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Sample records for regulates male tail

  1. Female tail wagging enhances sexual performance in male goats.

    PubMed

    Haulenbeek, Andrea M; Katz, Larry S

    2011-08-01

    Preference testing has shown that sexually experienced male goats choose females that are tail wagging, a behavior that may function as both attractivity and proceptivity, over those that are not. We hypothesized that exposure to females expressing high rates of tail wagging would arouse males, increasing sexual performance. Tail wagging rate could be manipulated because we have shown previously that flutamide treatment increases the frequency of tail wagging in estrous goats. Sexually experienced males observed different stimuli for 10 min before a 20 min sexual performance test (SPT). The stimuli were an empty pen (MT), or groups of three females that were all estrous (E), non-estrous (NE), estrous+flutamide (E(F)) or non-estrous+flutamide (NE(F)). During the stimulus observation period, tail wagging was recorded. During SPT, frequencies and latencies of sexual behaviors were recorded. E(F) females displayed the most tail wagging. Viewing E(F) females before SPT increased the number of ejaculations attained by males and decreased the latencies to first and second ejaculation, as well as the inter-ejaculatory interval. Viewing estrous females (E and E(F)) before SPT decreased the latency to first mount, as compared to non-estrous females (NE and NE(F)). We conclude that male goats are sexually aroused by tail wagging. This study and previous work demonstrate that tail wagging functions as both attractivity and proceptivity in goats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of the C. elegans labial orthologue ceh-13 during male tail morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Charles-Nicolas; Fleischmann, Martin; Suzuki, Yo; Tapparel, Natacha; Gautron, François; Streit, Adrian; Wood, William B; Müller, Fritz

    2003-07-01

    Hox genes are transcriptional regulators of metazoan body regionalization along the anteroposterior axis that act by specifying positional identity in differentiating cells. ceh-13, the labial orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, is expressed both during embryogenesis and post- embryonic development. Using GFP reporter analysis and immunocytochemistry, we discovered a spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression in the male tail during the L3 and L4 larval stages that is TGF-beta pathway-dependent. Analysis of reporter activity in transgenic animals identified a distinct promoter region driving male tail-specific ceh-13 expression. We also report the interspecies conservation of sequence motifs within this region and speculate that, in the course of evolutionary diversification, ceh-13 may have acquired new functionality while conserving its homeotic role.

  3. Long tails affect swimming performance and habitat choice in the male guppy.

    PubMed

    Karino, Kenji; Orita, Kazuhiro; Sato, Aya

    2006-03-01

    Sexual selection often favors male secondary sexual traits, although in some cases the elaborate traits incur costs to the males with respect to natural selection. Males of the guppy Poecilia reticulata have longer tails (caudal fins) than females, and the long tails contribute to the mating success of the males through female mate choice. We examined the effect of tail length on the swimming performance of male and female guppies. In a laboratory experiment, males with longer tails exhibited poorer swimming performance than those with shorter tails. However, this effect was not apparent in females. In addition, in a feral population, tail length of males was negatively correlated with water flow velocity in their microhabitats. Although body size of females was negatively correlated with water flow velocity in their microhabitats, tail length of females showed no significant correlation with degree of water flow. These results suggest that the long tail of male guppies incurs costs, such as a decrease in swimming performance, to the males with respect to natural selection and consequently limits their choice of habitats to those with slow water flow.

  4. Histone H2A mobility is regulated by its tails and acetylation of core histone tails

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Isobe, Keisuke; Morimoto, Akihiro; Shimada, Tomoko; Kataoka, Shogo; Watanabe, Wataru; Uchiyama, Susumu; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Fukui, Kiichi . E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-08

    Histone tail domains play important roles in cellular processes, such as replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation. Histone H2A has one central and two tail domains, and their functions have mainly been studied from a biochemical perspective. In addition, analyses based on visualization have been employed for functional analysis of some chromatin proteins. In this study, we analyzed histone H2A mobility in vivo by two-photon FRAP, and elucidated that the histone H2A N- and C-terminal tails regulate its mobility. We found that histone H2A mobility was increased following treatment of host cells with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our results support a model in which core histone tails directly regulate transcription by interacting with nucleosome DNA via electrostatic interactions.

  5. Male-specific use of the purr in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, purring has been described in mostly affiliative contexts. In the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), both males and females purr, but only males were observed purring in agonistic contexts. In order to determine whether male ring-tailed lemurs purr as aggressive displays during intrasexual agonistic encounters, 480 h of focal data were collected on 25 adult males from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, from March to July 2010. The male purring rate increased during periods of male-male agonism when compared to times without intrasexual agonism, and the purring rate was positively correlated with male dominance rank. However, the purring rate was not significantly higher during winning agonistic interactions when compared with losing encounters. My results indicate that the male ring-tailed lemur purr is used most frequently as an agonistic vocalization in male-male encounters, in addition to being used less frequently in other social contexts, including during tail-waving at females, resting, scent-marking, feeding and copulation. Dominant males have higher purring rates across social situations, suggesting that the purring rate may be driven by intrinsic male qualities rather than functioning as a meaningful signal in each disparate social context. Male purring in intrasexual agonistic encounters can be added to previously described social contexts for ring-tailed lemur purring.

  6. RAB-Like 2 Has an Essential Role in Male Fertility, Sperm Intra-Flagellar Transport, and Tail Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Jamsai, Duangporn; O'Connor, Anne E.; Borg, Claire; Clark, Brett J.; Whisstock, James C.; Field, Mark C.; Adams, Vicki; Ishikawa, Tomomoto; Aitken, R. John; Whittle, Belinda; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; O'Bryan, Moira K.

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of young men are infertile and, for the majority, the underlying cause remains unknown. Male infertility is, however, frequently associated with defective sperm motility, wherein the sperm tail is a modified flagella/cilia. Conversely, a greater understanding of essential mechanisms involved in tail formation may offer contraceptive opportunities, or more broadly, therapeutic strategies for global cilia defects. Here we have identified Rab-like 2 (RABL2) as an essential requirement for sperm tail assembly and function. RABL2 is a member of a poorly characterized clade of the RAS GTPase superfamily. RABL2 is highly enriched within developing male germ cells, where it localizes to the mid-piece of the sperm tail. Lesser amounts of Rabl2 mRNA were observed in other tissues containing motile cilia. Using a co-immunoprecipitation approach and RABL2 affinity columns followed by immunochemistry, we demonstrated that within developing haploid germ cells RABL2 interacts with intra-flagella transport (IFT) proteins and delivers a specific set of effector (cargo) proteins, including key members of the glycolytic pathway, to the sperm tail. RABL2 binding to effector proteins is regulated by GTP. Perturbed RABL2 function, as exemplified by the Mot mouse line that contains a mutation in a critical protein–protein interaction domain, results in male sterility characterized by reduced sperm output, and sperm with aberrant motility and short tails. Our data demonstrate a novel function for the RABL protein family, an essential role for RABL2 in male fertility and a previously uncharacterised mechanism for protein delivery to the flagellum. PMID:23055941

  7. mTAIL-seq reveals dynamic poly(A) tail regulation in oocyte-to-embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jaechul; Lee, Mihye; Son, Ahyeon; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V. Narry

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are subject to multiple types of tailing that critically influence mRNA stability and translatability. To investigate RNA tails at the genomic scale, we previously developed TAIL-seq, but its low sensitivity precluded its application to biological materials of minute quantity. In this study, we report a new version of TAIL-seq (mRNA TAIL-seq [mTAIL-seq]) with enhanced sequencing depth for mRNAs (by ∼1000-fold compared with the previous version). The improved method allows us to investigate the regulation of poly(A) tails in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. We found that maternal mRNAs are polyadenylated mainly during late oogenesis, prior to fertilization, and that further modulation occurs upon egg activation. Wispy, a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase, adenylates the vast majority of maternal mRNAs, with a few intriguing exceptions such as ribosomal protein transcripts. By comparing mTAIL-seq data with ribosome profiling data, we found a strong coupling between poly(A) tail length and translational efficiency during egg activation. Our data suggest that regulation of poly(A) tails in oocytes shapes the translatomic landscape of embryos, thereby directing the onset of animal development. By virtue of the high sensitivity, low cost, technical robustness, and broad accessibility, mTAIL-seq will be a potent tool to improve our understanding of mRNA tailing in diverse biological systems. PMID:27445395

  8. Squealing rate indicates dominance rank in the male ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M

    2013-12-01

    Squeals are sharp and forceful short-range vocalizations used as aggressive and submissive agonistic signals by many mammalian species. The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), a female-dominant strepsirhine primate, has a male-specific squeal call with proposed male-male agonistic functions and male-female courtship functions that have never been empirically tested. The goal of my study is to clarify why ring-tailed lemur males squeal at other males and females by applying the handicap hypothesis to this male-specific vocalization. This hypothesis has rarely been tested in primates, and this study elucidates how the rate of a male-specific call relates to male-male and male-female behavior in a Malagasy strepsirhine. To test whether males squeal towards other males to assert dominance, I predict that male squealing rate is positively correlated with dominance rank. I further predict that male ring-tailed lemurs squeal at other males while engaged in agonistic interactions, and that squealing during an interaction is positively correlated with winning that encounter. To test whether males squeal towards females as a mate attraction signal, I predict that male squealing rate is higher on estrus days, and that estrous females indicate attraction by approaching squealing males. From March to July 2010, 480 hr of focal data were collected on 25 males aged three and older at Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. I continuously observed each male for 30 min at a time and recorded all agonistic interactions and squeal vocalizations using 1-0 sampling at 2.5-min intervals. Squealing rate was higher during times of male-male agonism when compared to times without male-male agonism, and males with higher dominance ranks had higher squealing rates. In contrast, the mate attraction hypothesis was not supported. My results suggest that the male squeal is an agonistic signal when used in male-male interaction in ring-tailed lemurs, but does not specifically indicate aggression

  9. Sensory regulation of C. elegans male mate-searching behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arantza; Nurrish, Stephen; Emmons, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary How do animals integrate internal drives and external environmental cues to coordinate behaviours? We address this question studying mate-searching behaviour in C. elegans. C. elgans males explore their environment in search of mates (hermaphrodites) and will leave food if mating partners are absent. However, when mates and food coincide, male exploratory behaviour is suppressed and males are retained on the food source. We show that the drive to explore is stimulated by male specific neurons in the tail, the ray neurons. Periodic contact with the hermaphrodite detected through ray neurons changes the male’s behaviour during periods of no contact and prevents the male from leaving the food source. The hermaphrodite signal is conveyed by male-specific interneurons that are post-synaptic to the rays and that send processes to the major integrative center in the head. This study identifies key parts of the neural circuit that regulates a sexual appetitive behaviour in C. elegans. PMID:19062284

  10. cdc-25.2, a Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of cdc25, is required for male tail morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangmi; Yoon, Sunghee; Youn, Esther; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2017-01-22

    Cell division cycle 25 (Cdc25) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphatase that promotes cell cycle progression by activating cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which are inactivated by Wee1/Myt1 kinases. It was previously reported that cdc-25.2 promotes oocyte maturation and intestinal cell divisions in Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites. Here, we report a novel function of cdc-25.2 in male tail development which was significantly deformed by cdc-25.2 RNAi depletion and in cdc-25.2 mutant males. The deformation was also observed after RNAi depletion of other cell cycle regulators, cdk-1, cyb-3, cyd-1, and cyl-1. Furthermore, wee-1.3 counteracted cdc-25.2 in male tail development as observed in oocyte maturation and intestine development. The number of cells in ray precursor cell lineages was significantly reduced in cdc-25.2 depleted males. These results indicate that CDC-25.2 is essential for cell divisions in ray precursor cell lineages for proper male tail development.

  11. Fertility regulation in the male

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The current state of research into new methods of male contraception is reviewed, with special emphasis on the efforts of the WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. The article concentrates mainly on the development of orally administered or injectable substances capable of either (a) interfering with the hormonal control of testicular function, (b) disrupting spermatogenesis by direct influence on testis function, or (c) interfering with the fertilizing ability of the sperm and their transport. It is concluded that, despite the numerous areas of research currently being pursued, the availability of a new male contraceptive remains several years away. PMID:308403

  12. Paternity in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): Implications for male mating strategies.

    PubMed

    Parga, Joyce A; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Youssouf Jacky, Ibrahim Antho; Lawler, Richard R; Sussman, Robert W; Gould, Lisa; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    In group-living species with male dominance hierarchies where receptive periods of females do not overlap, high male reproductive skew would be predicted. However, the existence of female multiple mating and alternative male mating strategies can call into question single-male monopolization of paternity in groups. Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are seasonally breeding primates that live in multi-male, multi-female groups. Although established groups show male dominance hierarchies, male dominance relationships can break down during mating periods. In addition, females are the dominant sex and mate with multiple males during estrus, including group residents, and extra-group males-posing the question of whether there is high or low male paternity skew in groups. In this study, we analyzed paternity in a population of wild L. catta from the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve in southwestern Madagascar. Paternity was determined with 80-95% confidence for 39 offspring born to nine different groups. We calculated male reproductive skew indices for six groups, and our results showed a range of values corresponding to both high and low reproductive skew. Between 21% and 33% of offspring (3 of 14 or three of nine, counting paternity assignments at the 80% or 95% confidence levels, respectively) were sired by extra-troop males. Males siring offspring within the same group during the same year appear to be unrelated. Our study provides evidence of varying male reproductive skew in different L. catta groups. A single male may monopolize paternity across one or more years, while in other groups, >1 male can sire offspring within the same group, even within a single year. Extra-group mating is a viable strategy that can result in extra-group paternity for L. catta males. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Paternity in wild ring‐tailed lemurs (Lemur catta): Implications for male mating strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sauther, Michelle L.; Cuozzo, Frank P.; Youssouf Jacky, Ibrahim Antho; Lawler, Richard R.; Sussman, Robert W.; Gould, Lisa; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    1 In group‐living species with male dominance hierarchies where receptive periods of females do not overlap, high male reproductive skew would be predicted. However, the existence of female multiple mating and alternative male mating strategies can call into question single‐male monopolization of paternity in groups. Ring‐tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are seasonally breeding primates that live in multi‐male, multi‐female groups. Although established groups show male dominance hierarchies, male dominance relationships can break down during mating periods. In addition, females are the dominant sex and mate with multiple males during estrus, including group residents, and extra‐group males—posing the question of whether there is high or low male paternity skew in groups. In this study, we analyzed paternity in a population of wild L. catta from the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve in southwestern Madagascar. Paternity was determined with 80–95% confidence for 39 offspring born to nine different groups. We calculated male reproductive skew indices for six groups, and our results showed a range of values corresponding to both high and low reproductive skew. Between 21% and 33% of offspring (3 of 14 or three of nine, counting paternity assignments at the 80% or 95% confidence levels, respectively) were sired by extra‐troop males. Males siring offspring within the same group during the same year appear to be unrelated. Our study provides evidence of varying male reproductive skew in different L. catta groups. A single male may monopolize paternity across one or more years, while in other groups, >1 male can sire offspring within the same group, even within a single year. Extra‐group mating is a viable strategy that can result in extra‐group paternity for L. catta males. PMID:27391113

  14. Modeling distribution of dispersal distances in male white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Long, E.S.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Wallingford, B.D.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersal distances and their distribution pattern are important to understanding such phenomena as disease spread and gene flow, but oftentimes dispersal characteristics are modeled as a fixed trait for a given species. We found that dispersal distributions differ for spring and autumn dispersals of yearling male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but that combined data can be adequately modeled based on a log-normal distribution. We modeled distribution of dispersal distances from 3 distinct populations in Pennsylvania and Maryland, USA, based on the relationship between percent forest cover and mean dispersal distance and the relationship between mean and variance of dispersal distances. Our results suggest distributions of distances for dispersing yearling male white-tailed deer can be modeled by simply measuring a readily obtained landscape metric, percent forest cover, which could be used to create generalized spatially explicit disease or gene.

  15. Survival, cause-specific mortality, and harvesting of male black-tailed deer in washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Schirato, G.A.; Spencer, R.D.; McAllister, K.R.; Murphie, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    We determined survival rates, causes of mortality, and documented impacts of harvest on ???1.5-year-old male (hereafter, male) Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in 2 Washington, USA, game management units (GMUs; Skookumchuck and Snoqualmie) characterized by different hunting-season structures. We monitored 66 males (n = 28 and 38 annually) in Skookumchuck and 58 males (n = 26 and 32 annually) in Snoqualmie, September 1999-September 2001. Annual survival rates were 0.498 (SE = 0.066) in Skookumchuck and 0.519 (SE = 0.067) in Snoqualmie. Survival rates derived from population age structure did not differ from rates derived from radiotelemetry. Harvest was the primary mortality factor for each population, accounting for 67% (SE = 7; Skookumchuck) to 44% (SE = 9; Snoqualmie) of total annual mortality. Annual harvest-specific mortality rates were 0.317 (SE = 0.032) in Skookumchuck and 0.211 (SE = 0.021) in Snoqualmie, likely due to longer hunting seasons and greater hunter effort in Skookumchuck. Following the elimination of a late buck season centered on the rut in Snoqualmie, male harvest declined 56% and annual survival increased 60%, indicating that male harvest was largely additive to other mortality. Our results indicated that harvest was the primary influence on male black-tailed deer populations in Washington, was additive, and that the effect of harvest varied with hunting-season structure and hunter effort. Managers should not assume that harvesting removes a constant proportion of the male population annually, and management models that assume compensatory mortality in adult harvest may result in over-harvest of male populations.

  16. Dispersal among male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) on St. Catherines Island.

    PubMed

    Parga, J A; Lessnau, R G

    2008-07-01

    Male dispersal patterns were analyzed across a nine-year period in a population of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) on St. Catherines Island (SCI), USA, to evaluate two ultimate explanations for male dispersal: inbreeding avoidance and intrasexual mating competition. As part of this analysis, we also compared patterns of dispersal at this site with data from wild populations. Overall, we found that patterns of male intertroop movement on SCI are similar to the wild with respect to the frequency and seasonality of male transfer. In Madagascar, males move between groups every 3.1-3.5 years [Sussman, International Journal of Primatol 13:395-413, 1992; Koyama et al., Primates 43:291-314, 2002] as compared with every 3.2 years on SCI. The majority of transfers on SCI occurred during the birth season, as occurs at one site in Madagascar, Berenty [Budnitz & Dainis, Lemur biology. New York: Plenum Press, p 219-235, 1975; Jones, Folia Primatologica 40:145-160, 1983]. One difference is that males perform natal transfers 1-2 years earlier on SCI than in the wild, which may be related to food provisioning on SCI. Males never transferred back into their natal troops, which is remarkable given the small number of groups on SCI. Although this pattern of movement can indicate inbreeding avoidance by males, the fact that male troop tenure was in many cases long enough to overlap with the sexual maturation of potential daughters did not support the inbreeding avoidance hypothesis for male secondary dispersal. Instead, the intrasexual competition hypothesis was strongly supported, because males were significantly more likely to transfer into groups having fewer adult males and a more favorable sex ratio than their pretransfer groups. Males therefore appear to be bypassing groups in which they would experience a greater degree of intrasexual mating competition during the breeding season.

  17. Antipredator Vocalization Usage in the Male Ring-Tailed Lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M; Sauther, Michelle L; Cuozzo, Frank P; Youssouf Jacky, Ibrahim Antho

    2015-01-01

    The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is a group-living strepsirrhine primate endemic to Madagascar that faces considerable predation pressure from aerial and terrestrial predators. This species engages in mobbing and vigilance behavior in response to predators, and has referential alarm vocalizations. Because L. catta is female dominant, less is known about the alarm calls of males. We tested 3 hypotheses for male antipredator vocalization behavior on L. catta at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve in Madagascar: the predator confusion, group maintenance, and predation risk allocation hypotheses. We found support for 2 hypotheses. When a male L. catta made an antipredator call, other group members vocalized in response. Dominant males did not make alarm calls at higher rates than subordinate males. Predators were more abundant on the western side of Parcel 1, but an even greater number of antipredator vocalizations occurred in this area than predator abundance warranted. We show that male L. catta consistently participated in group-level antipredator vocalization usage in high-risk locations. Although female L. catta are known to hold the primary role in group defense, male L. catta are also key participants in group-wide behaviors that may confuse or drive away predators.

  18. Spatio-temporal variation in male white-tailed deer harvest rates in Pennsylvania: Implications for estimating abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, Andrew S.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Wallingford, Bret D.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 2 popular methods that use age-at-harvest data to estimate abundance of white-tailed deer is contingent on assumptions about variation in estimates of subadult (1.5 yr old) and adult (≥2.5 yr old) male harvest rates. Auxiliary data (e.g., estimates of survival or harvest rates from radiocollared animals) can be used to relax some assumptions, but unless these population parameters exhibit limited temporal or spatial variation, these auxiliary data may not improve accuracy. Unfortunately maintaining sufficient sample sizes of radiocollared deer for parameter estimation in every wildlife management unit (WMU) is not feasible for most state agencies. We monitored the fates of 397 subadult and 225 adult male white-tailed deer across 4 WMUs from 2002 to 2008 using radio telemetry. We investigated spatial and temporal variation in harvest rates and investigated covariates related to the patterns observed. We found that most variation in harvest rates was explained spatially and that adult harvest rates (0.36–0.69) were more variable among study areas than subadult harvest rates (0.26–0.42). We found that hunter effort during the archery and firearms season best explained variation in harvest rates of adult males among WMUs, whereas hunter effort during only the firearms season best explained harvest rates for subadult males. From a population estimation perspective, it is advantageous that most variation was spatial and explained by a readily obtained covariate (hunter effort). However, harvest rates may vary if hunting regulations or hunter behavior change, requiring additional field studies to obtain accurate estimates of harvest rates. 

  19. The control of male fertility by spermatid-specific factors: searching for contraceptive targets from spermatozoon's head to tail

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Batool, Aalia; Wang, Yu-Qian; Hao, Xiao-Xia; Chang, Chawn-Shang; Cheng, C Yan; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility due to abnormal spermatozoa has been reported in both animals and humans, but its pathogenic causes, including genetic abnormalities, remain largely unknown. On the other hand, contraceptive options for men are limited, and a specific, reversible and safe method of male contraception has been a long-standing quest in medicine. Some progress has recently been made in exploring the effects of spermatid-specifical genetic factors in controlling male fertility. A comprehensive search of PubMed for articles and reviews published in English before July 2016 was carried out using the search terms ‘spermiogenesis failure', ‘globozoospermia', ‘spermatid-specific', ‘acrosome', ‘infertile', ‘manchette', ‘sperm connecting piece', ‘sperm annulus', ‘sperm ADAMs', ‘flagellar abnormalities', ‘sperm motility loss', ‘sperm ion exchanger' and ‘contraceptive targets'. Importantly, we have opted to focus on articles regarding spermatid-specific factors. Genetic studies to define the structure and physiology of sperm have shown that spermatozoa appear to be one of the most promising contraceptive targets. Here we summarize how these spermatid-specific factors regulate spermiogenesis and categorize them according to their localization and function from spermatid head to tail (e.g., acrosome, manchette, head-tail conjunction, annulus, principal piece of tail). In addition, we emphatically introduce small-molecule contraceptives, such as BRDT and PPP3CC/PPP3R2, which are currently being developed to target spermatogenic-specific proteins. We suggest that blocking the differentiation of haploid germ cells, which rarely affects early spermatogenic cell types and the testicular microenvironment, is a better choice than spermatogenic-specific proteins. The studies described here provide valuable information regarding the genetic and molecular defects causing male mouse infertility to improve our understanding of the importance of spermatid

  20. Epigenetic regulation in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Natasha M; Chong, Suyinn; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical during spermatogenesis. In this review, the epigenetic regulation and the consequences of its aberrant regulation during mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis are described. The current knowledge on epigenetic modifications that occur during male meiosis is discussed, with special attention on events that define meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Finally, the recent studies focused on transgenerational and paternal effects in mice and humans are discussed. In many cases, these epigenetic effects resulted in impaired fertility and potentially long-ranging affects underlining the importance of research in this area.

  1. Emotion regulation in male abstinent heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhao; Lu, Xie; Li, Fu; Haitao, He; Ling, Yang; Aibao, Zhou

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined 25 male prisoners with a history of heroin dependency (M = 35.3 yr., SD = 8.5, range = 21-48) and 25 male prisoners with no history of substance abuse (M = 31.5 yr., SD = 9.8, range = 19-47) who were selected to complete the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. Results showed that the group with a history of heroin dependency used a cognitive reappraisal strategy less frequently than controls and that there was no difference in the use of expression suppression strategies between the two groups. It was concluded that the negative impact of heroin abuse on an individual's emotion regulation is primarily reflected in the cognitive reappraisal dimension.

  2. Rare congenital absence of tail (anury) and anus (atresia ani) in male camel (Camelus dromedarius) calf

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, S.; Purohit, G.N.

    2012-01-01

    A one-day old male camel calf was presented to the Al-Qattara Veterinary Hospital with complaints of abdominal straining and lack of defecation. On examination it was found that the calf had no tail, the posterior sacral margin was blunt and the anal opening was absent. The case was diagnosed as congenital anury with atresia ani. The animal was sedated with 0.1 mg/kg of xylazine administered intramuscularly and under local infiltration with 2% lidocaine a circular incision was made at the anal area to create an anal opening. The animal passed plenty of meconium. The cut edges were sutured with horizontal mattress sutures. The animal was administered penicillin and streptomycin for 5 days and had an uneventful recovery. It is reported that congenital anury rarely occurs in one humped camel and accompanied atresia ani can be surgically treated. PMID:26623295

  3. Regulation of Poly(A) Tail and Translation during the Somatic Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Eun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, Yoosik; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V Narry

    2016-05-05

    Poly(A) tails are critical for mRNA stability and translation. However, recent studies have challenged this view, showing that poly(A) tail length and translation efficiency are decoupled in non-embryonic cells. Using TAIL-seq and ribosome profiling, we investigate poly(A) tail dynamics and translational control in the somatic cell cycle. We find dramatic changes in poly(A) tail lengths of cell-cycle regulatory genes like CDK1, TOP2A, and FBXO5, explaining their translational repression in M phase. We also find that poly(A) tail length is coupled to translation when the poly(A) tail is <20 nucleotides. However, as most genes have >20 nucleotide poly(A) tails, their translation is regulated mainly via poly(A) tail length-independent mechanisms during the cell cycle. Specifically, we find that terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) tract-containing transcripts escape global translational suppression in M phase and are actively translated. Our quantitative and comprehensive data provide a revised view of translational control in the somatic cell cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of male-fertility-regulating agents.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Verma, P; Kumar, A

    1991-09-01

    Steroidal, nonsteroidal, plant-derived, gonadotropin-related and immunological agents investigated for control of male fertility are reviewed with brief descriptions of their effects, and illustrations of their structures. The physiology of the male reproductive system is presented as an introduction: an ideal male antifertility agent would inhibit spermatogenesis at the level of the Sertoli cells, without affecting endogenous androgen production by Leydig cells, needed for libido and potency. Androgens down-regulate their own production at physiological levels, but few long-acting orally active derivatives are available. Anti-androgens with mixed androgen and progestin activity, combined with a pure androgen are potentially useful. Androgen-progestin combinations are being tested by WHO as implants. Dozens of miscellaneous nonsteroidal compounds have been discovered serendipitously to have antifertility activity in men or male animals, including alkylating agents antimetabolites, antibiotics, sulfa derivatives, fungicides, trichomonocides, amebicides, alpha blockers, antimalarials, coumarins, and carbohydrate derivatives. Various plant alkaloids have been screened. Those of Hibiscus, Vitex and Plumbago species, as well as Tripterygium wilfordii glycosides, which are being evaluated in combination with gossypol, are mentioned here. Gossypol has been thoroughly tested in China, but rejected because of its side effects, particularly hypokalemic paralysis, its low therapeutic index, and uncertain recovery of fertility. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists and antagonists are being researched in combination with androgens with some success. The GnRH antagonists to date have low activity , or cause histamine-related side effects at higher doses; the androgens require a new route such as a long-acting implant to overcome the need for daily injections. Immunological contraception for males has not progressed beyond the research stage.

  5. Male short-tailed field voles (Microtus agrestis) build better insulated nests than females.

    PubMed

    Redman, P; Selman, C; Speakman, J R

    1999-12-01

    Nest construction is an extremely widespread behaviour. In small endotherms the nest serves primarily to provide insulation, and thereby retard heat loss of the constructor, or its offspring. In arctic and temperate regions many small mammals build nests to protect themselves from low ambient temperatures. We measured the physical properties of nests built by short-tailed field voles Microtus agrestis that were kept in captivity under cold conditions. The most important factor influencing nest insulation was nest wall thickness; however, nests with thick walls also contained more nesting material. Insulative capacity of the nest did not reach an asymptote up to nests containing 20 g of material. Nest insulation was not correlated with resting metabolic rate, body mass or body composition of the vole that constructed the nest. However, nests built by males had greater insulation than those made by females; males also had significantly lower food intake rates when compared to females with nests. No significant difference was observed in either fat mass or whole animal thermal conductance between males and females. Thermal conductance did increase significantly with increasing body mass, although not with resting metabolic rate. Voles with nests for prolonged periods had lower food intakes than voles without nests. The absolute saving averaged 1.9 g and was independent of body mass. This was a 28% saving on intake for a 22-g vole but only an 18% saving for a 40-g individual. When voles had nests for short periods they used the energy they saved to reduce food intake and increase body mass.

  6. Tail and Kinase Modules Differently Regulate Core Mediator Recruitment and Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Langelier, Marie-France; Bataille, Alain R; Pascal, John M; Pugh, B Franklin; Robert, François

    2016-11-03

    Mediator is a highly conserved transcriptional coactivator organized into four modules, namely Tail, Middle, Head, and Kinase (CKM). Previous work suggests regulatory roles for Tail and CKM, but an integrated model for these activities is lacking. Here, we analyzed the genome-wide distribution of Mediator subunits in wild-type and mutant yeast cells in which RNA polymerase II promoter escape is blocked, allowing detection of transient Mediator forms. We found that although all modules are recruited to upstream activated regions (UAS), assembly of Mediator within the pre-initiation complex is accompanied by the release of CKM. Interestingly, our data show that CKM regulates Mediator-UAS interaction rather than Mediator-promoter association. In addition, although Tail is required for Mediator recruitment to UAS, Tailless Mediator nevertheless interacts with core promoters. Collectively, our data suggest that the essential function of Mediator is mediated by Head and Middle at core promoters, while Tail and CKM play regulatory roles.

  7. Role of the tail in the regulated state of myosin 2

    PubMed Central

    Jung, HyunSuk; Billington, Neil; Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Salzameda, Bridget; Cremo, Christine R.; Chalovich, Joseph M.; Chantler, Peter D.; Knight, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin 2 from vertebrate smooth muscle or non-muscle sources is in equilibrium between compact, inactive monomers and thick filaments under physiological conditions. In the inactive monomer, the two heads pack compactly together and the long tail is folded into three closely-packed segments that are associated chiefly with one of the heads. The molecular basis of the folding of the tail remains unexplained. Using electron microscopy, we show that compact monomers of smooth muscle myosin 2 have the same structure in both the native state and following specific, intramolecular photo-cross-linking between Cys109 of the regulatory light chain (RLC) and segment 3 of the tail. Non-specific cross-linking between lysine residues of the folded monomer by glutaraldehyde also does not perturb the compact conformation, and stabilises it against unfolding at high ionic strength. Sequence comparisons across phyla and myosin 2 isoforms suggest that folding of the tail is stabilised by ionic interactions between the positively-charged N-terminal sequence of the RLC and a negatively-charged region near the start of tail segment 3, and that phosphorylation of the RLC could perturb these interactions. Our results support the view that interactions between the heads and the distal tail perform a critical role in regulating activity of myosin 2 molecules through stabilising the compact monomer conformation. PMID:21419133

  8. Lizard tail regeneration: regulation of two distinct cartilage regions by Indian hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Lozito, Thomas P; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-03-15

    Lizards capable of caudal autotomy exhibit the remarkable ability to "drop" and then regenerate their tails. However, the regenerated lizard tail (RLT) is known as an "imperfect replicate" due to several key anatomical differences compared to the original tail. Most striking of these "imperfections" concerns the skeleton; instead of the vertebrae of the original tail, the skeleton of the RLT takes the form of an unsegmented cartilage tube (CT). Here we have performed the first detailed staging of skeletal development of the RLT CT, identifying two distinct mineralization events. CTs isolated from RLTs of various ages were analyzed by micro-computed tomography to characterize mineralization, and to correlate skeletal development with expression of endochondral ossification markers evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. During early tail regeneration, shortly after CT formation, the extreme proximal CT in direct contact with the most terminal vertebra of the original tail develops a growth plate-like region that undergoes endochondral ossification. Proximal CT chondrocytes enlarge, express hypertrophic markers, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), apoptose, and are replaced by bone. During later stages of tail regeneration, the distal CT mineralizes without endochondral ossification. The sub-perichondrium of the distal CT expresses Ihh, and the perichondrium directly calcifies without cartilage growth plate formation. The calcified CT perichondrium also contains a population of stem/progenitor cells that forms new cartilage in response to TGF-β stimulation. Treatment with the Ihh inhibitor cyclopamine inhibited both proximal CT ossification and distal CT calcification. Thus, while the two mineralization events are spatially, temporally, and mechanistically very different, they both involve Ihh. Taken together, these results suggest that Ihh regulates CT mineralization during two distinct stages of lizard tail regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. A Caenorhabditis elegans homeobox gene expressed in the male tail, a link between pattern formation and sexual dimorphism?

    PubMed

    Kagoshima, H; Cassata, G; Bürglin, T R

    1999-01-01

    ceh-7 is a small Caenorhabditis elegans homeobox gene. We have shown that this gene is transcribed. Examination of the expression pattern of ceh-7 using reporter constructs revealed that it is expressed in a few cells of the male tail, which form a ring around the rectum. The most posterior member of the C. elegans Hox cluster, egl-5, an Abd-B homologue, has previously been shown to be required for the proper development of several blast cells in the male tail. We have examined the expression of ceh-7 in mutant backgrounds of egl-5 and also mab-5, an Antp/Ubx/Abd-A homologue. We find that ceh-7 is not expressed in egl-5 mutants, but is still expressed in mab-5 mutants.

  10. Androgen correlates of male reproductive effort in wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis): A multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Heistermann, Michael; Rahmi, Erdiansyah; Agil, Muhammad; Ahmad Fauzan, Panji; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-03-15

    The challenge hypothesis (Wingfield et al., 1990) has been broadly utilised as a conceptual framework to study male androgen correlates of reproductive challenges in mammals. These studies mainly assessed male androgen responsiveness to a general degree of challenge over extended periods of time. Short term co-variation between the socio-sexual challenging context and androgen levels remains, however, largely understudied. We thus aim at providing a multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis by investigating the inter- and intra-individual variations in faecal androgen excretion associated to 1) breeding seasonality, 2) dominance rank, 3) mate-guarding activity and 4) value of the guarded female. We studied long-tailed macaques, a species in which males engage in highly challenging monopolisation of females over discreet periods of time. This particularity allows testing specifically the predicted increase from level B to level C in the challenge hypothesis. The study was carried out during two reproductive seasons on three groups of wild long-tailed macaques. We combined behavioural observations and non-invasive measurements of faecal androgen metabolite (fAM) levels. We found that, as predicted by the challenge hypothesis, male long-tailed macaques respond not only to seasonal but also to short term reproductive challenges by adapting their androgen levels. First, males exhibited a seasonal rise in fAM levels during the mating period which may be triggered by fruit availability as shown by our phenological data. Second, males had increased androgen levels when mate-guarding females and, across mate-guarding periods, males had higher fAM levels when monopolising high-ranking parous females than when monopolising low-ranking ones. Finally, high-ranking males had higher fAM levels than low-ranking males year round. Our study confirms that, in species with a high degree of female monopolisability, androgen may be an important physiological fitness enhancing tool

  11. Kinases, tails and more: regulation of PTEN function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Rita; Barata, João T

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorylation regulates the conformation, stability, homo- and heterotypic protein interactions, localization, and activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN. From a simple picture, at the beginning of this millennium, recognizing that CK2 phosphorylated PTEN at the C-terminus and thereby impacted on PTEN stability and activity, research has led to a significantly more complex scenario today, where for instance GSK3, Plk3, ATM, ROCK or Src-family kinases are also gaining the spotlight in this evolving play. Here, we review the current knowledge on the kinases that phosphorylate PTEN, and on the impact that specific phosphorylation events have on PTEN function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Head-to-tail regulation is critical for the in vivo function of myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell organization requires regulated cargo transport along cytoskeletal elements. Myosin V motors are among the most conserved organelle motors and have been well characterized in both yeast and mammalian systems. Biochemical data for mammalian myosin V suggest that a head-to-tail autoinhibitory interaction is a primary means of regulation, but the in vivo significance of this interaction has not been studied. Here we generated and characterized mutations in the yeast myosin V Myo2p to reveal that it is regulated by a head-to-tail interaction and that loss of regulation renders the myosin V constitutively active. We show that an unregulated motor is very deleterious for growth, resulting in severe defects in Myo2-mediated transport processes, including secretory vesicle transport, mitochondrial inheritance, and nuclear orientation. All of the defects associated with motor misregulation could be rescued by artificially restoring regulation. Thus, spatial and temporal regulation of myosin V in vivo by a head-to-tail interaction is critical for the normal delivery functions of the motor. PMID:25940346

  13. Biological and social outcomes of antler point restriction harvest regulations for white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallingford, Bret D.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Long, Eric S.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.; Alt, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Selective harvest criteria, such as antler point restrictions (APRs), have been used to regulate harvest of male ungulates; however, comprehensive evaluation of the biological and social responses to this management strategy is lacking. In 2002, Pennsylvania adopted new APRs for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) that required, depending on wildlife management unit, ≥3 or ≥4 points on 1 antler for legal harvest. Historically, harvest rates of subadult (1.5 yr old) and adult (≥2.5 yr old) antlered males averaged 0.80. Antler point restrictions were designed to protect ≥50% of subadult males from harvest. Most adult males remained legal for harvest. We estimated harvest rates, survival rates, and cause-specific mortality of radio-collared male deer (453 subadults, 103 adults) in 2 wildlife management units (Armstrong and Centre counties) to evaluate biological efficacy of APRs to increase recruitment of adult males during 2002–2005. We administered statewide deer hunter surveys before and after each hunting season over the same 3 years to evaluate hunter attitudes toward APRs. We conducted 2 types of surveys: a simple random sample of all license buyers for each survey and a longitudinal panel of hunters who completed all 6 surveys. At the same time APRs were implemented, the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) increased antlerless harvests to reduce deer density to meet deer management goals.Survival rates varied by month and age but not between study areas or among years after implementation of APRs. Monthly survival rates for subadults ranged from 0.64 to 0.97 during hunting seasons and 0.95 to 0.99 during the non-hunting period. Annual survival of subadults was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.41–0.52). Adult monthly survival rates ranged from 0.36 to 0.95 during hunting seasons and we had no mortalities during the non-hunting period. Annual survival of adults was 0.28 (95% CI = 0.22–0.35). Antler point restrictions successfully reduced harvest

  14. Body molt of male long-tailed ducks in the nearshore waters of the north slope, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, M.D.; Grand, J.B.; Flint, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the timing and intensity of body molt in relation to stage of remige growth for postbreeding adult male Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) off the coast of northern Alaska. During this period, remige and rectrix feathers are molted simultaneously with body feathers during the prebasic molt, which results in a period of increased energetic and nutritional demands. We collected birds from late July through mid-August and recorded intensity of molt in eight regions: head and neck, back and rump, greater coverts, lesser coverts, flank and sides, breast, belly, and tail. Using nonlinear regression, we estimated the peak intensity and variation for each region in relation to ninth primary length. We found little evidence of molt in the head and neck region. The greater and lesser coverts, and back and rump reached peak molt intensities earliest and were followed by tail, breast, and belly. Molt intensity in the flank and side region was highly variable and indicated a more prolonged molting pattern in relation to other regions. While body molt occurs simultaneously with wing molt, we found that molt among regions occurred in a staggered pattern. Long-tailed Ducks may employ this staggered molting pattern to minimize the energetic and nutritional requirements of molt.

