyanova, Tanya; Andò, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Lisanti, Michael P; Gomella, Leonard G; Languino, Lucia R; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-11-15

    Proteomic analysis of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated the enrichment of Src tyrosine kinase activity in approximately 90% of patients. Src is known to induce cyclin D1, and a cyclin D1-regulated gene expression module predicts poor outcome in human prostate cancer. The tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2/Trop2/M1S1) is enriched in the prostate, promoting prostate stem cell self-renewal upon proteolytic activation via a γ-secretase cleavage complex (PS1, PS2) and TACE (ADAM17), which releases the Trop2 intracellular domain (Trop2 ICD). Herein, v-Src transformation of primary murine prostate epithelial cells increased the proportion of prostate cancer stem cells as characterized by gene expression, epitope characteristics, and prostatosphere formation. Cyclin D1 was induced by v-Src, and Src kinase induction of Trop2 ICD nuclear accumulation required cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 induced abundance of the Trop2 proteolytic cleavage activation components (PS2, TACE) and restrained expression of the inhibitory component of the Trop2 proteolytic complex (Numb). Patients with prostate cancer with increased nuclear Trop2 ICD and cyclin D1, and reduced Numb, had reduced recurrence-free survival probability (HR = 4.35). Cyclin D1, therefore, serves as a transducer of v-Src-mediated induction of Trop2 ICD by enhancing abundance of the Trop2 proteolytic activation complex. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6723-34. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Divergent cyclin B1 expression and Rb/p16/cyclin D1 pathway aberrations among pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Toru; Jiang, Shi-Xu; Kameya, Toru; Asamura, Hisao; Sato, Yuichi; Nagai, Kanji; Okayasu, Isao

    2004-10-01

    A total of 111 pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors comprising 13 typical carcinoids, five atypical carcinoids, 44 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and 49 small-cell carcinomas were immunohistochemically studied for dysregulated cyclin B1 expression and disruption of the Rb/p16/cyclin D1 pathway (Rb pathway), and the results were correlated with tumor proliferation activity and clinical outcome. Overexpression of cyclins B1 and D1, respectively, was detected in no and 15% typical carcinoids, 20 and 20% atypical carcinoids, 84 and 32% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 84 and 10% small-cell carcinomas. Loss of Rb and p16 expression, respectively, was observed in no and 14% typical carcinoids, no and 40% atypical carcinoids, 49 and 18% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 84 and 8% small-cell carcinomas. In summary, 29% typical carcinoids, 20% atypical carcinoids, 78% large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and 93% small-cell carcinomas had Rb pathway aberrations. Rb pathway aberration was mostly attributed to Rb loss in small-cell carcinomas, while p16 loss and/or cyclin D1 overexpression besides Rb loss also played an important role in large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, while cyclin D1 overexpression was the only cause of Rb pathway aberration in carcinoid tumors. Thus, both cyclin B1-associated G2/M arrest and Rb-mediated G1 arrest are consistently compromised in high-grade large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell carcinoma, but are generally intact or occasionally altered in carcinoid tumor; the mechanisms involved in Rb pathway aberration among the tumor categories are different, reflecting a genetic divergence among the individual tumor categories. Cyclin B1 expression closely correlated with the Ki-67 labeling index either in the individual tumor categories or overall tumors (P < 0.0001, r = 0.742), suggesting that cyclin B1 is one of the key factors regulating cell proliferation in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. Neither cyclins B1 and D1, Rb, p

  6. Functional Variants at the 11q13 Risk Locus for Breast Cancer Regulate Cyclin D1 Expression through Long-Range Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    French, Juliet D.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ahmed, Shahana; Khan, Sofia; Maranian, Mel J.; O’Reilly, Martin; Hillman, Kristine M.; Betts, Joshua A.; Carroll, Thomas; Bailey, Peter J.; Dicks, Ed; Beesley, Jonathan; Tyrer, Jonathan; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Beck, Andrew; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Chen, Constance; Kraft, Peter; Barnes, Daniel; González-Neira, Anna; Alonso, M. Rosario; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Benitez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Justenhoven, Christina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Peeters, Stephanie; Smeets, Ann; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Sardella, Domenico; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Ng, Char-Hong; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Healey, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Pooley, Karen A.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Sim, Xueling; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; McKay, James; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Godwin, Andrew K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Brown, Melissa A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 4,405 variants in 89,050 European subjects from 41 case-control studies identified three independent association signals for estrogen-receptor-positive tumors at 11q13. The strongest signal maps to a transcriptional enhancer element in which the G allele of the best candidate causative variant rs554219 increases risk of breast cancer, reduces both binding of ELK4 transcription factor and luciferase activity in reporter assays, and may be associated with low cyclin D1 protein levels in tumors. Another candidate variant, rs78540526, lies in the same enhancer element. Risk association signal 2, rs75915166, creates a GATA3 binding site within a silencer element. Chromatin conformation studies demonstrate that these enhancer and silencer elements interact with each other and with their likely target gene, CCND1. PMID:23540573

  7. Consequence of the tumor-associated conversion to cyclin D1b

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Carr, Richard; Yoshida, Akihiro; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Diehl, John Alan; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cyclin D1b, a variant of cyclin D1, is associated with tumor progression and poor outcome. However, the underlying molecular basis was unknown. Here, novel models were created to generate a genetic switch from cyclin D1 to cyclin D1b. Extensive analyses uncovered overlapping but non-redundant functions of cyclin D1b compared to cyclin D1 on developmental phenotypes, and illustrated the importance of the transcriptional regulatory functions of cyclin D1b in vivo. Data obtained identify cyclin D1b as an oncogene, wherein cyclin D1b expression under the endogenous promoter induced cellular transformation and further cooperated with known oncogenes to promote tumor growth in vivo. Further molecular interrogation uncovered unexpected links between cyclin D1b and the DNA damage/PARP1 regulatory networks, which could be exploited to suppress cyclin D1b-driven tumors. Collectively, these data are the first to define the consequence of cyclin D1b expression on normal cellular function, present evidence for cyclin D1b as an oncogene, and provide pre-clinical evidence of effective methods to thwart growth of cells dependent upon this oncogenic variant. PMID:25787974

  8. [The expression and significance of Pin1 and CyclinD1 in adult papilloma of larynx].

    PubMed

    Fan, Guoliang; Wang, Dali; Fan, Xinlong; Wang, Tie

    2009-12-01

    To study the expression and relationship of Pin1 and CyclinD1 in adult papilloma of larynx, and the effect of both in laryngeal papilloma's canceration. Ninety-two cases of paraffin section with immunoperoxidase (SP) staining method was used to detect the distribution of Pin1 and CyclinD1 in 10 cases of laryngeal normal epithelial tissue, 39 cases of laryngeal papilloma, 27 cases of laryngeal papilloma with middle, severe atypical hyperplasia and 16 cases of laryngeal carcinoma. The distribution of Pin1 and CyclinD1 increased gradually from laryngeal normal epithelial tissue to laryngeal carcinoma (P<0.05); No difference of the expression of CyclinD1 (not including Pin1, for Pin1, P=0.009) was found between laryngeal papilloma and laryngeal papilloma with middle, severe atypical hyperplasia (P>0.0125), but there had significant difference of the expression of Pin1 and CyclinD1 among the rest groups; There was significantly direct correlation between the expression of Pin1 and CyclinD1 (P<0.05). The hyper-expressions of Pin1 and CyclinD1 may play a key role in laryngeal papilloma's malignant change. Pin1 up-regulating the expressions of cyclinD1 possibly participate in its malignant change.

  9. Cyclin D1 repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and transactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenguang; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Zhou, Jian Nian; Fu, Maofu; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Albanese, Chris; Li, Zhiping; Wu, Kongming; Hulit, James; Neumeister, Peter; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Brownlee, Michael; Scherer, Philipp E; Jones, Joan G; Whitney, Kathleen D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Harris, Emily L; Rohan, Thomas; Johns, David C; Pestell, Richard G

    2003-09-01

    The cyclin D1 gene is overexpressed in human breast cancers and is required for oncogene-induced tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor selectively activated by ligands of the thiazolidinedione class. PPAR gamma induces hepatic steatosis, and liganded PPAR gamma promotes adipocyte differentiation. Herein, cyclin D1 inhibited ligand-induced PPAR gamma function, transactivation, expression, and promoter activity. PPAR gamma transactivation induced by the ligand BRL49653 was inhibited by cyclin D1 through a pRB- and cdk-independent mechanism, requiring a region predicted to form an helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure. The cyclin D1 HLH region was also required for repression of the PPAR gamma ligand-binding domain linked to a heterologous DNA binding domain. Adipocyte differentiation by PPAR gamma-specific ligands (BRL49653, troglitazone) was enhanced in cyclin D1(-/-) fibroblasts and reversed by retroviral expression of cyclin D1. Homozygous deletion of the cyclin D1 gene, enhanced expression by PPAR gamma ligands of PPAR gamma and PPAR gamma-responsive genes, and cyclin D1(-/-) mice exhibit hepatic steatosis. Finally, reduction of cyclin D1 abundance in vivo using ponasterone-inducible cyclin D1 antisense transgenic mice, increased expression of PPAR gamma in vivo. The inhibition of PPAR gamma function by cyclin D1 is a new mechanism of signal transduction cross talk between PPAR gamma ligands and mitogenic signals that induce cyclin D1.

  10. Kaiso Represses the Cell Cycle Gene cyclin D1 via Sequence-Specific and Methyl-CpG-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Michelle I.; Robinson, Shaiya C.; Weerawardane, Sonali M.; Daniel, Juliet M.

    2012-01-01

    Kaiso is the first member of the POZ family of zinc finger transcription factors reported to bind DNA with dual-specificity in both a sequence- and methyl-CpG-specific manner. Here, we report that Kaiso associates with and regulates the cyclin D1 promoter via the consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS), and also via methylated CpG-dinucleotides. The methyl-CpG sites appear critical for Kaiso binding to the cyclin D1 promoter, while a core KBS in close proximity to the methyl-CpGs appears to stabilize Kaiso DNA binding. Kaiso’s binding to both sites was demonstrated in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and in vivo using Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). To elucidate the functional relevance of Kaiso’s binding to the cyclin D1 promoter, we assessed Kaiso overexpression effects on a minimal cyclin D1 promoter-reporter that contains both KBS and CpG sites. Kaiso repressed this minimal cyclin D1 promoter-reporter in a dose-dependent manner and transcriptional repression occurred in a KBS-specific and methyl-CpG-dependent manner. Collectively our data validates cyclin D1 as a Kaiso target gene and demonstrates a mechanism for Kaiso binding and regulation of the cyclin D1 promoter. Our data also provides a mechanistic basis for how Kaiso may regulate other target genes whose promoters possess both KBS and methyl-CpG sites. PMID:23226276

  11. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  12. Placental estrogen suppresses cyclin D1 expression in the nonhuman primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W; Pepe, Gerald J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy.

  13. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  14. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  15. The role of MIF, cyclinD1 and ERK in the development of pulmonary hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoyun; Wang, Yanmei; Chen, Lingli; Han, Lijuan; Li, Lifang; He, Han; Li, Yuan; Huang, Nan; Ren, Hao; Pei, Fangying; Li, Guilan; Cheng, Jia; Wang, Wenkui

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a major disease in the broiler breeding industry. During PH, the pulmonary artery undergoes remodelling, which is caused by pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. CyclinD1 regulates cell proliferation. This study investigated the role of cyclinD1 in the development of PH in broilers, and which bioactivators and signalling pathway are involved in the pathological process. The PH group contained 3-4-week-old broilers with clinical PH, and the healthy group broilers from the same flock without PH. Histopathology indicated pulmonary arterial walls were thicker in the PH group compared with the healthy group. Target gene expressions of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclinD1 detected by quantitative real-time PCR were upregulated in the PH group compared with the healthy group. Immunohistochemistry showed MIF, phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK) and cyclinD1 were present on pulmonary vascular walls; MIF was present in the cytoplasm of arterial endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells; p-ERK and cyclinD1 were present in smooth muscle cell cytoplasm. Western blotting demonstrated that MIF, p-ERKand cyclinD1 levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the PH group compared with the healthy group. In summary, increased MIF in PH broiler pulmonary arteries upregulated cyclinD1 via the ERK signalling pathway to induce pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, causing pulmonary artery remodelling and hypertension.

  16. A jumonji (Jarid2) protein complex represses cyclin D1 expression by methylation of histone H3-K9.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Haruki; Ogawa, Satoko; Nakajima, Kuniko; Inagawa, Masayo; Kojima, Mizuyo; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2009-01-09

    Covalent modifications of histone tails have critical roles in regulating gene expression. Previously, we identified the jumonji (jmj, Jarid2) gene, the jmjC domain, and a Jmj family. Recently, many Jmj family proteins have been shown to be histone demethylases, and jmjC is the catalytic domain. However, Jmj does not have histone demethylase activity because the jmjC domain lacks conserved residues for binding to cofactors. Independently of these studies, we previously showed that Jmj binds to the cyclin D1 promoter and represses the transcription of cyclin D1. Here, we show the mechanisms by which Jmj represses the transcription of cyclin D1. We found that a protein complex of Jmj had histone methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 lysine 9 (H3-K9). We also found that Jmj bound to the H3-K9 methyltransferases G9a and GLP. Expression of Jmj recruited G9a and GLP to the cyclin D1 promoter and increased H3-K9 methylation. Inactivation of both G9a and GLP, but not of only G9a, inhibited the methylation of H3-K9 in the cyclin D1 promoter and repression of cyclin D1 expression by Jmj. These results suggest that Jmj methylates H3-K9 and represses cyclin D1 expression through G9a and GLP, and that Jmj family proteins can regulate gene expression by not only histone demethylation but also other histone modification.

  17. GSK3β-dependent cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation is indispensable for NVP-BEZ235 induced G0/G1 arrest in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-Ling; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Li-Di; Zhu, Han-Qing; Guo, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Mei; Wu, Yingli; Liu, Feng; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-10-05

    Cyclin D1 and cyclin E1, as vital regulatory factors of G1-S phase cell cycle progression, are frequently constitutive expressed and associated with pathogenesis and tumorigenesis in most human cancers and they have been regarded as promising targets for cancer therapy. In this study, we established NVP-BEZ235, a potent dual kinase inhibitor, could induce neuroblastoma cells proliferation inhibition without apoptosis activation. Moreover, we showed NVP-BEZ235 could induce neuroblastoma cells arrested at G0/G1 phase accompanied with significant reduction of the cyclin D1 and E1 proteins in a dose dependent manner at nanomole concentration. Additionally we found that GSK3β was dephosphorylated and activated by NVP-BEZ235 and then triggered cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation through ubiquitination proteasome pathway, based on the evidences that NVP-BEZ235 induced downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 were obviously recovered by proteasome inhibitor and the blockade of GSK3β contributed to remarkable rescue of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Analogous results about its anti-proliferation effects and molecular mechanism were observed on neuroblastoma xenograft mouse model in vivo. Therefore, these results indicate that NVP-BEZ235-induced cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 degradation, which happened through activating GSK3β, and GSK3β-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 should be available for anticancer therapeutics.

  18. Schlafen-1 causes a cell cycle arrest by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gareth; Boggan, Louise; Bowie, Andrew; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2005-09-02

    Schlafen-1 (Slfn-1), the prototypic member of the Schlafen family of proteins, was described as an inducer of growth arrest in T-lymphocytes and causes a cell cycle arrest in NIH3T3 fibroblasts prior to the G1/S transition. How Slfn-1 exerts its effects on the cell cycle is not currently known. We report that synchronized murine fibroblasts expressing Slfn-1 do not exit G1 when stimulated with fetal calf serum, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The induction of cyclin D1 by these stimuli was blocked in the presence of Slfn-1 as were all downstream cell cycle processes. Overexpression of cyclin D1 in growth-arrested, Slfn-1-expressing cells induced an increase in cell growth consistent with this protein being the biological target of Slfn-1. Activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by EGF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was unaffected by Slfn-1 expression. PDGF signaling was, however, almost completely blocked. This was due to a lack of PDGF receptor expression in Slfn-1-expressing cells consistent with Slfn-1 blocking the cell cycle in G1 where PDGF receptor expression is normally down-regulated. Finally, overexpression of Slfn-1 inhibited the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter. Slfn-1 therefore causes a cell cycle arrest during G1 by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1 by mitogens.

  19. Understanding and modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor specificity: molecular modeling and biochemical evaluation of pyrazolopyrimidinones as CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Karen A.; Markwalder, Jay A.; Seitz, Steven P.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cox, Sarah; Boisclair, Michael D.; Brizuela, Leonardo; Brenner, Stephen L.; Stouten, Pieter F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. The cyclins, their activating agents, and endogenous CDK inhibitors are frequently mutated in human cancers, making CDKs interesting targets for cancer chemotherapy. Our aim is the discovery of selective CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors. An ATP-competitive pyrazolopyrimidinone CDK inhibitor was identified by HTS and docked into a CDK4 homology model. The resulting binding model was consistent with available SAR and was validated by a subsequent CDK2/inhibitor crystal structure. An iterative cycle of chemistry and modeling led to a 70-fold improvement in potency. Small substituent changes resulted in large CDK4/CDK2 selectivity changes. The modeling revealed that selectivity is largely due to hydrogen-bonded interactions with only two kinase residues. This demonstrates that small differences between enzymes can efficiently be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors.

  20. A cyclin-D1 interaction with BAX underlies its oncogenic role and potential as a therapeutic target in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Elena; Fresquet, Vicente; Martinez-Useros, Javier; Richter-Larrea, Jose A.; Sagardoy, Ainara; Sesma, Izaskun; Almada, Luciana L.; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Siebert, Reiner; Gesk, Stefan; Calasanz, Maria J.; Malumbres, Raquel; Rieger, Melissa; Prosper, Felipe; Lossos, Izidore S.; Piris, Miguel Angel; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) leading to cyclin-D1 overexpression plays an essential role in the development of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive tumor that remains incurable with current treatment strategies. Cyclin-D1 has been postulated as an effective therapeutic target, but the evaluation of this target has been hampered by our incomplete understanding of its oncogenic functions and by the lack of valid MCL murine models. To address these issues, we generated a cyclin-D1–driven mouse model in which cyclin-D1 expression can be regulated externally. These mice developed cyclin-D1–expressing lymphomas capable of recapitulating features of human MCL. We found that cyclin-D1 inactivation was not sufficient to induce lymphoma regression in vivo; however, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays, we identified a novel prosurvival cyclin-D1 function in MCL cells. Specifically, we found that cyclin-D1, besides increasing cell proliferation through deregulation of the cell cycle at the G1–S transition, sequestrates the proapoptotic protein BAX in the cytoplasm, thereby favoring BCL2’s antiapoptotic function. Accordingly, cyclin-D1 inhibition sensitized the lymphoma cells to apoptosis through BAX release. Thus, genetic or pharmacologic targeting of cyclin-D1 combined with a proapoptotic BH3 mimetic synergistically killed the cyclin-D1–expressing murine lymphomas, human MCL cell lines, and primary lymphoma cells. Our study identifies a role of cyclin-D1 in deregulating apoptosis in MCL cells, and highlights the potential benefit of simultaneously targeting cyclin-D1 and survival pathways in patients with MCL. This effective combination therapy also might be exploited in other cyclin-D1–expressing tumors. PMID:21746927

  1. The assembly, activation, and substrate specificity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Stephan C.; Law, Mary E.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Rowe, Thomas C.; Davis, Bradley J.; Law, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting data regarding Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes and, considering the widespread overexpression of Cyclin D1 in cancer, it is important to fully understand their relevance. While many have shown Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes to form active complexes, others have failed to show activity or association. Here, using a novel p21-PCNA fusion protein as well as p21 mutant proteins, we show that p21 is a required scaffolding protein, with Cyclin D1 and Cdk2 failing to complex in its absence. These p21/Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are active and also bind the trimeric PCNA complex, with each trimer capable of independently binding distinct Cyclin/Cdk complexes. We also show that increased p21 levels due to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents result in increased formation and kinase activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes, and that Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes are able to phosphorylate a number of substrates in addition to Rb. Nucleophosmin and Cdh1, two proteins important for centrosome replication and implicated in the chromosomal instability of cancer are shown to be phosphorylated by Cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. Additionally, PSF is identified as a novel Cdk2 substrate, being phosphorylated by Cdk2 complexed with either Cyclin E or Cyclin D1, and given the many functions of PSF, it could have important implications on cellular activity. PMID:23627734

  2. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  3. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. PMID:26129688

  4. Progesterone Receptor–Cyclin D1 Complexes Induce Cell Cycle–Dependent Transcriptional Programs in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dressing, Gwen E.; Knutson, Todd P.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Daniel, Andrea R.; Hagan, Christy R.; Diep, Caroline H.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) and its coactivators are direct targets of activated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in response to peptide growth factors, progesterone, and deregulation of cell cycle inhibitors. Herein, using the T47D breast cancer model, we probed mechanisms of cell cycle–dependent PR action. In the absence of exogenous progestin, the PR is specifically phosphorylated during the G2/M phase. Accordingly, numerous PR target genes are cell cycle regulated, including HSPB8, a heat-shock protein whose high expression is associated with tamoxifen resistance. Progestin-induced HSPB8 expression required cyclin D1 and was insensitive to antiestrogens but blocked by antiprogestins or inhibition of specificity factor 1 (SP1). HSPB8 expression increased with or without ligand when cells were G2/M synchronized or contained high levels of cyclin D1. Knockdown of PRs abrogated ligand-independent HSPB8 expression in synchronized cells. Notably, PRs and cyclin D1 copurified in whole-cell lysates of transiently transfected COS-1 cells and in PR-positive T47D breast cancer cells expressing endogenous cyclin D1. PRs, cyclin D1, and SP1 were recruited to the HSPB8 promoter in progestin-treated T47D breast cancer cells. Mutation of PR Ser345 to Ala (S345A) or inhibition of CDK2 activity using roscovitine disrupted PR/cyclin D1 interactions with DNA and blocked HSPB8 mRNA expression. Interaction of phosphorylated PRs with SP1 and cyclin D1 provides a mechanism for targeting transcriptionally active PRs to selected gene promoters relevant to breast cancer progression. Understanding the functional linkage between PRs and cell cycle regulatory proteins will provide keys to targeting novel PR/cyclin D1 cross talk in both hormone-responsive disease and HSPB8-high refractory disease with high HSPB8 expression. PMID:24606123

  5. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies.

  6. Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 following long-term fractionated exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation in normal human diploid cells.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Sasatani, Megumi; Kamiya, Kenji; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a mitogenic sensor that responds to growth signals from the extracellular environment and regulates the G 1-to-S cell cycle transition. When cells are acutely irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy, cyclin D1 is degraded, causing cell cycle arrest at the G 1/S checkpoint. In contrast, cyclin D1 accumulates in human tumor cells that are exposed to long-term fractionated radiation (0.5 Gy/fraction of X-rays). In this study we investigated the effect of fractionated low-dose radiation exposure on cyclin D1 localization in 3 strains of normal human fibroblasts. To specifically examine the nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, cells were treated with a hypotonic buffer containing detergent to remove cytoplasmic cyclin D1. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence was used to identify cells in S phase. With this approach, we observed S-phase nuclear retention of cyclin D1 following low-dose fractionated exposures, and found that cyclin D1 nuclear retention increased with exposure time. Cells that retained nuclear cyclin D1 were more likely to have micronuclei than non-retaining cells, indicating that the accumulation of nuclear cyclin D1 was associated with genomic instability. Moreover, inhibition of the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway facilitated cyclin D1 degradation and eliminated cyclin D1 nuclear retention in cells exposed to fractionated radiation. Thus, cyclin D1 may represent a useful marker for monitoring long-term effects associated with exposure to low levels of radiation.

  7. The Role of Cyclin D1 in Altering Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    adenocarcinomas. One study of cyclin D1 expression in esophageal carcinomas indicated that cyclin D1 is strongly expressed in stromal fibroblasts. In this study...proliferate faster than controls in vivo in our tissue recombination model. Although cyclin D1 can increase BPH-1 cell motility and promote cell...Alarid ET, Turner T, Donjacour AA, Boutin EL, Foster BA. Normal and abnormal development of the male urogenital tract: role of androgens, mesenchymal

  8. Transcriptional role of cyclin D1 in development revealed by a “genetic-proteomic” screen

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, Frédéric; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Elias, Joshua E.; Meyer, Clifford A.; Mizeracka, Karolina; Marson, Alexander; Frampton, Garrett M.; Cole, Megan F.; Odom, Duncan T.; Odajima, Junko; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jecrois, Marie; Young, Richard A.; Liu, X. Shirley; Cepko, Constance L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin D1 belongs to the core cell cycle machinery, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers1,2. The full repertoire of cyclin D1 functions in normal development and in oncogenesis is currently unclear. Here we developed FLAG- and HA-tagged cyclin D1 knock-in mouse strains that allowed high-throughput mass spectrometry approach to search for cyclin D1-binding proteins in different mouse organs. In addition to cell cycle partners, we observed several proteins involved in transcription. Genome-wide location (ChIP-chip) analyses revealed that during mouse development cyclin D1 occupies promoters of abundantly expressed genes. In particular, we found that in developing mouse retinas – an organ that critically requires cyclin D1 function3,4 – cyclin D1 binds the upstream regulatory region of the Notch1 gene where it serves to recruit CBP histone acetyltransferase. Genetic ablation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased CBP recruitment, decreased histone acetylation of the Notch1 promoter region, and led to decreased levels of the Notch transcript and protein in cyclin D1-null retinas. Transduction of an activated allele of Notch1 into cyclin D1−/− retinas increased proliferation of retinal progenitor cells, indicating that upregulating Notch1 signaling alleviates the phenotype of cyclin D1-deficiency. These studies reveal that in addition to its well-established cell cycle roles, cyclin D1 plays an in vivo transcriptional function in mouse development. Our approach, which we term “genetic-proteomic” can be used to study the in vivo function of essentially any protein. PMID:20090754

  9. Lysine 269 is essential for cyclin D1 ubiquitylation by the SCFFbx4/αB-crystallin ligase and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation

    PubMed Central

    O., Barbash; E., Egan; L.L., Pontano; J., Kosak; Diehl, J. Alan

    2009-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is a complex enzymatic process that results in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin, via Gly-76 of ubiquitin, to an ε-NH2-group of an internal lysine residue in a given substrate. While E3 ligases frequently utilize lysines adjacent to the degron within the substrate, many substrates can be targeted to the proteasome via polyubiquitylation of any lysine. We have assessed the role of lysine residues proximal to the cyclin D1 phosphodegron for ubiquitylation by the SCFFbx4/αB-crystallin ubiquitin ligase and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1. The work described herein reveals a requisite role for Lys-269 (K269) for the rapid, poly-ubiquitin mediated degradation of cyclin D1. Mutation of lysine 269, which is proximal to the phosphodegron sequence surrounding Thr-286 in cyclin D1, not only stabilizes cyclin D1, but also triggers cyclin D1 accumulation within the nucleus thereby promoting cell transformation. In addition, D1-K269R is resistant to genotoxic stress induced degradation, similar to non-phosphorylatable D1-T286A, supporting the critical role for the post-translational regulation of cyclin D1 in the response to DNA damaging agents. Strikingly, while mutation of lysine 269 to arginine inhibits cyclin D1 degradation, it does not inhibit cyclin D1 ubiquitylation in vivo demonstrating that ubiquitylation of a specific lysine can influence substrate targeting to the 26S proteasome. PMID:19767775

  10. Synergistic cooperation of Sall4 and Cyclin D1 in transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Johann; Kaiser, Frank J.; Borozdin, Wiktor; Depping, Reinhard; Kohlhase, Juergen . E-mail: jkohlhase@humangenetik-freiburg.de

    2007-05-11

    Loss of function mutations in SALL4 cause Okihiro syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by radial ray malformations associated with Duane anomaly. In zebrafish and mouse Sall4 interacts with TBX5 during limb and heart development and plays a crucial role for embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here we report the nuclear interaction of murine Sall4 with Cyclin D1, one of the main regulators of G{sub 1} to S phase transition in cell cycle, verified by yeast two-hybrid assay, co-immunoprecipitation and intracellular co-localisation. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter gene assays we demonstrate that Sall4 operates as a transcriptional repressor located to heterochromatin and that this activity is modulated by Cyclin D1.

  11. PKCα TUMOR SUPPRESSION IN THE INTESTINE IS ASSOCIATED WITH TRANSCRIPTIONAL AND TRANSLATIONAL INHIBITION OF CYCLIN D1

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Leontieva, Olga V.; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Uronis, Joshua M.; Curry, Kathryn J.; Threadgill, David W.; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Robine, Sylvie; Velcich, Anna; Augenlicht, Leonard; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in PKC isozyme expression and aberrant induction of cyclin D1 are early events in intestinal tumorigenesis. Previous studies have identified cyclin D1 as a major target in the antiproliferative effects of PKCα in non-transformed intestinal cells; however, a link between PKC signaling and cyclin D1 in colon cancer remained to be established. The current study further characterized PKC isozyme expression in intestinal neoplasms and explored the consequences of restoring PKCα or PKCδ in a panel of colon carcinoma cell lines. Consistent with patterns of PKC expression in primary tumors, PKCα and δ levels were generally reduced in colon carcinoma cell lines, PKCβII was elevated and PKCε showed variable expression, thus establishing the suitability of these models for analysis of PKC signaling. While colon cancer cells were insensitive to the effects of PKC agonists on cyclin D1 levels, restoration of PKCα downregulated cyclin D1 by two independent mechanisms. PKCα expression consistently (a) reduced steady-state levels of cyclin D1 by a novel transcriptional mechanism not previously seen in non-transformed cells, and (b) re-established the ability of PKC agonists to activate the translational repressor 4E-BP1 and inhibit cyclin D1 translation. In contrast, PKCδ had modest and variable effects on cyclin D1 steady state levels and failed to restore responsiveness to PKC agonists. Notably, PKCα expression blocked anchorage-independent growth in colon cancer cells via a mechanism partially dependent on cyclin D1 deficiency, while PKCδ had only minor effects. Loss of PKCα and effects of its re-expression were independent of the status of the APC/β-catenin signaling pathway or known genetic alterations, indicating that they are a general characteristic of colon tumors. Thus, PKCα is a potent negative regulator of cyclin D1 expression and anchorage-independent cell growth in colon tumor cells, findings that offer important perspectives on the

  12. Activation of the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 survival signaling pathway in human cholesteatoma epithelium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yin, Tuanfang; Ren, Jihao; Li, Lihua; Xiao, Zian; Chen, Xing; Xie, Dinghua

    2014-02-01

    Cholesteatoma is a benign keratinizing squamous epithelial lesion characterized by the hyper-proliferation of keratinocytes with abundant production of keratin debris in the middle ear. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Akt/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/cyclinD1 signaling pathway is one of the most important pathways in regulating cell survival and proliferation. We hypothesized that the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 signaling pathway may be activated and involved in the cellular hyperplasia mechanism in acquired cholesteatoma epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated EGFR (p-EGFR), phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), activated NF-κB and cyclinD1 protein was performed in 40 cholesteatoma samples and 20 samples of normal external auditory canal (EAC) epithelium. Protein expression of p-EGFR, p-Akt, activated NF-κB and cyclinD1 in cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly increased when compared with normal EAC epithelium (p < 0.01). In cholesteatoma epithelium, a significant positive association was observed between p-EGFR and p-Akt expression and between the expressions of p-Akt and NF-κB, NF-κB and cyclinD1, respectively (p < 0.01). No significant relationships were observed between the levels of investigated proteins and the degree of bone destruction (p > 0.05). The increased protein expression of p-EGFR, p-Akt, NF-κB and cyclinD1 and their associations in cholesteatoma epithelium suggest that the EGFR/Akt/NF-κB/cyclinD1 survival signaling pathway is active and may be involved in the regulatory mechanisms of cellular hyperplasia in cholesteatoma epithelium.

  13. Characterization of cytoplasmic cyclin D1 as a marker of invasiveness in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santacana, Maria; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Gatius, Sònia; Pedraza, Neus; Pallarés, Judit; Cemeli, Tània; Valls, Joan; Tarres, Marc; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) is a proto-oncogen amplified in many different cancers and nuclear accumulation of Ccnd1 is a characteristic of tumor cells. Ccnd1 activates the transcription of a large set of genes involved in cell cycle progress and proliferation. However, Ccnd1 also targets cytoplasmic proteins involved in the regulation of cell migration and invasion. In this work, we have analyzed by immunohistochemistry the localization of Ccnd1 in endometrial, breast, prostate and colon carcinomas with different types of invasion. The number of cells displaying membranous or cytoplasmic Ccnd1 was significantly higher in peripheral cells than in inner cells in both collective and pushing invasion patterns of endometrial carcinoma, and in collective invasion pattern of colon carcinoma. Also, the cytoplasmic localization of Ccnd1 was higher when tumors infiltrated as single cells, budding or small clusters of cells. To evaluate cytoplasmic function of cyclin D1, we have built a variant (Ccnd1-CAAX) that remains attached to the cell membrane therefore sequestering this cyclin in the cytoplasm. Tumor cells harboring Ccnd1-CAAX showed high levels of invasiveness and metastatic potential compared to those containing the wild type allele of Ccnd1. However, Ccnd1-CAAX expression did not alter proliferative rates of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the role of Ccnd1 in the cytoplasm is mainly associated with the invasive capability of tumor cells. Moreover, we propose that subcellular localization of Ccnd1 is an interesting guideline to measure cancer outcome. PMID:27105504

  14. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor-Yue; Li, Sha; Tsang, Chi Man; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degradation. In addition, berberine recruits the Skp, Cullin, F-box containing complex-β-Transducin Repeat Containing Protein (SCFβ-TrCP) complex to facilitate Cyclin D1 ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolysis. Knockdown of β-TrCP blocks Cyclin D1 turnover induced by berberine; blocking the protein degradation induced by berberine in HepG2 cells increases tumor cell resistance to berberine. Our results shed light on berberine′s potential as an anti-tumor agent for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27854312

  15. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor-Yue; Li, Sha; Tsang, Chi Man; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degradation. In addition, berberine recruits the Skp, Cullin, F-box containing complex-β-Transducin Repeat Containing Protein (SCF(β-TrCP)) complex to facilitate Cyclin D1 ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolysis. Knockdown of β-TrCP blocks Cyclin D1 turnover induced by berberine; blocking the protein degradation induced by berberine in HepG2 cells increases tumor cell resistance to berberine. Our results shed light on berberine's potential as an anti-tumor agent for clinical cancer therapy.

  16. RhoA promotes epidermal stem cell proliferation via PKN1-cyclin D1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Zhan, Rixing; Chen, Liang; Dai, Xia; Wang, Wenping; Guo, Rui; Li, Xiaoge; Li, Zhe; Wang, Liang; Huang, Shupeng; Shen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) play a critical role in wound healing, but the mechanism underlying ESC proliferation is not well defined. Here, we explore the effects of RhoA on ESC proliferation and the possible underlying mechanism. Methods Human ESCs were enriched by rapid adhesion to collagen IV. RhoA(+/+)(G14V), RhoA(-/-)(T19N) and pGFP control plasmids were transfected into human ESCs. The effect of RhoA on cell proliferation was detected by cell proliferation and DNA synthesis assays. Induction of PKN1 activity by RhoA was determined by immunoblot analysis, and the effects of PKN1 on RhoA in terms of inducing cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression were detected using specific siRNA targeting PKN1. The effects of U-46619 (a RhoA agonist) and C3 transferase (a RhoA antagonist) on ESC proliferation were observed in vivo. Results RhoA had a positive effect on ESC proliferation, and PKN1 activity was up-regulated by the active RhoA mutant (G14V) and suppressed by RhoA T19N. Moreover, the ability of RhoA to promote ESC proliferation and DNA synthesis was interrupted by PKN1 siRNA. Additionally, cyclin D1 protein and mRNA expression levels were up-regulated by RhoA G14V, and these effects were inhibited by siRNA-mediated knock-down of PKN1. RhoA also promoted ESC proliferation via PKN in vivo. Conclusion This study shows that the effect of RhoA on ESC proliferation is mediated by activation of the PKN1-cyclin D1 pathway in vitro, suggesting that RhoA may serve as a new therapeutic target for wound healing. PMID:28222172

  17. Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Parray, Fazl Q; Dar, Manzoor Ahmad; Nissar, Saniya; Banday, Mujeeb Zafar; Rasool, Sabha; Gulzar, G M; Chowdri, Nissar A; Siddiqi, Mushtaq A

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyse the role of cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism in modulating the susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Kashmiri population. The genotype distribution of the cyclin D1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with 160 healthy controls was investigated. No direct significant association between cyclin D1 genotypes and CRC was observed; however, the AG and AA genotypes were found to be associated with an increased risk of CRC compared to the GG genotype, with an almost 2-fold increase in OR. This study suggests that the cyclin D1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC in the Kashmiri population.

  18. MicroRNA-195 inhibits proliferation of cervical cancer cells by targeting cyclin D1a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wei, Heng; Yin, Duo; Lu, Yanming; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Qiao; Ma, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shulan

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most frequent gynecological malignancies in women worldwide. MicroRNA-195 (miR-195) was recently found highly expressed in cervical cancer. However, the role of miR-195 in the pathology of cervical cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed the downregulation of miR-195 in primary cervical cancer tissues. For the functional study, we introduced the sequences of miR-195 or miR-195 inhibitor into Hela and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines. Overexpression of miR-195 inhibited the proliferation of both Hela and SiHa cells. In contrast, reducing the endogenous miR-195 level by miR-195 inhibitor promoted the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. Flow cytometric assay showed that overexpression of miR-195 induced G1 phase arrest, whereas miR-195 inhibitor shortened G1 phase of cervical cancer cells. In addition, the suppressive role of miR-195 in cell cycle was also demonstrated by the western blot results of various cell cycle indicators, such as phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-Rb) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in the gain and loss of function experiments. Furthermore, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay revealed that miR-195 targeted the 3'-untranslated region of cyclin D1a transcript, such as to regulate cyclin D1 expression. In summary, our results suggest that miR-195 acts as a suppressor in the proliferation and cell cycle of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting cyclin D1a mRNA.

  19. Expression of Cyclin D1 and P16 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; GiriLynrah, Kyrshanlang

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including cyclin D1 and p16 play important role in its carcinogenesis. We aimed to analyze the expressions of cyclin D1 and p16 with the various clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC. METHODS We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for cyclin D1 and p16 protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). RESULTS Out of the 30 cases, positive expression of cyclin D1 was detected in 26 cases (86.7%). The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (88.2%), lymph node metastasis (87.5%), and tumors which were poorly differentiated (92.9%) were higher in cyclin D1 positive tumors than in the cyclin D1 negative tumors. However no significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression and the different clinicopathological parameters.There were 22 cases of ESCC (73.3 %) which showed negativity for p16. The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (82.4%) and poorly differentiated tumors (92.9%) were higher in the p16 negative tumors than in the p16 positive tumors. There was significant association between the histological grade and p16 expression (p=0.012). However, there were no significant association with regard to site, size and lymph node status of the tumors and p16 expression. CONCLUSION The study shows that alterations of cyclin D1 and p16 play an important role in ESCC. Loss of p16 expression was associated with poor differentiation.

  20. Cyclin D1-negative blastoid mantle cell lymphoma identified by SOX11 expression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weifen; Fu, Kai; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Lim, Megan; Ondrejka, Sarah; Hsi, Eric D

    2012-02-01

    SOX11 expression has been recently shown to be useful in the diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), including cyclin D1-negative MCL with typical morphology. We evaluated SOX11 expression pattern in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) subtypes to confirm specificity and used it as a feature to identify the first reported cases of cyclin D1-negative blastoid MCL. SOX11 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 140 cases of mature B-NHL, including 4 cases of suspected blastoid MCL that lacked cyclin D1 expression and 8 cases of CD5-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL). In addition, 5 cases of B or T lymphoblastic lymphoma were included. Nuclear expression of SOX11 was found in cyclin D1-positive MCL (30/30, 100%) and in a case of cyclin D1-negative MCL with typical morphology. SOX11 was also expressed in Burkitt lymphoma (1/5, 20%) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (2/3 T-LBLs, 2/2 B-LBLs, overall 4/5, 80%), whereas all cases of DLBL (including CD5 DLBL) and other small B-NHL were negative. The 4 suspected cases of blastoid MCL were also SOX11. These cases had a complex karyotype that included 12p abnormalities. We confirmed prior reports that stated that SOX11 nuclear expression was a specific marker for MCL, including cyclin D1-negative MCL with typical morphology. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding its use in identifying cases of cyclin D1-negative blastoid MCL. Routine use of SOX11 in cases of suspected CD5 DLBL might help identify additional cases of cyclin D1-negative blastoid MCL.

  1. [Expression and clinical significance of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical epithelial tissues].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yu; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Deng, Dong-Rui; Wang, Shi-Xuan; Lu, Yun-Ping; Ma, Ding

    2006-03-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 is prevalently overexpressed in human cancers. Up-regulation of Pin1 elevates the expression of Cyclin D1, and plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. This study was to investigate the expression and clinical significance of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical epithelial tissues. The expression of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa, C33a and Caski were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Their expression in 88 samples of cervical tissues, including 10 samples of normal cervix, 21 samples of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 57 samples of invasive cervical cancer, were detected by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA and protein levels of Pin1 were significantly higher in HeLa, SiHa, C33a, and Caski cells than in normal cervical epithelial tissues (P<0.05). The expression of Pin1 increased progressively along with the disease process from normal cervix to CIN, and to invasive cervical cancer (0%, 47.62%, 64.91%, P<0.05). Pin1 expression had no relation to disease stage (FIGO), pathologic grade, and pelvic lymph node metastasis status (P>0.05). The positive rate of Pin1 was significantly higher in cervical adenocarcinoma than in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (100% vs. 60.0%, P<0.05). In cervical cancer tissues, the overexpression of Pin1 was positively correlated to that of Cyclin D1 (P<0.05). Pin1 is overexpressed in HeLa, SiHa, C33a and Caski cell lines as well as in cervical cancer tissues. The overexpression of Pin1 is closely related to Cyclin D1 expression in cervical cancer. The aberrant expression of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 might contribute to tumorigenesis of cervical cancer.

  2. T3 enhances thyroid cancer cell proliferation through TRβ1/Oct-1-mediated cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Perri, Anna; Catalano, Stefania; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vizza, Donatella; Rovito, Daniela; Qi, Hongyan; Aquila, Saveria; Panza, Salvatore; Rizza, Pietro; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2014-01-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that thyroid hormone T3 promotes cancer cell growth, even though the molecular mechanism involved in such processes still needs to be elucidated. In this study we demonstrated that T3 induced proliferation in papillary thyroid carcinoma cell lines concomitantly with an up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, that is a critical mitogen-regulated cell-cycle control element. Our data revealed that T3 enhanced the recruitment of the TRβ1/Oct-1 complex on Octamer-transcription factor-1 site within cyclin D1 promoter, leading to its transactivation. In addition, silencing of TRβ1 or Oct-1 expression by RNA interference reversed both increased cell proliferation and up-regulation of cyclin D1, underlying the important role of both transcriptional factors in mediating these effects. Finally, T3-induced increase in cell growth was abrogated after knocking down cyclin D1 expression. All these findings highlight a new molecular mechanism by which T3 promotes thyroid cancer cell growth.

  3. Expression of cyclin D1 and p16 in psoriasis before and after phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Abou EL-Ela, M; Nagui, N; Mahgoub, D; El-Eishi, N; Fawzy, M; El-Tawdy, A; Abdel Hay, R; Rashed, L

    2010-10-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PV) is characterized by keratinocyte hyperproliferation. Altered expression of cell-cycle regulatory genes involved in the cyclin D1 ⁄ p16 INK4-pRb pathway may contribute to this epidermal hyperproliferation. To assess the expression of cyclin D1 and p16 in psoriasis, and to evaluate the effect of phototherapy on their expression. The study population comprised 25 patients with PV and 10 healthy controls. Patients were treated with 24 sessions of either narrowband ultraviolet (UV) B or psoralen UVA. Skin biopsies were taken from the affected skin of each patient before and after treatment, and from the healthy controls, to examine cyclin D1 and p16 expression. Before phototherapy, the mean value of cyclin D1 concentration in patients was significantly greater than that in controls and the mean value of p16 concentration in patients was significantly lower than that in controls. Following treatment, we detected a significant decrease in cyclin D1 and a significant increase in p16. Cyclin D1 upregulation and p16 downregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Normalization of the levels of both parameters may be a mechanism by which phototherapy induces remission in psoriasis.

  4. Regulation of small GTPase activity by G1 cyclins.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Neus; Cemeli, Tània; Monserrat, Ma Ventura; Garí, Eloi; Ferrezuelo, Francisco

    2017-01-27

    Together with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) partner G1 cyclins control cell cycle entry by phosphorylating a number of nuclear targets and releasing a transcriptional program at the end of G1 phase. Yeast G1 cyclins also operate on cytoplasmic targets involved in the polarization of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking. These processes are mainly controlled by the small GTPase Cdc42, and G1 cyclins regulate the activity of this and other small GTPases through the modulation of their regulators and effectors. This regulation is key for different developmental outcomes in unicellular organisms. In mammalian cells cytoplasmic G1 cyclin D1 has been shown to promote the activity of Rac1 and Ral GTPases and to block RhoA. Regulation of these small GTPases by G1 cyclins may constitute a mechanism to coordinate proliferation with cell migration and morphogenesis, important processes not only during normal development and organogenesis but also for tumor formation and metastasis. Here we briefly review the evidence supporting a role of G1 cyclins and CDKs as regulators of the activity of small GTPases, emphasizing their functional relevance both in budding yeast and in mammalian cells.

  5. Lin-28 Homologue A (LIN28A) Promotes Cell Cycle Progression via Regulation of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin D1 (CCND1), and Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog A (CDC25A) Expression in Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1–17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent). PMID:22467868

  6. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  7. The CXCR4 inhibitor BL-8040 induces the apoptosis of AML blasts by down-regulating ERK BCL-2, MCL-1 and cyclin-D1 via altered miR-15a/16-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Abraham, M; Klein, S; Bulvik, B; Wald, H; Weiss, I D; Olam, D; Weiss, L; Beider, K; Eizenberg, O; Wald, O; Galun, E; Avigdor, A; Benjamini, O; Nagler, A; Pereg, Y; Tavor, S; Peled, A

    2017-03-10

    CXCR4 is a key player in the retention and survival of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. We studied the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist BL-8040 on the survival of AML blasts and investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CXCR4 signaling inhibition leads to leukemic cell death. Treatment with BL-8040 induced the robust mobilization of AML blasts from the BM. In addition, AML cells exposed to BL-8040 underwent differentiation. Furthermore, BL-8040 induced the apoptosis of AML cells in vitro and in vivo. This apoptosis was mediated by the up-regulation of miR-15a/miR-16-1, resulting in down-regulation of the target genes BCL-2, MCL-1 and cyclin-D1. Overexpression of miR-15a/miR-16-1 directly induced leukemic cell death. BL-8040-induced apoptosis was also mediated by the inhibition of survival signals via the AKT/ERK pathways. Importantly, treatment with a BCL-2 inhibitor induced apoptosis and act together with BL-8040 to enhance cell death. BL-8040 also synergized with FLT3 inhibitors to induce AML cell death. Importantly, this combined treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice and reduced minimal residual disease in vivo. Our results provide a rationale to test combination therapies employing BL-8040 and BCL2 or FLT3 inhibitors to achieve increased efficacy of these agents.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 10 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.82.