  15. Poly(A) tail length regulates PABPC1 expression to tune translation in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Chorghade, Sandip; Seimetz, Joseph; Emmons, Russell; Yang, Jing; Bresson, Stefan M; Lisio, Michael De; Parise, Gianni; Conrad, Nicholas K; Kalsotra, Auinash

    2017-01-01

    The rate of protein synthesis in the adult heart is one of the lowest in mammalian tissues, but it increases substantially in response to stress and hypertrophic stimuli through largely obscure mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that regulated expression of cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPC1) modulates protein synthetic capacity of the mammalian heart. We uncover a poly(A) tail-based regulatory mechanism that dynamically controls PABPC1 protein synthesis in cardiomyocytes and thereby titrates cellular translation in response to developmental and hypertrophic cues. Our findings identify PABPC1 as a direct regulator of cardiac hypertrophy and define a new paradigm of gene regulation in the heart, where controlled changes in poly(A) tail length influence mRNA translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24139.001 PMID:28653618

  16. Transcriptional regulators in the Hippo signaling pathway control organ growth in Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Ochi, Haruki; Ogino, Hajime; Kawasumi, Aiko; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    The size and shape of tissues are tightly controlled by synchronized processes among cells and tissues to produce an integrated organ. The Hippo signaling pathway controls both cell proliferation and apoptosis by dual signal-transduction states regulated through a repressive kinase cascade. Yap1 and Tead, transcriptional regulators that act downstream of the Hippo signaling kinase cascade, have essential roles in regulating cell proliferation. In amphibian limb or tail regeneration, the local tissue outgrowth terminates when the correct size is reached, suggesting that organ size is strictly controlled during epimorphic organ-level regeneration. We recently demonstrated that Yap1 is required for the regeneration of Xenopus tadpole limb buds (Hayashi et al., 2014, Dev. Biol. 388, 57-67), but the molecular link between the Hippo pathway and organ size control in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is not fully understood. To examine the requirement of Hippo pathway transcriptional regulators in epimorphic regeneration, including organ size control, we inhibited these regulators during Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration by overexpressing a dominant-negative form of Yap (dnYap) or Tead4 (dnTead4) under a heat-shock promoter in transgenic animal lines. Each inhibition resulted in regeneration defects accompanied by reduced cell mitosis and increased apoptosis. Single-cell gene manipulation experiments indicated that Tead4 cell-autonomously regulates the survival of neural progenitor cells in the regenerating tail. In amphibians, amputation at the proximal level of the tail (deep amputation) results in faster regeneration than that at the distal level (shallow amputation), to restore the original-sized tail with similar timing. However, dnTead4 overexpression abolished the position-dependent differential growth rate of tail regeneration. These results suggest that the transcriptional regulators in the Hippo pathway, Tead4 and Yap1, are required for general vertebrate

  17. Histone H4 tail mediates allosteric regulation of nucleosome remodelling by linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Harada, Bryan T; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2014-08-14

    Imitation switch (ISWI)-family remodelling enzymes regulate access to genomic DNA by mobilizing nucleosomes. These ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers promote heterochromatin formation and transcriptional silencing by generating regularly spaced nucleosome arrays. The nucleosome-spacing activity arises from the dependence of nucleosome translocation on the length of extranucleosomal linker DNA, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we study nucleosome remodelling by human ATP-dependent chromatin assembly and remodelling factor (ACF), an ISWI enzyme comprising a catalytic subunit, Snf2h, and an accessory subunit, Acf1 (refs 2, 11 - 13). We find that ACF senses linker DNA length through an interplay between its accessory and catalytic subunits mediated by the histone H4 tail of the nucleosome. Mutation of AutoN, an auto-inhibitory domain within Snf2h that bears sequence homology to the H4 tail, abolishes the linker-length sensitivity in remodelling. Addition of exogenous H4-tail peptide or deletion of the nucleosomal H4 tail also diminishes the linker-length sensitivity. Moreover, Acf1 binds both the H4-tail peptide and DNA in an amino (N)-terminal domain dependent manner, and in the ACF-bound nucleosome, lengthening the linker DNA reduces the Acf1-H4 tail proximity. Deletion of the N-terminal portion of Acf1 (or its homologue in yeast) abolishes linker-length sensitivity in remodelling and leads to severe growth defects in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanism for nucleosome spacing where linker DNA sensing by Acf1 is allosterically transmitted to Snf2h through the H4 tail of the nucleosome. For nucleosomes with short linker DNA, Acf1 preferentially binds to the H4 tail, allowing AutoN to inhibit the ATPase activity of Snf2h. As the linker DNA lengthens, Acf1 shifts its binding preference to the linker DNA, freeing the H4 tail to compete AutoN off the ATPase and thereby activating ACF.

  18. 3-Iodothyronamine Induces Tail Vasodilation Through Central Action in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gachkar, Sogol; Oelkrug, Rebecca; Martinez-Sanchez, Noelia; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Warner, Amy; Hoefig, Carolin S; López, Miguel; Mittag, Jens

    2017-06-01

    3-Iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) is an endogenous thyroid hormone (TH)-derived metabolite that induces severe hypothermia in mice after systemic administration; however, the underlying mechanisms have remained enigmatic. We show here that the rapid 3-T1AM-induced loss in body temperature is a consequence of peripheral vasodilation and subsequent heat loss (e.g., over the tail surface). The condition is subsequently intensified by hypomotility and a lack of brown adipose tissue activation. Although the possible 3-T1AM targets trace amine-associated receptor 1 or α2a-adrenergic receptor were detected in tail artery and aorta respectively, myograph studies did not show any direct effect of 3-T1AM on vasodilation, suggesting that its actions are likely indirect. Intracerebroventricular application of 3-T1AM, however, replicated the phenotype of tail vasodilation and body temperature decline and led to neuronal activation in the hypothalamus, suggesting that the metabolite causes tail vasodilation through a hypothalamic signaling pathway. Consequently, the 3-T1AM response constitutes anapyrexia rather than hypothermia and closely resembles the heat-stress response mediated by hypothalamic temperature-sensitive neurons. Our results thus underline the well-known role of the hypothalamus as the body's thermostat and suggest an additional molecular link between TH signaling and the central control of body temperature. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  19. Habitat use and foraging patterns of molting male Long-tailed Ducks in lagoons of the central Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Reed, John; Deborah Lacroix,; Richard Lanctot,

    2016-01-01

    From mid-July through September, 10 000 to 30 000 Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) use the lagoon systems of the central Beaufort Sea for remigial molt. Little is known about their foraging behavior and patterns of habitat use during this flightless period. We used radio transmitters to track male Long-tailed Ducks through the molt period from 2000 to 2002 in three lagoons: one adjacent to industrial oil field development and activity and two in areas without industrial activity. We found that an index to time spent foraging generally increased through the molt period. Foraging, habitat use, and home range size showed similar patterns, but those patterns were highly variable among lagoons and across years. Even with continuous daylight during the study period, birds tended to use offshore areas during the day for feeding and roosted in protected nearshore waters at night. We suspect that variability in behaviors associated with foraging, habitat use, and home range size are likely influenced by availability of invertebrate prey. Proximity to oil field activity did not appear to affect foraging behaviors of molting Long-tailed Ducks.

  20. Alternative reproductive tactics and reproductive success in male Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat).

    PubMed

    Fasel, N; Saladin, V; Richner, H

    2016-11-01

    The use of alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) is widespread in animals. Males of some species may change tactics depending on age, body condition and social environment. Many bat species are polygynous where a fraction of males only have access to fertile females. For polygynous bats, knowledge of the reproductive success of males using different ARTs is scarce, and it remains unclear how age of males is related to switching decisions between social statuses. We studied a large captive population of Carollia perspicillata, where males are either harem holders, bachelors or peripheral males. Using a multistate procedure, we modelled the age-related switches in reproductive tactics and in survival probability. From the model, we calculated the reproductive success and the frequencies of males displaying different reproductive tactics. As in mammals, the switch between social statuses is often related to age, we predicted that the transition probability of bachelor and peripheral males to harem status would increase with age. We show, however, that social status transition towards a harem holding position was not related to age. Reproductive success changed with age and social status. Harem males had a significantly higher reproductive success than bachelor males except between a short period from 3.8 to 4.4 years of age where success was similar, and a significantly higher reproductive success than peripheral males between 2.6 and 4.4 years of age. Harem males showed a clear decrease in the probability of maintaining social status with age, which suggests that senescence reduces resource holding potential.

  1. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  2. Review: neuroestrogen regulation of socio-sexual behavior of males

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    It is thought that estrogen (neuroestrogen) synthesized by the action of aromatase in the brain from testosterone activates male socio-sexual behaviors, such as aggression and sexual behavior in birds. We recently found that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), a hypothalamic neuropeptide, inhibits socio-sexual behaviors of male quail by directly activating aromatase and increasing neuroestrogen synthesis in the preoptic area (POA). The POA is thought to be the most critical site of aromatization and neuroestrogen action for the regulation of socio-sexual behavior of male birds. We concluded that GnIH inhibits socio-sexual behaviors of male quail by increasing neuroestrogen concentration beyond its optimal concentration in the brain for expression of socio-sexual behavior. On the other hand, it has been reported that dopamine and glutamate, which stimulate male socio-sexual behavior in birds and mammals, inhibit the activity of aromatase in the POA. Multiple studies also report that the activity of aromatase or neuroestrogen is negatively correlated with changes in male socio-sexual behavior in fish, birds, and mammals including humans. Here, we review previous studies that investigated the role of neuroestrogen in the regulation of male socio-sexual behavior and reconsider the hypothesis that neuroestrogen activates male socio-sexual behavior in vertebrates. It is considered that basal concentration of neuroestrogen is required for the maintenance of male socio-sexual behavior but higher concentration of neuroestrogen may inhibit male socio-sexual behavior. PMID:25352775

  3. Concerted regulation of ISWI by an autoinhibitory domain and the H4 N-terminal tail

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigsen, Johanna; Pfennig, Sabrina; Singh, Ashish K; Schindler, Christina; Harrer, Nadine; Forné, Ignasi; Zacharias, Martin; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2017-01-01

    ISWI-family nucleosome remodeling enzymes need the histone H4 N-terminal tail to mobilize nucleosomes. Here we mapped the H4-tail binding pocket of ISWI. Surprisingly the binding site was adjacent to but not overlapping with the docking site of an auto-regulatory motif, AutoN, in the N-terminal region (NTR) of ISWI, indicating that AutoN does not act as a simple pseudosubstrate as suggested previously. Rather, AutoN cooperated with a hitherto uncharacterized motif, termed AcidicN, to confer H4-tail sensitivity and discriminate between DNA and nucleosomes. A third motif in the NTR, ppHSA, was functionally required in vivo and provided structural stability by clamping the NTR to Lobe 2 of the ATPase domain. This configuration is reminiscent of Chd1 even though Chd1 contains an unrelated NTR. Our results shed light on the intricate structural and functional regulation of ISWI by the NTR and uncover surprising parallels with Chd1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21477.001 PMID:28109157

  4. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  5. Progesterone receptor in the forebrain of female gray short-tailed opossums: effects of exposure to male stimuli.

    PubMed

    Vitazka, Maria E; Cárdenas, Horacio; Cruz, Yolanda; Fadem, Barbara H; Norfolk, Jennifer R; Harder, John D

    2009-01-01

    Progesterone receptor immunoreactivity (PRir) in brain areas involved in reproductive behavior in eutherian species was examined for the first time in a female marsupial, the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica, hereinafter, opossum). PRir in nuclei of neurons, measured as area covered by stained nuclei, was seen in the arcuate nucleus (Arc); anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPv); bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST); medial preoptic area (MPOA), and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), but not in control areas adjacent to the hypothalamus or cortex. Female opossums are induced into cytological, urogenital sinus (UGS), estrus by male pheromones and into behavioral estrus, i.e., receptivity, by pairing with a male, and both estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) are involved in induction of receptivity in intact and ovariectomized females. PRir in the AVPv, MPOA, and VMH was very low in females that had never been exposed to males or their scent marks, i.e., naïve anestrous (NVA) females, and either previous or current exposure to males or their scent marks was associated with elevated PRir. PRir was significantly higher in the AVPv and MPOA of anestrous females with previous but no current exposure to males and their scent marks, i.e., experienced anestrous (EXPA) females, than in NVA females, but PRir was significantly lower in the MPOA and VMH of EXPA females than in females that were behaviorally receptive and had recently copulated, i.e., behavioral receptive estrous (BRE) females. PRir was higher in the VMH of both UGS estrous (UGSE) and BRE females compared to that in EXPA animals, but PRir did not differ between UGSE and BRE females in any of the 3 brain areas examined, including the MPOA These results provide evidence that pheromonal induction of estrus and sexual receptivity in opossums is associated with elevation of PRir in the VMH and MPOA and that prior exposure to males or their pheromones, even in the absence of current male stimuli

  6. Divalent cations crosslink vimentin intermediate filament tail domains to regulate network mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Broedersz, Chase P; Rowat, Amy C; Wedig, Tatjana; Herrmann, Harald; Mackintosh, Frederick C; Weitz, David A

    2010-06-18

    Intermediate filament networks in the cytoplasm and nucleus are critical for the mechanical integrity of metazoan cells. However, the mechanism of crosslinking in these networks and the origins of their mechanical properties are not understood. Here, we study the elastic behavior of in vitro networks of the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Rheological experiments reveal that vimentin networks stiffen with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), showing that divalent cations act as crosslinkers. We quantitatively describe the elastic response of vimentin networks over five decades of applied stress using a theory that treats the divalent cations as crosslinkers: at low stress, the behavior is entropic in origin, and increasing stress pulls out thermal fluctuations from single filaments, giving rise to a nonlinear response; at high stress, enthalpic stretching of individual filaments significantly modifies the nonlinearity. We investigate the elastic properties of networks formed by a series of protein variants with stepwise tail truncations and find that the last 11 amino acids of the C-terminal tail domain mediate crosslinking by divalent ions. We determined the single-filament persistence length, l(P) approximately 0.5 mum, and Young's modulus, Y approximately 9 MPa; both are consistent with literature values. Our results provide insight into a crosslinking mechanism for vimentin networks and suggest that divalent ions may help regulate the cytoskeletal structure and mechanical properties of cells. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IgG1 cytoplasmic tail is essential for cell surface expression in Igβ down-regulated cells.

    PubMed

    Todo, Kagefumi; Koga, Orie; Nishikawa, Miwako; Hikida, Masaki

    2014-03-14

    It has been shown that cytoplasmic tail of the IgG1 B cell receptors (BCRs) are essential for the induction of T-dependent immune responses. Also it has been revealed that unique tyrosine residue in the cytoplasmic tail of IgG2a has the potential of being phosphorylated at tyrosine and that this phosphorylation modulates BCR signaling. However, it still remains unclear whether such phosphorylation of IgG cytoplasmic tail is involved in the regulation of BCR surface expression. In order to approach the issue, we established and analyzed the cell lines which express wild-type or mutated forms of IgG1 BCR. As the result, we found that IgG1 BCR expressed normally on the surface of A20 B cell line independent of the cytoplasmic tail. In contrast, IgG1 BCR whose cytoplasmic tyrosine was replaced with glutamic acid which mimics phosphorylated tyrosine, was expressed most efficiently on the surface of non-B lineage cells and Igβ-down-regulated B cell lines. These results suggest that tyrosine residue in IgG cytoplasmic tail is playing a essential role for the efficient expression of IgG BCR on the cell surface when BCR associated signaling molecules, including Igβ, are down-regulated.

  8. Endocrine regulation of male fertility by the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Oury, Franck; Sumara, Grzegorz; Sumara, Olga; Ferron, Mathieu; Chang, Haixin; Smith, Charles E.; Hermo, Louis; Suarez, Susan; Roth, Bryan L.; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Although the endocrine capacity of bone is widely recognized, interactions between bone and the reproductive system have until now focused on the gonads as a regulator of bone remodeling. We now show that in males, bone acts as a regulator of fertility. Using co-culture assays, we demonstrate that osteoblasts are able to induce testosterone production by the testes, while they fail to influence estrogen production by the ovaries. Analyses of cell-specific loss- and gain-of-function models reveal that the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin performs this endocrine function. By binding to a G-protein coupled receptor expressed in the Leydig cells of the testes, osteocalcin regulates in a CREB-dependent manner the expression of enzymes required for testosterone synthesis, promoting germ cell survival. This study expands the physiological repertoire of osteocalcin, and provides the first evidence that the skeleton is an endocrine regulator of reproduction. PMID:21333348

  9. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-02

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males.

  10. Firearms regulation and declining rates of male suicide in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Mathieu; Robitaille, Yvonne; Hamel, Denis; St-Laurent, Danielle

    2010-08-01

    To examine whether significant changes in method-specific male suicide rates occurred in the province of Quebec after stronger firearms regulations were introduced in Canada in 1991; to ascertain whether more stringent firearms regulations influence firearms and total suicide trends among men and to determine whether different results are obtained according to the statistical methods used. Descriptive analyses of time trends in method-specific suicide rates for men from 1981 to 2006 using Joinpoint regression models and pre-post firearms regulation analyses. Quebec (Canada). PATIENTS OR SUBJECTS: Men who have commited suicide aged 15-34, 35-64 and 65 years and over, based on the Quebec mortality database, 1981-2006. A national firearms control initiative enacted in 1991. The Joinpoint regression models suggest that firearm suicide rates declined towards the end of the 1990 s. Since 1996, the pace of decline was twice as great in men aged 15-34 years (annual percentage change (APC) -11.1%) compared with men aged 35-64 years (APC -5.6%). Total suicide rates also declined among men aged 15-34 and 35-64 years during this period. Pre-post firearms regulation Poisson regression analyses failed to detect the specific point in time when significant changes in the trend occurred. Male firearm suicide rates declined following the introduction of restrictive firearms regulations in Canada. Whether this represents a causal relationship requires further study.

  11. Sensory Integration Regulating Male Courtship Behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, Dimitrije; Boll, Werner; Noll, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The courtship behavior of Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model system to study how complex innate behaviors are controlled by the nervous system. To understand how the underlying neural network controls this behavior, it is not sufficient to unravel its architecture, but also crucial to decipher its logic. By systematic analysis of how variations in sensory inputs alter the courtship behavior of a naïve male in the single-choice courtship paradigm, we derive a model describing the logic of the network that integrates the various sensory stimuli and elicits this complex innate behavior. This approach and the model derived from it distinguish (i) between initiation and maintenance of courtship, (ii) between courtship in daylight and in the dark, where the male uses a scanning strategy to retrieve the decamping female, and (iii) between courtship towards receptive virgin females and mature males. The last distinction demonstrates that sexual orientation of the courting male, in the absence of discriminatory visual cues, depends on the integration of gustatory and behavioral feedback inputs, but not on olfactory signals from the courted animal. The model will complement studies on the connectivity and intrinsic properties of the neurons forming the circuitry that regulates male courtship behavior. PMID:19214231

  12. Transcriptional regulation of male-sterility in 7B-1 male-sterile tomato mutant

    PubMed Central

    Omidvar, Vahid; Mohorianu, Irina; Dalmay, Tamas; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Pucci, Anna; Mazzucato, Andrea; Večeřová, Vendula; Sedlářova, Michaela; Fellner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The 7B-1 tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv Rutgers) is a male-sterile mutant with enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress, which makes it a potential candidate for hybrid seed breeding and stress engineering. To underline the molecular mechanism regulating the male-sterility in 7B-1, transcriptomic profiles of the 7B-1 male-sterile and wild type (WT) anthers were studied using mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In total, 768 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, including 132 up-regulated and 636 down-regulated transcripts. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of DEGs suggested a general impact of the 7B-1 mutation on metabolic processes, such as proteolysis and carbohydrate catabolic process. Sixteen candidates with key roles in regulation of anther development were subjected to further analysis using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Cytological studies showed several defects associated with anther development in the 7B-1 mutant, including unsynchronized anther maturation, dysfunctional meiosis, arrested microspores, defect in callose degradation and abnormal tapetum development. TUNEL assay showed a defect in programmed cell death (PCD) of tapetal cells in 7B-1 anthers. The present study provides insights into the transcriptome of the 7B-1 mutant. We identified several genes with altered expression level in 7B-1 (including beta-1,3 glucanase, GA2oxs, cystatin, cysteine protease, pectinesterase, TA29, and actin) that could potentially regulate anther developmental processes, such as meiosis, tapetum development, and cell-wall formation/degradation. PMID:28178307

  13. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  14. Juvenile hormone regulates extreme mandible growth in male stag beetles.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Cornette, Richard; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Okada, Yasukazu; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Miura, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The morphological diversity of insects is one of the most striking phenomena in biology. Evolutionary modifications to the relative sizes of body parts, including the evolution of traits with exaggerated proportions, are responsible for a vast range of body forms. Remarkable examples of an insect trait with exaggerated proportions are the mandibular weapons of stag beetles. Male stag beetles possess extremely enlarged mandibles which they use in combat with rival males over females. As with other sexually selected traits, stag beetle mandibles vary widely in size among males, and this variable growth results from differential larval nutrition. However, the mechanisms responsible for coupling nutrition with growth of stag beetle mandibles (or indeed any insect structure) remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that during the development of male stag beetles (Cyclommatus metallifer), juvenile hormone (JH) titers are correlated with the extreme growth of an exaggerated weapon of sexual selection. We then investigate the putative role of JH in the development of the nutritionally-dependent, phenotypically plastic mandibles, by increasing hemolymph titers of JH with application of the JH analog fenoxycarb during larval and prepupal developmental periods. Increased JH signaling during the early prepupal period increased the proportional size of body parts, and this was especially pronounced in male mandibles, enhancing the exaggerated size of this trait. The direction of this response is consistent with the measured JH titers during this same period. Combined, our results support a role for JH in the nutrition-dependent regulation of extreme mandible growth in this species. In addition, they illuminate mechanisms underlying the evolution of trait proportion, the most salient feature of the evolutionary diversification of the insects.

  15. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  16. Variation in fecal testosterone levels, inter-male aggression, dominance rank and age during mating and post-mating periods in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Gould, L; Ziegler, T E

    2007-12-01

    In primate species exhibiting seasonal reproduction, patterns of testosterone excretion in adult males are variable: in some species, peaks correlate with female receptivity periods and heightened male-male aggression over access to estrous females, in others, neither heightened aggression nor marked elevations in testosterone have been noted. In this study, we examined mean fecal testosterone ( f T) levels and intermale aggression in wild adult male ring-tailed lemurs residing in three groups at Beza Mahafaly Reserve, Madagascar. Results obtained from mating and post-mating season 2003 were compared to test Wingfield et al. [1990. Am Nat 136:829-846] "challenge hypothesis", which predicts a strong positive relationship between male testosterone levels and male-male competition for access to receptive females during breeding season. f T levels and rates of intermale aggression were significantly higher during mating season compared to the post-mating period. Mean f T levels and aggression rates were also higher in the first half of the mating season compared with the second half. Number of males in a group affected rates of intermale agonism, but not mean f T levels. The highest-ranking males in two of the groups exhibited higher mean f T levels than did lower-ranking males, and young males exhibited lower f T levels compared to prime-aged and old males. In the post-mating period, mean male f T levels did not differ between groups, nor were there rank or age effects. Thus, although male testosterone levels rose in relation to mating and heightened male-male aggression, f T levels fell to baseline breeding levels shortly after the early mating period, and to baseline non-breeding levels immediately after mating season had ended, offsetting the high cost of maintaining both high testosterone and high levels of male-male aggression in the early breeding period. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Regulation of Male Fertility by the Opioid System

    PubMed Central

    Subirán, Nerea; Casis, Luis; Irazusta, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides are substances involved in cell communication. They are present in various organs and tissues of the male and female reproductive tract, suggesting that they may regulate some of the processes involved in reproductive function. In fact, the opioid system that operates as a multi-messenger system can participate in the regulation of reproductive physiology at multiple levels, for example, at the levels of the central nervous system, at the testes level and at sperm level. A better understanding of the implication of the opioid system in reproductive processes may contribute to clarifying the etiology of many cases of infertility and the effect of opiate abuse on fertility. Indeed, a novel biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility could be based upon components of the opioid system. The presence of the opioid system in sperm cells also represents a novel opportunity for reproductive management, for either enhancing the probability of fertilization or reducing it through the development of novel targeted contraceptives. PMID:21431247

  18. Impact of the Motor and Tail Domains of Class III Myosins on Regulating the Formation and Elongation of Actin Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Raval, Manmeet H; Quintero, Omar A; Weck, Meredith L; Unrath, William C; Gallagher, James W; Cui, Runjia; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2016-10-21

    Class III myosins (MYO3A and MYO3B) are proposed to function as transporters as well as length and ultrastructure regulators within stable actin-based protrusions such as stereocilia and calycal processes. MYO3A differs from MYO3B in that it contains an extended tail domain with an additional actin-binding motif. We examined how the properties of the motor and tail domains of human class III myosins impact their ability to enhance the formation and elongation of actin protrusions. Direct examination of the motor and enzymatic properties of human MYO3A and MYO3B revealed that MYO3A is a 2-fold faster motor with enhanced ATPase activity and actin affinity. A chimera in which the MYO3A tail was fused to the MYO3B motor demonstrated that motor activity correlates with formation and elongation of actin protrusions. We demonstrate that removal of individual exons (30-34) in the MYO3A tail does not prevent filopodia tip localization but abolishes the ability to enhance actin protrusion formation and elongation in COS7 cells. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that MYO3A slows filopodia dynamics and enhances filopodia lifetime in COS7 cells. We also demonstrate that MYO3A is more efficient than MYO3B at increasing formation and elongation of stable microvilli on the surface of cultured epithelial cells. We propose that the unique features of MYO3A, enhanced motor activity, and an extended tail with tail actin-binding motif, allow it to play an important role in stable actin protrusion length and ultrastructure maintenance.

  19. Expression of uncharacterized male germ cell-specific genes and discovery of novel sperm-tail proteins in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun Tae; Ham, Sera; Jeon, Suyeon; Kim, Youil; Oh, Seungmin; Cho, Chunghee

    2017-01-01

    The identification and characterization of germ cell-specific genes are essential if we hope to comprehensively understand the mechanisms of spermatogenesis and fertilization. Here, we searched the mouse UniGene databases and identified 13 novel genes as being putatively testis-specific or -predominant. Our in silico and in vitro analyses revealed that the expressions of these genes are testis- and germ cell-specific, and that they are regulated in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenesis. We generated antibodies against the proteins encoded by seven of the genes to facilitate their characterization in male germ cells. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that one of these proteins was expressed only in testicular germ cells, three were expressed in both testicular germ cells and testicular sperm, and the remaining three were expressed in sperm of the testicular stages and in mature sperm from the epididymis. Further analysis of the latter three proteins showed that they were all associated with cytoskeletal structures in the sperm flagellum. Among them, MORN5, which is predicted to contain three MORN motifs, is conserved between mouse and human sperm. In conclusion, we herein identify 13 authentic genes with male germ cell-specific expression, and provide comprehensive information about these genes and their encoded products. Our finding will facilitate future investigations into the functional roles of these novel genes in spermatogenesis and sperm functions.

  20. The C-terminal tail of tetraspanin proteins regulates their intracellular distribution in the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Coceres, V M; Alonso, A M; Nievas, Y R; Midlej, V; Frontera, L; Benchimol, M; Johnson, P J; de Miguel, N

    2015-08-01

    The parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, a prevalent sexually transmitted infection. Here, we report the cellular analysis of T.vaginalis tetraspanin family (TvTSPs). This family of membrane proteins has been implicated in cell adhesion, migration and proliferation in vertebrates. We found that the expression of several members of the family is up-regulated upon contact with vaginal ectocervical cells. We demonstrate that most TvTSPs are localized on the surface and intracellular vesicles and that the C-terminal intracellular tails of surface TvTSPs are necessary for proper localization. Analyses of full-length TvTSP8 and a mutant that lacks the C-terminal tail indicates that surface-localized TvTSP8 is involved in parasite aggregation, suggesting a role for this protein in parasite : parasite interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The polyanionic C-terminal tail of human Rad17 regulates interaction with the 9-1-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2017-09-02

    In the activation and maintenance of ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint, the interaction between the Rad17-RFC2-5 and 9-1-1 complexes is essential, however, the regulatory mechanism of the interaction is not known. Here we show that vertebrate Rad17 proteins contain a polyanionic 12-amino acid sequence in the C-terminal ends that is important for the 9-1-1 interaction. We demonstrate that the C-terminal tail contains a conserved sequence designated iVERGE that must be intact for the 9-1-1 interaction and contains potential posttranslational modification sites. Our data raise a possibility that the Rad17 C-terminal tail is a molecular switch that regulates the 9-1-1 interaction and the ATR pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytoplasmic tails of beta 1, beta 2, and beta 7 integrins differentially regulate LFA-1 function in K562 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lub, M; van Vliet, S J; Oomen, S P; Pieters, R A; Robinson, M; Figdor, C G; van Kooyk, Y

    1997-01-01

    The beta 2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) mediates activation-dependent adhesion of lymphocytes. To investigate whether lymphocyte-specific elements are essential for LFA-1 function, we expressed LFA-1 in the erythroleukemic cell line K562, which expresses only the integrin very late antigen 5. We observed that LFA-1-expressing K562 cannot bind to intercellular adhesion molecule 1-coated surfaces when stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), whereas the LFA-1-activating antibody KIM185 markedly enhanced adhesion. Because the endogenously expressed beta 1 integrin very late antigen 5 is readily activated by PMA, we investigated the role of the cytoplasmic domain of distinct beta subunits in regulating LFA-1 function. Transfection of chimeric LFA-1 receptors in K562 cells reveals that replacement of the beta 2 cytoplasmic tail with the beta 1 but not the beta 7 cytoplasmic tail completely restores PMA responsiveness of LFA-1, whereas a beta 2 cytoplasmic deletion mutant of LFA-1 is constitutively active. Both deletion of the beta 2 cytoplasmic tail or replacement by the beta 1 cytoplasmic tail alters the localization of LFA-1 into clusters, thereby regulating LFA-1 activation and LFA-1-mediated adhesion to intercellular adhesion molecule 1. These data demonstrate that distinct signaling routes activate beta 1 and beta 2 integrins through the beta-chain and hint at the involvement of lymphocyte-specific signal transduction elements in beta 2 and beta 7 integrin activation that are absent in the nonlymphocytic cell line K562. Images PMID:9247650

  3. Palmitoylation on the carboxyl terminus tail is required for the selective regulation of dopamine D2 versus D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Le, Hang Thi; Zhang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Mei; Choi, Bo-Gil; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and D3 receptor (D3R) possess highly conserved amino acid sequences but this study showed that D3R was more extensively palmitoylated than D2R. Based on this finding, the molecular basis of this selective palmitoylation of D3R was determined and the roles of palmitoylation in the regulation of D3R functions were investigated. D3R was palmitoylated on the cysteine residue on its carboxyl terminus tail, the last amino acid residue of D3R, and an exchange of the carboxyl terminus tail between D2R and D3R (D2R-D3C and D3R-D2C) resulted in the switching of the palmitoylation phenotype. When the consensus site for palmitoylation was mutated or the palmitoylation of D3R was inhibited by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), a palmitoylation blocker, cell-surface expression, PKC-mediated endocytosis, agonist affinity, and agonist-induced tolerance of D3R were all inhibited. However, these changes were not observed when D3R palmitoylation was inhibited by replacing its carboxyl tail with that of D2R (D3R-D2C) or when the palmitoylation of D2R-D3C was inhibited by treatment with 2BP. Overall, this study shows that D3R is palmitoylated more extensively than D2R even though the carboxyl terminus tails of D2R and D3R are highly homologous, and thus provides a new clue regarding the consensus sequence for palmitoylation. This study also shows that palmitoylation controls various functionalities of D3R only when the receptor is in the intact D3R configuration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions regulating the head-to-tail directed assembly of biological Janus rods

    DOE PAGES

    Greene, A. C.; Bachand, M.; Gomez, A.; ...

    2017-03-31

    We can generalize the directed, head-to-tail self-assembly of microtubule filaments in the context of Janus colloidal rods. Specifically, their assembly at the tens of micron-length scale involves a careful balance between long-range electrostatic repulsion and short-range attractive forces. We show that the addition of counterion salts increases the rate of directed assembly by screening the electrostatic forces and enhancing the effectiveness of short-range interactions at the microtubule ends.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Reveals the Role of mRNA Poly(A) Tail Regulation in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25816335

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A) tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Amyloid beta precursor protein regulates male sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ho; Bonthius, Paul J; Tsai, Houng-Wei; Bekiranov, Stefan; Rissman, Emilie F

    2010-07-28

    Sexual behavior is variable between individuals, ranging from celibacy to sexual addictions. Within normal populations of individual men, ranging from young to middle aged, testosterone levels do not correlate with libido. To study the genetic mechanisms that contribute to individual differences in male sexual behavior, we used hybrid B6D2F1 male mice, which are a cross between two common inbred strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J). Unlike most laboratory rodent species in which male sexual behavior is highly dependent upon gonadal steroids, sexual behavior in a large proportion of these hybrid male mice after castration is independent of gonadal steroid hormones and their receptors; thus, we have the ability to discover novel genes involved in this behavior. Gene expression arrays, validation of gene candidates, and transgenic mice that overexpress one of the genes of interest were used to reveal genes involved in maintenance of male sexual behavior. Several genes related to neuroprotection and neurodegeneration were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of males that continued to mate after castration. Male mice overexpressing the human form of one of these candidate genes, amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), displayed enhanced sexual behavior before castration and maintained sexual activity for a longer duration after castration compared with controls. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected relationship between APP and male sexual behavior. We speculate that declining APP during normal aging in males may contribute to the loss of sexual function.

  8. Acetylation mimics within individual core histone tail domains indicate distinct roles in regulating the stability of higher-order chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome arrays undergo salt-dependent self-association into large oligomers in a process thought to recapitulate essential aspects of higher-order tertiary chromatin structure formation. Lysine acetylation within the core histone tail domains inhibits self-association, an effect likely related to its role in facilitating transcription. As acetylation of specific tail domains may encode distinct functions, we investigated biochemical and self-association properties of model nucleosome arrays containing combinations of native and mutant core histones with lysine-to-glutamine substitutions to mimic acetylation. Acetylation mimics within the tail domains of H2B and H4 caused the largest inhibition of array self-association, while modification of the H3 tail uniquely affected the stability of DNA wrapping within individual nucleosomes. In addition, the effect of acetylation mimics on array self-association is inconsistent with a simple charge neutralization mechanism. For example, acetylation mimics within the H2A tail can have either a positive or negative effect on self-association, dependent upon the acetylation state of the other tails and nucleosomal repeat length. Finally, we demonstrate that glutamine substitutions and lysine acetylation within the H4 tail domain have identical effects on nucleosome array self-association. Our results indicate that acetylation of specific tail domains plays distinct roles in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  9. Conservation of fruitless' role as master regulator of male courtship behaviour from cockroaches to flies.

    PubMed

    Clynen, Elke; Ciudad, Laura; Bellés, Xavier; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors

    2011-05-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship behaviour is regulated by the fruitless gene. In D. melanogaster, fruitless encodes a set of putative transcription factors that are sex-specifically spliced. Male-specific variants are necessary and sufficient to elicit male courtship behaviour. Fruitless sequences have been reported in other insect species, but there are no data available on their functional role. In the present work, we cloned and sequenced fruitless in males of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, and we studied its expression in male brain and testes. B. germanica fruitless encodes a 350-amino acid protein with BTB and Zinc finger domains typical of fruitless sequences. Upon RNAi-mediated knockdown of fruitless in B. germanica, males no longer exhibit courtship behaviour, thus implying that fruitless is necessary for male sexual behaviour in our cockroach model. This suggests that the role of fruitless as master regulator of male sexual behaviour has been conserved along insect evolution, at least from cockroaches to flies.

  10. Preputial Obstruction and Urine-induced Cellulitis Due to Nonnutritive Suckling in a Male White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Fawn

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Timothy A; Reichard, Mason V

    2008-01-01

    A 73-d-old white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn was diagnosed at necropsy with a ventral abdominal cellulitis secondary to urine after preputial swelling, urethral obstruction and hemorrhage, and focal urethral rupture. During the acute antemortem disease phase, the urinary obstruction tentatively was attributed to potential urethral uroliths, but after euthanasia, extensive gross and microscopic examinations of the urogenital tract revealed no uroliths. This fawn had been copenned with another male fawn, both of which exhibited nonnutritive suckling of the penmate's genitalia before and after periodic milk replacer feedings. We attribute this uncommon presentation of urine-induced cellulitis to urethritis and urethral rupture secondary to repeated, nursing-induced, physical trauma to the prepuce. We examine the husbandry implications of this disease with regard to management of deer fawns in a laboratory setting. PMID:18702453

  11. Isolation and genotypic characterization of Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes recovered from active cranial abscess infections of male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bradley S; Belser, Emily H; Keeler, Shamus P; Yabsley, Michael J; Miller, Karl V

    2015-03-01

    Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes is a causative agent of suppurative infections in domestic and wild animals. In some populations of captive or free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), cranial abscess disease is an important source of mortality in adult males. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood, T. pyogenes has been isolated from active infections with other opportunistic bacteria. In this study, bacteria associated with cranial abscess infections were identified, the prevalence of T. pyogenes associated with these infections was determined, and the presence of known virulence determinants in T. pyogenes isolates was ascertained. Using routine biochemical techniques seven bacterial species were identified from 65 samples taken from active cranial abscess infections of 65 male white-tailed deer. Trueperellapyogenes was recovered from 46 samples; in 32 samples it was the only bacterium species detected. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 26 samples. From these samples, the presence of known and putative virulence genes of T. pyogenes--plo, nanH, nanP, cbpA, fimA, fimC, fimE, and fimG--was examined by conventional polymerase chain reaction. All T. pyogenes isolates were positive for the pyolysin genes plo, nanP, and fimA. Furthermore, nanH, fimA, fimC, and fimE were detected in over 70% of isolates. Of the isolates tested, 48% had genotypes containing all virulence genes except cbpA. The suggestive virulence potential of all isolates, coupled with the large number of pure cultures obtained, implies that T. pyogenes is a causative agent of cranial abscess disease.