  8. DNA tumor virus oncoproteins and retinoblastoma gene mutations share the ability to relieve the cell's requirement for cyclin D1 function in G1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) participates in the regulation of the cell division cycle through complex formation with numerous cellular regulatory proteins including the potentially oncogenic cyclin D1. Extending the current view of the emerging functional interplay between pRB and D-type cyclins, we now report that cyclin D1 expression is positively regulated by pRB. Cyclin D1 mRNA and protein is specifically downregulated in cells expressing SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A, and papillomavirus E7/E6 oncogene products and this effect requires intact RB-binding, CR2 domain of E1A. Exceptionally low expression of cyclin D1 is also seen in genetically RB-deficient cell lines, in which ectopically expressed wild-type pRB results in specific induction of this G1 cyclin. At the functional level, antibody-mediated cyclin D1 knockout experiments demonstrate that the cyclin D1 protein, normally required for G1 progression, is dispensable for passage through the cell cycle in cell lines whose pRB is inactivated through complex formation with T antigen, E1A, or E7 oncoproteins as well as in cells which have suffered loss-of-function mutations of the RB gene. The requirement for cyclin D1 function is not regained upon experimental elevation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with mutant RB, while reintroduction of wild-type RB into RB-deficient cells leads to restoration of the cyclin D1 checkpoint. These results strongly suggest that pRB serves as a major target of cyclin D1 whose cell cycle regulatory function becomes dispensable in cells lacking functional RB. Based on available data including this study, we propose a model for an autoregulatory feedback loop mechanism that regulates both the expression of the cyclin D1 gene and the activity of pRB, thereby contributing to a G1 phase checkpoint control in cycling mammalian cells. PMID:8175885

  9. Prognostic Importance of Cell Cycle Regulators Cyclin D1 (CCND1) and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B/p27) in Sporadic Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Minarikova, Petra; Halkova, Tereza; Belsanova, Barbora; Tuckova, Inna; Belina, Frantisek; Dusek, Ladislav; Zavoral, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is known for a notable variety in the course of the disease. Clinical factors, such as tumor stage, grade, and localization, are key in patient survival. It is expected that molecular factors such as somatic mutations and gene amplifications are also underlying tumor biological behavior and may serve as factors for prognosis estimation. Aim. The purpose of this study was to examine gene amplifications from a panel of genes to uncover potential prognostic marker candidates. Methods. A panel of gene amplifications including 71 genes was tested by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique in 76 gastric cancer samples from a Caucasian population. The correlation of gene amplification status with patient survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results. The amplification of two cell cycle regulators, CCND1 and CDKN1B, was identified to have a negative prognostic role. The medial survival of patients with gastric cancer displaying amplification compared to patients without amplification was 192 versus 725 days for CCND1 (P = 0.0012) and 165 versus 611 days for CDKN1B (P = 0.0098). Conclusion. Gene amplifications of CCND1 and CDKN1B are potential candidates to serve as prognostic markers for the stratification of patients based on the estimate of survival in the management of gastric cancer patients. PMID:27781065

  10. The role of pRB, p16 and cyclin D1 in colonic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Semin; Isisag, Aydyn; Saruc, Murat; Nese, Nalan; Demir, Mehmet Akif; Kucukmetin, Nurten Turkel

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate abnormal expression of the Rb protein (pRb), p16(INK4a) (p16) and cyclin D1 in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas and to assess the possible alterations in Rb pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis. 44 cases of colorectal adenoma and 44 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibodies to identify abnormalities of pRb, p16, and cyclin D1 expression. Staining degree of above-mentioned markers was assessed by using a semi-quantitative method in all cases in order to determine any staining differences. In 70.5% of the adenomas and 97.7% of the adenocarcinomas, an overexpression of pRb was found. There was a statistically significant relationship between the immunoreactivity of pRb and villous/tubulovillous types of adenomas (p < 0.05). There was a loss of p16 expression in 84.1% of adenomas and 61.4% of adenocarcinomas. Statistically significantly, the p16 overexpression was not seen in any of tubular adenomas (p < 0.001). Overexpression of cyclin D1 was found in only 9.1% of adenomas, while 31.8% of adenocarcinomas overexpressed this protein. Loss of expression of cyclin D1 was similar in adenomas and adenocarcinomas (27.3% and 25%, respectively). Staining degrees of all three cell cycle proteins were shown to be statistically different in adenomas and adenocarcinomas, for pRb (p = 0.001), for p16 ( p = 0.045), and cyclin D1 ( p = 0.05). Also, there was only a mild agreement with respect to p16 and cyclin D1 relationship between for adenomas ( K = +0.28 p = 0.051) and for adenocarcinomas ( K = +0.35 p = 0.017). Besides, there was no correlation between the expression of pRb, p16, and cyclin D1 and clinicopathological tumor characteristics and prognostic data such as stage or lymph node/liver metastasis. pRb, p16 and cyclin D1 are shown to be aberrantly expressed in both colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. It can be claimed that disturbances in Rb

  11. Telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene through an interaction with NOL1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Juyeong; Lee, Ji Hoon; Chung, In Kwon

    2016-04-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that is required for the maintenance of telomere repeats. Although overexpression of telomerase in normal human somatic cells is sufficient to overcome replicative senescence, the ability of telomerase to promote tumorigenesis requires additional activities that are independent of its role in telomere extension. Here, we identify proliferation-associated nucleolar antigen 120 (NOL1, also known as NOP2) as a telomerase RNA component (TERC)-binding protein that is found in association with catalytically active telomerase. Although NOL1 is highly expressed in the majority of human tumor cells, the molecular mechanism by which NOL1 contributes to tumorigenesis remained unclear. We show that NOL1 binds to the T-cell factor (TCF)-binding element of the cyclin D1 promoter and activates its transcription. Interestingly, telomerase is also recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter in a TERC-dependent manner through the interaction with NOL1, further enhancing transcription of the cyclin D1 gene. Depletion of NOL1 suppresses cyclin D1 promoter activity, thereby leading to induction of growth arrest and altered cell cycle distributions. Collectively, our findings suggest that NOL1 represents a new route by which telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene, thus maintaining cell proliferation capacity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Cyclin D1, retinoblastoma and p16 protein expression in carcinoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineeta; Patel, Brijesh; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Mridula; Pandey, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the gallbladder is a relatively rare neoplasm with a poor prognosis. The exact mechanisms of its genesis are not known and very little information is available on molecular events leading to labeling this as an orphan cancer. In this prospective case control study we evaluated the expression of p16, pRb and cyclin D1 by immunohistochemistry to study the G1-S cell-cycle check point and its possible role in gallbladder carcinogenesis. A total of 25 patients with gallbladder carcinoma (group I), 25 with cholelithiasis (group II) and 10 normal controls. were enrolled. Cyclin D1 expression was seen in 10 (40%) patients each with carcinoma and cholelithiasis while only in 2 (20%) of the normal gallbladders but differences were not statistically significant (p value=0.488). p16 was expressed in 12% patients of carcinoma of the gallbladder and 28% of cholelithiasis, however this difference was not statistically significant (p value=0.095). Retinoblastoma protein was found to be expressed in 50% of normal gallbladders and 6 (24%) of carcinoma and 8 (32%) of gallstones. The present study failed to demonstrate any conclusive role of cyclin D1/RB/ p16 pathway in carcinoma of the gallbladder. The positive relation observed between tumor metastasis and cyclinD1 expression and p16 with nodal metastasis suggested that higher cyclin D1/p16 expression may act as a predictive biomarker for aggressive behavior of gallbladder malignancies.

  13. Reduced expression of cyclin D2 is associated with poor recurrence-free survival independent of cyclin D1 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Park, Seong-Eun; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Jungho; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2012-08-01

    Compared to well-known function of cyclin D1 in lung cancer, the role of cyclin D2 is not clear. This study was aimed at understanding the clinicopathological significance of cyclin D2 in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analyzed expression statuses of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, p16, p21, p27, Ki-67, and phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) using immunohistochemistry in 626 NSCLCs. Cyclin D2 was expressed in normal lung tissue, and its expression was reduced in 170 (27%) of 626 NSCLCs with a median duration of follow-up of 64 months. Mean phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels were not associated with expression levels of cyclin D2 (P=0.15). The relationship between recurrence and the reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not homogenous by stage (Breslow-Day test for homogeneity, P=0.04). Reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with patient's prognosis in 370 stage I, 112 stage II, and 18 stage IV NSCLCs. However, for 126 stage III NSCLCs, reduced expression of cyclin D2 was adversely associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio [HR]=3.71, 95% CI=1.54-13.17; P=0.01), independent of histology and expression of cyclin D1. The reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with the overexpression of cyclin D1 (P=0.65). The present study suggests that reduced expression of cyclin D2 in stage III NSCLC may be associated with poor RFS. And, cyclin D2 may have a distinct role from cyclin D1 in NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  15. Cyclin D1 expression in acral melanoma: a case control study in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zainal Abidin; Narihan, M Zulkarnaen A; Ojep, Dk Norlida A; Soosay, Ashley Edward Roy; Pan, Kok Long

    2012-12-01

    Acral melanoma has been reported to have distinctive clinical presentation and ethnic distribution compared to other histological types of malignant melanoma. Acral melanoma also exhibits distinctive focused gene amplifications, including cyclin D1 overexpression. We reviewed archived histological material of malignant melanoma in the Sarawak General Hospital from year 2004 to 2010. 43 tumours, comprising 28 acral melanoma and 15 non-acral melanoma, had sufficient material to be included in the study. The majority (36%) of acral melanoma tumours occurred in the heel. The tumours were analyzed for cyclin D1 expression by immunohistochemistry. 68% of acral melanoma were cyclin D1 positive compared to a positivity of 33% in non-acral tumours. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). This finding may improve the histological diagnosis of acral melanoma and detection of positive resection margins.

  16. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide treatment produces anxiety-like behavior and spatial cognition impairment in rats: Possible involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis via brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclin D1 regulation.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Sayo; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Saori; Kanemoto, Erika; Sugimoto, Misaki; Kawai, Toshiki; Machida, Ayumi; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2015-10-01

    Many patients who have received chemotherapy to treat cancer experience depressive- and anxiety-like symptoms or cognitive impairment. However, despite the evidence for this, the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. This study investigated behavioral and biochemical changes upon treatment with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, focusing on mental and cognitive systems, as well as neurogenesis in male rats. Doxorubicin (2 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg), and the combination of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide were injected intraperitoneally once per week for 4 weeks. In particular, the co-administration of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide produced anhedonia-like, anxiety-like, and spatial cognitive impairments in rats. It also reduced both the number of proliferating cells in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and their survival. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were decreased along with chemotherapy-induced decreases in platelet levels. However, hippocampal BDNF levels and Bdnf mRNA levels were not decreased by this treatment. On the other hand, hippocampal cyclin D1 levels were significantly decreased by chemotherapy. These results suggest that the co-administration of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide induces psychological and cognitive impairment, in addition to negatively affecting hippocampal neurogenesis, which may be related to hippocampal cyclin D1 levels, but not hippocampal BDNF levels.

  17. Immunohistochemical comparison of cyclin D1 and P16 in odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Poursadeghi, Hamid; Aminzadeh, Atousa

    2013-03-01

    The different growth mechanism and biologic behavior of the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) compared to other odontogenic cysts might be related to the proliferating capacity of its epithelium. In this study, the aim was to evaluate and compare the distribution and staining intensity of P16 and cyclin D1 in OKC and unicystic ameloblastoma (UA). In this descriptive analytic study, hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides of OKCs and UAs available from the archives of the oral pathology laboratory of the Esfahan School of Dentistry were examined. Twenty-five noninflamed solitary odontogenic keratocysts and 25 unicystic ameloblastomas (of either type) were selected and stained immunohistochemically. Distribution and staining intensity score (SID score) for P16- and cyclin D1-positive cells was calculated in both groups. Results were analyzed statistically with Wilcoxon, Friedman, and Mann-Whitney tests; P < 0.05 was considered significant. The highest expression of Cyclin D1-positive cells was seen in the suprabasal layer of keratocysts (P < 0.05) and in the peripheral layer of UAs (P < 0.05). Likewise, the highest expression of P16-positive cells was observed in the basal and suprabasal layers of keratocysts (P > 0.05) and central portions of UAs (P > 0.05). Expression of Cyclin D1 was higher in UAs compared to keratocyts (P < 0.05), although P16 did not show a significant difference between the two study groups (P > 0.05). Cyclin D1 did show a higher staining intensity in UAs compared to the keratocysts, although the expression of P16 was similar in the studied groups. The invasive growth of OKC might be related to the state of expression of cyclin D1 and P16 in the epithelium of this cyst.

  18. Evaluation of Cyclin D1 expression in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Vishal; Verma, Jyoti; Misra, Vatsala; Srivastav, Sapan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is an aggressive epithelial malignancy of the upper aero digestive tract and comprises 90% of all Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC). It is the sixth leading cancer worldwide with approximately 600,000 cases reported annually. It is one of the most common cancers in India. Tumour Lymph Node and Metastases (TNM) staging has been the most useful indicator to predict prognosis in HNSCC but recently various biomolecular markers have potentially offered new methods for early diagnosis and treatment alternatives for HNSCC patients; one amongst them being cyclin D1. Aim This study has been undertaken to evaluate expression of cyclin D1 in HNSCC cases and to find out its association with various pathological prognostic factors. Materials and Methods A 48 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour sections, stained with Haematoxylin & Eosin were graded and staged. Immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 was evaluated as Extent Score (ES), Intensity Score (IS) and Total Score (TS) was calculated. Statistical Analysis All the relevant data collected was transferred on to the excel sheet. Chi square test with and without Yate’s correction was used to compare various parameters. The p-value ≤ 0.05 was taken as critical level of significance. Results A significant association was seen between TS of Cyclin D1 expression with tumour stage and with lymph node metastasis but not with grade. Conclusion Higher Cyclin D1 expression is associated with higher tumour stage and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, there is value of analysing cyclin D1 amplification and expression, for prognostic evaluation. This may also be further used for targeted therapy in head and neck cancers. PMID:28384866

  19. Downregulation of cyclin D1 sensitizes cancer cells to MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuhui; Eilers, Grant; He, Quan; Liu, Lili; Wu, Yeqing; Wu, Yuehong; Yu, Wei; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Ou, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2-p53 pathway has a prominent oncogenic function in the pathogenesis of various cancers. Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2-p53 interaction, inhibits proliferation in cancer cells with wild-type p53. Herein, we evaluate the expression of MDM2, both the full length and a splicing variant MDM2-A, and the sensitivity of Nutlin-3 in different cancer cell lines. Included are seven cell lines with wild-type p53 (four mesothelioma, one breast cancer, one chondrosarcoma, and one leiomyosarcoma), two liposarcoma cell lines harboring MDM2 amplification and wild-type p53, and one mesothelioma cell line harboring a p53 point mutation. Nutlin-3 treatment increased expression of cyclin D1, MDM2, and p53 in cell lines with wild-type p53. Additive effects were observed in cells containing wild-type p53 through coordinated attack on MDM2-p53 binding and cyclin D1 by lentivirual shRNA knockdown or small molecule inhibition, as demonstrated by immunoblots and cell viability analyses. Further results demonstrate that MDM2 binds to cyclin D1, and that an increase in cyclin D1 expression after Nutlin-3 treatment is correlated with expression and ubiquitin E3-ligase activity of MDM2. MDM2 and p53 knockdown experiments demonstrated inhibition of cyclin D1 by MDM2 but not p53. These results indicate that combination inhibition of cyclin D1 and MDM2-p53 binding warrants clinical evaluation as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. PMID:27129163

  20. OVCA1 inhibits the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cancer cells by decreasing cyclin D1 and increasing p16.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fandou; Tong, Rui; Jia, Lingyu; Wei, Wei; Miao, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xinyu; Sun, Wenping; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Chunyan

    2011-08-01

    OVCA1, a tumor suppressor gene, is deleted or lower expressed in about 80% of ovarian cancer. Over expression of OVCA1 in human ovarian cancer A2780 cells inhibits cell proliferation and arrests cells in G1 stage. However, the fact that the molecular mechanism of OVCA1 inhibits cell growth is presently elusive. Here we investigated the potential signaling pathway induced by over-expression of OVCA1. Our results show that over-expression of human OVCA1 in ovarian cancer cells A2780 leads to down-regulation of cyclin D1, and up-regulation of p16, but no effect on the expression of NF-κB. It indicates that OVCA1 could inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cell A2780 by p16/cyclin D1 pathway, but not by NF-κB.

  1. Myostatin induces p300 degradation to silence cyclin D1 expression through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ming; Zhang, Qiang; Ye, Jianwei; Wang, Xueyan; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Dahai

    2008-08-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and affects numerous genes expression involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying myostatin-regulated genes expression remain to be elucidated. In this study, we showed that myostatin blocked the recruitment of p300 to the cyclin D1 promoter, resulting in the silence of cyclin D1 expression. Our data further demonstrated that myostatin decreased the protein level of p300 by inducing p300 degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In addition, we provided experimental evidence to show that myostatin-induced p300 degradation was mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway and this could be antagonized by IGF-1 or insulin. Results presented in this study uncovered an epigenetic control of genes expression in response to myostatin.

  2. The Role of Cyclin D1 in the Chemoresistance of Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0297 TITLE: The Role of Cyclin D1 in the Chemoresistance of Mantle Cell Lymphoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vu Ngo...SUBTITLE The Role of Cyclin D1 in the Chemoresistance of Mantle Cell Lymphoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0297 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0297...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B

  3. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  4. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  5. Cyclin D1 unbalances the redox status controlling cell adhesion, migration, and drug resistance in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustany, Sophie; Bourgeais, Jérôme; Tchakarska, Guergana; Body, Simon; Hérault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Sola, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with their microenvironment are crucial for pathogenesis. MM cells could interact differentially with their microenvironment depending on the type of cyclin D they express. We established several clones that constitutively express cyclin D1 from the parental RPMI8226 MM cell line and analyzed the impact of cyclin D1 expression on cell behavior. We performed a gene expression profiling study on cyclin D1-expressing vs. control cells and validated the results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 altered the transcription of genes that control adhesion and migration. We confirmed that cyclin D1 increases cell adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin, stabilizes F-actin fibers, and enhances chemotaxis and inflammatory chemokine secretion. Both control and cyclin D1-expressing cells were more resistant to acute carfilzomib treatment when cultured on stromal cells than in suspension. However, this resistance was specifically reduced in cyclin D1-expressing cells after pomalidomide pre-treatment that modifies tumor cell/microenvironment interactions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that cyclin D1 expression was also associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling metabolism. We also found that cyclin D1 expression disrupted the redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species. The resulting oxidative stress activated the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK1/2) signaling pathway, increased cell adhesion to fibronectin or stromal cells, and controlled drug sensitivity. Our results have uncovered a new function for cyclin D1 in the control of redox metabolism and interactions of cyclin D1-expressing MM cells with their bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27286258

  6. QKI-5 suppresses cyclin D1 expression and proliferation of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells via MAPK signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, X; Feng, Y

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most frequently occurring malignancies in the world. The RNA-binding protein quaking (QKI) is a newly identified tumour suppressor in multiple cancers, but its role in OSCC is currently unknown. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between QKI expression and OSCC development. We found QKI-5 expression to be significantly decreased in the oral cancer cell line CAL-27. QKI-5 overexpression also reduced the proliferation of CAL-27 cells, which correlated with cyclin D1. This regulative function of QKI-5 occurs by modulating the phosphorylation level of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Therefore this study shows that underexpression of tumour suppressor QKI-5 could activate the MAPK pathway and contribute to uncontrolled cyclin D1 expression, thus resulting in increased proliferation of oral cancer cells.

  7. Cyclin D1 overexpression in proliferation centres of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Teixeira Mendes, Larissa Sena; Peters, Natalie; Attygalle, Ayoma D; Wotherspoon, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The recent publication reviewing the updated WHO classification commented on the presence of cyclin D1-positive cells in the proliferation centres (PC) of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (SLL/CLL). The figure quoted was 30%, which appeared higher than our experience. To assess cyclin D1 expression in PC of SLL/CLL cases, we performed a review of SLL/CLL cases diagnosed at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1996 and 2009. Of 105 SLL/CLL cases, 16.2% showed expression of cyclin D1 in PC with none carrying the translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32). Our study and a review of the published literature suggest that this phenomenon occurs with a significantly lower prevalence than that described in the recent review of the updated WHO classification. We confirm that cyclin D1 expression is confined to PC with the typical small lymphocytes being negative. This finding is apparently unrelated to the translocation involving CCND1 and IGH genes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. The tumor suppressor, parafibromin, mediates histone H3 K9 methylation for cyclin D1 repression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Parafibromin, a component of the RNA polymerase II-associated PAF1 complex, is a tumor suppressor linked to hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. Parafibromin induces cell cycle arrest by repressing cyclin D1 via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that parafibromin interacts with the histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, and functions as a transcriptional repressor. The central region (128-227 amino acids) of parafibromin is important for both the interaction with SUV39H1 and transcriptional repression. Parafibromin associated with the promoter and coding regions of cyclin D1 and was required for the recruitment of SUV39H1 and the induction of H3 K9 methylation but not H3 K4 methylation. RNA interference analysis showed that SUV39H1 was critical for cyclin D1 repression. These data suggest that parafibromin plays an unexpected role as a repressor in addition to its widely known activity associated with transcriptional activation. Parafibromin as a part of the PAF1 complex might downregulate cyclin D1 expression by integrating repressive H3 K9 methylation during transcription.

  9. PAC exhibits potent anti-colon cancer properties through targeting cyclin D1 and suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Al-Qasem, Abeer; Al-Howail, Huda A; Al-Swailem, Mashael; Al-Mazrou, Amer; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although response rates and overall survival have been improved in recent years, resistance to multiple drug combinations is inevitable. Therefore, the development of more efficient drugs, with fewer side effects is urgently needed. To this end, we have investigated in the present report the effect of PAC, a novel cucumin analogue, on CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that PAC induces apoptosis, mainly via the internal mitochondrial route, and inhibits cell proliferation through delaying the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect was mediated through STAT3-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and its downstream target survivin. Indeed, change in the expression level of cyclin D1 modulated the expression of survivin and the response of CRC cells to PAC. Furthermore, using the ChIP assay, we have shown PAC-dependent reduction in the binding of STAT3 to the cyclin D1 promoter in vivo. Additionally, PAC suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal process through down-regulating the mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and Twist1) and inhibiting the invasion/migration abilities of the CRC cells via repressing the pro-migration/invasion protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2. In addition, PAC inhibited tumor growth and repressed the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways as well as their common downstream effectors cyclin D1 and survivin in humanized CRC xenografts. Collectively, these results indicate that PAC has potent anti-CRC effects, and therefore could constitute an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent, which may consolidate the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer.

  10. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-11-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling.

  11. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-01-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling. PMID:27900033

  12. P16, EGFR, Cyclin D1, and p53 Staining Patterns for Inverted Papilloma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Giant C.; Scheel, Adam; Akkina, Sarah; Chinn, Steven; Graham, Martin; Komarck, Christine; Walline, Heather; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Prince, Mark E.; Carey, Thomas; Zacharek, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aim to better characterize the staining patterns of inverted papilloma (IP) with and without carcinoma by performing immunohistochemistry for p16, EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor), p53, and Cyclin D1 antibodies on a large patient cohort. Methods One hundred and sixty-two IP specimens from 122 patients treated at the University of Michigan between 1996 and 2011. Twenty-two specimens contained carcinoma. Tumor was extracted for construction of two tissue microarrays and stained for p16, EGFR, p53, and Cyclin D1. Tumor staining intensity and percentage staining were scored. Results Mean percentage staining for IP and IP with carcinoma was 12% versus 7% for p16 (no statistical significance, NS), 20% versus 34% for EGFR (NS), 4% versus 24% for p53 (p<0.001), and 17% versus 21% for Cyclin D1 (NS). Benign disease was positive for p16 in 64%, EGFR in 50%, p53 in 30%, and Cyclin D1 in 76%. Inverted papilloma with carcinomatous degeneration was positive for p16 in 14%, EGFR in 71%, p53 in 62%, and Cyclin D1 in 76%. This is statistically significant for differences between IP and IP carcinoma for p16 and p53 staining only. Conclusion Important characteristic staining pattern for inverted papilloma with and without carcinoma are highlighted in this study. Unlike recent trends in HPV-related head and neck malignancies, low expression of p16 is a marker for malignancy in this series. Positive staining for p53 correlates with the development of carcinoma in inverted papilloma. PMID:24039221

  13. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression correlates to tumor staging in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de Carli, Marina-Lara; Sperandio, Felipe-Fornias; Hanemann, João-Adolfo-Costa; Pereira, Alessandro-Antônio-Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background The immunohistochemical expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 were analyzed in tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), relating them to the clinical and morphological exhibition of these tumors. Material and Methods Twenty-nine patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria; clinical data included gender, age, ethnicity and use of licit drugs such as alcohol and tobacco. The TNM staging and histopathological differentiation grading was assessed for each case. In addition, T1 patients were gathered with T2 patients; and T3 patients were gathered with T4 patients to assemble two distinct groups: (T1/T2) and (T3/T4). Results The mean follow-up time was 24 months and 30% of the patients died as a consequence of the disease, while 23.3% lived with the disease and 46.7% lived lesion-free. T1 and T2 tumors showed statistically lesser Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 staining when compared to T3 and T4 tumors. Conclusions Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 pose as auxiliary tools when determining the progression of tongue SCC at the time of diagnosis. Key words:Carcinoma, squamous cell, cyclin D, immunohistochemistry, Ki-67 antigen, prognosis. PMID:26449430

  14. Misexpression of cyclin D1 in embryonic germ cells promotes testicular teratoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise G; Dawson, Emily P; Rao, Priya; Heaney, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Testicular teratomas result from anomalies in embryonic germ cell development. In the 129 family of inbred mouse strains, teratomas arise during the same developmental period that male germ cells normally enter G1/G0 mitotic arrest and female germ cells initiate meiosis (the mitotic:meiotic switch). Dysregulation of this switch associates with teratoma susceptibility and involves three germ cell developmental abnormalities seemingly critical for tumor initiation: delayed G1/G0 mitotic arrest, retention of pluripotency, and misexpression of genes normally restricted to embryonic female and adult male germ cells. One misexpressed gene, cyclin D1 (Ccnd1), is a known regulator of cell cycle progression and an oncogene in many tissues. Here, we investigated whether Ccnd1 misexpression in embryonic germ cells is a determinant of teratoma susceptibility in mice. We found that CCND1 localizes to teratoma-susceptible germ cells that fail to enter G1/G0 arrest during the mitotic:meiotic switch and is the only D-type cyclin misexpressed during this critical developmental time frame. We discovered that Ccnd1 deficiency in teratoma-susceptible mice significantly reduced teratoma incidence and suppressed the germ cell proliferation and pluripotency abnormalities associated with tumor initiation. Importantly, Ccnd1 expression was dispensable for somatic cell development and male germ cell specification and maturation in tumor-susceptible mice, implying that the mechanisms by which Ccnd1 deficiency reduced teratoma incidence were germ cell autonomous and specific to tumorigenesis. We conclude that misexpression of Ccnd1 in male germ cells is a key component of a larger pro-proliferative program that disrupts the mitotic:meiotic switch and predisposes 129 inbred mice to testicular teratocarcinogenesis.

  15. Leptin-induced Growth Stimulation of Breast Cancer Cells Involves Recruitment of Histone Acetyltransferases and Mediator Complex to CYCLIN D1 Promoter via Activation of Stat3*

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Vertino, Paula M.; Anania, Frank A.; Sharma, Dipali

    2010-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Leptin, the key player in the regulation of energy balance and body weight control also acts as a growth factor on certain organs in both normal and disease state. In this study, we analyzed the role of leptin and the molecular mechanism(s) underlying its action in breast cancer cells that express both short and long isoforms of leptin receptor. Leptin increased MCF7 cell population in the S-phase of the cell cycle along with a robust increase in CYCLIN D1 expression. Also, leptin induced Stat3-phosphorylation-dependent proliferation of MCF7 cells as blocking Stat3 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor, AG490, abolished leptin-induced proliferation. Using deletion constructs of CYCLIN D1 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity is mediated through binding of activated Stat3 at the Stat binding sites and changes in histone acetylation and methylation. We also show specific involvement of coactivator molecules, histone acetyltransferase SRC1, and mediator complex in leptin-mediated regulation of CYCLIN D1 promoter. Importantly, silencing of SRC1 and Med1 abolished the leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 expression and MCF7 cell proliferation. Intriguingly, recruitment of both SRC1 and Med1 was dependent on phosphorylated Stat3 as AG490 treatment inhibited leptin-induced recruitment of these coactivators to CYCLIN D1 promoter. Our data suggest that CYCLIN D1 may be a target gene for leptin mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells and molecular mechanisms involve activated Stat3-mediated recruitment of distinct coactivator complexes. PMID:17344214

  16. Mantle cell lymphoma in cyclin D1 transgenic mice with Bim-deficient B cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, Samuel G; Labelle, James L; Meng, Hailong; Valeriano, Regina P; Fisher, Jill K; Sun, Heather; Rodig, Scott J; Kleinstein, Steven H; Walensky, Loren D

    2014-02-06

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a highly aggressive B-cell lymphoma resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Although defined by the characteristic t(11;14) translocation, MCL has not been recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of cyclin D1 overexpression alone. Indeed, several genetic aberrations have been identified in MCL that may contribute to its pathogenesis and chemoresistance. Of particular interest is the frequent biallelic deletion of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein BIM. BIM exerts its pro-death function via its α-helical BH3 death domain that has the dual capacity to inhibit antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 and MCL-1 and directly trigger proapoptotic proteins such as the mitochondrial executioner protein BAX. To evaluate a functional role for Bim deletion in the pathogenesis of MCL, we generated cyclin D1-transgenic mice harboring Bim-deficient B cells. In response to immunization, Eμ(CycD1)CD19(CRE)Bim(fl/fl) mice manifested selective expansion of their splenic mantle zone compartment. Three distinct immune stimulation regimens induced lymphomas with histopathologic and molecular features of human MCL in a subset of mice. Thus, deletion of Bim in B cells, in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression, disrupts a critical control point in lymphoid maturation and predisposes to the development of MCL. This genetic proof of concept for MCL pathogenesis suggests an opportunity to reactivate the death pathway by pharmacologic mimicry of proapoptotic BIM.

  17. Molecular and immunochemical analyses of RB1 and cyclin D1 in human ductal pancreatic carcinomas and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Lang, D; Geradts, J; Obara, T; Klein-Szanto, A J; Lynch, H T; Ruggeri, B A

    1996-02-01

    cyclin D1 gene was not amplified in any of the primary pancreatic tumors or cell lines examined. These immunochemical and molecular analyses of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene and cyclin D1 proto-oncogene in a large series of human pancreatic cancers and cell lines indicate that RB1 and cyclin D1 alterations occur during the development of some human DPCAs. Nevertheless, it is probable that alterations in cell-cycle regulation in DPCAs more frequently involve pathways other than those involving RB1 and cyclin D1.

  18. Age Dependent Switching Role of Cyclin D1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Carmela; Malara, Natalia Maria; D’Angelo, Rosalia; Sidoti, Antonina; Leotta, Attilio; Lio, Santo; Caparello, Basilio; Ruggeri, Alessia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Amato, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers, including breast cancer, functioning as an oncogene. The aim of this study was to better understand the molecular dynamics of ductal carcinomas with regard to proliferation and the ageing process. Methods: 130 cases of ductal breast cancer in postmenopausal women, aged 52–96 in 3 age classes were selected. Tumoral tissues preserved in formaldehyde solution and subsequently embedded in paraffin were subjected to analysis Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT- PCR) and immuno-histochemical tests. The molecular variables studied were estimated in relation to the patients’ age. Results: The results obtained suggest that the increment of the levels of cyclin D1 in intra-ductal breast tumors in older woman that we have examined is significantly associated with a lower proliferation rate. Conclusion: Cyclin D1, which characterizes tumor in young women as molecular director involved in strengthening tumoral proliferation mechanisms, may be seen as a potential blocking molecular switch in corresponding tumours in old women. PMID:22231956

  19. Induction of cyclin D1 by submicromolar concentrations of arsenite in human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.-J.; Utti, Charles; Steinberg, Mark . E-mail: marste@sci.ccny.cuny.edu

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent environmental carcinogen but arsenic is not directly mutagenic and the mechanism by which arsenite brings about oncogenic transformation is poorly understood. To gain insight into the oncogenic properties of arsenic, we studied the expression of cyclin D1 in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes treated with submicromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite. Arsenite at concentrations between 200 and 800 nM over a 3-day period brought about an increase in cell growth rate. Uptake of the vital stain, neutral red, arsenite at 200 and 400 nM concentrations brought about a parallel increase in cell viability over the same treatment period. Analysis of cell cycle parameters by flow cytometry showed that the growth stimulation was accompanied by a concomitant shift from the G1 into the S/G2 cell cycle compartment in the arsenite-treated cells. Real-time PCR analysis of cyclin D1 transcription showed that there was an induction of more than three-fold in cells exposed to 400 nM arsenite for 3 days. Quantitation of cyclin D levels in Western blots showed that arsenite treatment caused a time-dependent induction of cyclin D proteins representing an induction of about 2.0-fold after a 7 day treatment period. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that arsenite also stimulated binding of the transcription factors, AP1 and CREBP to their respective binding motifs within 3 days. This supports a mechanism of oncogenesis based on persistent upregulation of D type cyclins leading to a concomitant loss of G1/S checkpoint control.

  20. Modulation of p53, c-fos, RARE, cyclin A, and cyclin D1 expression in human leukemia (HL-60) cells exposed to arsenic trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently been successfully used to treat all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) resistant relapsing acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, its molecular mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we used the human leukemia (HL-60) cell line as a test model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer properties of As2O3. We hypothesized that As2O3-induced expression of stress genes and related proteins may play a role in the cellular and molecular events leading to cell cycle modulation in leukemic cells. To test this hypothesis, we performed Western blot analysis to assess the expression of specific cellular response proteins including p53, c-fos, RARE, Cyclin A, and Cyclin D1. Densitometric analysis was performed to determine the relative abundance of these proteins. Western Blot and densitometric analyses demonstrated a strong dose-response relationship with regard to p53 and RARE expression within the dose range of 0-8μg/mL. Expression of c-fos was slightly up-regulated at 2μg/mL, and down-regulated within the dose-range of 4-8 μg/mL. A statistically significant down-regulation of this protein was detected at the 6 and 8 μg/mL dose levels. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in Cyclin D1 expression was found between As2O3-treated cells and the control. Cyclin A expression in As2O3-treated HL-60 cells was up-regulated at 6μg/mL, suggesting that it is required for S phase and passage through G2 phase in cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results indicate that As2O3 has the potential to induce cell cycle arrest through activation of the 53-kDa tumor suppressor protein and repression of the c-fos transcription factor. Up-regulation of RARE by As2O3 indicates that its cytotoxicity may be mediated through interaction/binding with the retinoic acid receptor, and subsequent inhibition of growth and differentiation. PMID:19444595

  1. Clinical significance of the phosphorylation of MAPK and protein expression of cyclin D1 in human osteosarcoma tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Lei-Lei; Yuan, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Song, Shu

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the significance of the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the protein expression of cyclin D1 in human osteosarcoma tissues. Human osteosarcoma tissue samples were collected from 30 patients, benign bone tumor samples were collected from 30 patients, and normal bone tissues were collected from 10 individuals as controls. Immunohistochemistry was performed to measure the levels of phosphorylated (p)-MAPK and cyclin D1 protein in cases of human osteosarcoma. The results showed that the positive rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in osteosarcoma were 86.67% (26/30) and 73.00% (22/30), respectively. The positive staining rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in benign bone tumor tissues were 10.00% (3/30) and 3.30% (1/30), respectively. The positive rate in the normal bone tissues was 0% (0/30), which was significantly lower, compared with that of the cancerous bone tissue. The positive rates of MAPK and cyclin D1 in osteosarcoma were increased (P<0.05), and the expression of cyclin D1 and p‑MAPK were positively correlated. The phosphorylation of MAPK may be important in the development of osteosarcoma, and the overactivation of MAPK may induce high expression of cyclin D1 and induce tumor cells to proliferate continuously.

  2. The checkpoint kinase ATM protects against stress-induced elevation of cyclin D1 and potential cell death in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Masahiro; Stacey, Dennis W

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative cytometric studies show that cyclin D1 levels must decline during S phase for proper cell cycle progression, and that cyclin D1 decline follows phosphorylation induced by the checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). ATM is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), a disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Importantly, neurodegeneration in many cases has been linked to the increased expression of cyclin D1 in neurons leading to inappropriate cell cycle entry. These facts prompted us to test the possibility that ATM normally protects against neural degeneration by suppressing cyclin D1 levels, particularly following genotoxic stress. For this purpose, neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into mature neural cells, including neurons. ATM activity in these cultures was inhibited with a specific chemical inhibitor in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide treatment, and the effect on cyclin D1 expression was determined by quantitative, single cell cytometric analyses. As predicted, inhibition of ATM did promote elevation of cyclin D1 in differentiated neurons, particularly under conditions of oxidative stress. The survival of differentiated neurons and of neural stem cells was reduced by such treatments. These data support our suggestion that ATM functions to maintain low levels of cyclin D1 expression in differentiated neurons; and may provide important clues in understanding neural degeneration in general. Copyright 2010 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Correlation of cyclin D1 expression with aggressive DNA pattern in patients with tobacco-related intraoral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Satya N.; Khare, Pratima; Singh, Manoj K; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cyclin D1 has been strongly implicated in cell proliferation particularly in the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, and prognoses in human malignancies. We investigated the correlation between cyclin D1 overexpression and clinicopathological features as well as cell cycle parameters to understand its clinical significance in patients with tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods: Immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 and DNA flowcytometry for cell cycle parameters was done on paraffin embedded tumour samples from 45 patients with OSCC Results: Higher expression of cyclin D1 was observed only in 30 (66.6%) of 45 cases that correlated with advanced age (P <0.02), higher tumour stage ((P<0.01), histological differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P <0.01). Analysis of nuclear DNA pattern revealed cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in tumours with aggressive DNA pattern such as aneuploidy ((P<0.05) and higher S phase fraction ((P<0.04). Interpretation & conclusions: Higher expression of cyclin D1 in oral cancer appears to be closely linked to cell proliferation, differentiation and lymph node invasion. Pre-operative evaluation of cyclin D1 in biopsy specimen may be useful in planning the most appropriate treatment strategies in patients with tobacco-related OSCC. PMID:21537090

  4. Endoglin inhibits ERK-induced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression to impede endothelial cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Christopher C.; Bloodworth, Jeffrey C.; Mythreye, Karthikeyan; Lee, Nam Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin inhibits ERK activation in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin is a regulator of c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-arrestin2 interaction with endoglin is required for ERK/c-Myc repression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin impedes cellular proliferation by targeting ERK-induced mitogenic signaling. -- Abstract: Endoglin is an endothelial-specific transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}) co-receptor essential for angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Endoglin regulates a wide range of cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, through TGF-{beta} signaling to canonical Smad and Smad-independent pathways. Despite its overall pro-angiogenic role in the vasculature, the underlying mechanism of endoglin action is poorly characterized. We previously identified {beta}-arrestin2 as a binding partner that causes endoglin internalization from the plasma membrane and inhibits ERK signaling towards endothelial migration. In the present study, we examined the mechanistic role of endoglin and {beta}-arrestin2 in endothelial cell proliferation. We show that endoglin impedes cell growth through sustained inhibition of ERK-induced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression in a TGF-{beta}-independent manner. The down-regulation of c-Myc and cyclin D1, along with growth-inhibition, are reversed when the endoglin/{beta}-arrestin2 interaction is disrupted. Given that TGF-{beta}-induced Smad signaling potently represses c-Myc in most cell types, our findings here show a novel mechanism by which endoglin augments growth-inhibition by targeting ERK and key downstream mitogenic substrates.

  5. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL.

  6. Early B-cell Specific Inactivation of ATM Synergizes with Ectopic CyclinD1 Expression to Promote Pre-germinal center B-cell Lymphomas in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lee, Brian J.; Li, Chen; Dubois, Richard L.; Hobeika, Elias; Bhagat, Govind; Zha, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (B-NHL), including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B-cells causes cell-autonomous, clonal mature B cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly naïve B cell specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. While EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increased the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas towards pre-GC derived small lymphocytic neoplasms sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naïve B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.g. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-germinal center B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  7. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin stimulates proliferation of HAPI microglia by affecting the Akt/GSK-3β/cyclin D1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangfei; Li, Yuanye; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Wu, Qiyun; Chen, Gang; Iwata, Takeo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Wan, Chunhua; Nie, Xiaoke

    2014-01-30

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental toxin that induces apoptosis of neurons and a pro-inflammatory response in microglial cells. First, we found that TCDD induced proliferation of HAPI microglial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis showed that this proliferation by TCDD was due to mainly enhancing the G1 to S phase transition. Next, it was found that TCDD treatment led to up-regulation of cyclin D1, which induces cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase, in a time-dependent manner. As for molecular mechanism, we revealed that TCDD was capable of inducing Akt phosphorylation and activation, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Inactivated GSK-3β attenuated proteasomal degradation of cyclin D1 by reducing Thr(286)-phosphorylated cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, inactivated GSK-3β increased cyclin D1 gene transcription by increasing its transcription factor β-catenin in the nucleus. Further, blockage of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt kinase with their specific inhibitors, LY294002 and Akt 1/2 kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced TCDD-enhanced proliferation of HAPI microglial cells. In conclusion, TCDD stimulates proliferation of HAPI microglial cells by affecting the Akt/GSK-3β/cyclin D1 signaling pathway.

  8. Inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by androgen receptor in breast cancer cells--identification of a novel androgen response element.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Marilena; Sisci, Diego; Morelli, Catia; Garofalo, Cecilia; Catalano, Stefania; Casaburi, Ivan; Capparelli, Claudia; Giordano, Cinzia; Giordano, Francesca; Maggiolini, Marcello; Andò, Sebastiano

    2010-09-01

    Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) is a critical mitogen-regulated cell-cycle control element whose transcriptional modulation plays a crucial role in breast cancer growth and progression. Here we demonstrate that the non-aromatizable androgen 5-α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) inhibits endogenous cyclin D1 expression, as evidenced by reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein levels, and decrease of CCND1-promoter activity, in MCF-7 cells. The DHT-dependent inhibition of CCND1 gene activity requires the involvement and the integrity of the androgen receptor (AR) DNA-binding domain. Site directed mutagenesis, DNA affinity precipitation assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicate that this inhibitory effect is ligand dependent and it is mediated by direct binding of AR to an androgen response element (CCND1-ARE) located at -570 to -556-bp upstream of the transcription start site, in the cyclin D1 proximal promoter. Moreover, AR-mediated repression of the CCND1 involves the recruitment of the atypical orphan nuclear receptor DAX1 as a component of a multiprotein repressor complex also embracing the participation of Histone Deacetylase 1. In conclusion, identification of the CCND1-ARE allows defining cyclin D1 as a specific androgen target gene in breast and might contribute to explain the molecular basis of the inhibitory role of androgens on breast cancer cells proliferation.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists induce proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunhua; Burghardt, Robert; Smith, Roger; Wormke, Mark; Stewart, Jessica; Safe, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists ciglitazone or 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease of cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha proteins, and this was accompanied by decreased cell proliferation and G(1)-G(0)-->S-phase progression. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 and ER alpha by PPARgamma agonists was inhibited in cells cotreated with the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PSII, but not in cells cotreated with the protease inhibitors calpain II and calpeptin. Moreover, after treatment of MCF-7 cells with 15-deoxy-Delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 and immunoprecipitation with cyclin D1 or ER alpha antibodies, there was enhanced formation of ubiquitinated cyclin D1 and ER alpha bands. Thus, PPARgamma-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell growth is due, in part, to proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 (and ER alpha), and this pathway may be important for other cancer cell lines.

  10. Expression pattern of ATM and cyclin D1 in ductal carcinoma, normal adjacent and normal breast tissues of Iranian breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Mahdieh; Mozdarani, Hossein; Majidzadeh, Keivan

    2012-09-01

    ATM protein kinase plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity by activating a biochemical chain reaction that in turn leads to cell cycle checkpoint activation and repair of DNA damage. Cyclin D1 acts in regulating the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Experimental and clinical studies suggest them to be involved in transformation and tumour progression. To elucidate the role of ATM and cyclin D1 expression in sporadic breast cancer, we investigated the possible link between their RNA expression levels in ductal carcinoma and normal adjacent versus normal breast tissues measured by Taqman real-time PCR in 119 breast tissues. Results showed that cyclin D1 over-expressed in 51.4% of breast tumours, whereas ATM expression was down regulated in 55% of breast tumours compared to both normal adjacent and normal controls (P ≤ 0.01). Cyclin D1 expression in adjacent normal and normal tissues was not significantly differed, whereas ATM expression in normal adjacent was lower than normal control (P ≤ 0.01). Over-expression of cyclin D1 correlated with ER(+) and/or PR(+) (oestrogen/progesterone receptor) status, whereas it mostly under-expressed in HER2(+) (human epidermal growth factor 2) tumours. ATM under-expression was more observed in triple-negative tumours (ER(-), PR(-) and HER2(-)). Our results indicated that reduced expression of the ATM and aberrant cyclin D1 expressions may contribute to the development and/or malignant progression of breast carcinomas also the latter could be involved in the regulation of hormone sensitivity associated with ER and PR.

  11. Hairy cell leukemia with translocation (11;20)(q13;q11) and overexpression of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ishida, F; Kitano, K; Ichikawa, N; Ito, T; Kohara, Y; Taniguchi, T; Motokura, T; Kiyosawa, K

    1999-08-01

    We report on a male Japanese patient with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). A cytogenetic study with lipopolysaccharide stimuli showed a novel translocation (11;20)(q13;q11) in 10% of the analyzed cells. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR analysis for cyclin D1 revealed the overexpression of cyclin D1, although the southern blot analysis of PRAD1 gene showed no rearrangement. In this particular case, the t(11;20)(q13;q11) might play some role in the oncogenesis of HCL and the overexpression of cyclin D1.

  12. SOX11 expression is highly specific for mantle cell lymphoma and identifies the cyclin D1-negative subtype

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ana; Royo, Cristina; Hartmann, Elena; De Jong, Daphne; Baró, Cristina; Valera, Alexandra; Fu, Kai; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Delabie, Jan; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Ruiz-Marcellan, Carmen; Dave, Sandeep; Rimsza, Lisa; Braziel, Rita; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Solé, Francisco; López-Guillermo, Armando; Colomer, Dolors; Staudt, Louis M.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Jares, Pedro; Campo, Elias

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma is difficult to distinguish from other small B-cell lymphomas. The clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with this form of lymphoma have not been well defined. Overexpression of the transcription factor SOX11 has been observed in conventional mantle cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether this gene is expressed in cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma and whether its detection may be useful to identify these tumors. Design and Methods The microarray database of 238 mature B-cell neoplasms was re-examined. SOX11 protein expression was investigated immunohistochemically in 12 cases of cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma, 54 cases of conventional mantle cell lymphoma, and 209 additional lymphoid neoplasms. Results SOX11 mRNA was highly expressed in conventional and cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma and in 33% of the cases of Burkitt’s lymphoma but not in any other mature lymphoid neoplasm. SOX11 nuclear protein was detected in 50 cases (93%) of conventional mantle cell lymphoma and also in the 12 cyclin D1-negative cases of mantle cell lymphoma, the six cases of lymphoblastic lymphomas, in two of eight cases of Burkitt’s lymphoma, and in two of three T-prolymphocytic leukemias but was negative in the remaining lymphoid neoplasms. Cyclin D2 and D3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma than in conventional mantle cell lymphoma but the protein expression was not discriminative. The clinico-pathological features and outcomes of the patients with cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma identified by SOX11 expression were similar to those of patients with conventional mantle cell lymphoma. Conclusions SOX11 mRNA and nuclear protein expression is a highly specific marker for both cyclin D1-positive and negative mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:19880778

  13. PI3K target based novel cyano derivative of betulinic acid induces its signalling inhibition by down-regulation of pGSK3β and cyclin D1 and potentially checks cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Rabiya; Hussain, Aashiq; Sangwan, Payare L; Chinthakindi, Praveen K; Khan, Imran; Sharma, Parduman R; Koul, Surrinder; Saxena, Ajit K; Hamid, Abid

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the Betulinic acid (BA) being recognized as anticancerous source; its further use in clinical development is greatly hampered because of its poor pharmacokinetic properties. To circumvent these limitations, we synthesized a PI3K target based library of 18 triazole based derivatives and we identified a C-3 cyano analog of betulinic acid (CBA) with significant cell death effects with 5-7 fold higher potency than BA in various cancers. Importantly, no such report is available demonstrating the involvement of BA or its structural analogs in the modulation of PI3K pathway. Using, human leukemia HL-60 cells as a model, we for the first time report that CBA decreased expression of PI3K p110α, p85α, and pAKT in HL-60. Furthermore, we could find significant depletion of pGSK3β, cyclin D1 and increased expression of p21/cip, p27/Kip proteins. CBA induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, increased sub-G0 DNA fraction and annexin V binding of the cells besides imparting the typical surface features of cell death. Also, this target specific inhibition was associated with mitochondrial apoptosis as was reflected by expression studies of various proteins together with reactive oxygen species generation and decline in mitochondrial trans membrane potential. The apoptotic effectors i.e., caspase 8 and caspase 9 were found to get upregulated besides PI3K associated DNA repair enzyme i.e., PARP cleavage was observed. Thus, our results elucidated that CBA or other BA based small molecules inhibit PI3K/AKT pathway with induction of subsequent cancer cell death which may be useful therapeutic strategy against leukemias and possibly other cancers.