  12. A Novel Trafficking Signal within the HLA-C Cytoplasmic Tail Allows Regulated Expression Upon Differentiation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Malinda R.; Williams, Maya; Kulpa, Deanna A.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Yaffee, Anna Q.; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2008-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I) present peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In addition, HLA-C allotypes are recognized by killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) found on natural killer (NK) cells and effector CTLs. Compared to other classical MHC-I allotypes, HLA-C has low cell surface expression and an altered intracellular trafficking pattern. We present evidence that this results from effects of both the extracellular domain and the cytoplasmic tail. Notably, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic tail contains a dihydrophobic (LI) internalization and lysosomal targeting signal that is partially attenuated by an aspartic acid residue (DXSLI). In addition, we provide evidence that this signal is specifically inhibited by hypophosphorylation of the adjacent serine residue upon macrophage differentiation and that this allows high HLA-C expression in this cell type. We propose that tightly regulated HLA-C surface expression facilitates immune surveillance and allows HLA-C to serve a specialized role in macrophages. PMID:18523244

  13. Unique Aspects of Transcription Regulation in Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    White-Cooper, Helen; Davidson, Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex and ordered differentiation process in which the spermatogonial stem cell population gives rise to primary spermatocytes that undergo two successive meiotic divisions followed by a major biochemical and structural reorganization of the haploid cells to generate mature elongate spermatids. The transcriptional regulatory programs that orchestrate this process have been intensively studied in model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and mouse. Genetic and biochemical approaches have identified the factors involved and revealed mechanisms of action that are unique to male germ cells. In a well-studied example, cofactors and pathways distinct from those used in somatic tissues mediate the action of CREM in male germ cells. But perhaps the most striking feature concerns the paralogs of somatically expressed transcription factors and of components of the general transcription machinery that act in distinct regulatory mechanisms in both Drosophila and murine spermatogenesis. PMID:21555408

  14. Regulation of the malic enzyme gene malE by the transcriptional regulator MalR in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jens P; Polen, Tino; Youn, Jung-Won; Emer, Denise; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a Gram-positive nonpathogenic bacterium that is used for the biotechnological production of amino acids. Here, we investigated the transcriptional control of the malE gene encoding malic enzyme (MalE) in C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, which is known to involve the nitrogen regulator AmtR. Gel shift experiments using purified regulators RamA and RamB revealed binding of these regulators to the malE promoter. In DNA-affinity purification experiments a hitherto uncharacterized transcriptional regulator belonging to the MarR family was found to bind to malE promoter DNA and was designated as MalR. C. glutamicum cells overexpressing malR showed reduced MalE activities in LB medium or in minimal media with acetate, glucose, pyruvate or citrate. Deletion of malR positively affected MalE activities during growth in LB medium and minimal media with pyruvate, glucose or the TCA cycle dicarboxylates l-malate, succinate and fumarate. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed elevated malE promoter activity in the malR deletion mutant during growth in pyruvate minimal medium suggesting that MalR acts as a repressor of malE. Purified MalR bound malE promoter DNA in gel shift experiments. Two MalR binding sites were identified in the malE promoter by mutational analysis. Thus, MalR contributes to the complex transcriptional control of malE which also involves RamA, RamB and AmtR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brazilian free-tailed bats as insect pest regulators in transgenic and conventional cotton crops.

    PubMed

    Federico, Paula; Hallam, Thomas G; McCracken, Gary F; Purucker, S Thomas; Grant, William E; Correa-Sandoval, A Nelly; Westbrook, John K; Medellin, Rodrigo A; Cleveland, Cutler J; Sansone, Chris G; López, Juan D; Betke, Margrit; Moreno-Valdez, Arnulfo; Kunz, Thomas H

    2008-06-01

    During the past 12000 years agricultural systems have transitioned from natural habitats to conventional agricultural regions and recently to large areas of genetically engineered (GE) croplands. This GE revolution occurred for cotton in a span of slightly more than a decade during which a switch occurred in major cotton production areas from growing 100% conventional cotton to an environment in which 95% transgenics are grown. Ecological interactions between GE targeted insects and other insectivorous insects have been investigated. However, the relationships between ecological functions (such as herbivory and ecosystem transport) and agronomic benefits of avian or mammalian insectivores in the transgenic environment generally remain unclear, although the importance of some agricultural pest management services provided by insectivorous species such as the Brazilian free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis, have been recognized. We developed a dynamic model to predict regional-scale ecological functions in agricultural food webs by using the indicators of insect pest herbivory measured by cotton boll damage and insect emigration from cotton. In the south-central Texas Winter Garden agricultural region we find that the process of insectivory by bats has a considerable impact on both the ecology and valuation of harvest in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic and nontransgenic cotton crops. Predation on agricultural pests by insectivorous bats may enhance the economic value of agricultural systems by reducing the frequency of required spraying and delaying the ultimate need for new pesticides. In the Winter Garden region, the presence of large numbers of insectivorous bats yields a regional summer dispersion of adult pest insects from Bt cotton that is considerably reduced from the moth emigration when bats are absent in either transgenic or non-transgenic crops. This regional decrease of pest numbers impacts insect herbivory on a transcontinental scale. With a few

  16. The tail wagging the dog--regulation of lipid metabolism by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Peiffer, Carsten

    2013-11-01

    Upon their discovery almost 40 years ago, isoforms of the lipid-activated protein kinase C (PKC) family were initially regarded only as downstream effectors of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol, undergoing activation upon phospholipid hydrolysis in response to acute stimuli. Subsequently, several isoforms were found to be associated with the inhibitory effects of lipid over-supply on glucose homeostasis, especially the negative cross-talk with insulin signal transduction, observed upon accumulation of diacylglycerol in insulin target tissues. The PKC family has therefore attracted much attention in diabetes and obesity research, because intracellular lipid accumulation is strongly correlated with defective insulin action and the development of type 2 diabetes. Causal roles for various isoforms in the generation of insulin resistance have more recently been confirmed using PKC-deficient mice. However, during characterization of these animals, it became increasingly evident that the enzymes play key roles in the modulation of lipid metabolism itself, and may control the supply of lipids between tissues such as adipose and liver. Molecular studies have also demonstrated roles for PKC isoforms in several aspects of lipid metabolism, such as adipocyte differentiation and hepatic lipogenesis. While the precise mechanisms involved, especially the identities of protein substrates, are still unclear, the emerging picture suggests that the currently held view of the contribution of PKC isoforms to metabolism is an over-simplification. Although PKCs may inhibit insulin signal transduction, these enzymes are not merely downstream effectors of lipid accumulation, but in fact control the fate of fatty acids, thus the tail wags the dog. © 2013 Commonwealth of Australia.

  17. Regulation of Anopheles gambiae male accessory gland genes influences postmating response in female.

    PubMed

    Dottorini, Tania; Persampieri, Tania; Palladino, Pietro; Baker, Dean A; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Senin, Nicola; Crisanti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the accessory gland proteins (Acps) secreted from the male accessory glands (MAGs) and transferred along with sperm into the female reproductive tract have been implicated in triggering postmating behavioral changes, including refractoriness to subsequent mating and propensity to egg laying. Recently, Acps have been found also in Anopheles, suggesting similar functions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation of Acps and their functional role in modulating Anopheles postmating behavior may lead to the identification of novel vector control strategies to reduce mosquito populations. We identified heat-shock factor (HSF) binding sites within the Acp promoters of male Anopheles gambiae and discovered three distinct Hsf isoforms; one being significantly up-regulated in the MAGs after mating. Through genome-wide transcription analysis of Hsf-silenced males, we observed significant down-regulation in 50% of the Acp genes if compared to control males treated with a construct directed against an unrelated bacterial sequence. Treated males retained normal life span and reproductive behavior compared to control males. However, mated wild-type females showed a ∼46% reduction of egg deposition rate and a ∼23% reduction of hatching rate (∼58% combined reduction of progeny). Our results highlight an unsuspected role of HSF in regulating Acp transcription in A. gambiae and provide evidence that Acp down-regulation in males leads a significant reduction of progeny, thus opening new avenues toward the development of novel vector control strategies.

  18. The photomorphogenesis regulator DET1 binds the amino-terminal tail of histone H2B in a nucleosome context.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, Giovanna; Formiggini, Fabio; Laflamme, Pierre; Malakhov, Mikhail; Bowler, Chris

    2002-09-03

    Light provides a major source of information from the environment during plant growth and development. Recent results suggest that the key events controlling light-regulated gene expression in plants are translocation of the phytochrome photoreceptors into the nucleus, followed by their binding to transcription factors such as PIF3. Coupled with this, the degradation of positively acting intermediates such as the transcription factor HY5 by COP1 and the COP9 signalosome appears to be an important process whereby photomorphogenesis is repressed in darkness (e.g., ). Genetic analyses in Arabidopsis and tomato have revealed that the nuclear protein DET1 also plays a key role in the repression of photomorphogenesis. However, the function of this protein has remained a mystery. In a series of in vitro experiments, we provide persuasive evidence that DET1 binds to nonacetylated amino-terminal tails of the core histone H2B in the context of the nucleosome. Furthermore, we have utilized FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) imaging with GFP variants to demonstrate this interaction within the nucleus of living plant cells. Given the dramatic photomorphogenic phenotypes of det1 mutants, we propose that chromatin remodeling plays a heretofore unsuspected role in regulating gene expression during photomorphogenesis.

  19. Corticosterone regulates multiple colour traits in Lacerta [Zootoca] vivipara males.

    PubMed

    San-Jose, L M; Fitze, P S

    2013-12-01

    Ornamental colours usually evolve as honest signals of quality, which is supported by the fact that they frequently depend on individual condition. It has generally been suggested that some, but not all types of ornamental colours are condition dependent, indicating that different evolutionary mechanisms underlie the evolution of multiple types of ornamental colours even when these are exhibited by the same species. Stress hormones, which negatively affect condition, have been shown to affect colour traits based on different pigments and structures, suggesting that they mediate condition dependence of multiple ornament types both among and within individuals. However, studies investigating effects of stress hormones on different ornament types within individuals are lacking, and thus, evidence for this hypothesis is scant. Here, we investigated whether corticosterone mediates condition dependence of multiple ornaments by manipulating corticosterone levels and body condition (via food availability) using a two-factorial design and by assessing their effect on multiple colour traits in male common lizards. Corticosterone negatively affected ventral melanin- and carotenoid-based coloration, whereas food availability did not affect coloration, despite its significant effect on body condition. The corticosterone effect on melanin- and carotenoid-based coloration demonstrates the condition dependence of both ornaments. Moreover, corticosterone affected ventral coloration and had no effect on the nonsexually selected dorsal coloration, showing specific effects of corticosterone on ornamental ventral colours. This suggests that corticosterone simultaneously mediates condition dependence of multiple colour traits and that it therefore accounts for covariation among them, which may influence their evolution via correlational selection. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Molecular regulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-gonads axis in males.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia-Min; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2014-11-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG) plays vital roles in reproduction and steroid hormone production in both sexes. The focus of this review is upon gene structures, receptor structures and the signaling pathways of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The hormones' functions in reproduction as well as consequences resulting from mutations are also summarized. Specific characteristics of hormones such as the pulsatile secretions of GnRH are also covered. The different regulators of the HPG axis are introduced including kisspeptin, activin, inhibin, follistatin, androgens and estrogen. This review includes not only their basic information, but also their unique function in the HPG axis. Here we view the HPG axis as a whole, so relations between ligands and receptors are well described crossing different levels of the HPG axis. Hormone interactions and transformations are also considered. The major information of this article is depicted in three figures summarizing the current discoveries on the HPG axis. This article systematically introduces the basic knowledge of the HPG axis and provides information of the current advances relating to reproductive hormones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 is regulated by latch-like properties of N and C terminal tails.

    PubMed

    Silva, Leslie P; Vanzile, Michael; Bavari, Sina; Aman, J M Javad; Schriemer, David C

    2012-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 coordinates numerous functions in the viral life cycle of the Ebola virus. These range from the regulation of viral transcription to morphogenesis, packaging and budding of mature virions. Similar to the matrix proteins of other nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA viruses, VP40 proceeds through intermediate states of assembly (e.g. octamers) but it remains unclear how these intermediates are coordinated with the various stages of the life cycle. In this study, we investigate the molecular basis of synchronization as governed by VP40. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to follow induced structural and conformational changes in VP40. Together with computational modeling, we demonstrate that both extreme N and C terminal tail regions stabilize the monomeric state through a direct association. The tails appear to function as a latch, released upon a specific molecular trigger such as RNA ligation. We propose that triggered release of the tails permits the coordination of late-stage events in the viral life cycle, at the inner membrane of the host cell. Specifically, N-tail release exposes the L-domain motifs PTAP/PPEY to the transport and budding complexes, whereas triggered C-tail release could improve association with the site of budding.

  2. Analysis of the Role of the C-Terminal Tail in the Regulation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Erika; Das, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Collier, Timothy S.; Cantor, Aaron; Huang, Yongjian; Wong, Kathryn; Mirza, Amar; Barros, Tiago; Grob, Patricia; Jura, Natalia; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The ∼230-residue C-terminal tail of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is phosphorylated upon activation. We examined whether this phosphorylation is affected by deletions within the tail and whether the two tails in the asymmetric active EGFR dimer are phosphorylated differently. We monitored autophosphorylation in cells using flow cytometry and found that the first ∼80 residues of the tail are inhibitory, as demonstrated previously. The entire ∼80-residue span is important for autoinhibition and needs to be released from both kinases that form the dimer. These results are interpreted in terms of crystal structures of the inactive kinase domain, including two new ones presented here. Deletions in the remaining portion of the tail do not affect autophosphorylation, except for a six-residue segment spanning Tyr 1086 that is critical for activation loop phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the two tails in the dimer is asymmetric, with the activator tail being phosphorylated somewhat more strongly. Unexpectedly, we found that reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of EGFR in vesicles leads to a peculiar phenomenon in which kinase domains appear to be trapped between stacks of lipid bilayers. This artifactual trapping of kinases between membranes enhances an intrinsic functional asymmetry in the two tails in a dimer. PMID:26124280

  3. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Martins Peçanha, Flavia Letícia; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas

    2017-07-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK) is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 µg/g, i.p. during 21 days) mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10), gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10) and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10) muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 µg/g, i.p.) did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  4. Involvement of tyrosine residues located in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2-adrenergic receptor in agonist-induced down-regulation of the receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Valiquette, M; Bonin, H; Hnatowich, M; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Bouvier, M

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure of various cell types to adrenergic agonists leads to a decrease in cell surface beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2AR) number. Sequestration of the receptor away from the cell surface as well as a down-regulation of the total number of cellular receptors are believed to contribute to this agonist-mediated regulation of receptor number. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not well characterized. Recently, tyrosine residues located in the cytoplasmic tails of several membrane receptors, such as the low density lipoprotein and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, have been suggested as playing an important role in the agonist-induced internalization of these receptors. Accordingly, we assessed the potential role of two tyrosine residues in the carboxyl tail of the human beta 2AR in agonist-induced sequestration and down-regulation of the receptor. Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 of the human beta 2AR were replaced with alanine residues by site-directed mutagenesis and both wild-type and mutant beta 2AR were stably expressed in transformed Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mutation dramatically decreased the ability of the beta 2AR to undergo isoproterenol-induced down-regulation. However, the substitution of Tyr-350 and Tyr-354 did not affect agonist-induced sequestration of the receptor. These results suggest that tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of human beta 2AR are crucial determinants involved in its down-regulation. PMID:2164220

  5. Interactions of human Myosin Va isoforms, endogenously expressed in human melanocytes, are tightly regulated by the tail domain.

    PubMed

    Westbroek, Wendy; Lambert, Jo; Bahadoran, Philippe; Busca, Roser; Herteleer, Marie Chantal; Smit, Nico; Mommaas, Mieke; Ballotti, Robert; Naeyaert, Jean Marie

    2003-03-01

    Primary human epidermal melanocytes express six endogenous isoforms of the human actin-associated myosin Va motor protein, involved in organelle transport. As isoforms containing exon F are most abundant in melanocytes, we hypothesized that these isoforms probably have a melanocyte-specific function. To uncover the biologic role of the six isoforms we introduced enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-myosin Va tail constructs in human melanocytes. We found that the medial tail, undergoing alternative splicing, has to be expressed in combination with the globular tail in order to obtain clear colocalization with organelles. Our data show that isoforms lacking exon F but containing exon D are associated with vesicles near the Golgi area. Myosin Va isoforms containing exon F are able to colocalize with and influence melanosome distribution by indirect interaction with rab27a and direct interaction with melanophilin. These results indicate that the myosin Va medial tail domain provides the globular tail domain with organelle-interacting specificity.

  6. Expression Profiling Reveals Developmentally Regulated lncRNA Repertoire in the Mouse Male Germline1

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Wu, Jingwen; Schuster, Andrew S.; Hennig, Grant W.; Yan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In mammals, the transcriptome of large noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is believed to be greater than that of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Some lncRNAs, especially large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), participate in epigenetic regulation by binding chromatin-modifying protein complexes and regulating protein-coding gene expression. Given that epigenetic regulation plays a critical role in male germline development, we embarked on expression profiling of both lncRNAs and mRNAs during male germline reprogramming and postnatal development using microarray analyses. We identified thousands of lncRNAs and hundreds of lincRNAs that are either up- or downregulated at six critical time points during male germ cell development. In addition, highly regulated lncRNAs were correlated with nearby (<30 kb) mRNA gene clusters, which were also significantly up- or downregulated. Large ncRNAs can be localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear lncRNAs mostly associated with key components of the chromatin-remodeling protein complexes. Our data indicate that expression of lncRNAs is dynamically regulated during male germline development and that lncRNAs may function to regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels via genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24048575

  7. Myosin XIK is a major player in cytoplasm dynamics and is regulated by two amino acids in its tail

    PubMed Central

    Avisar, Dror; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Belausov, Eduard; Sadot, Einat

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been found that among the 17 Arabidopsis myosins, six (XIC, XIE, XIK, XI-I, MYA1, and MYA2) have a major role in the motility of Golgi bodies and mitochondria in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum. Here, the same dominant negative tail fragments were also found to arrest the movement of Gogi bodies when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis plants. However, when a Golgi marker was transiently expressed in plants knocked out in these myosins, its movement was dramatically inhibited only in the xik mutant. In addition, a tail fragment of myosin XIK could inhibit the movement of several post-Golgi organelles, such as the trans-Golgi network, pre-vacuolar compartment, and endosomes, as well as total cytoplasmic streaming, suggesting that myosin XIK is a major player in cytoplasm kinetics. However, no co-localization of myosin tails with the arrested organelles was observed. Several deletion truncations of the myosin XIK tail were generated to corroborate function with localization. All deletion mutants possessing an inhibitory effect on organelle movement exhibited a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. Point mutations in the tail of myosin XIK revealed that Arg1368 and Arg1443 are essential for its activity. These residues correspond to Lys1706 and Lys1779 from mouse myosin Va, which mediate the inhibitory head–tail interaction in this myosin. Therefore, such an interaction might underlie the dominant negative effect of truncated plant myosin tails and explain the mislocalization with target organelles. PMID:21914656

  8. Tribolium castaneum Transformer-2 regulates sex determination and development in both males and females

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Tribolium castaneum Transformer (TcTra) is essential for female sex determination and maintenance through the regulation of sex-specific splicing of doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA. In females, TcTra also regulates the sex-specific splicing of its own pre-mRNA to ensure continuous production of functional Tra protein. Transformer protein is absent in males and hence dsx pre-mRNA is spliced in a default mode. The mechanisms by which males inhibit the production of functional Tra protein are not known. Here, we report on functional characterization of transformer-2 (tra-2) gene (an ortholog of Drosophila transformer-2) in T. castaneum. RNA interference-mediated knockdown in the expression of gene coding for tra-2 in female pupae or adults resulted in the production of male-specific isoform of dsx and both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 is essential for the female-specific splicing of tra and dsx pre-mRNAs. Interestingly, knockdown of tra-2 in males did not affect the splicing of dsx but resulted in the production of both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 suppresses female-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA in males. This dual regulation of sex-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA ensures a tight regulation of sex determination and maintenance. These data suggest a critical role for Tra-2 in suppression of female sex determination cascade in males. In addition, RNAi studies showed that Tra-2 is also required for successful embryonic and larval development in both sexes. PMID:24056158

  9. Tribolium castaneum Transformer-2 regulates sex determination and development in both males and females.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2013-12-01

    Tribolium castaneum Transformer (TcTra) is essential for female sex determination and maintenance through the regulation of sex-specific splicing of doublesex (dsx) pre-mRNA. In females, TcTra also regulates the sex-specific splicing of its own pre-mRNA to ensure continuous production of functional Tra protein. Transformer protein is absent in males and hence dsx pre-mRNA is spliced in a default mode. The mechanisms by which males inhibit the production of functional Tra protein are not known. Here, we report on functional characterization of transformer-2 (tra-2) gene (an ortholog of Drosophila transformer-2) in T. castaneum. RNA interference-mediated knockdown in the expression of gene coding for tra-2 in female pupae or adults resulted in the production of male-specific isoform of dsx and both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 is essential for the female-specific splicing of tra and dsx pre-mRNAs. Interestingly, knockdown of tra-2 in males did not affect the splicing of dsx but resulted in the production of both female and male isoforms of tra suggesting that Tra-2 suppresses female-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA in males. This dual regulation of sex-specific splicing of tra pre-mRNA ensures a tight regulation of sex determination and maintenance. These data suggest a critical role for Tra-2 in suppression of female sex determination cascade in males. In addition, RNAi studies showed that Tra-2 is also required for successful embryonic and larval development in both sexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid male-specific regulatory divergence and down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila species hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids.

  11. Rapid Male-Specific Regulatory Divergence and Down Regulation of Spermatogenesis Genes in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids. PMID:23593487

  12. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of the RHOX homeobox gene cluster and its association with human male infertility.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Marcy E; Bleiziffer, Andreas; Tüttelmann, Frank; Gromoll, Jörg; Wilkinson, Miles F

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked RHOX cluster encodes a set of homeobox genes that are selectively expressed in the reproductive tract. Members of the RHOX cluster regulate target genes important for spermatogenesis promote male fertility in mice. Studies show that demethylating agents strongly upregulate the expression of mouse Rhox genes, suggesting that they are regulated by DNA methylation. However, whether this extends to human RHOX genes, whether DNA methylation directly regulates RHOX gene transcription and how this relates to human male infertility are unknown. To address these issues, we first defined the promoter regions of human RHOX genes and performed gain- and loss-of-function experiments to determine whether human RHOX gene transcription is regulated by DNA methylation. Our results indicated that DNA methylation is necessary and sufficient to silence human RHOX gene expression. To determine whether RHOX cluster methylation associates with male infertility, we evaluated the methylation status of RHOX genes in sperm from a large cohort of infertility patients. Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between RHOX gene cluster hypermethylation and three independent types of semen abnormalities. Hypermethylation was restricted specifically to the RHOX cluster; we did not observe it in genes immediately adjacent to it on the X chromosome. Our results strongly suggest that human RHOX homeobox genes are under an epigenetic control mechanism that is aberrantly regulated in infertility patients. We propose that hypermethylation of the RHOX gene cluster serves as a marker for idiopathic infertility and that it is a candidate to exert a causal role in male infertility.

  14. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone regulates diurnal changes in sexual behavior of male quail.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuki; Haraguchi, Shogo; Nagino, Koki; Ishikawa, Kei; Fukahori, Yoko; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    In the Japanese quail, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, a previously undescribed avian neurosteroid, is actively produced in the brain. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone acts as a novel neuronal activator to stimulate locomotor activity of quail. Therefore, in this study, we determined whether 7α-hydroxypregnenolone changes the expression of sexual behavior in Japanese quail. We first measured diurnal changes in sexual behavior of male quail exposed to a long-day photoperiod. We found that sexual behavior of male quail was high in the morning when endogenous 7α-hydroxypregnenolone level is high. Subsequently, we centrally administered 7α-hydroxypregnenolone in the evening when endogenous 7α-hydroxypregnenolone level is low. In the 30 min after intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone dose dependently increased the frequency of sexual behavior of male quail. However, 7β-hydroxypregnenolone, a stereoisomer of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, did not effect on the frequency of sexual behavior of male quail. In addition, to confirm the action of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone on sexual behavior, male birds received an ICV injection of ketoconazole, an inhibitor of cytochrome P450s, and behavioral experiments were performed in the morning. Ketoconazole significantly decreased the frequency of sexual behavior of male quail, whereas administration of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone to ketoconazole-treated males increased the frequency of their sexual behavior. These results indicate that 7α-hydroxypregnenolone regulates diurnal changes in sexual behavior of male quail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Peptide hormones regulate the physiological functions of reproductive organs in Tenebrio molitor males.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Paweł; Urbański, Arkadiusz; Kudlewska, Milena; Szymczak, Monika; Rosiński, Grzegorz

    2016-06-25

    In insects, the majority of studies have been conducted on the hormonal regulation of female reproduction. Thus far, little is known about the regulation of male reproductive physiology, especially by peptide hormones. We report here, for the first time in insects, the effects of three peptides, Neb-colloostatin (SIVPLGLPVPIGPIVVGPR), Neb-TMOF (NPTNLH) and Lepde-NPF-I (ARGPQLRLRFa), on various aspects of reproduction in male Tenebrio molitor beetles. All three tested peptides increased the soluble protein concentration in the testes and the dry mass of the beetle's testes. They also significantly changed the protein profiles of the testes. Injection of these peptides also significantly changed the number of sperm cells in the testes. However, the observed effects were age specific. The most prominent changes were observed in 4-day-old males. Neb-colloostatin and Neb-TMOF decreased the number of sperm cells, whereas Lepde-NPF-I increased the number of spermatocytes. Moreover, in vitro experiments revealed that Neb-TMOF and Lepde-NPF-I increased the contractility of the ejaculatory duct of T. molitor males. The results obtained suggest that different reproductive processes in males might be regulated by complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Null Mice Exhibit Female and Male Differences In Regulation of Vascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Luca; Canestraro, Martina; Lee, Craig R.; Cao, Jian; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2015-01-01

    Increased CYP epoxygenase activity and consequently up regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels provides protection against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Conversion of arachidonic acid epoxides to diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) diminishes the beneficial cardiovascular properties of these epoxyeicosanoids. We therefore examined the possible biochemical consequences of sEH deletion on vascular responses in male and female mice. Through the use of the sEH KO mouse, we provide evidence of differences in the compensatory response in the balance between nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), EETs and the vasoconstrictor 20-HETE in male and female KO mice. Serum levels of adiponectin, TNFα, IL-1b and MCP1 and protein expression in vascular tissue of p-AMPK, p-AKT and p-eNOS were measured. Deletion of sEH caused a significant (p<0,05) decrease in body weight, and an increase in adiponectin, pAMPK and pAKT levels in female KO mice compared to male KO mice. Gene deletion resulted in a higher production of renal EETs in female KO compared to male KO mice and, concomitantly, we observed an increase in renal 20-HETEs levels and superoxide anion production only in male KO mice. sEH deletion increased p-AKT and p-eNOS protein expression but decreased p-AMPK levels in female KO mice. Increased levels of p-eNOS at Thr-495 were observed only in KO male mice. While p-eNOS at 1177 were not significantly different between male and female. Nitric oxide production was unaltered in male KO mice. These results provide evidence of gender differences in the preservation of vascular homeostasis in response to sEH deletion which involves regulation of phosphorylation of eNOS at the 495 site. PMID:25908301

  17. Three TF Co-expression Modules Regulate Pressure-Overload Cardiac Hypertrophy in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Ming; Ling, Li; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Yu-Wang; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Chang

    2017-08-08

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, a dynamic remodeling process, is a major risk factor for heart failure. Although a number of key regulators and related genes have been identified, how the transcription factors (TFs) dynamically regulate the associated genes and control the morphological and electrophysiological changes during the hypertrophic process are still largely unknown. In this study, we obtained the time-course transcriptomes at five time points in four weeks from male murine hearts subjected to transverse aorta banding surgery. From a series of computational analyses, we identified three major co-expression modules of TF genes that may regulate the gene expression changes during the development of cardiac hypertrophy in mice. After pressure overload, the TF genes in Module 1 were up-regulated before the occurrence of significant morphological changes and one week later were down-regulated gradually, while those in Modules 2 and 3 took over the regulation as the heart size increased. Our analyses revealed that the TF genes up-regulated at the early stages likely initiated the cascading regulation and most of the well-known cardiac miRNAs were up-regulated at later stages for suppression. In addition, the constructed time-dependent regulatory network reveals some TFs including Egr2 as new candidate key regulators of cardiovascular-associated (CV) genes.

  18. The PSI–U1 snRNP interaction regulates male mating behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingqing; Taliaferro, J. Matthew; Klibaite, Ugne; Hilgers, Valérie; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Rio, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is a critical regulatory mechanism that operates extensively in the nervous system to produce diverse protein isoforms. Fruitless AS isoforms have been shown to influence male courtship behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Using genome-wide approaches and quantitative behavioral assays, we show that the P-element somatic inhibitor (PSI) and its interaction with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP) control male courtship behavior. PSI mutants lacking the U1 snRNP-interacting domain (PSIΔAB mutant) exhibit extended but futile mating attempts. The PSIΔAB mutant results in significant changes in the AS patterns of ∼1,200 genes in the Drosophila brain, many of which have been implicated in the regulation of male courtship behavior. PSI directly regulates the AS of at least one-third of these transcripts, suggesting that PSI–U1 snRNP interactions coordinate the behavioral network underlying courtship behavior. Importantly, one of these direct targets is fruitless, the master regulator of courtship. Thus, PSI imposes a specific mode of regulatory control within the neuronal circuit controlling courtship, even though it is broadly expressed in the fly nervous system. This study reinforces the importance of AS in the control of gene activity in neurons and integrated neuronal circuits, and provides a surprising link between a pleiotropic pre-mRNA splicing pathway and the precise control of successful male mating behavior. PMID:27114556

  19. Translational regulation of human beta interferon mRNA: association of the 3' AU-rich sequence with the poly(A) tail reduces translation efficiency in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Grafi, G; Sela, I; Galili, G

    1993-01-01

    The 3' AU-rich region of human beta-1 interferon (hu-IFN beta) mRNA was found to act as a translational inhibitory element. The translational regulation of this 3' AU-rich sequence and the effect of its association with the poly(A) tail were studied in cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate. A poly(A)-rich hu-IFN beta mRNA (110 A residues) served as an inefficient template for protein synthesis. However, translational efficiency was considerably improved when the poly(A) tract was shortened (11 A residues) or when the 3' AU-rich sequence was deleted, indicating that interaction between these two regions was responsible for the reduced translation of the poly(A)-rich hu-IFN beta mRNA. Differences in translational efficiency of the various hu-IFN beta mRNAs correlated well with their polysomal distribution. The poly(A)-rich hu-IFN beta mRNA failed to form large polysomes, while its counterpart bearing a short poly(A) tail was recruited more efficiently into large polysomes. The AU-rich sequence-binding activity was reduced when the RNA probe contained both the 3' AU-rich sequence and long poly(A) tail, supporting a physical association between these two regions. Further evidence for this interaction was achieved by RNase H protection assay. We suggest that the 3' AU-rich sequence may regulate the translation of hu-IFN beta mRNA by interacting with the poly(A) tail. Images PMID:7684500

  20. Male sex interspecies divergence and down regulation of expression of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila sterile hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Vignesh; Civetta, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Male sex genes have shown a pattern of rapid interspecies divergence at both the coding and gene expression level. A common outcome from crosses between closely-related species is hybrid male sterility. Phenotypic and genetic studies in Drosophila sterile hybrid males have shown that spermatogenesis arrest is postmeiotic with few exceptions, and that most misregulated genes are involved in late stages of spermatogenesis. Comparative studies of gene regulation in sterile hybrids and parental species have mainly used microarrays providing a whole genome representation of regulatory problems in sterile hybrids. Real-time PCR studies can reject or reveal differences not observed in microarray assays. Moreover, differences in gene expression between samples can be dependant on the source of RNA (e.g., whole body vs. tissue). Here we survey expression in D. simulans, D. mauritiana and both intra and interspecies hybrids using a real-time PCR approach for eight genes expressed at the four main stages of sperm development. We find that all genes show a trend toward under expression in the testes of sterile hybrids relative to parental species with only the two proliferation genes (bam and bgcn) and the two meiotic class genes (can and sa) showing significant down regulation. The observed pattern of down regulation for the genes tested can not fully explain hybrid male sterility. We discuss the down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids between closely-related species within the contest of rapid divergence experienced by the male genome, hybrid sterility and possible allometric changes due to subtle testes-specific developmental abnormalities.

  1. Rapid estrogen regulation of DHEA metabolism in the male and female songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Devaleena S.; Yu, Yan; Soma, Kiran K.

    2010-01-01

    In the songbird brain, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is metabolized to the active and aromatizable androgen androstenedione (AE) by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (3β-HSD). Thus, brain 3β-HSD plays a key role in regulating the steroidal milieu of the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that stress rapidly regulates brain 3β-HSD activity in a sex-specific manner. To elucidate endocrine regulation of brain 3β-HSD, we asked whether 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates DHEA metabolism in adult zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and whether there are sex-specific effects. Brain tissue was homogenized and centrifuged to obtain supernatant lacking whole cells and cell nuclei. Supernatant was incubated with [3H]DHEA and radioinert E2 in vitro. Within only 10 min, E2 significantly reduced 3β-HSD activity in both male and female brain. Interestingly, the rapid effects of E2 were more pronounced in females than males. These are the first data to show a rapid effect of estrogens on the songbird brain and suggest that rapid estrogen effects differ between male and female brains. PMID:17949414

  2. Tail planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantin, L

    1926-01-01

    This report presents methods by which the cells of large commercial airplanes may be reduced. The tail of large airplanes represent an area where considerable improvement in weight and size reduction can be attained.

  3. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  4. A-MYB (MYBL1) transcription factor is a master regulator of male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Bannister, Laura A; Barash, Alex; Schimenti, Kerry J; Hartford, Suzanne A; Eppig, John J; Handel, Mary Ann; Shen, Lishuang; Schimenti, John C

    2011-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of mammalian meiosis is poorly characterized, owing to few genetic and ex vivo models. From a genetic screen, we identify the transcription factor MYBL1 as a male-specific master regulator of several crucial meiotic processes. Spermatocytes bearing a novel separation-of-function allele (Mybl1(repro9)) had subtle defects in autosome synapsis in pachynema, a high incidence of unsynapsed sex chromosomes, incomplete double-strand break repair on synapsed pachytene chromosomes and a lack of crossing over. MYBL1 protein appears in pachynema, and its mutation caused specific alterations in expression of diverse genes, including some translated postmeiotically. These data, coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip) experiments and bioinformatic analysis of promoters, identified direct targets of MYBL1 regulation. The results reveal that MYBL1 is a master regulator of meiotic genes that are involved in multiple processes in spermatocytes, particularly those required for cell cycle progression through pachynema.

  5. Regulating mitosis and meiosis in the male germ line: critical functions for cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.; Roberts, Shelby S.

    2010-01-01

    Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory subunits, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners the cyclin-dependent kinases. Regulating the cell cycle in the male germ line cells represents unique challenges for this machinery given the constant renewal of gametes throughout the reproductive lifespan and the induction of the unique process of meiosis, a highly specialized kind of cell division. With challenges come opportunities to the critical eye, recognizing that understanding these specialized modes of regulation will provide considerable insight into both normal differentiation as well as disease conditions, including infertility and oncogenesis. PMID:20403876

  6. Maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation through music: a behavioral and neuroimaging study of males and females.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Emily; Saarikallio, Suvi; Toiviainen, Petri; Bogert, Brigitte; Kliuchko, Marina; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Music therapists use guided affect regulation in the treatment of mood disorders. However, self-directed uses of music in affect regulation are not fully understood. Some uses of music may have negative effects on mental health, as can non-music regulation strategies, such as rumination. Psychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used explore music listening strategies in relation to mental health. Participants (n = 123) were assessed for depression, anxiety and Neuroticism, and uses of Music in Mood Regulation (MMR). Neural responses to music were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in a subset of participants (n = 56). Discharge, using music to express negative emotions, related to increased anxiety and Neuroticism in all participants and particularly in males. Males high in Discharge showed decreased activity of mPFC during music listening compared with those using less Discharge. Females high in Diversion, using music to distract from negative emotions, showed more mPFC activity than females using less Diversion. These results suggest that the use of Discharge strategy can be associated with maladaptive patterns of emotional regulation, and may even have long-term negative effects on mental health. This finding has real-world applications in psychotherapy and particularly in clinical music therapy.

  7. Maladaptive and adaptive emotion regulation through music: a behavioral and neuroimaging study of males and females

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Emily; Saarikallio, Suvi; Toiviainen, Petri; Bogert, Brigitte; Kliuchko, Marina; Brattico, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Music therapists use guided affect regulation in the treatment of mood disorders. However, self-directed uses of music in affect regulation are not fully understood. Some uses of music may have negative effects on mental health, as can non-music regulation strategies, such as rumination. Psychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used explore music listening strategies in relation to mental health. Participants (n = 123) were assessed for depression, anxiety and Neuroticism, and uses of Music in Mood Regulation (MMR). Neural responses to music were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in a subset of participants (n = 56). Discharge, using music to express negative emotions, related to increased anxiety and Neuroticism in all participants and particularly in males. Males high in Discharge showed decreased activity of mPFC during music listening compared with those using less Discharge. Females high in Diversion, using music to distract from negative emotions, showed more mPFC activity than females using less Diversion. These results suggest that the use of Discharge strategy can be associated with maladaptive patterns of emotional regulation, and may even have long-term negative effects on mental health. This finding has real-world applications in psychotherapy and particularly in clinical music therapy. PMID:26379529

  8. GDP-D-mannose epimerase regulates male gametophyte development, plant growth and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Liu, Zhipeng; Fan, Meng; Chen, Yan; Tian, Haixia; Wu, Dewei; Gao, Hua; Ren, Chunmei; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2017-09-04

    Plant GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, a precursor of both L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and cell wall polysaccharides. However, the genetic functions of GME in Arabidopsis are unclear. In this study, we found that mutations in Arabidopsis GME affect pollen germination, pollen tube elongation, and transmission and development of the male gametophyte through analysis of the heterozygous GME/gme plants and the homozygous gme plants. Arabidopsis gme mutants also exhibit severe growth defects and early leaf senescence. Surprisingly, the defects in male gametophyte in the gme plants are not restored by L-ascorbate, boric acid or GDP-L-galactose, though boric acid rescues the growth defects of the mutants, indicating that GME may regulate male gametophyte development independent of L-ascorbate and GDP-L-galactose. These results reveal key roles for Arabidopsis GME in reproductive development, vegetative growth and leaf senescence, and suggest that GME regulates plant growth and controls male gametophyte development in different manners.