  14. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and cyclin D1 on cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sijing; Li, Min; Zeng, Daxiong; Sun, Gengyun; Zhou, Junsheng; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking may contribute to pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by resulting in pulmonary vascular remodeling that involves pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. This study investigated the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and cyclin D1 on the pulmonary vascular remodeling in smoking-exposed rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups. Three tobacco-exposed groups were exposed to the smoke produced by 20 cigarettes for 60 min, twice a day for two, four or eight weeks, and the control group were exposed to fresh air. The expression of bFGF and cyclin D1 in the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were determined using immunohistochemistry. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted to determine the expression levels of bFGF and cyclin D1 mRNA. In addition, the expression of bFGF and cyclin D1 proteins was evaluated by western blotting. The expression of bFGF and cyclin D1 at the mRNA and protein levels was shown to increase with the duration of smoke exposure (P<0.05). The correlation analysis indicated the expression of bFGF and cyclin D1 was positively associated with the pulmonary vessel wall thickness. The expression of bFGF was positively associated with that of cyclin D1. Collectively, the data demonstrated that the upregulation of bFGF and cyclin D1 occurred in rats subjected to smoke exposure, which may be associated with the abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle cells in the pulmonary arteries.

  15. Detection of cyclin D1 mRNA by hybridization sensitive NIC-oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Kovaliov, Marina; Segal, Meirav; Kafri, Pinhas; Yavin, Eylon; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2014-05-01

    A large group of fluorescent hybridization probes, includes intercalating dyes for example thiazole orange (TO). Usually TO is coupled to nucleic acids post-synthetically which severely limits its use. Here, we have developed a phosphoramidite monomer, 10, and prepared a 2'-OMe-RNA probe, labeled with 5-(trans-N-hexen-1-yl-)-TO-2'-deoxy-uridine nucleoside, dU(TO), (Nucleoside bearing an Inter-Calating moiety, NIC), for selective mRNA detection. We investigated a series of 15-mer 2'-OMe-RNA probes, targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA, containing one or several dU(TO) at various positions. dU(TO)-2'-OMe-RNA exhibited up to 7-fold enhancement of TO emission intensity upon hybridization with the complementary RNA versus that of the oligomer alone. This NIC-probe was applied for the specific detection of a very small amount of a breast cancer marker, cyclin D1 mRNA, in total RNA extract from cancerous cells (250 ng/μl). Furthermore, this NIC-probe was found to be superior to our related NIF (Nucleoside with Intrinsic Fluorescence)-probe which could detect cyclin D1 mRNA target only at high concentrations (1840 ng/μl). Additionally, dU(T) can be used as a monomer in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis, thus avoiding the need for post-synthetic modification of oligonucleotide probes. Hence, we propose dU(TO) oligonucleotides, as hybridization probes for the detection of specific RNA in homogeneous solutions and for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The HTLV-1 HBZ protein inhibits cyclin D1 expression through interacting with the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zheng, Shangen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zang, Wenqiao; Li, Min; Wang, Na; Li, Ping; Jin, Jing; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that can cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, interacts with several transcription factors and is involved in T cell proliferation, viral gene transcription and cellular transformation. Cyclin D1 is a pivotal regulatory protein involved in cell cycle progression, and its depressed expression correlates with cell cycle prolongation or arrested at the G1/S transition. In our present study, we observed that HBZ expression suppressed cyclin D1 level. To investigate the role of HBZ on cyclin D1 depression, we transduced HBZ with lentivirus vector into 293T cells, CEM cells and Jurkat cells. The results of Western blot, RT-PCR and luciferase assays showed that transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter was suppressed by the bZIP domain of HBZ (HBZ-bZIP) through cyclic AMP response element (CRE) site. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed the binding of HBZ-bZIP to CRE-binding protein (CREB), which confirmed that the cyclin D1 promoter activity inhibition via the CRE-site was mediated by HBZ-bZIP. The results suggested that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 transcription through interactions with CREB and along with other viral protein, HBZ may play a causal role for leukemogenesis.

  17. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cyclin D1 Shows Deregulated Expression in Multiple Myeloma with the t(11;14)

    PubMed Central

    Pruneri, Giancarlo; Fabris, Sonia; Baldini, Luca; Carboni, Nadia; Zagano, Savina; Colombi, Maria Angela; Ciceri, Gabriella; Lombardi, Luigia; Rocchi, Mariano; Buffa, Roberto; Maiolo, Anna Teresa; Neri, Antonino

    2000-01-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) chromosomal translocation, the hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), is recurrently found in multiple myelomas (MM) by means of conventional cytogenetics. Unlike MCL, recent molecular studies of MM-derived cell lines with t(11;14) have indicated that the breakpoints are highly dispersed over the 11q13 region; however, the fact that cyclin D1 is generally overexpressed in these cell lines suggests that this gene is the target of the translocation. To evaluate further the involvement of cyclin D1 in MM, we used immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization to investigate cyclin D1 expression and the presence of chromosome 11 abnormalities in a representative panel of 48 MM patients (40 at diagnosis and 8 at relapse). Cyclin D1 overexpression occurred in 12/48 (25%) of cases; combined immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses in 39 patients showed cyclin D1 positivity in all of the cases (7/7) bearing the t(11;14), in two of the 13 cases with trisomy 11, and in one of the 19 cases with no apparent abnormalities of chromosome 11. Our data indicate that the t(11;14) translocation in MM leads to cyclin D1 overexpression and that immunohistochemical analysis may represent a reliable means of identifying this lesion in MM. PMID:10793062

  19. The ATM and ATR inhibitors CGK733 and caffeine suppress cyclin D1 levels and inhibit cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Alao, John P; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2009-11-10

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and the ATM- related (ATR) kinases play a central role in facilitating the resistance of cancer cells to genotoxic treatment regimens. The components of the ATM and ATR regulated signaling pathways thus provide attractive pharmacological targets, since their inhibition enhances cellular sensitivity to chemo- and radiotherapy. Caffeine as well as more specific inhibitors of ATM (KU55933) or ATM and ATR (CGK733) have recently been shown to induce cell death in drug-induced senescent tumor cells. Addition of these agents to cancer cells previously rendered senescent by exposure to genotoxins suppressed the ATM mediated p21 expression required for the survival of these cells. The precise molecular pharmacology of these agents however, is not well characterized. Herein, we report that caffeine, CGK733, and to a lesser extent KU55933, inhibit the proliferation of otherwise untreated human cancer and non-transformed mouse fibroblast cell lines. Exposure of human cancer cell lines to caffeine and CGK733 was associated with a rapid decline in cyclin D1 protein levels and a reduction in the levels of both phosphorylated and total retinoblastoma protein (RB). Our studies suggest that observations based on the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation and survival must be interpreted with caution. The differential effects of caffeine/CGK733 and KU55933 on cyclin D1 protein levels suggest that these agents will exhibit dissimilar molecular pharmacological profiles.

  20. Human RAD6 Promotes G1-S Transition and Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cyclin D1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Ewelina; Liu, Yan; Chen, Pei-Chao; Chang, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Wenjie; Jing, Yuanya; Chen, Youwei; Jin, Hui; Chen, Su

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitinylation regulates protein stability and activity. RAD6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which that has been substantially biochemically characterized, functions in a number of biologically relevant pathways, including cell cycle progression. In this study, we show that RAD6 promotes the G1-S transition and cell proliferation by regulating the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) in human cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that RAD6 influences the transcription of CCND1 by increasing monoubiquitinylation of histone H2B and trimethylation of H3K4 in the CCND1 promoter region. Our study presents, for the first time, an evidence for the function of RAD6 in cell cycle progression and cell proliferation in human cells, raising the possibility that RAD6 could be a new target for molecular diagnosis and prognosis in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25409181

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  2. Arcyriaflavin a, a cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase4 inhibitor, induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of human endometriotic stromal cells: a potential therapeutic agent in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Tomoko; Nasu, Kaei; Aoyagi, Yoko; Takebayashi, Kanetoshi; Narahara, Hisashi

    2017-07-18

    We previously showed that microRNA-503 (miR-503) transfection into endometriotic cyst stromal cells (ECSCs) induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing cyclin D1. This finding prompted us to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of cyclin D1 inhibitors in endometriotic cells. This study aimed to determine whether arcyriaflavin A, a representative inhibitor of cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), is beneficial in the treatment of endometriosis. ECSCs were isolated from the ovarian endometriotic tissues of 32 women. The effects of arcyriaflavin A on cell viability and proliferation, vascular endothelial growth factor A expression, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression were evaluated using a modified methylthiazoletetrazolium assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Caspase-Glo® 3/7 assay, and flow cytometry. Arcyriaflavin A significantly inhibited cell viability, proliferation, and angiogenesis of ECSCs as assessed using the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and methylthiazoletetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ELISA. Arcyriaflavin A induced apoptosis as shown in the Caspase-Glo® 3/7 assay and cell death detection ELISA whilethe cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 phase. The findings indicate that cyclin D1-CDK4 inhibitors may be promising candidates for the treatment of endometriosis. This is the first study to demonstrate the potential usefulness of arcyriaflavin A as a therapeutic agent for endometriosis. Further studies of the effects of cyclin D1-CDK4 inhibitors on endometriosis may provide useful information on pathogenesis and treatment.

  3. CCN2 promotes cigarette smoke-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells through upregulating cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Xu, Yong-jian; Liu, Xian-sheng; Zeng, Da-xiong; Xiang, Min

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been demonstrated to induce pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is characterized by medial thickening of the pulmonary arteries mainly resulting from the abnormal proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether CCN2 regulated rat PASMCs (rPASMCs) proliferation induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and nicotine by upregulating cyclin D1 in vitro. CCN2 siRNA or cyclin D1 siRNA were transfected to rPASMCs which were then exposed to CSE and nicotine. Both mRNA and protein expressions of CCN2 were significantly increased in rPASMCs treated with 2% CSE or 1 µM nicotine, which markedly promoted the proliferation of rPASMCs. CCN2 siRNA inhibited the proliferation of rPASMCs induced by CSE or nicotine. Furthermore, CCN2 siRNA markedly suppressed the mRNA and protein expressions of cyclin D1 in rPASMCs and led to cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase resulting in reduced rPASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that CCN2 contributes to the CSE and nicotine-induced proliferation of rPASMCs at least in part by upregulating cyclin D1 expression. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functional, chemical genomic, and super-enhancer screening identify sensitivity to cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway inhibition in Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Brian; Cowley, Glenn; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A.; Tsherniak, Aviad; Parasuraman, Sudha; Kim, Sunkyu; Alexe, Gabriela; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents, with treatment remaining a clinical challenge. This disease is mediated by somatic chromosomal translocations of the EWS gene and a gene encoding an ETS transcription factor, most commonly, FLI1. While direct targeting of aberrant transcription factors remains a pharmacological challenge, identification of dependencies incurred by EWS/FLI1 expression would offer a new therapeutic avenue. We used a combination of super-enhancer profiling, near-whole genome shRNA-based and small-molecule screening to identify cyclin D1 and CDK4 as Ewing sarcoma-selective dependencies. We revealed that super-enhancers mark Ewing sarcoma specific expression signatures and EWS/FLI1 target genes in human Ewing sarcoma cell lines. Particularly, a super-enhancer regulates cyclin D1 and promotes its expression in Ewing sarcoma. We demonstrated that Ewing sarcoma cells require CDK4 and cyclin D1 for survival and anchorage-independent growth. Additionally, pharmacologic inhibition of CDK4 with selective CDK4/6 inhibitors led to cytostasis and cell death of Ewing sarcoma cell lines in vitro and growth delay in an in vivo Ewing sarcoma xenograft model. These results demonstrated a dependency in Ewing sarcoma on CDK4 and cyclin D1 and support exploration of CDK4/6 inhibitors as a therapeutic approach for patients with this disease. PMID:26337082

  5. Fibroblast growth factor-10 prevents H2O2-induced cell cycle arrest by regulation of G1 cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, D; Chang, W; Wei, K; Gao, M; Rosen, G D

    2007-01-23

    We studied the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-10) on H2O2-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) G1 arrest and the role of G1 cyclins. FGF-10 prevented H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest. FGF-10 induced 2-4-fold increase in cyclin E, cyclin A and CDKs (2,4) alone and in AEC treated with H2O2. H2O2 downregulated cyclin D1; FGF-10 blocked these effects. FGF-10 prevented H2O2-induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21. SiRNAp21 blocked H2O2-induced downregulation of cyclins, CDKs and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide first evidence that FGF-10 regulates G1 cyclins and CDKs, and prevents H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest.

  6. FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR-10 PREVENTS H2O2-INDUCED CELL CYCLE ARREST BY REGULATION OF G1 CYCLINS AND CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, D; Chang, W; Wei, K; Gao, M; Rosen, GD

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-10) on H2O2-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) G1 arrest and the role of G1 cyclins. FGF-10 prevented H2O2–induced AEC G1 arrest. FGF-10 induced 2 to 4-fold increase in cyclin E, cyclin A and CDKs (2, 4) alone and in AEC treated with H2O2. H2O2 downregulated cyclin D1; FGF-10 blocked these effects. FGF-10 prevented H2O2–induced upregulation of CDK inhibitor, p21. SiRNAp21 blocked H2O2–induced downregulation of cyclins, CDKs and AEC G1 arrest. Accordingly, we provide first evidence that FGF-10 regulates G1 cyclins and CDKs, and prevents H2O2-induced AEC G1 arrest. PMID:17188682

  7. HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor downregulates cyclin D1 expression via interactions with NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Qian, Lili; Song, Xianmei; Wang, Xueyin; Yang, Chaokuan; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2017-03-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus. It can cause adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus-strand of the provirus, is expressed in all cases of ATL and involved in T cell proliferation. However, the exact mechanism underlying its growth-promoting activity is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 expression by inhibiting the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Among the potential mechanisms of cyclin D1 inhibition mediated by HBZ, we found that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 promoter activity. Luciferase assay analysis revealed that HBZ repressed cyclin D1 promoter activity by suppressing NF-κB‑driven transcription mediated by the p65 subunit. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we found that HBZ could bind to p65, but not p50. Finally, we showed that HBZ selectively interacted with p65 via its AD+bZIP domains. By suppressing cyclin D1 expression, HBZ can alter cell cycle progression of HTLV-1-infected cells, which may be critical for oncogenesis.

  8. Metformin induces degradation of cyclin D1 via AMPK/GSK3β axis in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gwak, HyeRan; Kim, Youngmin; An, Haein; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Song, Yong Sang

    2017-02-01

    Metformin, which is widely used as an anti-diabetic drug, reduces cancer related morbidity and mortality. However, the role of metformin in cancer is not fully understood. Here, we first describe that the anti-cancer effect of metformin is mediated by cyclin D1 deregulation via AMPK/GSK3β axis in ovarian cancer cells. Metformin promoted cytotoxic effects only in the cancer cells irrespective of the p53 status and not in the normal primary-cultured cells. Metformin induced the G1 cell cycle arrest, in parallel with a decrease in the protein expressions of cyclin D1 without affecting its transcriptional levels. Using a proteasomal inhibitor, we could address that metformin-induced decrease in cyclin D1 through the ubiquitin/proteasome process. Cyclin D1 degradation by metformin requires the activation of GSK3β, as determined based on the treatment with GSK3β inhibitors. The activation of GSK3β correlated with the inhibitory phosphorylation by Akt as well as p70S6K through AMPK activation in response to metformin. These findings suggested that the anticancer effects of metformin was induced due to cyclin D1 degradation via AMPK/GSK3β signaling axis that involved the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway specifically in ovarian cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cyclin D1 depletion induces DNA damage in mantle cell lymphoma lines.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Suchismita; Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Tran, Thai; Bedell, Victoria; Wu, Jun; Scuto, Anna; Murata-Collins, Joyce; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Ngo, Vu N

    2017-03-01

    Elevated cyclin D1 (CCND1) expression levels in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are associated with aggressive clinical manifestations related to chemoresistance, but little is known about how this important proto-oncogene contributes to the resistance of MCL. Here, we showed that RNA interference-mediated depletion of CCND1 increased caspase-3 activities and induced apoptosis in the human MCL lines UPN-1 and JEKO-1. In vitro and xenotransplant studies revealed that the toxic effect of CCND1 depletion in MCL cells was likely due to increase in histone H2AX phosphorylation, a DNA damage marker. DNA fiber analysis suggested deregulated replication initiation after CCND1 depletion as a potential cause of DNA damage. Finally, in contrast to depletion or inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 4, CCND1 depletion increased chemosensitivity of MCL cells to replication inhibitors hydroxyurea and cytarabine. Our findings have an important implication for CCND1 as a potential therapeutic target in MCL patients who are refractory to standard chemotherapy.

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  11. Obatoclax, a Pan-BCL-2 Inhibitor, Targets Cyclin D1 for Degradation to Induce Antiproliferation in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Or, Chi-Hung R.; Chang, Yachu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Lee, Wee-Chyan; Su, Hong-Lin; Cheung, Muk-Wing; Huang, Chang-Po; Ho, Cheesang; Chang, Chia-Che

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Aberrant overexpression of antiapoptotic BCL-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) family proteins is closely linked to tumorigenesis and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. Obatoclax is an inhibitor targeting all antiapoptotic BCL-2 proteins. A previous study has described the antiproliferative action of obatoclax in one human colorectal cancer cell line without elucidating the underlying mechanisms. We herein reported that, in a panel of human colorectal cancer cell lines, obatoclax inhibits cell proliferation, suppresses clonogenicity, and induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest, along with cyclin D1 downregulation. Notably, ectopic cyclin D1 overexpression abrogated clonogenicity suppression but also G1-phase arrest elicited by obatoclax. Mechanistically, pre-treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 restored cyclin D1 levels in all obatoclax-treated cell lines. Cycloheximide chase analyses further revealed an evident reduction in the half-life of cyclin D1 protein by obatoclax, confirming that obatoclax downregulates cyclin D1 through induction of cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation. Lastly, threonine 286 phosphorylation of cyclin D1, which is essential for initiating cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, was induced by obatoclax in one cell line but not others. Collectively, we reveal a novel anticancer mechanism of obatoclax by validating that obatoclax targets cyclin D1 for proteasomal degradation to downregulate cyclin D1 for inducing antiproliferation. PMID:28035994

  12. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  13. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  14. Activation of cyclin D1 by estradiol and spermine in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: a mechanism involving the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joan S; Vijayanathan, Veena; Thomas, T J; Pestell, Richard G; Albanese, Chris; Gallo, Michael A; Thomas, Thresia

    2005-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and the naturally occurring polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) play important roles in breast cancer cell growth and differentiation. We examined the effects of E2 and spermine on the phosphorylation and DNA binding of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATF-2 is a transcription factor involved in estrogenic regulation of cyclin D1 gene, and thereby cell cycle progression. DNA affinity immunoblot assays showed a six- to eightfold increase in the binding of ATF-2 to a 74-mer ATF/CRE oligonucleotide (ODN1) from cyclin D1 promoter in the presence of 4 nM E2 and 0.5 mM spermine, compared to untreated control. Individual treatments with E2 or spermine caused a twofold or lower increase in ATF-2 binding to ODN1. Immunoblotting with phospho-ATF-2 antibody showed that increased DNA binding of ATF-2 was associated with its phosphorylation. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD169316, inhibited ATF-2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the MEK-ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, or the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, had no significant effect on DNA binding of ATF-2. Cyclin D1 promoter (-1745CD1) activity increased by approximately 12-fold (above control) in the presence of E2 and spermine, compared to a sixfold increase in the presence of E2 alone and a twofold increase with spermine. Cells transfected with a dominant negative mutant of ATF-2 showed decreased transactivation of cyclin D1 promoter in response to E2 and spermine. These results indicate that spermine can enhance E2-induced cell signaling and cyclin D1 transcription by activation of the p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylation of ATF-2, contributing to breast cancer cell proliferation.

  15. Immunohistochemical evaluation of oral epithelial dysplasia using cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 expression as predictors of malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Abilasha; Ramani, Pratibha; Sherlin, Herald J; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Thiruvengadam, Chandrasekar

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the degree of expression of cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia using immunohistochemical evaluation in order to illustrate their prognostic value and attempt to propose a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia. The analysis included thirty cases of mild, moderate and severe dysplasia from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Saveetha Dental College, Chennai after a critical review of the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections. They were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation using the markers cyclin-D1, p27 and p63. The assessment of the expression based on staining intensity and distribution of immunohistochemical staining of the various markers was analyzed followed by statistical analysis. A highly significant increase in the expression of cyclin-D1 (P < 0.000) and p63 (P < 0.001) and a moderately significant decrease in the expression of p27 (P < 0.012) with the increasing severity of dysplasia was observed in our study. The result of our research affirms the fact that the increase in the expression of markers of cell cycle regulators such as cyclin D1, decrease in the expression of cell cycle inhibitors like p27 and increased expression of p63 in parallel with the increasing severity of dysplasia, emphasizes the use of immunohistochemical markers cyclin D1, p27 and p63 as prognostic markers for better understanding the behaviour of these potentially malignant disorders aiming towards proposing a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia to enable timely management prior to their possible malignant transformation.

  16. Immunohistochemical evaluation of oral epithelial dysplasia using cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 expression as predictors of malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanian, Abilasha; Ramani, Pratibha; Sherlin, Herald J.; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Thiruvengadam, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the degree of expression of cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia using immunohistochemical evaluation in order to illustrate their prognostic value and attempt to propose a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia. Materials and Methods: The analysis included thirty cases of mild, moderate and severe dysplasia from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Saveetha Dental College, Chennai after a critical review of the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections. They were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation using the markers cyclin-D1, p27 and p63. The assessment of the expression based on staining intensity and distribution of immunohistochemical staining of the various markers was analyzed followed by statistical analysis. Results: A highly significant increase in the expression of cyclin-D1 (P < 0.000) and p63 (P < 0.001) and a moderately significant decrease in the expression of p27 (P < 0.012) with the increasing severity of dysplasia was observed in our study. Conclusions: The result of our research affirms the fact that the increase in the expression of markers of cell cycle regulators such as cyclin D1, decrease in the expression of cell cycle inhibitors like p27 and increased expression of p63 in parallel with the increasing severity of dysplasia, emphasizes the use of immunohistochemical markers cyclin D1, p27 and p63 as prognostic markers for better understanding the behaviour of these potentially malignant disorders aiming towards proposing a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia to enable timely management prior to their possible malignant transformation. PMID:24082731

  17. Role of p16/MTS1, cyclin D1 and RB in primary oral cancer and oral cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, M; Steingrimsdottir, H; Elamin, F; Gäken, J; Warnakulasuriya, S; Partridge, M; Thakker, N; Johnson, N W; Tavassoli, M

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important components of G1 checkpoint is the retinoblastoma protein (pRB110). The activity of pRB is regulated by its phosphorylation, which is mediated by genes such as cyclin D1 and p16/MTS1. All three genes have been shown to be commonly altered in human malignancies. We have screened a panel of 26 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC), nine premalignant and three normal oral tissue samples as well as eight established OSCC cell lines for mutations in the p16/MTS1 gene. The expression of p16/MTS1, cyclin D1 and pRB110 was also studied in the same panel. We have found p16/MTS1 gene alterations in 5/26 (19%) primary tumours and 6/8 (75%) cell lines. Two primary tumours and five OSCC cell lines had p16/MTS1 point mutations and another three primary and one OSCC cell line contained partial gene deletions. Six of seven p16/MTS1 point mutations resulted in termination codons and the remaining mutation caused a frameshift. Western blot analysis showed absence of p16/MTS1 expression in 18/26 (69%) OSCC, 7/9 (78%) premalignant lesions and 8/8 cell lines. One cell line, H314, contained a frameshift mutation possibly resulting in a truncated p16/MTS1 protein. pRB was detected in 14/25 (56%) of OSCC but only 11/14 (78%) of these contained all or some hypophosphorylated (active) pRB. In premalignant samples, 6/8 (75%) displayed pRB, and all three normal samples and eight cell lines analysed contained RB protein. p16/MTS1 protein was undetectable in 10/11 (91%) OSCCs with positive pRB. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was observed in 9/22 (41%) OSCC, 3/9 (33%) premalignant and 8/8 (100%) of OSCC cell lines. Our data suggest p16/MTS1 mutations and loss of expression to be very common in oral cancer cell lines and less frequent in primary OSCC tumours. A different pattern of p16/MTS1 mutations was observed in OSCC compared to other cancers with all the detected p16/MTS1 mutations resulting in premature termination codons or a frameshift. The RB protein was expressed

  18. Expression of retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) in mantle cell lymphomas. Correlation with cyclin D1 (PRAD1/CCND1) mRNA levels and proliferative activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jares, P.; Campo, E.; Pinyol, M.; Bosch, F.; Miquel, R.; Fernandez, P. L.; Sanchez-Beato, M.; Soler, F.; Perez-Losada, A.; Nayach, I.; Mallofré, C.; Piris, M. A.; Montserrat, E.; Cardesa, A.

    1996-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) are molecularly characterized by bcl-1 rearrangement and constant cyclin D1 (PRAD-1/CCND1) gene overexpression. Cyclin D1 is a G1 cyclin that participates in the control of the cell cycle progression by interacting with the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb). Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor gene has been implicated in the development of different types of human tumors including some high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. To determine the role of the retinoblastoma gene in the pathogenesis of MCLs and its possible interaction with cyclin D1, pRb expression was examined in 23 MCLs including 17 typical and 6 blastic variants by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Rb gene structure was studied in 13 cases by Southern blot. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in 5 cases. The results were compared with the cyclin D1 mRNA levels examined by Northern analysis, and the proliferative activity of the tumors was measured by Ki-67 growth fraction and flow cytometry. pRb was expressed in all MCLs. The expression varied from case to case (mean, 14.1% of positive cells; range, 1.3 to 42%) with a significant correlation with the proliferative activity of the tumors (mitotic index r = 0.85; Ki-67 r = 0.7; S phase = 0.73). Blastic variants showed higher numbers of pRb-positive cells (mean, 29%) than the typical cases (10%; P < 0.005) by immunohistochemistry and, concordantly, higher levels of expression by Western blot. In addition, the blastic cases also had an increased expression of the phosphorylated protein. No alterations in Rb gene structure were observed by Southern blot analysis. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels were independent of pRb expression and the proliferative activity of the tumors. These findings suggest that pRb in MCLs is normally regulated in relation to the proliferative activity of the tumors. Cyclin D1 overexpression may play a role in the maintenance of cell proliferation by overcoming the suppressive growth control of pRb. Images

  19. The impact of cyclin D1 overexpression on the prognosis of ER-positive breast cancers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Wei-Hui; Xia, Xiang-Hou; Yang, Hong-Jian; Li, Bo; Mao, Wei-Min

    2013-06-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1), a key regulator of cell cycle progression, is overexpressed in many human cancers, including breast cancer. However, the impact of CCND1 overexpression in these cancers remains unclear and controversial. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE with the search terms "cyclin D1", "CCND1", "breast cancer", "prognosis", and potential studies for analysis were selected. Studies with survival data, including progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) or metastasis-free survival (MFS), were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 33 studies containing 8,537 cases were included. The combined hazard risk (HR) and its 95 % confidence interval (CI) of OS, PFS and MFS were 1.13 (95 % CI 0.87-1.47; P = 0.35), 1.25 (95 % CI 0.95-1.64; P = 0.12), and 1.04 (95 % CI 0.80-1.36; P = 0.76), respectively, for primary breast cancer patients with tumors exhibiting CCND1 overexpression. Interestingly, the impact of CCND1 expression on OS was a 1.67-fold (95 % CI 1.38-2.02; P = 0.00) increased risk for ER-positive breast cancer patients. However, CCND1 overexpression exhibited no association with the PFS or OS of patients who received epirubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, for which the P values were 0.63 and 0.47, respectively. In summary, CCND1 overexpression impacts the prognosis of ER-positive breast cancer patients, but not patients with unselected primary breast cancer or patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  20. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Griniatsos, John; Michail, Othon P; Theocharis, Stamatios; Arvelakis, Antonios; Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Felekouras, Evangelos; Pikoulis, Emmanouel; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Bakoyiannis, Chris; Marinos, George; Bramis, John; Michail, Panayiotis O

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm. METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004, twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism, underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00, 06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cyclins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods. RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001). A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P< 0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1 - p21 and E - p21 were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1 - p16 and E - p16 were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00 and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00. CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity

  1. Cigarette smoke extract alters the cell cycle via the phospholipid transfer protein/transforming growth factor-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xue-Min; Li, You-Lun; Chen, Hong; Guo, Shu-Liang; Shui, Li-Li; Chen, Ya-Juan

    2016-09-05

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced alteration of the cell cycle and the possible mechanism. Male Wistar rats and the rat alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) were exposed to normal air or different concentrations of CSE. Then PLTP siRNA was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was administered prior to CSE exposure. Histological changes and cell cycle stage were recorded, as were the expression levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, CyclinD1 and CDK4. Resulting morphological changes included diffuse interstitial substance incrassation and elevated alveolar rupturing. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase in a time- and dose-related manner. Both PLTP and TGF-β1 were up-regulated at protein and mRNA levels, whereas CyclinD1 and CDK4 expression was down-regulated after CSE exposure. Furthermore, PLTP siRNA significantly suppressed CSE-induced TGF-β1 expression, resulting in up-regulation of CyclinD1 and CDK4, but the TGF-β1 inhibitor was not able to abrogate CSE-induced PLTP over-expression. In conclusion, PLTP may operate upstream of the TGF-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway and may mediate the CSE-induced G1 arrest in RLE-6TN cells. Our work provides some new insight into the relation between PLTP and cell cycle progression.

  2. Knocking-down of CREPT prohibits the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma and suppresses cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juntao; Ren, Yipeng; Zhang, Lei; Kong, Xiangpan; Wang, Tong; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rongfa

    2017-01-01

    As a regulator essential for many cell cycle-related proteins, the robust expression of Cell cycle-Related and Expression-elevated Protein in Tumor (CREPT) implicates a poor diagnosis of endoderm and mesoderm-derived tumors. Whether CREPT plays the same role in the tumorigenesis derived from ectodermal tissues remains elusive. To explore the role of CREPT in ectoderm-derived tumors, cells from 7oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) lines and 84clinical OSCC samples were exploited in this study. Quantitative PCR, Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry were applied in the evaluation of CREPT, cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression. Knocking-down of CREPT was performed by lentivirus delivering specific shRNA of CREPT. The effects of CREPT on OSCC were examined by cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis, cell migration and xenograft implantation experiments. Compared with human normal oral keratinocytes, OSCC cell lines showed a significantly elevated expression of CREPT in both mRNA and protein levels. Consistently, samples from OSCC patients also exhibited a noticeably stronger CREPT expression than the noncancerous samples. In contrast, knocking down of CREPT in OSCC cell lines significantly reduced proliferation, colony formation and migration as well as the expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, but promoted apoptosis. Statistical analysis also suggested that CREPT expression was significantly correlated with the T and N classification of OSCC. Furthermore, CAL27 mouse xenograft model confirmed that down-regulation of CREPT prohibited cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression, through which decreased the in vivo tumor growth, but increased the survival ratio of hosts. In OSCC cell lines, up-regulated CREPT expression enhanced cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle as well as promoted cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression as it did in endoderm and mesoderm-origin tumors. Our study strongly suggests that CREPT could be used as a marker for the OSCC prognosis and might work as a

  3. Attenuation of microRNA-16 derepresses the cyclins D1, D2 and E1 to provoke cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Zou, Xiao; Zhu, Jie-Ning; Fu, Yong-Heng; Lin, Qiu-Xiong; Liang, Ye-You; Deng, Chun-Yu; Kuang, Su-Juan; Zhang, Meng-Zhen; Liao, Yu-Lin; Zheng, Xi-Long; Yu, Xi-Yong; Shan, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclins/retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway participates in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous small non-coding RNAs, were recognized to play significant roles in cardiac hypertrophy. But, it remains unknown whether cyclin/Rb pathway is modulated by miRNAs during cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigates the potential role of microRNA-16 (miR-16) in modulating cyclin/Rb pathway during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. An animal model of hypertrophy was established in a rat with abdominal aortic constriction (AAC), and in a mouse with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and in a mouse with subcutaneous injection of phenylephrine (PE) respectively. In addition, a cell model of hypertrophy was also achieved based on PE-promoted neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte and based on Ang-II-induced neonatal mouse ventricular cardiomyocyte respectively. We demonstrated that miR-16 expression was markedly decreased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in rats and mice. Overexpression of miR-16 suppressed rat cardiac hypertrophy and hypertrophic phenotype of cultured cardiomyocytes, and inhibition of miR-16 induced a hypertrophic phenotype in cardiomyocytes. Expressions of cyclins D1, D2 and E1, and the phosphorylated pRb were increased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, but could be reversed by enforced expression of miR-16. Cyclins D1, D2 and E1, not pRb, were further validated to be modulated post-transcriptionally by miR-16. In addition, the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 and c-Myc were activated during myocardial hypertrophy, and inhibitions of them prevented miR-16 attenuation. Therefore, attenuation of miR-16 provoke cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via derepressing the cyclins D1, D2 and E1, and activating cyclin/Rb pathway, revealing that miR-16 might be a target to manage cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25583328

  4. Sphk1 promotes breast epithelial cell proliferation via NF-κB-p65-mediated cyclin D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shifei; Zhou, Yan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiujuan; Liang, Yueyang; Wang, Shushu; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is crucially involved with the promotion of malignant progression and metastasis in various cancers. Growing evidence suggests that many types of cancers express high levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1), which is known to mediate cell proliferation We hypothesized that Sphk1/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling contributes to tumor progression. In MCF10A and MCF10A-Sphk1 breast epithelial cells, we used TNF-α to activate the Sphk1/S1P pathway and the measured expression levels of NF-κBp65 and cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in the presence and absence of an NF-κB-p65 inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were performed to determine whether NF-κB-p65 binds to the cyclin D1 promoter. We found that overexpression of Sphk1 induced NF-κB-p65 activation, increased expression of cyclin D1, shortened the cell division cycle, and thus promoted proliferation of breast epithelial cells. These findings provide insight into the mechanism by which an Sphk1/NF-κB-p65/cyclin D1 signaling pathway mediates cell proliferation. PMID:27811358

  5. The cyclin D1-CDK4 oncogenic interactome enables identification of potential novel oncogenes and clinical prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Sharma, Samanta; Michowski, Wojciech; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Geng, Yan; Quackenbush, John; Elias, Joshua E; Gygi, Steven P; Wang, Yaoyu E; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of cyclin D1 and its catalytic partner, CDK4, is frequently seen in human cancers. We constructed cyclin D1 and CDK4 protein interaction network in a human breast cancer cell line MCF7, and identified novel CDK4 protein partners. Among CDK4 interactors we observed several proteins functioning in protein folding and in complex assembly. One of the novel partners of CDK4 is FKBP5, which we found to be required to maintain CDK4 levels in cancer cells. An integrative analysis of the extended cyclin D1 cancer interactome and somatic copy number alterations in human cancers identified BAIAPL21 as a potential novel human oncogene. We observed that in several human tumor types BAIAPL21 is expressed at higher levels as compared to normal tissue. Forced overexpression of BAIAPL21 augmented anchorage independent growth, increased colony formation by cancer cells and strongly enhanced the ability of cells to form tumors in vivo. Lastly, we derived an Aggregate Expression Score (AES), which quantifies the expression of all cyclin D1 interactors in a given tumor. We observed that AES has a prognostic value among patients with ER-positive breast cancers. These studies illustrate the utility of analyzing the interactomes of proteins involved in cancer to uncover potential oncogenes, or to allow better cancer prognosis.

  6. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection Restores ki67, p53, and Cyclin D1 Immunoreactivity in the Human Gastric Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Emanouil, Theodoros; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Damaskou, Vasileia; Tziatzios, Georgios; Panayiotides, Ioannis G.; Vafiadis, Irene; Ladas, Spiros D.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We evaluated the effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication on p53, cyclin D1 expression, and cell proliferation in gastric mucosa. MATERIALS AND METHODS We assessed p53, cyclin D1, and ki67 immunoexpression in gastric mucosa from 31 HP chronic gastritis patients and 12 controls. Reassessment was performed 6 months after successful HP eradication. RESULTS Successful eradication resulted in significant decrease of p53 (1.53 ± 0.16 vs 0.83 ± 0.19, P = 0.01) and ki67 (9.84 ± 0.96 vs 4.77 ± 0.27, P < 0.001) staining in the antrum. Similarly, p53 immunoreactivity significantly decreased in the corpus (1.27 ± 0.20 vs 0.46 ± 0.15, P = 0.02), while there was a trend for decreased corpus cyclin D1 and ki67 expression (0.17 ± 0.07 vs 0.0, P = 0.08 and 8.71 ± 1.24 vs 5.85 ± 0.54, P = 0.09, respectively). Importantly, after successful HP eradication, the immunoreactivity of the studied parameters was similar to that of controls. CONCLUSION Successful HP infection eradication restores p53, cyclin D1, and ki67 immunoreactivity in the gastric mucosa to the level of controls. PMID:27891056

  7. Overexpression of cyclins D1 and D3 during estrogen-induced breast oncogenesis in female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Weroha, S John; Li, Sara Antonia; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Jonathan J

    2006-03-01

    A common feature of human breast oncogenesis is cell cycle deregulation. The expression of cyclins D1 and D3 was examined during estradiol-17beta (E(2))-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female August Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats. Low serum E(2) levels ( approximately 60-120 pg/ml) were sufficient to induce mammary gland tumors (MGTs) that remarkably resemble human ductal breast cancer (BC) at the histopathologic and molecular levels. Western blot analysis of the E(2)-induced MGTs revealed a marked rise in cyclins D1 (24-fold), D3 (9-fold) and cdk4 (3-fold) expression compared with age-matched untreated controls. Small focal dysplasias with large, pale staining nuclei were commonly seen at 3-3.6 months, large focal dysplasias, including atypical ductal hyperplasia at 3.6-4.3 months, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCISs) at 4.3-5.0 months, and 100% incidence of invasive ductal BC/frank tumors at 5-6 months were detected after E(2) treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis of serial sections of focal dysplasias, DCISs and invasive ductal carcinomas showed overexpression of cyclins D1, D3, estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptor (PR). However, cyclin D3 expression, unlike D1, was confined essentially to early pre-malignant lesions (focal dysplasias and DCISs) and primary MGTs with <1-5% of resting and normal hyperplastic breast cells staining positive. The kinase activity for cyclins D1 and D3, using retinoblastoma (Rb) as a substrate, in E(2)-induced MGTs and their binding to cdk4 was significantly elevated. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of the E(2)-induced MGTs exhibited increased expression of cyclins D1 (2.9-fold) and D3 (1.4-fold) mRNA, indicating that their elevated protein expression was due in part to an increase in mRNA transcription. However, when analyzed by quantitative real-time Q-PCR, these genes were not amplified. These data indicate that in female ACI rat mammary glands, E(2)-induced pre-malignant lesions

  8. Role of cyclin D1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mohini A; Lee, Susie A; Macias, Everardo; Lam, Ernest T; Xu, Chuanrui; Jones, Kirk D; Ho, Coral; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo; Chen, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Activation of c-Met signaling and beta-catenin mutations are frequent genetic events observed in liver cancer development. Recently, we demonstrated that activated beta-catenin can cooperate with c-Met to induce liver cancer formation in a mouse model. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is an important cell cycle regulator that is considered to be a downstream target of beta-catenin. To determine the importance of CCND1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, we investigated the genetic interactions between CCND1, beta-catenin, and c-Met in liver cancer development using mouse models. We coexpressed CCND1 with c-Met in mice and found CCND1 to cooperate with c-Met to promote liver cancer formation. Tumors induced by CCND1/c-Met had a longer latency period, formed at a lower frequency, and seemed to be more benign compared with those induced by beta-catenin/c-Met. In addition, when activated beta-catenin and c-Met were coinjected into CCND1-null mice, liver tumors developed despite the absence of CCND1. Intriguingly, we observed a moderate accelerated tumor growth and increased tumor malignancy in these CCND1-null mice. Molecular analysis showed an up-regulation of cyclin D2 (CCND2) expression in CCND1-null tumor samples, indicating that CCND2 may replace CCND1 in hepatic tumorigenesis. Together, our results suggest that CCND1 functions as a mediator of beta-catenin during HCC pathogenesis, although other molecules may be required to fully propagate beta-catenin signaling. Moreover, our data suggest that CCND1 expression is not essential for liver tumor development induced by c-Met and beta-catenin.

  9. Effect of growth factors and steroid hormones on heme oxygenase and cyclin D1 expression in primary astroglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, V; Grasso, S; Tomassoni, D; Traini, E; Raciti, G; Viola, M; Li Volti, G; Campisi, A; Amenta, F; Avola, R

    2015-03-01

    Astrocyte activity may be modulated by steroid hormones and GFs. This study investigates the interaction between glucocorticoids or estrogens and GFs on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclin D1 in astrocyte cultures at 14 days treated for 48 or 60 hr with dexamethasone (DEX) or 48 hr with 17β-estradiol (E2) alone or with GFs added only in the last 12 or 24 hr. Twelve- or twenty-four-hour epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment significantly enhanced HO-1 expression in astrocyte cultures pretreated for 48 hr with DEX. A highly significant increase in HO-1 expression was obtained after the last-12-hr EGF treatment in 48-hr E2-pretreated astrocyte cultures; this enhancement was particularly significant in 48-hr E2-pretreated cultures as well as in the last-12-hr insulin-treated ones pretreated for 48 hr with E2. Sixty-hour DEX-alone pretreatment as well as the last-12-hr EGF treatment in 60-hr DEX-pretreated astrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of cyclin D1 expression. A significant decrease of cyclin D1 expression in the last-12-hr insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1)-treated cultures pretreated for 60 hr with DEX was observed. A highly significant enhancement in cyclin D1 expression in 14 days in vitro astrocyte cultures pretreated with E2 alone for 48 hr and treated in the last 12 hr with IGF-1 in 48-hr E2-pretreated cultures was found. Finally, the data highlight an interactive dialogue between the growth factors and glucocorticoids or estrogens during the maturation of astroglial cells in culture that may control the HO-1 and cyclin D1 expression as well as proliferating astroglial cells during the cell cycle.

  10. Amplification of EGFR and cyclin D1 genes associated with human papillomavirus infection in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chotiyano, Apinya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Promthet, Supannee; Swangphon, Piyawut; Bumrungthai, Sureewan; Pimson, Charinya; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2017-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with several genetic alterations including oncogene amplification, leading to increased aggression of tumors. Recently, a relationship between HPV infection and oncogene amplification has been reported, but this finding remains controversial. This study therefore investigated relationships between HPV infection and amplification of genes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling cascade in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Extracted DNA from 142 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OSCC tissues was performed to investigate the copy number of EGFR, KRAS, c-myc and cyclin D1 genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and compared with calibrators. A tissue microarray of OSCC tissues was used for detection of c-Myc expression and HPV infection by immunohistochemistry and HPV E6/E7 RNA in situ hybridization, respectively. HPV infection was also investigated using PCR and RT-PCR. Of the 142 OSCC samples, 81 (57%) were HPV-infected cases. The most frequently amplified gene was c-myc (55.6%), followed by cyclin D1 (26.1%), EGFR (23.9%) and KRAS (19.7%). Amplification of c-myc was significantly associated with levels of its protein product. EGFR amplification was also significantly associated with amplification of genes in the signaling cascade: KRAS (50.0%), c-myc (34.2%) and cyclin D1 (46.0%). Interestingly, HPV infection was significantly associated with amplification of both EGFR (76.5%) and cyclin D1 (73.0%). Only cyclin D1 amplification was significantly associated with severity of OSCC histopathology. HPV infection may play an important synergistic role in amplification of genes in the EGFR signaling cascade, leading to increased aggression in oral malignancies.

  11. Expression of cyclin D1 in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice results in epidermal hyperproliferation and severe thymic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Robles, A I; Larcher, F; Whalin, R B; Murillas, R; Richie, E; Gimenez-Conti, I B; Jorcano, J L; Conti, C J

    1996-01-01

    To study the involvement of cyclin D1 in epithelial growth and differentiation and its putative role as an oncogene in skin, transgenic mice were developed carrying the human cyclin D1 gene driven by a bovine keratin 5 promoter. As expected, all squamous epithelia including skin, oral mucosa, trachea, vaginal epithelium, and the epithelial compartment of the thymus expressed aberrant levels of cyclin D1. The rate of epidermal proliferation increased dramatically in transgenic mice, which also showed basal cell hyperplasia. However, epidermal differentiation was unaffected, as shown by normal growth arrest of newborn primary keratinocytes in response to high extracellular calcium. Moreover, an unexpected phenotype was observed in the thymus. Transgenic mice developed a severe thymic hyperplasia that caused premature death due to cardio-respiratory failure within 4 months of age. By 14 weeks, the thymi of transgenic mice increased in weight up to 40-fold, representing 10% of total body weight. The hyperplastic thymi had normal histology revealing a well-differentiated cortex and medulla, which supported an apparently normal T-cell developmental program based on the distribution of thymocyte subsets. These results suggest that proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells are under independent genetic controls in these organs and that cyclin D1 can modulate epithelial proliferation without altering the initiation of differentiation programs. No spontaneous development of epithelial tumors or thymic lymphomas was perceived in transgenic mice during their first 8 months of life, although they continue under observation. This model provides in vivo evidence of the action of cyclin D1 as a pure mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755527

  12. Cyclin D1 (Bcl-1, PRAD1) protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W. I.; Zukerberg, L. R.; Motokura, T.; Arnold, A.; Harris, N. L.