  9. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-03-01

    Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland.

  10. Testosterone Regulates NUCB2 mRNA Expression in Male Mouse Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Sojeong; Jeon, Daun; Kim, Heejeong; Chung, Yiwa; Choi, Narae; Yang, Hyunwon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is known to take part in the control of the appetite and energy metabolism. Recently, many reports have shown nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression and function in various organs. We previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 expression level is higher in the pituitary gland compared to other organs and its expression is regulated by 17β-estradiol and progesterone secreted from the ovary. However, currently no data exist on the expression of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 and its regulation mechanism in the pituitary of male mouse. Therefore, we examined whether nesfatin-1/NUCB2 is expressed in the male mouse pituitary and if its expression is regulated by testosterone. As a result of PCR and western blotting, we found that a large amount of nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The NUCB2 mRNA expression level in the pituitary was decreased after castration, but not in the hypothalamus. In addition, its mRNA expression level in the pituitary was increased after testosterone treatment in the castrated mice, whereas, the expression level in the hypothalamus was significantly decreased after the treatment with testosterone. The in vitro experiment to elucidate the direct effect of testosterone on NUCB2 mRNA expression showed that NUCB2 mRNA expression was significantly decreased with testosterone in cultured hypothalamus tissue, but increased with testosterone in cultured pituitary gland. The present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1/NUCB2 was highly expressed in the male mouse pituitary and was regulated by testosterone. This data suggests that reproductive-endocrine regulation through hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis may contribute to NUCB2 mRNA expression in the mouse hypothalamus and pituitary gland. PMID:28484746

  11. Juvenile hormone regulation of male accessory gland activity in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, R.; Tan, A.; Sun, Z.; Chen, J.; Rainkin, M.; Palli, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Male accessory gland proteins (Acps) act as key modulators of reproductive success in insects by influencing the female reproductive physiology and behavior. We used custom microarrays and identified 112 genes that were highly expressed in male accessory glands (MAG) in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Out of these 112 identified genes, 59 of them contained sequences coding for signal peptide and cleavage site and the remaining 53 contained transmembrane domains. The expression of 14 these genes in the MAG but not in other tissues of male or female was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. In virgin males, juvenile hormone (JH) levels increased from second day post adult emergence (PAE), remained high on third day PAE and declined on fourth day PAE. The ecdysteroid titers were high soon after adult emergence but declined to minimal levels from 1-5 days PAE. Feeding of juvenile hormone analog, hydroprene, but not the ecdysteroid analog, RH-2485, showed an increase in size of MAGs, as well as an increase in total RNA and protein content of MAG. Hydroprene treatment also increased the expression Acp genes in the MAG. RNAi-mediated knock-down in the expression of JHAMT gene decreased the size of MAGs and expression of Acps. JH deficiency influenced male reproductive fitness as evidenced by a less vigor in mating behavior, poor sperm transfer, low egg and the progeny production by females mated with the JH deficient males. These data suggest a critical role for JH in the regulation of male reproduction especially through MAG secretions. PMID:19324087

  12. Juvenile hormone regulation of male accessory gland activity in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, R; Tan, A; Sun, Z; Chen, Z; Rankin, M; Palli, S R

    2009-07-01

    Male accessory gland proteins (Acps) act as key modulators of reproductive success in insects by influencing the female reproductive physiology and behavior. We used custom microarrays and identified 112 genes that were highly expressed in male accessory glands (MAG) in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Out of these 112 identified genes, 59 of them contained sequences coding for signal peptide and cleavage site and the remaining 53 contained transmembrane domains. The expression of 14 of these genes in the MAG but not in other tissues of male or female was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. In virgin males, juvenile hormone (JH) levels increased from second day post adult emergence (PAE), remained high on third day PAE and declined on fourth day PAE. The ecdysteroid titers were high soon after adult emergence but declined to minimal levels from 1 to 5 days PAE. Feeding of juvenile hormone analog, hydroprene, but not the ecdysteroid analog, RH-2485, showed an increase in size of MAGs, as well as an increase in total RNA and protein content of MAG. Hydroprene treatment also increased the expression of Acp genes in the MAG. RNAi-mediated knock-down in the expression of JHAMT gene decreased the size of MAGs and expression of Acps. JH deficiency influenced male reproductive fitness as evidenced by a less vigor in mating behavior, poor sperm transfer, low egg and the progeny production by females mated with the JH deficient males. These data suggest a critical role for JH in the regulation of male reproduction especially through MAG secretions.

  13. Male fertility and apoptosis in normal spermatogenesis are regulated by vacuolar-ATPase isoform a2.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Agrawal, Varkha; Katara, Gajendra K; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Chaouat, Gerard; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2015-11-01

    The a2 isoform of vacuolar-ATPase (ATP6V0A2, referred to as a2V) is required for normal spermatogenesis and maturation of sperm. Treatment of male mice with anti-a2V disturbs the testicular cytokine/chemokine balance and leads to severe deficiencies of spermatogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of a2V in male fertility and in the regulation of apoptotic pathways required for normal spermatogenesis in mice. To study the role of a2V single dose of anti-a2V monoclonal antibody or mouse IgG isotype (3μg/animal) was injected i.p. into males on alternate days for 10 days. The expression of sperm maturation-related molecules and pro-apoptotic molecules was measured by real-time PCR or immunohistochemistry in control and anti-a2V-treated testes. The caspase levels and their activity were measured by western blot and fluorometry. We found that the expression of the sperm maturation-related molecules SPAM1, ADAM1, and ADAM2 was significantly decreased in testes from anti-a2V-treated males. The expression of pro-apoptotic molecules (Bax, p53, and p21) and molecules involved in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis (caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP), which are crucial for normal spermatogenesis was significantly reduced in testes from anti-a2V-treated males compared with the control. The total ATP level was significantly lower in anti-a2V-treated testes. The data provide novel evidence showing that a2V can regulate the apoptotic pathways, an essential testicular feature, and is necessary for efficient spermatogenesis.

  14. Antinociception versus serum concentration relationships following acute administration of intravenous morphine in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats: differences between the tail flick and hot plate nociceptive tests.

    PubMed

    South, Samantha M; Edwards, Stephen R; Smith, Maree T

    2009-01-01

    1. Antinociception versus serum morphine concentration relationships were defined in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats administered single intravenous (i.v.) bolus doses of morphine, using the hot plate (2.1-14 mg/kg) and tail flick tests (1-8 mg/kg). 2. Serum concentrations of morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), its major metabolite in the rat, were assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. 3. Significantly higher (P < 0.05) values of peak antinociception (approximately 1.7-fold), as well as the extent and duration of antinociception (approximately fourfold), were observed in male compared with female rats administered 10 mg/kg morphine in the hot plate test. Although there were no significant sex-related differences in the area under the serum morphine concentration versus time curve (AUC) at this dose, systemic exposure to M3G (M3G AUC) was significantly higher (approximately twofold; P < 0.05) in female than male rats. 4. In contrast with most previous studies investigating sex differences in morphine antinociception in rats, the antinociceptive effects of single i.v. doses of morphine (1-8 mg/kg) in the tail flick test did not differ significantly between male and female rats. 5. Morphine ED(50) and EC(50) values (95% confidence intervals) for antinociception in the hot plate test were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in male rats (ED(50) 8.4 mg/kg (7.6-9.2); EC(50) 1.8 nmol/L (1.5-2.1)) compared with female rats (ED(50) 10.6 mg/kg (9.1-12.0); EC(50) 3.7 nmol/L (3.4-4.1)). However, in the tail flick test, there was no significant difference between male and female rats in ED(50) (1.8 (0.4-3.3) and 1.4 mg/kg (0.4-2.5), respectively) or EC(50) (0.5 (0.3-0.6) and 0.4 nmol/L (0.2-0.5), respectively) values. 6. Supraspinal attenuation of morphine antinociception by M3G may account for these differences.

  15. Social regulation of male reproductive plasticity in an African cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2013-12-01

    Social interactions with the outcome of a position in a dominance hierarchy can have profound effects on reproductive behavior and physiology, requiring animals to integrate environmental information with their internal physiological state; but how is salient information from the animal's dynamic social environment transformed into adaptive behavioral, physiological, and molecular-level changes? The African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, is ideally suited to understand socially controlled reproductive plasticity because activity of the male reproductive (brain-pituitary-gonad) axis is tightly linked to social status. Males form hierarchies in which a small percentage of brightly colored dominant individuals have an active reproductive axis, defend territories, and spawn with females, while the remaining males are subordinate, drably colored, do not hold a territory, and have a suppressed reproductive system with minimal opportunities for spawning. These social phenotypes are plastic and quickly reversible, meaning that individual males may switch between dominant and subordinate status multiple times within a lifetime. Here, we review the rapid and remarkable plasticity that occurs along the entire reproductive axis when males rise in social rank, a transition that has important implications for the operational sex ratio of the population. When males rise in rank, transformations occur in the brain, pituitary, circulation, and testes over short time-scales (minutes to days). Changes are evident in overt behavior, as well as modifications at the physiological, cellular, and molecular levels that regulate reproductive capacity. Widespread changes triggered by a switch in rank highlight the significance of external social information in shaping internal physiology and reproductive competence.

  16. The role of androgen receptors in regulating territorial aggression in male song sparrows.

    PubMed

    Sperry, Todd S; Wacker, Douglas W; Wingfield, John C

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the role that androgen receptors (ARs) play in modulating aggressive behavior in male song sparrows, Melospiza melodia morphna. Song sparrows are seasonally breeding, territorial birds that maintain year-round territories with male-female pair bonds formed during the spring breeding season. Plasma testosterone levels peak as territories are established and mates acquired. In late summer, testosterone levels fall and remain basal during the non-breeding season. We examined the role of ARs in regulating territorial aggression in captive song sparrows under short- and long-day conditions as well as just prior to, and at the start of the breading season in freely living birds using the nonsteroidal antiandrogen flutamide to block AR function. Birds were implanted with either empty or drug filled silastic implants for 18 to 42 days and then challenged with a novel male decoy to assess the individual birds level of male-male aggression. Freely living birds remained on their home territory and underwent a simulated territorial intrusion, whereas laboratory-held birds were assessed using a laboratory simulated territorial intrusion and remained in their home cage. Experimental treatment of male song sparrows decreased aggressive behavior during the pre-breeding life history substage (March-April) in freely living birds as well as in laboratory-held birds under long-day (16L:8D) conditions. During the early breeding substage (April-May) there was no measurable effect of flutamide treatment on aggressive behavior, nor was there a difference in behavior in the (8L:16D) laboratory birds. This demonstrates that ARs are an important component of the neuroendocrine control of aggressive behavior. Given that flutamide only affected aggression during the pre-breeding substage and in LD birds, the results suggest that AR dependent control of aggressive behavior changes as song sparrow life history states change.

  17. Cytological, molecular mechanisms and temperature stress regulating production of diploid male gametes in Dianthus caryophyllus L.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuhong; Mo, Xijun; Gui, Min; Wu, Xuewei; Jiang, Yalian; Ma, Lulin; Shi, Ziming; Luo, Ying; Tang, Wenru

    2015-12-01

    In plant evolution, because of its key role in sexual polyploidization or whole genome duplication events, diploid gamete formation is considered as an important component in diversification and speciation. Environmental stress often triggers unreduced gamete production. However, the molecular, cellular mechanisms and adverse temperature regulating diplogamete production in carnation remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the cytological basis for 2n male gamete formation and describe the isolation and characterization of the first gene, DcPS1 (Dianthus Caryophyllus Parallel Spindle 1). In addition, we analyze influence of temperature stress on diploid gamete formation and transcript levels of DcPS1. Cytological evidence indicated that 2n male gamete formation is attributable to abnormal spindle orientation at male meiosis II. DcPS1 protein is conserved throughout the plant kingdom and carries domains suggestive of a regulatory function. DcPS1 expression analysis show DcPS1 gene probably have a role in 2n pollen formation. Unreduced pollen formation in various cultivation was sensitive to high or low temperature which was probably regulated by the level of DcPS1 transcripts. In a broader perspective, these findings can have potential applications in fundamental polyploidization research and plant breeding programs.

  18. Octopamine neuromodulation regulates Gr32a-linked aggression and courtship pathways in Drosophila males.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jonathan C; Fernández, María Paz; Yu, Qin; Leary, Greg P; Leung, Adelaine K W; Kavanaugh, Michael P; Kravitz, Edward A; Certel, Sarah J

    2014-05-01

    Chemosensory pheromonal information regulates aggression and reproduction in many species, but how pheromonal signals are transduced to reliably produce behavior is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the pheromonal signals detected by Gr32a-expressing chemosensory neurons to enhance male aggression are filtered through octopamine (OA, invertebrate equivalent of norepinephrine) neurons. Using behavioral assays, we find males lacking both octopamine and Gr32a gustatory receptors exhibit parallel delays in the onset of aggression and reductions in aggression. Physiological and anatomical experiments identify Gr32a to octopamine neuron synaptic and functional connections in the suboesophageal ganglion. Refining the Gr32a-expressing population indicates that mouth Gr32a neurons promote male aggression and form synaptic contacts with OA neurons. By restricting the monoamine neuron target population, we show that three previously identified OA-Fru(M) neurons involved in behavioral choice are among the Gr32a-OA connections. Our findings demonstrate that octopaminergic neuromodulatory neurons function as early as a second-order step in this chemosensory-driven male social behavior pathway.

  19. Androgen Inhibits Abdominal Fat Accumulation and Negatively Regulates the PCK1 Gene in Male Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonggang; Li, Junying; Ling, Yao; Teng, Kedao; Li, Hongwei; Wu, Changxin

    2013-01-01

    Capons are male chickens whose testes have been surgically incised. Capons show a significant increase in fat accumulation compared to intact male chickens. However, while caponization leads to a significant reduction in androgen levels in roosters, little is known about the molecular mechanisms through which androgen status affects lipogenesis in avian species. Therefore, investigation of the influence of androgens on fat accumulation in the chicken will provide insights into this process. In this study, Affymetrix microarray technology was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of livers from capons and intact male chickens because the liver is the major site of lipogenesis in avian species. Through gene ontology, we found that genes involved in hepatic lipogenic biosynthesis were the most highly enriched. Interestingly, among the upregulated genes, the cytosolic form of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) gene showed the greatest fold change. Additionally, in conjunction with quantitative real-time PCR data, our results suggested that androgen status negatively regulated the PCK1 gene in male chickens. PMID:23544081

  20. Arsenic as an endocrine disruptor: arsenic disrupts retinoic acid receptor-and thyroid hormone receptor-mediated gene regulation and thyroid hormone-mediated amphibian tail metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Davey, Jennifer C; Nomikos, Athena P; Wungjiranirun, Manida; Sherman, Jenna R; Ingram, Liam; Batki, Cavus; Lariviere, Jean P; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2008-02-01

    Chronic exposure to excess arsenic in drinking water has been strongly associated with increased risks of multiple cancers, diabetes, heart disease, and reproductive and developmental problems in humans. We previously demonstrated that As, a potent endocrine disruptor at low, environmentally relevant levels, alters steroid signaling at the level of receptor-mediated gene regulation for all five steroid receptors. The goal of this study was to determine whether As can also disrupt gene regulation via the retinoic acid (RA) receptor (RAR) and/or the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) and whether these effects are similar to previously observed effects on steroid regulation. Human embryonic NT2 or rat pituitary GH3 cells were treated with 0.01-5 microM sodium arsenite for 24 hr, with or without RA or TH, respectively, to examine effects of As on receptor-mediated gene transcription. At low, noncytotoxic doses, As significantly altered RAR-dependent gene transcription of a transfected RAR response element-luciferase construct and the native RA-inducible cytochrome P450 CYP26A gene in NT2 cells. Likewise, low-dose As significantly altered expression of a transfected TR response element-luciferase construct and the endogenous TR-regulated type I deiodinase (DIO1) gene in a similar manner in GH3 cells. An amphibian ex vivo tail metamorphosis assay was used to examine whether endocrine disruption by low-dose As could have specific pathophysiologic consequences, because tail metamorphosis is tightly controlled by TH through TR. TH-dependent tail shrinkage was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by 0.1- 4.0 microM As. As had similar effects on RAR- and TR-mediated gene regulation as those previously observed for the steroid receptors, suggesting a common mechanism or action. Arsenic also profoundly affected a TR-dependent developmental process in a model animal system at very low concentrations. Because RAR and TH are critical for both normal human development and adult

  1. A SHPing tale: perspectives on the regulation of SHP-1 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatases by the C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Poole, Alastair W; Jones, Matthew L

    2005-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a ubiquitous signalling mechanism and is regulated by a balance between the action of kinases and phosphatases. The SH2 domain-containing phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 are the best studied of the classical non-receptor tyrosine phosphatases, but it is intriguing that despite their close sequence and structural homology these two phosphatases play quite different cellular roles. In particular, whereas SHP-1 plays a largely negative signalling role suppressing cellular activation, SHP-2 plays a largely positive signalling role. Major sequence differences between the two molecules are apparent in the approximately 100 amino acid residues at the extreme C-terminus of the proteins, beyond the phosphatase catalytic domain. Here we review how the differences in the tails of these proteins may regulate their activities and explain some of their functional differences.

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Regulate Dendritic Spine Plasticity in the Hippocampus of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Burgos, Ignacio; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C.; Velázquez-Zamora, Dulce A.; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Some selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are neuroprotective and reduce brain inflammation in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. In addition, raloxifene and tamoxifen counteract cognitive deficits caused by gonadal hormone deprivation in male rats. In this study, we have explored whether raloxifene and tamoxifen may regulate the number and geometry of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Young adult male rats were injected with raloxifene (1 mg/kg), tamoxifen (1 mg/kg), or vehicle and killed 24 h after the injection. Animals treated with raloxifene or tamoxifen showed an increased numerical density of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to animals treated with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen had also specific effects in the morphology of spines. These findings suggest that raloxifene and tamoxifen may influence the processing of information by hippocampal pyramidal neurons by affecting the number and shape of dendritic spines. PMID:22164341

  4. LOX-1: a male hormone-regulated scavenger receptor for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Geng, Yong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a unique scavenger receptor that mediates the binding and uptake of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) by vascular cells during the development of atherosclerosis. Exposure to ox-LDL induces LOX-1 expression and LOX-1-dependent biological activities, such as activation of NF-κB, a nuclear factor important for signal transduction in inflammation. Accumulating evidence indicates that male hormones may regulate expression of LOX-1 and NF-κB as well as atherogenesis. Deficiency or low levels of the male hormone testosterone promote LOX-1 expression and NF-κB activation, while testosterone replacement therapy reduces the expression of LOX-1 and the activation of NF-κB, thereby protecting the arterial wall against atherogenesis.

  5. Two New Cave-Dwelling Species of the Short-Tailed Whipscorpion Genus Rowlandius (Arachnida: Schizomida: Hubbardiidae) from Northeastern Brazil, with Comments on Male Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Adalberto J.; Ferreira, Rodrigo Lopes; Buzatto, Bruno A.

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of the arachnid order Schizomida, Rowlandius ubajara sp.nov. and Rowlandius potiguar sp.nov., are described based on both male and female specimens collected in caves from northeastern Brazil. Rowlandius ubajara is known only from the Ubajara Cave, in the state of Ceará; R. potiguar is recorded from 20 caves of the Apodi Limestone Group, in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. A remarkable dimorphism in male pedipalp length is described and analyzed in R. potiguar. The distribution of male pedipalp length is clearly bimodal in the species, but the two male morphs (homeomorphic and heteromorphic) present some overlap in the sizes of this structure. Moreover, males show a steeper allometry in pedipalp length than females, indicating that this trait is under a different selective regime in males and in females. PMID:23723989

  6. SRY directly regulates the neurotrophin 3 promoter during male sex determination and testis development in rats.

    PubMed

    Clement, Tracy M; Bhandari, Ramji K; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Skinner, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    Neurotrophin 3 (Ntf3) is expressed in Sertoli cells and acts as a chemo-attractant for cell migration from the mesonephros into the developing testis, a process critical to the early morphological events of testis cord formation. The male sex-determining gene Sry initiates the process of testicular development. Sox9 is a key regulator of male sex determination and is directly regulated by SRY. Information on other downstream target genes of SRY is limited. The current study demonstrates an interaction of SRY with the Ntf3 promoter both in vitro and in vivo. The Ntf3 promoter in both rat and mouse contains at least one putative SRY binding site in the -0.6 kb promoter region. In a luciferase reporter assay system, both SRY and SOX9 stimulated the Ntf3 promoter in vitro through an interaction with this SRY-binding motif. In an immunoprecipitation-based pull-down assay, recombinant SRY protein bound the Ntf3 promoter fragment containing an intact SRY binding site, whereas the same protein did not interact with the fragment containing a mutated SRY motif. Specific antibodies against SRY were used in a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay of embryonic testis and were found to precipitate the Ntf3 promoter region. The SRY ChIP assay confirmed the direct interaction between SRY and the Ntf3 promoter in vivo during male sex determination. Observations suggest that SRY physically interacts with the Ntf3 promoter during male sex determination to coordinate cell migration in the testis to form testis cords.

  7. The Lombard effect in male ultrasonic frogs: Regulating antiphonal signal frequency and amplitude in noise

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic communication in noisy environments presents a significant challenge for vocal animals because noise can interfere with animal acoustic signals by decreasing signal-to-noise ratios and masking signals. Birds and mammals increase call intensity or frequency as noise levels increase, but it is unclear to what extend this behavior is shared by frogs. Concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have evolved the capacity to produce various calls containing ultrasonic harmonics and to communicate beside noisy streams. However, it is largely unclear how frogs regulate vocalization in response to increasing noise levels. We exposed male frogs to various levels of noise with playback of conspecific female courtship calls and recorded antiphonal signals and spontaneous short calls. Males were capable of rapidly adjusting fundamental frequency and amplitude of antiphonal signals as noise levels increased. The increment in fundamental frequency and amplitude was approximately 0.5 kHz and 3 dB with every 10 dB increase in noise level, indicating the presence of noise-dependent signal characteristics. Males showed the noise-tolerant adaption in response to female calls in noise level from 40 to 90 dB SPL. The results suggest that the noise-dependent signal characteristics in O. tormota have evolved as a strategy to cope with varying torrent noise. PMID:27345957

  8. The Sex Determination Gene transformer Regulates Male-Female Differences in Drosophila Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Elizabeth J.; Narsaiya, Marcus S.; Grewal, Savraj S.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all animals show sex differences in body size. For example, in Drosophila, females are larger than males. Although Drosophila is widely used as a model to study growth, the mechanisms underlying this male-female difference in size remain unclear. Here, we describe a novel role for the sex determination gene transformer (tra) in promoting female body growth. Normally, Tra is expressed only in females. We find that loss of Tra in female larvae decreases body size, while ectopic Tra expression in males increases body size. Although we find that Tra exerts autonomous effects on cell size, we also discovered that Tra expression in the fat body augments female body size in a non cell-autonomous manner. These effects of Tra do not require its only known targets doublesex and fruitless. Instead, Tra expression in the female fat body promotes growth by stimulating the secretion of insulin-like peptides from insulin producing cells in the brain. Our data suggest a model of sex-specific growth in which body size is regulated by a previously unrecognized branch of the sex determination pathway, and identify Tra as a novel link between sex and the conserved insulin signaling pathway. PMID:26710087

  9. The Sex Determination Gene transformer Regulates Male-Female Differences in Drosophila Body Size.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Elizabeth J; Narsaiya, Marcus S; Grewal, Savraj S

    2015-12-01

    Almost all animals show sex differences in body size. For example, in Drosophila, females are larger than males. Although Drosophila is widely used as a model to study growth, the mechanisms underlying this male-female difference in size remain unclear. Here, we describe a novel role for the sex determination gene transformer (tra) in promoting female body growth. Normally, Tra is expressed only in females. We find that loss of Tra in female larvae decreases body size, while ectopic Tra expression in males increases body size. Although we find that Tra exerts autonomous effects on cell size, we also discovered that Tra expression in the fat body augments female body size in a non cell-autonomous manner. These effects of Tra do not require its only known targets doublesex and fruitless. Instead, Tra expression in the female fat body promotes growth by stimulating the secretion of insulin-like peptides from insulin producing cells in the brain. Our data suggest a model of sex-specific growth in which body size is regulated by a previously unrecognized branch of the sex determination pathway, and identify Tra as a novel link between sex and the conserved insulin signaling pathway.

  10. The Lombard effect in male ultrasonic frogs: Regulating antiphonal signal frequency and amplitude in noise.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-06-27

    Acoustic communication in noisy environments presents a significant challenge for vocal animals because noise can interfere with animal acoustic signals by decreasing signal-to-noise ratios and masking signals. Birds and mammals increase call intensity or frequency as noise levels increase, but it is unclear to what extend this behavior is shared by frogs. Concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have evolved the capacity to produce various calls containing ultrasonic harmonics and to communicate beside noisy streams. However, it is largely unclear how frogs regulate vocalization in response to increasing noise levels. We exposed male frogs to various levels of noise with playback of conspecific female courtship calls and recorded antiphonal signals and spontaneous short calls. Males were capable of rapidly adjusting fundamental frequency and amplitude of antiphonal signals as noise levels increased. The increment in fundamental frequency and amplitude was approximately 0.5 kHz and 3 dB with every 10 dB increase in noise level, indicating the presence of noise-dependent signal characteristics. Males showed the noise-tolerant adaption in response to female calls in noise level from 40 to 90 dB SPL. The results suggest that the noise-dependent signal characteristics in O. tormota have evolved as a strategy to cope with varying torrent noise.

  11. Pituitary Androgen Receptor Signalling Regulates Prolactin but Not Gonadotrophins in the Male Mouse

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; Curley, Michael; Tedim Ferreira, Maria; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Production of the androgen testosterone is controlled by a negative feedback loop within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Stimulation of testicular Leydig cells by pituitary luteinising hormone (LH) is under the control of hypothalamic gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), while suppression of LH secretion by the pituitary is controlled by circulating testosterone. Exactly how androgens exert their feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion (and whether this is at the level of the pituitary), as well as the role of AR in other pituitary cell types remains unclear. To investigate these questions, we exploited a transgenic mouse line (Foxg1Cre/+; ARfl/y) which lacks androgen receptor in the pituitary gland. Both circulating testosterone and gonadotrophins are unchanged in adulthood, demonstrating that AR signalling is dispensable in the male mouse pituitary for testosterone-dependent regulation of LH secretion. In contrast, Foxg1Cre/+; ARfl/y males have a significant increase in circulating prolactin, suggesting that, rather than controlling gonadotrophins, AR-signalling in the pituitary acts to suppress aberrant prolactin production in males. PMID:25799562

  12. Molecular analysis of the PArkin co-regulated gene and association with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gabrielle R; Sim, Marcus L-J; Brody, Kate M; Taylor, Juliet M; McLachlan, Robert I; O'Bryan, Moira K; Delatycki, Martin B; Lockhart, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the potential role of PArkin co-regulated gene (PACRG) in human male infertility. Case-control study. Academic reproductive biology department. Blood samples were obtained from 610 patients and 156 normal control subjects. Genomic DNA was used as template for polymerase chain reaction amplification of the PACRG promoter and coding exons. The amplified fragments were tested for DNA sequence variations by direct sequencing and restriction enzyme analysis. Gene structure and sequence alterations of PACRG in infertile male patients. The structure of PACRG was determined to comprise 5 coding exons, generating a single transcript in the testis which encoded a predicted protein of 257 amino acids. No pathogenic mutations were identified; however, a variant in the promoter of PACRG was shown to be significantly associated with azoospermia, but not oligospermia, in the case-control cohort. Mutation of PACRG was not identified as a cause of male infertility, but variation in the promoter was demonstrated to be a risk factor associated with azoospermia. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of foraging trips and incubation routine in male and female wandering albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Weimerskirch, Henri

    1995-04-01

    The resolution of the conflict between eggcare and foraging was studied in male and female wandering albatrosses. The foraging zone and range, duration of incubation shifts and foraging trips, and associated changes in body mass were studied. Costs during incubation, expressed as the time spent incubating and the proportional loss of body mass, were similar for both sexes. The mass gained at sea was related to the duration of foraging trips, but the relationship was much less significant in males, where foraging ranges, though similar on average to those of females, were very variable. Males foraged in more southerly waters than females, and gained mass more rapidly. Only females appeared to regulate the duration of foraging trips, and this compensated for the mass lost during the incubation fast. Previous breeding experience had no influence on foraging efficiency. Egg desertion because of depletion of body reserves was very rare because birds have a wide "safety margin", i.e. the difference between the average body mass when relieved and that at nest desertion. This safety margin enables the birds to compensate for the high variability in the duration of foraging trips, and is probably a reason for the high breeding success of wandering albatrosses. Decisions to return from the sea to the nest or to desert the nest are probably related to the status of body reserves, and have been selected in the large wandering albatross so that both present and future reproductive success are maximised.

  14. Regulation of male sex determination: genital ridge formation and Sry activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satomi S; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Sex determination is essential for the sexual reproduction to generate the next generation by the formation of functional male or female gametes. In mammals, primary sex determination is commenced by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome, which controls the fate of the gonadal primordium. The somatic precursor of gonads, the genital ridge is formed at the mid-gestation stage and gives rise to one of two organs, a testis or an ovary. The fate of the genital ridge, which is governed by the differentiation of somatic cells into Sertoli cells in the testes or granulosa cells in the ovaries, further determines the sex of an individual and their germ cells. Mutation studies in human patients with disorders of sex development and mouse models have revealed factors that are involved in mammalian sex determination. In most of mammals, a single genetic trigger, the Y-linked gene Sry (sex determination region on Y chromosome), regulates testicular differentiation. Despite identification of Sry in 1990, precise mechanisms underlying the sex determination of bipotential genital ridges are still largely unknown. Here, we review the recent progress that has provided new insights into the mechanisms underlying genital ridge formation as well as the regulation of Sry expression and its functions in male sex determination of mice.

  15. Progressive effects of silver nanoparticles on hormonal regulation of reproduction in male rats.

    PubMed

    Dziendzikowska, K; Krawczyńska, A; Oczkowski, M; Królikowski, T; Brzóska, K; Lankoff, A; Dziendzikowski, M; Stępkowski, T; Kruszewski, M; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, J

    2016-12-15

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in various applications, including consumer, agriculture and medicine products, has raised many concerns about the potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) to human health and the environment. An increasing body of evidence suggests that AgNPs may have adverse effects of humans, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNPs on the male reproductive system. Silver particles (20nm AgNPs (groups Ag I and Ag II) and 200nm Ag sub-micron particles (SPs) (group Ag III)) were administered intravenously to male Wistar rats at a dose of 5 (groups Ag I and Ag III) or 10 (group Ag II) mg/kg of body weight. The biological material was sampled 24h, 7days and 28days after injection. The obtained results revealed that the AgNPs had altered the luteinising hormone concentration in the plasma and the sex hormone concentration in the plasma and testes. Plasma and intratesticular levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone were significantly decreased both 7 and 28days after treatment. No change in the prolactin and sex hormone-binding globulin concentration was observed. Exposure of the animals to AgNPs resulted in a considerable decrease in 5α-reductase type 1 and the aromatase protein level in the testis. Additionally, expression analysis of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism revealed significant down-regulation of Star, Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b3 and Srd5a1 mRNAs in AgNPs/AgSPs-exposed animals. The present study demonstrates the potential adverse effect on the hormonal regulation of the male reproductive function following AgNP/AgSP administration, in particular alterations of the sex steroid balance and expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis and the steroids metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Compartmentalization and regulation of iron metabolism proteins protect male germ cells from iron overload.

    PubMed

    Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Cohen, Lyora A; Weiss, Avital; Marohn, Britta; Schubert, Stephanie; Meinhardt, Andreas; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G

    2012-06-15

    The universal importance of iron, its high toxicity, and complex chemistry present a challenge to biological systems in general and to protected compartments in particular. The high mitotic rate and avid mitochondriogenesis of developing male germ cells imply high iron requirements. Yet access to germ cells is tightly regulated by the blood-testis barrier that protects the meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. To elucidate how iron is supplied to developing male germ cells, we analyzed iron deposition and iron transport proteins in testes of mice with iron overload and with genetic ablation of the iron regulators Hfe and iron regulatory protein 2. Iron accumulated mainly around seminiferous tubules, and only small amounts localized within the seminiferous tubules. The localization and regulation of proteins involved in iron import, storage, and export such as transferrin, transferrin receptor, the divalent metal transporter-1, cytosolic ferritin, and ferroportin strongly support a model of a largely autonomous iron cycle within seminiferous tubules. We show evidence that ferritin secretion from Sertoli cells may play an important role in iron acquisition of primary spermatocytes. During spermatogenic development iron is carried along from primary spermatocytes to spermatids, and from spermatids iron is recycled to the apical compartment of Sertoli cells, which traffic it back to a new generation of spermatocytes. Losses are replenished by the peripheral circulation. Such an internal iron cycle essentially detaches the iron homeostasis within the seminiferous tubule from the periphery and protects developing germ cells from iron fluctuations. This model explains how compartmentalization can optimize cellular and systemic nutrient homeostasis.

  17. Localization and Regulation of Murine Esco2 During Male and Female Meiosis1

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth B.; Hogarth, Cathryn; Evanoff, Ryan M.; Mitchell, Debra; Small, Christopher; Griswold, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meiosis is essential for generation of healthy gametes in both sexes and involves recombination and segregation of homologous chromosomes to produce haploid gametes. The initiation of meiosis in both sexes relies upon retinoic acid (RA) (Griswold MD, Hogarth CA, Bowles J, Koopman P. Initiating Meiosis: The Case for Retinoic Acid. Biol Reprod 2012; 86(35):1–7). Previous studies have demonstrated that the stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8) was required for meiotic progression in both the mouse ovary and postnatal testis. To identify additional candidates that may play a role during meiosis, we used microarray databases to generate lists of transcripts with expression profiles similar to that of Stra8 in the embryonic ovary and postnatal testis. One such gene, establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (Esco2), has been described as a regulator of sister chromatid cohesion during mitosis. This study describes the first in-depth analysis of ESCO2 localization and regulation during meiosis in both males and females. ESCO2 colocalized with the gamma H2A histone family member X (H2AFX) in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that ESCO2 is a component of the XY body. In pachytene cells of the embryonic ovary, ESCO2 colocalized with H2AFX, which is consistent with the presence of ESCO2 in areas of double-stranded breaks. In addition, the expression of Esco2 was found to be regulated by RA in the postnatal testis. These data indicate that ESCO2 may play a vital role in meiosis in both males and females. PMID:22699483

  18. Regulation of the TMEPAI promoter by TCF7L2: the C-terminal tail of TCF7L2 is essential to activate the TMEPAI gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoko; Kato, Mitsuyasu; Itoh, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that TCF7L2 could activate the TMEPAI gene efficiently, whereas LEF1 could not nearly augment its transcription. When we comprehended the functional difference(s) between TCF7L2 and LEF1 with respect to the activation of the TMEPAI gene, the C-terminal tail of TCF7L2 was needed to reveal its transcriptional activity as well as its interaction with Smad3. Consistently, both TCF7/TCF7L2 and LEF1/TCF7L2 chimeric proteins exhibited an activity similar to TCF7L2 in transcription and Smad3 binding in contrast with LEF1 and TCF7. Our data elaborated on the diverse activity among TCF/LEF family members with respect to the transcriptional regulation of the TMEPAI gene. PMID:26590303

  19. The serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha cytoplasmic tail negatively regulate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Wienands, J; Reth, M

    2000-07-18

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a multiprotein complex consisting of the membrane-bound Ig molecule and the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. On BCR engagement, Ig-alpha and Ig-beta become phosphorylated not only on tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif but also on serine and threonine residues. We have mutated all serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha tail to alanine and valine, respectively. The mutated Ig-alpha sequence was expressed either as a single-chain Fv/Ig-alpha molecule or in the context of the complete BCR. In both cases, the mutated Ig-alpha showed a stronger tyrosine phosphorylation than the wild-type Ig-alpha and initiated increased signaling on stimulation. These findings suggest that serine/threonine kinases can negatively regulate signal transduction from the BCR.

  20. The Interfollicular Epidermis of Adult Mouse Tail Comprises Two Distinct Cell Lineages that Are Differentially Regulated by Wnt, Edaradd, and Lrig1

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Céline; Chua, Wesley; Miremadi, Ahmad; Quist, Sven; Headon, Denis J.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Current models of how mouse tail interfollicular epidermis (IFE) is maintained overlook the coexistence of two distinct terminal differentiation programs: parakeratotic (scale) and orthokeratotic (interscale). Lineage tracing and clonal analysis revealed that scale and interscale are maintained by unipotent cells in the underlying basal layer, with scale progenitors dividing more rapidly than interscale progenitors. Although scales are pigmented and precisely aligned with hair follicles, melanocytes and follicles were not necessary for scale differentiation. Epidermal Wnt signaling was required for scale enlargement during development and for postnatal maintenance of scale-interscale boundaries. Loss of Edaradd inhibited ventral scale formation, whereas loss of Lrig1 led to scale enlargement and fusion. In wild-type skin, Lrig1 was not expressed in IFE but was selectively upregulated in dermal fibroblasts underlying the interscale. We conclude that the different IFE differentiation compartments are maintained by distinct stem cell populations and are regulated by epidermal and dermal signals. PMID:24052938

  1. The interfollicular epidermis of adult mouse tail comprises two distinct cell lineages that are differentially regulated by Wnt, Edaradd, and Lrig1.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Chua, Wesley; Miremadi, Ahmad; Quist, Sven; Headon, Denis J; Watt, Fiona M

    2013-01-01

    Current models of how mouse tail interfollicular epidermis (ife) is maintained overlook the coexistence of two distinct terminal differentiation programs: parakeratotic (scale) and orthokeratotic (interscale). lineage tracing and clonal analysis revealed that scale and interscale are maintained by unipotent cells in the underlying basal layer, with scale progenitors dividing more rapidly than interscale progenitors. Although scales are pigmented and precisely aligned with hair follicles, melanocytes and follicles were not necessary for scale differentiation. Epidermal Wnt signaling was required for scale enlargement during development and for postnatal maintenance of scale-interscale boundaries. Loss of Edaradd inhibited ventral scale formation, whereas loss of Lrig1 led to scale enlargement and fusion. In wild-type skin, Lrig1 was not expressed in IFE but was selectively upregulated in dermal fibroblasts underlying the interscale. We conclude that the different IFE differentiation compartments are maintained by distinct stem cell populations and are regulated by epidermal and dermal signals.

  2. Cdc34 C-terminal tail phosphorylation regulates Skp1/cullin/F-box (SCF)-mediated ubiquitination and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Martin; Mawson, Amanda; Baker, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2007-08-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 (cell division cycle 34) plays an essential role in promoting the G1-S-phase transition of the eukaryotic cell cycle and is phosphorylated in vivo. In the present study, we investigated if phosphorylation regulates Cdc34 function. We mapped the in vivo phosphorylation sites on budding yeast Cdc34 (yCdc34; Ser207 and Ser216) and human Cdc34 (hCdc34 Ser203, Ser222 and Ser231) to serine residues in the acidic tail domain, a region that is critical for Cdc34's cell cycle function. CK2 (protein kinase CK2) phosphorylates both yCdc34 and hCdc34 on these sites in vitro. CK2-mediated phosphorylation increased yCdc34 ubiquitination activity towards the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sic1 in vitro, when assayed in the presence of its cognate SCFCdc4 E3 ligase [where SCF is Skp1 (S-phase kinase-associated protein 1)/cullin/F-box]. Similarly, mutation of the yCdc34 phosphorylation sites to alanine, aspartate or glutamate residues altered Cdc34-SCFCdc4-mediated Sic1 ubiquitination activity. Similar results were obtained when yCdc34's ubiquitination activity was assayed in the absence of SCFCdc4, indicating that phosphorylation regulates the intrinsic catalytic activity of Cdc34. To evaluate the in vivo consequences of altered Cdc34 activity, wild-type yCdc34 and the phosphosite mutants were introduced into an S. cerevisiae cdc34 deletion strain and, following synchronization in G1-phase, progression through the cell cycle was monitored. Consistent with the increased ubiquitination activity in vitro, cells expressing the phosphosite mutants with higher catalytic activity exhibited accelerated cell cycle progression and Sic1 degradation. These studies demonstrate that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc34 on the acidic tail domain stimulates Cdc34-SCFCdc4 ubiquitination activity and cell cycle progression.

  3. Sex peptide of Drosophila melanogaster males is a global regulator of reproductive processes in females

    PubMed Central

    Gioti, A.; Wigby, S.; Wertheim, B.; Schuster, E.; Martinez, P.; Pennington, C. J.; Partridge, L.; Chapman, T.

    2012-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) alter female behaviour and physiology and can mediate sexual conflict. In Drosophila melanogaster, a single Sfp, the sex peptide (SP), triggers remarkable post-mating responses in females, including altered fecundity, feeding, immunity and sexual receptivity. These effects can favour the evolutionary interests of males while generating costs in females. We tested the hypothesis that SP is an upstream master-regulator able to induce diverse phenotypes through efficient induction of widespread transcriptional changes in females. We profiled mRNA responses to SP in adult female abdomen (Abd) and head+thorax (HT) tissues using microarrays at 3 and 6 h following mating. SP elicited a rich, subtle signature of temporally and spatially controlled mRNAs. There were significant alterations to genes linked to egg development, early embryogenesis, immunity, nutrient sensing, behaviour and, unexpectedly, phototransduction. There was substantially more variation in the direction of differential expression across time points in the HT versus Abd. The results support the idea that SP is an important regulator of gene expression in females. The expression of many genes in one sex can therefore be under the influence of a regulator expressed in the other. This could influence the extent of sexual conflict both within and between loci. PMID:22977156

  4. Methamphetamine acts on subpopulations of neurons regulating sexual behavior in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Frohmader, Karla S.; Wiskerke, Joost; Wise, Roy A.; Lehman, Michael N.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a highly addictive stimulant. Meth abuse is commonly associated with the practice of sexual risk behavior and increased prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Meth users report heightened sexual desire, arousal, and sexual pleasure. The biological basis for this drug-sex nexus is unknown. The current study demonstrates that Meth administration in male rats activates neurons in brain regions of the mesolimbic system that are involved in the regulation of sexual behavior. Specifically, Meth and mating co-activate cells in the nucleus accumbens core and shell, basolateral amygdala, and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings illustrate that in contrast to current belief drugs of abuse can activate the same cells as a natural reinforcer, i.e. sexual behavior, and in turn may influence compulsive seeking of this natural reward. PMID:20045448

  5. Regulation of the corpora allata in male larvae of the cockroach Diploptera punctata

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of corpora allata was studied in final instar males of Diploptera punctata. The glands were manipulated in vivo and removed to determine the effect by in vitro radiochemical assay for juvenile hormone synthesis. Corpora allata were also treated with putative regulatory factors in vitro. During the final stadium the corpora allata were inhibited both by nerves and by humoral factors. Neural inhibition was shown by an increase in juvenile hormone synthesis following denervation of the corpora allata. This operation elicited an extra larval instar. Humoral inhibition was shown by the decline in juvenile hormone synthesis of adult female corpora allata following transplantation into final instar larval hosts, and conversely the increase in juvenile hormone synthesis by larval corpora allata following implantation into adult females. Humoral inhibition was prevented by decapitation of larvae prior to the head critical period for molting and restored by implantation of a larval brain, showing that the brain is the source of this inhibition.

  6. Function of cyclins in regulating the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized cell cycles that characterize various aspects of the differentiation of germ cells provide a unique opportunity to understand heretofore elusive aspects of the in vivo function of cell cycle regulators. Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory sub-units, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases. Some of the cyclins exhibit unique patterns of expression in germ cells that suggest possible concomitant distinct functions, predictions that are being explored by targeted mutagenesis in mouse models. A novel, meiosis-specific function has been shown for one of the A-type cyclins, cyclin A1. Embryonic lethality has obviated understanding of the germline functions of cyclin A2 and cyclin B1, while yet other cyclins, although expressed at specific stages of germ cell development, may have less essential function in the male germline. PMID:19001847

  7. Histone H3 Threonine Phosphorylation Regulates Asymmetric Histone Inheritance in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Wooten, Matthew; Tran, Vuong; Chen, Bi-Chang; Pozmanter, Caitlin; Simbolon, Christine; Betzig, Eric; Chen, Xin

    2015-11-05

    A long-standing question concerns how stem cells maintain their identity through multiple divisions. Previously, we reported that pre-existing and newly synthesized histone H3 are asymmetrically distributed during Drosophila male germline stem cell (GSC) asymmetric division. Here, we show that phosphorylation at threonine 3 of H3 (H3T3P) distinguishes pre-existing versus newly synthesized H3. Converting T3 to the unphosphorylatable residue alanine (H3T3A) or to the phosphomimetic aspartate (H3T3D) disrupts asymmetric H3 inheritance. Expression of H3T3A or H3T3D specifically in early-stage germline also leads to cellular defects, including GSC loss and germline tumors. Finally, compromising the activity of the H3T3 kinase Haspin enhances the H3T3A but suppresses the H3T3D phenotypes. These studies demonstrate that H3T3P distinguishes sister chromatids enriched with distinct pools of H3 in order to coordinate asymmetric segregation of "old" H3 into GSCs and that tight regulation of H3T3 phosphorylation is required for male germline activity.

  8. Histone H3 Threonine Phosphorylation Regulates Asymmetric Histone Inheritance in the Drosophila Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Wooten, Matthew; Tran, Vuong; Chen, Bi-Chang; Pozmanter, Caitlin; Simbolon, Christine; Betzig, Eric; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A long-standing question concerns how stem cells maintain their identity through multiple divisions. Previously we reported that pre-existing and newly synthesized histone H3 are asymmetrically distributed during Drosophila male germline stem cell (GSC) asymmetric division. Here we show that phosphorylation at Threonine 3 of H3 (H3T3P) distinguishes preexisting versus newly synthesized H3. Converting T3 to the unphosphorylatable residue alanine (H3T3A) or to the phosphomimetic aspartate (H3T3D) disrupts asymmetric H3 inheritance. Expression of H3T3A or H3T3D specifically in early-stage germline also leads to cellular defects including GSC loss and germline tumors. Finally, compromising the activity of the H3T3 kinase Haspin enhances the H3T3A but suppresses the H3T3D phenotypes. Together these studies demonstrate that H3T3P distinguishes sister chromatids enriched with distinct pools of H3, coordinating asymmetric segregation of “old” H3 into GSCs, and that a tight regulation of H3T3 phosphorylation is required for male germline activity. PMID:26522592

  9. Concise Review: Geminin-A Tale of Two Tails: DNA Replication and Transcriptional/Epigenetic Regulation in Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Karamitros, Dimitris; Kyrousi, Christina; Lygerou, Zoi; Taraviras, Stavros

    2017-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing maintenance, commitment, and differentiation of stem cells are largely unexploited. Molecules involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes are of particular importance for stem cell physiology, as they integrate different signals and coordinate cellular decisions related with self-renewal and fate determination. Geminin has emerged as a critical factor in DNA replication and stem cell differentiation in different stem cell populations. Its inhibitory interaction with Cdt1, a member of the prereplicative complex, ensures the controlled timing of DNA replication and, consequently, genomic stability in actively proliferating cells. In embryonic as well as somatic stem cells, Geminin has been shown to interact with transcription factors and epigenetic regulators to drive gene expression programs and ultimately guide cell fate decisions. An ever-growing number of studies suggests that these interactions of Geminin and proteins regulating transcription are conserved among metazoans. Interactions between Geminin and proteins modifying the epigenome, such as members of the repressive Polycomb group and the SWI/SNF proteins of the permissive Trithorax, have long been established. The complexity of these interactions, however, is only just beginning to unravel, revealing key roles on maintaining stem cell self-renewal and fate specification. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and give new perspectives for the role of Geminin on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation, alongside with its regulatory activity in DNA replication and their implication in the regulation of stem and progenitor cell biology. Stem Cells 2017;35:299-310. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  10. The Globular Tail Domain of Myosin-5a Functions as a Dimer in Regulating the Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Yao, Lin-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-24

    Myosin-5a contains two heavy chains, which are dimerized via the coiled-coil regions. Thus, myosin-5a comprises two heads and two globular tail domains (GTDs). The GTD is the inhibitory domain that binds to the head and inhibits its motor function. Although the two-headed structure is essential for the processive movement of myosin-5a along actin filaments, little is known about the role of GTD dimerization. Here, we investigated the effect of GTD dimerization on its inhibitory activity. We found that the potent inhibitory activity of the GTD is dependent on its dimerization by the preceding coiled-coil regions, indicating synergistic interactions between the two GTDs and the two heads of myosin-5a. Moreover, we found that alanine mutations of the two conserved basic residues at N-terminal extension of the GTD not only weaken the inhibitory activity of the GTD but also enhance the activation of myosin-5a by its cargo-binding protein melanophilin (Mlph). These results are consistent with the GTD forming a head to head dimer, in which the N-terminal extension of the GTD interacts with the Mlph-binding site in the counterpart GTD. The Mlph-binding site at the GTD-GTD interface must be exposed prior to the binding of Mlph. We therefore propose that the inhibited Myo5a is equilibrated between the folded state, in which the Mlph-binding site is buried, and the preactivated state, in which the Mlph-binding site is exposed, and that Mlph is able to bind to the Myo5a in preactivated state and activates its motor function.

  11. Integrin Cytoplasmic Tail Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors essential for multicellular life. They connect cells to the extracellular environment and transduce chemical and mechanical signals to and from the cell. Intracellular proteins that bind the integrin cytoplasmic tail regulate integrin engagement of extracellular ligands as well as integrin localization and trafficking. Cytoplasmic integrin-binding proteins also function downstream of integrins, mediating links to the cytoskeleton and to signaling cascades that impact cell motility, growth, and survival. Here, we review key integrin-interacting proteins and their roles in regulating integrin activity, localization, and signaling. PMID:24467163

  12. Regulation of the brain isoprenoids farnesyl- and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate is altered in male Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Gunter P; Hooff, Gero P; Strandjord, Dana M; Igbavboa, Urule; Volmer, Dietrich A; Müller, Walter E; Wood, W Gibson

    2009-08-01

    Post-translational modification of small GTPases by farnesyl- (FPP) and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (GGPP) has generated much attention due to their potential contribution to cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Prenylated proteins have been identified in numerous cell functions and elevated levels of FPP and GGPP have been previously proposed to occur in Alzheimer disease (AD) but have never been quantified. In the present study, we determined if the mevalonate derived compounds FPP and GGPP are increased in brain grey and white matter of male AD patients as compared with control samples. This study demonstrates for the first time that FPP and GGPP levels are significantly elevated in human AD grey and white matter but not cholesterol, indicating a potentially disease-specific targeting of isoprenoid regulation independent of HMG-CoA-reductase. Further suggesting a selective disruption of FPP and GGPP homeostasis in AD, we show that inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in vivo significantly reduced FPP, GGPP and cholesterol abundance in mice with the largest effect on the isoprenoids. A tentative conclusion is that if indeed regulation of FPP and GGPP is altered in AD brain such changes may stimulate protein prenylation and contribute to AD neuropathophysiology.

  13. Nutrition regulation of male accessory gland growth and maturation in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Anciro, Ashlee L; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2015-06-02

    Insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway is known to control growth, development and reproduction. Insulin-like peptide mediated body size plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster has been reported. Here, our studies showed that IIS pathway and nutrition regulate growth and maturation of the male accessory gland (MAG) in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. The size of MAG increased from day 1 to day 5 post-adult emergence (PAE). This increase in the size of MAG is contributed by an increase in cell size, but not cell number. The growth of MAG was impaired after double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-mediated knockdown in the expression of genes coding for ILP3, InR, Chico, PI3k, AKT, and GATA1 involved in IIS pathway. Interestingly, starvation showed similar effects on the growth and maturation of MAG. The phenotypes observed in animals where IIS signaling pathway genes were knocked down are similar to the phenotypes observed after starving beetles for 5 days PAE. These data suggest that nutrition signals working through IIS pathway regulate maturation of MAG by promoting the growth of MAG cells.

  14. Chronic unpredictable stress regulates visceral adipocyte‐mediated glucose metabolism and inflammatory circuits in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannides, Iordanes; Golovatscka, Viktoriya; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Sideri, Aristea; Salas, Martha; Stavrakis, Dimitris; Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Bradesi, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic psychological stress is a prominent risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of many complex diseases, including major depression, obesity, and type II diabetes. Visceral adipose tissue is a key endocrine organ involved in the regulation of insulin action and an important component in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we examined for the first time the changes on visceral adipose tissue physiology and on adipocyte‐associated insulin sensitivity and function after chronic unpredictable stress in rats. Male rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress for 35 days. Total body and visceral fat was measured. Cytokines and activated intracellular kinase levels were determined using high‐throughput multiplex assays. Adipocyte function was assessed via tritiated glucose uptake assay. Stressed rats showed no weight gain, and their fat/lean mass ratio increased dramatically compared to control animals. Stressed rats had significantly higher mesenteric fat content and epididymal fat pad weight and demonstrated reduced serum glucose clearing capacity following glucose challenge. Alterations in fat depot size were mainly due to changes in adipocyte numbers and not size. High‐throughput molecular screening in adipocytes isolated from stressed rats revealed activation of intracellular inflammatory, glucose metabolism, and MAPK networks compared to controls, as well as significantly reduced glucose uptake capacity in response to insulin stimulation. Our study identifies the adipocyte as a key regulator of the effects of chronic stress on insulin resistance, and glucose metabolism, with important ramifications in the pathophysiology of several stress‐related disease states. PMID:24819750

  15. Steroidogenic Factor 1 Differentially Regulates Fetal and Adult Leydig Cell Development in Male Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1−/− mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1−/−;tg+/0) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1−/−;tg+/0 embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival. PMID:26269506

  16. Ablation of internalization signals in the carboxyl-terminal tail of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator enhances cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Peter, Krisztina; Varga, Karoly; Bebok, Zsuzsa; McNicholas-Bevensee, Carmel M; Schwiebert, Lisa; Sorscher, Eric J; Schwiebert, Erik M; Collawn, James F

    2002-12-20

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that undergoes endocytosis through clathrin-coated pits. Previously, we demonstrated that Y1424A is important for CFTR endocytosis (Prince, L. S., Peter, K., Hatton, S. R., Zaliauskiene, L., Cotlin, L. F., Clancy, J. P., Marchase, R. B., and Collawn, J. F. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 3602-3609). Here we show that a second substitution in the carboxyl-terminal tail of CFTR, I1427A, on Y1424A background more than doubles CFTR surface expression as monitored by surface biotinylation. Internalization assays indicate that enhanced surface expression of Y1424A,I1427A CFTR is caused by a 76% inhibition of endocytosis. Patch clamp recording of chloride channel activity revealed that there was a corresponding increase in chloride channel activity of Y1424A,I1427A CFTR, consistent with the elevated surface expression, and no change in CFTR channel properties. Y14124A showed an intermediate phenotype compared with the double mutation, both in terms of surface expression and chloride channel activity. Metabolic pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the two mutations did not affect maturation efficiency or protein half-life. Taken together, our data show that there is an internalization signal in the COOH terminus of CFTR that consists of Tyr(1424)-X-X-Ile(1427) where both the tyrosine and the isoleucine are essential residues. This signal regulates CFTR surface expression but not CFTR biogenesis, degradation, or chloride channel function.

  17. The posteromedial cortical amygdala regulates copulatory behavior, but not sexual odor preference, in the male Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Maras, P M; Petrulis, A

    2008-10-15

    In rodent species, the expression of reproductive behavior relies heavily on the perception of social odors, as well as the presence of circulating steroid hormones. In the Syrian hamster, chemosensory and hormonal cues are processed within an interconnected network of ventral forebrain nuclei that regulates many aspects of social behavior. Within this network, the posteromedial cortical amygdala (PMCo) receives direct projections from the accessory olfactory bulbs and contains a dense population of steroid receptor-containing neurons. Consequently, the PMCo may be important for generating odor-guided aspects of reproductive behavior, yet little is known regarding the role of this nucleus in regulating these behaviors. Thus, the present study tested male hamsters with site-specific electrolytic lesions of the PMCo for their (a) sexual odor preference in a Y-maze apparatus, (b) sexual odor discrimination in a habituation-dishabituation task, and (c) copulatory behavior when paired with a sexually receptive female. PMCo-lesioned males preferred to investigate female odors over male odors and were able to discriminate between these odor sources. However, PMCo lesions were associated with several alterations in the male copulatory pattern. First, PMCo-lesioned males displayed increased investigation of the female's non-anogenital region, suggesting that the PMCo may be involved in directing appropriate chemosensory investigation during mating. Second, PMCo lesions altered the temporal pattern of the mating sequence, as PMCo-lesioned males took longer than Sham-lesioned males to reach sexual satiety, as indicated by the delayed expression of long intromissions. This delayed onset of satiety was associated with an increased number of ejaculations compared with Sham-lesioned males. Importantly, these data provide the first direct evidence for a functional role of the PMCo in regulating male reproductive behavior.

  18. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-01-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3+/− germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse. PMID:28290521

  19. Ndrg3 gene regulates DSB repair during meiosis through modulation the ERK signal pathway in the male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuan; Jiang, Hanwei; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Liu; Qi, Qi; Bi, Yuan; Wang, Jian; Shi, Qinghua; Li, Runsheng

    2017-03-14

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG) family consists of 4 members, NDRG-1, -2, -3, -4. Physiologically, we found Ndrg3, a critical gene which led to homologous lethality in the early embryo development, regulated the male meiosis in mouse. The expression of Ndrg3 was enhanced specifically in germ cells, and reached its peak level in the pachytene stage spermatocyte. Haplo-insufficiency of Ndrg3 gene led to sub-infertility during the male early maturation. In the Ndrg3(+/-) germ cells, some meiosis events such as DSB repair and synaptonemal complex formation were impaired. Disturbances on meiotic prophase progression and spermatogenesis were observed. In mechanism, the attenuation of pERK1/2 signaling was detected in the heterozygous testis. With our primary spermatocyte culture system, we found that lactate promoted DSB repair via ERK1/2 signaling in the male mouse germ cells in vitro. Deficiency of Ndrg3 gene attenuated the activation of ERK which further led to the aberrancy of DSB repair in the male germ cells in mouse. Taken together, we reported that Ndrg3 gene modulated the lactate induced ERK pathway to facilitate DSB repair in male germ cells, which further regulated meiosis and subsequently fertility in male mouse.

  20. Fkbp52 regulates androgen receptor transactivation activity and male urethra morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanying; Yong, Weidong; Hinds, Terry D; Yang, Zuocheng; Zhou, Yuhong; Sanchez, Edwin R; Shou, Weinian

    2010-09-03

    Hypospadias is a common birth defect in humans, yet its etiology and pattern of onset are largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that male mice with targeted ablation of FK506-binding protein-52 (Fkbp52) develop hypospadias, most likely due to actions of Fkbp52 as a molecular co-chaperone of the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we further dissect the developmental and molecular mechanisms that underlie hypospadias in Fkbp52-deficient mice. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a defect in the elevation of prepucial swelling that led to the onset of the ventral penile cleft. Interestingly, expression of Fkbp52 was highest in the ventral aspect of the developing penis that undergoes fusion of the urethral epithelium. Although in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Fkbp52 mutants had a normal urethral epithelium signaling center and epithelial differentiation, a reduced apoptotic cell index at ventral epithelial cells at the site of fusion and a defect of genital mesenchymal cell migration were observed. Supplementation of gestating females with excess testosterone partially rescued the hypospadic phenotype in Fkbp52 mutant males, showing that loss of Fkbp52 desensitizes AR to hormonal activation. Direct measurement of AR activity was performed in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells treated with dihydrotestosterone or synthetic agonist R1881. Reduced AR activity at genes controlling sexual dimorphism and cell growth was found in Fkbp52-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed normal occupancy of AR at gene promoters, suggesting that Fkbp52 exerts downstream effects on the transactivation function of AR. Taken together, our data show Fkbp52 to be an important molecular regulator in the androgen-mediated pathway of urethra morphogenesis.

  1. Fkbp52 Regulates Androgen Receptor Transactivation Activity and Male Urethra Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hanying; Yong, Weidong; Hinds, Terry D.; Yang, Zuocheng; Zhou, Yuhong; Sanchez, Edwin R.; Shou, Weinian

    2010-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common birth defect in humans, yet its etiology and pattern of onset are largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that male mice with targeted ablation of FK506-binding protein-52 (Fkbp52) develop hypospadias, most likely due to actions of Fkbp52 as a molecular co-chaperone of the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we further dissect the developmental and molecular mechanisms that underlie hypospadias in Fkbp52-deficient mice. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a defect in the elevation of prepucial swelling that led to the onset of the ventral penile cleft. Interestingly, expression of Fkbp52 was highest in the ventral aspect of the developing penis that undergoes fusion of the urethral epithelium. Although in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Fkbp52 mutants had a normal urethral epithelium signaling center and epithelial differentiation, a reduced apoptotic cell index at ventral epithelial cells at the site of fusion and a defect of genital mesenchymal cell migration were observed. Supplementation of gestating females with excess testosterone partially rescued the hypospadic phenotype in Fkbp52 mutant males, showing that loss of Fkbp52 desensitizes AR to hormonal activation. Direct measurement of AR activity was performed in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells treated with dihydrotestosterone or synthetic agonist R1881. Reduced AR activity at genes controlling sexual dimorphism and cell growth was found in Fkbp52-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed normal occupancy of AR at gene promoters, suggesting that Fkbp52 exerts downstream effects on the transactivation function of AR. Taken together, our data show Fkbp52 to be an important molecular regulator in the androgen-mediated pathway of urethra morphogenesis. PMID:20605780

  2. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  3. Direct binding of the Kex2p cytosolic tail to the VHS domain of yeast Gga2p facilitates TGN to prevacuolar compartment transport and is regulated by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    De, Mithu; Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Fuller, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Human Golgi-localized, γ-ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor–binding proteins (Ggas) bind directly to acidic dileucine sorting motifs in the cytosolic tails (C-tails) of intracellular receptors. Despite evidence for a role in recruiting ubiquitinated cargo, it remains unclear whether yeast Ggas also function by binding peptide-sorting signals directly. Two-hybrid analysis shows that the Gga1p and Gga2p Vps27, Hrs, Stam (VHS) domains both bind a site in the Kex2p C-tail and that the Gga2p VHS domain binds a site in the Vps10p C-tail. Binding requires deletion of an apparently autoinhibitory sequence in the Gga2p hinge. Ser780 in the Kex2p C-tail is crucial for binding: an Ala substitution blocks but an Asp substitution permits binding. Biochemical assays using purified Gga2p VHS–GGA and TOM1 (GAT) and glutathione S-transferase–Kex2p C-tail fusions show that Gga2p binds directly to the Kex2p C-tail, with relative affinities Asp780 > Ser780 > Ala780. Affinity-purified antibody against a peptide containing phospho-Ser­780 recognizes wild-type Kex2p but not S780A Kex2p, showing that Ser780 is phosphorylated in vivo; phosphorylation of Ser780 is up-regulated by cell wall–damaging drugs. Finally, mutation of Ser780 alters trafficking of Kex2p both in vivo and in cell-free trans-Golgi network (TGN)–prevacuolar compartment (PVC) transport. Thus yeast Gga adaptors facilitate TGN–PVC transport by direct binding of noncanonical phosphoregulated Gga-binding sites in cargo molecules. PMID:23408788

  4. The male fight-flight response: a result of SRY regulation of catecholamines?

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Harley, Vincent R

    2012-06-01

    The SRY gene, which is located on the Y chromosome and directs male development, may promote aggression and other traditionally male behavioural traits, resulting in the fight-or-flight reaction to stress.

  5. Evolutionary insights into the regulation of courtship behavior in male amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Sarah C; Sakata, Jon T; Crews, David

    2004-11-15

    Comparative studies of species differences and similarities in the regulation of courtship behavior afford an understanding of evolutionary pressures and constraints shaping reproductive processes and the relative contributions of hormonal, genetic, and ecological factors. Here, we review species differences and similarities in the control of courtship and copulatory behaviors in male amphibians and reptiles, focusing on the role of sex steroid hormones, the neurohormone arginine vasotocin (AVT), and catecholamines. We discuss species differences in the sensory modalities used during courtship and in the neural correlates of these differences, as well as the value of particular model systems for neural evolution studies with regard to reproductive processes. For example, in some genera of amphibians (e.g., Ambystoma) and reptiles (e.g., Cnemidophorus), interspecific hybridizations occur, making it possible to compare the ancestral with the descendant species, and these systems provide a window into the process of behavioral and neural evolution as well as the effect of genome size. Though our understanding of the hormonal and neural correlates of mating behavior in a variety of amphibian and reptilian species has advanced substantially, more studies that manipulate hormone or neurotransmitter systems are required to assess the functions of these systems.

  6. A cytoplasmic male sterility-associated mitochondrial peptide in common bean is post-translationally regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Sarria, R; Lyznik, A; Vallejos, C E; Mackenzie, S A

    1998-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility in the common bean plant is associated with a dominant mitochondrial mutation designated pvs-or f 239 (for Phaseolus vulgaris sterility sequence open reading frame 239). The sequence is transcribed in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, but the translation product, ORF239, is present only in reproductive tissues. We present evidence to support a model of post-translational regulation of ORF239 expression based on the following observations. In organello translation experiments using purified mitochondria from young seedlings demonstrated accumulation of ORF239 only when a protease inhibitor was included. Proteolytic activity against ORF239 was observed in mitochondrial extracts fractionating with the mitochondrial inner membrane. The DNA sequence encoding a serine-type protease, similar to the lon protease gene of Escherichia coli, was cloned from the Arabidopsis genome. The expression product of this sequence demonstrated proteolytic activity against ORF239 in vitro, with features resembling the activity detected in mitochondrial inner membrane preparations. Antibodies generated against the overexpressed Lon homolog reduced proteolytic activity against ORF239 when added to mitochondrial extracts. Our data suggest that ORF239 was undetected in vegetative tissue due to rapid turnover by at least one mitochondrial protease that acts against ORF239 post-translationally. PMID:9668139

  7. Gene regulation by NMDA receptor activation in the SDN-POA neurons of male rats during sexual development.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Shao, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ke-Li; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Hsu, Chin

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify possible signaling pathways, which may play a role in prevention of neuronal apoptosis in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) after physiological activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Gene response to the blockage of the NMDA receptor by an antagonist (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate; MK-801) was screened after suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The results showed that differential screening after SSH detected the presence of some neurotrophic genes (RNA binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), alpha-tubulin) as well as apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, cytochrome oxidase subunit III) in the SDN-POA of male rats, which were down-regulated by blocking the NMDA receptor. The RT-PCR products of the aforementioned genes in MK-801-treated males were significantly less than that in untreated males. In particular, the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, including Bcl-2 protein, in male rats were significantly suppressed by MK-801 treatment. Moreover, the binding activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) was significantly higher in male rats than in females, but significantly diminished by blocking the NMDA receptor with MK-801 in male rats. No significant difference in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding activity was observed among untreated male, MK-801-treated male, untreated female and MK-801-treated female groups. These results suggest that genes regulated by NMDA receptor activation might participate in neuronal growth and/or anti-apoptosis, and support an important signaling pathway of NFkappaB activation and its target gene, Bcl-2, in preventing neuronal apoptosis in the SDN-POA of male rats during sexual development.

  8. Quantitative measurement of histone tail acetylation reveals stage-specific regulation and response to environmental changes during Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ryan A.; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O’Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J.; O’Reilly, Alana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as gamma-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, gamma-irradiation dramatically increased acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via non-homologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system, and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation. PMID:26836402

  9. Regulation of pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors by androgens in the male rabbit.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Ladizhenskaya, A; Gunsalus, G L; Bardin, C W; Thau, R B

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in adult male rabbits after castration and androgen replacement with testosterone (T) or 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone acetate (U-15,614; T analog) supplied by Silastic capsules implanted sc. Castration increased pituitary GnRH receptors significantly, from 99.3 to 329.5 fmol/mg protein within 4 weeks, without a change in the equilibrium association constant. Serum LH concentrations increased from 0.45 to maximum levels of 2.6 ng/ml by day 8 after orchiectomy; these levels persisted throughout the 4 weeks of study. Serum FSH reached maximum levels of 33.6 ng/ml 5 days after castration. T replacement with 250, 500, and 1000 micrograms/kg X day, prevented a postcastration rise in both pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations and gonadotropin secretion, while 100 micrograms/kg X day prevented an increase in GnRH receptors, but did not completely inhibit hypersecretion of gonadotropins. Administration of T analog at doses of 6.25 and 12.5 micrograms/kg X day partially suppressed the castration-induced increase in pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations, while 25, 50, and 100 micrograms/kg X day suppressed GnRH-binding sites to the levels found in intact controls in 15 of 16 rabbits. By contrast, none of the T analog doses was able to prevent completely LH and FSH hypersecretion. The fact that both T and T analog induced dose-dependent stimulation of prostate and seminal vesicle weights indicates that there are tissue-specific differences in the sensitivity to androgens. We conclude that in the male rabbit 1) pituitary GnRH receptors significantly increase after castration; 2) this increase may partially mediate the postcastration hypersecretion of LH and FSH; 3) castration-induced effects can be prevented by androgen replacement. These results are similar to those obtained in rats, where castration increases LHRH receptors, but contrast with results in mice and hamsters, where castration either reduces or does not

  10. Large Putative PEST-like Sequence Motif at the Carboxyl Tail of Human Calcium Receptor Directs Lysosomal Degradation and Regulates Cell Surface Receptor Level*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Northup, John K.; Ray, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    A deletion between amino acid residues Ser895 and Val1075 in the carboxyl terminus of the human calcium receptor (hCaR), which causes autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, showed enhanced signaling activity and increased cell surface expression in HEK293 cells (Lienhardt, A., Garabédian, M. G., Bai, M., Sinding, C., Zhang, Z., Lagarde, J. P., Boulesteix, J., Rigaud, M., Brown, E. M., and Kottler, M. L. (2000) J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 85, 1695–1702). To identify the underlying mechanism(s) for these increases, we investigated the effects of carboxyl tail truncation and deletion in hCaR mutants using a combination of biochemical and cell imaging approaches to define motifs that participate in regulating cell surface numbers of this G protein-coupled receptor. Our data indicate a rapid constitutive receptor internalization of the cell surface hCaR, accumulating in early (Rab7 positive) and late endosomal (LAMP1 positive) sorting compartments, before targeting to lysosomes for degradation. Recycling of hCaR back to the cell surface was also evident. Truncation and deletion mapping defined a 51-amino acid sequence between residues 920 and 970 that is required for targeting to lysosomes and degradation but not for internalization or recycling of the receptor. No singular sequence motif was identified, instead the required sequence elements seem to distribute throughout this entire interval. This interval includes a high proportion of acidic and hydroxylated amino acid residues, suggesting a similarity to PEST-like degradation motif (PESTfind score of +10) and several glutamine repeats. The results define a novel large PEST-like sequence that participates in the sorting of internalized hCaR routed to the lysosomal/degradation pathway that regulates cell surface receptor numbers. PMID:22158862

  11. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  12. The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic C-Terminal Tail Domain Regulates the Energy Requirement for EBV-Induced Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. IMPORTANCE Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV

  13. Impact of gonadectomy on blood pressure regulation in ageing male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Pijacka, Wioletta; Clifford, Bethan; Walas, Dawid; Tilburgs, Chantal; Joles, Jaap A; McMullen, Sarah; Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in blood pressure has been associated with differential expression of the angiotensin II (AII) receptors and with activity of the nervous system. It is generally accepted that ageing affects kidney function as well as autonomic nervous system and hormonal balance. Given that hypertension is more prevalent in men than women until women reach their seventh decade, we hypothesised that females would be relatively protected from adverse effects of ageing compared to males and that this would be mediated by the protective effect of ovarian steroids. Intact and gonadectomised male and female normotensive Wistar rats aged 6, 12 and 18 months were used to study renal function, blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure variability. We observed that intact females had lower levels of proteinuria and higher (12.5%) creatinine clearance compared to intact males and that this difference was abolished by castration but not by ovariectomy. Ovariectomy resulted in a change by 9% in heart rate, resulting in similar cardiovascular parameters to those observed in males or gonadectomised males. Spectral analysis of systolic blood pressure revealed that high-frequency power spectra were significantly elevated in the females vs. males and were reduced by ovariectomy. Taken altogether, the results show that females are protected from age-related declining renal function and to a lesser extent from rising blood pressure in comparison to males. Whilst ovariectomy had some deleterious effects in females, the strongest effects were associated with gonadectomy in males, suggesting a damaging effect of male hormones.

  14. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  15. The essential Drosophila CLAMP protein differentially regulates non-coding roX RNAs in male and females.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jennifer A; Doherty, Caroline A; Jordan, William T; Bliss, Jacob E; Feng, Jessica; Soruco, Marcela M; Rieder, Leila E; Tsiarli, Maria A; Larschan, Erica N

    2017-06-01

    Heterogametic species require chromosome-wide gene regulation to compensate for differences in sex chromosome gene dosage. In Drosophila melanogaster, transcriptional output from the single male X-chromosome is equalized to that of XX females by recruitment of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, which increases transcript levels of active genes 2-fold. The MSL complex contains several protein components and two non-coding RNA on the X ( roX) RNAs that are transcriptionally activated by the MSL complex. We previously discovered that targeting of the MSL complex to the X-chromosome is dependent on the chromatin-linked adapter for MSL proteins (CLAMP) zinc finger protein. To better understand CLAMP function, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to generate a frameshift mutation in the clamp gene that eliminates expression of the CLAMP protein. We found that clamp null females die at the third instar larval stage, while almost all clamp null males die at earlier developmental stages. Moreover, we found that in clamp null females roX gene expression is activated, whereas in clamp null males roX gene expression is reduced. Therefore, CLAMP regulates roX abundance in a sex-specific manner. Our results provide new insights into sex-specific gene regulation by an essential transcription factor.

  16. Molecular regulation of sexual preference revealed by genetic studies of 5-HT in the brains of male mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yun'ai; Si, Yunxia; Kim, Ji-Young; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Rao, Yi

    2011-04-07

    Although the question of to whom a male directs his mating attempts is a critical one in social interactions, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling mammalian sexual preference. Here we report that the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is required for male sexual preference. Wild-type male mice preferred females over males, but males lacking central serotonergic neurons lost sexual preference although they were not generally defective in olfaction or in pheromone sensing. A role for 5-HT was demonstrated by the phenotype of mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2), which is required for the first step of 5-HT synthesis in the brain. Thirty-five minutes after the injection of the intermediate 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), which circumvented Tph2 to restore 5-HT to the wild-type level, adult Tph2 knockout mice also preferred females over males. These results indicate that 5-HT and serotonergic neurons in the adult brain regulate mammalian sexual preference.

  17. Genetic mapping of male pheromone response in the European corn borer identifies candidate genes regulating neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Teun; Heckel, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The sexual pheromone communication system of moths is a model system for studies of the evolution of reproductive isolation. Females emit a blend of volatile components that males detect at a distance. Species differences in female pheromone composition and male response directly reinforce reproductive isolation in nature, because even slight variations in the species-specific pheromone blend are usually rejected by the male. The mechanisms by which a new pheromone signal–response system could evolve are enigmatic, because any deviation from the optimally attractive blend should be selected against. Here we investigate the genetic mechanisms enabling a switch in male response. We used a quantitative trait locus-mapping approach to identify the genetic basis of male response in the two pheromone races of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis. Male response to a 99:1 vs. a 3:97 ratio of the E and Z isomers of the female pheromone is governed by a single, sex-linked locus. We found that the chromosomal region most tightly linked to this locus contains genes involved in neurogenesis but, in accordance with an earlier study, does not contain the odorant receptors expressed in the male antenna that detect the pheromone. This finding implies that differences in the development of neuronal pathways conveying information from the antenna, not differences in pheromone detection by the odorant receptors, are primarily responsible for the behavioral response differences among the males in this system. Comparison with other moth species reveals a previously unexplored mechanism by which male pheromone response can change in evolution. PMID:27698145

  18. Roles of RNA-binding Proteins and Post-transcriptional Regulation in Driving Male Germ Cell Development in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Licatalosi, Donny D

    Tissue development and homeostasis are dependent on highly regulated gene expression programs in which cell-specific combinations of regulatory factors determine which genes are expressed and the post-transcriptional fate of the resulting RNA transcripts. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by RNA-binding proteins has critical roles in tissue development-allowing individual genes to generate multiple RNA and protein products, and the timing, location, and abundance of protein synthesis to be finely controlled. Extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs during mammalian gametogenesis, including high levels of alternative mRNA expression, stage-specific expression of mRNA variants, broad translational repression, and stage-specific activation of mRNA translation. In this chapter, an overview of the roles of RNA-binding proteins and the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in male germ cell development in the mouse is presented.