    1994-01-01

    Mantle cell (centrocytic) lymphoma (MCL) and occasional cases of B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-SLL/CLL) show a characteristic translocation, t(11:14)(q13;q32) involving rearrangement of the Bcl-1 region. Recently it was shown that the key Bcl-1 region oncogene is cyclin D1/PRAD1; cyclin D1 mRNA was shown to be overexpressed in cases of MCL. We examined cyclin D1 protein expression in low-grade B-cell lymphomas and reactive lymphoid hyperplasias using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to cyclin D1 protein. Definite nuclear staining was seen in 15 of 15 MCLs, 1 of 7 B-SLL/CLLs, 0 of 7 reactive hyperplasias, 0 of 10 follicular lymphomas, and 0 of 4 lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue using immunoperoxidase stains on paraffin-embedded sections. Best results were obtained with the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody on microwave-treated, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. MCLs showed diffuse nuclear staining, whereas the one positive B-SLL/CLL showed dot-like or globular nuclear staining. Nuclear cyclin D1 protein can be detected in all cases of MCL and in rare cases of B-SLL/CLL using an immunohistochemical technique on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, and it does not appear to be detectable in reactive hyperplasias and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. This protein may be useful in subclassification of low-grade B-cell lymphomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7518196

  13. Differential expression of cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology.

  14. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  15. Multiparameter immunohistochemical analysis of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, Ki-67, p21WAF1, p27KIP1, and p53 in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Izban, K F; Alkan, S; Singleton, T P; Hsi, E D

    2000-10-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1, a G1 cyclin that participates in the control of cell cycle progression at the G1 to S phase transition. In addition to cyclin D1, other cell cycle regulatory molecules may be involved in the proliferation and progression of MCL. Mutation of p53, deletion of p16(INK4a), and loss of p21(WAF1) expression have been reported in some cases of blastoid MCL. We sought to examine levels of expression of these proteins in typical and blastoid MCL and to determine whether differences were present between these subtypes of lymphomas. A retrospective series of typical and blastoid MCLs was evaluated for expression of the cell cycle-related proteins cyclin D1, p21(WAF1), p27(KIP1), Ki-67, and p53, as well as mitotic index. Paraffin-embedded archival tissues from 24 MCL specimens (17 typical, 7 blastoid) were immunostained with antibodies to p21(WAF1), p27(KIP1), p53, Ki-67, and cyclin D1. The percentage of positive cells for each specimen was estimated by counting 1500 cells under oil immersion microscopy. Levels of antigen expression were compared for the typical and blastoid MCLs. The mitotic index was estimated using twenty 100x oil immersion fields (OIFs) for each specimen. Cyclin D1 expression was seen in 22/24 specimens (92%). Blastoid MCLs were characterized by a significantly higher mean mitotic index (>20 mitoses/20 OIFs) and Ki-67 index (>45%) when compared with typical MCLs (P <.001 and P <.008, respectively; Fisher's exact test). High expression of p27(KIP1) (>25% staining) was seen more frequently in typical MCLs than in the blastoid variants (P =.03; Fisher's exact test). No significant differences were found between typical and blastoid MCLs for the expression of p21(WAF1) or p53. A significantly higher mitotic index and Ki-67 index were found in blastoid MCLs as compared with typical MCLs. Low p27(KIP1) expression was associated with the blastoid MCL variant. These findings confirm the

  16. Alterations of pRb1-cyclin D1-cdk4/6-p16(INK4A) pathway in endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Semczuk, Andrzej; Jakowicki, Jerzy Andrzej

    2004-01-08

    The retinoblastoma protein pathway (pRb1-cyclin D1-cdk4/6-p16(INK4A)) participates in the regulation of the cellular processes at the transition of G1/S phases of the cell-cycle. Derailments of this pathway, caused either by lack of pRb1 or p16(INK4A) expression or overexpression of cyclin D1 and/or cdk4/6, are implicated in the deregulation of the cell-cycle machinery, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation, tumor heterogeneity, invasion and metastasis. Several studies conducted so far have assessed the deregulation of the pRb1-pathway components in various human tumors and cell-lines, provided these pathway alterations play an obligatory role in tumorigenesis. This review briefly summarizes the current information on the pRb1-cyclin D1-cdk4/6-p16(INK4A) alterations in sporadic uterine cancer, placing emphasis on the influence on the dualistic model of endometrial carcinogenesis.

  17. Involvement of the cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, CREB, and Cyclin D1 in LPA-Induced Proliferation of P19 Embryonic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jung; Sun, Yuanjie; Yang, Haijie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Jeon, Sung Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2012-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid growth factor that induces proliferation of fibroblasts by activating the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Here, we further investigated whether LPA induces proliferation of P19 cells, a line of pluripotent embryonic carcinoma cells. 5′-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation and cell viability as-says showed that LPA stimulated proliferation of P19 cells. Immunoblot experiments with P19 cells revealed that the mitogen activated protein kinases, including p-ERK, p38, pAKT, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and CREB were phosphorylated by treatment with 10 μM LPA. LPA-induced phosphorylation of CREB was efficiently blocked by U0126 and H89, inhibitors of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 and mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1, respectively. Involvement of cyclin D1 in LPA-induced P19 cell proliferation was verified by immunoblot analysis in combination with pharmacological inhibitor treatment. Furthermore, LPA up-regulated CRE-harboring cyclin D1 promoter activity, suggesting that CREB and cyclin D1 play significant roles in LPA-induced proliferation of P19 embryonic carcinoma cells. PMID:22847216

  18. p18Ink4cand p53 act as tumor suppressors in Cyclin D1-driven primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Raya; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Matmati, Kelly; Rehg, Jerold E.; Baumer, Shannon H.; Khoury, Joseph D.; Billups, Catherine; Neale, Geoffrey; Helton, Kathleen J.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2008-01-01

    The RB tumor suppressor pathway is likely important in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the brain. In fact, 10-15% of children born with RB mutations develop brain PNETs, commonly in the pineal gland. Cyclin D1, which in association with Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) 4 and 6 phosphorylates and inactivates the RB protein, is expressed in 40% of sporadic medulloblastoma, a PNET of the cerebellum. To understand tumorigenic events cooperating with RB pathway disruption in brain PNET, we generated a transgenic mouse where Cyclin D1 was expressed in pineal cells. Cyclin D1 enhanced pinealocyte proliferation, causing pineal gland enlargement. However, proliferation ceased beyond 2 weeks of age with reversal of Cdk4-mediated Rb phosphorylation despite continued expression of the transgene, and the pineal cells showed heterochromatin foci suggestive of a senescent-like state. In the absence of the p53 tumor suppressor, cell proliferation continued, resulting in pineal PNET that limited mouse survival to ~ 4 months. Interestingly, the Cdk-inhibitor p18Ink4c was induced in the transgenic pineal glands independently of p53, and transgenic mice that lacked Ink4c developed invasive PNET, though at an older age than those lacking p53. Analogous to our mouse model, we found that children with heritable retinoblastoma often had asymptomatic pineal gland enlargement that only rarely progressed to PNET. Our finding that the Cdk4-inhibitor p18Ink4c is a tumor suppressor in Cyclin D1-driven PNET suggests that pharmacological interventions to inhibit Cdk4 activity may be a useful chemoprevention or therapeutic strategy in cancer driven by primary Rb pathway disruption. PMID:19147556

  19. Aberrant expression pattern and location of cullin 1 are associated with the development of papillary carcinoma in thyroid and cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Do, Sung-Im; Kim, Kyungeun; Lee, Hyunjoo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Do, Tae Gu; Yun, Jisup; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Park, Yong Lai; Park, Chan Heun; Sohn, Jin Hee; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Pyo, Jung-Soo

    2014-09-01

    Cullin 1 (Cul1) is a rigid scaffold protein of a major class of E3 ubiquitin ligase, also known as the Skp1/cullin1/F-box (SCF) complex, which is involved in cell-cycle progression. The aberrant expression of Cul1 is involved in the dysfunction of SCF E3 ligase. Previous studies have revealed an association between increased Cul1 expression and tumor progression and poor outcome in several different tumors. We constructed a tissue microarray containing 103 papillary carcinoma tissues of the thyroid and 66 normal thyroid tissues. Cul1 expression and Cyclin D1 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry staining, and the relationship between their expression and clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. Cytoplasmic expression of Cul1 was correlated with tumor occurrence (p < 0.001), N stage (p = 0.027), and Cyclin D1 expression (p < 0.001). Cyclin D1 expression showed a correlation with tumor occurrence (p < 0.001) and T stage (p = 0.009). On the other hand, nuclear expression of Cul1 showed a negative correlation with tumor occurrence (p < 0.001) and Cyclin D1 expression (p < 0.001). Cytoplasmic Cul1 expression was associated with tumor development and higher nodal metastasis status, supporting the idea that the SCF complex is involved in cell-cycle regulation and promotes cell proliferation. Nuclear expression of Cul1 showed inverse relationship between tumor aggressiveness factors. Our data suggest that the expression site of Cul1 may affect the function of the SFC complex and play a role in tumor progression.

  20. Alterations of cell cycle control proteins SHP‑1/2, p16, CDK4 and cyclin D1 in radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gang; Cao, Ru-Bo; Li, Yue-Hua; Zou, Zhen-Wei; Huang, Jing; Ding, Qian

    2014-10-01

    The primary treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy. However, resistance to radiotherapy is not uncommon. The aim of the present study was to establish a radioresistant NPC cell line to study the molecular mechanisms of radioresistance by measuring the expression of cell cycle control proteins src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP)-1/2, p16, CDK4 and cyclin D1. Human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE‑2 cells were cultured, divided into two groups (CNE-2S1 and CNE-2S2) and irradiated with a dose of 6 Gy x5 or 2 Gy x15, respectively. The cells were subcultured between doses of irradiation. The surviving sublines (CNE-2S1 and CNE-2S2 clones) were then passaged for three months and their radiosensitivity was determined. The cell cycle distribution and protein expression of SHP-1/2, p16, CDK4 and cyclin D1 in parental and progenitor cell lines were measured. Small interfering (si)RNA-mediated knockdown of SHP-1 and SHP‑2 in the NPC cells was used to further examine their roles in radiosensitivity and cell cycle distribution. CNE-2S1, a radio‑resistant cell line, had a significantly higher percentage of cells in S phase and a lower percentage of cells in G1 phase, enhanced expression levels of SHP-1, CDK4 and cyclin D1, and reduced expression of p16, respectively, as compared with the parent cells. Stable suppression of SHP-1 mRNA in CNE‑2 cells resulted in increased radiosensitivity compared with the parental cells, a decrease in the number of cells in S phase and an increase in the expression of p16. The results suggested that the SHP‑1/p16/cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway may have a role in regulating radiosensitivity and cell cycle distribution in nasopharyngeal cells.

  1. Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism: Association with uterine leiomyoma risk and in silico analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Saeedeh; Shahrakipour, Mahnaz; Hajizadeh, Azam; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Mousavi, Mahdieh; Teimoori, Batool; Yaghmaei, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) is the most common benign tumor causing considerable morbidity during the reproductive years in women. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a cell cycle regulatory protein that is required for the G1 phase, and increased expression levels of this protein may affect tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to assess the possible effect of the CCND1 G870A polymorphism on UL susceptibility. A total of 154 women with UL and 197 healthy women who were age-, body mass index (BMI)- and ethnicity-matched were genotyped for the CCND1 G870A (rs9344) polymorphism using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The effects of G870A transition on the structure of mRNA and proteins of CCND1 was evaluated using bioinformatics tools. The frequency of the CCND1 870AA genotype was significantly higher in women with UL compared with the control subjects, and the risk of UL was 1.4-fold higher in women with the AA genotype when compared with the GG genotype before and after adjusting for age, BMI, and ethnicity [odds ratio (OR), 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–2 (P=0.02)]. The frequency of CCND1 870GA genotype was not significantly different between the two groups. The frequency of the CCND1 870A allele was significantly higher in the women with UL when compared with the control subjects (57 vs. 48%; P=0.02). The in silico analysis revealed that the G870A transition may fundamentally alter the structure of the CCND1-mRNA. Thus, the CCND1 870AA genotype was associated with UL susceptibility in a sample of women from the southeast of Iran. PMID:28357079

  2. The different roles of cyclinD1-CDK4 in STP and mGluR-LTD during the postnatal development in mice hippocampus area CA1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenchen; Li, Xinmei; Chen, Weiheng; Yu, Shanshan; Chen, Jutao; Wang, Huili; Ruan, Diyun

    2007-05-30

    Cell-cycle-related proteins, such as cyclins or cyclin-dependent kinases, may have functions beyond that of cell cycle regulation. The expression and translocation of cyclinD1-CDK4 in post-mitotic neurons indicate that they may have supplementary functions in differentiated neurons that might be associated with neuronal plasticity. In the present study, our findings showed that the expression of CDK4 was localized mostly in nuclei and cytoplasm of pyramidal cells of CA1 at postnatal day 10 (P10); whereas at P28 staining of CDK4 could be detected predominantly in the cytoplasm but not nuclei. Basal synaptic transmission was normal in the presence of CDK4 inhibitor. Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) was impaired in CDK4 inhibitor pre-treated slices both from neonatal (P8-15) and adolescent (P21-35) animals; however there was no significant change in paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) in slices pre-incubated with the CDK4 inhibitor from adolescent animals. By the treatment of CDK4 inhibitor, the induction or the maintenance of Long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to a strong tetanus and NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) were normal in hippocampus. However, long-term depression (LTD) induced either by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) agonist or by paired-pulse low-frequency stimulation (PP-LFS) was impaired in CDK4 inhibitor pretreated slices both from neonatal and adolescent animals. But the effects of the CDK4 inhibitor at slices from adolescent animals were not as robust as at slices from neonatal animals. Our results indicated that the activation of cyclinD1-CDK4 is required for short-term synaptic plasticity and mGluR-dependent LTD, and suggested that this cyclin-dependent kinase may have different roles during the postnatal development in mice hippocampus area CA1.

  3. Cdks, cyclins and CKIs: roles beyond cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shuhui; Kaldis, Philipp

    2013-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are serine/threonine kinases and their catalytic activities are modulated by interactions with cyclins and Cdk inhibitors (CKIs). Close cooperation between this trio is necessary for ensuring orderly progression through the cell cycle. In addition to their well-established function in cell cycle control, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mammalian Cdks, cyclins and CKIs play indispensable roles in processes such as transcription, epigenetic regulation, metabolism, stem cell self-renewal, neuronal functions and spermatogenesis. Even more remarkably, they can accomplish some of these tasks individually, without the need for Cdk/cyclin complex formation or kinase activity. In this Review, we discuss the latest revelations about Cdks, cyclins and CKIs with the goal of showcasing their functional diversity beyond cell cycle regulation and their impact on development and disease in mammals.

  4. Retinoblastoma and p16 proteins in mammary carcinoma: their relationship to cyclin D1 and histopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Dublin, E A; Patel, N K; Gillett, C E; Smith, P; Peters, G; Barnes, D M

    1998-02-20

    The cell cycle-associated retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and p16 protein were demonstrated using immuno-histochemistry on paraffin sections from 192 cases of invasive breast carcinoma. Abnormal expression of pRb was defined as negative staining and was seen in 17% of tumours. Such abnormal expression was significantly more frequent in tumours with negative oestrogen receptor (ER) status. There was also a trend for tumours which were negative for pRb to be grade III ductal carcinomas. There was no association between p16 staining and any histopathological parameter, though, surprisingly, log-rank analysis showed that strong staining was associated with a poor outcome. There was a significant inverse relationship between pRb and p16 expression and a significant positive association between pRb and cyclin D1. In a Cox multivariate analysis, which included cyclin D1, neither pRb nor p16 was an independent predictor of patient outcome.

  5. Overexpression of Hyaluronan-binding Protein 1 (HABP1/p32/gC1qR) in HepG2 Cells Leads to Increased Hyaluronan Synthesis and Cell Proliferation by Up-regulation of Cyclin D1 in AKT-dependent Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Rachna; Saha, Paramita; Saradhi, Mallampati; Prasad, Ramachandra L. A.; Chatterjee, Soumya; Ghosh, Ilora; Tyagi, Rakesh K.; Datta, Kasturi

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the mature form of hyaluronan-binding protein 1 (HABP1/gC1qR/p32), a ubiquitous multifunctional protein involved in cellular signaling, in normal murine fibroblast cells leads to enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and ultimately apoptosis with the release of cytochrome c. In the present study, human liver cancer cell line HepG2, having high intracellular antioxidant levels was chosen for stable overexpression of HABP1. The stable transformant of HepG2, overexpressing HABP1 does not lead to ROS generation, cellular stress, and apoptosis, rather it induced enhanced cell growth and proliferation over longer periods. Phenotypic changes in the stable transformant were associated with the increased “HA pool,” formation of the “HA cable” structure, up-regulation of HA synthase-2, and CD44, a receptor for HA. Enhanced cell survival was further supported by activation of MAP kinase and AKT-mediated cell survival pathways, which leads to an increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity. Compared with its parent counterpart HepG2, the stable transformant showed enhanced tumorigenicity as evident by its sustained growth in low serum conditions, formation of the HA cable structure, increased anchorage-independent growth, and cell-cell adhesion. This study suggests that overexpression of HABP1 in HepG2 cells leads to enhanced cell survival and tumorigenicity by activating HA-mediated cell survival pathways. PMID:22451658

  6. CCND1 rearrangements and cyclin D1 overexpression in renal oncocytomas: frequency, clinicopathologic features, and utility in differentiation from chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sukov, William R; Ketterling, Rhett P; Lager, Donna J; Carlson, Austin W; Sinnwell, Jason P; Chow, George K; Jenkins, Robert B; Cheville, John C

    2009-09-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a benign tumor occurring singly or as multiple synchronous lesions. The histologic features of renal oncocytoma may overlap with those of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. Chromosomal translocations involving the CCND1 locus at 11q13 and overexpression of cyclin D1 occur in a subset of renal oncocytomas. We evaluated a series of 63 renal oncocytomas and 36 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and assessed the clinical features, cyclin D1 overexpression by immunohistochemistry, and alterations of the CCND1 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization. All 36 chromophobe renal cell carcinomas were negative for cyclin D1 overexpression and alterations of CCND1. Of the 63 renal oncocytomas, 21 (33%) showed cyclin D1 overexpression. Of 21 renal oncocytomas with cyclin D1 overexpression, a CCND1 rearrangement was detected in 12 (57%). A CCND1 rearrangement was also identified in 1 (2%) of the 42 renal oncocytomas without cyclin D1 overexpression. Of 42 renal oncocytomas without cyclin D1 overexpression, 16 (38%) were from patients with multiple renal oncocytomas at nephrectomy. Of 21 renal oncocytomas with cyclin D1 overexpression, only 1 (5%) patient had multiple renal oncocytomas (P = .006). Of the 25 patients whose original tumor showed no cyclin D1 overexpression, 8 (32%) developed a subsequent renal oncocytoma. None of 15 patients whose original tumor showed cyclin D1 overexpression had a subsequent renal oncocytoma (P = .016). The findings of this study suggest that renal oncocytomas lacking cyclin D1 overexpression may be associated with the development of multiple renal oncocytomas and that these patients are more likely to develop subsequent renal oncocytomas suggesting the need for more frequent clinical for these patients and little need for follow-up in patients with renal oncocytomas overexpressing cyclin D1. The data also show that cyclin D1 overexpression and CCND1 rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization are absent in

  7. Spontaneous peripheral T-cell responses toward the tumor-associated antigen cyclin D1 in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Stefanie R; Hermanns, Thomas; Bransi, Ali; Matter, Claudia; von Boehmer, Lotta; Stevanovic, Stefan; Schraml, Peter; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous group of kidney cancers with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) as the major subgroup. To expand the number of clinically relevant tumor-associated antigens (TAA) that can be targeted by immunotherapy, we analyzed samples from 23 patients with primary ccRCC for the expression and immunogenicity of various TAAs. We found high-frequency expression of MAGE-A9 and NY-ESO-1 in 36% and 55% of samples, respectively, and overexpression of PRAME, RAGE-1, CA-IX, Cyclin D1, ADFP, C-MET, and RGS-5 in many of the tumor samples. We analyzed the blood of patients with HLA-A2(+) ccRCC for the presence of CD8(+) T cells specific for TAA-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptides and found spontaneous responses to cyclin D1 in 5 of 6 patients with Cyclin D1-positive tumors. Cyclin D1-specific CD8(+) T cells secreted TNF-α, IFN-γ, and interleukin-2 (IL-2), and degranulated, indicating the presence of polyfunctional tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells in the blood of these patients with ccRCC. The high frequency (43%) of Cyclin D1 overexpression and the presence of functional cyclin D1-specific T cells in 83% of these patients with ccRCC suggest that cyclin D1 may be a target for immunotherapeutic strategies.

  8. IMP-3 protects the mRNAs of cyclins D1 and D3 from GW182/AGO2-dependent translational repression.

    PubMed

    Deforzh, Evgeny; Vargas, Thaiz Rivera; Kropp, Jeremie; Vandamme, Marie; Pinna, Guillaume; Polesskaya, Anna

    2016-12-01

    IGF-2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3, IMP-3) is a well-known post-transcriptional regulatory factor of gene expression, mainly involved in embryonic development and oncogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that a subset of IMP-3 targets, such as the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1, are positively regulated by IMP-3, and that this regulation depends on nuclear localization of IMP-3. In the present study, we show that as a first step following a knock-down of IMP-3, the protein levels of the cyclins rapidly decrease, while their mRNAs remain stable and associated with the polyribosomes, though not translated. We have elucidated the molecular mechanisms of this regulation, demonstrating that IMP-3 and its protein partners ILF3/NF90 and PTBP1 bind to the 3'UTRs of the cyclin mRNAs and protect them from the translational repression induced by miRNA-dependent recruitment of AGO2/GW182 complex in human cancer cells.

  9. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  10. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/Cyclin D1/Cdk4 Survival Signaling Pathway for Eradication of Tumor Radioresistance Acquired by Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kakuda, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yasushi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Takai, Yoshihiro; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Radioresistance is a major cause of treatment failure of radiotherapy (RT) in human cancer. We have recently revealed that acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by fractionated radiation is attributable to cyclin D1 overexpression as a consequence of the downregulation of GSK3{beta}-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis mediated by a constitutively activated serine-threonine kinase, AKT. This prompted us to hypothesize that targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1 pathway may improve fractionated RT by suppressing acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were exposed to X-rays after incubation with either an AKT inhibitor, AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor-2 (API-2), or a Cdk4 inhibitor (Cdk4-I). Cells were then subjected to immunoblotting, clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, and cell death analysis with TUNEL and annexin V staining. In vivo radiosensitivity was assessed by growth of human tumors xenografted into nude mice. Results: Treatment with API-2 resulted in downregulation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with acquired radioresistance. Cellular radioresistance disappeared completely both in vitro and in vivo with accompanying apoptosis when treated with API-2. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 by Cdk4-I was sufficient for abolishing radioresistance. Treatment with either API-2 or Cdk4-I was also effective in suppressing resistance to cis-platinum (II)-diamine-dichloride in the cells with acquired radioresistance. Interestingly, the radiosensitizing effect of API-2 was canceled by overexpression of cyclin D1 whereas Cdk4-I was still able to sensitize cells with cyclin D1 overexpression. Conclusion: Cyclin D1/Cdk4 is a critical target of the AKT survival signaling pathway responsible for tumor radioresistance. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway would provide a novel approach to improve fractionated RT and would have an impact on tumor

  11. ATF7 is stabilized during mitosis in a CDK1-dependent manner and contributes to cyclin D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Etienne; Vigneron, Marc; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Chatton, Bruno; Donzeau, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ATF7 undergoes multiple post-translational modifications, each of which has distinct effects upon ATF7 function. Here, we show that ATF7 phosphorylation on residue Thr112 exclusively occurs during mitosis, and that ATF7 is excluded from the condensed chromatin. Both processes are CDK1/cyclin B dependent. Using a transduced neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the Thr112 epitope in living cells, we could demonstrate that Thr112 phosphorylation protects endogenous ATF7 protein from degradation, while it has no effect on the displacement of ATF7 from the condensed chromatin. The crucial role of Thr112 phosphorylation in stabilizing ATF7 protein during mitosis was confirmed using phospho-mimetic and phospho-deficient mutants. Finally, silencing ATF7 by CRISPR/Cas9 technology leads to a decrease of cyclin D1 protein expression levels. We propose that mitotic stabilized ATF7 protein re-localizes onto chromatin at the end of telophase and contributes to induce the cyclin D1 gene expression. PMID:26101806

  12. ATF7 is stabilized during mitosis in a CDK1-dependent manner and contributes to cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Etienne; Vigneron, Marc; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Chatton, Bruno; Donzeau, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ATF7 undergoes multiple post-translational modifications, each of which has distinct effects upon ATF7 function. Here, we show that ATF7 phosphorylation on residue Thr112 exclusively occurs during mitosis, and that ATF7 is excluded from the condensed chromatin. Both processes are CDK1/cyclin B dependent. Using a transduced neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the Thr112 epitope in living cells, we could demonstrate that Thr112 phosphorylation protects endogenous ATF7 protein from degradation, while it has no effect on the displacement of ATF7 from the condensed chromatin. The crucial role of Thr112 phosphorylation in stabilizing ATF7 protein during mitosis was confirmed using phospho-mimetic and phospho-deficient mutants. Finally, silencing ATF7 by CRISPR/Cas9 technology leads to a decrease of cyclin D1 protein expression levels. We propose that mitotic stabilized ATF7 protein re-localizes onto chromatin at the end of telophase and contributes to induce the cyclin D1 gene expression.

  13. A cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma with an IGL-CCND2 translocation that relapsed with blastoid morphology and aggressive clinical behavior.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Kengo; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Hojo, Atsuko; Uchino, Yoshihito; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Miura, Katsuhiro; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Sugitani, Masahiko; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Koichi; Takei, Masami

    2016-10-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B cell neoplasm characterized by cyclin D1 overexpression; its prognosis is poor, especially when it exhibits a blastoid morphology. Cyclin D1-negative MCL is rare, and its pathogenesis and progression remain unclear. Herein, we describe a cyclin D1-negative, cyclin D2-positive MCL with a CCND2 and immunoglobulin lambda light chain (IGL) translocation. The patient was initially diagnosed with cyclin D1-negative MCL and achieved complete remission via combination chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. After relapsing, he was diagnosed with a blastoid variant of MCL that showed lymphoid cells with dispersed chromatin and more mitotic figures and higher p53 expression compared with the initial MCL. Despite salvage therapies, the disease became refractory, and the patient died 28 months after initiating chemotherapy. This case demonstrates that blastoid morphology in cyclin D1-negative MCL with IGL-CCND2 translocation indicates progression to a more aggressive neoplasm, similar to cyclin D1-positive MCL.

  14. Knocking-down of CREPT prohibits the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma and suppresses cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Juntao; Ren, Yipeng; Zhang, Lei; Kong, Xiangpan; Wang, Tong; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rongfa

    2017-01-01

    Background As a regulator essential for many cell cycle-related proteins, the robust expression of Cell cycle-Related and Expression-elevated Protein in Tumor (CREPT) implicates a poor diagnosis of endoderm and mesoderm-derived tumors. Whether CREPT plays the same role in the tumorigenesis derived from ectodermal tissues remains elusive. Methods To explore the role of CREPT in ectoderm-derived tumors, cells from 7oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) lines and 84clinical OSCC samples were exploited in this study. Quantitative PCR, Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry were applied in the evaluation of CREPT, cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression. Knocking-down of CREPT was performed by lentivirus delivering specific shRNA of CREPT. The effects of CREPT on OSCC were examined by cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis, cell migration and xenograft implantation experiments. Results Compared with human normal oral keratinocytes, OSCC cell lines showed a significantly elevated expression of CREPT in both mRNA and protein levels. Consistently, samples from OSCC patients also exhibited a noticeably stronger CREPT expression than the noncancerous samples. In contrast, knocking down of CREPT in OSCC cell lines significantly reduced proliferation, colony formation and migration as well as the expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, but promoted apoptosis. Statistical analysis also suggested that CREPT expression was significantly correlated with the T and N classification of OSCC. Furthermore, CAL27 mouse xenograft model confirmed that down-regulation of CREPT prohibited cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression, through which decreased the in vivo tumor growth, but increased the survival ratio of hosts. Conclusion In OSCC cell lines, up-regulated CREPT expression enhanced cell proliferation, migration and cell cycle as well as promoted cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression as it did in endoderm and mesoderm-origin tumors. Our study strongly suggests that CREPT could be used as a marker for

  15. p53 mutation and cyclin D1 amplification correlate with cisplatin sensitivity in xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas from head and neck.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Eva; Baldetorp, Bo; Borg, Ake; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Akervall, Jan; Wennerberg, Johan; Wahlberg, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the response of tumour growth to cisplatin treatment, in relation to p53 mutation and cyclin D1 dysregulation on DNA and protein level, biopsies from seven xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas from the head and neck were analysed with immunohistochemistry for p53 expression and cyclin D1 expression. Polymerase chain reaction-singlestranded conformation polymorphism was used to determine p53 mutations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to analyse cyclin D1 amplification. The mice were injected i.p. with NaCl (controls) or cisplatin. After injection the tumour volume were measured. The inhibition of tumour growth by cisplatin was defined as the area under the growth curves, and compared with the growth curves of the tumours in the control group. Xenografts with p53 mutation showed significantly higher resistance to cisplatin (p < 0.001) and also tumours with cyclin D1 amplification showed significantly higher resistance (p < 0.001).

  16. The p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in proliferation of smooth muscle cells after exposure to cigarette smoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjia; Song, Ting; Ni, Leng; Yang, Genhuan; Song, Xitao; Wu, Lifei; Liu, Bao; Liu, Changwei

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Smooth muscle cells proliferated after exposure to cigarette smoke extract. • The p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expressions increased in the process. • The p-ERK inhibitor, U0126, can reverse these effects. • The p-ERK → p-c-Jun → cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the process. - Abstract: An epidemiological survey has shown that smoking is closely related to atherosclerosis, in which excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role. To investigate the mechanism underlying this unusual smoking-induced proliferation, cigarette smoke extract (CSE), prepared as smoke-bubbled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), was used to induce effects mimicking those exerted by smoking on SMCs. As assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 detection (an improved MTT assay), SMC viability increased significantly after exposure to CSE. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expression increased. When p-ERK was inhibited using U0126 (inhibitor of p-ERK), cell viability decreased and the expression of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1 was reduced accordingly, suggesting that p-ERK functions upstream of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1. When a c-Jun over-expression plasmid was transfected into SMCs, the level of cyclinD1 in these cells increased. Moreover, when c-Jun was knocked down by siRNA, cyclinD1 levels decreased. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the excessive proliferation of SMCs exposed to CSE.

  17. Cyclin D1 is a useful marker for soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor in children and adolescents: A comparative immunohistochemical study with rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Brancato, Franca; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Alaggio, Rita; Parenti, Rosalba; Salvatorelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin D1 amplification and/or overexpression contribute to the loss of the regulatory circuits that govern G1-S transition phase of the cell cycle, playing pivotal roles in different human malignant tumors, including breast, colon, prostate cancer, lymphoma, melanoma and neuroblastoma. In vitro studies have shown that cyclin D1 is overexpressed in Ewing's sarcoma (EWS)/peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (pPNET), but not in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Only a few immunohistochemical studies are available on cyclin D1 expression in EWS/pPNET, which confirmed its expression only in a limited number of cases. The aim of the present study was a comparative immunohistochemical analysis of the expression and distribution of cyclin D1 in a large series of pediatric/adolescent soft tissue EWS/pPNETs and rhabdomyosarcomas (both embryonal and alveolar subtypes) to assess its potential usefulness in their differential diagnosis. Notably cyclin D1 was strongly and diffusely expressed in all cases (20/20) of EWS/pPNET, while it was lacked in all cases (15/15) of rhabdomyosarcomas. Immunohistochemical overexpression of cyclin D1 in EWS/pPNET is a novel finding which could be exploitable as a diagnostic immunomarker for this tumor. Although highly sensitive, cyclin D1 is not specific for EWS/pPNET, and thus it should not be evaluated alone but in the context of a wide immunohistochemical panel. Accordingly, we first emphasize that when pathologists are dealing with a small round blue cell tumor of soft tissues in pediatric/adolescent patients, a strong and diffuse nuclear expression of cyclin D1 is of complementary diagnostic value to CD99 and FLI-1 in confirming diagnosis of EWS/pPNET and in ruling out rhabdomyosarcoma.

  18. Cdk2 plays a critical role in hepatocyte cell cycle progression and survival in the setting of cyclin D1 expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Nelsen, Christopher J; Goggin, Melissa M; Anttila, Chelsea K; Mullany, Lisa K; Berthet, Cyril; Kaldis, Philipp; Crary, Gretchen S; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    Cdk2 was once believed to play an essential role in cell cycle progression, but cdk2(-/-) mice have minimal phenotypic abnormalities. In this study, we examined the role of cdk2 in hepatocyte proliferation, centrosome duplication and survival. Cdk2(-/-) hepatocytes underwent mitosis and had normal centrosome content after mitogen stimulation. Unlike wild-type cells, cdk2(-/-) liver cells failed to undergo centrosome overduplication in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression. After mitogen stimulation in culture or partial hepatectomy in vivo, cdk2(-/-) hepatocytes demonstrated diminished proliferation. Cyclin D1 is a key mediator of cell cycle progression in hepatocytes, and transient expression of this protein is sufficient to promote robust proliferation of these cells in vivo. In cdk2(-/-) mice and animals treated with the cdk2 inhibitor seliciclib, cyclin D1 failed to induce hepatocyte cell cycle progression. Surprisingly, cdk2 ablation or inhibition led to massive hepatocyte and animal death following cyclin D1 transfection. In a transgenic model of chronic hepatic cyclin D1 expression, seliciclib induced hepatocyte injury and animal death, suggesting that cdk2 is required for survival of cyclin D1-expressing cells even in the absence of substantial proliferation. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that cdk2 plays a role in liver regeneration. Furthermore, it is essential for centrosome overduplication, proliferation and survival of hepatocytes that aberrantly express cyclin D1 in vivo. These studies suggest that cdk2 may warrant further investigation as a target for therapy of liver tumors with constitutive cyclin D1 expression.

  19. Hypoxia, angiotensin-II, and norepinephrine mediated apoptosis is stimulus specific in canine failed cardiomyocytes: a role for p38 MAPK, Fas-L and cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Victor G; Todor, Anastassia; Suzuki, George; Morita, Hideaki; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Sabbah, Hani N

    2003-03-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to the myocardial dysfunction associated with heart failure (HF). Activation of the p38 MAPK cascade can induce apoptosis in non-cardiac cells through increased expression of Fas-L, or through decreased expression of cyclin D(1). We tested the hypothesis that hypoxia (HX), angiotensin-II (A-II) and norepinephrine (NEPI) can mediate apoptosis by activating p38 MAPK, and thus initiating stimulus specific changes in Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression in failing cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes isolated from ten dogs with HF induced by coronary microembolizations were subjected to HX or A-II or NEPI with and without a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB 203580). TUNEL staining for DNA fragmentation and Western blots for p38 MAPK, Fas-L and cyclin D(1) detection were performed. HX-induced apoptosis was associated with increased Fas-L expression, A-II-induced apoptosis was associated with increased Fas-L and decreased cyclin D(1) expression, and NEPI-induced apoptosis was associated with decreased cyclin D(1) expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity attenuated stress-induced apoptosis in all experiments and reversed changes in Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression. HX, A-II and NEPI mediate apoptosis in failing cardiomyocytes via different effects on Fas-L and cyclin D(1) expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK reversed these effects, suggesting that apoptosis induced by HX, A-II and NEPI involves activation of p38 MAPK upstream from Fas-L and cyclin D(1).

  20. Abrogation of the p16-retinoblastoma-cyclin D1 pathway in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Hun-Woong; Song, Si-Youn; Lee, Tae-Jin; Jeong, Daewon; Lee, Tae-Yoon

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, we analyzed p16, retinoblastoma (Rb), and cyclin D1 abnormalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tissues and cell lines from Korean patients. We found a 40% loss of heterozygosity at the D9S171 locus (9p21 region) these tissues. All eight of the HNSCC cell lines did not express the p16 protein, and in two of these cell lines (Amc-HN-6 and 8), this was due to a deletion of the p16 gene. Three of the cell lines (Amc-HN-3 to 5) that expressed the p16 mRNA had the same nonsense mutation at codon 50 (CGA-Arg to TGA-Ter). The Amc-HN-1 and Amc-HN-7 cell lines, which did not express the p16 mRNA, had a missense mutation at codon 9 (GCC-Ala to GTC-Val) and a silent mutation at codon 106 (CCC-Pro to CCA), respectively. The Amc-HN-2 cell line (p16 exon-positive/mRNA-negative) had a single base deletion at codon 38 (CGG-Arg to CG), which resulted in a frameshift and a consequent stop signal at codon 44. The Rb protein was detected in all of the eight cell lines, although it was inactive in five of these due to hyperphosphorylation. The inverse relationship between p16 and Rb was 62.5% (5/8). Cyclin D1 was overexpressed in all of the eight cell lines. Our results suggest that the abrogation of p16, the overexpression of cyclin D1, and the consequent inactivation of Rb could be important factors in the carcinogenesis of HNSCCs.

  1. The p16-cyclin D1/CDK4-pRb pathway and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusume, T; Tsuda, H; Kawabata, M; Inoue, T; Umesaki, N; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-01

    A significant positive association has been reported between p16 expression and clinical outcome for epithelial ovarian cancer patients. However, there is a reciprocal correlation between genetic alterations of single members of the p16-cyclin D1/CDK4-pRb pathway (G1 pathway). Simultaneous evaluation of these four elements may produce a better prognostic factor than p16 alone. We studied the prognostic significance of the G1 pathway in 59 epithelial ovarian cancer patients undergoing surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy by immunohistochemical technique. Abnormal expression of p16 or pRb was defined by negative nuclei staining, and that of CDK4 and cyclin D1 was defined by 50% nuclear staining. An abnormal G1 pathway was indicated in cases that have at least one abnormality among these four elements. Abnormal expression of p16, pRb, and cyclin D1/CDK4 was observed in 33.9, 3.4, and 15.3% of studied cases, respectively. Abnormal G1 pathway was detected in 49.2% (29 of 59) of all cases. The patients with normal G1 pathway tended to achieve a higher complete response rate (81.0%) to chemotherapy, compared with patients with abnormal G1 pathway (55.0%); however, there was no significant difference (P = 0.1001) between the two groups. Univariate analyses identified advanced stage [hazards ratio (HR), 3.665; P = 0.0218], histological low grade (HR, 3.625; P = 0.0066), and abnormal G1 pathway (HR, 2.935; P = 0.03) as prognostic factors for overall survival. The G1 pathway might help as a prognostic factor to select high-risk patients.

  2. Rapamycin inhibits prostate cancer cell growth through cyclin D1 and enhances the cytotoxic efficacy of cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Imrali, Ahmet; Mao, Xueying; Yeste-Velasco, Marc; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in Western men and hormone refractory cancer (HRPC) kills most of the patients. Chemo-resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of prostate cancer. Platinum-complexes have been used to treat a number of malignancies including prostate cancer. However, it has limited effect to prostate cancer and with significant toxicity at higher doses. In recent years, increasing numbers of new agents targeting cancer specific pathways have become available and with low toxic side-effects. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) is an mTORC1 inhibitor, which inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which is commonly altered in prostate cancer. We determined the expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-mTOR proteins in association with the response to rapamycin in two androgen sensitive (22RV1 and LNCaP) and two androgen independent (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cell lines and found that the base-line and changes of cyclin D1 level, but not the expression level of p-mTOR, correlated with rapamycin sensitivity. We evaluated the cell killing effect of combined rapamycin and cisplatin treatment and showed that the combination had a more than additive effect in both androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer cells, which may be partially explained by the reduction of cyclin D1 expression by rapamycin. We also evaluated a range of combined treatment schedules, simultaneously or sequentially and found that continuous rapamycin treatment after a short cisplatin exposure was effective. The clinical application of these findings for prostate cancer treatment should be further investigated. PMID:27648364

  3. A proteomic study on cell cycle progression of endothelium exposed to tumor conditioned medium and the possible role of cyclin D1/E.

    PubMed

    Li, Ailing; Li, Hongwei; Jin, Gang; Xiu, Ruijuan

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to comprehensively analyze the differential expression of proteins from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to tumor conditioned medium (TCM) and to identify the key regulator in the cell cycle progression. The HUVECs were exposed to TCM from breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then their cell cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometer (FCM). The role of protein in cell cycle progression was detected via two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and western blotting. Following the stimulation of TCM, HUVECs showed a more cells in the S phase than did the negative control group (ECGF-free medium with 20% FBS), but the HUVECs' level was similar to the positive control group (medium with 25 micrograms/ml ECGF and 20% FBS). Increased expression of cyclin D1/E and some changes in other related proteins occurred after incubation with TCM. From our results, we can conclude that breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 may secrete soluble pro-angiogenic factors that induce the HUVEC angiogenic switch, during which the expression of cell cycle regulator cyclin D1/E increases and related proteins play an important role in this process.

  4. A cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of germinal center B-cell-like subtype in the right tonsil

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Changrui; Shi, Xiuying; Fan, Chuifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cyclin D1-positive tumor cells are commonly found in mantle cell lymphoma but they are very rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Clinical findings/Patient concerns: Here we present a rare case of cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the right tonsil of a 50-year-old man. Computed tomographic imaging detected a mass, about 2.5 cm × 1.8 cm in size, in the left side of the oropharynx. Diagnoses: Microscopically, the tumor cells were located under the pharyngeal mucosa and diffusely arranged. The tumor cells were large, with marked nuclear atypia. On performing immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells showed diffuse positive staining for CD10, CD20, cyclin D1, and Pax-5, and negative staining for CD3, CD15, CD30, CD56, and CK. Bcl-6 and Mum-1 expression were observed in 60% and 80% of tumor cells, respectively. The tumor Ki67 index was about 60%. Based on these findings, The tumor was diagnosed as a rare cyclin D1-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma rather than a mantle cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma is rare, but as large B-cell lymphoma is a common type of lymphoma, cyclin D1-positive large B-cell lymphoma should be considered a major possibility during differential diagnosis, including in the tonsils. PMID:28296741

  5. Zebrafish cyclin Dx is required for development of motor neuron progenitors, and its expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Huang-Wei; Yuan, Rey-Yue; Chou, Chih-Ming; Chen, Yi-Chung; Hung, Chin-Chun; Hu, Chin-Hwa; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L.; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chen, Chih-Lung; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Huang, Chang-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Cyclins play a central role in cell-cycle regulation; in mammals, the D family of cyclins consists of cyclin D1, D2, and D3. In Xenopus, only homologs of cyclins D1 and D2 have been reported, while a novel cyclin, cyclin Dx (ccndx), was found to be required for the maintenance of motor neuron progenitors during embryogenesis. It remains unknown whether zebrafish possess cyclin D3 or cyclin Dx. In this study, we identified a zebrafish ccndx gene encoding a protein which can form a complex with Cdk4. Through whole-mount in situ hybridization, we observed that zccndx mRNA is expressed in the motor neurons of hindbrain and spinal cord during development. Analysis of a 4-kb promoter sequence of the zccndx gene revealed the presence of HRE sites, which can be regulated by HIF2α. Morpholino knockdown of zebrafish Hif2α and cyclin Dx resulted in the abolishment of isl1 and oligo2 expression in the precursors of motor neurons, and also disrupted axon growth. Overexpression of cyclin Dx mRNA in Hif2α morphants partially rescued zccndx expression. Taken together, our data indicate that zebrafish cyclin Dx plays a role in maintaining the precursors of motor neurons. PMID:27323909

  6. Coffee polyphenols change the expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 modifying cyclin D1 levels in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oleaga, Carlota; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms of its chemopreventive effects remain unknown. To identify differentially expressed genes upon incubation of HT29 colon cancer cells with instant caffeinated coffee (ICC) or caffeic acid (CA) using whole-genome microarrays. ICC incubation of HT29 cells caused the overexpression of 57 genes and the underexpression of 161, while CA incubation induced the overexpression of 12 genes and the underexpression of 32. Using Venn-Diagrams, we built a list of five overexpressed genes and twelve underexpressed genes in common between the two experimental conditions. This list was used to generate a biological association network in which STAT5B and ATF-2 appeared as highly interconnected nodes. STAT5B overexpression was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. For ATF-2, the changes in mRNA levels were confirmed for both ICC and CA, whereas the decrease in protein levels was only observed in CA-treated cells. The levels of cyclin D1, a target gene for both STAT5B and ATF-2, were downregulated by CA in colon cancer cells and by ICC and CA in breast cancer cells. Coffee polyphenols are able to affect cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells through the modulation of STAT5B and ATF-2.

  7. Rac1b enhances cell survival through activation of the JNK2/c-JUN/Cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wei, Si-Si; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yi-He; Xu, Wei-Ping; Jie, Qi-Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Yi-Gang; Wei, Yi-Dong; Wang, Yue-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Rac1b is a constitutively activated, alternatively spliced form of the small GTPase Rac1. Previous studies showed that Rac1b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to detect genes differentially expressed in HEK293T cells and SW480 human colon cancer cells stably overexpressing Rac1b. We found that the pro-proliferation genes JNK2, c-JUN and cyclin-D1 as well as anti-apoptotic AKT2 and MCL1 were all upregulated in both lines. Rac1b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis by activating the JNK2/c-JUN/cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways, respectively. Very low Rac1b levels were detected in the colonic epithelium of wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Knockout of the rat Rac1 gene exon-3b or knockdown of endogenous Rac1b in HT29 human colon cancer cells downregulated only the AKT2/MCL1 pathway. Our study revealed that very low levels of endogenous Rac1b inhibit apoptosis, while Rac1b upregulation both promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. It is likely the AKT2/MCL1 pathway is more sensitive to Rac1b regulation. PMID:26918455

  8. A Human Long Non-Coding RNA ALT1 Controls the Cell Cycle of Vascular Endothelial Cells Via ACE2 and Cyclin D1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Rui; Ma, Jie-Yi; Wang, Mian; Cui, Jin; Wu, Wei-Bin; Liu, Rui-Ming; Zhang, Chun-Xiang; Li, Wen; Wang, Shen-Ming

    2017-10-05

    ALT1 is a novel long non-coding RNA derived from the alternatively spliced transcript of the deleted in lymphocytic leukemia 2 (DLEU2). To date, ALT1 biological roles in human vascular endothelial cells have not been reported. ALT1 was knocked down by siRNAs. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cck-8. The existence and sequence of human ALT1 were identified by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The interaction between lncRNA and proteins was analyzed by RNA-Protein pull down assay, RNA immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry analysis. ALT1 was expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The expression of ALT1 was significantly downregulated in contact-inhibited HUVECs and in hypoxia-induced, growth-arrested HUVECs. Knocking down of ALT1 inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. We observed that angiotensin converting enzyme Ⅱ(ACE2) was a direct target gene of ALT1. Knocking-down of ALT1 or its target gene ACE2 could efficiently decrease the expression of cyclin D1 via the enhanced ubiquitination and degradation, in which HIF-1α and protein von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL) might be involved. The results suggested the human long non-coding RNA ALT1 is a novel regulator for cell cycle of HUVECs via ACE2 and cyclin D1 pathway. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Cyclin I is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Taiki; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Akio; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Kikkawa, Ushio; Kamada, Shinji

    2013-08-15

    Cyclins control cell cycle progression by regulating the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Cyclin I is a member of the cyclin family because of the presence of a cyclin box motif. It has been suggested that Cyclin I is involved in various biological processes, such as cell survival, angiogenesis, and cell differentiation. However, whether or not Cyclin I has a role in regulating the cell cycle similarly to other cyclins has yet to be clarified. Therefore, we investigated the role for Cyclin I in cell cycle progression. We showed that the protein level of Cyclin I oscillated during the cell cycle, and that Cyclin I was subjected to ubiquitination and degradation in cells. The interaction between Cyclin I and Cdk5 was detected in cells overexpressed with both proteins. Furthermore, depletion of Cyclin I by siRNAs prevented cell proliferation, suggesting the positive role of Cyclin I for the cell cycle progression. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that cells depleted of Cyclin I were accumulated at G₂/M phases. By using HeLa.S-Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) cells, we further confirmed that knockdown of Cyclin I induced cell cycle arrest at S/G₂/M phases. These results strongly suggest that Cyclin I has the role in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  10. Cyclin D1 silencing suppresses tumorigenicity, impairs DNA double strand break repair and thus radiosensitizes androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Marampon, Francesco; Gravina, Giovanni; Ju, Xiaoming; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pompili, Simona; Festuccia, Claudio; Colapietro, Alessandro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-02-02

    Patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) have higher biochemical failure rates following radiation therapy (RT). Cyclin D1 deregulated expression in PCa is associated with a more aggressive disease: however its role in radioresistance has not been determined. Cyclin D1 levels in the androgen-independent PC3 and 22Rv1 PCa cells were stably inhibited by infecting with cyclin D1-shRNA. Tumorigenicity and radiosensitivity were investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental assays. Cyclin D1 silencing interfered with PCa oncogenic phenotype by inducing growth arrest in the G1 phase of cell cycle and reducing soft agar colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor formation and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. Depletion of cyclin D1 significantly radiosensitizes PCa cells by increasing the RT-induced DNA damages by affecting the NHEJ and HR pathways responsible of the DNA double-strand break repair. Following treatment of cells with RT the abundance of a biomarker of DNA damage, γ-H2AX, was dramatically increased in sh-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. Concordant with these observations DNA-PKcs-activation and RAD51-accumulation, part of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery, were reduced in shRNA-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. We further demonstrate the physical interaction between CCND1 with activated-ATM, -DNA-PKcs and RAD51 is enhanced by RT. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing experiments indicated DNA-PKcs and RAD51 are downstream targets of CCND1-mediated PCa cells radioresistance. In summary, these observations suggest that CCND1 is a key mediator of PCa radioresistance and could represent a potential target for radioresistant hormone-resistant PCa.