  19. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    PubMed

    Voss, Gareth J; Kump, D Kevin; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4%) and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  20. Variation in Salamander Tail Regeneration Is Associated with Genetic Factors That Determine Tail Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Gareth J.; Kump, D. Kevin; Walker, John A.; Voss, S. Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander’s tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66–68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4%) and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site. PMID:23843997

  1. Molecular Regulation of Sexual Preference Revealed by Genetic Studies of 5-HT in the Brain of Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yun’ai; Si, Yunxia; Kim, Ji-Young; Chen, Zhou-Feng; Rao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    To whom should a male directs his mating? While it is a critical social interaction, little is known about molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling mammalian sexual preference. Here we report that the neurotransmitter 5-HT is required for male sexual preference. Male mice lacking central serotonergic neurons lost sexual preference but were not generally defective in olfaction. A role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was demonstrated by the phenotype of mice unable to synthesize 5-HT in the brain when lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2). 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) injection rescued the phenotype of adult Tph2 knockout mice within 35 minutes. These results indicate that 5-HT and serotonergic neurons in the adult brain regulate mammalian sexual preference. PMID:21441904

  2. Kisspeptin regulates tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurones and prolactin secretion in an oestradiol-dependent manner in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A B; Leite, C M; Kalil, B; Franci, C R; Anselmo-Franci, J A; Szawka, R E

    2015-02-01

    Prolactin (PRL) secretion is inhibited by hypothalamic dopamine. Kisspeptin controls luteinising hormone (LH) secretion and is also involved in PRL regulation. We further investigated the effect of kisspeptin-10 (Kp-10) on the activity of tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neurones and the role of oestradiol (E2 ) in this mechanism. Female and male rats were injected with i.c.v. Kp-10 and evaluated for PRL release and the activity of dopamine terminals in the median eminence (ME) and neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary (NIL). Kp-10 at the doses of 0.6 and 3 nmol increased plasma PRL and decreased 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels in the ME and NIL of ovariectomised (OVX), E2 -treated rats but had no effect in OVX. In gonad-intact males, 3 nmol Kp-10 increased PRL secretion and decreased DOPAC levels in the ME but not in the NIL. Castrated males treated with either testosterone or E2 also displayed increased PRL secretion and reduced ME DOPAC in response to Kp-10, whereas castrated rats receiving oil or dihydrotestosterone were unresponsive. By contrast, the LH response to Kp-10 was not E2 -dependent in either females or males. Additionally, immunohistochemical double-labelling demonstrated that TIDA neurones of male rats contain oestrogen receptor (ER)-α, with a higher proportion of neurones expressing ERα than in dioestrous females. The dopaminergic neurones of periventricular hypothalamic nucleus displayed much lower ERα expression. Thus, TIDA neurones express ERα in male and female rats, and kisspeptin increases PRL secretion through inhibition of TIDA neurones in an E2 -dependent manner in both sexes. These findings provide new evidence about the role of kisspeptin in the regulation of dopamine and PRL. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  3. Overexpression of phytosulfokine-α induces male sterility and cell growth by regulating cell wall development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangliang; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yumin; Li, Qiong; Tang, Guirong; Luo, Li

    2016-12-01

    Over-production of functional PSK-α in Arabidopsis caused increases in both plant cell growth and biomass and induced male sterility by regulating cell wall development. Phytosulfokine-α (PSK-α) is a novel disulfated pentapeptide hormone that is involved in promoting plant cell growth. Although a role for PSK-α in stimulating protoplast expansion has been suggested, how PSK-α regulates cell growth in planta remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that overexpression of the normal PSK-α precursor gene AtPSK4, which resulted in high levels of PSK-α, caused longer roots and larger leaves with enlarged cells. As expected, these changes were not observed in transgenic plants overexpressing mutated AtPSK4, which generated unsulfated PSK-α. These findings confirmed the role of PSK-α in promoting plant cell growth. Furthermore, we found that overexpressing AtPSK4, but not mutated AtPSK4, induced a phenotype of male sterility that resulted from the failure of fibrous cell wall development in the endothecium. In addition, overexpressing AtPSK4 enhanced expression of a number of genes encoding expansins, which are involved in cell wall loosening. Accordingly, in addition to its role in cell growth, we propose a novel function for PSK-α signaling in the modulation of plant male sterility via regulation of cell wall development.

  4. White-tailed deer in the Midwest.

    Treesearch

    USDA FS

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of the nonyarding white-tailed deer population in the Midwestern United States. Range appraisal, habitat, harvest regulation, and population control are included.

  5. Role of male-female interaction in regulating reproduction in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Walkden-Brown, S W; Martin, G B; Restall, B J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of synchronous ovulatory activity in anovulatory sheep and goats after the introduction of males, the 'male effect', has probably been used to advantage since these species were domesticated and the underlying physiological and behavioural mechanisms have been progressively elucidated over the past 50 years. Less well understood is the analogous effect of oestrous females on males. This review examines the nature and importance of these male-female interactions in sheep and goats, and describes the most important internal and external factors influencing the reproductive outcomes of such interactions. It is proposed that the male and female effects are both components of a self-reinforcing cycle of stimulation that, under ideal conditions, culminates in the synchronous very rapid onset (within days) of fertile reproductive activity. However, precisely because of the speed of this response, it is suggested that mechanisms have evolved to limit its efficacy, and thus prevent conception at inappropriate times. The complexity of these factors and the interactions between them are highlighted, and a broad conceptual framework for understanding them is proposed based upon an appreciation of variation in both the responsiveness of the target animal and the quality of the signal from the signalling animal.

  6. Androgen regulation of secretions in the sebaceous-like uropygial gland of the male Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Abalain, J H; Amet, Y; Daniel, J Y; Floch, H H

    1984-11-01

    The uropygial gland of the male quail is a sebaceous-like, androgen-dependent structure. The waxes secreted by this gland consist of fatty acids esterified by alkane-2,3-diols. In adult male quail the relative concentrations of all fatty acids were not affected by castration and testosterone treatment; but in contrast, the relative concentration of dodecane diol was found to be correlated with the androgen levels. In castrated quail administration of testosterone induced an increase in the dodecane diol percentage which was blocked by protein-synthesis inhibitors. Furthermore, the effects of testosterone were found to be neutralized by the administration of cyproterone acetate. Consequently it may be stated that the relative concentration of dodecane diol is indeed a very good marker for androgenicity in the uropygial gland of the male quail. This experimental model seems well suited for evaluating the stimulators and inhibitors of the activity of the sebaceous gland.

  7. Self-Regulated Learning and Executive Function: Exploring the Relationships in a Sample of Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Effeney, Gerard; Carroll, Annemaree; Bahr, Nan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between SRL and EF in a sample of 254 school-aged adolescent males. Two hypotheses were tested: that self-reported measures of SRL and EF are closely related and that as different aspects of EF mature during adolescence, the corresponding components of SRL should also improve, leading to an age-related…

  8. Development and psychometric properties of a self-regulation scale about leisure time physical activity in Iranian male adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Abasi, Mohammad Hadi; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Rakhshani, Fatemeh; Shiri, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-regulation is one of the current psychological concepts that have been known as a determinant of leisure time physical activity. Due to cultural and social diversity in different societies and age groups, application of specific questionnaires is essential to perform investigations about physical activities. The aim of this study is development and evaluation of psychometric properties of a self-regulation questionnaire about leisure time physical activity in Iranian male adolescents. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013, and data of 603 male students from 12 high schools in Isfahan were collected. A comprehensive literature review and similar questionnaire review were conducted and 25 items were selected or developed to measure self-regulation. Comprehensibility of items was evaluated in a pilot study and an expert panel evaluated face and content validity. Exploratory factors analysis (EFA) was used for evaluation of construct validity and extraction of sub-constructs of self-regulation. Leisure time physical activity was assessed using International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Results: The mean age of the participants was 16.3 years (SD =1.0) and the range was 15-19 years. Cronbach's α coefficient of the questionnaire in the pilot and main study was 0.84 and 0.90, respectively. EFA resulted in four sub-constructs including “enlistment of social support”, “goal setting”, “self-construction”, and “self-monitoring”, which explained 63.6% of the variance of self-regulation. Conclusions: Results of this investigation provide some support to the validity and reliability of the 16-item questionnaire of self-regulation abut leisure time physical activity in the target group. PMID:27095993

  9. Chk2 and P53 Regulate the Transmission of Healed Chromosomes in the Drosophila Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Titen, Simon W. A.; Lin, Ho-Chen; Bhandari, Jayaram; Golic, Kent G.

    2014-01-01

    When a dicentric chromosome breaks in mitosis, the broken ends cannot be repaired by normal mechanisms that join two broken ends since each end is in a separate daughter cell. However, in the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a broken end may be healed by de novo telomere addition. We find that Chk2 (encoded by lok) and P53, major mediators of the DNA damage response, have strong and opposite influences on the transmission of broken-and-healed chromosomes: lok mutants exhibit a large increase in the recovery of healed chromosomes relative to wildtype control males, but p53 mutants show a strong reduction. This contrasts with the soma, where mutations in lok and p53 have the nearly identical effect of allowing survival and proliferation of cells with irreparable DNA damage. Examination of testes revealed a transient depletion of germline cells after dicentric chromosome induction in the wildtype controls, and further showed that P53 is required for the germline to recover. Although lok mutant males transmit healed chromosomes at a high rate, broken chromosome ends can also persist through spermatogonial divisions without healing in lok mutants, giving rise to frequent dicentric bridges in Meiosis II. Cytological and genetic analyses show that spermatid nuclei derived from such meiotic divisions are eliminated during spermiogenesis, resulting in strong meiotic drive. We conclude that the primary responsibility for maintaining genome integrity in the male germline lies with Chk2, and that P53 is required to reconstitute the germline when cells are eliminated owing to unrepaired DNA damage. PMID:24586185

  10. Chk2 and p53 regulate the transmission of healed chromosomes in the Drosophila male germline.

    PubMed

    Titen, Simon W A; Lin, Ho-Chen; Bhandari, Jayaram; Golic, Kent G

    2014-02-01

    When a dicentric chromosome breaks in mitosis, the broken ends cannot be repaired by normal mechanisms that join two broken ends since each end is in a separate daughter cell. However, in the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a broken end may be healed by de novo telomere addition. We find that Chk2 (encoded by lok) and P53, major mediators of the DNA damage response, have strong and opposite influences on the transmission of broken-and-healed chromosomes: lok mutants exhibit a large increase in the recovery of healed chromosomes relative to wildtype control males, but p53 mutants show a strong reduction. This contrasts with the soma, where mutations in lok and p53 have the nearly identical effect of allowing survival and proliferation of cells with irreparable DNA damage. Examination of testes revealed a transient depletion of germline cells after dicentric chromosome induction in the wildtype controls, and further showed that P53 is required for the germline to recover. Although lok mutant males transmit healed chromosomes at a high rate, broken chromosome ends can also persist through spermatogonial divisions without healing in lok mutants, giving rise to frequent dicentric bridges in Meiosis II. Cytological and genetic analyses show that spermatid nuclei derived from such meiotic divisions are eliminated during spermiogenesis, resulting in strong meiotic drive. We conclude that the primary responsibility for maintaining genome integrity in the male germline lies with Chk2, and that P53 is required to reconstitute the germline when cells are eliminated owing to unrepaired DNA damage.

  11. A Young Drosophila Duplicate Gene Plays Essential Roles in Spermatogenesis by Regulating Several Y-Linked Male Fertility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yuan; Zhao, Ruoping; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Guojie; Dong, Yang; Yu, Haijing; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplication is supposed to be the major source for genetic innovations. However, how a new duplicate gene acquires functions by integrating into a pathway and results in adaptively important phenotypes has remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanism of the young kep1 gene family in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup to understand the origin and evolution of new genes with new functions. Sequence and expression analysis demonstrates that one of the new duplicates, nsr (novel spermatogenesis regulator), exhibits positive selection signals and novel subcellular localization pattern. Targeted mutagenesis and whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis provide evidence that nsr is required for male reproduction associated with sperm individualization, coiling, and structural integrity of the sperm axoneme via regulation of several Y chromosome fertility genes post-transcriptionally. The absence of nsr-like expression pattern and the presence of the corresponding cis-regulatory elements of the parental gene kep1 in the pre-duplication species Drosophila yakuba indicate that kep1 might not be ancestrally required for male functions and that nsr possibly has experienced the neofunctionalization process, facilitated by changes of trans-regulatory repertories. These findings not only present a comprehensive picture about the evolution of a new duplicate gene but also show that recently originated duplicate genes can acquire multiple biological roles and establish novel functional pathways by regulating essential genes. PMID:21203494

  12. piRNA-mediated transposon regulation and the germ-line mutation rate in Drosophila melanogaster males.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Michael J; Peterson, Mark P; Thorp, Michael W; Buschette, Jared T; DiPrima, Stephanie N; Harter, Christine L; Skolnick, Matthew J

    2015-03-01

    Transposons, especially retrotransposons, are abundant in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. These mobile elements are regulated by small RNAs that interact with the Piwi family of proteins-the piwi-interacting or piRNAs. The Piwi proteins are encoded by the genes argonaute3 (ago3), aubergine (aub), and piwi. Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1), a chromatin-organizing protein encoded by the Suppressor of variegation 205 [Su(var)205] gene, also plays a role in this regulation. To assess the mutational impact of weakening the system for transposon regulation, we measured the frequency of recessive X-linked lethal mutations occurring in the germ lines of males from stocks that were heterozygous for mutant alleles of the ago3, aub, piwi, or Su(var)205 genes. These mutant alleles are expected to deplete the wild-type proteins encoded by these genes by as much as 50%. The mutant alleles of piwi and Su(var)205 significantly increased the X-linked lethal mutation frequency, whereas the mutant alleles of ago3 did not. An increased mutation frequency was also observed in males from one of two mutant aub stocks, but this increase may not have been due to the aub mutant. The increased mutation frequency caused by depleting Piwi or HP1suggests that chromatin-organizing proteins play important roles in minimizing the germ-line mutation rate, possibly by stabilizing the structure of the heterochromatin in which many transposons are situated.

  13. BMP-regulated exosomes from Drosophila male reproductive glands reprogram female behavior

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Laura; Redhai, Siamak; Leiblich, Aaron; Fan, Shih-Jung; Perera, Sumeth M.W.; Patel, Rachel; Gandy, Carina; Wainwright, S. Mark; Morris, John F.; Hamdy, Freddie; Goberdhan, Deborah C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Male reproductive glands secrete signals into seminal fluid to facilitate reproductive success. In Drosophila melanogaster, these signals are generated by a variety of seminal peptides, many produced by the accessory glands (AGs). One epithelial cell type in the adult male AGs, the secondary cell (SC), grows selectively in response to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. This signaling is involved in blocking the rapid remating of mated females, which contributes to the reproductive advantage of the first male to mate. In this paper, we show that SCs secrete exosomes, membrane-bound vesicles generated inside late endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs). After mating, exosomes fuse with sperm (as also seen in vitro for human prostate-derived exosomes and sperm) and interact with female reproductive tract epithelia. Exosome release was required to inhibit female remating behavior, suggesting that exosomes are downstream effectors of BMP signaling. Indeed, when BMP signaling was reduced in SCs, vesicles were still formed in MVBs but not secreted as exosomes. These results demonstrate a new function for the MVB–exosome pathway in the reproductive tract that appears to be conserved across evolution. PMID:25154396

  14. Opuntia humifusa supplementation increased bone density by regulating parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin in male growing rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junyong; Park, Jinho; Choi, Seong Hee; Igawa, Shoji; Song, Youngju

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa) supplementation on bone density and related hormone secretion in growing male rats. Sixteen six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups; control diet group (CG, n = 8), and experimental diet group (EG, n = 8). The rats in the CG were given a control diet and those in the EG were given 5% O. humifusa added to the control diet for eight weeks. The serum OC level of the EG was significantly higher than that of the CG, and the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level of EG was significantly lower than that of the CG. In addition, the femoral and tibial BMD of the EG were significantly higher values than those of the CG, and the tibial BMC of the EG was significantly higher than that of the CG. These results suggest that O. humifusa supplementation has a positive effect on bone density by suppressing PTH and increasing the OC level in growing male rats.

  15. Opuntia humifusa Supplementation Increased Bone Density by Regulating Parathyroid Hormone and Osteocalcin in Male Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Junyong; Park, Jinho; Choi, Seong Hee; Igawa, Shoji; Song, Youngju

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Opuntia humifusa (O. humifusa) supplementation on bone density and related hormone secretion in growing male rats. Sixteen six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups; control diet group (CG, n = 8), and experimental diet group (EG, n = 8). The rats in the CG were given a control diet and those in the EG were given 5% O. humifusa added to the control diet for eight weeks. The serum OC level of the EG was significantly higher than that of the CG, and the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level of EG was significantly lower than that of the CG. In addition, the femoral and tibial BMD of the EG were significantly higher values than those of the CG, and the tibial BMC of the EG was significantly higher than that of the CG. These results suggest that O. humifusa supplementation has a positive effect on bone density by suppressing PTH and increasing the OC level in growing male rats. PMID:22837661

  16. Transcriptomic Profiling Reveals Complex Molecular Regulation in Cotton Genic Male Sterile Mutant Yu98-8A

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Deyi; Sun, Li; Xu, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Lirong; Zhao, Yuanming; Lv, Shuping; Tang, Zhongjie; Nie, Lihong; Li, Wu; Hou, Jianan; Duan, Zhengzheng; Yu, Yuebo; Yang, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Although cotton genic male sterility (GMS) plays an important role in the utilization of hybrid vigor, its precise molecular mechanism remains unclear. To characterize the molecular events of pollen abortion, transcriptome analysis, combined with histological observations, was conducted in the cotton GMS line, Yu98-8A. A total of 2,412 genes were identified as significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) before and during the critical pollen abortion stages. Bioinformatics and biochemical analysis showed that the DEGs mainly associated with sugars and starch metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and plant endogenous hormones play a critical and complicated role in pollen abortion. These findings extend a better understanding of the molecular events involved in the regulation of pollen abortion in genic male sterile cotton, which may provide a foundation for further research studies on cotton heterosis breeding. PMID:26382878

  17. Photoperiodic regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days (SD) with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine at multiple time points across 10 weeks of SD exposure. Compared with counterparts held in long day (LD) lengths, across the first 8 weeks of SD exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at 10 weeks in SD lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in LD lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function and behavior at multiple levels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Photoperiodic Regulation of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Male White-footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Walton, James C.; Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Weil, Zachary M.; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well-described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog BrdU at multiple time points across ten weeks of short day exposure. Compared to counterparts held in long day lengths, across the first eight weeks of short day exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at ten weeks in short day lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in long day lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes, and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function, and behavior at multiple levels. PMID:24893623

  19. Activated Cdc42 kinase regulates Dock localization in male germ cells during Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Abbas M; Zhou, Xin; Kim, Christine; Shah, Kushani K; Hogden, Christopher; Schoenherr, Jessica A; Clemens, James C; Chang, Henry C

    2013-06-15

    Deregulation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ACK1 (Activated Cdc42-associated kinase) correlates with poor prognosis in cancers and has been implicated in promoting metastasis. To further understand its in vivo function, we have characterized the developmental defects of a null mutation in Drosophila Ack, which bears a high degree of sequence similarity to mammalian ACK1 but lacks a CRIB domain. We show that Ack, while not essential for viability, is critical for sperm formation. This function depends on Ack tyrosine kinase activity and is required cell autonomously in differentiating male germ cells at or after the spermatocyte stage. Ack associates predominantly with endocytic clathrin sites in spermatocytes, but disruption of Ack function has no apparent effect on clathrin localization and receptor-mediated internalization of Boss (Bride of sevenless) protein in eye discs. Instead, Ack is required for the subcellular distribution of Dock (dreadlocks), the Drosophila homolog of the SH2- and SH3-containing adaptor protein Nck. Moreover, Dock forms a complex with Ack, and the localization of Dock in male germ cells depends on its SH2 domain. Together, our results suggest that Ack-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation recruits Dock to promote sperm differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Magea gene cluster regulates male germ cell apoptosis without affecting the fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Siyuan; Xian, Li; Shi, Peiliang; Li, Chaojun; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While apoptosis is essential for male germ cell development, improper activation of apoptosis in the testis can affect spermatogenesis and cause reproduction defects. Members of the MAGE-A (melanoma antigen family A) gene family are frequently clustered in mammalian genomes and are exclusively expressed in the testes of normal animals but abnormally activated in a wide variety of cancers. We investigated the potential roles of these genes in spermatogenesis by generating a mouse model with a 210-kb genomic deletion encompassing six members of the Magea gene cluster (Magea1, Magea2, Magea3, Magea5, Magea6 and Magea8). Male mice carrying the deletion displayed smaller testes from 2 months old with a marked increase in apoptotic germ cells in the first wave of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, we found that Magea genes prevented stress-induced spermatogenic apoptosis after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) treatment during the adult stage. Mechanistically, deletion of the Magea gene cluster resulted in a dramatic increase in apoptotic germ cells, predominantly spermatocytes, with activation of p53 and induction of Bax in the testes. These observations demonstrate that the Magea genes are crucial in maintaining normal testicular size and protecting germ cells from excessive apoptosis under genotoxic stress. PMID:27226137

  1. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  2. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  3. Long Hair and the Law: A Look at Constitutional and Title VII Challenges to Public and Private Regulation of Male Grooming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troup, David P.

    1975-01-01

    Arguments that have been advanced in court by both sides of the controversy are examined, and it is concluded that male grooming regulations may effectively exclude a significant proportion of males from job opportunities or require them to alter their personal appearance for reasons probably unrelated to job performance. (LBH)

  4. Androgen receptor (AR) promotes male bladder cancer cell proliferation and migration via regulating CD24 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guoqing; Yu, Shicheng; Cheng, Sheng; Li, Gonghui; Yu, Yanlan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has proved the pivotal roles of androgen receptor in various diseases, including prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The CD24 has been proved to be correlated to bladder cancer metastasis and tumorigenesis in recent study. This study was aimed to investigate the roles of AR in bladder cell proliferation and metastasis and to explore its potential mechanism. Expressions of AR in two kinds of bladder tumor cells (T24 and UM-UC-3) were analyzed using the CRISPR Activation Plasmid transfection or siRNA-mediated gene. The effects of AR on tumor cell proliferation and migration were also analyzed. Moreover, the effects of CD24 and influence of AR on cell proliferation and metastasis-related protein were also analyzed. The results showed that AR was significantly down-regulated in T24 cells but was significantly overexpressed in UM-UC-3 cells. The up-regulated T24 promotes cell proliferation, but this enhance effect was blocked by silencing CD24. Additionally, the AR overexpression significantly increased the VEGF and CD24 expression. Besides, the migrated bladder cells was increased by the up-regulated AR, but was decreased by silencing CD24 or silencing VEGF. Taken together, our study suggested that the up-regulated AR enhances the male bladder tumor cell proliferation and metastasis via modulating the CD24 and VEGF. This study may provide theoretical basis for the possibility of AR to be a therapeutic target for bladder cancer.

  5. The levels of male gametic mitochondrial DNA are highly regulated in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

  6. The Levels of Male Gametic Mitochondrial DNA Are Highly Regulated in Angiosperms with Regard to Mitochondrial Inheritance[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:20605854

  7. Role of the oxytocin system in amygdala subregions in the regulation of social interest in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, Kelly M.; Alonso, Andrea G.; Bredewold, Remco; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that oxytocin (OT) receptor (OTR) binding density in the medial amygdala (MeA) correlated positively with social interest (i.e., the motivation to investigate a conspecific) in male rats, while OTR binding density in the central amygdala (CeA) correlated negatively with social interest in female rats. Here, we determined the causal involvement of OTR in the MeA and CeA in the sex-specific regulation of social interest in adult rats by injecting an OTR antagonist (5 ng/0.5 µl/side) or OT (100 pg/0.5 µl/side) before the social interest test (4-min same-sex juvenile exposure). OTR blockade in the CeA decreased social interest in males but not females, while all other treatments had no behavioral effect. To further explore the sex-specific involvement of the OT system in the CeA in social interest, we used in vivo microdialysis to determine possible sex differences in endogenous OT release in the CeA during social interest. Interestingly, males and females showed similar levels of extracellular OT release at baseline and during social interest, suggesting that factors other than local OT release mediate the sex-specific role of CeA-OTR in social interest. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between CeA-OT release and social investigation time in females. This was further reflected by reduced CeA-OT release during social interest in females that expressed low compared to high social interest. We discuss the possibility that this reduction in OT release may be a consequence, rather than a cause, of exposure to a social stimulus. Overall, our findings show for the first time that extracellular OT release in the CeA is similar between males and females and that OTR in the CeA plays a causal role in the regulation of social interest towards juvenile conspecifics in males. PMID:27235738

  8. Role of the oxytocin system in amygdala subregions in the regulation of social interest in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Kelly M; Alonso, Andrea G; Bredewold, Remco; Veenema, Alexa H

    2016-08-25

    We previously found that oxytocin (OT) receptor (OTR) binding density in the medial amygdala (MeA) correlated positively with social interest (i.e., the motivation to investigate a conspecific) in male rats, while OTR binding density in the central amygdala (CeA) correlated negatively with social interest in female rats. Here, we determined the causal involvement of OTR in the MeA and CeA in the sex-specific regulation of social interest in adult rats by injecting an OTR antagonist (5ng/0.5μl/side) or OT (100pg/0.5μl/side) before the social interest test (4-min same-sex juvenile exposure). OTR blockade in the CeA decreased social interest in males but not females, while all other treatments had no behavioral effect. To further explore the sex-specific involvement of the OT system in the CeA in social interest, we used in vivo microdialysis to determine possible sex differences in endogenous OT release in the CeA during social interest. Interestingly, males and females showed similar levels of extracellular OT release at baseline and during social interest, suggesting that factors other than local OT release mediate the sex-specific role of CeA-OTR in social interest. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between CeA-OT release and social investigation time in females. This was further reflected by reduced CeA-OT release during social interest in females that expressed low compared to high social interest. We discuss the possibility that this reduction in OT release may be a consequence, rather than a cause, of exposure to a social stimulus. Overall, our findings show for the first time that extracellular OT release in the CeA is similar between males and females and that OTR in the CeA plays a causal role in the regulation of social interest toward juvenile conspecifics in males.

  9. Regulation of cell divisions and differentiation by MALE STERILITY32 is required for anther development in maize.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jihyun; Skibbe, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Kelliher, Timothy; Kremling, Karl; Walbot, Virginia; Cande, William Zacheus

    2013-11-01

    Male fertility in flowering plants relies on proper division and differentiation of cells in the anther, a process that gives rise to four somatic layers surrounding central germinal cells. The maize gene male sterility32 (ms32) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, which functions as an important regulator of both division and differentiation during anther development. After the four somatic cell layers are generated properly through successive periclinal divisions, in the ms32 mutant, tapetal precursor cells fail to differentiate, and, instead, undergo additional periclinal divisions to form extra layers of cells. These cells become vacuolated and expand, and lead to failure in pollen mother cell development. ms32 expression is specific to the pre-meiotic anthers and is distributed initially broadly in the four lobes, but as the anther develops, its expression becomes restricted to the innermost somatic layer, the tapetum. The ms32-ref mac1-1 double mutant is unable to form tapetal precursors and also exhibits excessive somatic proliferation leading to numerous, disorganized cell layers, suggesting a synergistic interaction between ms32 and mac1. Altogether, our results show that MS32 is a major regulator in maize anther development that promotes tapetum differentiation and inhibits periclinal division once a tapetal cell is specified. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Differential regulation of BDNF, synaptic plasticity and sprouting in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; MacLusky, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have described potent effects of BDNF, 17β-estradiol or androgen on hippocampal synapses and their plasticity. Far less information is available about the interactions between 17β-estradiol and BDNF in hippocampus, or interactions between androgen and BDNF in hippocampus. Here we review the regulation of BDNF in the mossy fiber pathway, a critical part of hippocampal circuitry. We discuss the emerging view that 17β-estradiol upregulates mossy fiber BDNF synthesis in the adult female rat, while testosterone exerts a tonic suppression of mossy fiber BDNF levels in the adult male rat. The consequences are interesting to consider: in females, increased excitability associated with high levels of BDNF in mossy fibers could improve normal functions of area CA3, such as the ability to perform pattern completion. However, memory retrieval may lead to anxiety if stressful events are recalled. Therefore, the actions of 17β-estradiol on the mossy fiber pathway in females may provide a potential explanation for the greater incidence of anxiety-related disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in women relative to men. In males, suppression of BDNF-dependent plasticity in the mossy fibers may be protective, but at the 'price' of reduced synaptic plasticity in CA3. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'.

  11. Immunocytochemical evidence of hypothalamic regulation of adenohypophyseal VIP in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Carretero, J; Sánchez, F; Rubio, M; Lorenzo, M J; Francos, M; Cacicedo, L; Sánchez-Franco, F; Vázquez, R

    1992-12-01

    In order to check whether hypothalamic stimulatory or inhibitory factors exert any kind of modulation on the morphology of VIP-immunoreactive cells in the rat hypophysis, the transport of these towards the hypophyseal portal system was blocked by intraventricular administration of colchicine in adult male rats, thereafter performing a morphometric study after characterizing the VIP-immunoreactive adenohypophyseal cells by immunocytochemical techniques. Colchicine administration led to a significant increase (p < 0.01) in the number of reactive cells observed. These cells were characterized by a larger cellular area (p < 0.01), owing to increases in nuclear area (p < 0.05) and cytoplasmic area (p < 0.05). Their morphology became more regular, with a predominance of polygonal and oval cells. The results suggest that the VIP-reactive cells of the rat hypophysis are subject to a hypothalamic inhibitory influence and their activity increasing when the hypothalamic effect is interrupted by intraventricular administration of colchicine.

  12. Ethylene is a positive regulator for GA3-induced male sex in Anemia phyllitidis gametophytes.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, A

    2003-12-01

    Effects of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) on the development and expression of male sex were tested using the model of the three-zonal structure of 12-day-old (15-celled) Anemia phyllitidis gametophyte. ACC at 10 microM concentration enhanced the number of antheridia induced by gibberellic acid. Cytomorphological measurements showed that this effect was limited to only the antheridial region of gametophytes and depended on transverse expansion of antheridial mother cells. Time-course cytophotometrical measurements showed that this promotive effect of ACC was preceded by reorganization of nuclear chromatin and induction of DNA synthesis in nuclei in the antheridial region cells of fern gametophytes.

  13. Proteomics of spermatogenesis: from protein lists to understanding the regulation of male fertility and infertility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Yan; Sha, Jia-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Proteomic technologies have undergone significant development in recent years, which has led to extensive advances in protein research. Currently, proteomic approaches have been applied to many scientific areas, including basic research, various disease and malignant tumour diagnostics, biomarker discovery and other therapeutic applications. In addition, proteomics-driven research articles examining reproductive biology and medicine are becoming increasingly common. The key challenge for this field is to move from lists of identified proteins to obtaining biological information regarding protein function. The present article reviews the available scientific literature related to spermatogenesis. In addition, this study uses two-dimensional electrophoresis mass spectrometry (2DE-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS to construct a series of proteome profiles describing spermatogenesis. This large-scale identification of proteins provides a rich resource for elucidating the mechanisms underlying male fertility and infertility. PMID:21076435

  14. Minoxidil and male-pattern alopecia: a potential role for a local regulator of sebum secretion with vasoconstrictive effects?

    PubMed

    Kurbel, S; Kurbel, B; Zanić-Matanić, D

    1999-11-01

    Regulation of the hair cycle takes place at the pilo-sebaceous unit with the sebaceous gland as a sex hormone-dependent part. Although minoxidil stimulates proliferation of follicular cells and activation of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-1, it was suggested that other mechanisms, such as an increase in the local blood flow, might mediate the drug effect on hair growth. If that is the case, it is possible that minoxidil counteracts some vasoconstrictive mediator of male-pattern alopecia. This hypothetical vasoconstrictive mediator X would have to meet some criteria: (I) vasoconstriction both in the general circulation and in the hair-growing skin; (II) local vasoconstrictive activity in the hair growing skin should be related to the circulating testosterone level; (III) only an increase in the local mediator X activity causes male-pattern alopecia, since hypertensive patients are not balder than expected. The sebaceous gland is a possible place of the mediator X secretion since it is a sex-hormone-dependent part of the pilo-sebaceous unit. ET-1 might be a suitable candidate for the mediator X, since male hormones raise ET-1 plasma levels and female hormones lower them. The speculation presented here is that ET-1, beside vasoconstriction in the general circulation, might also regulate the sebum secretion, by triggering contractions of the myoepithelial cells. This hypothetical mechanism would normally remain confined to the sebaceous gland. During puberty, sex hormones stimulate growth of sebaceous glands in both sexes. In women hypertrophied sebaceous glands under estrogen control would not increase its ET-1 content, while in men, testosterone would increase ET-1 secretion that might affect the neighboring arterioles. Induced vasoconstriction might reduce the hair growth and promote hair loss. If ET-1 plays the described role, then an ET-1 antagonist, i.e. bosentane, should also have some hair-growing properties.

  15. Rapid estrogen receptor alpha signaling mediated by ERK activation regulates vascular tone in male and ovary-intact female mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Chul; Boese, Austin C; Moore, Matthew H; Cleland, Rea M; Chang, Lin; Delafontaine, Patrice; Yin, Ke-Jie; Lee, Jean-Pyo; Hamblin, Milton H

    2017-09-08

    Estrogen has been shown to affect vascular reactivity. Here, we assessed estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) dependency of estrogenic effects on vasorelaxation via a rapid nongenomic pathway in both male and ovary-intact female mice. We compared the effect of a primary estrogen, 17 beta-estradiol (E2) or 4,4',4"-(4-propyl-[1H]pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)tris-phenol (PPT) (selective ERα agonist). We found that E2 and PPT induced greater aortic relaxation in females than males, indicating ERα mediation, which is further validated by employing ERα antagonism. Treatment with 1,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyl-5-[4-(2-piperidinylethoxy)phenol]-1H-pyrazole dihydrochloride (MPP dihydrochloride) (ERα antagonist) attenuated PPT-mediated vessel relaxation in both sexes. ERα-mediated vessel relaxation is further validated by the absence of significant PPT-mediated relaxation in aortas isolated from ERα knockout mice. Treatment with a specific extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059 reduced E2-induced vessel relaxation in both sexes, but to a lesser extent in females. Further, PD98059 prevented PPT-induced vessel relaxation in both sexes. Both E2 and PPT treatment activated ERK as early as 5-10 min, which was attenuated by PD98059 in aortic tissue, cultured primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and endothelial cells (ECs). Aortic rings denuded of endothelium showed no differences in vessel relaxation following E2 or PPT treatment, implicating a role of ECs in the observed sex differences. Here, our results are unique to show estrogen-stimulated rapid ERα signaling mediated by ERK activation in aortic tissue, as well as VSMCs and ECs in vitro, in regulating vascular function by employing side-by-side comparisons in male and ovary-intact female mice in response to E2 or PPT. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  16. ROCK1 in AgRP Neurons Regulates Energy Expenditure and Locomotor Activity in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hu; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ye, Chianping; Lima, Ines S.; Oh, Byung-Chul; Lowell, Bradford B.; Zabolotny, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    Normal leptin signaling is essential for the maintenance of body weight homeostasis. Proopiomelanocortin- and agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-producing neurons play critical roles in regulating energy metabolism. Our recent work demonstrates that deletion of Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1) in the AgRP neurons of mice increased body weight and adiposity. Here, we report that selective loss of ROCK1 in AgRP neurons caused a significant decrease in energy expenditure and locomotor activity of mice. These effects were independent of any change in food intake. Furthermore, AgRP neuron-specific ROCK1-deficient mice displayed central leptin resistance, as evidenced by impaired Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 activation in response to leptin administration. Leptin's ability to hyperpolarize and decrease firing rate of AgRP neurons was also abolished in the absence of ROCK1. Moreover, diet-induced and genetic forms of obesity resulted in reduced ROCK1 activity in murine arcuate nucleus. Of note, high-fat diet also impaired leptin-stimulated ROCK1 activity in arcuate nucleus, suggesting that a defect in hypothalamic ROCK1 activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of central leptin resistance in obesity. Together, these data demonstrate that ROCK1 activation in hypothalamic AgRP neurons is required for the homeostatic regulation of energy expenditure and adiposity. These results further support previous work identifying ROCK1 as a key regulator of energy balance and suggest that targeting ROCK1 in the hypothalamus may lead to development of antiobesity therapeutics. PMID:23885017

  17. ROCK1 in AgRP neurons regulates energy expenditure and locomotor activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hu; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ye, Chianping; Lima, Ines S; Oh, Byung-Chul; Lowell, Bradford B; Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum

    2013-10-01

    Normal leptin signaling is essential for the maintenance of body weight homeostasis. Proopiomelanocortin- and agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-producing neurons play critical roles in regulating energy metabolism. Our recent work demonstrates that deletion of Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1) in the AgRP neurons of mice increased body weight and adiposity. Here, we report that selective loss of ROCK1 in AgRP neurons caused a significant decrease in energy expenditure and locomotor activity of mice. These effects were independent of any change in food intake. Furthermore, AgRP neuron-specific ROCK1-deficient mice displayed central leptin resistance, as evidenced by impaired Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 activation in response to leptin administration. Leptin's ability to hyperpolarize and decrease firing rate of AgRP neurons was also abolished in the absence of ROCK1. Moreover, diet-induced and genetic forms of obesity resulted in reduced ROCK1 activity in murine arcuate nucleus. Of note, high-fat diet also impaired leptin-stimulated ROCK1 activity in arcuate nucleus, suggesting that a defect in hypothalamic ROCK1 activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of central leptin resistance in obesity. Together, these data demonstrate that ROCK1 activation in hypothalamic AgRP neurons is required for the homeostatic regulation of energy expenditure and adiposity. These results further support previous work identifying ROCK1 as a key regulator of energy balance and suggest that targeting ROCK1 in the hypothalamus may lead to development of antiobesity therapeutics.