  11. Cyclin D1 silencing suppresses tumorigenicity, impairs DNA double strand break repair and thus radiosensitizes androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaoming; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Pompili, Simona; Festuccia, Claudio; Colapietro, Alessandro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Pestell, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) have higher biochemical failure rates following radiation therapy (RT). Cyclin D1 deregulated expression in PCa is associated with a more aggressive disease: however its role in radioresistance has not been determined. Cyclin D1 levels in the androgen-independent PC3 and 22Rv1 PCa cells were stably inhibited by infecting with cyclin D1-shRNA. Tumorigenicity and radiosensitivity were investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental assays. Cyclin D1 silencing interfered with PCa oncogenic phenotype by inducing growth arrest in the G1 phase of cell cycle and reducing soft agar colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor formation and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. Depletion of cyclin D1 significantly radiosensitizes PCa cells by increasing the RT-induced DNA damages by affecting the NHEJ and HR pathways responsible of the DNA double-strand break repair. Following treatment of cells with RT the abundance of a biomarker of DNA damage, γ-H2AX, was dramatically increased in sh-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. Concordant with these observations DNA-PKcs-activation and RAD51-accumulation, part of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery, were reduced in shRNA-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. We further demonstrate the physical interaction between CCND1 with activated-ATM, -DNA-PKcs and RAD51 is enhanced by RT. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing experiments indicated DNA-PKcs and RAD51 are downstream targets of CCND1-mediated PCa cells radioresistance. In summary, these observations suggest that CCND1 is a key mediator of PCa radioresistance and could represent a potential target for radioresistant hormone-resistant PCa. PMID:26689991

  12. Control of sleep by cyclin A and its regulator.

    PubMed

    Rogulja, Dragana; Young, Michael W

    2012-03-30

    How and why the brain reversibly switches from a waking to a sleep state remain among the most intriguing questions in biology. We show that cyclin A (CycA) and regulator of cyclin A1, essential cell cycle factors, function in postmitotic neurons to promote sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. Reducing the abundance of CycA in neurons delayed the wake-sleep transition, caused multiple arousals from sleep, and reduced the homeostatic response to sleep deprivation. CycA is expressed in ~40 to 50 neurons in the adult brain, most of which are intermingled with circadian clock neurons, suggesting functional interactions among neurons controlling sleep and circadian behavior.

  13. pRb and CyclinD1 Complement p16 as Immunohistochemical Surrogate Markers of HPV Infection in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Johannes H; Hauck, Franziska; Barros, Mário H M; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2015-12-09

    Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) association in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is important to identify patients with favorable disease course. However, molecular HPV detection is not universally available. p16 has been proposed as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in HNSCC but, use on its own may result in wrong assignment of some cases to the group of HPV-associated tumors. We have therefore studied 424 HNSCC cases with known p16 and HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) status for expression of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and CyclinD1 by immunohistochemistry using 6-tiered scales (0 to 5) and a combined score (0 to 10). Sixty-one of 424 cases showed overexpression of p16. Of these, 52 cases were HPV DNA-PCR-positive. HPV association strongly correlated with low expression scores for pRb and CyclinD1 individually (scores ≤2) or combined (score sum ≤4), whereas HPV-negative carcinomas showed widely distributed expression scores. High expression scores for pRb or for pRb/CyclinD1 were observed exclusively in HPV DNA-PCR-negative cases. Three of 9 p16-positive/HPV DNA-PCR-negative cases showed high expression of pRb and displayed a high combined pRb/CyclinD1 score. We conclude that HPV-positive HNSCC are characterized by p16 overexpression and low scores for pRb, CyclinD1, and a low combined pRb/CyclinD1 score. High pRb or combined pRb/CyclinD1 scores are strong indicators for HPV-negativity and may justify excluding these cases from further molecular HPV testing. Furthermore p16-positive/HPV DNA-PCR-negative cases show heterogeneous expression of pRb and CyclinD1, including high pRb or high combined pRb/CyclinD1 scores suggesting that at least some of these cases are truly HPV negative.

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of the p53, mdm2, p21/Waf-1, Rb, p16, Ki67, cyclin D1, cyclin A and cyclin B1 proteins and apoptotic index in T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kanavaros, P; Bai, M; Stefanaki, K; Poussias, G; Rontogianni, D; Zioga, E; Gorgoulis, V; Agnantis, N J

    2001-04-01

    Fifty-seven cases of T-cell lymphomas (TCL) including 5 lymphoblastic (T-LBL) and 52 peripheral TCL (PTCL) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of p53, mdm2, p21, Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and Ki67/MIB1 proteins and 39/52 PTCL were also analyzed for the expression of p16 protein and for the presence of apoptotic cells by the TUNEL method. The aim was to search for abnormal immunoprofiles of p53 and Rb growth control pathways and to determine the proliferative activity and the apoptotic index of TCL. Abnormal overexpression of p53, p21 and mdm2, in comparison to normal lymph nodes, was found in 12/57, 10/57 and 2/57 cases of TCL, respectively. Abnormal loss of Rb and p16 expression was found in 1/57 and 2/39 cases, respectively, whereas abnormal overexpression of cyclin D1 was not detected in any of the 57 cases. Our data revealed entity-related p53/p21/mdm2 phenotypes. Indeed, most nodal and cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) showed concomitant overexpression of p53 and p21 proteins (7/8 cases), and mdm2 was overexpressed in 2 p53-positive nodal ALCL. In contrast, overexpression of p53 was found in 3/17 cases of nodal peripheral TCL unspecified (PTCL-UC) and 2/7 non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Overexpression of p21 protein was detected in 2/3 p53-positive PTCL-UC and in 1/2 p53-positive non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Finally, all the remaining 25 cases of TCL did not show p53 and p21 overexpression. Overall, the p53+/p21+ phenotype in 10/57 TCL suggests wild-type p53 capable of inducing p21 expression. The highest apoptotic index (AI) was found in ALCL and a positive correlation between apoptotic index and Ki67 index (p<0.001) was detected. Ki67, cyclin A and cyclin B1 expression was found in all 57 TCL and on the basis of the combined use of these 3 variables, 3 groups of proliferative activity could be determined: a) high in ALCL and T-LBL, b) low in mycosis fungoides (MF) and gammadelta hepatosplenic TCL

  15. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) suppressed cyclin D1 expression and hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Hui; Jian, Wei-Hua; Wu, Zhao-Feng; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Hua; Li, Wen; Xia, Jin-Tang

    2014-07-30

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory and immunoregulatory chemokine, plays important roles in cancer-related biological processes. However, few studies have focused on the clinical relevance of MIF and cyclin D1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs). In this study, MIF and cyclin D1 expression levels in HCC tissues and cell lines were significantly upregulated compared with adjacent normal tissues or a normal liver cell line. In HCC specimens, MIF expression positively correlated with cyclin D1 expression. Additionally, MIF and cyclin D1 expression positively correlated with tumor size. MIF knockdown inhibited the proliferation of PLC and HepG2 cells and promoted apoptosis. However, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MIF did not influence the cell cycle in these cells. In an in vivo xenograft model, MIF knockdown reduced the tumor growth rate. The expression levels of Bcl-2, p-caspase-3, BIM and Bax were upregulated, while the expression levels of cyclin D1, p-Akt and p-ERK were downregulated in MIF-knockdown cells. These findings indicate that MIF siRNA reduces proliferation and increases apoptosis in HCC cells. MIF knockdown inhibits the expression of growth-related proteins and induces the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, supporting a role for MIF as a novel therapeutic target for HCC.

  16. Knockdown of ILK inhibits glioma development via upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kebin; Wang, Guangyi; Li, Chunhui; Shan, Xiaosong; Liu, Haipeng

    2015-07-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein kinase that interacts with cytoplasmic domains of integrin subunits in tumor tissues. However, the relationship between gliomas and ILK is elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the role of ILK in a human glioma cell line (U251). ILK stable expressing vector, U251ILK-PGFP-V-RS-shRNA, was established and named as U251-si. The empty-PGFP-V-RS-shRNA (U251-N) was employed as the control. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect ILK and E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell cycle analysis was employed to examine the cell cycle distribution. Cell migration was detected using a wound healing assay, and cell invasion was detected using a Transwell invasion assay. Tumor size and weight were also examined. The results indicated that ILK was expressed at a lower level at both the mRNA and protein levels in the U251-si group compared with the U251-N group (p<0.01). ILK knockdown suppressed cell proliferation of the glioma cells. Knockdown of ILK reduced the migratory and invasive potentials of the glioma cells. Inhibition of ILK expression upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated cyclin D1 in the glioma cells compared to the U251-N group (p<0.05). Knockdown of ILK in the U251 cells attenuated the ability of U251 cells to form tumors in nude mice and impaired glioma cell in vivo tumorigenicity. In conclusion, knockdown of ILK inhibits glioma cell migration, invasion and proliferation through upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of cyclin D1. Our results suggest that ILK may serve as a promising therapeutic target for glioma.

  17. Differential regulation of CDP/Cux p110 by cyclin A/Cdk2 and cyclin A/Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Marianne; Nepveu, Alain

    2005-09-23

    Previous experiments with peptide fusion proteins suggested that cyclin A/Cdk1 and Cdk2 might exhibit similar yet distinct phosphorylation specificities. Using a physiological substrate, CDP/Cux, our study confirms this notion. Proteolytic processing of CDP/Cux by cathepsin L generates the CDP/Cux p110 isoform at the beginning of S phase. CDP/Cux p110 makes stable interactions with DNA during S phase but is inhibited in G2 following the phosphorylation of serine 1237 by cyclin A/Cdk1. In this study, we propose that differential phosphorylation by cyclin A/Cdk1 and cyclin A/Cdk2 enables CDP/Cux p110 to exert its function as a transcriptional regulator specifically during S phase. We found that like cyclin A/Cdk1, cyclin A/Cdk2 interacted efficiently with recombinant CDP/Cux proteins that contain the Cut homeodomain and an adjacent cyclin-binding motif (Cy). In contrast to cyclin A/Cdk1, however, cyclin A/Cdk2 did not efficiently phosphorylate CDP/Cux p110 on serine 1237 and did not inhibit its DNA binding activity in vitro. Accordingly, co-expression with cyclin A/Cdk2 in cells did not inhibit the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of CDP/Cux p110. To confirm that the sequence surrounding serine 1237 was responsible for the differential regulation by Cdk1 and Cdk2, we replaced 4 amino acids flanking the phosphorylation site to mimic a known Cdk2 phosphorylation site present in the Cdc6 protein. Both cyclin A/Cdk2 and Cdk1 efficiently phosphorylated the CDP/Cux(Cdc6) mutant and inhibited its DNA binding activity. Altogether our results help explain why the DNA binding activity of CDP/Cux p110 is maximal during S phase and decreases in G2 phase.

  18. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  19. Notch1-induced mammary tumor development is cyclin D1-dependent and correlates with expansion of pre-malignant multipotent duct-limited progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ling, H; Sylvestre, J-R; Jolicoeur, P

    2010-08-12

    Members of the Notch family are involved in the development of breast cancer in animal models and in humans. In young transgenic mice, expressing intracellular activated Notch1 (N1(IC)) in mammary cells, we found that CD24(+) CD29(high) progenitor cells had enhanced survival, and were expanded through a cyclin D1-dependent pathway. This expansion positively correlated with the later cyclin D1-dependent formation of basal-like ductal tumors. This expanded population exhibited abnormal differentiation skewed toward the basal cells, showed signs of pre-malignancy (low PTEN/p53 and high c-myc) and contained stem cells with impaired self-renewal in vivo, and more numerous multipotent, ductal-restricted progenitors. Our data suggest that N1(IC) can favor transformation of progenitor cells early in life through a cyclin D1-dependent pathway.

  20. Enterolactone induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest in non-small cell lung cancer cells by down-regulating cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Chikara, Shireen; Lindsey, Kaitlin; Dhillon, Harsharan; Mamidi, Sujan; Kittilson, Jeffrey; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Reindl, Katie M.

    2017-01-01

    Flaxseed is a rich source of the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) which is metabolized into mammalian lignans enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone (EL) in the digestive tract. The anti-cancer properties of these lignans have been demonstrated for various cancer types, but have not been studied for lung cancer. In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effects of EL for several non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines of various genetic backgrounds. EL inhibited the growth of A549, H441, and H520 lung cancer cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The anti-proliferative effects of EL for lung cancer cells were not due to enhanced cell death, but rather due to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Molecular studies revealed that EL- decreased mRNA or protein expression levels of the G1-phase promoters cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)-2, -4, and -6, and p-cdc25A; decreased phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-pRb) protein levels; and simultaneously increased levels of p21WAF1/CIP1, a negative regulator of the G1-phase. The results suggest that EL inhibits the growth of NSCLC cell lines by down-regulating G1-phase cyclins and CDKs, and up-regulating p21WAF1/CIP1, which leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Therefore, EL may hold promise as an adjuvant treatment for lung cancer therapy. PMID:28323486

  1. Cyclin D2 Protein Stability Is Regulated in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu Mei; Sartori, Daniel J.; Teta, Monica; Opare-Addo, Lynn M.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Long, Simon Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Kushner, Jake A.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular determinants of β-cell mass expansion remain poorly understood. Cyclin D2 is the major D-type cyclin expressed in β-cells, essential for adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that cyclin D2 could be actively regulated in β-cells, which could allow mitogenic stimuli to influence β-cell expansion. Cyclin D2 protein was sharply increased after partial pancreatectomy, but cyclin D2 mRNA was unchanged, suggesting posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms influence cyclin D2 expression in β-cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, cyclin D2 protein stability is powerfully regulated in fibroblasts. Threonine 280 of cyclin D2 is phosphorylated, and this residue critically limits D2 stability. We derived transgenic (tg) mice with threonine 280 of cyclin D2 mutated to alanine (T280A) or wild-type cyclin D2 under the control of the insulin promoter. Cyclin D2 T280A protein was expressed at much higher levels than wild-type cyclin D2 protein in β-cells, despite equivalent expression of tg mRNAs. Cyclin D2 T280A tg mice exhibited a constitutively nuclear cyclin D2 localization in β-cells, and increased cyclin D2 stability in islets. Interestingly, threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice had greatly reduced β-cell apoptosis, with suppressed expression of proapoptotic genes. Suppressed β-cell apoptosis in threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice resulted in greatly increased β-cell area in aged mice. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclin D2 is regulated by protein stability in pancreatic β-cells, that signals that act upon threonine 280 limit cyclin D2 stability in β-cells, and that threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 overexpression prolongs β-cell survival and augments β-cell mass expansion. PMID:19628581

  2. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 induces cyclin D1 degradation through the phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286} in squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Jun; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi . E-mail: yanaga@clipharm.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hirata, Masato; Morimoto, Sachio; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are morphogens which induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. We reported that DIF-1 and DIF-3 inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in mammalian cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines NA and SAS, well differentiated and poorly differentiated cell lines, respectively. Although DIF-1 did not induce the expression of cell differentiation makers in these cell lines, it inhibited the proliferation of NA and SAS in a dose-dependent manner by restricting the cell cycle in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase. DIF-1 induced cyclin D1 degradation, but this effect was prevented by treatment with lithium chloride and SB216763, the inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}). Depletion of endogenous GSK-3{beta} by RNA interference also attenuated the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 degradation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on GSK-3{beta} and found that DIF-1 dephosphorylated GSK-3{beta} on Ser{sup 9} and induced the nuclear translocation of GSK-3{beta}, suggesting that DIF-1 activated GSK-3{beta}. Then, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 mutants (Thr286Ala, Thr288Ala, and Thr286/288Ala). We revealed that Thr286Ala and Thr286/288Ala mutants were highly resistant to DIF-1-induced degradation compared with wild-type cyclin D1, indicating that the phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286} was critical for cyclin D1 degradation induced by DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 induces degradation of cyclin D1 through the GSK-3{beta}-mediated phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286}.

  3. Effects of MEK and DNMT inhibitors on arsenic-treated human uroepithelial cells in relation to Cyclin-D1 and p16.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Jiang, Wen-Hong; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2011-01-15

    Arsenic compounds are well-known toxic and carcinogenic agents, and they are widely distributed throughout the earth's crust. These compounds are associated with various human malignancies. It has been reported that there is an elevated risk of bladder cancer in an area highly contaminated with arsenic on the southwest coast of Taiwan. However, the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-associated carcinogenesis are still unclear. The cell cycle regulatory proteins are important indicators in control of cell cycle progression. Moreover, the high expression of Cyclin-D1 and loss of p16 has been associated with a worse prognosis in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, we investigated the effect of arsenic on Cyclin-D1 and p16 expression and evaluated the role of the ERK signaling pathway and DNA methylation in arsenic carcinogenesis. Our study results showed that Cyclin-D1 high expression was found in 56.3% (9/16) of urothelial carcinomas (UC) from a blackfoot disease (BFD) area and 6.3% (1/16) of UC from a non-BFD area (p=0.002). The p16 low expression in 81.2% (13/16) of UC from BFD areas was significantly lower than in non-BFD areas (25.0%; 4/16) (p=0.001). In addition, the Cyclin-D1 increased expression but decreased p16 expression in arsenite-treated SV-HUC-1 cells. However, when cells were pretreated with inhibitors (5-aza-CdR or U0126), the effects of arsenite on Cyclin-D1 and p16 expression were suppressed. Finally, these results indicated that Cyclin-D1 and p16 both might play important roles in carcinogenesis as a result of arsenic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of microRNA-95-3p suppresses brain metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma through downregulation of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Su Jin; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hye Ree; Song, Hye Jin; Lee, Dong Heon; Lee, Hong; Shin, Chang Hoon; Joung, Je-Gun; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Joo, Kyeung Min; Kim, Hyeon Ho

    2015-08-21

    Despite great efforts to improve survival rates, the prognosis of lung cancer patients is still very poor, mainly due to high invasiveness. We developed brain metastatic PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells through intracardiac injection of lung adenocarcinoma PC14PE6 cells. Western blot and RT-qPCR analyses revealed that PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells had mesenchymal characteristics and higher invasiveness than PC14PE6 cells. We found that cyclin D1 was upregulated, miR-95-3p was inversely downregulated, and pri-miR-95 and its host gene, ABLIM2, were consistently decreased in PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells. MiR-95-3p suppressed cyclin D1 expression through direct binding to the 3' UTR of cyclin D1 mRNA and suppressed invasiveness, proliferation, and clonogenicity of PC14PE6/LvBr4 cells. Ectopic cyclin D1 reversed miR-95-3p-mediated inhibition of invasiveness and clonogenicity, demonstrating cyclin D1 downregulation is involved in function of miR-95-3p. Using bioluminescence imaging, we found that miR-95-3p suppressed orthotopic tumorigenicity and brain metastasis in vivo and increased overall survival and brain metastasis-free survival. Consistent with in vitro metastatic cells, the levels of miR-95-3p, pri-miR-95, and ABLIM2 mRNA were decreased in brain metastatic tissues compared with lung cancer tissues and higher cyclin D1 expression was involved in poor prognosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-95-3p is a potential therapeutic target for brain metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  5. Functional regulation of D-type cyclins by insulin-like growth factor-I and serum in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Janet; Rabin, Neil; Lam, Eric W-F; Yong, Kwee L

    2007-10-01

    D-type cyclin genes are universally dysregulated in multiple myeloma (MM), but the functional consequences are unclear as D-type cyclin gene expression does not correlate with proliferation or disease progression. We examined the protein expression and regulation of D-type cyclins and other cell cycle regulators in human myeloma cell lines and primary CD138(+) plasma cells (PCs). Cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4, CDK6, p27(Kip1) p18(INK4C) and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) were absent in normal PCs, heterogeneously expressed in primary MM cells and positively correlated with disease activity/progression. Cyclins D1 and D2 complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6, suggesting that both phosphorylate pRb in MM. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expressed via either t(14;16) or t(4;14) IgH translocations was functionally upregulated by fetal calf serum or insulin-like growth factor-I, leading to pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle entry/progression, and in some cases inversely correlated with p27(Kip1). However, pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle progression mediated by cyclin D1 expressed via t(11;14) was less dependent on exogenous stimuli. These data suggest that the presence or absence of specific IgH translocations underlying aberrant D-type cyclin expression may influence their response to mitogens in the bone marrow microenvironment. We showed for the first time that D-type cyclins are functionally regulated in MM, differentially responsive to exogenous growth factors and upregulated with disease progression.

  6. [Expression of CD68, cyclin D1 and rearrangement of bcl-6 gene are adverse prognostic factors in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojie; Wang, Jinfen; Bai, Wei; Sun, Ruifang

    2015-08-01

    To study expression of CD68, cyclin D1 protein and rearrangement of bcl-6 gene impact on the prognosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Gets paraffin samples of the 105 cases DLBCL with the detailed follow-up information, and were studied by using immunohistochemical EnVision method for CD3, CD10, CD20, CD68, cyclin D1, bcl-6, MUM 1, SOX-11 immunolabeling. The DLBCL were classified into germinal center B cell-like (GCB) subtypes and non-germinal center B cell-like (non-GCB) subtypes according to Hans'algorithm. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to detect the bcl-6 gene rearrangement. The relationship between CD68, cyclin D1 protein, the bcl-6 gene and the curative effect of chemotherapy and survival was analyzed using statistical software. Respectively by GCB type, non-GCB type immune phenotype and CHOP, R-CHOP chemotherapy group, compare the curative effects. 105 patients had GCB 19 cases (18.1%), non-GCB 86 cases (81.9%), CD68 expression was 18 cases (17.1%), cyclin D1 high expression 36 cases (34.3%), bcl-6 gene rearrangement in 21 cases (21.9%), there is no correlation among the three (P > 0.05). One-way analysis of variance showed that age ≤ 60 years, clinical stage I-II, IPI score 0 to 2 points, LDH (U/L) < 245 IU/L,GCB subtypes, R-CHOP therapy, the prognosis of patients with better (P < 0.05), But gender, primary site no correlation with prognosis (P > 0.05). CD68, cyclin D1 high expression, bcl-6 rearrangement had poor prognosis (P < 0.05). Stratification analysis results show GCB-type or non-GCB type with high expression of CD68 contrast alloimmune phenotype groups had a poor prognosis, non-GCB type with high expression of cyclin D1 and rearrangement of bcl-6 gene had a poor prognosis (P < 0.001, P = 0.02). Treatment scheme of layered display, the CHOP treatment, significantly correlated with overall survival with high expression of CD68, cyclin D1 (P < 0.05), the R-CHOP treatment, there was no statistically

  7. Role of NADPH oxidases in inducing a selective increase of oxidant stress and cyclin D1 and checkpoint 1 over-expression during progression to human gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Javé, Eduardo E; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Hernández-Espinosa, Diego R; Sánchez-Sevilla, Lourdes; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Contreras-Zentella, Martha L; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Escalante-Tatersfield, Tomás; Echegaray-Donde, Agustín; Ruiz-Molina, Juan M; Herrera, Miguel F; Morán, Julio; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the main causes of global mortality. Here, reactive oxygen species (ROS) could largely contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. Hence, the present work was aimed to assess the role of ROS, oxidant status, NADPH oxidases (NOXs) expression, during human gastric adenocarcinoma. We obtained subcellular fraction from samples of gastric mucosa taken from control subjects (n = 20), and from 40 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as samples of distant areas (tumour-free gastric mucosa). Parameters indicative of lipid peroxidation and cell proliferation were selectively increased in both tumour-free and in cancerous gastric mucosa, despite of glutathione (GSH) content, glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in the adenocarcinoma. These high levels of antioxidant defences inversely correlated with down-regulated expression for NOX2 and 4; however, over-expression of NOX1 occurred with increased caspase-3 activity and overexpressed checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and cyclin D1 proteins. In the tumour-free mucosa an oxidant stress took place, without changing total GSH but with decreased activities for GR and mitochondrial SOD; moreover, over-expression of checkpoint 1 (MDC1) correlated with lower NOX2 and 4 expression in this mucosa. Chronically injured gastric mucosa increases lipoperoxidative events and cell proliferation. In the adenocarcinoma, cell proliferation was further enhanced, oxidant stress decreased which seemed to be linked to NOX1, MDC1 and cyclin D1 over-expression, but with a lower NOXs activity leading a 'low tone' of ROS formation. Therefore, our results could be useful for early detection and treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of c-Myc and Cyclin D1 by JCV T-Antigen and β-Catenin in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Michael J.; Parker Struckhoff, Amanda; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Li, Li; Margolin, David A.; McGoey, Robin; Valle, Luis Del

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, mounting evidence has implicated the human neurotropic virus JC virus in the pathology of colon cancer. However, the mechanisms of JC virus-mediated oncogenesis are still not fully determined. One candidate to mediate these effects is the viral early transcriptional product T-Antigen, which has the ability to inactivate cell cycle regulatory proteins such as p53. In medulloblastomas, T-Antigen has been shown to bind the Wnt signaling pathway protein β-catenin; however, the effects of this interaction on downstream cell cycle regulatory proteins remain unknown. In light of these observations, we investigated the association of T-Antigen and nuclear β-catenin in colon cancer cases and the effects of this complex in the activation of the transcription and cell cycle regulators c-Myc and Cyclin D1 in vitro. Gene amplification demonstrated the presence of viral sequences in 82.4% of cases and we detected expression of T-Antigen in 64.6% of cases by immunohistochemistry. Further, we found that T-Antigen and β-catenin co-localized in the nuclei of tumor cells and we confirmed the physical binding between these two proteins in vitro. The nuclear presence of T-Antigen and β-catenin resulted in the significant enhancement of TCF-dependent promoter activity and activation of the β-catenin downstream targets, c-Myc and Cyclin D1. These observations provide further evidence for a role of JCV T-Antigen in the dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway and in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. PMID:25229241

  9. Abrogation of p53 by its antisense in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells increases cyclin D1 via activation of Akt and promotion of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Kumari, Ratna; Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2007-11-15

    The p53 protein has been a subject of intense research interest since its discovery as about 50% of human cancers carry p53 mutations. Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic lesions in breast cancers suggesting a critical role of p53 in breast cancer development, growth and chemosensitivity. This report describes the derivation and characterization of MCF-7As53, an isogenic cell line derived from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells in which p53 was abrogated by antisense p53 cDNA. Similar to MCF-7 and simultaneously selected hygromycin resistant MCF-7H cells, MCF-7As53 cells have consistent basal epithelial phenotype, morphology, and estrogen receptor expression levels at normal growth conditions. Present work documents investigation of molecular variations, growth kinetics, and cell cycle related studies in relation to absence of wild-type p53 protein and its transactivation potential as well. Even though wild-type tumor suppressor p53 is an activator of cell growth arrest and apoptosis-mediator genes such as p21, Bax, and GADD45 in MCF-7As53 cells, no alterations in expression levels of these genes were detected. The doubling time of these cells decreased due to depletion of G0/G1 cell phase because of constitutive activation of Akt and increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. This proliferative property was abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore this p53 null cell line indicates that p53 is an indispensable component of cellular signaling system which is regulated by caveolin-1 expression, involving Akt activation and increase in cyclin D1, thereby promoting proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  10. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells.

  11. The novel agent phospho-glycerol-ibuprofen-amide (MDC-330) inhibits glioblastoma growth in mice: an effect mediated by cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Lauren E; Mattheolabakis, George; Vaeth, Brandon M; LaComb, Joseph F; Wang, Ruixue; Zhi, Jizu; Komninou, Despina; Rigas, Basil; Mackenzie, Gerardo G

    2016-04-01

    Given that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis, new agents are urgently needed. We developed phospho-glycerol-ibuprofen-amide (PGIA), a novel ibuprofen derivative, and evaluated its safety and efficacy in preclinical models of GBM, and its mechanism of action using human GBM cells and animal tumor models. Furthermore, we explored whether formulating PGIA in polymeric nanoparticles could enhance its levels in the brain. PGIA was 3.7- to 5.1-fold more potent than ibuprofen in suppressing the growth of human GBM cell lines. PGIA 0.75× IC50 inhibited cell proliferation by 91 and 87% in human LN-229 and U87-MG GBM cells, respectively, and induced strong G1/S arrest.In vivo, compared with control, PGIA reduced U118-MG and U87-MG xenograft growth by 77 and 56%, respectively (P< 0.05), and was >2-fold more efficacious than ibuprofen. Normal human astrocytes were resistant to PGIA, indicating selectivity. Mechanistically, PGIA reduced cyclin D1 levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in GBM cells and in xenografts. PGIA induced cyclin D1 degradation via the proteasome pathway and induced dephosphorylation of GSK3β, which was required for cyclin D1 turnover. Furthermore, cyclin D1 overexpression rescued GBM cells from the cell growth inhibition by PGIA. Moreover, the formulation of PGIA in poly-(L)-lactic acid poly(ethylene glycol) polymeric nanoparticles improved its pharmacokinetics in mice, delivering PGIA to the brain. PGIA displays strong efficacy against GBM, crosses the blood-brain barrier when properly formulated, reaching the target tissue, and establishes cyclin D1 as an important molecular target. Thus, PGIA merits further evaluation as a potential therapeutic option for GBM.

  12. The novel agent phospho-glycerol-ibuprofen-amide (MDC-330) inhibits glioblastoma growth in mice: an effect mediated by cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Lauren E.; Mattheolabakis, George; Vaeth, Brandon M.; LaComb, Joseph F.; Wang, Ruixue; Zhi, Jizu; Komninou, Despina; Rigas, Basil; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.

    2016-01-01

    Given that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis, new agents are urgently needed. We developed phospho-glycerol-ibuprofen-amide (PGIA), a novel ibuprofen derivative, and evaluated its safety and efficacy in preclinical models of GBM, and its mechanism of action using human GBM cells and animal tumor models. Furthermore, we explored whether formulating PGIA in polymeric nanoparticles could enhance its levels in the brain. PGIA was 3.7- to 5.1-fold more potent than ibuprofen in suppressing the growth of human GBM cell lines. PGIA 0.75× IC50 inhibited cell proliferation by 91 and 87% in human LN-229 and U87-MG GBM cells, respectively, and induced strong G1/S arrest. In vivo, compared with control, PGIA reduced U118-MG and U87-MG xenograft growth by 77 and 56%, respectively (P < 0.05), and was >2-fold more efficacious than ibuprofen. Normal human astrocytes were resistant to PGIA, indicating selectivity. Mechanistically, PGIA reduced cyclin D1 levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in GBM cells and in xenografts. PGIA induced cyclin D1 degradation via the proteasome pathway and induced dephosphorylation of GSK3β, which was required for cyclin D1 turnover. Furthermore, cyclin D1 overexpression rescued GBM cells from the cell growth inhibition by PGIA. Moreover, the formulation of PGIA in poly-(l)-lactic acid poly(ethylene glycol) polymeric nanoparticles improved its pharmacokinetics in mice, delivering PGIA to the brain. PGIA displays strong efficacy against GBM, crosses the blood-brain barrier when properly formulated, reaching the target tissue, and establishes cyclin D1 as an important molecular target. Thus, PGIA merits further evaluation as a potential therapeutic option for GBM. PMID:26905586

  13. Differential expression of p16(INK4A) and cyclin D1 in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors: a study of 44 Cases.

    PubMed

    Jour, G; West, K; Ghali, V; Shank, D; Ephrem, G; Wenig, B M

    2013-09-01

    Salivary gland tumors (SGT) are a heterogeneous group of lesions. There is conflicting data concerning the molecular events involving the tumour suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway in these tumors. Few studies examined the alterations in components of the Rb pathway by immunohistochemical (IHC) methods in benign and malignant SGTs. Furthermore, recent evidence implicates human papillomavirus (HPV) in mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) carcinogenesis. The purpose of our study is to examine p16(INK4A) and cyclin D1 expression in a variety of benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, and to investigate p16(INK4A) expression as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in MEC. Our series includes 30 malignant tumors [14 MEC, 6 acinic cell carcinomas (ACC), 5 polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas (PLGA), 5 (AdCC)] and 14 benign tumors (4 benign cysts, 5 Warthin tumors and 5 pleomorphic adenomas (PA). All cases were tested by IHC for p16(INK4A) and cyclin D1. Testing for HPV wide spectrum (HPV-WS) was performed by in situ hybridization in all MEC cases. Staining intensity was recorded semi quantitatively (on a scale from 0 to 4+). Fisher's exact test and Pearson X2 test with a p < 0.05 were used. Cyclin D1 and p16(INK4A) are expressed similarly in malignant and benign tumors (p = 0.146 and p = 0.543, respectively). None of the MEC cases showed nuclear reactivity for HPV-WS. Statistical analysis showed positive correlation between cyclin D1 and p16(INK4A) expression. Our findings suggest that p16(INK4A) overexpression is likely secondary to cyclin D1 gene upregulation or amplification. Further molecular studies are warranted.

  14. Betulinic acid decreases expression of bcl-2 and cyclin D1, inhibits proliferation, migration and induces apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Stepulak, Andrzej; Szymański, Marek; Sifringer, Marco; Kaczor, Józef; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2006-10-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others in the bark of white birch Betula alba. BA was reported to display a wide range of biological effects, including antiviral, antiparasitic, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, and in particular to inhibit growth of cancer cells. The aim of the study was further in vitro characterization of BA anticancer activity. In this study, we demonstrated a remarkable antiproliferative effect of BA in all tested tumor cell cultures including neuroblastoma, rabdomyosarcoma-medulloblastoma, glioma, thyroid, breast, lung and colon carcinoma, leukemia and multiple myeloma, as well as in primary cultures isolated from ovarian carcinoma, cervical carcinoma and glioblastoma multiforme. Furthermore, we have shown that BA decreased cancer cell motility and induced apoptotic cell death. We also observed decrease of bcl2 and cyclin D1 genes expression, and increase of bax gene expression after betulinic acid treatment. These findings demonstrate the anticancer potential of betulinic acid and suggest that it may be taken into account as a supportive agent in the treatment of cancers with different tissue origin.

  15. Overexpression of Reg3alpha increases cell growth and the levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; De Jesus, Kristine; Zhao, Hong; Takasawa, Shin; Shi, Bingyin; Srikant, Coimbatore B; Liu, Jun-Li

    2009-06-01

    Regenerating gene (Reg) family protein Reg3alpha is normally expressed in pancreatic acinar and endocrine cells. In order to explore its effect on islet beta-cell replication, insulinoma MIN6 cells were stably transfected with murine Reg3alpha cDNA. Determined using real-time PCR and Western blots, the levels of Reg3alpha mRNA and protein in Reg3alpha-transfected clones were increased 10- and 6-fold, respectively. Western blots also revealed that the protein was released into the culture medium, consistent with an endocrine effect. In MTT cell proliferation assay, Reg3alpha-overexpressing cells exhibited a 2-fold increase in the rate of cell growth. In order to investigate the intracellular mechanism, we studied cell cycle regulatory proteins. In Reg3alpha-expressing cells, we detected 2.2- and 2.5-fold increased levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, respectively, which paralleled a 1.8-fold increase in the rate of Akt phosphorylation. It is established that beta-cell replication is associated with increased cyclin D1 and CDK4 levels; deficiency in CDK4 or cyclin D2 results in reduced beta-cell mass and diabetes. Our results suggest that Reg3alpha stimulates beta-cell replication, by activating Akt kinase and increasing the levels of cyclin D1/CDK4.

  16. Disruption of transforming growth factor-beta signaling through beta-spectrin ELF leads to hepatocellular cancer through cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kitisin, K; Ganesan, N; Tang, Y; Jogunoori, W; Volpe, E A; Kim, S S; Katuri, V; Kallakury, B; Pishvaian, M; Albanese, C; Mendelson, J; Zasloff, M; Rashid, A; Fishbein, T; Evans, S R T; Sidawy, A; Reddy, E P; Mishra, B; Johnson, L B; Shetty, K; Mishra, L

    2007-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling members, TGF-beta receptor type II (TBRII), Smad2, Smad4 and Smad adaptor, embryonic liver fodrin (ELF), are prominent tumor suppressors in gastrointestinal cancers. Here, we show that 40% of elf(+/-) mice spontaneously develop hepatocellular cancer (HCC) with markedly increased cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), c-Myc and MDM2 expression. Reduced ELF but not TBRII, or Smad4 was observed in 8 of 9 human HCCs (P<0.017). ELF and TBRII are also markedly decreased in human HCC cell lines SNU-398 and SNU-475. Restoration of ELF and TBRII in SNU-398 cells markedly decreases cyclin D1 as well as hyperphosphorylated-retinoblastoma (hyperphosphorylated-pRb). Thus, we show that TGF-beta signaling and Smad adaptor ELF suppress human hepatocarcinogenesis, potentially through cyclin D1 deregulation. Loss of ELF could serve as a primary event in progression toward a fully transformed phenotype and could hold promise for new therapeutic approaches in human HCCs.

  17. Small Molecule Inhibition of the Ubiquitin-specific Protease USP2 Accelerates cyclin D1 Degradation and Leads to Cell Cycle Arrest in Colorectal Cancer and Mantle Cell Lymphoma Models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Pragani, Rajan; Fox, Jennifer T; Shen, Min; Parmar, Kalindi; Gaudiano, Emily F; Liu, Li; Tanega, Cordelle; McGee, Lauren; Hall, Matthew D; McKnight, Crystal; Shinn, Paul; Nelson, Henrike; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; D'Andrea, Alan D; Auld, Douglas S; DeLucas, Larry J; Li, Zhuyin; Boxer, Matthew B; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-11-18

    Deubiquitinases are important components of the protein degradation regulatory network. We report the discovery of ML364, a small molecule inhibitor of the deubiquitinase USP2 and its use to interrogate the biology of USP2 and its putative substrate cyclin D1. ML364 has an IC50 of 1.1 μm in a biochemical assay using an internally quenched fluorescent di-ubiquitin substrate. Direct binding of ML364 to USP2 was demonstrated using microscale thermophoresis. ML364 induced an increase in cellular cyclin D1 degradation and caused cell cycle arrest as shown in Western blottings and flow cytometry assays utilizing both Mino and HCT116 cancer cell lines. ML364, and not the inactive analog 2, was antiproliferative in cancer cell lines. Consistent with the role of cyclin D1 in DNA damage response, ML364 also caused a decrease in homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair. These effects by a small molecule inhibitor support a key role for USP2 as a regulator of cell cycle, DNA repair, and tumor cell growth. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Oncogene abnormalities in a series of primary melanomas of the sinonasal tract: NRAS mutations and cyclin D1 amplification are more frequent than KIT or BRAF mutations.

    PubMed

    Chraybi, Meriem; Abd Alsamad, Issam; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Baia, Maryse; André, Jocelyne; Dumaz, Nicolas; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of sinonasal tract is a rare but severe form of melanoma. We retrospectively analyzed 17 cases and focused on the histologic presentation and the expression of c-Kit, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin D1/Bcl-1, PS100, and HMB45 and searched for BRAF, NRAS, and KIT mutations that are known to be associated with melanoma subtypes, together with amplifications of KIT, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, MDM2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In most cases (78%), an in situ component was evidenced. Invasive components were composed of diffuse areas of rhabdoid, epithelioid, or spindle cells and, in most cases, lacked inflammatory reaction, suggesting that an immune escape phenomenon probably develops when the disease progresses. EGFR was rarely and weakly expressed in the in situ component of 2 cases. None of the investigated case showed BRAF V600E, but 1 had a D594G mutation. NRAS mutations in exon 2 (G12D or G12A) were found in 3 cases (18%), and a KIT mutation in exon 11 (L576P), in 1, whereas c-Kit was expressed at the protein level in half of the cases. Amplifications of cyclin D1 were evidenced in 5 cases, confirmed in 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, but this was not always correlated with protein expression, found in 8 patients (62.5%), 3 having no significant amplification. In conclusion, primary malignant melanoma of sinonasal tract is not associated with BRAF V600E mutations. Instead, NRAS or KIT mutations and cyclin D1 amplification can be found in a proportion of cases, suggesting that primary malignant melanoma of sinonasal tract is heterogeneous at the molecular level and should not be sensitive to therapeutic approaches aiming at BRAF.

  19. MEK2 controls the activation of MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis involved in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell survival: Correlation with cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Huth, Hugo W; Albarnaz, Jonas D; Torres, Alice A; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Ropert, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates fundamental processes in malignant cells. However, the exact contributions of MEK1 and MEK2 to the development of cancer remain to be established. We studied the effects of MEK small-molecule inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) and MEK1 and MEK2 knock-down on cell proliferation, apoptosis and MAPK activation. We showed a diminution of cell viability that was associated with a downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and an increase of apoptosis marker in MEK2 silenced cells; by contrast, a slight increase of cell survival was observed in the absence of MEK1 that correlated with an augment of cyclin D1 expression. These data indicate that MEK2 but not MEK1 is essential for MDA-MB-231 cell survival. Importantly, the role of MEK2 in cell survival appeared independent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation since its absence did not alter the level of activated ERK1/2. Indeed, we have reported an unrevealed link between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 MAPK axis where MEK2 was essential for the phosphorylation of MKK3/MKK6 and p38 MAPK that directly impacted on cyclin D1 expression. Importantly, the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059, like MEK1 silencing, induced an augment of cyclin D1 expression that correlated with an increase of MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation suggesting that MEK1 may play a regulatory role in these cells. In sum, the crucial role of MEK2 in MDA-MB-231 cell viability and the unknown relationship between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis here revealed may open new therapeutic strategies for aggressive breast cancer.

  20. Curcumol induces cell cycle arrest in colon cancer cells via reactive oxygen species and Akt/ GSK3β/cyclin D1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Li, Xu-Mei; Bai, Zhun; Chi, Bi-Xia; Wei, Yan; Chen, Xu

    2017-07-04

    Curcuma kwangsiensis S. G. Lee & C. F. Liang (Guangxi ezhu, in Chinese) belongs to the Zingiberaceae family, has been used as a traditionally Chinese medicine nearly 2000 year. Curcumol is one of the guaiane-type sesquiterpenoid hemiketal isolated from medicine plant Curcuma kwangsiensis S. G. Lee & C. F. Liang, which has been reported possesses anti-cancer effects. Our previous study found that the most contribution to inhibit nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth was curcumol. To assess the effect of curcumol on cell cycle arrest against human colon cancer cells (CRC) cells (LoVo and SW480) and explore its mechanism in vitro and in vivo. Curcumol was dissolved in absolute ethyl alcohol. The concentration of absolute ethyl alcohol in the control group or in experimental samples was always 1/500 (v/v) of the final medium volume. LoVo and SW480 cells were treated with different concentrations of curcumol (0, 53, 106, 212 and 424μM). And then the cell cycle of each group was examined by flow cytometry. The protein levels of PI3K, p-Akt, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4 and GSK3β were determined by Western blot. The mRNA expression of PI3K, Akt, cyclin D1, CDK4, P27, p21, and P16 in the treated cells were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, the antitumor activity of curcumol was evaluated in nude mice bearing orthotopic tumor implants. Curcumol induced cell cycle arrest in G1/S phase. RT-qPCR and Western blot data showed that curcumol enhanced the expression of GSK3β, P27, p21 and P16, and decreased the levels of PI3K, phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), cyclin D1, CDK4, cyclin E and CDK2. Furthermore, curcumol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in LoVo cells, and ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly reversed curcumol-induced cell growth inhibition. Besides, curcumol also prevented the growth of human colon cancer cells xenografts in nude mouse, accompanied by the reduction of PI3K, Akt, cyclin D1, CDK4, cycln E and significant increase of

  1. Upstream stimulatory factor regulates expression of the cell cycle-dependent cyclin B1 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cogswell, J P; Godlevski, M M; Bonham, M; Bisi, J; Babiss, L

    1995-01-01

    Progression through the somatic cell cycle requires the temporal regulation of cyclin gene expression and cyclin protein turnover. One of the best-characterized examples of this regulation is seen for the B-type cyclins. These cyclins and their catalytic component, cdc2, have been shown to mediate both the entry into and maintenance of mitosis. The cyclin B1 gene has been shown to be expressed between the late S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while the protein is degraded specifically at interphase via ubiquitination. To understand the molecular basis for transcriptional regulation of the cyclin B1 gene, we cloned the human cyclin B1 gene promoter region. Using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system and both stable and transient assays, we have shown that the cyclin B1 gene promoter (extending to -3800 bp relative to the cap site) can confer G2-enhanced promoter activity. Further analysis revealed that an upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-binding site and its cognate transcription factor(s) are critical for expression from the cyclin B1 promoter in cycling HeLa cells. Interestingly, USF DNA-binding activity appears to be regulated in a G2-specific fashion, supporting the idea that USF may play some role in cyclin B1 gene activation. These studies suggest an important link between USF and the cyclin B1 gene, which in part explains how maturation promoting factor complex formation is regulated. PMID:7739559

  2. Function of cyclins in regulating the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized cell cycles that characterize various aspects of the differentiation of germ cells provide a unique opportunity to understand heretofore elusive aspects of the in vivo function of cell cycle regulators. Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory sub-units, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases. Some of the cyclins exhibit unique patterns of expression in germ cells that suggest possible concomitant distinct functions, predictions that are being explored by targeted mutagenesis in mouse models. A novel, meiosis-specific function has been shown for one of the A-type cyclins, cyclin A1. Embryonic lethality has obviated understanding of the germline functions of cyclin A2 and cyclin B1, while yet other cyclins, although expressed at specific stages of germ cell development, may have less essential function in the male germline. PMID:19001847

  3. The SET protein regulates G2/M transition by modulating cyclin B-cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Canela, Núria; Rodriguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Diaz, Carmen; Pujol, María Jesús; Agell, Neus; Bachs, Oriol

    2003-01-10

    The SET protein and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) interact in vivo and in vitro. We identified here the domain (157)LIF(159) of p21(Cip1) as essential for the binding of SET. We also found that SET contains at least two domains of interaction with p21(Cip1), one located in the fragment amino acids 81-180 and the other one in the fragment including amino acids 181-277. SET and p21(Cip1) co-localize in the cell nucleus in a temporal manner. Overexpression of SET blocks the cell cycle at the G(2)/M transition in COS and HCT116 cells. Moreover, SET inhibits cyclin B-CDK1 activity both in vivo and in vitro in both cell types. This effect is specific for these complexes since SET did not inhibit either cyclin A-CDK2 or cyclin E-CDK2 complexes. SET and p21(Cip1) cooperate in the inhibition of cyclin B-CDK1 activity. The inhibitory effect of SET resides in its acidic C terminus, as demonstrated by the ability of this domain to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity and by the lack of blocking G(2)/M transition when a mutated form of SET lacking this C terminus domain was overexpressed in COS cells. These results indicate that SET might regulate G(2)/M transition by modulating cyclin B-CDK1 activity.

  4. Association between cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism and gastric cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yafei; Zeng, Xianling; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Hong; Zhao, Enfa; Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Published data on the association between cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism and gastric cancer (GC) risk are inconclusive. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and GC risk. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of science and the Cochrane Library up to June 12, 2015 for relevant studies. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the strength of associations. Nine studies published from 2003 to 2014, with a total of 1813 cases and 2173 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that there was no association between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and GC risk in any genetic model. The subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity showed an increased breast cancer risk in Caucasian based on heterozygote comparison (GA vs. GG: OR=1.49, 95% CI=1.06-2.10, P=0.02). We found the same association in population based (PB) stratified analyses by Source of controls (AA vs. GG: OR=1.39, 95% CI=1.01-1.93, 0.05). When stratifying by the type, Sex and H. pylori infection in dominant model, Interestingly, we found the opposite result in Male (AA + GA vs. GG: OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.33-0.76, P=0.001), there were no association between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and GC risk in any other subgroup. This meta-analysis suggests that CCND1 G870A polymorphism is a risk factor for susceptibility to GC in Caucasians and in general populations. While, CCND1 G870A polymorphism plays a possible protective effect in GC in Male. Further large scale multicenter epidemiological studies are warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:27623072

  5. Quercetin reduces cyclin D1 activity and induces G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Li, L U; Fang, L I; Xie, Hua; Yao, Wenxiu; Zhou, Xiang; Xiong, Zhujuan; Wang, L I; Li, Zhixi; Luo, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Quercetin is able to inhibit proliferation of malignant tumor cells; however, the exact mechanism involved in this biological process remains unclear. The current study utilized a quantitative proteomic analysis to explore the antitumor mechanisms of quercetin. The leucine of HepG2 cells treated with quercetin was labeled as d3 by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The isotope peaks of control HepG2 cells were compared with the d3-labeled HepG2 cells by mass spectrometry (MS) to identify significantly altered proteins. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were subsequently employed to verify the results of the MS analysis. A flow cytometry assay was designed to observe the influence of various quercetin treatment concentrations on the cell cycle distribution of HepG2 cells. The results indicated that quercetin is able to substantially inhibit proliferation of HepG2 cells and induce an obvious morphological alteration of cells. According to the MS results, the 70 credibly-changed proteins that were identified may play important roles in multiple cellular processes, including protein synthesis, signaling, cytoskeletal processes and metabolism. Among these functional proteins, the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) was found to be significantly decreased. RT-PCR and western blot analyses verified the SILAC-MS results of decreased CCND1 expression. In summary, flow cytometry revealed that quercetin is able to induce G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells. Based on the aforementioned observations, it is suggested that quercetin exerts antitumor activity in HepG2 cells through multiple pathways, including interfering with CCND1 gene expression to disrupt the cell cycle and proliferation of HepG2 cells. In the future, we aim to explore this effect in vivo.

  6. Initiation and termination of DNA replication during S phase in relation to cyclins D1, E and A, p21WAF1, Cdt1 and the p12 subunit of DNA polymerase δ revealed in individual cells by cytometry.

    PubMed

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Sufang; Lee, Marietta Y W T; Lee, Ernest Y C; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2015-05-20

    During our recent studies on mechanism of the regulation of human DNA polymerase δ in preparation for DNA replication or repair, multiparameter imaging cytometry as exemplified by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) has been used to assess changes in expression of the following nuclear proteins associated with initiation of DNA replication: cyclin A, PCNA, Ki-67, p21(WAF1), DNA replication factor Cdt1 and the smallest subunit of DNA polymerase δ, p12. In the present review, rather than focusing on Pol δ, we emphasize the application of LSC in these studies and outline possibilities offered by the concurrent differential analysis of DNA replication in conjunction with expression of the nuclear proteins. A more extensive analysis of the data on a correlation between rates of EdU incorporation, likely reporting DNA replication, and expression of these proteins, is presently provided. New data, specifically on the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E with respect to EdU incorporation as well as on a relationship between expression of cyclin A vs. p21(WAF1) and Ki-67 vs. Cdt1, are also reported. Of particular interest is the observation that this approach makes it possible to assess the temporal sequence of degradation of cyclin D1, p21(WAF1), Cdt1 and p12, each with respect to initiation of DNA replication and with respect to each other. Also the sequence or reappearance of these proteins in G2 after termination of DNA replication is assessed. The reviewed data provide a more comprehensive presentation of potential markers, whose presence or absence marks the DNA replicating cells. Discussed is also usefulness of these markers as indicators of proliferative activity in cancer tissues that may bear information on tumor progression and have a prognostic value.

  7. Initiation and termination of DNA replication during S phase in relation to cyclins D1, E and A, p21WAF1, Cdt1 and the p12 subunit of DNA polymerase δ revealed in individual cells by cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Sufang; Marietta, Y.W.T. Lee; Ernest, Y.C. Lee; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    During our recent studies on mechanism of the regulation of human DNA polymerase δ in preparation for DNA replication or repair, multiparameter imaging cytometry as exemplified by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) has been used to assess changes in expression of the following nuclear proteins associated with initiation of DNA replication: cyclin A, PCNA, Ki-67, p21WAF1, DNA replication factor Cdt1 and the smallest subunit of DNA polymerase δ, p12. In the present review, rather than focusing on Pol δ, we emphasize the application of LSC in these studies and outline possibilities offered by the concurrent differential analysis of DNA replication in conjunction with expression of the nuclear proteins. A more extensive analysis of the data on a correlation between rates of EdU incorporation, likely reporting DNA replication, and expression of these proteins, is presently provided. New data, specifically on the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E with respect to EdU incorporation as well as on a relationship between expression of cyclin A vs. p21WAF1 and Ki-67 vs. Cdt1, are also reported. Of particular interest is the observation that this approach makes it possible to assess the temporal sequence of degradation of cyclin D1, p21WAF1, Cdt1 and p12, each with respect to initiation of DNA replication and with respect to each other. Also the sequence or reappearance of these proteins in G2 after termination of DNA replication is assessed. The reviewed data provide a more comprehensive presentation of potential markers, whose presence or absence marks the DNA replicating cells. Discussed is also usefulness of these markers as indicators of proliferative activity in cancer tissues that may bear information on tumor progression and have a prognostic value. PMID:26059433

  8. Cdk5-mediated inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 switches on the cyclin D1-Cdk4-pRb pathway causing aberrant S-phase entry of postmitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Veas-Pérez de Tudela, Miguel; Maestre, Carolina; Delgado-Esteban, María; Bolaños, Juan P; Almeida, Angeles

    2015-12-10

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates cell cycle progression in proliferating cells. To enter the S-phase, APC/C must be inactivated by phosphorylation of its cofactor, Cdh1. In post-mitotic cells such as neurons APC/C-Cdh1 complex is highly active and responsible for the continuous degradation of mitotic cyclins. However, the specific molecular pathway that determines neuronal cell cycle blockade in post-mitotic neurons is unknown. Here, we show that activation of glutamatergic receptors in rat cortical primary neurons endogenously triggers cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdh1 leading to its cytoplasmic accumulation and disassembly from the APC3 core protein, causing APC/C inactivation. Conversely, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Cdk5 promotes Cdh1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we show that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Cdh1 leads to p27 depletion, which switches on the cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (Cdk4)-retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway to allow the S-phase entry of neurons. However, neurons do not proceed through the cell cycle and die by apoptosis. These results indicate that APC/C-Cdh1 actively suppresses an aberrant cell cycle entry and death of neurons, highlighting its critical function in neuroprotection.

  9. High Expression of Cyclin D1 and p21 in N-Nitroso-N-Methylurea-Induced Breast Cancer in Wistar Albino Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahboobeh; Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Abroun, Saeid

    2012-01-01

    Objective: N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) induces breast cancer in rodents, particularly in rats. This model of breast cancer is very similar to human breast cancer. As a continuation of our recent work, we investigated the expressions of cyclin D1 and p21 in NMU-induced breast cancer of Wistar Albino rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, mammary carcinoma was induced in female Wistar Albino rats by a new protocol which included the intraperitoneal injection of NMU (50 mg/kg) at 50, 65, and 80 days of the animal’s age. The animals were weighed weekly and palpated in order to record the numbers, location, and size of tumors. Subsequently tumor incidence (TI), latency period (LP), and tumor multiplicity (TM) were reported. About four weeks after the tumor size reached 1.5 cm3, rats were sacrificed. Cyclin D1 and p21 expressions in tumors and normal mammary glands from normal rats were measured by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) and Western blot analysis. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS software version 16.0. Results: The efficiency of tumor induction was 65%, LP was 150 days, and a TM of 1.43 ± 0.53 per rat was noted. RT-PCR and Western blot data indicated significant (p<0.05) induction of both cyclin D1 and p21 expressions in rat mammary tumors compared with normal tissue from the control group. Conclusion: These results indicate an efficient mammary tumor induction protocol for this type of rat, which is accompanied by an increase in cyclin D1 and p21 expressions. PMID:23508728

  10. Gain of 11q/cyclin D1 overexpression is an essential early step in skin cancer development and causes abnormal tissue organization and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burnworth, B; Popp, S; Stark, H-J; Steinkraus, V; Bröcker, E B; Hartschuh, W; Birek, C; Boukamp, P

    2006-07-27

    Non-melanoma skin cancers, in particular keratoacanthomas (KAs) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), have become highly frequent tumor types especially in immune-suppressed transplant patients. Nevertheless, little is known about essential genetic changes. As a paradigm of 'early' changes, that is, changes still compatible with tumor regression, we studied KAs by comparative genomic hybridization and show that gain of chromosome 11q is not only one of the most frequent aberration (8/18), but in four tumors also the only aberration. Furthermore, 11q gain correlated with amplification of the cyclin D1 locus (10/14), as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and overexpression of cyclin D1 protein (25/31), as detected by immunohistochemistry. For unraveling the functional consequence, we overexpressed cyclin D1 in HaCaT skin keratinocytes. These cells only gained little growth advantage in conventional and in organotypic co-cultures. However, although the control vector-transfected cells formed a well-stratified and orderly differentiated epidermis-like epithelium, they showed deregulation of tissue architecture with an altered localization of proliferation and impaired differentiation. The most severe phenotype was seen in a clone that additionally upregulated cdk4 and p21. These cells lacked terminal differentiation, exhibited a more autonomous growth in vitro and in vivo and even formed tumors in two injection sites with a growth pattern resembling that of human KAs. Thus, our results identify 11q13 gain/cyclin D1 overexpression as an important step in KA formation and point to a function that exceeds its known role in proliferation by disrupting tissue organization and thereby allowing abnormal growth.

  11. Frequent deletions and mutations of the beta-catenin gene are associated with overexpression of cyclin D1 and fibronectin and poorly differentiated histology in childhood hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, H; Horie, H; Hiyama, E; Matsunaga, T; Hayashi, Y; Watanabe, Y; Suita, S; Kaneko, M; Sasaki, F; Hashizume, K; Ozaki, T; Furuuchi, K; Tada, M; Ohnuma, N; Nakagawara, A

    2001-04-01

    Hepatoblastoma (HBL) is the most common malignant liver tumor in young children. Recent reports have shown that the beta-catenin gene was frequently mutated or deleted in HBLS: To elucidate the role of beta-catenin abnormalities in HBLs, we searched for mutations of beta-catenin and APC as well as expression of the target genes, cyclin D1, c-myc, and fibronectin, in 68 primary HBLS: The mutation analysis revealed that 44 (65%) tumors carried missense mutations or deletions of beta-catenin, all of which were somatic and targeted to the exon 3 encoding the amino acid residues involved in its degradation. However, no loss of function mutation of the APC gene was detected by the yeast functional assay. Of interest, beta-catenin mutation was significantly correlated with overexpression of the target genes, cyclin D1 and fibronectin, but not with that of c-myc in HBLs as measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The immunohistochemical studies in 15 HBLs demonstrated that the nuclear/cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin was positive in 13 tumors, 9 of which had the deletion or mutation of the gene. The significant correlation between the beta-catenin gene abnormality and the positive staining of cyclin D1 was also confirmed. Furthermore, the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was strongly associated with the poorly differentiated tumor cell components as well as with the positive staining of cyclin D1 within the tumor. Thus, our present results suggested that the gain of function mutation of beta-catenin played a crucial role in the malignant progression of HBL in vivo.

  12. c-Jun/AP-1 pathway-mediated cyclin D1 expression participates in low dose arsenite-induced transformation in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongyun; Li Jingxia; Gao Jimin; Huang Chuanshu

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen associated with skin carcinogenesis. Our previous work reveals that arsenite exposure is able to induce cell transformation in mouse epidermal cell JB6 Cl41 through the activation of ERK, rather than JNK pathway. Our current studies further evaluate downstream pathway in low dose arsenite-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells. Our results showed that treatment of cells with low dose arsenite induced activation of c-Jun/AP-1 pathway, and ectopic expression of dominant negative mutant of c-Jun (TAM67) blocked arsenite-induced transformation. Furthermore, our data indicated that cyclin D1 was an important downstream molecule involved in c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure, because inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by its specific siRNA in the JB6 Cl41 cells resulted in impairment of anchorage-independent growth of cells induced by low dose arsenite. Collectively, our results demonstrate that c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cyclin D1 expression is at least one of the key events implicated in cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure.

  13. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species perturb AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling via oxidative inactivation of PP2A in lowdose irradiated human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Sasatani, Megumi; Kamiya, Kenji; Kawai, Hidehiko; Inaba, Yohei; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-19

    Here we investigated the cellular response of normal human fibroblasts to repeated exposure to low-dose radiation. In contrast to acute single radiation, low-dose fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 Gy/fraction or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 days increased in mitochondrial mass, decreased cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione and caused persistent accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excess ROS promoted oxidative inactivation of protein phosphatase PP2A which in turn led to disruption of normal negative feed-back control of AKT/cyclin D1 signaling in cells treated with long-term FR. The resulting abnormal nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 causes growth retardation, cellular senescence and genome instability in low-dose irradiated cells. Thus, loss of redox control and subsequently elevated levels of ROS perturb signal transduction as a result of oxidative stress. Our study highlights a specific role of mitochondrial ROS in perturbation of AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling after low-dose long-term FR. The antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine, TEMPO and mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant Mito-TEMPO provided protection against the harmful cell cycle perturbations induced by low-dose long-term FR.

  14. Association between cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Hang; You, Xue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism may be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk, but the results of previous studies were inconsistent. Available evidence was meta-analyzed to assess their potential association. Methods Databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Google Scholar were systematically searched. Meta-analyses were performed to investigate the association of G870A polymorphism with HCC risk by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the data of relevant case–control studies. Results Results of this meta-analysis of six case–control studies involving 1,030 cases and 1,683 controls indicate that G870A polymorphism was not associated with HCC risk in any of the five genetic models tested (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.95–2.00, P=0.09; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.87–2.20, P=0.17; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =1.60, 95% CI =0.87–2.94, P=0.13; heterozygous model: AG vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =0.86–1.79, P=0.25; allelic model: A vs G: OR =1.30, 95% CI =0.95–1.80, P=0.10). Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity showing marginally significant association between this single nucleotide polymorphism and HCC risk indicate that G870A may be significantly associated with HCC risk in Caucasian populations (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =2.34, 95% CI =1.60–3.42, P<0.0001; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =2.44, 95% CI =1.19–4.97, P=0.01; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =3.42, 95% CI =1.80–6.50, P=0.0002; allelic model: A vs G: OR =2.06, 95% CI =1.31–3.24, P=0.002), but not in Asian populations. Conclusion Available evidence suggests that no significant association between G870A polymorphism and HCC risk was found in either total populations or Asian populations. However, significant association was found in Caucasian populations. These

  15. Role of the mTORC1 complex in satellite cell activation by RNA-induced mitochondrial restoration: dual control of cyclin D1 through microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jash, Sukanta; Dhar, Gunjan; Ghosh, Utpalendu; Adhya, Samit

    2014-10-01

    During myogenesis, satellite stem cells (SCs) are induced to proliferate and differentiate to myogenic precursors. The role of energy sensors such as the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in SC activation is unclear. We previously observed that upregulation of ATP through RNA-mediated mitochondrial restoration (MR) accelerates SC activation following skeletal muscle injury. We show here that during regeneration, the AMPK-CRTC2-CREB and Raptor-mTORC-4EBP1 pathways were rapidly activated. The phosho-CRTC2-CREB complex was essential for myogenesis and activated transcription of the critical cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 (Ccnd1). Knockdown (KD) of either mTORC or its subunit Raptor delayed SC activation without influencing the differentiation program. KD of 4EBP1 had no effect on SC activation but enhanced myofiber size. mTORC1 positively regulated Ccnd1 translation but destabilized Ccnd1 mRNA. These antithetical effects of mTORC1 were mediated by two microRNAs (miRs) targeted to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Ccnd1 mRNA: miR-1 was downregulated in mTORC-KD muscle, and depletion of miR-1 resulted in increased levels of mRNA without any effect on Ccnd1 protein. In contrast, miR-26a was upregulated upon mTORC depletion, while anti-miR-26a oligonucleotide specifically stimulated Ccnd1 protein expression. Thus, mTORC may act as a timer of satellite cell proliferation during myogenesis.

  16. PinX1 suppresses bladder urothelial carcinoma cell proliferation via the inhibition of telomerase activity and p16/cyclin D1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Ye; Qian, Dong; He, Li-Ru; Li, Yong-Hong; Liao, Yi-Ji; Mai, Shi-Juan; Tian, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Xing; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Xie, Dan

    2013-11-23

    PIN2/TRF1-interacting telomerase inhibitor1 (PinX1) was recently suggested as a putative tumor suppressor in several types of human cancer, based on its binding to and inhibition of telomerase. Moreover, loss of PinX1 has been detected in many human malignancies. However, the possible involvement of PinX1 and its clinical/prognostic significance in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) are unclear. The PinX1 expression profile was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in UCB tissues and adjacent normal urothelial bladder epithelial tissues. PinX1 was overexpressed and silenced in UCB cell lines to determine its role in tumorigenesis, development of UCB, and the possible mechanism. PinX1 expression in UCB was significantly down-regulated at both mRNA and protein level as compared with that in normal urothelial bladder epithelial tissues. PinX1 levels were inversely correlated with tumor multiplicity, advanced N classification, high proliferation index (Ki-67), and poor survival (P < 0.05). Moreover, overexpression of PinX1 in UCB cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, whereas silencing PinX1 dramatically enhanced cell proliferation. Overexpression of PinX1 resulted in G1/S phase arrest and cell growth/proliferation inhibition, while silencing PinX1 led to acceleration of G1/S transition, and cell growth/proliferation promotion by inhibiting/enhancing telomerase activity and via the p16/cyclin D1 pathway. These findings suggest that down-regulation of PinX1 play an important role in the tumorigenesis and development of UCB and that the expression of PinX1 as detected by IHC is an independent molecular marker in patients with UCB.

  17. D-type Cyclins are important downstream effectors of cytokine signaling that regulate the proliferation of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2013-01-01

    In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent Kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer. PMID:23562856

  18. D-type Cyclins are important downstream effectors of cytokine signaling that regulate the proliferation of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2014-01-25

    In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer.

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M.; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF- /CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:24242917

  1. miR-18a promotes cell proliferation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells by increasing cylin D1 via regulating PTEN-PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiguo Lei, Caipeng; Fan, Junli; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-12

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Cyclin D1 is overexpressed and plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC; however the mechanism of the deregulation of Cyclin D1 in ESCC remains to be determined. In the study, we found that miR-18a promotes the expression Cyclin D1 by targeting PTEN in eophageal squamous cell carcinoma TE13 and Eca109 cells. Transfection of miR-18a mimetics increased cyclin D1, while transfection of miR-18a antagomir decreased D1. Moreover, miR-18a-mediated upregulation of cyclin D1 was accompanied with downregulation of PTEN, which is a direct target of miR-18a, and increase of the phosphorylation of AKT and S6K1. In addition, pharmacologic inhibition of AKT or mTOR kinases abolished the increase of cyclinD1 by miR-18a, which was accompanied with decreased phosphorylation of Rb−S780 and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our results demonstrated the upregulation of miR-18a promoted cell proliferation by increasing cylin D1 via regulating PTEN-PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of AKT-mTOR signaling are potential agents for the treatment of ESCC patients with upregulation of miR-17-92 cluster. - Highlights: • miR-18a promotes the proliferation of ESCC cells. • miR-18a increase cyclin D1 expression in ESCC cells. • miR-18a directly targets PTEN in ESCC cells. • Inhibition of AKT-mTOR prevents miR-18a-induced cyclin D1 in ESCC cells. • miR-18a antagomir sensitizes ESCC cells to cisplatin.

  2. Regulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional enhancement by the cyclin A/Cdk2 complex.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, J M; Rogatsky, I; Garabedian, M J

    1997-09-16

    We have found that ectopic expression of cyclin A increases hormone-dependent and hormone-independent transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor in vivo in a number of cell lines, including HeLa cells, U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells and Hs 578Bst breast epithelial cells. This effect can be further enhanced in HeLa cells by the concurrent expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase activator, cyclin H, and cdk7, and abolished by expression of the cdk inhibitor, p27(KIP1), or by the expression of a dominant negative catalytically inactive cdk2 mutant. ER is phosphorylated between amino acids 82 and 121 in vitro by the cyclin A/cdk2 complex and incorporation of phosphate into ER is stimulated by ectopic expression of cyclin A in vivo. Together, these results strongly suggest a direct role for the cyclin A/cdk2 complex in phosphorylating ER and regulating its transcriptional activity.

  3. Co-expressed Cyclin D variants cooperate to regulate proliferation of germline nuclei in a syncytium.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Gunasekaran; Campsteijn, Coen; Thompson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    The role of the G1-phase Cyclin D-CDK 4/6 regulatory module in linking germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation to nutrition is evolutionarily variable. In invertebrate Drosophila and C. elegans GSC models, G1 is nearly absent and Cyclin E is expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas vertebrate spermatogonial stem cells have a distinct G1 and Cyclin D1 plays an important role in GSC renewal. In the invertebrate, chordate, Oikopleura, where germline nuclei proliferate asynchronously in a syncytium, we show a distinct G1-phase in which 2 Cyclin D variants are co-expressed. Cyclin Dd, present in both somatic endocycling cells and the germline, localized to germline nuclei during G1 before declining at G1/S. Cyclin Db, restricted to the germline, remained cytoplasmic, co-localizing in foci with the Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor, CKIa. These foci showed a preferential spatial distribution adjacent to syncytial germline nuclei at G1/S. During nutrient-restricted growth arrest, upregulated CKIa accumulated in arrested somatic endoreduplicative nuclei but did not do so in germline nuclei. In the latter context, Cyclin Dd levels gradually decreased. In contrast, the Cyclin Dbβ splice variant, lacking the Rb-interaction domain and phosphodegron, was specifically upregulated and the number of cytoplasmic foci containing this variant increased. This upregulation was dependent on stress response MAPK p38 signaling. We conclude that under favorable conditions, Cyclin Dbβ-CDK6 sequesters CKIa in the cytoplasm to cooperate with Cyclin Dd-CDK6 in promoting germline nuclear proliferation. Under nutrient-restriction, this sequestration function is enhanced to permit continued, though reduced, cycling of the germline during somatic growth arrest.

  4. Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis comprising 9,911 cases and 11,171 controls.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 represents a key molecule in the regulation of cell cycle. CCND1 G870A (rs603965) polymorphism has drawn considerable attention as the A allele may generate a variant splice product with possible oncogenic actions. A meta-analysis examining the association between CCND1 G870A polymorphism and breast cancer risk was performed. Separate analyses on Caucasian and Chinese populations were also implemented. Eligible articles were identified for the period up to July 2010. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were appropriately derived from fixed-effects or random-effects models. Sensitivity analysis excluding studies whose genotype frequencies in controls significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) was performed. Nine case-control studies on Caucasians (7,304 cases and 8,149 controls) and four case-control studies on Chinese (2,607 cases and 3,022 controls) were eligible. At the overall analysis the A allele seemed to be associated with elevated breast cancer risk; the effect seemed to be confined to homozygous carriers (pooled OR = 1.091, 95% CI: 1.008-1.179, P = 0.030, fixed effects) as heterozygous carriers did not exhibit significantly elevated breast cancer risk. No statistically significant associations were demonstrated in Caucasians. On the other hand, Chinese AA carriers exhibited marginally elevated breast cancer risk (pooled OR = 1.144, 95% CI: 0.984-1.329, P = 0.080, fixed effects). Nevertheless, the controls in two out of the four Chinese studies deviated from HWE. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that the A allele of the CCND1 G870A polymorphism may confer additional breast cancer risk when it comes to homozygosity and Chinese populations. The need for additional, methodologically sound studies on Chinese populations seems warranted.

  5. γ-Tocopherol inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation by up-regulation of transglutaminase 2 and down-regulation of cyclins.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, P; Caraglia, M; Abbruzzese, A; Beninati, S

    2013-01-01

    To establish a system to study differentiation therapy drugs, we used the androgen-independent human prostate PC-3 tumor cell line as a target and α- and γ-tocopherol as inducers. Effects of α- and γ-tocopherol on the cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation, were examined. A more significant growth inhibition activity for γ- than for α-tocopherol was observed. Flow cytometry analysis of α- and γ-tocopherol-treated prostate carcinoma PC3 cells showed decreased progression into the S-phase. This effect, particularly evident for γ-tocopherol, was associated with an up-regulation and increased activity of transglutaminase 2 (TG2), a reduced DNA synthesis and a remarkable decreased levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Activation of TG2 suggests that γ-tocopherol has an evident differentiative capacity on PC3 cells, leading to an increased expression of TG2, and reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E levels, affecting cell cycle progression. It is feasible that up-regulation and activation of TG2, associated with a reduced proliferation, are parts of a large-scale reprogramming that can attenuate the malignant phenotype of PC3 cells in vitro. These data suggest further investigation on the potential use of this γ-form of vitamin E as a differentiative agent, in combination with the common cytotoxic treatments for prostate cancer therapy.

  6. The impact of cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms, morphology and p53 in mantle cell lymphoma: p53 alterations and blastoid morphology are strong predictors of a high proliferation index.

    PubMed

    Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Koch, Ina; de Leval, Laurence; Keller, Gisela; Klier, Margit; Bink, Karin; Kremer, Marcus; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2012-09-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 protein. Blastoid morphology, high proliferation, and secondary genetic aberrations are markers of aggressive behavior. Expression profiling of mantle cell lymphoma revealed that predominance of the 3'UTR-deficient, short cyclin D1 mRNA isoform was associated with high cyclin D1 levels, a high "proliferation signature" and poor prognosis. Sixty-two cases of mantle cell lymphoma were analyzed for cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms and total cyclin D1 levels by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and TP53 alterations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. Results were correlated with proliferation index and clinical outcome. Predominance of the short cyclin D1 mRNA was found in 14 (23%) samples, including four with complete loss of the standard transcript. TP53 alterations were found in 15 (24%) cases. Predominance of 3'UTR-deficient mRNA was significantly associated with high cyclin D1 mRNA levels (P=0.009) and more commonly found in blastoid mantle cell lymphoma (5/11, P=0.060) and cases with a proliferation index of >20% (P=0.026). Both blastoid morphology (11/11, P<0.001) and TP53 alterations (15/15, P<0.001) were significantly correlated with a high proliferation index. A proliferation index of 10% was determined to be a significant threshold for survival in multivariate analysis (P=0.01). TP53 alterations are strongly associated with a high proliferation index and aggressive behavior in mantle cell lymphoma. Predominance of the 3'UTR-deficient transcript correlates with higher cyclin D1 levels and may be a secondary contributing factor to high proliferation, but failed to reach prognostic significance in this study.

  7. The impact of cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms, morphology and p53 in mantle cell lymphoma: p53 alterations and blastoid morphology are strong predictors of a high proliferation index

    PubMed Central

    Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Koch, Ina; de Leval, Laurence; Keller, Gisela; Klier, Margit; Bink, Karin; Kremer, Marcus; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Background Mantle cell lymphoma is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by overexpression of cyclin D1 protein. Blastoid morphology, high proliferation, and secondary genetic aberrations are markers of aggressive behavior. Expression profiling of mantle cell lymphoma revealed that predominance of the 3’UTR-deficient, short cyclin D1 mRNA isoform was associated with high cyclin D1 levels, a high “proliferation signature” and poor prognosis. Design and Methods Sixty-two cases of mantle cell lymphoma were analyzed for cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms and total cyclin D1 levels by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and TP53 alterations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. Results were correlated with proliferation index and clinical outcome. Results Predominance of the short cyclin D1 mRNA was found in 14 (23%) samples, including four with complete loss of the standard transcript. TP53 alterations were found in 15 (24%) cases. Predominance of 3’UTR-deficient mRNA was significantly associated with high cyclin D1 mRNA levels (P=0.009) and more commonly found in blastoid mantle cell lymphoma (5/11, P=0.060) and cases with a proliferation index of >20% (P=0.026). Both blastoid morphology (11/11, P<0.001) and TP53 alterations (15/15, P<0.001) were significantly correlated with a high proliferation index. A proliferation index of 10% was determined to be a significant threshold for survival in multivariate analysis (P=0.01). Conclusions TP53 alterations are strongly associated with a high proliferation index and aggressive behavior in mantle cell lymphoma. Predominance of the 3’UTR-deficient transcript correlates with higher cyclin D1 levels and may be a secondary contributing factor to high proliferation, but failed to reach prognostic significance in this study. PMID:22315488

  8. 4-Nerolidylcatechol: apoptosis by mitochondrial mechanisms with reduction in cyclin D1 at G0/G1 stage of the chronic myelogenous K562 cell line.

    PubMed

    Benfica, Polyana Lopes; Ávila, Renato Ivan de; Rodrigues, Bruna Dos Santos; Cortez, Alane Pereira; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Gaeti, Marilisa Pedroso Nogueira; Lima, Eliana Martins; Rezende, Kênnia Rocha; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2017-12-01

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NRC) has showed antitumor potential through apoptosis. However, its apoptotic mechanisms are still unclear, especially in leukemic cells. To evaluate the cytotoxic potential of 4-NRC and its cell death pathways in p53-null K562 leukemic cells. Cytotoxicity of 4-NRC (4.17-534.5 μM) over 24 h of exposure was evaluated by MTT assay. 4-NRC-induced apoptosis in K562 cells was investigated by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, cell cycle, sub-G1, mitochondrial evaluation, cytochrome c, cyclin D1 and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and caspase activity analysis. IC50 values obtained were 11.40, 27.31, 15.93 and 15.70 μM for lymphocytes, K562, HL-60 and Jurkat cells, respectively. In K562 cells, 4-NRC (27 μM) promoted apoptosis as verified by cellular morphological changes, a significant increase in PS externalization and sub-G1 cells. Moreover, it significantly arrested the cells at the G0/G1 phase due to a reduction in cyclin D1 expression. These effects of 4-NRC also significantly promoted a reduction in mitochondrial activity and membrane depolarization, accumulation of cytosolic cytochrome c and ROS overproduction. Additionally, it triggered an increase in caspases -3/7, -8 and -9 activities. When the cells were pretreated with N-acetyl-l-cysteine ROS scavenger, 4-NRC-induced apoptosis was partially blocked, which suggests that it exerts cytotoxicity though not exclusively through ROS-mediated mechanisms. 4-NRC has antileukemic properties, inducing apoptosis mediated by mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms with cyclin D1 inhibition. Given that emerging treatment concepts include novel combinations of well-known agents, 4-NRC could offer a promising alternative for chemotherapeutic combinations to maximize tumour suppression.

  9. BCL-1 (PRAD-1/cyclin D-1) overexpression distinguishes the blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma from B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Soslow, R A; Zukerberg, L R; Harris, N L; Warnke, R A

    1997-08-01

    The blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL-BV) can occur de novo or can represent a morphologic transformation of MCL associated with aggressive clinical disease. Its cytologic appearance is very similar to that of lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) because of its characteristic nuclear features and high proliferative rate. To assess the usefulness of antibodies to cyclin D-1 (BCL-1/ PRAD-1), CD99 (12E7), CD34, and TdT in distinguishing between MCL-BV and LBL in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, we studied from the Stanford data base 10 cases originally diagnosed as B-lineage LBL, 5 MCL-BVs, 2 cases thought likely to represent MCL-BV, and 2 blastic lymphomas whose morphology and immunophenotype were indeterminate. Six (60%) of 10 LBLs stained with CD99, as opposed to none of 7 MCL-BVs. Four (40%) of 10 LBLs reacted with CD34, as compared with none of 7 MCL-BVs. Eight (89%) of nine LBLs were positive for TdT, but all of the four MCL-BVs tested were negative. In contrast, the anti-cyclin D-1 antibody stained the nuclei of all of the MCL-BVs and none of the LBLs tested. On the basis of our evaluation, the probable MCL-BV cases were considered to be definite MCL-BV. Of the indeterminate cases, one was considered to be LBL, whereas we felt that the other represented MCL-BV. We conclude that staining formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, high-grade lymphomas with anti-cyclin D-1 antibody is useful in confirming the diagnosis of MCL-BV, whereas positive reactions with CD99, CD34, and particularly TdT are more characteristic of LBL.

  10. Cyclin E constrains Cdk5 activity to regulate synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Odajima, Junko; Wills, Zachary P; Ndassa, Yasmine M; Terunuma, Miho; Kretschmannova, Karla; Deeb, Tarek Z; Geng, Yan; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Quadros, Isabel M; Newman, Jennifer; Das, Manjusri; Jecrois, Marie E; Yu, Qunyan; Li, Na; Bienvenu, Frederic; Moss, Stephen J; Greenberg, Michael E; Marto, Jarrod A; Sicinski, Piotr

    2011-10-18

    Cyclin E is a component of the core cell cycle machinery, and it drives cell proliferation by regulating entry and progression of cells through the DNA synthesis phase. Cyclin E expression is normally restricted to proliferating cells. However, high levels of cyclin E are expressed in the adult brain. The function of cyclin E in quiescent, postmitotic nervous system remains unknown. Here we use a combination of in vivo quantitative proteomics and analyses of cyclin E knockout mice to demonstrate that in terminally differentiated neurons cyclin E forms complexes with Cdk5 and controls synapse function by restraining Cdk5 activity. Ablation of cyclin E led to a decreased number of synapses, reduced number and volume of dendritic spines, and resulted in impaired synaptic plasticity and memory formation in cyclin E-deficient animals. These results reveal a cell cycle-independent role for a core cell cycle protein, cyclin E, in synapse function and memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Downregulation of miR-34a contributes to the proliferation and migration of laryngeal carcinoma cells by targeting cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin; Li, Laisheng; Feng, Pinning; Wan, Jianxin; Li, Jingjia

    2016-07-01

    Laryngeal carcinoma is one of the most common head and neck cancers. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs 18-25 nucleotides in length that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and have a pivotal role in many biological processes including cancer development. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-34a in laryngeal carcinoma and confirmed the regulation of cyclin D1 (CCND1) by miR-34a. We examined miR-34a expression levels in 71 laryngeal carcinoma patient specimens by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and analyzed the clinicopathological significance of the obtained data. Then, functional assays were performed to investigate the potential effects of miR-34a on cancer cell proliferation and migration. In addition, western blotting, luciferase reporter assay and several algorithms were conducted to confirm that CCND1 is directly regulated by miR-34a. We demonstrated that the miR-34a expression level was significantly downregulated in laryngeal carcinoma clinical specimens compared with that observed in their paired adjacent normal tissues. Additionally, miR-34a expression was also inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage. Functional assays showed that ectopic expression of miR-34a inhibited cell proliferation and migration in laryngeal carcinoma cells. Bioinformatic analysis identified CCND1 as a potential target of miR-34a. Moreover, we confirmed that miR-34a inhibited the expression of CCND1 by directly binding to its 3'-untranslated region. Silencing of CCND1 induced effects similar to those of miR-34a ectopic expression, and in laryngeal carcinoma tissues, miR-34a and CCND1 were inversely correlated. Our data suggest that tumor suppressor miR-34a could serve as a new potential diagnostic marker and that ectopic expression of miR-34a may be used as a therapeutic target for laryngeal carcinoma.

  12. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zheng; Zhou, Yuning; Evers, B. Mark; Wang, Qingding

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor-FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  13. Mechanisms and regulation of the degradation of cyclin B.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of the cyclin B subunit of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B is required for inactivation of the kinase and exit from mitosis. Cyclin B is degraded by the ubiquitin pathway, a system involved in most selective protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by ligation to ubiquitin, a process carried out by the sequential action of three enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase E3. In the system responsible for cyclin B degradation, the E3-like function is carried out by a large complex called cyclosome or anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the early embryonic cell cycles, the cyclosome is inactive in the interphase, but becomes active at the end of mitosis. Activation requires phosphorylation of the cyclosome/APC by protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B. The lag kinetics of cyclosome activation may be explained by Suc1-assisted multiple phosphorylations of partly phosphorylated complex. The presence of a Fizzy/Cdc20-like protein is necessary for maximal activity of the mitotic form of cyclosome/APC in cyclin-ubiquitin ligation. PMID:10582242

  14. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  16. Modulations of benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA adduct, cyclin D1 and PCNA in oral tissue by 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun-Ming; Sacks, Peter G.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Lin, Jyh-Ming; Boyiri, Telih; Schwartz, Joel; Richie, John P.; Calcagnotto, Ana; Das, Arunangshu; Bortner, James; Zhao, Zonglin; Amin, Shantu; Guttenplan, Joseph; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2009-05-22

    Tobacco smoking is an important cause of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Tobacco smoke contains multiple carcinogens include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons typified by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Surgery is the conventional treatment approach for SCC, but it remains imperfect. However, chemoprevention is a plausible strategy and we had previously demonstrated that 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC) significantly inhibited tongue tumors-induced by the synthetic 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (not present in tobacco smoke). In this study, we demonstrated that p-XSC is capable of inhibiting B[a]P-DNA adduct formation, cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression in human oral cells in vitro. In addition, we showed that dietary p-XSC inhibits B[a]P-DNA adduct formation, cell proliferation and cyclin D1 protein expression in the mouse tongue in vivo. The results of this study are encouraging to further evaluate the chemopreventive efficacy of p-XSC initially against B[a]P-induced tongue tumors in mice and ultimately in the clinic.

  17. Same difference: A pilot study of cyclin D1, bcl-2, AMACR, and ALDH-1 identifies significant differences in expression between primary colon adenocarcinoma and its metastases.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Gerard J; Denning, Krista L; Graffeo, Vincent; Griswold, Doreen C; Davis, Adam R; Brown, Linda G

    2016-11-01

    Tumor heterogeneity implies the possibility of significantly different expression of key pathways between primary and metastatic clones. Colon adenocarcinoma is one of the few tumors where current practice includes resection of primary and isolated organ metastases simultaneously without neoadjuvant therapy. We performed a pilot study on 28 cases of colon adenocarcinoma resected simultaneously with metastases in patients with no history of neoadjuvant therapy. We assayed matched primary and metastatic tumors from each patient with common diagnostic antibodies to Bcl-2, Cyclin D1, AMACR, and ALDH-1 by immunohistochemistry with semi-quantitative interpretation on archived formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples. We were powered for large, consistent differences between primary and metastatic expression, and found 21 of 28 had a significant difference in expression of at least one of the four proteins, accounting for multiplicity of testing. Cyclin D1 had significantly more cases with differential metastatic:primary expression than would be expected by chance alone (p-value 0.0043), favoring higher expression in the metastatic sample. Bcl-2 and ALDH-1 had trends in this direction (p-value 0.078 each). Proportionately more cases with significant differences were identified when a liver metastasis was tested. We conclude differences in expression between metastatic and primary colon adenocarcinoma within the same patient exist, and may have therapeutic and biomarker testing consequences.

  18. The prognostic significance of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and PIN1 in minor salivary gland carcinoma: β-catenin predicts overall survival.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sven; Thurnher, Dietmar; Seemann, Rudolf; Brunner, Markus; Kadletz, Lorenz; Ghanim, Bahil; Aumayr, Klaus; Heiduschka, Gregor; Lill, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Minor salivary gland carcinoma is a rare and heterogeneous type of cancer. Molecular prognostic and predictive markers are sparse. The aim of this study was to identify new prognostic and predictive markers in minor salivary gland carcinoma. 50 tissue samples of carcinomas of the minor salivary glands (adenoid cystic carcinoma n = 23, mucoepidermoid carcinoma n = 12, adenocarcinoma n = 10, carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma n = 2, salivary duct carcinoma n = 1, clear cell carcinoma n = 1, basal cell carcinoma n = 1) were immunohistochemically stained for β-catenin, cyclin D1 and PIN1. Expression patterns were analyzed and correlated to clinical outcome of 37 patients with complete clinical data. High expression of membranous β-catenin was linked to significantly better overall survival in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (log rank test, χ (2) = 13.3, p = .00397, Bonferroni corrected p = .024). PIN1 and cyclin D1 did not show any significant correlation to patients' clinical outcome. Expression of β-catenin in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands significantly correlates with better overall survival. Hence, evaluation of β-catenin might serve as a clinical prognostic marker.

  19. Marine steroids as potential anticancer drug candidates: In silico investigation in search of inhibitors of Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Surovi; Kolita, Bhaskor; Dutta, Partha P; Dutta, Deep J; Neipihoi; Nath, Shyamalendu; Bordoloi, Manobjyoti; Quan, Pham Minh; Thuy, Tran Thu; Phuong, Doan Lan; Long, Pham Quoc

    2015-10-01

    Star fishes (Asteroidea) are rich in polar steroids with diverse structural characteristics. The structural modifications of star fish steroids occur at 3β, 4β, 5α, 6α (or β), 7α (or β), 8, 15α (or β) and 16β positions of the steroidal nucleus and in the side chain. Widely found polar steroids in starfishes include polyhydroxysteroids, steroidal sulfates, glycosides, steroid oligoglycosides etc. Bioactivity of these steroids is less studied; only a few reports like antibacterial, cytotoxic activity etc. are available. In continuation of our search for bioactive molecules from natural sources, we undertook in silico screening of steroids from star fishes against Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1 - two important targets of progression and proliferation of cancer cells. We have screened 182 natural steroids from star fishes occurring in different parts of the world and their 282 soft-derivatives by in silico methods. Their physico-chemical properties, drug-likeliness, binding potential with the selected targets, ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, toxicity) were predicted. Further, the results were compared with those of existing steroidal and non steroidal drugs and inhibitors of Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1. The results are promising and unveil that some of these steroids can be potent leads for cancer treatments.

  20. Distinctive patterns of Her-2/neu, c-myc, and cyclin D1 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization in primary human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Janocko, L E; Brown, K A; Smith, C A; Gu, L P; Pollice, A A; Singh, S G; Julian, T; Wolmark, N; Sweeney, L; Silverman, J F; Shackney, S E

    2001-06-15

    Human solid tumors undergo clonal evolution as they progress, but evidence for specific sequences of genetic changes that occur in individual tumors and are recapitulated in other tumors is difficult to obtain. Patterns of amplification of Her-2/neu, c-myc, and cyclin D1 were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in relation to the presence of p53 dysfunction and ploidy in 60 primary human breast cancers. We show that there are clusters of genophenotypic abnormalities that distinguish lobular breast cancers from nonlobular tumors; that cyclin D1 amplification occurs prior to the divergence of lobular breast cancers from nonlobular cancers; that p53 dysfunction, Her-2/neu amplification, and c-myc amplification are characteristic features of nonlobular breast cancers, but not of lobular breast cancers; and that the frequencies of amplification of all three oncogenes examined increase progressively with increasing aneuploidy, but that each gene exhibits a different profile of increasing amplification in relation to tumor progression. Early amplification of c-myc appears to be an especially prominent feature of hypertetraploid/hypertetrasomic tumors. The data suggest that in tumors containing multiple abnormalities, these abnormalities often accumulate in the same cells within each tumor. Furthermore, the same patterns of accumulation of multiple genophenotypic abnormalities are recapitulated in different tumors.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 promotes G(1)/S cell cycle progression through bidirectional regulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway in developing rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mairet-Coello, Georges; Tury, Anna; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2009-01-21

    Although survival-promoting effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) during neurogenesis are well characterized, mitogenic effects remain less well substantiated. Here, we characterize cell cycle regulators and signaling pathways underlying IGF-1 effects on embryonic cortical precursor proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, IGF-1 stimulated cell cycle progression and increased cell number without promoting cell survival. IGF-1 induced rapid increases in cyclin D1 and D3 protein levels at 4 h and cyclin E at 8 h. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression were reduced, suggesting downregulation of negative regulators contributes to mitogenesis. Furthermore, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway specifically underlies IGF-1 activity, because blocking this pathway, but not MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)/ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), prevented mitogenesis. To determine whether mechanisms defined in culture relate to corticogenesis in vivo, we performed transuterine intracerebroventricular injections. Whereas blockade of endogenous factor with anti-IGF-1 antibody decreased DNA synthesis, IGF-1 injection stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the number of S-phase cells in the ventricular zone. IGF-1 treatment increased phospho-Akt fourfold at 30 min, cyclins D1 and E by 6 h, and decreased p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression. Moreover, blockade of the PI3K/Akt pathway in vivo decreased DNA synthesis and cyclin E, increased p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) expression, and prevented IGF-1-induced cyclin E mRNA upregulation. Finally, IGF-1 injection in embryos increased postnatal day 10 brain DNA content by 28%, suggesting a role for IGF-1 in brain growth control. These results demonstrate a mitogenic role for IGF-1 that tightly controls both positive and negative cell cycle regulators, and indicate that the PI3K/Akt pathway mediates IGF-1 mitogenic signaling during corticogenesis.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates degranulation in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Ilarraza, Ramses; Davoine, Francis; Logan, Michael R; Shayeganpour, Anooshirvan; Wu, Yingqi; Majaesic, Carina; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige

    2015-04-01

    Degranulation from eosinophils in response to secretagogue stimulation is a regulated process that involves exocytosis of granule proteins through specific signalling pathways. One potential pathway is dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its effector molecules, p35 and p39, which play a central role in neuronal cell exocytosis by phosphorylating Munc18, a regulator of SNARE binding. Emerging evidence suggests a role for Cdk5 in exocytosis in immune cells, although its role in eosinophils is not known. We sought to examine the expression of Cdk5 and its activators in human eosinophils, and to assess the role of Cdk5 in eosinophil degranulation. We used freshly isolated human eosinophils and analysed the expression of Cdk5, p35, p39 and Munc18c by Western blot, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation. Cdk5 kinase activity was determined following eosinophil activation. Cdk5 inhibitors were used (roscovitine, AT7519 and small interfering RNA) to determine its role in eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) secretion. Cdk5 was expressed in association with Munc18c, p35 and p39, and phosphorylated following human eosinophil activation with eotaxin/CCL11, platelet-activating factor, and secretory IgA-Sepharose. Cdk5 inhibitors (roscovitine, AT7519) reduced EPX release when cells were stimulated by PMA or secretory IgA. In assays using small interfering RNA knock-down of Cdk5 expression in human eosinophils, we observed inhibition of EPX release. Our findings suggest that in activated eosinophils, Cdk5 is phosphorylated and binds to Munc18c, resulting in Munc18c release from syntaxin-4, allowing SNARE binding and vesicle fusion, with subsequent eosinophil degranulation. Our work identifies a novel role for Cdk5 in eosinophil mediator release by agonist-induced degranulation.

  3. Bio-pathologic characteristics related to chromosome 11 aneusomy and cyclin D1 gene status in surgically resected stage I and II breast cancer: Identification of an adverse prognostic profile.

    PubMed

    Mottolese, Marcella; Orlandi, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Merola, Roberta; Buglioni, Simonetta; Di Benedetto, Anna; Pinnarò, Paola; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Cognetti, Francesco; Cianciulli, AnnaMaria

    2007-02-01

    We aimed at developing a more detailed understanding of cyclin D1 in early stage human breast cancer and defining the biologic profiles with different prognostic value correlating cyclin D1 gene amplification and chromosome 11 aneusomy with bio-pathologic variables of known clinical importance. Cyclin D1 gene amplification and chromosome 11 aneusomy were investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization whereas cyclin D1, PgR, HER-2, Bcl2, p53, and Ki-67 expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 121 stage I or II breast cancer patients uniformly treated with cyclophosphamide/metotrexate/5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Cyclin D1 was amplified in 6.6% and overexpressed in 32.2% of cases. Amplification was not associated with any selected bio-pathologic variables, whereas the chromosome 11 aneusomy level significantly increased in tumors with higher histologic grade (P < 0.01), higher tumor size (P < 0.003), p53 nuclear accumulation (P < 0.04), and ERalpha negativity (P < 0.049). Multiple correspondence analysis showed 4 different biologic tumor profiles. The first, characterized by high Ki-67 score, p53+, cyclin D1+, HER-2+, aneusomy level > 30%, ratio (cyclin D1 gene/CEP11) > 2, was associated with tumor relapse defining the most unfavorable biologic profile. Kaplan-Meier's method showed significantly shorter disease-free survival in patients with at least 3 variables positive out of the 6 detected by multiple correspondence analysis. In multivariate analysis, the identified biologic profile emerged as the only significant prognostic indicator. Our findings are of particular clinical interest for early stage breast cancer patients, because the assessment of biologic factors predictive of tumor aggressiveness may influence postoperative therapeutic strategies.