  18. Heparan sulfate regulates the number and centrosome positioning of Drosophila male germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Levings, Daniel C.; Arashiro, Takeshi; Nakato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell division is tightly controlled via secreted signaling factors and cell adhesion molecules provided from local niche structures. Molecular mechanisms by which each niche component regulates stem cell behaviors remain to be elucidated. Here we show that heparan sulfate (HS), a class of glycosaminoglycan chains, regulates the number and asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila testis. We found that GSC number is sensitive to the levels of 6-O sulfate groups on HS. Loss of 6-O sulfation also disrupted normal positioning of centrosomes, a process required for asymmetric division of GSCs. Blocking HS sulfation specifically in the niche, termed the hub, led to increased GSC numbers and mispositioning of centrosomes. The same treatment also perturbed the enrichment of Apc2, a component of the centrosome-anchoring machinery, at the hub–GSC interface. This perturbation of the centrosome-anchoring process ultimately led to an increase in the rate of spindle misorientation and symmetric GSC division. This study shows that specific HS modifications provide a novel regulatory mechanism for stem cell asymmetric division. The results also suggest that HS-mediated niche signaling acts upstream of GSC division orientation control. PMID:26792837

  19. Heparan sulfate regulates the number and centrosome positioning of Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Levings, Daniel C; Arashiro, Takeshi; Nakato, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Stem cell division is tightly controlled via secreted signaling factors and cell adhesion molecules provided from local niche structures. Molecular mechanisms by which each niche component regulates stem cell behaviors remain to be elucidated. Here we show that heparan sulfate (HS), a class of glycosaminoglycan chains, regulates the number and asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila testis. We found that GSC number is sensitive to the levels of 6-O sulfate groups on HS. Loss of 6-O sulfation also disrupted normal positioning of centrosomes, a process required for asymmetric division of GSCs. Blocking HS sulfation specifically in the niche, termed the hub, led to increased GSC numbers and mispositioning of centrosomes. The same treatment also perturbed the enrichment of Apc2, a component of the centrosome-anchoring machinery, at the hub-GSC interface. This perturbation of the centrosome-anchoring process ultimately led to an increase in the rate of spindle misorientation and symmetric GSC division. This study shows that specific HS modifications provide a novel regulatory mechanism for stem cell asymmetric division. The results also suggest that HS-mediated niche signaling acts upstream of GSC division orientation control.

  20. Dynamics of the Transcriptome during Human Spermatogenesis: Predicting the Potential Key Genes Regulating Male Gametes Generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zijue; Li, Chong; Yang, Shi; Tian, Ruhui; Wang, Junlong; Yuan, Qingqing; Dong, Hui; He, Zuping; Wang, Shengyue; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-12

    Many infertile men are the victims of spermatogenesis disorder. However, conventional clinical test could not provide efficient information on the causes of spermatogenesis disorder and guide the doctor how to treat it. More effective diagnosis and treating methods could be developed if the key genes that regulate spermatogenesis were determined. Many works have been done on animal models, while there are few works on human beings due to the limited sample resources. In current work, testis tissues were obtained from 27 patients with obstructive azoospermia via surgery. The combination of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting was chosen as the efficient method to sort typical germ cells during spermatogenesis. RNA Sequencing was carried out to screen the change of transcriptomic profile of the germ cells during spermatogenesis. Differential expressed genes were clustered according to their expression patterns. Gene Ontology annotation, pathway analysis, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were carried out on genes with specific expression patterns and the potential key genes such as HOXs, JUN, SP1, and TCF3 which were involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, with the potential value serve as molecular tools for clinical purpose, were predicted.

  1. Defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus of obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio-Souza, Leticia M; Bombassaro, Bruna; Pascoal, Livia B; Portovedo, Mariana A; Razolli, Daniela S; Coope, Andressa; Victorio, Sheila C; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Nascimento, Lucas F; Arruda, Ana P; Anhe, Gabriel F; Milanski, Marciane; Velloso, Licio A

    2014-08-01

    In both human and experimental obesity, inflammatory damage to the hypothalamus plays an important role in the loss of the coordinated control of food intake and energy expenditure. Upon prolonged maintenance of increased body mass, the brain changes the defended set point of adiposity, and returning to normal weight becomes extremely difficult. Here we show that in prolonged but not in short-term obesity, the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus fails to maintain an adequate rate of protein recycling, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. This is accompanied by an increased colocalization of ubiquitin and p62 in the arcuate nucleus and reduced expression of autophagy markers in the hypothalamus. Genetic protection from obesity is accompanied by the normal regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus, whereas the inhibition of proteasome or p62 results in the acceleration of body mass gain in mice exposed for a short period to a high-fat diet. Thus, the defective regulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in the hypothalamus may be an important mechanism involved in the progression and autoperpetuation of obesity.

  2. The receptor tyrosine phosphatase Lar regulates adhesion between Drosophila male germline stem cells and the niche.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Shrividhya; Mahowald, Anthony P; Fuller, Margaret T

    2012-04-01

    The stem cell niche provides a supportive microenvironment to maintain adult stem cells in their undifferentiated state. Adhesion between adult stem cells and niche cells or the local basement membrane ensures retention of stem cells in the niche environment. Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) attach to somatic hub cells, a component of their niche, through E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions, and orient their centrosomes toward these localized junctional complexes to carry out asymmetric divisions. Here we show that the transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase Leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar), which is best known for its function in axonal migration and synapse morphogenesis in the nervous system, helps maintain GSCs at the hub by promoting E-cadherin-based adhesion between hub cells and GSCs. Lar is expressed in GSCs and early spermatogonial cells and localizes to the hub-GSC interface. Loss of Lar function resulted in a reduced number of GSCs at the hub. Lar function was required cell-autonomously in germ cells for proper localization of Adenomatous polyposis coli 2 and E-cadherin at the hub-GSC interface and for the proper orientation of centrosomes in GSCs. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that in Lar mutants the adherens junctions between hub cells and GSCs lack the characteristic dense staining seen in wild-type controls. Thus, the Lar receptor tyrosine phosphatase appears to polarize and retain GSCs through maintenance of localized E-cadherin-based adherens junctions.

  3. The receptor tyrosine phosphatase Lar regulates adhesion between Drosophila male germline stem cells and the niche

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shrividhya; Mahowald, Anthony P.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2012-01-01

    The stem cell niche provides a supportive microenvironment to maintain adult stem cells in their undifferentiated state. Adhesion between adult stem cells and niche cells or the local basement membrane ensures retention of stem cells in the niche environment. Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) attach to somatic hub cells, a component of their niche, through E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions, and orient their centrosomes toward these localized junctional complexes to carry out asymmetric divisions. Here we show that the transmembrane receptor tyrosine phosphatase Leukocyte-antigen-related-like (Lar), which is best known for its function in axonal migration and synapse morphogenesis in the nervous system, helps maintain GSCs at the hub by promoting E-cadherin-based adhesion between hub cells and GSCs. Lar is expressed in GSCs and early spermatogonial cells and localizes to the hub-GSC interface. Loss of Lar function resulted in a reduced number of GSCs at the hub. Lar function was required cell-autonomously in germ cells for proper localization of Adenomatous polyposis coli 2 and E-cadherin at the hub-GSC interface and for the proper orientation of centrosomes in GSCs. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that in Lar mutants the adherens junctions between hub cells and GSCs lack the characteristic dense staining seen in wild-type controls. Thus, the Lar receptor tyrosine phosphatase appears to polarize and retain GSCs through maintenance of localized E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. PMID:22378638

  4. Mechanisms of cardiovascular regulation in male rabbits chronically exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, P; Carmignani, M

    1986-01-01

    Male rabbits received 20 micrograms/ml of cadmium in drinking water for nine months. At the end of the treatment aortic vascular resistance was increased, whereas maximum rate of increase in left ventricular pressure, aortic blood flow, stroke volume, cardiac output, left ventricular minute work, and left ventricular stroke work were reduced. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and the index of myocardial oxygen consumption were not modified. The exposed rabbits also showed reduced pressor responses to vagotomy, increased cardiovascular responses to angiotensin I and II and isoprenaline, and lower responses to serotonin and guanethidine; the bradycardia induced by clonidine was augmented; the cardiovascular effects of bilateral carotid occlusion, hexamethonium, phenylephrine, histamine, acetylcholine, tyramine, papaverine and verapamil were unaltered. In the treated rabbits cadmium was appreciably higher in the kidney than in the heart; however, renal concentrations of cadmium were lower than those reported as critical for workers exposed to cadmium. Zinc was increased in the kidney but not in the heart, whereas copper remained unchanged in the examined organs. In rabbits treated with cadmium the increased aortic vascular resistance and the reduced myocardial contractility contribute to preserve a haemodynamic equilibrium without alteration of blood pressure and heart rate; the question of whether a similar condition may be present in people exposed to cadmium with normal cardiovascular parameters is discussed. PMID:3756111

  5. Cadmium exposure disrupts GABA and taurine regulation of prolactin secretion in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Caride, A; Fernández-Pérez, B; Cabaleiro, T; Esquifino, A I; Lafuente, A

    2009-03-28

    This work was undertaken to evaluate the possible effects of cadmium exposure on 24 h changes of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine median eminence and pituitary contents. Also the possible alterations of the regulatory mechanisms of GABA and taurine on prolactin secretion were evaluated. Adult male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 25 mg/l of cadmium chloride in the drinking water for 30 days. Control age-matched rats received cadmium free water. Metal exposure induced the appearance of a maximal value of prolactin at 08:00 h. In median eminence, cadmium abolished the GABA and taurine maximal values and decreased GABA and taurine mean levels. In the anterior pituitary, cadmium treatment phase advanced 12 h the peak observed in controls at 00:00 h for both amino acids. There was a positive correlation between GABA and taurine contents in median eminence and the anterior pituitary in both control and cadmium-exposed animals. However, the correlation between GABA or/and taurine with prolactin levels disappeared in cadmium-exposed animals. These results suggest that cadmium exposure affects GABA and taurine daily pattern in the median eminence and anterior pituitary, and those changes explain, at least in part, the modification in the regulatory pattern of prolactin secretion.

  6. Regulation of Nucleosome Stacking and Chromatin Compaction by the Histone H4 N-Terminal Tail-H2A Acidic Patch Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinming; Yang, Renliang; Korolev, Nikolay; Liu, Chuan Fa; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2017-06-30

    Chromatin folding and dynamics are critically dependent on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions with important contributions from internucleosome binding of the histone H4 N-terminal tail K16-R23 domain to the surface of the H2A/H2B dimer. The H4 Lys16 plays a pivotal role in this regard. Using in vitro reconstituted 12-mer nucleosome arrays, we have investigated the mechanism of the H4 N-terminal tail in maintaining nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and mediating intra- and inter-array chromatin compaction, with emphasis on the role of K16 and the positive charge region, R17-R23. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments and precipitation assays were employed to analyze effects on chromatin folding and self-association, respectively. Effects on chromatin folding caused by various mutations and modifications at position K16 in the H4 histone were studied. Additionally, using charge-quenching mutations, we characterized the importance of the interaction of the residues within the H4 positive charge region R17-R23 with the H2A acidic patch of the adjacent nucleosome. Furthermore, crosslinking experiments were conducted to establish the proximity of the basic tail region to the acidic patch. Our data indicate that the positive charge and length of the side chain of H4 K16 are important for its access to the adjacent nucleosome in the process of nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and array folding. The location and orientation of the H4 R17-R23 domain on the H2A/H2B dimer surface of the neighboring nucleosome core particle (NCP) in the compacted chromatin fiber were established. The dominance of electrostatic interactions in maintaining intra-array interaction was demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Colour bands, dominance, and body mass regulation in male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Cuthill, I. C.; Hunt, S.; Cleary, C.; Clark, C.

    1997-01-01

    The arbitrary assignment of different coloured leg bands to zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) has profound effects on mate preference, reproductive success, mortality rates, parental investment and sex ratio. Choice chamber experiments indicate that the effect is mediated by altered attractiveness to members of the opposite sex. Effects on intrasexual dominance are more equivocal. We present two experiments which demonstrate significant effects of band colour on behavioural dominance (red bands are more dominant than light green bands) and the resulting diurnal pattern of gain in mass, fat, and seeds stored in the crop. Consistent with the literature on dominance and strategic regulation of body mass in other species, subordinate (green-banded) birds maintain higher fat reserves at dawn, but dominant (red-banded) birds show the highest overall daily mass gains. The lack of obvious effects of band colour on dominance in previous studies may lie in the degree to which food can be monopolized by particular individuals.

  8. Circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Regulates Its Receptor in the Brain of Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Trueba-Saiz, A; Fernandez, A M; Nishijima, T; Mecha, M; Santi, A; Munive, V; Aleman, I Torres

    2017-02-01

    The role of IGF-1 and its receptor (IGF-1R) in brain pathology is still unclear. Thus, either reduction of IGF-IR or treatment with IGF-1, two apparently opposite actions, has proven beneficial in brain diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia. A possible explanation of this discrepancy is that IGF-1 down-regulates brain IGF-1R levels, as previously seen in a mouse Alzheimer's dementia model. We now explored whether under normal conditions IGF-1 modulates its receptor. We first observed that in vitro, IGF-1 reduced IGF-1R mRNA levels in all types of brain cells including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, and oligodendrocytes. IGF-1 also inhibited its own expression in neurons and brain endothelium. Next, we analyzed the in vivo actions of IGF-1. Because serum IGF-1 can enter the brain, we injected mice with IGF-1 ip. As soon as 1 hour after the injection, decreased hippocampal IGF-1 levels were observed, followed by increased IGF-1 and IGF-1R mRNAs 6 hours later. Because environmental enrichment (EE) stimulates the entrance of serum IGF-1 into the brain, we analyzed whether a physiological entrance of IGF-1 also produced changes in brain IGF-1R. Stimulation of IGF-1R by EE triggered a gradual decrease in hippocampal IGF-1 levels. After 6 hours of EE exposure, IGF-1 levels reached a significant decrease in parallel with increased IGF-1R expression. After longer times, IGF-1R mRNA levels returned to baseline. Thus, under nonpathological conditions, IGF-1 regulates brain IGF-1R. Because baseline IGF-1R levels are rapidly restored, a tight control of brain IGF-1R expression seems to operate under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  9. An Epididymis-Specific Secretory Protein HongrES1 Critically Regulates Sperm Capacitation and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Zheng, Min; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Li; Zhen, Wei; Chen, Wenying; Zhang, Yonglian

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilizion. Although progress had been made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little is known about the potential roles of epididymal proteins during this process. Here we report that HongrES1, a new member of the SERPIN (serine proteinase inhibitor) family exclusively expressed in the rat cauda epididymis and up-regulated by androgen, is secreted into the lumen and covers the sperm head. Co-culture of caudal sperms with HongrES1 antibody in vitro resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa. Furthermore, the percentage of capacitated spermatozoa clearly increased in rats when HongrES1 was down-regulated by RNAi in vivo. Remarkably, knockdown of HongrES1 in vivo led to reduced fertility accompanied with deformed appearance of fetuses and pups. These results identify HongrES1 as a novel and critical molecule in the regulation of sperm capacitation and male fertility. PMID:19116669

  10. Testis-specific transcriptional regulators selectively occupy BORIS-bound CTCF target regions in mouse male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Hinojosa, Samuel; Kang, Sungyun; Lobanenkov, Victor V.; Zentner, Gabriel E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite sharing the same sequence specificity in vitro and in vivo, CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and its paralog brother of the regulator of imprinted sites (BORIS) are simultaneously expressed in germ cells. Recently, ChIP-seq analysis revealed two classes of CTCF/BORIS-bound regions: single CTCF target sites (1xCTSes) that are bound by CTCF alone (CTCF-only) or double CTCF target sites (2xCTSes) simultaneously bound by CTCF and BORIS (CTCF&BORIS) or BORIS alone (BORIS-only) in germ cells and in BORIS-positive somatic cancer cells. BORIS-bound regions (CTCF&BORIS and BORIS-only sites) are, on average, enriched for RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) binding and histone retention in mature spermatozoa relative to CTCF-only sites, but little else is known about them. We show that subsets of CTCF&BORIS and BORIS-only sites are occupied by several testis-specific transcriptional regulators (TSTRs) and associated with highly expressed germ cell-specific genes and histone retention in mature spermatozoa. We also demonstrate a physical interaction between BORIS and one of the analyzed TSTRs, TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 7-like (TAF7L). Our data suggest that CTCF and BORIS cooperate with additional TSTRs to regulate gene expression in developing male gametes and histone retention in mature spermatozoa, potentially priming certain regions of the genome for rapid activation following fertilization. PMID:28145452

  11. The cytoplasmic tail domain of the vacuolar protein sorting receptor Vps10p and a subset of VPS gene products regulate receptor stability, function, and localization.

    PubMed

    Cereghino, J L; Marcusson, E G; Emr, S D

    1995-09-01

    VPS10 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a type I transmembrane receptor protein required for the sorting of the soluble vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). To characterize the essential structural features and intercompartmental transport itinerary of the CPY receptor, we have constructed mutant forms of Vps10p that alter the carboxyterminal cytoplasmic tail of the protein. In addition, we have analyzed the effect these mutations as well as mutations in several VPS genes have on the function, stability, and localization of Vps10p. Although wild-type Vps10p is very stable over a 3-h chase period, overproduction of Vps10p results in PEP4-dependent degradation of the receptor. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that overexpressed receptor is delivered to the vacuole. A mutant form of Vps10p, in which 157 residues of the 164-residue cytoplasmic tail domain have been deleted, missorts CPY and is degraded rapidly. Additional mutations in the carboxy-terminus of Vps10p, including a deletion of a putative retention/recycling signal (FYVF), also result in CPY missorting and PEP4-dependent receptor instability. Because the cytoplasmic tail domain may interact with other factors, possibly VPS gene products, Vps10p stability was examined in a number of vps mutants. As was observed with the late Golgi protein Kex2p, Vps10p is unstable in a vps1 mutant. However, instability of Vps10p is even more severe in the class E vps mutants. Double mutant analyses demonstrate that this rapid degradation is dependent upon vacuolar proteases and a functional vacuolar ATPase. Fractionation studies of Vps10p in class E vps mutant strains indicate that the turnover of Vps10p occurs in a compartment other than the vacuole. These data are consistent with a model in which the cytoplasmic tail of Vps10p directs cycling of the receptor between a late Golgi sorting compartment and a prevacuolar endosome-like compartment, an exaggerated form of which is present in the vps class E mutants.

  12. Perilipin 3 Differentially Regulates Skeletal Muscle Lipid Oxidation in Active, Sedentary, and Type 2 Diabetic Males.

    PubMed

    Covington, Jeffrey D; Noland, Robert C; Hebert, R Caitlin; Masinter, Blaine S; Smith, Steven R; Rustan, Arild C; Ravussin, Eric; Bajpeyi, Sudip

    2015-10-01

    The role of perilipin 3 (PLIN3) on lipid oxidation is not fully understood. We aimed to 1) determine whether skeletal muscle PLIN3 protein content is associated with lipid oxidation in humans, 2) understand the role of PLIN3 in lipid oxidation by knocking down PLIN3 protein content in primary human myotubes, and 3) compare PLIN3 content and its role in lipid oxidation in human primary skeletal muscle cultures established from sedentary, healthy lean (leans), type 2 diabetic (T2D), and physically active donors. This was a clinical investigation of 29 healthy, normoglycemic males and a cross-sectional study using primary human myotubes from five leans, four T2D, and four active donors. Energy expenditure, whole-body lipid oxidation, PLIN3 protein content in skeletal muscle tissue, and ex vivo muscle palmitate oxidation were measured. Myotubes underwent lipolytic stimulation (palmitate, forskolin, inomycin [PFI] cocktail), treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), and knockdown of PLIN3 using siRNA. Experiments were performed in a Biomedical Research Institute. Protein content, 24-hour respiratory quotient (RQ), and ex vivo/in vitro lipid oxidations. PLIN3 protein content was associated with 24-h RQ (r = -0.44; P = .02) and skeletal muscle-specific ex vivo palmitate oxidation (r = 0.61; P = .02). PLIN3 knockdown showed drastic reductions in lipid oxidation in myotubes from leans. Lipolytic stimulation increased PLIN3 protein in cells from leans over T2Ds with little expression in active participants. Furthermore, treatment with BFA, known to inhibit coatomers that associate with PLIN3, reduced lipid oxidation in cells from lean and T2D, but not in active participants. Differential expression of PLIN3 and BFA sensitivity may explain differential lipid oxidation efficiency in skeletal muscle among these cohorts.

  13. Perilipin 3 Differentially Regulates Skeletal Muscle Lipid Oxidation in Active, Sedentary, and Type 2 Diabetic Males

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Jeffrey D.; Noland, Robert C.; Hebert, R. Caitlin; Masinter, Blaine S.; Smith, Steven R.; Rustan, Arild C.; Ravussin, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Context: The role of perilipin 3 (PLIN3) on lipid oxidation is not fully understood. Objective: We aimed to 1) determine whether skeletal muscle PLIN3 protein content is associated with lipid oxidation in humans, 2) understand the role of PLIN3 in lipid oxidation by knocking down PLIN3 protein content in primary human myotubes, and 3) compare PLIN3 content and its role in lipid oxidation in human primary skeletal muscle cultures established from sedentary, healthy lean (leans), type 2 diabetic (T2D), and physically active donors. Design, Participants, and Intervention: This was a clinical investigation of 29 healthy, normoglycemic males and a cross-sectional study using primary human myotubes from five leans, four T2D, and four active donors. Energy expenditure, whole-body lipid oxidation, PLIN3 protein content in skeletal muscle tissue, and ex vivo muscle palmitate oxidation were measured. Myotubes underwent lipolytic stimulation (palmitate, forskolin, inomycin [PFI] cocktail), treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), and knockdown of PLIN3 using siRNA. Setting: Experiments were performed in a Biomedical Research Institute. Main Outcome Measures: Protein content, 24-hour respiratory quotient (RQ), and ex vivo/in vitro lipid oxidations. Results: PLIN3 protein content was associated with 24-h RQ (r = −0.44; P = .02) and skeletal muscle–specific ex vivo palmitate oxidation (r = 0.61; P = .02). PLIN3 knockdown showed drastic reductions in lipid oxidation in myotubes from leans. Lipolytic stimulation increased PLIN3 protein in cells from leans over T2Ds with little expression in active participants. Furthermore, treatment with BFA, known to inhibit coatomers that associate with PLIN3, reduced lipid oxidation in cells from lean and T2D, but not in active participants. Conclusions: Differential expression of PLIN3 and BFA sensitivity may explain differential lipid oxidation efficiency in skeletal muscle among these cohorts. PMID:26171795

  14. Weight loss by calorie restriction versus bariatric surgery differentially regulates the HPA axis in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Bernadette E.; Hakala-Finch, Andrew P.; Kekulawala, Melani; Laub, Holly; Egan, Ann E.; Ressler, Ilana B.; Woods, Stephen C.; Herman, James P.; Seeley, Randy J.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral modifications for the treatment of obesity, including caloric restriction, have notoriously low long-term success rates relative to bariatric weight-loss surgery. The reasons for the difference in sustained weight loss are not clear. One possibility is that caloric restriction alone activates the stress-responsive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, undermining the long-term maintenance of weight loss, and that this is abrogated after bariatric surgery. Accordingly, we compared the HPA response to weight loss in 5 groups of male rats: (1) high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats treated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, n=7), (2) DIO rats treated with vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, n=11), (3) DIO rats given sham surgery and subsequently restricted to the food intake of the VSG/RYGB groups (Pair-fed, n=11), (4) ad libitum-fed DIO rats given sham surgery (Obese, n=11) and (5) ad libitum chow-fed rats given sham surgery (Lean, n=12). Compared to Lean controls, food-restricted rats exhibited elevated morning (nadir) non-stress plasma corticosterone concentrations and increased hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin mRNA expression, indicative of basal HPA activation. This was largely prevented when weight loss was achieved by bariatric surgery. DIO increased HPA activation by acute (novel environment) stress and this was diminished by bariatric surgery-, but not pair-feeding-, induced weight loss. These results suggest that the HPA axis is differentially affected by weight loss from caloric restriction versus bariatric surgery, and this may contribute to the differing long-term effectiveness of these two weight-loss approaches. PMID:25238021

  15. Differential expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, fatty acid synthase, and hormone-sensitive lipase in fat-tailed and thin-tailed sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Xu, X C; Li, B B; Wei, X; Yang, Y X; Wang, X L; Chen, Y L

    2015-12-02

    Tail fat content affects meat quality, and it varies in different sheep breeds. Theoretically, lipid metabolism contributes to variation in tail fat content. Tail length, tail width, and tail girth were measured in live Tong sheep (with both short fat tail and long fat tail), Shaanbei fine wool sheep (long thin tail), Tan sheep (short fat tail), Kazakh sheep (hip fat tail), and Tibetan sheep (short thin tail). The expression levels of genes related to tail adipose tissue lipid metabolism were investigated, which included lipogenetic genes (PPARγ and FAS) and lipolytic gene (HSL). Differences were observed (P < 0.05) in PPARγ mRNA expression levels in the different breeds; FAS mRNA expression levels did not differ (P > 0.05) in Tong sheep with short fat tail, Tong sheep with long fat tail, Shaanbei fine wool sheep, and Tibetan sheep; HSL mRNA expression levels were not different (P > 0.05) in Tong sheep. PPARγ and HSL protein expression levels differed (P < 0.05) between the different breeds; FAS protein expression levels were different (P < 0.05) in Tong sheep with long fat tails, Tan sheep, Kazakh sheep, and Tibetan sheep, but did not differ (P > 0.05) in Tong sheep with short fat tails and Shaanbei fine wool sheep. These results provide useful information to further understand the function of PPARγ, FAS, and HSL in sheep tail lipid metabolism, which should be applicable to studies on the regulation of fat deposition and improvement of meat quality.

  16. Changes in tail length between docking and weaning of lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was conducted with crossbred lambs (n = 109 female and 120 male) to quantify tail length at docking and weaning. Lambs were born in April of one year and weaned at ˜ 125 d of age. Within 24 h after birth, lambs were weighed and ear tagged, and rubber rings were applied to dock tails. R...

  17. Population characteristics of a central Appalachian white tailed deer herd

    Treesearch

    Tyler A. Campbell; Benjamin R. Laseter; W. Mark Ford; Karl V. Miller; Karl V. Miller

    2005-01-01

    Reliable estimates of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population parameters are needed for effective population management. We used radiotelemetrv to compare survival and cause-specific mortality rates between male and female white-tailed deer and present reproductive data for a high-density deer herd in the central Appalachians of West Virginia during...

  18. Androgens regulate sex differences in signaling but are not associated with male variation in morphology in the weakly electric fish Parapteronotus hasemani.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Jacquelyn M; Smith, G Troy

    2016-02-01

    Sexually dimorphic signaling is widespread among animals and can act as an honest indicator of mate quality. Additionally, differences in signaling and morphology within a sex can be associated with different strategies for acquiring mates. Weakly electric fish communicate via self-generated electrical fields that transmit information about sex, reproductive state, and social status. The weakly electric knifefish Parapteronotus hasemani exhibits sexual dimorphism in body size as well as substantial within-male variation in body size and jaw length. We asked whether P. hasemani exhibits hormonally mediated sexual dimorphism in electrocommunication behavior. We also asked whether males with short versus long jaws differed significantly from each other in morphology, behavior, hormone levels, or reproductive maturity. Males produced longer chirps than females, but other signal parameters (electric organ discharge frequency; chirp rate and frequency modulation) were sexually monomorphic. Pharmacologically blocking androgen receptors in males reduced chirp duration, suggesting that this sexually dimorphic trait is regulated at least in part by the activational effects of androgens. Males sorted into two distinct morphological categories but did not differ in circulating 11-ketotestosterone or testosterone. Short-jawed males and long-jawed males also did not differ in any aspects of signaling. Thus, chirping and high levels of 11-ketotestosterone were reliably associated with reproductively active males but do not necessarily indicate male type or quality. This contrasts with other alternative male morph systems in which males that differ in morphology also differ in androgen profiles and signaling behavior.

  19. Androgens regulate sex differences in signaling but are not associated with male variation in morphology in the weakly electric fish Parapteronotus hasemani

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Jacquelyn M.; Smith, G. Troy

    2015-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic signaling is widespread among animals and can act as an honest indicator of mate quality. Additionally, differences in signaling and morphology within a sex can be associated with different strategies for acquiring mates. Weakly electric fish communicate via self-generated electrical fields that transmit information about sex, reproductive state, and social status. The weakly electric knifefish Parapteronotus hasemani exhibits sexual dimorphism in body size as well as substantial within-male variation in body size and jaw length. We asked whether P. hasemani exhibits hormonally mediated sexual dimorphism in electrocommunication behavior. We also asked whether males with short versus long jaws differed significantly from each other in morphology, behavior, hormone levels, or reproductive maturity. Males produced longer chirps than females, but other signal parameters (electric organ discharge frequency; chirp rate and frequency modulation) were sexually monomorphic. Pharmacologically blocking androgen receptors in males reduced chirp duration, suggesting that this sexually dimorphic trait is regulated at least in part by the activational effects of androgens. Males sorted into two distinct morphological categories but did not differ in circulating 11-ketotestosterone or testosterone. Short-jawed males and long-jawed males also did not differ in any aspects of signaling. Thus, chirping and high levels of 11-ketotestosterone were reliably associated with reproductively active males but do not necessarily indicate male type or quality. This contrasts with other alternative male morph systems in which males that differ in morphology also differ in androgen profiles and signaling behavior. PMID:26518663

  20. Regulation of crayfish, Orconectes virilis, tail muscle lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in response to anoxic conditions is associated with alterations in phosphorylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Green, Stuart R; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the terminal enzyme of anaerobic glycolysis, has a crucial role in sustaining ATP production by glycolysis during periods of anoxia via regenerating NAD(+) through the production of lactate. The present study examined the effects of prolonged (20h) anoxic submergence on LDH from the tail muscle of an anoxia-tolerant crayfish (Orconectes virilis). LDH was purified to homogeneity from tail muscle of both aerobic control and anoxic crayfish in a three step process. Analysis of the kinetic parameters and the stability of LDH showed that the Vmax in the pyruvate-reducing direction was significantly higher for the enzyme from anoxic crayfish whereas in the lactate-oxidizing direction the Vmax was significantly higher for the control enzyme. Differential scanning fluorimetry was used to assess thermal unfolding of crayfish LDH. The results showed that the enzyme from control muscle had a significantly higher melting temperature (greater thermal stability) than the anoxic enzyme form, suggesting that there was a structural difference between the two enzyme forms. Immunoblotting of purified LDH implicated post-translational modification as the reason for this difference; purified LDH from aerobic control crayfish showed significantly higher amounts of serine/threonine phosphorylation than did the anoxic enzyme form. This study provides evidence for anoxia-induced modifications of crayfish muscle LDH that may contribute significantly to modulating enzyme function under anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MicroRNAs 221 and 222 regulate the undifferentiated state in mammalian male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-En; Racicot, Karen E; Kaucher, Amy V; Oatley, Melissa J; Oatley, Jon M

    2013-01-15

    Continuity of cycling cell lineages relies on the activities of undifferentiated stem cell-containing subpopulations. Transition to a differentiating state must occur periodically in a fraction of the population to supply mature cells, coincident with maintenance of the undifferentiated state in others to sustain a foundational stem cell pool. At present, molecular mechanisms regulating these activities are poorly defined for most cell lineages. Spermatogenesis is a model process that is supported by an undifferentiated spermatogonial population and transition to a differentiating state involves attained expression of the KIT receptor. We found that impaired function of the X chromosome-clustered microRNAs 221 and 222 (miR-221/222) in mouse undifferentiated spermatogonia induces transition from a KIT(-) to a KIT(+) state and loss of stem cell capacity to regenerate spermatogenesis. Both Kit mRNA and KIT protein abundance are influenced by miR-221/222 function in spermatogonia. Growth factors that promote maintenance of undifferentiated spermatogonia upregulate miR-221/222 expression; whereas exposure to retinoic acid, an inducer of spermatogonial differentiation, downregulates miR-221/222 abundance. Furthermore, undifferentiated spermatogonia overexpressing miR-221/222 are resistant to retinoic acid-induced transition to a KIT(+) state and are incapable of differentiation in vivo. These findings indicate that miR-221/222 plays a crucial role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mammalian spermatogonia through repression of KIT expression.

  2. Bile acid-FXRα pathways regulate male sexual maturation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Aurélie; Sédes, Lauriane; Rouaisnel, Betty; de Haze, Angélique; Baron, Silvère; Schoonjans, Kristina; Caira, Françoise; Volle, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor Farnesol-X-Receptor alpha (FRXα) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. FRXα is expressed in the interstitial compartment of the adult testes, which contain the Leydig cells. In adult, short term treatment (12 hours) with FRXα agonist inhibits the expression of steroidogenic genes via the induction of the Small heterodimer partner (SHP). However the consequences of FRXα activation on testicular pathophysiology have never been evaluated. We demonstrate here that mice fed a diet supplemented with bile acid during pubertal age show increased incidence of infertility. This is associated with altered differentiation and increase apoptosis of germ cells due to lower testosterone levels. At the molecular level, next to the repression of basal steroidogenesis via the induction expression of Shp and Dax-1, two repressors of steroidogenesis, the main action of the BA-FRXα signaling is through lowering the Leydig cell sensitivity to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, the main regulator of testicular endocrine function. In conclusion, BA-FRXα signaling is a critical actor during sexual maturation. PMID:26848619

  3. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased dendritic spine density and tau expression are associated with individual differences in steroidal regulation of male sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Pranay; McInnis, Christine; Madden, Amanda M K; Bonthuis, Paul J; Zup, Susan; Rissman, Emilie F; Park, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Male sexual behavior (MSB) is modulated by gonadal steroids, yet this relationship is highly variable across species and between individuals. A significant percentage (~30%) of B6D2F1 hybrid male mice demonstrate MSB after long-term orchidectomy (herein after referred to as "maters"), providing an opportunity to examine the mechanisms that underlie individual differences in steroidal regulation of MSB. Use of gene expression arrays comparing maters and non-maters has provided a first pass look at the genetic underpinnings of steroid-independent MSB. Surprisingly, of the ~500 genes in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) that differed between maters and non-maters, no steroid hormone or receptor genes were differentially expressed between the two groups. Interestingly, best known for their association with Alzheimer's disease, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) were elevated in maters. Increased levels of their protein products (APP and tau) in their non-pathological states have been implicated in cell survival, neuroprotection, and supporting synaptic integrity. Here we tested transgenic mice that overexpress tau and found facilitated mounting and intromission behavior after long-term orchidectomy relative to littermate controls. In addition, levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, proteins generally enriched in synapses and dendritic spines respectively, were elevated in the MPOA of maters. Dendritic morphology was also assessed in Golgi-impregnated brains of orchidectomized B6D2F1 males, and hybrid maters exhibited greater dendritic spine density in MPOA neurons. In sum, we show for the first time that retention of MSB in the absence of steroids is correlated with morphological differences in neurons.

  6. Adaptive Regulation of Testis Gene Expression and Control of Male Fertility by the Drosophila Harpin RNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiayu; Duan, Hong; Bejarano, Fernando; Okamura, Katsutomo; Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.; Bortolamiol-Becet, Diane; Martin, Raquel; Ruby, J. Graham; Lai, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Although endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) have been described in many species, still little is known about their endogenous utility. Here, we show that Drosophila hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs) generate an endo-siRNA class with predominant expression in testes. Although hpRNAs are universally recently evolved, we identify highly complementary protein-coding targets for all hpRNAs. Importantly, we find broad evidence for evolutionary divergences that preferentially maintain compensatory pairing between hpRNAs and targets, serving as first evidence for adaptive selection for siRNA-mediated target regulation in metazoans. We demonstrate organismal impact of hpRNA activity, since knockout of hpRNA1 derepresses its target ATP synthase-β in testes and compromises spermatogenesis and male fertility. Moreover, we reveal surprising male-specific impact of RNAi factors on germ cell development and fertility, consistent with testis-directed function of the hpRNA pathway. Finally, the collected hpRNA loci chronicle an evolutionary timeline that reflects their origins from prospective target genes, mirroring a strategy described for plant miRNAs. PMID:25544562

  7. Differential regulation of BDNF, synaptic plasticity and sprouting in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway of male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have described potent effects of BDNF, 17β-estradiol or androgen on hippocampal synapses and their plasticity. Far less information is available about the interactions between 17β-estradiol and BDNF in hippocampus, or interactions between androgen and BDNF in hippocampus. Here we review the regulation of BDNF in the mossy fiber pathway, a critical part of hippocampal circuitry. We discuss the emerging view that 17β-estradiol upregulates mossy fiber BDNF synthesis in the adult female rat, while testosterone exerts a tonic suppression of mossy fiber BDNF levels in the adult male rat. The consequences are interesting to consider: in females, increased excitability associated with high levels of BDNF in mossy fibers could - on the one hand - improve normal functions of area CA3, such as the ability to perform pattern completion. On the other hand, memory retrieval may lead to anxiety if stressful events are recalled. Therefore, the actions of 17β-estradiol on the mossy fiber pathway in females may provide a potential explanation for the greater incidence of anxiety-related disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in women relative to men. In males, suppression of BDNF-dependent plasticity in the mossy fibers may be protective, but at the `price' of reduced synaptic plasticity in CA3. PMID:23660230

  8. PMS1T, producing phased small-interfering RNAs, regulates photoperiod-sensitive male sterility in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yourong; Yang, Jiangyi; Mathioni, Sandra M.; Yu, Jinsheng; Shen, Jianqiang; Yang, Xuefei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qinghua; Cai, Zhaoxia; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Phased small-interfering RNAs (phasiRNAs) are a special class of small RNAs, which are generated in 21- or 24-nt intervals from transcripts of precursor RNAs. Although phasiRNAs have been found in a range of organisms, their biological functions in plants have yet to be uncovered. Here we show that phasiRNAs generated by the photopheriod-sensetive genic male sterility 1 (Pms1) locus were associated with photoperiod-sensitive male sterility (PSMS) in rice, a germplasm that started the two-line hybrid rice breeding. The Pms1 locus encodes a long-noncoding RNA PMS1T that was preferentially expressed in young panicles. PMS1T was targeted by miR2118 to produce 21-nt phasiRNAs that preferentially accumulated in the PSMS line under long-day conditions. A single nucleotide polymorphism in PMS1T nearby the miR2118 recognition site was critical for fertility change, likely leading to differential accumulation of the phasiRNAs. This result suggested possible roles of phasiRNAs in reproductive development of rice, demonstrating the potential importance of this RNA class as regulators in biological processes. PMID:27965387

  9. ssc-miR-7134-3p regulates fat accumulation in castrated male pigs by targeting MARK4 gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejun; Li, Wenting; Bai, Ying; Yang, Wanjie; Ling, Yao; Fang, Meiying

    2017-01-01

    Castration of male pigs is a common practice used to reduce boar taint in commercial pork production, but it also significantly results in fat accumulation in carcass. Our previous study revealed a miRNA gene, ssc-miR-7134-3p that was implicated in adipogenesis. However, the relationship between ssc-miR-7134-3p and fat deposition due to castration is unknown. In the present study, we observed that ssc-miR-7134-3p targets the coding sequence (CDS) region of MARK4 based on bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assays. Experiments using silent mutations and sub-cloning showed that ssc-miR-7134-3p binds independently to two adjacent sites in the MARK4 CDS. Subsequently, ssc-miR-7134-3p inhibits MARK4 protein expression in pig fibroblast cells, being consistent with the targeting demonstrated in vitro. We found higher MARK4 protein levels in the back fat of castrated pigs than in intact pigs, providing further evidence that MARK4 is involved in regulation of fat deposition. In addition, one SNP (g.2581A>G) in MARK4 was significantly associated with the back fat trait in Chinese and European pig populations. Taken together, we would conclude that ssc-miR-7134-3p targets the MARK4 gene for fat accumulation in the castrated male pigs. PMID:28255271

  10. Androgen regulation of adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone secretion in the male rat following novelty and foot shock stressors.