  4. The cyclin A centrosomal localization sequence recruits MCM5 and Orc1 to regulate centrosome reduplication.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rebecca L; Pascreau, Gaetan; Maller, James L

    2010-08-15

    Centrosomes are the major microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells and regulate formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Aberrant centrosome number causes chromosome mis-segregation, and has been implicated in genomic instability and tumor development. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for the DNA replication factors MCM5 and Orc1 in preventing centrosome reduplication. Cyclin A-Cdk2 localizes on centrosomes by means of a modular centrosomal localization sequence (CLS) that is distinct from that of cyclin E. Here, we show that cyclin A interacts with both MCM5 and Orc1 in a CLS-dependent but Cdk-independent manner. Although the MRAIL hydrophobic patch is contained within the cyclin A CLS, binding of both MCM5 and Orc1 to cyclin A does not require a wild-type hydrophobic patch. The same domain in MCM5 that mediates interaction with cyclin E also binds cyclin A, resulting in centrosomal localization of MCM5. Finally, unlike its function in DNA synthesis, MCM5-mediated inhibition of centrosome reduplication in S-phase-arrested CHO cells does not require binding to other MCM family members. These results suggest that cyclins E and A sequentially prevent centrosome reduplication throughout interphase by recruitment of DNA replication factors such as MCM5 and Orc1.

  5. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Cooper, Katrina F.

    2014-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission) and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD) execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13), translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail this new function

  6. Involvement of Cyclin K Posttranscriptional Regulation in the Formation of Artemia Diapause Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Ding, Xia; Ye, Xiang; Dai, Zhong-Min; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. Principal Finding This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (Rpb1) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) survival signaling pathway. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways. PMID:22363807

  7. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  8. Inhibition of the CyclinD1 promoter in response to sonic hedgehog signaling pathway transduction is mediated by Gli1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhongxiao; Sheng, Hansong; You, Chaoguo; Cai, Ming; Zhang, Yiping; Yu, Li Sheng; Yu, Xiaoming; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Nu

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant tumor of the central nervous system in children. Accumulating evidence suggests a major role for the activation of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway in the development of MB cells; however, the mechanisms underlying the effect of this pathway on tumor survival and growth remain poorly understood. The Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli1) transcription factor is considered as a mediator of the SHH signaling pathway in MB cells. Therefore, the present study investigated whether the SHH signaling pathway promotes the apoptosis of MB cells via downregulation of Gli1. GANT61, a novel Gli1 inhibitor, is known to have an in vitro activity against tumors. In the current study, Daoy cells were treated with different concentrations of GANT61 for 24 h, and the effect on cell proliferation was assayed by cell counting kit-8 assay. In addition, the cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry analysis and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The effects of GANT61 treatment on SHH signaling pathway at the mRNA level were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To further elucidate the inhibitory effects of GANT61 on the expression of Gli1 and CyclinD1, their protein levels were examined by western blot and immunofluorescence. The results indicated that GANT61 significantly inhibited the proliferation of Daoy cells in a dose-dependent manner, compared with the control group (P<0.05). HE staining revealed that cells had increasingly abnormal protuberance with increasing GANT61 concentration. Flow cytometry analysis also demonstrated that GANT61 induced G1/S arrest and apoptosis of Daoy cells in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Gli1 and CyclinD1 mRNA expression levels were downregulated by GANT61 treatment (P<0.05); similarly, their protein levels were downregulated by GANT61 treatment in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). In conclusion, Gli1 expression was significantly associated with CyclinD1 expression

  9. OVCA1 expression and its correlation with the expression levels of cyclin D1 and p16 in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Rui; Yang, Qing; Wang, Chunyan; Bi, Fangfang; Jiang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the associations between the protein and mRNA expression levels of ovarian cancer gene 1 (OVCA1), cyclin D1 and p16 and high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in cervical lesions. The protein expression levels of OVCA1, cyclin D1 and p16 in 66 cases of cervical cancer, 64 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and 34 normal cervix tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of OVCA1, cyclin D1 and p16 in cervical cancer and normal cervix cells were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the protein expression levels of OVCA1 increased gradually, whereas its mRNA expression levels decreased gradually, in the progression from normal cervix tissue to CIN and cervical cancer (P<0.01). In addition, significant differences in the protein expression levels of OVCA1 between low-and high-level CIN, as well as between the early and advanced stages of cervical cancer, were observed (P<0.05). No significant associations were detected between the protein and mRNA expression levels of OVCA1 and the pathological type of cervical cancer or the presence of lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). The expression levels of OVCA1 mRNA and protein were positively correlated with the levels of p16 expression (P<0.01). Significant differences were also observed in the OVCA1 protein and mRNA expression levels between the HR-HPV (+) and HR-HPV (−) groups (P<0.05). Therefore, aberrant expression of OVCA1 protein and mRNA may be important during the development of cervical lesions, particularly in the early stages. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the effects of OVCA1 during cervical cancer development may involve p16 and HPV, as the levels of OVCA1 in cervical lesions were correlated with abnormal expression of p16 and HR-HPV infection. PMID:28521400

  10. OVCA1 expression and its correlation with the expression levels of cyclin D1 and p16 in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rui; Yang, Qing; Wang, Chunyan; Bi, Fangfang; Jiang, Bing

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the associations between the protein and mRNA expression levels of ovarian cancer gene 1 (OVCA1), cyclin D1 and p16 and high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in cervical lesions. The protein expression levels of OVCA1, cyclin D1 and p16 in 66 cases of cervical cancer, 64 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and 34 normal cervix tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of OVCA1, cyclin D1 and p16 in cervical cancer and normal cervix cells were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the protein expression levels of OVCA1 increased gradually, whereas its mRNA expression levels decreased gradually, in the progression from normal cervix tissue to CIN and cervical cancer (P<0.01). In addition, significant differences in the protein expression levels of OVCA1 between low-and high-level CIN, as well as between the early and advanced stages of cervical cancer, were observed (P<0.05). No significant associations were detected between the protein and mRNA expression levels of OVCA1 and the pathological type of cervical cancer or the presence of lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). The expression levels of OVCA1 mRNA and protein were positively correlated with the levels of p16 expression (P<0.01). Significant differences were also observed in the OVCA1 protein and mRNA expression levels between the HR-HPV (+) and HR-HPV (-) groups (P<0.05). Therefore, aberrant expression of OVCA1 protein and mRNA may be important during the development of cervical lesions, particularly in the early stages. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the effects of OVCA1 during cervical cancer development may involve p16 and HPV, as the levels of OVCA1 in cervical lesions were correlated with abnormal expression of p16 and HR-HPV infection.

  11. Inhibition of the CyclinD1 promoter in response to sonic hedgehog signaling pathway transduction is mediated by Gli1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhongxiao; Sheng, Hansong; You, Chaoguo; Cai, Ming; Zhang, Yiping; Yu, Li Sheng; Yu, Xiaoming; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Nu

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant tumor of the central nervous system in children. Accumulating evidence suggests a major role for the activation of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway in the development of MB cells; however, the mechanisms underlying the effect of this pathway on tumor survival and growth remain poorly understood. The Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli1) transcription factor is considered as a mediator of the SHH signaling pathway in MB cells. Therefore, the present study investigated whether the SHH signaling pathway promotes the apoptosis of MB cells via downregulation of Gli1. GANT61, a novel Gli1 inhibitor, is known to have an in vitro activity against tumors. In the current study, Daoy cells were treated with different concentrations of GANT61 for 24 h, and the effect on cell proliferation was assayed by cell counting kit-8 assay. In addition, the cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry analysis and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The effects of GANT61 treatment on SHH signaling pathway at the mRNA level were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To further elucidate the inhibitory effects of GANT61 on the expression of Gli1 and CyclinD1, their protein levels were examined by western blot and immunofluorescence. The results indicated that GANT61 significantly inhibited the proliferation of Daoy cells in a dose-dependent manner, compared with the control group (P<0.05). HE staining revealed that cells had increasingly abnormal protuberance with increasing GANT61 concentration. Flow cytometry analysis also demonstrated that GANT61 induced G1/S arrest and apoptosis of Daoy cells in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Gli1 and CyclinD1 mRNA expression levels were downregulated by GANT61 treatment (P<0.05); similarly, their protein levels were downregulated by GANT61 treatment in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). In conclusion, Gli1 expression was significantly associated with CyclinD1 expression

  12. Unusual concomitant rearrangements of Cyclin D1 and MYC genes in blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Delas, Audrey; Sophie, Dobbelstein; Brousset, Pierre; Laurent, Camille

    2013-02-15

    We report herein a case of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) with both aberrant phenotype and unusual genetics. Unexpectedly, lymphoma cells were CD5(-) and CD10(+). Standard karyotype and FISH techniques showed that tumor cells carried two distinct translocations which had not been reported together in a same tumor. The first translocation juxtaposed the immunoglobulin lambda light chain locus with CCND1 locus, leading to Cyclin D1 overexpression. The second translocation revealed MYC rearrangement with a non-immunoglobulin gene partner located on the short arm of chromosome 4. The interpretation of the case on tissue sections alone could have been challenging. Indeed, the lack of CD5 and expression of CD10 associated with MYC rearrangement detected on interphasic nuclei could support the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma. This distinction is also especially important as these lymphoma subtypes require specific treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of cyclin D2 gene expression by the Myc/Max/Mad network: Myc-dependent TRRAP recruitment and histone acetylation at the cyclin D2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Caroline; Dittrich, Oliver; Kiermaier, Astrid; Dohmann, Karen; Menkel, Annette; Eilers, Martin; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins promote cell cycle progression in part through the transcriptional up-regulation of the cyclin D2 gene. We now show that Myc is bound to the cyclin D2 promoter in vivo. Binding of Myc induces cyclin D2 expression and histone acetylation at a single nucleosome in a MycBoxII/TRRAP-dependent manner. Down-regulation of cyclin D2 mRNA expression in differentiating HL60 cells is preceded by a switch of promoter occupancy from Myc/Max to Mad/Max complexes, loss of TRRAP binding, increased HDAC1 binding, and histone deacetylation. Thus, recruitment of TRRAP and regulation of histone acetylation are critical for transcriptional activation by Myc. PMID:11511535

  14. Association of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CYCLIN D1 and Cathepsin D with Clinicopathological Parameters in Breast Carcinoma; an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Külahcı, Özgür; Esen, H. Hasan; Asut, Elife; Güngör, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Objective Breast carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor detected in women. The hypothesis that increased levels of adhesion molecules and Cathepsin D affect cancerous cells moving away the primary tumor and contributes to migration of the cancerous cell and may cause remote organ metastases is defended. The aim of the present study was to search the association of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), Cyclin D1, cathepsin D immunohistochemically with clinicopathological parameters in the patients diagnosed with invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods The pathological slides of 153 patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma were evaluated retrospectively. Three groups were created. Group 1 consisted of patients with positive lymph node metastasis and extranodal tumor invasion; Group 2 consisted of patients with positive axillary lymph node metastasis and negative extranodal tumor invasion and Group 3 consisted of the patients with negative axillary lymph node metastasis. In all groups, 20 paraffin blocks belonging to the primary tumor in the breast were stained by ICAM-1, VCAM-1, Cyclin D1 and Cathepsin D. Findings were examined by comparing with clinicopathological parameters. Results The highest number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes and the highest rate of cathepsin D staining were statistically found in the cases with positive axillary lymph node metastasis and extranodal tumor invasion. CerbB2 was negative in the cases with negative ICAM-1 whereas estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor were positive in the cases with positive VCAM-1. Conclusion The present study reveals significant results for the patients diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma through breast biopsy especially before mastectomy in terms of increased number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes and extranodal tumor invasion by immunohistochemical Cathepsin D stain without any additional invasive intervention

  15. Methylation of CpG islands of p16(INK4a) and cyclinD1 overexpression associated with progression of intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tieju; Niu, Yun; Feng, Yumei; Niu, Ruifang; Yu, Yong; Lv, Ajuan; Yang, Yi

    2008-11-01

    P16(INK4a) is a tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated by aberrant promoter hypermethylation. In this study, p16(INK4a) methylation was evaluated in intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight) and methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was performed to compare and validate the methylation analysis. P16(INK4a) methylation associated with oncogene cyclinD1 expression, detected through the use of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, was likewise characterized. P16(INK4a) methylation displayed varying significance among different types of intraductal proliferative lesions. Both the positive rate and the median quantitative methylation value increased with the evolution of intraductal proliferative lesions through the use of quantitative and qualitative assays. P16(INK4a) methylation was positively correlated to cyclinD1 overexpression. This study demonstrated that p16(INK4a) methylation served as the silencing mechanism of p16(INK4a) protein expression and played a crucial role in the intraductal proliferative lesions' progression. In the differential diagnosis of intraductal proliferative lesions, quantitative DNA methylation analysis of p16(INK4a) by MethyLight may be used as a surrogate, especially to distinguish atypical ductal hyperplasia from usual ductal hyperplasia and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. Furthermore, this study discovered that flat epithelial atypia do not share similar molecular profiles of p16(INK4a) epigenetic modification with atypical ductal hyperplasia and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

  16. BRAF inhibitor therapy-associated melanocytic lesions lack the BRAF V600E mutation and show increased levels of cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Kumaran; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Duvic, Madeleine; Ciurea, Ana; Hymes, Sharon; Milton, Denái R; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Prieto, Victor G; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Curry, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Newly appearing or changing melanocytic lesions (MLs) are a recently reported toxicity of BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy. Morphologically, MLs associated with BRAFi therapy (BRAFi-MLs) may demonstrate alarming features of melanoma with an epithelioid cell phenotype with notable cytologic atypia. We sought to characterize the clinicopathological and molecular features of BRAFi-MLs. A retrospective review over a 4-year period revealed 20 patients in which 44 MLs (including 11 control nevi) were characterized by histopathology, review of clinical medical records, and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies (with anti-BRAF V600E, anti-BAP1, anti-cyclin D1, and anti-p16); the percentage of IHC+ cells was scored. Of the 20 patients, 3 (15%) whose BRAFi-MLs were biopsied had a second primary cutaneous melanoma. Of the 44 BRAFi-MLs tested, 37 (100%) of 37 MLs available for BRAF V600E testing lacked expression in contrast to 1 (9%) of 11 control nevi (lesions not associated with targeted therapy). A significantly higher level of cyclin D1 expression (>50% IHC+ cells) was more commonly seen in BRAFi-MLs (44%) than in control nevi (9%). No difference in p16 expression in melanocytes was seen between the 2 groups. BRAF mutation status distinctly differs between BRAFi-MLs from melanomas and nevi biopsied in patients who do not receive BRAFi therapy. Morphologically, BRAFi-MLs demonstrate a greater degree of atypia than do control nevi. Furthermore, BRAFi-MLs with coexisting cutaneous keratinocyte toxicity developed during fewer days of targeted therapy. Paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway in BRAF(WT) melanocytes may account for ~15% to 21% of patients developing a second new primary melanoma within a year of starting BRAFi therapy; thus, close clinical surveillance is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exisulind in combination with celecoxib modulates epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1 against prostate carcinogenesis: in vivo evidence.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Bhagavathi A; Reddy, Bandaru S; Bosland, Maarten C; Nargi, Dominick; Horton, Lori; Randolph, Carla; Narayanan, Narayanan K

    2007-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs mediate anticancer effects by modulating cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent and/or COX-2-independent mechanism(s); however, the toxicity issue is a concern with single agents at higher doses. In this study, we determined the combined effect of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, along with exisulind (sulindac sulfone/Aptosyn) at low doses in prostate cancer. We used a sequential regimen of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea + testosterone to induce prostate cancer in Wistar-Unilever rats. Following carcinogen treatment, celecoxib and exisulind individually and their combination at low doses were given in NIH-07 diet for 52 weeks. We determined the incidence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinomas, rate of tumor cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis were done to determine COX-2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Akt, androgen receptor, and cyclin D1 expression. Serum prostaglandin E2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were determined using enzyme immunoassay/ELISA assays. The rats that received celecoxib in combination with exisulind at low doses showed a significant decrease in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinomas as well as an enhanced rate of apoptosis. An overall decrease in COX-2, EGFR, Akt, androgen receptor, and cyclin D1 expression was found associated with tumor growth inhibition. Reduced serum levels of COX-2 protein, prostaglandin E2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha indicated anti-inflammatory effects. A strong inhibition of total and phosphorylated form of EGFR (Tyr(992) and Tyr(845)) and Akt (Ser(473)) was significant in rats given with these agents in combination. In this study, we show for the first time that the combination of celecoxib with exisulind at low doses could prevent prostate carcinogenesis by altering key molecular events.

  18. FTY720 Shows Promising In vitro and In vivo Preclinical Activity by Downmodulating Cyclin D1 and Phospho-Akt in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Alinari, Lapo; Chen, Ching-Shih; Yan, Fengting; Dalton, James T.; Lapalombella, Rosa; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lin, Teresa; Byrd, John C.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), all patients invariably relapse with the currently available therapies. Because of the absence of curative therapy for MCL, we explored FTY720 as a novel agent against MCL. Experimental Design The cytotoxic effect of FTY720 in primary MCL tumor cells and cell lines were evaluated in vitro. The effects of FTY720 on caspase activation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and modulation of Cyclin D1 and Akt, which are implied in the pathogenesis of MCL, were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of FTY720 was evaluated in a Jeko-severe combined immunodeficient xenograft model of human MCL. Results FTY720 mediated time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in primary MCL tumor cells and MCL cell lines in vitro. FTY720-induced cytotoxicity occured independent of caspase activation but dependent on the generation of ROS in MCL. In addition, FTY720 treatment resulted in the time-dependent downmodulation of Cyclin D1 and accumulation of cells in G0-G1 and G2-M phases of the cell cycle with concomitant decrease in S-phase entry. Furthermore, concentrations of FTY720 that induced cytotoxicity led to decreased phospho-Akt in primary MCL cells and cell lines. Most importantly, the in vivo therapeutic activity of FTY720 was shown in severe combined immunodeficient mice engrafted with the Jeko MCL cell line. Conclusions These results provide the first evidence for a potential use of FTY720 in targeting key pathways that are operable in the pathogenesis of MCL and warrant further investigation of FTY720 in clinical trials to treat patients with MCL. PMID:20460491

  19. Mammalian cell-cycle regulation: several Cdks, numerous cyclins and diverse compensatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, A; Kaldis, P

    2009-08-20

    After a decade of extensive work on gene knockout mouse models of cell-cycle regulators, the classical model of cell-cycle regulation was seriously challenged. Several unexpected compensatory mechanisms were uncovered among cyclins and Cdks in these studies. The most astonishing observation is that Cdk2 is dispensable for the regulation of the mitotic cell cycle with both Cdk4 and Cdk1 covering for Cdk2's functions. Similar to yeast, it was recently discovered that Cdk1 alone can drive the mammalian cell cycle, indicating that the regulation of the mammalian cell cycle is highly conserved. Nevertheless, cell-cycle-independent functions of Cdks and cyclins such as in DNA damage repair are still under investigation. Here we review the compensatory mechanisms among major cyclins and Cdks in mammalian cell-cycle regulation.

  20. Expression of Cyclin d1 protein and CCND1 та PNKP genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in clean up worker of Chornobyl accident with different state of immune system.

    PubMed

    Bazyka, D A; Kubashko, A V; Ilyenko, I M; Belyaev, O A; Pleskach, O J

    2015-12-01

    Meta. Doslidyty zminy rivniv Cyclin D1+ klityn ta asotsiyovanykh geniv CCND1 ta PNKP u mononuklearakh peryfe rychnoI krovi v uchasnykiv likvidatsiI naslidkiv avariI (ULNA) na ChAES z riznym imunnym statusom v zalezhnosti vid dozy oprominennia.Materialy i metody. Proanalizovano vidnosnyy riven' Cyclin D1+ klityn u mononuklearakh peryferychnoI krovi 39 ULNA na ChAES, cholovikiv, oprominenykh u dozi u diapazoni (0,01–2,00) Gr. Imunologichnyy status obstezhenykh vyz nachavsia za rivnem CD3/19, CD4/8, CD3/HLA DR, SD3/16/56 metodom protochnoI tsytofluorymetriI ta za vmistom Ig klasiv A,M,G metodom imunofermentnogo analizu u krovi. Ekspresiia geniv CCND1 ta PNKP, iaki pov’iazani z Syclin D1, provodylos' za metodom polimeraznoI lantsiugovoI reaktsiI u real'nomu chasi. Porivniannia rezul'tativ zdiysniuva los' iz vidpovidnymy danymy, otrymanymy vid 18 zdorovykh cholovikiv, iaki ne maly kontaktu z ionizuiuchym vyp rominiuvanniam vyshche pryrodn'ogo fonu.Rezul'taty. Pokazano, shcho vidsotok Suclin D1+ klityn zbil'shuiet'sia za normu v osib, oprominenykh u dozi > 0,1 Gr, ta koreliuie z dozoiu oprominennia (rs = 0,417, p = 0,048). Vidkhylennia rivnia Cyclin D1+ klityn za mezhi kontrol'nykh zna chen' pov’iazuiet'sia zi zminamy v klitynniy ta gumoral'niy lankakh imunitetu. Zmenshennia vidsotku Cyclin D1+ klityn za mezhi kontrol'nykh znachen' v ULNA na ChAES iz dozoiu < 0,35 Gr suprovodzhuiet'sia znyzhenniam rivniv CD3+ ta pidvy shchenniam CD3 16+56+ limfotsytiv; u osib, oprominenykh u dozi > 0,35 Gr, zbil'shennia vidsotku Cyclin D1+ klityn asotsiiuiet'sia zi znyzhenniam CD3+ ta tendentsiieiu shchodo znyzhennia CD3+16+56+ limfotsytiv u poiednanni zi zbil'shen niam rivnia IgG. Zbil'shennia rivniv CD4+, CD19+, Ireg. ta IgG suprovodzhuiet'sia poiavoiu koreliatsiynykh zv’iazkiv mizh Cyclin D1+ ta CD3 16+56+ klitynamy (rs = 0,872, p = 0,049), Cyclin D1+ ta CD8+ i IgG (rs = 0,683, p = 0,042; rs = 0,809, p = 0,014), Cyclin D1+ ta CD4+ (rs = 0,602, p = 0,029), Cyclin D1+ ta CD19+ i

  1. Selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, R; Kuroda, H; Komatsu, H; Hosokawa, Y; Kagami, Y; Ogura, M; Nakamura, S; Kodera, Y; Morishima, Y; Ueda, R; Seto, M

    1999-09-01

    Three D-type cyclins, cyclin D1, D2 and D3, belong to the G1 cyclin, which regulates the G1/S transition of the cell cycle, and feature highly homologous amino acid sequences. The cyclin D1 gene was found to be transcriptionally activated in B-lymphoid malignancies with t(11;14), but available information is limited regarding expression of cyclin D2 and D3 in hematopoietic malignancies. We examined the expressions of three D-type cyclins to investigate how these homologous genes are differentially used. Northern blot hybridization with densitometric analyses was performed to examine 64 cell lines and 159 patients with various hematopoietic malignancies. Among lymphoid malignancies, cyclin D1 overexpression was exclusively detected in B cell malignancies accompanied by a genetic event consisting of 11q13 chromosomal translocation, consisting of 13 of 19 (68%) patients with mantle cell lymphoma, two of 11 (18%) with B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and one of six (17%) with multiple myeloma. The cyclin D2 expression was significantly higher in T cell malignancies than in B cell malignancies (P = 0.003 for cell lines and P < 0.0001 for patient samples, respectively). In the T cell malignancies, cyclin D2 overexpression was predominantly recognized in those with mature phenotype. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expression was upregulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of normal T-lymphocytes, suggesting that this simply represents the proliferation status of mature T cells. Although cyclin D3 was ubiquitously expressed, its expression was reduced in lymphoid malignancies with cyclin D1 or D2 overexpression. In myeloid leukemias, although three D-type type cyclins were differentially expressed, no preference for particular D-type cyclins was found. This selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies suggests an existence of a regulatory mechanism among three D-type cyclins.

  2. Cyclin Y-mediated transcript profiling reveals several important functional pathways regulated by Cyclin Y in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Hong, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Mirang; Park, Mikyoung

    2017-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY), which is a cyclin protein known to play a role in cell division, is unexpectedly and thus interestingly expressed in non-proliferating neuronal cells. There have been only a few studies reporting the neuronal functions of CCNY in synapse remodeling and hippocampal long-term potentiation. Therefore, we here provide global and comprehensive information on the putative functions of CCNY in biological and functional pathways in neuronal systems. We adopted high-throughput RNA-sequencing technology for analyzing transcriptomes regulated by CCNY and utilized bioinformatics for identifying putative molecules, biological processes, and functional pathways that are possibly connected to CCNY functions in hippocampal neuronal cells of rats. We revealed that several enriched annotation terms and pathways associated with CCNY expression within neurons, including apoptosis, learning or memory, synaptic plasticity, actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway are targeted by CCNY. In addition, the mRNA levels of some genes enriched for those annotation terms and pathways or genes reported to be altered in Alzheimer’s disease mouse model were further validated by quantitative real-time PCR in hippocampal neuronal cells. The present study provides an excellent resource for future investigations of CCNY functions in neuronal systems. PMID:28241067

  3. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  4. HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC9 Bind to PC3/Tis21/Btg2 and Are Required for Its Inhibition of Cell Cycle Progression and Cyclin D1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Laura; D'Andrea, Giorgio; Leonardi, Luca; Tirone, Felice

    2017-07-01

    PC3/Tis21 is a transcriptional cofactor that inhibits proliferation in several cell types, including neural progenitors. Here, we report that PC3/Tis21 associates with HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC9 in vivo, in fibroblast cells. Furthermore, when HDAC1, HDAC4, or HDAC9 are silenced in fibroblasts or in a line of cerebellar progenitor cells, the ability of PC3/Tis21 to inhibit proliferation is significantly reduced. Overexpression of HDAC1, HDAC4, or HDAC9 in fibroblasts and in cerebellar precursor cells synergizes with PC3/Tis21 in inhibiting the expression of cyclin D1, a cyclin selectively inhibited by PC3/Tis21. Conversely, the depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC4 (but not HDAC9) in fibroblasts and in cerebellar precursor cells significantly impairs the ability of PC3/Tis21 to inhibit cyclin D1 expression. An analysis of HDAC4 deletion mutants shows that both the amino-terminal moiety and the catalytic domain of HDAC4 associate to PC3/Tis21, but neither alone is sufficient to potentiate the inhibition of cyclin D1 by PC3/Tis21. As a whole, our findings indicate that PC3/Tis21 inhibits cell proliferation in a way dependent on the presence of HDACs, in fibroblasts as well as in neural cells. Considering that several reports have demonstrated that HDACs can act as transcriptional corepressors on the cyclin D1 promoter, our data suggest that the association of PC3/Tis21 to HDACs is functional to recruit them to target genes, such as cyclin D1, for repression of their expression. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1696-1707, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cyclin E-Mediated Human Proopiomelanocortin Regulation as a Therapeutic Target for Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Araki, Takako; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Hong, Jiang; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Tone, Yukiko; Tone, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cushing disease, due to pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH hypersecretion, drives excess adrenal cortisol production with adverse morbidity and mortality. Loss of glucocorticoid negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to autonomous transcription of the corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC), consequent ACTH overproduction, and adrenal hypercortisolism. We previously reported that R-roscovitine (CYC202, seliciclib), a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine analog, suppresses cyclin-dependent-kinase 2/cyclin E and inhibits ACTH in mice and zebrafish. We hypothesized that intrapituitary cyclin E signaling regulates corticotroph tumor POMC transcription independently of cell cycle progression. The aim was to investigate whether R-roscovitine inhibits human ACTH in corticotroph tumors by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin E signaling pathway. Methods: Primary cell cultures of surgically resected human corticotroph tumors were treated with or without R-roscovitine, ACTH measured by RIA and quantitative PCR, and/or Western blot analysis performed to investigate ACTH and lineage-specific transcription factors. Cyclin E and E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection was performed in murine corticotroph tumor AtT20 cells to elucidate mechanisms for drug action. POMC gene promoter activity in response to R-roscovitine treatment was analyzed using luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Results: R-roscovitine inhibits human corticotroph tumor POMC and Tpit/Tbx19 transcription with decreased ACTH expression. Cyclin E and E2F1 exhibit reciprocal positive regulation in corticotroph tumors. R-roscovitine disrupts E2F1 binding to the POMC gene promoter and suppresses Tpit/Tbx19 and other lineage-specific POMC transcription cofactors via E2F1-dependent and -independent pathways. Conclusion: R-roscovitine inhibits human pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH by targeting the

  6. Cyclin E-Mediated Human Proopiomelanocortin Regulation as a Therapeutic Target for Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Araki, Takako; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Hong, Jiang; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Tone, Yukiko; Tone, Masahide; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-07-01

    Cushing disease, due to pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH hypersecretion, drives excess adrenal cortisol production with adverse morbidity and mortality. Loss of glucocorticoid negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to autonomous transcription of the corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC), consequent ACTH overproduction, and adrenal hypercortisolism. We previously reported that R-roscovitine (CYC202, seliciclib), a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine analog, suppresses cyclin-dependent-kinase 2/cyclin E and inhibits ACTH in mice and zebrafish. We hypothesized that intrapituitary cyclin E signaling regulates corticotroph tumor POMC transcription independently of cell cycle progression. The aim was to investigate whether R-roscovitine inhibits human ACTH in corticotroph tumors by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2/cyclin E signaling pathway. Primary cell cultures of surgically resected human corticotroph tumors were treated with or without R-roscovitine, ACTH measured by RIA and quantitative PCR, and/or Western blot analysis performed to investigate ACTH and lineage-specific transcription factors. Cyclin E and E2F transcription factor 1 (E2F1) small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection was performed in murine corticotroph tumor AtT20 cells to elucidate mechanisms for drug action. POMC gene promoter activity in response to R-roscovitine treatment was analyzed using luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. R-roscovitine inhibits human corticotroph tumor POMC and Tpit/Tbx19 transcription with decreased ACTH expression. Cyclin E and E2F1 exhibit reciprocal positive regulation in corticotroph tumors. R-roscovitine disrupts E2F1 binding to the POMC gene promoter and suppresses Tpit/Tbx19 and other lineage-specific POMC transcription cofactors via E2F1-dependent and -independent pathways. R-roscovitine inhibits human pituitary corticotroph tumor ACTH by targeting the cyclin E/E2F1 pathway. Pituitary cyclin E

  7. Regulating mitosis and meiosis in the male germ line: critical functions for cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.; Roberts, Shelby S.

    2010-01-01

    Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory subunits, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners the cyclin-dependent kinases. Regulating the cell cycle in the male germ line cells represents unique challenges for this machinery given the constant renewal of gametes throughout the reproductive lifespan and the induction of the unique process of meiosis, a highly specialized kind of cell division. With challenges come opportunities to the critical eye, recognizing that understanding these specialized modes of regulation will provide considerable insight into both normal differentiation as well as disease conditions, including infertility and oncogenesis. PMID:20403876

  8. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21{sup Cip1}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Kim, Seonggon; Hwang, Junmo; Kim, Young Hun; Lim, Ga Young; Sohn, Wern-Joo; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Tae Sung; Park, Kwon Moo; Ryoo, Zae Young; Lee, Sanggyu

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27{sup Kip1} and repressed p21{sup Cip1}, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21{sup Cip1}, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  9. Metronomic Ceramide Analogs Inhibit Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer through Up-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Thrombospondin-1 and Down-regulation of Cyclin D112

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Guido; Fioravanti, Anna; Orlandi, Paola; Di Desidero, Teresa; Natale, Gianfranco; Fanelli, Giovanni; Viacava, Paolo; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Francia, Giulio; Danesi, Romano

    2012-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of metronomic ceramide analogs and their relevant molecular mechanisms. Methods Human endothelial cells [human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC)] and pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1 and MIA PaCa-2) were treated with the ceramide analogs (C2, AL6, C6, and C8), at low concentrations for 144 hours to evaluate any antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects and inhibition of migration and to measure the expression of caveolin-1 (CAV-1) and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) mRNAs by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Assessment of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and Akt phosphorylation and of CAV-1 and cyclin D1 protein expression was performed by ELISA. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) gemcitabine was compared against metronomic doses of the ceramide analogs by evaluating the inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous tumor growth in nude mice. Results Metronomic ceramide analogs preferentially inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. Low concentrations of AL6 and C2 caused a significant inhibition of HUVEC migration. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were significantly decreased after metronomic ceramide analog treatment. Such treatment caused the overexpression of CAV-1 and TSP-1 mRNAs and proteins in endothelial cells, whereas cyclin D1 protein levels were reduced. The antiangiogenic and antitumor impact in vivo of metronomic C2 and AL6 regimens was similar to that caused by MTD gemcitabine. Conclusions Metronomic C2 and AL6 analogs have antitumor and antiangiogenic activity, determining the up-regulation of CAV-1 and TSP-1 and the suppression of cyclin D1. PMID:23019415

  10. Distinct proliferative and transcriptional effects of the D-type cyclins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; White, Peter; Hanse, Eric A; Nelsen, Christopher J; Goggin, Melissa M; Mullany, Joseph E; Anttila, Chelsea K; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2008-07-15

    The D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are components of the cell cycle machinery and govern progression through G(1) phase in response to extracellular signals. Although these proteins are highly homologous and conserved in evolution, they contain distinct structural motifs and are differentially regulated in various cell types. Cyclin D1 appears to play a role in many different types of cancer, whereas cyclins D2 and D3 are less frequently associated with malignancy. In this study, we transiently expressed cyclin D1, D2 or D3 in hepatocytes and analyzed transcriptional networks regulated by each. All three D-type cyclins promoted robust hepatocyte proliferation and marked liver growth, although cyclin D3 stimulated less DNA synthesis than D1 or D2. Accordingly, the three D-type cyclins similarly activated genes associated with cell division. Cyclin D1 regulated transcriptional pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other substrates, whereas cyclin D2 did not regulate these pathways despite having an equivalent effect on proliferation. Comparison of transcriptional profiles following 70% partial hepatectomy and cyclin D1 transduction revealed a highly significant overlap, suggesting that cyclin D1 may regulate diverse cellular processes in the regenerating liver. In summary, these studies provide the first comparative analysis of the transcriptional networks regulated by the D-type cyclins and provide insight into novel functions of these key cell cycle proteins. Further study of the unique targets of cyclin D1 should provide further insight into its prominent role in proliferation, growth and cancer.

  11. In vivo study on the effects of curcumin on the expression profiles of anti-tumour genes (VEGF, CyclinD1 and CDK4) in liver of rats injected with DEN.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chu Zhu; Huang, Wei Zhe; Zhang, Ge; Tang, Dan Ling

    2013-10-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of curcumin, derived from plant Curcuma longa, on oxidative toxicity, and the possible molecular mechanism of antitumour of curcumin in liver cancer rats. Results showed that blood levels of Gamma-glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glutathione S-transferase, and liver level of MD were significantly decreased after curcumin feeding. Levels of the liver malondialdehyde MDA, nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased. Moreover, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis results showed that curcumin treatment significantly decreased liver vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CyclinD1 and CDK4 mRNA expression levels and CyclinD1 and CDK4 proteins levels in liver cancer rats. These findings were confirmed by histopathology. It is concluded that curcumin can protect the liver from the damage caused by N-nitrosodiethylamine. Moreover, curcumin has the potential to be used in a therapy for liver cancer. The present data provide evidence to support the presence of free radicals and VEGF, CyclinD1 and CDK4 mRNA in rat tumour cells. Studies are in progress in order to further characterize the role of VEGF, CyclinD1 and CDK4 mRNA in liver cancer cells and in hepatic therapeutics.

  12. Glucose Regulates Cyclin D2 Expression in Quiescent and Replicating Pancreatic β-Cells Through Glycolysis and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Salpeter, Seth J.; Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Porat, Shay; Granot, Zvi; Shapiro, A. M. James; Magnuson, Mark A.; Eden, Amir; Grimsby, Joseph; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular triggers of pancreatic β-cell proliferation may facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for diabetes. Genetic studies have demonstrated an important role for cyclin D2 in β-cell proliferation and mass homeostasis, but its specific function in β-cell division and mechanism of regulation remain unclear. Here, we report that cyclin D2 is present at high levels in the nucleus of quiescent β-cells in vivo. The major regulator of cyclin D2 expression is glucose, acting via glycolysis and calcium channels in the β-cell to control cyclin D2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, cyclin D2 mRNA is down-regulated during S-G2-M phases of each β-cell division, via a mechanism that is also affected by glucose metabolism. Thus, glucose metabolism maintains high levels of nuclear cyclin D2 in quiescent β-cells and modulates the down-regulation of cyclin D2 in replicating β-cells. These data challenge the standard model for regulation of cyclin D2 during the cell division cycle and suggest cyclin D2 as a molecular link between glucose levels and β-cell replication. PMID:21521747

  13. The high expression of TC1 (C8orf4) was correlated with the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 and the progression of squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cao, Hong-Yi; Bai, Lin-Lin; Li, Wei-Nan; Wang, Yuan; Chen, Song-Yan; Zhang, Li; Yang, Lian-He; Xu, Hong-Tao; Wang, En-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Thyroid cancer 1 (TC1, C8orf4) plays important roles in many signaling pathways, such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is involved in the development of many cancers. The objective of this study was to examine the expression of TC1 and investigate the associations among TC1, β-catenin, Chibby, cyclin D1, and the clinicopathological factors of oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCCs). The expressions of TC1, β-catenin, Chibby, and cyclin D1 were examined in 109 cases of OTSCCs using immunohistochemistry. The expression of TC1 was observed in all cases of OTSCCs but was negative or weak in normal squamous epithelial tissues of tongue. The high expression of TC1 was correlated with the advanced TNM stage (P = 0.042), the abnormal expression of β-catenin (correlation coefficient = 0.314, P = 0.001) and the expression of cyclin D1 (correlation coefficient = 0.274, P = 0.006) in OTSCCs. But we did not find any associations between TC1 and Chibby. The abnormal expression of β-catenin was correlated with the poor differentiation (P = 0.035), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.048) and the expression of cyclin D1 (correlation coefficient = 0.422, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the high expression of TC1 was common in OTSCCs and correlated with the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 and the progression of OTSCCs. The high expression level of TC1 might promote the progression of OTSCCs by enhancing the activity of Wnt signaling pathway.

  14. [Retracted] Epidermal growth factor-stimulated human cervical cancer cell growth is associated with EGFR and cyclin D1 activation, independent of COX-2 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rajkishen; Kim, Hye Na; Narayanan, Narayanan K; Nargi, Dominick; Narayanan, Bhagavathi

    2017-01-01

    Following the publication of this article, which was concerned with the expression of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR) and cyclin D1 activation independently of the expression levels of cyclo-oxygenase-2, an interested reader drew to our attention apparent anomalies associated with the western blot data shown in Fig. 2C. Following an internal investigation at the New York University School of Medicine, we were requested to produce the original film, or the scan of the image of the film, for verification. Unfortunately, we were unable to provide the original film or scanned image to disprove the allegation, since the original pEGFR image could not be found. Therefore, the Investigation Committee recommended that this article be retracted, and we are withdrawing the article in line with the request. All the authors agree to the retraction of this paper. We sincerely regret any inconvenience this has caused. [the original article was published in the International Journal of Oncology 40: 13-20, 2012; DOI: 10.3892/ijo.2011.1211].

  15. The risk factor of gallbladder cancer: hyperplasia of mucous epithelium caused by gallstones associates with p16/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jinglong; Wei, Honglian; Gao, Ping; Shi, Jingsen; Zhang, Jinqian; Zhao, Fenglin

    2011-10-01

    The mucosa of gallbladder stimulated with gallstones and accompanied with abnormalities in bile composition, is the origin of biliary disease, which could induce metaplasia, simple hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia and even carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma in gallbladder mucosa. To determine the disorder of the balance between cell proliferation and cell cycle or apoptosis in gallbladder cancer accompanied with gallstones, removal of the gallbladder due to gallstones specimens of 88 cases were collected randomly, including a variety of 54 cases for hyperplasia, 27 cases for gallbladder cancer and 7 cases for normal gallbladder. The expressions of key cell cycle factors were detected by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The expressions of CDK4 and Cyclin D1 increased along with progression of gallbladder mucosa hyperplasia; and showed highest expression in cancer group. On the contrary, p16 decreased to the lowest level in gallbladder cancer. The increased apoptotic index analyzed by TUNEL assay rose along with malignant degree to the highest level in undifferentiated carcinoma. Our results suggest that changes of these signals have effect on breaking the balance of proliferation and death of gallbladder epithelial cells, even on inducing gallbladder cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Ru(pipe)(dppb)(bipy)]PF6: A novel ruthenium complex that effectively inhibits ERK activation and cyclin D1 expression in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Silva, Guilherme A; Ortega, Marina M; Banionis, Marco A; Garavelli, Graciana Y; Martins, Felipe T; Dias, Julia S M; Viegas, Cláudio; Oliveira, Jaqueline C de; Nascimento, Fabio B do; Doriguetto, Antonio C; Barbosa, Marilia I F; Ionta, Marisa

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. In Brazil, only 14% of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer survived 5years in the last decades. Although improvements in the therapeutic approach, it is relevant to identify new chemotherapeutic agents. In this framework, ruthenium metal compounds emerge as a promising alternative to platinum-based compounds once they displayed lower cytotoxicity and more selectivity for tumor cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor potential of innovative ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(pipe)(dppb)(bipy)]PF6 (PIPE) on A549 cells, which is derived from non-small cell lung cancer. Results demonstrated that PIPE effectively reduced the viability and proliferation rate of A549 cells. When PIPE was used at 9μM there was increase in G0/G1 cell population with concomitant reduction in frequency of cells in S-phase, indicating cell cycle arrest in G1/S transition. Antiproliferative activity of PIPE was associated to its ability of reducing cyclin D1 expression and ERK phosphorylation levels. Cytotoxic activity of PIPE on A549 cells was observed when PIPE was used at 18μM, which was associated to its ability of inducing apoptosis by intrinsic pathway. Taken together, the data demonstrated that PIPE is a promising antitumor agent and further in vivo studies should be performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantifying β-catenin subcellular dynamics and cyclin D1 mRNA transcription during Wnt signaling in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Kafri, Pinhas; Hasenson, Sarah E; Kanter, Itamar; Sheinberger, Jonathan; Kinor, Noa; Yunger, Sharon; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Signal propagation from the cell membrane to a promoter can induce gene expression. To examine signal transmission through sub-cellular compartments and its effect on transcription levels in individual cells within a population, we used the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as a model system. Wnt signaling orchestrates a response through nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the cell population. However, quantitative live-cell measurements in individual cells showed variability in nuclear β-catenin accumulation, which could occur in two waves, followed by slow clearance. Nuclear accumulation dynamics were initially rapid, cell cycle independent and differed substantially from LiCl stimulation, presumed to mimic Wnt signaling. β-catenin levels increased simultaneously at adherens junctions and the centrosome, and a membrane-centrosome transport system was revealed. Correlating β-catenin nuclear dynamics to cyclin D1 transcriptional activation showed that the nuclear accumulation rate of change of the signaling factor, and not actual protein levels, correlated with the transcriptional output of the pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16748.001 PMID:27879202

  18. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  19. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves cell cycle-dependent regulation of developmental genes by Cyclin D.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-02-15

    Coordination of differentiation and cell cycle progression represents an essential process for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. These mechanisms ultimately determine the quantities of specific cell types that are generated. Despite their importance, the precise molecular interplays between cell cycle machinery and master regulators of cell fate choice remain to be fully uncovered. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1-3 control cell fate decisions in human pluripotent stem cells by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and coactivator complexes onto neuroectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm genes. This activity results in blocking the core transcriptional network necessary for endoderm specification while promoting neuroectoderm factors. The genomic location of Cyclin Ds is determined by their interactions with the transcription factors SP1 and E2Fs, which result in the assembly of cell cycle-controlled transcriptional complexes. These results reveal how the cell cycle orchestrates transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifiers to instruct cell fate decisions. © 2016 Pauklin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Seok; Rho, Jun Gi; Shin, Jung Jae; Song, Woo Keun; Lee, Eun Kyung; Egan, Josephine M.; Kim, Wook

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212–2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes. PMID:26967640

  1. Regulation of cell cycle and cyclins by 16alpha-hydroxyestrone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S; Thomas, T J; Klinge, C M; Gallo, M A; Thomas, T

    2001-12-01

    It has been suggested that alterations in estradiol (E(2)) metabolism, resulting in increased production of 16alpha-hydroxyestrone (16alpha-OHE(1)), is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. In the present study, we examined the effects of 16alpha-OHE(1)on DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. G(1) synchronized cells were treated with 1 to 25 nM 16alpha-OHE(1) for 24 and 48 h. [(3)H]Thymidine incorporation assay showed that 16alpha-OHE(1) caused an 8-fold increase in DNA synthesis compared with that of control cells, whereas E(2) caused a 4-fold increase. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle progression also demonstrated the potency of 16alpha-OHE(1) in stimulating cell growth. When G(1) synchronized cells were treated with 10 nM 16alpha-OHE(1) for 24 h, 62+/-3% of cells were in S phase compared with 14+/-3% and 52+/-2% of cells in the control and E(2)-treated groups respectively. In order to explore the role of 16alpha-OHE(1) in cell cycle regulation, we examined its effects on cyclins (D1, E, A, B1), cyclin dependent kinases (Cdk4, Cdk2), and retinoblastoma protein (pRB) using Western and Northern blot analysis. Treatment of cells with 10 nM 16alpha-OHE(1) resulted in 4- and 3-fold increases in cyclin D1 and cyclin A, respectively, at the protein level. There was also a significant increase in pRB phosphorylation and Cdk2 activation. In addition, transient transfection assay using an estrogen response element-driven luciferase reporter vector showed a 15-fold increase in estrogen receptor-mediated transactivation compared with control. These results show that 16alpha-OHE(1) is a potent estrogen capable of accelerating cell cycle kinetics and stimulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins.

  2. Simultaneous expression analysis of vitamin D receptor, calcium-sensing receptor, cyclin D1, and PTH in symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism in Asian Indians.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Shweta; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Sachdeva, Naresh; Behera, Arunanshu; Arya, Ashutosh Kumar; Sharma, Sadhna; Bhansali, Anil; Mithal, Ambrish; Rao, Sudhaker D

    2013-07-01

    To explore underlying molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of symptomatic sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Forty-one parathyroid adenomas from patients with symptomatic PHPT and ten normal parathyroid glands either from patients with PHPT (n=3) or from euthyroid patients without PHPT during thyroid surgery (n=7) were analyzed for vitamin D receptor (VDR), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cyclin D1 (CD1), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) expressions. The protein expressions were assessed semiquantitatively by immunohistochemistry, based on percentage of positive cells and staining intensity, and confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed significant reductions in VDR (both nuclear and cytoplasmic) and CASR expressions and significant increases in CD1 and PTH expressions in adenomatous compared with normal parathyroid tissue. Consistent with immunohistochemistry findings, both VDR and CASR mRNAs were reduced by 0.36- and 0.45-fold change (P<0.001) and CD1 and PTH mRNAs were increased by 9.4- and 17.4-fold change respectively (P<0.001) in adenomatous parathyroid tissue. PTH mRNA correlated with plasma PTH (r=0.864; P<0.001), but not with adenoma weight, while CD1 mRNA correlated with adenoma weight (r=0.715; P<0.001). There were no correlations between VDR and CASR mRNA levels and serum Ca, plasma intact PTH, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. In addition, there was no relationship between the decreases in VDR and CASR mRNA expressions and the increases in PTH and CD1 mRNA expressions. The expression of both VDR and CASR are reduced in symptomatic PHPT in Asian Indians. In addition, CD1 expression was greatly increased and correlated with adenoma weight, implying a potential role for CD1 in adenoma growth and differential clinical expression of PHPT.

  3. Distinction between Asymptomatic Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis with Cyclin D1 Overexpression and Mantle Cell Lymphoma: From Molecular Profiling to Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Ana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Nonell, Lara; Salar, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Gimeno, Javier; Garcia-Garcia, Mar; Carmen Vela, Maria; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Navarro, José Tomás; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Abrisqueta, Pau; Arenillas, Leonor; Serrano, Cristina; Lloreta, Josep; Miñana, Belén; Cerutti, Andrea; Florensa, Lourdes; Orfao, Alberto; Sanz, Ferran; Solé, Francesc; Dominguez-Sola, David; Serrano, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose According to current diagnostic criteria, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) encompasses the usual, aggressive variants and rare, nonnodal cases with monoclonal asymptomatic lymphocytosis, cyclin D1–positive (MALD1). We aimed to understand the biology behind this clinical heterogeneity and to identify markers for adequate identification of MALD1 cases. Experimental Design We compared 17 typical MCL cases with a homogeneous group of 13 untreated MALD1 cases (median follow-up, 71 months). We conducted gene expression profiling with functional analysis in five MCL and five MALD1. Results were validated in 12 MCL and 8 MALD1 additional cases by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in 24 MCL and 13 MALD1 cases by flow cytometry. Classification and regression trees strategy was used to generate an algorithm based on CD38 and CD200 expression by flow cytometry. Results We found 171 differentially expressed genes with enrichment of neoplastic behavior and cell proliferation signatures in MCL. Conversely, MALD1 was enriched in gene sets related to immune activation and inflammatory responses. CD38 and CD200 were differentially expressed between MCL and MALD1 and confirmed by flow cytometry (median CD38, 89% vs. 14%; median CD200, 0% vs. 24%, respectively). Assessment of both proteins allowed classifying 85% (11 of 13) of MALD1 cases whereas 15% remained unclassified. SOX11 expression by qRT-PCR was significantly different between MCL and MALD1 groups but did not improve the classification. Conclusion We show for the first time that MALD1, in contrast to MCL, is characterized by immune activation and driven by inflammatory cues. Assessment of CD38/CD200 by flow cytometry is useful to distinguish most cases of MALD1 from MCL in the clinical setting. MALD1 should be identified and segregated from the current MCL category to avoid overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. PMID:24352646

  4. Expression of p53, p16, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor and Notch1 in patients with temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shinya; Nakamaru, Yuji; Homma, Akihiro; Yasukawa, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Sakashita, Tomohiro; Kano, Satoshi; Fukuda, Atsushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of p53, p16, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Notch1 in temporal bone squamous cell carcinoma (TBSCC) tissue samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and to evaluate the association between these biomarkers and clinicopathological features. We performed a retrospective, single-institution review of 30 TBSCC patients treated with curative intent between April 2006 and March 2015. All tissue samples were obtained from pretreatment biopsy specimens or surgical specimens and using IHC staining. Ten patients were categorized as T1, seven as T2, five as T3 and eight as T4. Nine patients had clinically positive lymph node metastasis. The positive expression of p53 and EGFR was significantly associated with T classification (P = 0.042 and P = 0.0039). EGFR expression was significantly more frequent in patients with positive lymph node metastasis compared with patients without node involvement (P = 0.017). In the analysis of the association between protein expression by IHC staining and prognosis, the positive expression of EGFR and Notch1 was significantly correlated with poor survival outcomes in TBSCC (P = 0.015 and P = 0.025) CONCLUSION: Overexpression of p53 and EGFR may be valuable biomarkers for identifying individuals at high risk of developing tumors in TBSCC. Furthermore, the positive expression of EGFR was significantly associated with poor survival outcome. Anti-EGFR therapy has potential for use as the treatment modality of choice for advanced-stage TBSCC as well as other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

  5. Nuclear PRMT5, cyclin D1 and IL-6 are associated with poor outcome in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients and is inversely associated with p16-status

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhavna; Yadav, Arti; Brown, Nicole V.; Zhao, Songzhu; Cipolla, Michael J.; Wakely, Paul E.; Schmitt, Alessandra C.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Teknos, Theodoros N.

    2017-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase-5 (PRMT5) plays an important role in cancer progression by repressing the expression of key tumor suppressor genes via the methylation of transcriptional factors and chromatin-associated proteins. However, very little is known about the expression and biological role of PRMT5 in head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined expression profile of PRMT5 at subcellular levels in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and assessed its correlation with disease progression and patient outcome. Our results show that nuclear PRMT5 was associated with poor overall survival (p < 0.012) and these patients had 1.732 times higher hazard of death (95% CI: 1.127–2.661) as compared to patients in whom PRMT5 was not present in the nucleus of the tumors. Nuclear PRMT5 expression was inversely correlated with p16-status (p < 0.001) and was significantly higher in tumor samples from patients who smoked > 10 pack-years (p = 0.013). In addition, nuclear PRMT5 was directly correlated with cyclin D1 (p = 0.0101) and IL-6 expression (p < 0.001). In a subgroup survival analysis, nuclear PRMT5-positive/IL-6-positive group had worst survival, whereas nuclear PRMT5-negative/IL-6-negative group had the best survival. Similarly, patients with p16-negative/nuclear PRMT5-positive tumors had worse survival compared to patients with p16-positive/nuclear PRMT5-negative tumors. Our mechanistic results suggest that IL-6 promotes nuclear translocation of PRMT5. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that nuclear PRMT5 expression is associated with poor clinical outcome in OPSCC patients and IL-6 plays a role in the nuclear translocation of PRMT5. PMID:28107179

  6. Nuclear PRMT5, cyclin D1 and IL-6 are associated with poor outcome in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients and is inversely associated with p16-status.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhavna; Yadav, Arti; Brown, Nicole V; Zhao, Songzhu; Cipolla, Michael J; Wakely, Paul E; Schmitt, Alessandra C; Baiocchi, Robert A; Teknos, Theodoros N; Old, Matthew; Kumar, Pawan

    2017-01-17

    Protein arginine methyltransferase-5 (PRMT5) plays an important role in cancer progression by repressing the expression of key tumor suppressor genes via the methylation of transcriptional factors and chromatin-associated proteins. However, very little is known about the expression and biological role of PRMT5 in head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined expression profile of PRMT5 at subcellular levels in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and assessed its correlation with disease progression and patient outcome. Our results show that nuclear PRMT5 was associated with poor overall survival (p < 0.012) and these patients had 1.732 times higher hazard of death (95% CI: 1.127-2.661) as compared to patients in whom PRMT5 was not present in the nucleus of the tumors. Nuclear PRMT5 expression was inversely correlated with p16-status (p < 0.001) and was significantly higher in tumor samples from patients who smoked > 10 pack-years (p = 0.013). In addition, nuclear PRMT5 was directly correlated with cyclin D1 (p = 0.0101) and IL-6 expression (p < 0.001). In a subgroup survival analysis, nuclear PRMT5-positive/IL-6-positive group had worst survival, whereas nuclear PRMT5-negative/IL-6-negative group had the best survival. Similarly, patients with p16-negative/nuclear PRMT5-positive tumors had worse survival compared to patients with p16-positive/nuclear PRMT5-negative tumors. Our mechanistic results suggest that IL-6 promotes nuclear translocation of PRMT5. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that nuclear PRMT5 expression is associated with poor clinical outcome in OPSCC patients and IL-6 plays a role in the nuclear translocation of PRMT5.

  7. Combination of atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen profoundly inhibits colonic adenocarcinomas by suppressing the p65/β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Nanjoo; Reddy, Bandaru S.; DeCastro, Andrew; Paul, Shiby; Lee, Hong Jin; Smolarek, Amanda K.; So, Jae Young; Simi, Barbara; Wang, Chung Xiou; Janakiram, Naveena B.; Steele, Vernon; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports the protective role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and statins against colon cancer. Experiments were designed to evaluate the efficacies atorvastatin and NSAIDs administered individually and in combination against colon tumor formation. F344 rats were fed AIN-76A diet and colon tumors were induced with azoxymethane (AOM). One week after the second AOM-treatment groups of rats were fed diets containing atorvastatin (200 ppm), sulindac (100 ppm) or naproxen (150 ppm), or their combinations with low-dose atorvastatin (100 ppm) for 45 weeks. Administration of atorvastatin at 200 ppm significantly suppressed both adenocarcinoma incidence (52% reduction, p=0.005) and multiplicity (58% reduction, p=0.008). Most importantly, colon tumor multiplicities were profoundly decreased (80–85% reduction, p<0.0001) when given low-dose atorvastatin with either sulindac or naproxen. Also, a significant inhibition of colon tumor incidence was observed when given a low-dose atorvastatin with either sulindac (p=0.001) or naproxen (p =0.0005). Proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and β-catenin in tumors of rats exposed to sulindac, naproxen, atorvastatin, and/or combinations showed a significant suppression. Importantly, colon adenocarcinomas from atorvastatin and NSAIDs fed animals showed reduced key inflammatory markers, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, phospho-p65, as well as inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-4. Overall, this is the first report on the combination treatment using low-dose atorvastatin with either low dose sulindac or naproxen, which greatly suppress the colon adenocarcinoma incidence and multiplicity. Our results suggest that low-dose atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen might potentially be useful combinations for colon cancer prevention in humans. PMID:21764859

  8. Silencing of the Menkes copper-transporting ATPase (Atp7a) gene increases cyclin D1 protein expression and impairs proliferation of rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F

    2014-10-01

    The Menkes copper-transporting ATPase (Atp7a) has dual roles in mammalian enterocytes: pumping copper into the trans-Golgi network (to support cuproenzyme synthesis) and across the basolateral membrane (to deliver dietary copper to the blood). Atp7a is strongly induced in the rodent duodenum during iron deprivation, suggesting that copper influences iron homeostasis. To investigate this possibility, Atp7a was silenced in rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells. Irrespective of its influence on iron homeostasis, an unexpected observation was made in the Atp7a knockdown (KD) cells: the cells grew slower (∼40% fewer cells at 96h) and were larger than negative-control shRNA-transfected cells. Lack of Atp7a activity thus perturbed cell cycle control. To elucidate a possible molecular mechanism, expression of two important cell cycle control proteins was assessed. Cyclin D1 (CD1) protein expression increased in Atp7a KD cells whereas proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression was unaltered. Increased CD1 expression is consistent with impaired cell cycle progression. Expression of additional cell proliferation marker genes (p21 and Ki67) was also investigated; p21 expression increased, whereas Ki67 decreased, both consistent with diminished cell growth. Further experiments were designed to determine whether increased cellular copper content was the trigger for the altered growth phenotype of the Atp7a KD cells. Copper loading, however, did not influence the expression patterns of CD1, p21 or Ki67. Overall, these findings demonstrate that Atp7a is required for normal proliferation of IEC-6 cells. How Atp7a influences cell growth is unclear, but the underlying mechanism could relate to its roles in intracellular copper distribution or cuproenzyme synthesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Contribution of cyclin D1 (CCND1) and E-cadherin (CDH1) alterations to colorectal cancer susceptibility: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Govatati, Suresh; Singamsetty, Gopi Krishna; Nallabelli, Nayudu; Malempati, Sravanthi; Rao, Pasupuleti Sreenivasa; Madamchetty, Venkata Kranthi Kumar; Govatati, Sowdamani; Kanapuram, Rudramadevi; Narayana, Nagesh; Bhanoori, Manjula; Kassetty, Kondaiah; Nallanchakravarthula, Varadacharyulu

    2014-12-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) and E-cadherin (CDH1) are two important genes of the β-catenin/LEF pathway that is involved in tumorigenesis of various cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, studies of the association between genetic variants of these two genes and CRC have shown conflicting results. We conducted a genetic association study in South Indian population (cases, 103; controls, 107) to assess the association of CCND1 870G/A and CDH1 -160C/A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with CRC risk. Genotyping of SNPs was performed by PCR sequencing analysis. Haplotype frequencies for multiple loci and the standardized disequilibrium coefficient (D') for pair-wise linkage disequilibrium (LD) were assessed by Haploview Software. In addition, to better understand the role of CCND1 and CDH1 in the pathophysiology of CRC, the expression pattern was evaluated in analogous tumor and adjacent normal tissues from 23 CRC patients by Western blot analysis. The frequencies of CCND1 870A/A (P = 0.045) genotype, CDH1 -160A allele (P = 0.042), and 870A/-160A haplotype (P = 0.002) were significantly higher in patients as compared with controls. Strong LD was observed between 870G/A and -160C/A SNPs in cases (D' = 0.76) as compared to controls (D' = 0.32). Furthermore, elevated CCND1 and diminished CDH1 expression was observed in tumor tissue as compared with analogous normal tissue of CRC patients. Interestingly, advanced-stage tumors showed wider expression alterations than in early-stage tumors. In conclusion, CCND1 870G/A and CDH1 -160C/A SNPs may modify the risk of CRC susceptibility in South Indian population. In addition, elevated CCND1 and diminished CDH1 expression appears to be useful prognostic markers for CRC.

  10. Combination of atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen profoundly inhibits colonic adenocarcinomas by suppressing the p65/β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Suh, Nanjoo; Reddy, Bandaru S; DeCastro, Andrew; Paul, Shiby; Lee, Hong Jin; Smolarek, Amanda K; So, Jae Young; Simi, Barbara; Wang, Chung Xiou; Janakiram, Naveena B; Steele, Vernon; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2011-11-01

    Evidence supports the protective role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and statins against colon cancer. Experiments were designed to evaluate the efficacies atorvastatin and NSAIDs administered individually and in combination against colon tumor formation. F344 rats were fed AIN-76A diet, and colon tumors were induced with azoxymethane. One week after the second azoxymethane treatment, groups of rats were fed diets containing atorvastatin (200 ppm), sulindac (100 ppm), naproxen (150 ppm), or their combinations with low-dose atorvastatin (100 ppm) for 45 weeks. Administration of atorvastatin at 200 ppm significantly suppressed both adenocarcinoma incidence (52% reduction, P = 0.005) and multiplicity (58% reduction, P = 0.008). Most importantly, colon tumor multiplicities were profoundly decreased (80%-85% reduction, P < 0.0001) when given low-dose atorvastatin with either sulindac or naproxen. Also, a significant inhibition of colon tumor incidence was observed when given a low-dose atorvastatin with either sulindac (P = 0.001) or naproxen (P = 0.0005). Proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1, and β-catenin in tumors of rats exposed to sulindac, naproxen, atorvastatin, and/or combinations showed a significant suppression. Importantly, colon adenocarcinomas from atorvastatin and NSAIDs fed animals showed reduced key inflammatory markers, inducible nitric oxide synthase and COX-2, phospho-p65, as well as inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-4. Overall, this is the first report on the combination treatment using low-dose atorvastatin with either low-dose sulindac or naproxen, which greatly suppress the colon adenocarcinoma incidence and multiplicity. Our results suggest that low-dose atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen might potentially be useful combinations for colon cancer prevention in humans.

  11. Drosophila cyclin D/Cdk4 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and aging and sensitizes animals to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Icreverzi, Amalia; Flor de la Cruz, Aida; Van Voorhies, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila cyclin D (CycD) is the single fly ortholog of the mammalian cyclin D1 and promotes both cell cycle progression and cellular growth. However, little is known about how CycD promotes cell growth. We show here that CycD/Cdk4 hyperactivity leads to increased mitochondrial biogenesis (mitobiogenesis), mitochondrial mass, NRF-1 activity (Tfam transcript levels) and metabolic activity in Drosophila, whereas loss of CycD/Cdk4 activity has the opposite effects. Surprisingly, both CycD/Cdk4 addition and loss of function increase mitochondrial superoxide production and decrease lifespan, indicating that an imbalance in mitobiogenesis may lead to oxidative stress and aging. In addition, we provide multiple lines of evidence indicating that CycD/Cdk4 activity affects the hypoxic status of cells and sensitizes animals to hypoxia. Both mitochondrial and hypoxia-related effects can be detected at global transcriptional level. We propose that mitobiogenesis and the hypoxic stress response have an antagonistic relationship, and that CycD/Cdk4 levels regulate mitobiogenesis contemporaneous to the cell cycle, such that only when cells are sufficiently oxygenated can they proliferate. PMID:22293404

  12. Pan-cancer genetic analysis identifies PARK2 as a master regulator of G1/S cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongxing; Zack, Travis Ian; Morris, Luc G T; Lin, Kan; Hukkelhoven, Ellen; Raheja, Radhika; Tan, I-Li; Turcan, Sevin; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Meng, Shasha; Viale, Agnes; Schumacher, Steven E; Palmedo, Perry; Beroukhim, Rameen; Chan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Coordinate control of different classes of cyclins is fundamentally important for cell cycle regulation and tumor suppression, yet the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we show that the PARK2 tumor suppressor mediates this coordination. The PARK2 E3 ubiquitin ligase coordinately controls the stability of both cyclin D and cyclin E. Analysis of approximately 5,000 tumor genomes shows that PARK2 is a very frequently deleted gene in human cancer and uncovers a striking pattern of mutual exclusivity between PARK2 deletion and amplification of CCND1, CCNE1 or CDK4—implicating these genes in a common pathway. Inactivation of PARK2 results in the accumulation of cyclin D and acceleration of cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PARK2 is a component of a new class of cullin-RING-containing ubiquitin ligases targeting both cyclin D and cyclin E for degradation. Thus, PARK2 regulates cyclin-CDK complexes, as does the CDK inhibitor p16, but acts as a master regulator of the stability of G1/S cyclins. PMID:24793136

  13. Interferon regulatory factor-1 together with reactive oxygen species promotes the acceleration of cell cycle progression by up-regulating the cyclin E and CDK2 genes during high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Long; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Yang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Shen, Man-Ru; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Hu, Kai-Meng

    2013-10-14

    The high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular diseases. In a previous study, we confirmed that Interferon regulatory factor-1 (Irf-1) is a positive regulator of the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. However, the mechanisms remain to be determined. The levels of cyclin/CDK expression in two cell models involving Irf-1 knockdown and overexpression were quantified to explore the relationship between Irf-1 and its downstream effectors under normal or high glucose conditions. Subsequently, cells were treated with high glucose/NAC, normal glucose/H₂O₂, high glucose/U0126 or normal glucose/H₂O₂/U0126 during an incubation period. Then proliferation, cyclin/CDK expression and cell cycle distribution assays were performed to determine whether ROS/Erk1/2 signaling pathway was involved in the Irf-1-induced regulation of VSMC growth under high glucose conditions. We found that Irf-1 overexpression led to down-regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4 and inhibited cell cycle progression in VSMCs under normal glucose conditions. In high glucose conditions, Irf-1 overexpression led to an up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and an acceleration of cell cycle progression, whereas silencing of Irf-1 suppressed the expression of both proteins and inhibited the cell cycle during the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with antioxidants prevented the Irf-1 overexpression-induced proliferation of VSMCs, the up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and the acceleration of cell cycle progression in high glucose conditions. In contrast, under normal glucose conditions, H₂O₂ stimulation and Irf-1 overexpression induced cell proliferation, up-regulated cyclin E/CDK2 expression and promoted cell cycle acceleration. In addition, overexpression of Irf-1 promoted the activation of Erk1/2 and when VSMCs overexpressing Irf-1 were treated with U0126, the specific Erk1/2 inhibitor

  14. Expression, regulation and activity of a B2-type cyclin in mitotic and endoreduplicating maize endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Sabelli, Paolo A.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Nguyen, Hong N.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases, the master regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, are complexes comprised of a catalytic serine/threonine protein kinase and an essential regulatory cyclin. The maize genome encodes over 50 cyclins grouped in different types, but they have been little investigated. We characterized a type B2 cyclin (CYCB2;2) during maize endosperm development, which comprises a cell proliferation phase based on the standard mitotic cell cycle, followed by an endoreduplication phase in which DNA replication is reiterated in the absence of mitosis or cytokinesis. CYCB2;2 RNA was present throughout the period of endosperm development studied, but its level declined as the endosperm transitioned from a mitotic to an endoreduplication cell cycle. However, the level of CYCB2;2 protein remained relatively constant during both stages of endosperm development. CYCB2;2 was recalcitrant to degradation by the 26S proteasome in endoreduplicating endosperm extracts, which could explain its sustained accumulation during endosperm development. In addition, although CYCB2;2 was generally localized to the nucleus of endosperm cells, a lower molecular weight form of the protein accumulated specifically in the cytosol of endoreduplicating endosperm cells. In dividing cells, CYCB2;2 appeared to be localized to the phragmoplast and may be involved in cytokinesis and cell wall formation. Kinase activity was associated with CYCB2;2 in mitotic endosperm, but was absent or greatly reduced in immature ear and endoreduplicating endosperm. CYCB2;2-associated kinase phosphorylated maize E2F1 and the “pocket” domains of RBR1 and RBR3. CYCB2;2 interacted with both maize CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 in insect cells. These results suggest CYCB2;2 functions primarily during the mitotic cell cycle, and they are discussed in the context of the roles of cyclins, CDKs and proteasome activity in the regulation of the cell cycle during endosperm development. PMID:25368625

  15. The puc1 Cyclin Regulates the G1 Phase of the Fission Yeast Cell Cycle in Response to Cell Size

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Blanco, Miguel A.; de Prada, José M.; Moreno, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate cell size with cell division by regulating the length of the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the length of the G1 phase depends on a precise balance between levels of positive (cig1, cig2, puc1, and cdc13 cyclins) and negative (rum1 and ste9-APC) regulators of cdc2. Early in G1, cyclin proteolysis and rum1 inhibition keep the cdc2/cyclin complexes inactive. At the end of G1, the balance is reversed and cdc2/cyclin activity down-regulates both rum1 and the cyclin-degrading activity of the APC. Here we present data showing that the puc1 cyclin, a close relative of the Cln cyclins in budding yeast, plays an important role in regulating the length of G1. Fission yeast cells lacking cig1 and cig2 have a cell cycle distribution similar to that of wild-type cells, with a short G1 and a long G2. However, when the puc1+ gene is deleted in this genetic background, the length of G1 is extended and these cells undergo S phase with a greater cell size than wild-type cells. This G1 delay is completely abolished in cells lacking rum1. Cdc2/puc1 function may be important to down-regulate the rum1 Cdk inhibitor at the end of G1. PMID:10679013

  16. The effect of the ginger on the apoptosis of hippochampal cells according to the expression of BAX and Cyclin D1 genes and histological characteristics of brain in streptozotocin male diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Molahosseini, A; Taghavi, M M; Taghipour, Z; Shabanizadeh, A; Fatehi, F; Kazemi Arababadi, M; Eftekhar Vaghefe, S H

    2016-10-31

    Diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder in humans with multiple complications including nervous system damages. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of ginger extract on apoptosis of the neurons of hippocampus, via evaluation of BAX and Cyclin D1 and also histological analysis, in male diabetic rats. In this experimental study, 60 Wistar rats (220 ± 30gr) were conducted in 5 groups as follow: diabetic group treated with saline (group 1), normal group treated with saline (group 2), diabetic group treated with ginger (group 3), diabetic group treated with ginger-insulin (group 4), diabetic group treated with insulin (group 5). STZ (60 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally used to induce the diabetes. Expression levels of BAX and Cyclin D1 were examined using Real-Time PCR technique and the normality of neurons was evaluated using H&E staining method. The results showed that blood glucose level significantly decreased in group 4 when compared to group 1. In molecular analysis, there was no significant difference between groups regarding the expression of BAX gens, while, the expression of Cyclin D1 were significantly decreased in group 4 compared with group 1. Histological analysis revealed that pathological symptoms were lower in group 4 than the other diabetic groups. The results of present study showed that the ginger in addition to lowering blood sugar level, changes the expression of Cyclin D1 gene and histological characteristics in a positive manner. This means that the ginger may protects neurons of the hippocampus from apoptosis in diabetic patients.

  17. Cyclin I-like (CCNI2) is a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yanfei; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to conventional cyclin-dependent kinases that are important for mitotic cell division, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is predominantly activated in post-mitotic cells and is involved in various cellular events. The kinase activity of CDK5 is tightly regulated by specific activators including p35, p39, and cyclin I (CCNI). Here we show that cyclin I-like (CCNI2), a homolog of CCNI, interacts with CDK5 and activates the kinase activity of CDK5. Different from CCNI, which colocalizes with CDK5 in the nuclei in transfected cells, CCNI2 mainly retains CDK5 in the cytoplasm as well as on the cell membrane. Furthermore, although the expression level of CCNI2 mRNA and CCNI2 protein do not change significantly during cell cycle, depletion of CCNI2 with siRNA affects cell cycle progression as well as cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that CCNI2 is a novel CDK5 activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation. PMID:28112194

  18. Enantioselective effect of 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid on 3T6 fibroblast growth through ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways and cyclin D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Diana; Moreno, Juan J

    2008-09-01

    Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) have numerous physiological effects, including modulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, little is known about the selective effects of HETE enantiomers on cell proliferation and cell signalling pathways involved in the regulation of cell growth. Furthermore, information on epithelial and endothelial cells growth is controversial. Recently, we demonstrated that 5-, 12-, and 15-HETE are involved in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth though serine/treonine Akt/PKB (Akt) pathway. Here we examined the participation of both enantiomers (S and R) of HETEs in the control of 3T6 fibroblast growth. Our results show that HETEs (5-, 12-, and 15-HETE) are enantioselective on protein and DNA synthesis and 3T6 fibroblast growth. Furthermore, we observed that 12(S)-HETE induces the enhancement of cAMP and intracellular calcium concentration, whereas 12(R)-HETE was uneffective. Our findings also demonstrated that 12(S)-HETE exerts these effects through enantiospecific interactions with a cellular element, probably a plasma membrane receptor coupling to a pertussis toxin-sensitive protein G. Moreover, these elements may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways which induce the enhancement of cyclin D(1) levels.

  19. A cross-talk between the androgen receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor leads to p38MAPK-dependent activation of mTOR and cyclinD1 expression in prostate and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Anna Grazia; Musti, Anna Maria; Lanzino, Marilena; Panno, Maria Luisa; Turano, Ermanna; Zumpano, Rachele; Belfiore, Antonino; Andò, Sebastiano; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2009-03-01

    In androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cells, the proliferation induced by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) involves a cross-talk between the EGF receptor (EGFR) and the androgen receptor (AR). In lung cancer the role of the EGF-EGFR transduction pathway has been documented, whereas androgen activity has received less attention. Here we demonstrate that in LNCaP and A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), AR and EGFR are required for either 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or EGF-stimulated cell growth. Only EGF activated ERK signaling and up-regulated early gene expression, while DHT triggered the expression of classical AR-responsive genes with the exception of the EGF-induced PSA transcript in A549 cells. DHT and EGF up-regulated cyclinD1 (CD1) at both mRNA and protein levels in A549 cells, while in LNCaP cells each mitogen increased only CD1 protein expression. In both cell contexts, CD1 up-regulation was prevented by selective inhibitors as well as by knock-down of either AR or EGFR and also inhibiting p38MAPK and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Interestingly, p38MAPK and mTOR repression prevented the activation of the mTOR target ribosomal p70S6 kinase induced by DHT and EGF, indicating that p38MAPK acts as an upstream mTOR regulator. In addition, the proliferative effects promoted by both DHT and EGF in LNCaP and A549 cancer cells were no longer observed blocking either p38MAPK or mTOR activity. Hence, our data suggest that p38MAPK-dependent activation of the mTOR/CD1 pathway may represent a mechanism through which AR and EGFR cross-talk contributes to prostate and lung cancer progression.

  20. Cell cycle regulated D3-type cyclins form active complexes with plant-specific B-type cyclin-dependent kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazue; Murray, James A H; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Sekine, Masami

    2006-05-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells are the most highly synchronizable plant cell culture, and previously we used them to analyze cell cycle regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) containing the cyclin binding motifs PSTAIRE (CDKA) and PPTA/TLRE (CDKB). Here we describe the analysis of tobacco CycD3 cyclins whose transcripts predominantly accumulate during G2 to M phase, which represents a unique feature of this type of cyclin D in plants. Although protein levels of CycD3s fluctuate with different patterns during the cell cycle, kinase assays revealed that the CycD3-associated kinases phosphorylate histone H1 and the tobacco retinoblastoma related protein (NtRBR1) with two peaks at the G1/S and G2/M boundaries. In vitro pull-down assays revealed that cell cycle-regulated CycD3s bind to CDKA, but more weakly than does CycD3;3, and that they also bind to CDKB and the CDK inhibitor NtKIS1a. Mutations in the cyclin box of the CycD3s showed that two amino acids are required for binding with CDKA and NtKIS1a, but no diminished interaction was observed with CDKB. A reconstituted kinase assay was adapted for use with bacterially produced GST-CycD3s, and kinase activity could be activated by incubation of extracts from exponentially growing BY-2 cells. Such activated complexes contained CDKA and CDKB, and the reconstituted GST-CycD3 mutants, retaining binding ability to CDKB, showed kinase activity, suggesting that these cell cycle-regulated CycD3s form active complexes with both A- and B-type CDKs in vitro.

  1. STAR syndrome-associated CDK10/Cyclin M regulates actin network architecture and ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guen, Vincent J; Gamble, Carly; Perez, Dahlia E; Bourassa, Sylvie; Zappel, Hildegard; Gärtner, Jutta; Lees, Jacqueline A; Colas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    CDK10/CycM is a protein kinase deficient in STAR (toe Syndactyly, Telecanthus and Anogenital and Renal malformations) syndrome, which results from mutations in the X-linked FAM58A gene encoding Cyclin M. The biological functions of CDK10/CycM and etiology of STAR syndrome are poorly understood. Here, we report that deficiency of CDK10/Cyclin M promotes assembly and elongation of primary cilia. We establish that this reflects a key role for CDK10/Cyclin M in regulation of actin network organization, which is known to govern ciliogenesis. In an unbiased screen, we identified the RhoA-associated kinase PKN2 as a CDK10/CycM phosphorylation substrate. We establish that PKN2 is a bone fide regulator of ciliogenesis, acting in a similar manner to CDK10/CycM. We discovered that CDK10/Cyclin M binds and phosphorylates PKN2 on threonines 121 and 124, within PKN2's core RhoA-binding domain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deficiencies in CDK10/CycM or PKN2, or expression of a non-phosphorylatable version of PKN2, destabilize both the RhoA protein and the actin network architecture. Importantly, we established that ectopic expression of RhoA is sufficient to override the induction of ciliogenesis resulting from CDK10/CycM knockdown, indicating that RhoA regulation is critical for CDK10/CycM's negative effect on ciliogenesis. Finally, we show that kidney sections from a STAR patient display dilated renal tubules and abnormal, elongated cilia. Altogether, these results reveal CDK10/CycM as a key regulator of actin dynamics and a suppressor of ciliogenesis through phosphorylation of PKN2 and promotion of RhoA signaling. Moreover, they suggest that STAR syndrome is a ciliopathy.

  2. Artemis regulates cell cycle recovery from the S phase checkpoint by promoting degradation of cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Geng, Liyi; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J

    2009-07-03

    Artemis, a member of the SNM1 gene family, is a known phosphorylation target of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs. We have previously identified two serine residues in Artemis (Ser(516) and Ser(645)) that are subject to phosphorylation by ATM and are involved in mediating recovery from the G(2)/M checkpoint in response to ionizing radiation. Here we show that these same sites are also phosphorylated by ATR in response to various types of replication stress including UVC, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea. We also show that mutation of the Ser(516) and Ser(645) residues causes a prolonged S phase checkpoint recovery after treatment with UV or aphidicolin, and that this delayed recovery process coincides with a prolonged stabilization of cyclin E and down-regulation of Cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, we show that Artemis interacts with the F-box protein Fbw7, and that this interaction regulates cyclin E degradation through the SCF(Fbw7) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The interaction between Artemis and Fbw7 is regulated by phosphorylation of Ser(516) and Ser(645) sites that occur in response to replication stress. Thus, our findings suggest a novel pathway of recovery from the S phase checkpoint in that in response to replication stress phosphorylation of Artemis by ATR enhances its interaction with Fbw7, which in turn promotes ubiquitylation and the ultimate degradation of cyclin E.

  3. Artemis links ATM to G2/M checkpoint recovery via regulation of Cdk1-cyclin B.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liyi; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zheng, Shu; Legerski, Randy J

    2007-04-01

    Artemis is a phospho-protein that has been shown to have roles in V(D)J recombination, nonhomologous end-joining of double-strand breaks, and regulation of the DNA damage-induced G(2)/M cell cycle checkpoint. Here, we have identified four sites in Artemis that are phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and show that ATM is the major kinase responsible for these modifications. Two of the sites, S534 and S538, show rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and the other two sites, S516 and S645, exhibit rapid and prolonged phosphorylation. Mutation of both of these latter two residues results in defective recovery from the G(2)/M cell cycle checkpoint. This defective recovery is due to promotion by mutant Artemis of an enhanced interaction between unphosphorylated cyclin B and Cdk1, which in turn promotes inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk1 by the Wee1 kinase. In addition, we show that mutant Artemis prevents Cdk1-cyclin B activation by causing its retention in the centrosome and inhibition of its nuclear import during prophase. These findings show that ATM regulates G(2)/M checkpoint recovery through inhibitory phosphorylations of Artemis that occur soon after DNA damage, thus setting a molecular switch that, hours later upon completion of DNA repair, allows activation of the Cdk1-cyclin B complex. These findings thus establish a novel function of Artemis as a regulator of the cell cycle in response to DNA damage.

  4. A family of cyclin D homologs from plants differentially controlled by growth regulators and containing the conserved retinoblastoma protein interaction motif.

    PubMed Central

    Soni, R; Carmichael, J P; Shah, Z H; Murray, J A

    1995-01-01

    A new family of three related cyclins has been identified in Arabidopsis by complementation of a yeast strain deficient in G1 cyclins. Individual members show tissue-specific expression and are conserved in other plant species. They form a distinctive group of plant cyclins, which we named delta-type cyclins to indicate their similarities with mammalian D-type cyclins. The sequence relationships between delta and D cyclins include the N-terminal sequence LXCXE. This motif was originally identified in certain viral oncoproteins and is strongly implicated in binding to the retinoblastoma protein pRb. By analogy to mammalian cyclin D, these plant homologs may mediate growth and phytohormonal signals into the plant cell cycle. In support of this hypothesis, we show that, on restimulation of suspension-cultured cells, cyclin delta 3 is rapidly induced by the plant growth regulator cytokinin and cyclin delta 2 is induced by carbon source. PMID:7696881

  5. Induction of G1 arrest by down-regulation of cyclin D3 in T cell hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between activation-induced growth inhibition and regulation of the cell cycle progression was investigated in T cell hybridomas by studying the function of the cell cycle-regulating genes such as G1 cyclins and their associated kinases. Activation of T cell hybridomas by anti-T cell receptor antibody induces growth arrest at G1 phase of the cell cycle and subsequently results in activation-driven cell death. Rapid reduction of both messenger RNA and protein level of the cyclin D3 is accompanied by growth arrest upon activation. Although the residual cyclin D3 protein forms a complex with cdk4 protein, cyclin D3-dependent kinase activity is severely impaired. Stable transfectants engineered to express cyclin D3 override the growth arrest upon activation. These results imply that the activation signal through T cell receptor induces the down-regulation of cyclin D3 expression and cyclin D3-dependent kinase activity, leading to growth arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle in T cells. PMID:7629502

  6. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  7. High glucose concentration induces endothelial cell proliferation by regulating cyclin-D2-related miR-98.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xin; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, You-Jie; Xie, Ning; Yan, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yong-Liang; Zhou, Ling; Xie, Shu-Yang; Wang, Ping-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Cyclin D2 is involved in the pathology of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study investigated the role of cyclin-D2-regulated miRNAs in endothelial cell proliferation of T2DM. Results showed that higher glucose concentration (4.5 g/l) significantly promoted the proliferation of rat aortic endothelial cells (RAOECs), and significantly increased the expression of cyclin D2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma 1 (p-RB1) in RAOECs compared with those under low glucose concentration. The cyclin D2-3' untranslated region is targeted by miR-98, as demonstrated by miRNA analysis software. Western blot also confirmed that cyclin D2 and p-RB1 expression was regulated by miR-98. The results indicated that miR-98 treatment can induce RAOEC apoptosis. The suppression of RAOEC growth by miR-98 might be related to regulation of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase 9 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of miR-98 decreased in 4.5 g/l glucose-treated cells compared with those treated by low glucose concentration. Similarly, the expression of miR-98 significantly decreased in aortas of established streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat model compared with that in control rats; but cyclin D2 and p-RB1 levels remarkably increased in aortas of STZ-induced diabetic rats compared with those in healthy control rats. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that high glucose concentration induces cyclin D2 up-regulation and miR-98 down-regulation in the RAOECs. By regulating cyclin D2, miR-98 can inhibit human endothelial cell growth, thereby providing novel therapeutic targets for vascular complication of T2DM. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. BAFF induces spleen CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by down-regulating phosphorylation of FOXO3A and activates cyclin D2 and D3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Fang; Chen, Rongjing; Liu, Baojun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Han, Junli; Wang, Haining; Shen, Gang; Tao, Jiang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Firstly analyze the mechanism of BAFF and anti-CD3 co-stimulation on purified mouse splenic CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carrying out siRNA technology to study FOXO3A protein function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Helpful to understand the T cell especially CD4{sup +} T cell's role in immunological reaction. -- Abstract: The TNF ligand family member 'B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family' (BAFF, also called BLyS, TALL-1, zTNF-4, and THANK) is an important survival factor for B and T cells. In this study, we show that BAFF is able to induce CD4{sup +} spleen T cell proliferation when co-stimulated with anti-CD3. Expression of phosphorylated FOXO3A was notably down-regulated and cyclins D2 and D3 were up-regulated and higher in the CD4{sup +} T cells when treated with BAFF and anti-CD3, as assessed by Western blotting. Furthermore, after FOXO3A was knocked down, expression of cyclin D1 was unchanged, compared with control group levels, but the expression of cyclins D2 and D3 increased, compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that BAFF induced CD4{sup +} spleen T cell proliferation by down-regulating the phosphorylation of FOXO3A and then activating cyclin D2 and D3 expression, leading to CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation.

  9. NeuroD1: developmental expression and regulated genes in the rodent pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Estela M; Bailey, Michael J; Rath, Martin F; Shi, Qiong; Morin, Fabrice; Coon, Steven L; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C

    2007-08-01

    NeuroD1/BETA2, a member of the bHLH transcription factor family, is known to influence the fate of specific neuronal, endocrine and retinal cells. We report here that NeuroD1 mRNA is highly abundant in the developing and adult rat pineal gland. Pineal expression begins in the 17-day embryo at which time it is also detectable in other brain regions. Expression in the pineal gland increases during the embryonic period and is maintained thereafter at levels equivalent to those found in the cerebellum and retina. In contrast, NeuroD1 mRNA decreases markedly in non-cerebellar brain regions during development. Pineal NeuroD1 levels are similar during the day and night, and do not appear to be influenced by sympathetic neural input. Gene expression analysis of the pineal glands from neonatal NeuroD1 knockout mice identifies 127 transcripts that are down-regulated (>twofold, p < 0.05) and 16 that are up-regulated (>twofold, p < 0.05). According to quantitative RT-PCR, the most dramatically down-regulated gene is kinesin family member 5C ( approximately 100-fold) and the most dramatically up-regulated gene is glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 ( approximately fourfold). Other impacted transcripts encode proteins involved in differentiation, development, signal transduction and trafficking. These findings represent the first step toward elucidating the role of NeuroD1 in the rodent pinealocyte.

  10. [Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1/CDC28 in regulation of cell cycle].

    PubMed

    Koltovaya, N A

    2013-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of enzymes essential for the progression of the cells through the cell cycle in eukaryotes. Moreover, genetic stability-maintaining processes, such as checkpoint control and DNA repair, require the phosphorylation of a wide variety of target substrates by CDK. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the key role in the cell cycle progression is played by CDK1/CDC28 kinase. This enzyme is the most thoroughly investigated. In this review the involvement of CDC28 kinase in regulation of the cell cycle is discussed in the light of newly obtained data.

  11. Receptor crosstalk protein, calcyon, regulates affinity state of dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Roberts, A; Zhang, L; Koh, P O; Lezcano, N; Bergson, C

    2001-09-21

    The recently cloned protein, calcyon, potentiates crosstalk between G(s)-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and heterologous G(q/11)-coupled receptors allowing dopamine D1 receptors to stimulate intracellular Ca(2+) release, in addition to cAMP production. This crosstalk also requires the participating G(q/11)-coupled receptors to be primed by their agonists. We examined the ability of calcyon and priming to regulate the affinity of dopamine D1 receptors for its ligands. Receptor binding assays were performed on HEK293 cell membrane preparations expressing dopamine D1 receptors either alone or in combination with calcyon. Co-expression of dopamine D1 receptor and calcyon affected neither the affinity of this receptor for antagonists nor the affinity of agonist binding to this receptor high and low-affinity states. However, the presence of calcyon dramatically decreased the proportion of the high-affinity dopamine D1 receptor agonist binding sites. This decrease was reversed by carbachol, which primes the receptor crosstalk by stimulating endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic receptors. Our findings suggest that calcyon regulates the ability of dopamine D1 receptors to achieve the high-affinity state for agonists, in a manner that depends on priming of receptor crosstalk.

  12. GLP-1 ameliorates the proliferation activity of INS-1 cells inhibited by intermittent high glucose concentrations through the regulation of cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xinkui; Yang, Lei; Lei, Lei; Cai, Dehong; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analog exendin (EX)-4 have been considered to promote β-cell growth and expansion. In the present, study we investigated the effect of GLP-1 on proliferative activity and cell cycle regulation in the pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cell line, INS-1, treated with intermittent high glucose. INS-1 cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/l), constant high glucose (30 mmol/l) and intermittent high glucose (rotation/24 h in 5.5 or 30 mmol/l) in the presence or absence of GLP-1 (100 nmol/l) for seven days. Proliferative activity, cell cycle and the expression of cyclin D1, p21, p27 and Skp2 were examined. INS-1 treated with intermittent high glucose and GLP-1 demonstrated a significant increase in proliferation activity (1.45±0.12; P<0.01) and decreased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase (49.73±4.04%, P<0.01) compared with those without GLP-1. Furthermore, the expression levels of cyclin D1 and Skp2 were increased, while the expression of p27 and p21 were significantly reduced. Similar results were identified in those treated with constant high glucose and GLP-1. These results suggest that GLP-1 may ease the G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of INS-1 cells induced by intermittent high glucose by upregulating the expression of cyclin D1 and Skp2, downregulating the expression of p21 and p27, and finally promoting the cell cycle progression and proliferation activity.

  13. Microcystic Stromal Tumor: A Distinctive Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Neoplasm Characterized by FOXL2, SF-1, WT-1, Cyclin D1, and β-catenin Nuclear Expression and CTNNB1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A; Lee, Cheng-Han; Yip, Stephen; Oliva, Esther; McCluggage, W Glenn; Young, Robert H

    2015-10-01

    Since our first description of the microcystic stromal tumor (MST) of the ovary, a rare and distinctive neoplasm with a definitional, usually striking microcystic pattern and a CD10+/vimentin+/inhibin-/calretinin- immunophenotype, 3 examples with β-catenin nuclear localization, and CTNNB1 mutation have been reported. We undertook a detailed immunohistochemical study and molecular analysis of CTNNB1 and FOXL2 of 15 cases of MST to further characterize this neoplasm and establish its histogenesis. Diffuse nuclear staining for FOXL2, WT-1, cyclin D1, and β-catenin was present in all tumors tested, and 12/15 were positive for steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1). Heterozygous missense point mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 were detected in 8 of 14 cases, resulting in amino acid changes at codons 32, 34, 35, and 37. There was no correlation between CTNNB1 exon 3 mutation status and tumor immunophenotype. All 14 cases tested showed wild-type FOXL2. Our study establishes that MST of the ovary exhibits a characteristic FOXL2/SF-1/WT-1/cyclin D1/nuclear β-catenin-positive immunohistochemical profile, which may be useful in diagnosis and in the exclusion of histologic mimics. The presence of diffuse nuclear FOXL2 and WT-1 immunostaining in all cases and SF-1 in most supports the classification of MST within the sex cord-stromal category. Aberrant nuclear β-catenin expression, detected in all MSTs, appears to be the result of stabilizing CTNNB1 mutations in 57% of cases, providing further evidence that dysregulation of the Wnt/B-catenin pathway is involved in the tumorigenesis of MST and may involve activation of β-catenin with upregulation of cyclin D1.

  14. Colocalization of β-catenin with Notch intracellular domain in colon cancer: a possible role of Notch1 signaling in activation of CyclinD1-mediated cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Saravanakumar, Marimuthu; Madankumar, Perumal; Thiyagu, Mani; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2014-11-01

    The Wnt and Notch1 signaling pathways play major roles in intestinal development and tumorigenesis. Sub-cellular localization of β-catenin has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. However, the β-catenin and Notch intracellular domain (NICD) interaction has to be addressed. Immunohistochemistries of β-catenin, NICD, and dual immunofluorescence of β-catenin and NICD were analyzed in colorectal tissues and HT29 cell line. Moreover, real-time PCR analysis of CyclinD1, Hes1 and MUC2 was done in HT29 cells upon N-[N-(3, 5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) treatment. Dual staining emphasized the strong interaction of β-catenin and NICD in adenoma and adenocarcinoma than in normal tissues. Hes1 transcript levels were decreased 1.5- and 7.1-fold in 12.5 and 25 µM DAPT-treated HT29 cells. CyclinD1 transcript levels decreased 1.2- and 1.6-fold, and MUC2 transcript level increased 4.3- and 7.5-fold in 12.5 and 25 µM DAPT-treated HT29 cells. The results of this study showed that the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin converges with NICD inducing proliferation through the activation of CyclinD1 and Hes1. Moreover, the inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DAPT leads to the arrest of cell proliferation and induces apoptosis leading to the upregulation of MUC2, a secretory cell lineage marker.

  15. Foxp3 Protein Stability Is Regulated by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2*

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Peter A.; Mehra, Parul; Chen, Chunxia; Bhatti, Tricia; Wells, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Foxp3 is a transcription factor required for the development of regulatory T cells (Treg). Mice and humans with a loss of Foxp3 function suffer from uncontrolled autoimmunity and inflammatory disease. Expression of Foxp3 is necessary for the anti-inflammatory capacity of Treg, but whether Foxp3 activity is further subject to regulation by extracellular signals is unclear. The primary structure of Foxp3 contains four cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) motifs (Ser/Thr-Pro) within the N-terminal repressor domain, and we show that CDK2 can partner with cyclin E to phosphorylate Foxp3 at these sites. Consistent with our previous demonstration that CDK2 negatively regulates Treg function, we find that mutation of the serine or threonine at each CDK motif to alanine (S/T→A) results in enhanced Foxp3 protein stability in CD4+ T cells. T cells expressing the S/T→A mutant of Foxp3 showed enhanced induction (e.g. CD25) and repression (e.g. IL2) of canonical Foxp3-responsive genes, exhibited an increased capacity to suppress conventional T cell proliferation in vitro, and were highly effective at ameliorating colitis in an in vivo model of inflammatory bowel disease. These results indicate that CDK2 negatively regulates the stability and activity of Foxp3 and implicate CDK-coupled receptor signal transduction in the control of regulatory T cell function and stability. PMID:23853094

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4) Perturbs the G1-S Cell Cycle Progression via Deregulation of the cyclin D1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Mitra, Jaba; Lee, Stacy; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee; Ha, Taekjip; Jung, Jae U

    2015-10-21

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection modulates the host cell cycle to create an environment optimal for its viral-DNA replication during the lytic life cycle. We report here that KSHV vIRF4 targets the β-catenin/CBP cofactor and blocks its occupancy on the cyclin D1 promoter, suppressing the G1-S cell cycle progression and enhancing KSHV replication. This shows that KSHV vIRF4 suppresses host G1-S transition, possibly providing an intracellular milieu favorable for its replication.

  17. The Hematopoietic Transcription Factor AML1 (RUNX1) Is Negatively Regulated by the Cell Cycle Protein Cyclin D3

    Pub