    PubMed

    Handa, R J; Nunley, K M; Lorens, S A; Louie, J P; McGivern, R F; Bollnow, M R

    1994-01-01

    To examine mechanisms responsible for sex differences in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to stress, we studied the role of androgens in the regulation of the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) responses to foot shock and novelty stressors in gonadectomized (GDX) or intact male F344 rats. Foot shock or exposure to a novel open field increased plasma ACTH and CORT, which was significantly greater in GDX vs. intacts. Testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone propionate (DHT) treatment of GDX animals returned poststress levels of ACTH and CORT to intact levels. Estrogen treatment of GDX males further increased poststress CORT secretion above GDX levels. There was no difference in the ACTH response of anterior pituitaries from intact, GDX, and GDX+DHT animals to CRF using an in vitro perifusion system. There were no differences in beta max or binding affinity of type I or II CORT receptors in the hypothalamus or hippocampus of intact, GDX, or GDX+DHT groups. These data demonstrate an effect of GDX on hormonal indices of stress. The increased response in GDX rats appears to be due to the release from androgen receptor mediated inhibition of the HPA axis. This inhibition by androgen is not due to changes in anterior pituitary sensitivity to CRH, nor to changes in type I or type II corticosteroid receptor concentrations.

  11. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-05-01

    The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings.

  13. Deficits in coordinated motor behavior and in nigrostriatal dopaminergic system ameliorated and VMAT2 expression up-regulated in aged male rats by administration of testosterone propionate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Kang, Yunxiao; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Yingbo; Cui, Rui; Yan, Wensheng; Tan, Huibing; Li, Shuangcheng; Wu, Baiyila; Cui, Huixian; Shi, Geming

    2016-06-01

    The effects of testosterone propionate (TP) supplements on the coordinated motor behavior and nigrostriatal dopaminergic (NSDA) system were analyzed in aged male rats. The present study showed the coordinated motor behavioral deficits, the reduced activity of NSDA system and the decreased expression of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in 24 month-old male rats. Long term TP treatment improved the motor coordination dysfunction with aging. Increased tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter, as well as dopamine and its metabolites were found in the NSDA system of TP-treated 24 month-old male rats, indicative of the amelioratory effects of TP supplements on NSDA system of aged male rats. The enhancement of dopaminergic (DAergic) activity of NSDA system by TP supplements might underlie the amelioration of the coordinated motor dysfunction in aged male rats. TP supplements up-regulated VMAT2 expression in NSDA system of aged male rats. Up-regulation of VMAT2 expression in aged male rats following chronic TP treatment might be involved in the maintenance of DAergic function of NSDA system in aged male rats.

  14. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  15. Helicopter tail rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-T.; George, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  16. The Tail of BPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  17. Estimating tail probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  18. Effect of photoperiod on characteristics of semen obtained by electroejaculation in stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides).

    PubMed

    García Granados, Mónica Dafne; Hernández López, Leonor Estela; Córdoba Aguilar, Alejandro; Cerda Molina, Ana Lilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Olivia; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    Some environmental variables determining seasonal reproduction in mammals are temperature, humidity, food availability, and photoperiod. Among these, photoperiod is considered the main regulator of primates' seasonal reproduction, thus the latitudinal distribution of primate populations is a key factor determining the appearance of seasonal reproduction. The present work presents supporting discrete seasonality in male stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides). We investigated whether semen quality and testosterone covaried with Mexico City's photoperiod and relative humidity by analyzing variations in the portions that form the ejaculate: the seminal liquid, the seminal coagulum, and the copulatory plug. Five male adult stump-tailed macaques were electroejaculated once a month, obtaining three semen samples per male, from August 2011 to July 2012 (except for December 2011) (n = 165). Our results showed that stump-tailed macaque sperm counts were significantly different between the portions of the ejaculate. The seminal coagulum contained the significantly largest number of spermatozoids, followed by the copulatory plug and the seminal fluid. Photoperiod and relative humidity had major influence on the sperm count in the seminal coagulum and the testosterone concentrations. Testosterone reached its highest values around the time when days and nights lasted the same hours, decreasing when days either grew longer or became shorter. Concerning relative humidity, sperm counts in the seminal coagulum were highly variable on dry days, but decreased as the relative humidity increased. We conclude that stump-tailed macaques have a discrete seasonality, occurring in spring and fall when macaques' reproductive condition and readiness for postcopulatory intrasexual competition increase.

  19. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2003-06-20

    Local renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) have been postulated in brain, pituitary and adrenal glands. These local RAS have been implicated, respectively, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system and body water balance, the secretion of pituitary hormones and the secretion of aldosterone by adrenal glands. By other hand, it is known that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in blood pressure regulation, and is affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of testosterone on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase A, B and M activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis, measuring these activities in their soluble and membrane-bound forms in the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands of orchidectomized males and orchidectomized males treated subcutaneously with several doses of testosterone. The present data suggest that in male mice, testosterone influences the RAS- and vasopressin-degrading activities at all levels of the HPA axis.

  20. Acceptability of drugs for male fertility regulation: a prospectus and some preliminary data. World Health Organization Task Force on Psychosocial Research in Family Planning.

    PubMed

    1980-02-01

    Hormonal substances for male fertility regulation administered orally or by injection are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These trials, sponsored by the World Health Organization, provide unique opportunities for intensive study of the acceptability of such an approach to fertility regulation, and of these drugs in particular. The research employs repeated interviews over a 15-month period and is conducted by social scientists collaborating with biomedical scientists at each of seven sites (Bangkok, Hong Kong, London, Mexico City, Santiago, Seoul, and Toronto). The focus is upon gauging male user's evaluations of hormonal methods (several androgen/gestagen combinations as well as cyproterone acetate) relative to their evaluations of other male methods they know about or have experienced. Of particular importance is to determine whether the hormonal methods modify or interfere with sexual desire, feelings, and behavior. The research is also assessing specific ways in which various perceived properties of fertility regulating methods relate to their acceptability in different socio-cultural settings.

  1. Specific down-regulation of spermatogenesis genes targeted by 22G RNAs in hybrid sterile males associated with an X-Chromosome introgression.

    PubMed

    Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Bi, Yu; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Young, Amanda; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long; Sarkies, Peter; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid incompatibility (HI) prevents gene flow between species, thus lying at the heart of speciation genetics. One of the most common HIs is male sterility. Two superficially contradictory observations exist for hybrid male sterility. First, an introgression on the X Chromosome is more likely to produce male sterility than on autosome (so-called large-X theory); second, spermatogenesis genes are enriched on the autosomes but depleted on the X Chromosome (demasculinization of X Chromosome). Analysis of gene expression in Drosophila hybrids suggests a genetic interaction between the X Chromosome and autosomes that is essential for male fertility. However, the prevalence of such an interaction and its underlying mechanism remain largely unknown. Here we examine the interaction in nematode species by contrasting the expression of both coding genes and transposable elements (TEs) between hybrid sterile males and its parental nematode males. We use two lines of hybrid sterile males, each carrying an independent introgression fragment from Caenorhabditis briggsae X Chromosome in an otherwise Caenorhabditis nigoni background, which demonstrate similar defects in spermatogenesis. We observe a similar pattern of down-regulated genes that are specific for spermatogenesis between the two hybrids. Importantly, the down-regulated genes caused by the X Chromosome introgressions show a significant enrichment on the autosomes, supporting an epistatic interaction between the X Chromosome and autosomes. We investigate the underlying mechanism of the interaction by measuring small RNAs and find that a subset of 22G RNAs specifically targeting the down-regulated spermatogenesis genes is significantly up-regulated in hybrids, suggesting that perturbation of small RNA-mediated regulation may contribute to the X-autosome interaction. © 2016 Li et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Specific down-regulation of spermatogenesis genes targeted by 22G RNAs in hybrid sterile males associated with an X-Chromosome introgression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Bi, Yu; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Young, Amanda; Zhang, Zhihong; Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long; Sarkies, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid incompatibility (HI) prevents gene flow between species, thus lying at the heart of speciation genetics. One of the most common HIs is male sterility. Two superficially contradictory observations exist for hybrid male sterility. First, an introgression on the X Chromosome is more likely to produce male sterility than on autosome (so-called large-X theory); second, spermatogenesis genes are enriched on the autosomes but depleted on the X Chromosome (demasculinization of X Chromosome). Analysis of gene expression in Drosophila hybrids suggests a genetic interaction between the X Chromosome and autosomes that is essential for male fertility. However, the prevalence of such an interaction and its underlying mechanism remain largely unknown. Here we examine the interaction in nematode species by contrasting the expression of both coding genes and transposable elements (TEs) between hybrid sterile males and its parental nematode males. We use two lines of hybrid sterile males, each carrying an independent introgression fragment from Caenorhabditis briggsae X Chromosome in an otherwise Caenorhabditis nigoni background, which demonstrate similar defects in spermatogenesis. We observe a similar pattern of down-regulated genes that are specific for spermatogenesis between the two hybrids. Importantly, the down-regulated genes caused by the X Chromosome introgressions show a significant enrichment on the autosomes, supporting an epistatic interaction between the X Chromosome and autosomes. We investigate the underlying mechanism of the interaction by measuring small RNAs and find that a subset of 22G RNAs specifically targeting the down-regulated spermatogenesis genes is significantly up-regulated in hybrids, suggesting that perturbation of small RNA-mediated regulation may contribute to the X-autosome interaction. PMID:27197225

  3. Androgens up-regulate atherosclerosis-related genes in macrophages from males but not females: molecular insights into gender differences in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Martin K C; Quinn, Carmel M; McCrohon, Jane A; Nakhla, Shirley; Jessup, Wendy; Handelsman, David J; Celermajer, David S; Death, Alison K

    2003-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of androgens on gene expression in male- and female-donor macrophages. Men have more severe coronary disease than women. Androgen exposure increases foam cell formation in male but not female macrophages, and male macrophages express >4-fold more androgen receptor messenger ribonucleic acid than female macrophages. Therefore, androgen exposure may have gender-specific and potentially pro-atherogenic effects in macrophages. Utilizing complementary deoxyribonucleic acid arrays, we studied the effects of a pure androgen (dihydrotestosterone, 40 nmol/l) on human monocyte-derived macrophages from healthy male and female donors (n = 4 hybridizations; 2 men, 2 women). Differential expression of atherosclerosis-related genes was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in five male and five female donors. Functional corroboration of foam cell formation-related findings was undertaken by experiments using (125)I-acetylated low-density lipoprotein (AcLDL). In male macrophages, androgen treatment produced differential up-regulation of 27 genes concentrated in five functional classes: 1) lipoprotein processing; 2) cell-surface adhesion; 3) extracellular signaling; 4) coagulation and fibrinolysis; and 5) transport protein genes. By contrast, none of 588 genes were up-regulated in female macrophages. By RT-PCR, we confirmed the gender-specific up-regulation of six of these atherosclerosis-related genes: acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl transferase I, lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), caveolin-2, CD40, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 receptor, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Functionally, androgen-treated male macrophages showed increased rates of lysosomal AcLDL degradation, by 45% to 75% after 15 to 20 h of (125)I-AcLDL incubation (p = 0.001), consistent with increased LAL activity. Androgens increase expression of atherosclerosis-related genes in male but not female macrophages, with functional

  4. Wagging tail vibration absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, R. G.; Humphrey, P. W.

    1969-01-01

    A 750-foot cantilever length of extendible-tape boom (very low stiffness) was considered as the main system to be damped. A number of tail lengths were tried from 20 feet to 80 feet after which 40 feet was investigated further as a desirable compromise between performance and practical lengths. A 40-foot damping tail produced a damping effect on the main boom for the first mode equivalent in decay rate to 3.1 percent of critical damping. In this case the spring-hinge and tail were tuned to the main boom first mode frequency and the hinge damping was set at 30 percent of critical based on the tail properties. With this same setting, damping of the second mode was .4 percent and the third mode .1 percent.

  5. TGF-β1 regulation of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein in the developing male blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Baello, Stephanie; Iqbal, Majid; Bloise, Enrrico; Javam, Mohsen; Gibb, William; Matthews, Stephen G

    2014-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter encoded by the abcb1 gene, protects the developing fetal brain. Levels of P-gp in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) increase dramatically during the period of peak brain growth. This is coincident with increased release of TGF-β1 by astrocytes and neurons. Although TGF-β1 has been shown to modulate P-gp activity in a number of cell types, little is known about how TGF-β1 regulates brain protection. In the present study, we hypothesized that TGF-β1 increases abcb1 expression and P-gp activity in fetal and postnatal BBB in an age-dependent manner. We found TGF-β1 to potently regulate abcb1 mRNA and P-gp function. TGF-β1 increased P-gp function in brain endothelial cells (BECs) derived from fetal and postnatal male guinea pigs. These effects were more pronounced earlier in gestation when compared with BECs derived postnatally. To investigate the signaling pathways involved, BECs derived at gestational day 50 and postnatal day 14 were exposed to ALK1 and ALK5 inhibitors and agonists. Through inhibition of ALK5, we demonstrated that ALK5 is required for the TGF-β1 effects on P-gp function. Activation of ALK1, by the agonist BMP-9, produced similar results to TGF-β1 on P-gp function. However, TGF-β1 signaling through the ALK1 pathway is age-dependent as dorsomorphin, an ALK1 inhibitor, attenuated TGF-β1-mediated effects in BECs derived at postnatal day 14 but not in those derived at gestational day 50. In conclusion, TGF-β1 regulates P-gp at the fetal and neonatal BBB and both ALK5 and ALK1 pathways are implicated in the regulation of P-gp function. Aberrations in TGF-β1 levels at the developing BBB may lead to substantial changes in fetal brain exposure to P-gp substrates, triggering consequences for brain development.

  6. Experimental analyses of sexual and natural selection on short tails in a polygynous warbler.

    PubMed Central

    Balmford, A; Lewis, M J; Brooke, M L; Thomas, A L; Johnson, C N

    2000-01-01

    We believe that no experimental study has yet tested Darwin's idea that, as well as generating trait elaboration, intersexual selection might sometimes drive sex-biased trait reduction. Here we present the results of two experiments exploring the negative relationship between tail length and reproductive success in male golden-headed cisticolas (Cisticola exilis). In the first experiment, artificially shortening a male's tail produced a dramatic increase in his reproductive success, measured as either the number of females nesting or number of chicks Hedged on his territory. A second experiment, in which manipulated birds were flown through a maze, revealed that short tails also impose costs by reducing aerodynamic performance during slow-speed foraging flight. Because tail shortening yields reproductive benefits and viability costs, we conclude it has evolved via sexual selection. Disentangling exactly how short tails enhance male reproductive success is more difficult. Male-male competition appears partly responsible: aerodynamic theory predicts that tail reduction enhances high-speed flight and, in line with this, shortened-tail males spent more time engaged in high-speed aerial chases of rivals and defended higher-quality territories. However, shortened-tail males had higher reproductive success independent of territory quality and spent more time in aerial displays which may be directed at females. This suggests that tail shortening is also favoured via female choice based on male phenotype. PMID:10885517

  7. The Tail Suspension Test

    PubMed Central

    Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Bhat, Shambhu; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The tail-suspension test is a mouse behavioral test useful in the screening of potential antidepressant drugs, and assessing of other manipulations that are expected to affect depression related behaviors. Mice are suspended by their tails with tape, in such a position that it cannot escape or hold on to nearby surfaces. During this test, typically six minutes in duration, the resulting escape oriented behaviors are quantified. The tail-suspension test is a valuable tool in drug discovery for high-throughput screening of prospective antidepressant compounds. Here, we describe the details required for implementation of this test with additional emphasis on potential problems that may occur and how to avoid them. We also offer a solution to the tail climbing behavior, a common problem that renders this test useless in some mouse strains, such as the widely used C57BL/6. Specifically, we prevent tail climbing behaviors by passing mouse tails through a small plastic cylinder prior to suspension. Finally, we detail how to manually score the behaviors that are manifested in this test. PMID:22315011

  8. The C-terminal tail inhibitory phosphorylation sites of PTEN regulate its intrinsic catalytic activity and the kinetics of its binding to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yeong-Chit Joel; Catimel, Bruno; Lio, Daisy Sio Seng; Ang, Ching-Seng; Peng, Benjamin; Wu, Hong; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Cheng, Heung-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Dephosphorylation of four major C-terminal tail sites and occupancy of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]-binding site of PTEN cooperate to activate its phospholipid phosphatase activity and facilitate its recruitment to plasma membrane. Our investigation of the mechanism by which phosphorylation of these C-terminal sites controls the PI(4,5)P2-binding affinity and catalytic activity of PTEN resulted in the following findings. First, dephosphorylation of all four sites leads to full activation; and phosphorylation of any one site significantly reduces the intrinsic catalytic activity of PTEN. These findings suggest that coordinated inhibition of the upstream protein kinases and activation of the protein phosphatases targeting the four sites are needed to fully activate PTEN phosphatase activity. Second, PI(4,5)P2 cannot activate the phosphopeptide phosphatase activity of PTEN, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 can only activate the phospholipid phosphatase activity but not the phosphoprotein phosphatase activity of PTEN. Third, dephosphorylation of all four sites significantly decreases the affinity of PTEN for PI(4,5)P2. Since PI(4,5)P2 is a major phospholipid co-localizing with the phospholipid- and phosphoprotein-substrates in plasma membrane, we hypothesise that the reduced affinity facilitates PTEN to "hop" on the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate these substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Testicular Steroidogenesis and Locomotor Activity Are Regulated by Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone in Male European Sea Bass

    PubMed Central

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A.; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; López-Olmeda, José F.; Mañanós, Evaristo L.; Zanuy, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neurohormone that suppresses reproduction by acting at both the brain and pituitary levels. In addition to the brain, GnIH may also be produced in gonads and can regulate steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. However, the function of GnIH in gonadal physiology has received little attention in fish. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of peripheral sbGnih-1 and sbGnih-2 implants on gonadal development and steroidogenesis during the reproductive cycle of male sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Both Gnihs decreased testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) plasma levels in November and December (early- and mid-spermatogenesis) but did not affect plasma levels of the progestin 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP). In February (spermiation), fish treated with sbGnih-1 and sbGnih-2 exhibited testicles with abundant type A spermatogonia and partial spermatogenesis. In addition, we determined the effects of peripheral Gnih implants on plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) levels, as well as on brain and pituitary expression of the main reproductive hormone genes and their receptors during the spermiation period (February). Treatment with sbGnih-2 increased brain gnrh2, gnih, kiss1r and gnihr transcript levels. Whereas, both Gnihs decreased lhbeta expression and plasma Lh levels, and sbGnih-1 reduced plasmatic Fsh. Finally, through behavioral recording we showed that Gnih implanted animals exhibited a significant increase in diurnal activity from late spermatogenic to early spermiogenic stages. Our results indicate that Gnih may regulate the reproductive axis of sea bass acting not only on brain and pituitary hormones but also on gonadal physiology and behavior. PMID:27788270

  10. A True Human Tail in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Mahesh K.; Nair, Smitha T.

    2017-01-01

    A true human tail is a benign vestigial caudal cutaneous structure composed of adipose, connective tissue, muscle, vessels, nerves and mechanoreceptors. A true human tail can be distinguished from a pseudotail as the latter is commonly associated with underlying spinal dysraphism, which requires specialised management. True human tails are very rare, with fewer than 40 cases reported to date. We report a healthy one-day-old male newborn who was referred to the Bharath Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala, India, in 2014 with a cutaneous appendage arising from the lumbosacral region. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine ruled out spinal dysraphism. The appendage was removed by simple surgical excision. Clinicians should emphasise use of ‘true tail’ and ‘pseudotail’ as specific disparate terms as the clinical, radiological and histological findings of these conditions differ significantly, along with management strategies and outcomes. PMID:28417039

  11. High-Fat Diet During Mouse Pregnancy and Lactation Targets GIP-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Adult Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Michael; Keyhani-Nejad, Farnaz; Isken, Frank; Nitz, Barbara; Kretschmer, Anja; Reischl, Eva; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Osterhoff, Martin A; Grallert, Harald; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2016-03-01

    Maternal obesity is a worldwide problem associated with increased risk of metabolic diseases in the offspring. Genetic deletion of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor (GIPR) prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice due to specific changes in energy and fat cell metabolism. We investigated whether GIP-associated pathways may be targeted by fetal programming and mimicked the situation by exposing pregnant mice to control or HFD during pregnancy (intrauterine [IU]) and lactation (L). Male wild-type (WT) and Gipr(-/-) offspring received control chow until 25 weeks of age followed by 20 weeks of HFD. Gipr(-/-) offspring of mice exposed to HFD during IU/L became insulin resistant and obese and exhibited increased adipose tissue inflammation and decreased peripheral tissue substrate utilization after being reintroduced to HFD, similar to WT mice on regular chow during IU/L. They showed decreased hypothalamic insulin sensitivity compared with Gipr(-/-) mice on control diet during IU/L. DNA methylation analysis revealed increased methylation of CpG dinucleotides and differential transcription factor binding of promoter regions of genes involved in lipid oxidation in the muscle of Gipr(-/-) offspring on HFD during IU/L, which were inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Our data identify GIP-regulated metabolic pathways that are targeted by fetal programming. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  13. VITELLOGENIN MRNA REGULATION AND PLASMA CLEARANCE IN MALE SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS, CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS AFTER CESSATION OF EXPOSURE TO 17B-ESTRADIOL AND P-NONYLPHENOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to determine the kinetics of hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA regulation and plasma VTG accumulation and clearance in male sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) during and after cessation of exposure to either 17b-estradiol (E2) or para-nonylphenol (NP)...

  14. Uranium mill tailings stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-02-01

    Uranium mill tailings pose a potential radiation health hazard to the public. Therefore, stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is needed to minimize radon exhalation and other environmental hazards. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing U tailings is the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other hazardous materials within uranium tailings. This approach is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Results of these studies indicate that a radon flux reduction of greater than 99% can be obtained using either a poured-on/sprayed-on seal (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick) or an admixture seal (2.5 to 12.7 cm thick) containing about 18 wt % residual asphalt. A field test was carried out in June 1979 at the Grand Junction tailings pile in order to demonstrate the sealing process. A reduction in radon flux ranging from 4.5 to greater than 99% (76% average) was achieved using a 15.2-cm (6-in.) admix seal with a sprayed-on top coat. A hydrostatic stabilizer was used to apply the admix. Following compaction, a spray coat seal was applied over the admix as the final step in construction of a radon seal. Overburden was applied to provide a protective soil layer over the seal. Included in part of the overburden was a herbicide to prevent root penetration.

  15. Impact of Italian legislation regulating assisted reproduction techniques on ICSI outcomes in severe male factor infertility: a multicentric survey.

    PubMed

    Ciriminna, R; Papale, M L; Artini, P G; Costa, M; De Santis, L; Gandini, L; Parmegiani, L; Ragni, G; Revelli, A; Rienzi, L; Barbaro, R; Cela, V; Cino, I; Colia, D; D'Ambrogio, G; Diotallevi, L; Dusi, M; Filicori, M; Genazzani, A R; Giuffrida, G; Lombardo, F; Paffoni, A; Racca, C; Greco, E

    2007-09-01

    In 2004, a law regulating assisted reproduction techniques (ART) was passed in Italy. The new rules allow for the formation and transfer of a maximum of three embryos at one time, whereas embryo selection and embryo storage are prohibited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of these restrictions on ICSI outcome in couples affected by severe male factor infertility. Thirteen Italian ART Units were involved in this study. Data were collected on ICSI cycles performed during 2 years before (control group) and 2 years after (study group) the enforcement of the law. Only cases of obstructive azoospermia (OA), non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and severe oligoastenoteratozoospermia (OAT) (sperm count male factor infertility. NOA patients are particularly affected by this restriction imposed by the new Italian law.

  16. Sexual selection and tail streamers in the barn swallow

    PubMed Central

    ller, A. P. M; Barbosa, A.; Cuervo, J. J.; Lope, F. de; Merino, S.; Saino, N.

    1998-01-01

    The functional significance of elongated, narrow tips of the tail feathers of certain birds, so-called tail streamers, has recently been discussed from an aerodynamic point of view, and the effects of sexual selection on such traits have been questioned. We review our long-term field studies using observational and experimental approaches to investigate natural and sexual selection in the barn swallow, Hirundo rustica, which has sexually size-dimorphic outermost tail feathers. Experimental manipulation of the length of the outermost tail feathers has demonstrated sexual selection advantages of tail elongation and disadvantages of tail shortening, with opposite effects for natural selection in terms of foraging efficiency, haematocrit and survival. These findings are contrary to the prediction of a general deterioration from both shortening and elongation, if the tail trait was determined solely by its effects on aerodynamic efficiency and flight manoeuvrability. Patterns of sexual selection in manipulated birds conform with patterns in unmanipulated birds, and selection differentials for different components of sexual selection in manipulated birds are strongly positively correlated with differentials in unmanipulated birds. Age and sex differences in tail length, and geographical patterns of sexual size dimorphism, are also consistent with sexual selection theory, but inconsistent with a purely natural selection advantage of long outermost tail feathers in male barn swallows.

  17. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  18. Multiple-Family Group Intervention for Incarcerated Male Adolescents Who Sexually Offend and Their Families: Change in Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Predicts Adaptive Change in Adolescent Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Keiley, Margaret K; Zaremba-Morgan, Ali; Datubo-Brown, Christiana; Pyle, Raven; Cox, Milira

    2015-07-01

    The multiple-family group intervention is an effective, yet affordable, 8-week treatment that is conducted in a juvenile correctional institution in Alabama with adolescents who sexually offend and their families. Data from 115 incarcerated male adolescents and their male and female caregivers collected at pre-, post-, and 1-year follow-up were used to determine that problem behaviors (internalizing, externalizing) decreased over pre- and posttest and the significant decreases in maladaptive emotion regulation predicted those changes. Adolescent-reported anxiety over abandonment and attachment dependence on parents increased significantly; these changes were predicted by decreases in maladaptive emotion regulation. Linear growth models were also fit over the 3 time points and indicate decreases in adolescent problem behavior and maladaptive emotion regulation.

  19. Differential regulation of endobiotic-oxidizing cytochromes P450 in vitamin A-deficient male rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Michael; Sefton, Rachel M; Croft, Kevin D; Butler, Alison M

    2001-01-01

    The hepatic CYP4A-dependent ω-hydroxylation of arachidonic acid and CYP2C11-dependent 2α-/16α-hydroxylations of testosterone were decreased to 74 and 60% of respective control in microsomal fractions from vitamin A-deficient rats. Decreases in the rates of arachidonic acid ω-1-hydroxylation and testosterone 6β-, 7α- and 17α-hydroxylations were less pronounced.Corresponding decreases in microsomal CYP4A and CYP2C11 immunoreactive protein expression to 64 and 68% of respective control were observed in vitamin A-deficient rat liver. Expression of CYP3A proteins was unchanged from vitamin A-adequate control.Northern analysis revealed a selective decrease in CYP4A2 mRNA expression in vitamin A-deficient rat liver to ∼5% of control; expression of the related CYP4A1/4A3 mRNAs was not decreased. CYP2C11 mRNA expression was also decreased in vitamin A-deficient male rat liver to 39% of control levels.Intake of the deficient diet containing all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) during the final week of the experiment restored CYP4A2 mRNA and CYP4A protein. Administration of exogenous androgen or episodic growth hormone was ineffective. In contrast, CYP2C11 expression was restored by ATRA and androgen, but not by growth hormone.From these studies it emerges that CYP4A2, a fatty acid ω-hydroxylase in rat liver, is highly dependent on vitamin A for optimal expression, whereas CYP2C11 is indirectly down regulated by androgen deficiency resulting from vitamin A-deficiency. Altered CYP expression in vitamin A-deficiency provides insights into the relationship between dietary constituents and the intracellular formation of vasoactive eicosanoids as well as the clearance of androgenic steroids. PMID:11724755

  20. Mechanisms regulating male sexual behavior in the rat: role of 3 alpha- and 3 beta-androstanediols.

    PubMed

    Morali, G; Oropeza, M V; Lemus, A E; Perez-Palacios, G

    1994-09-01

    To assess whether naturally occurring 5 alpha-androstanediols (5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol and 5 alpha-androstane-3 beta, 17 beta-diol) play a role in the regulation of male sexual behavior in the rat, their capability to restore copulatory behavior in castrated animals was evaluated. Androstanediols were chronically administered either alone or in combination with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or with estradiol-17 beta (E2). Animals treated with testosterone (T), DHT, E2, and vehicle, either alone or in different combinations, served as controls. The occurrence of mounting, intromission, and ejaculation as well as detailed parameters of copulatory behavior were recorded twice per week for 3 weeks. At the end of treatments, the weights of sex accessory organs were also recorded. When 3 beta, 5 alpha-androstanediol (3 beta-diol; 500 micrograms/day) was administered in combination with DHT (300 micrograms/day), full copulatory behavior was restored in all subjects in a manner similar to that obtained with E2 plus DHT or T plus DHT combinations, thus indicating an estrogen-like behavioral effect of 3 beta-diol. Administration of 3 alpha, 5 alpha-androstanediol (3 alpha-diol; 500 micrograms/day) combined with DHT also restored sexual behavior, though to a lesser extent. When 3 alpha-diol (500 micrograms/day) was simultaneously administered with E2 (5 micrograms/day), the copulatory behavior of castrated animals was fully restored in a fashion similar to that observed after administration of DHT plus E2 and T plus E2 combinations, indicating a potent androgen-like effect of 3 alpha-diol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Differential Regulation of GnRH Secretion in the Preoptic Area (POA) and the Median Eminence (ME) in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M.

    2015-01-01

    GnRH release in the median eminence (ME) is the central output for control of reproduction. GnRH processes in the preoptic area (POA) also release GnRH. We examined region-specific regulation of GnRH secretion using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to detect GnRH release in brain slices from adult male mice. Blocking endoplasmic reticulum calcium reuptake to elevate intracellular calcium evokes GnRH release in both the ME and POA. This release is action potential dependent in the ME but not the POA. Locally applied kisspeptin induced GnRH secretion in both the ME and POA. Local blockade of inositol triphospate-mediated calcium release inhibited kisspeptin-induced GnRH release in the ME, but broad blockade was required in the POA. In contrast, kisspeptin-evoked secretion in the POA was blocked by local gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone, but broad gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone application was required in the ME. Although action potentials are required for GnRH release induced by pharmacologically-increased intracellular calcium in the ME and kisspeptin-evoked release requires inositol triphosphate-mediated calcium release, blocking action potentials did not inhibit kisspeptin-induced GnRH release in the ME. Kisspeptin-induced GnRH release was suppressed after blocking both action potentials and plasma membrane Ca2+ channels. This suggests that kisspeptin action in the ME requires both increased intracellular calcium and influx from the outside of the cell but not action potentials. Local interactions among kisspeptin and GnRH processes in the ME could thus stimulate GnRH release without involving perisomatic regions of GnRH neurons. Coupling between action potential generation and hormone release in GnRH neurons is thus likely physiologically labile and may vary with region. PMID:25314270

  2. Sex Differences in the Right Tail of Cognitive Abilities: A 30 Year Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, Jonathan; Cacchio, Megan; Putallaz, Martha; Makel, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    One factor in the debate surrounding the underrepresentation of women in science technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) involves male-female mathematical ability differences in the extreme right tail (top 1% in ability). The present study provides male-female ability ratios from over 1.6 million 7th grade students in the right tail (top 5%…

  3. Corecognition of DNA and a methylated histone tail by the MSL3 chromodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daesung; Blus, Bartlomiej J.; Chandra, Vikas; Huang, Pengxiang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2010-11-12

    MSL3 resides in the MSL (male-specific lethal) complex, which upregulates transcription by spreading the histone H4 Lys16 (H4K16) acetyl mark. We discovered a DNA-dependent interaction of MSL3 chromodomain with the H4K20 monomethyl mark. The structure of a ternary complex shows that the DNA minor groove accommodates the histone H4 tail, and monomethyllysine inserts in a four-residue aromatic cage in MSL3. H4K16 acetylation antagonizes MSL3 binding, suggesting that MSL function is regulated by a combination of post-translational modifications.

  4. Structural studies of the C‐terminal tail of polycystin‐2 (PC2) reveal insights into the mechanisms used for the functional regulation of PC2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in polycystin‐2 (PC2) lead to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The molecular mechanism linking mutations in PC2 and the pathogenesis of ADPKD is not well understood. Therefore, understanding the functional regulation of PC2 and its interaction with other proteins under both physiological and pathogenic conditions is important for elucidating the disease mechanism and identifying potential molecular targets for treatment. Normally, PC2 functions as a calcium‐permeable channel whose activity is regulated by calcium binding to the C‐terminal domain of PC2 (PC2 Cterm). The PC2 Cterm is also involved in the PC2 channel assembly and hetero‐oligomerization with other binding partners in cells. Different functional domains of the PC2 Cterm have been studied using structural approaches. Within the PC2 Cterm, there is a calcium‐binding EF‐hand domain, crucial for the calcium‐dependent activity of the PC2 channel. Downstream of the EF‐hand domain lies a coiled‐coil region, which is involved in the assembly and hetero‐interaction of the PC2 protein. The PC2 Cterm can form an oligomer, mediated by the coiled‐coil region. Although PC2 Cterm has been extensively studied for its relationship with ADPKD and its importance in PC2 regulation, there are misunderstandings with respect to the definition of the domain topology within the PC2 Cterm and the functional role of each domain. Here, we review previous studies that connect the molecular properties of the domains of PC2 Cterm to distinct aspects of PC2 functions and regulation. PMID:26857659

  5. Central dopamine D2 receptors regulate growth-hormone-dependent body growth and pheromone signaling to conspecific males.

    PubMed

    Noaín, Daniela; Pérez-Millán, M Inés; Bello, Estefanía P; Luque, Guillermina M; Casas Cordero, Rodrigo; Gelman, Diego M; Peper, Marcela; Tornadu, Isabel García; Low, Malcolm J; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-03-27

    Competition between adult males for limited resources such as food and receptive females is shaped by the male pattern of pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion that determines body size and the production of urinary pheromones involved in male-to-male aggression. In the brain, dopamine (DA) provides incentive salience to stimuli that predict the availability of food and sexual partners. Although the importance of the GH axis and central DA neurotransmission in social dominance and fitness is clearly appreciated, the two systems have always been studied unconnectedly. Here we conducted a cell-specific genetic dissection study in conditional mutant mice that selectively lack DA D2 receptors (D2R) from pituitary lactotropes (lacDrd2KO) or neurons (neuroDrd2KO). Whereas lacDrd2KO mice developed a normal GH axis, neuroDrd2KO mice displayed fewer somatotropes; reduced hypothalamic Ghrh expression, pituitary GH content, and serum IGF-I levels; and exhibited reduced body size and weight. As a consequence of a GH axis deficit, neuroDrd2KO adult males excreted low levels of major urinary proteins and their urine failed to promote aggression and territorial behavior in control male challengers, in contrast to the urine taken from control adult males. These findings reveal that central D2Rs mediate a neuroendocrine-exocrine cascade that controls the maturation of the GH axis and downstream signals that are critical for fitness, social dominance, and competition between adult males.

  6. Joint-linkage mapping and GWAS reveal extensive genetic loci that regulate male inflorescence size in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both insufficient and excessive male inflorescence size leads to a reduction in maize yield. Knowledge of the genetic architecture of male inflorescence is essential to achieve the optimum inflorescence size for maize breeding. In this study, we used approximately eight thousand inbreds, including b...

  7. Managing 'tail liability'.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C; Weber, Ryan J

    2013-11-01

    To reduce and control their level of tail liability, hospitals should: Utilize a self-insurance vehicle; Consider combined limits between the hospital and physicians; Communicate any program changes to the actuary, underwriter, and auditor; Continue risk management and safety practices; Ensure credit is given to the organization's own medical malpractice program.

  8. "Tails" of Linguistic Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmis, Ivor

    2010-01-01

    Given the relatively short history of computerized corpora of spoken language, it is not surprising that few diachronic studies have been done on the grammatical features recently highlighted by the analysis of such corpora. This article, however, does take a diachronic perspective on one such feature: the syntactic feature of "tails"…

  9. White-tailed deer

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Johns; John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    from a public relations standpoint, the white-tailed deer (Odocileus virginiamus) is probably the most important wildlife species occurring on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS deer herd has been the subject of more scientific investigations than any comparable deer population in the world, resulting in more than 125 published papers. Each year...

  10. Exploring Mercury Tail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-08-26

    As the MESSENGER spacecraft approached Mercury, the UVVS field of view was scanned across the planet's exospheric "tail," which is produced by the solar wind pushing Mercury's exosphere (the planet's extremely thin atmosphere) outward. This figure, recently published in Science magazine, shows a map of the distribution of sodium atoms as they stream away from the planet (see PIA10396); red and yellow colors represent a higher abundance of sodium than darker shades of blue and purple, as shown in the colored scale bar, which gives the brightness intensity in units of kiloRayleighs. The escaping atoms eventually form a comet-like tail that extends in the direction opposite that of the Sun for many planetary radii. The small squares outlined in black correspond to individual measurements that were used to create the full map. These measurements are the highest-spatial-resolution observations ever made of Mercury's tail. In less than six weeks, on October 6, 2008, similar measurements will be made during MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury. Comparing the measurements from the two flybys will provide an unprecedented look at how Mercury's dynamic exosphere and tail vary with time. Date Acquired: January 14, 2008. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11076

  11. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  12. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu; Makaroff, Christopher; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation.

  13. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the virulence activator TcpP in Vibrio cholerae is initiated by the tail-specific protease (Tsp).

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wei Ping; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae uses a multiprotein transcriptional regulatory cascade to control expression of virulence factors cholera toxin and toxin-co-regulated pilus. Two proteins in this cascade are ToxR and TcpP - unusual membrane-localized transcription factors with relatively undefined periplasmic domains and transcription activator cytoplasmic domains. TcpP and ToxR function with each other and two other membrane-localized proteins, TcpH and ToxS, to activate transcription of toxT, encoding the direct activator of toxin and pilus genes. Under some conditions, TcpP is degraded in a two-step proteolytic pathway known as regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), thereby inactivating the cascade. The second step in this proteolytic pathway involves the zinc metalloprotease YaeL; V. cholerae cells lacking YaeL accumulate a truncated yet active form of TcpP termed TcpP*. We hypothesized that a protease acting prior to YaeL degrades TcpP to TcpP*, which is the substrate of YaeL. In this study, we demonstrate that a C-terminal protease called Tsp degrades TcpP to form TcpP*, which is then acted upon by YaeL. We present evidence that TcpH and Tsp serve to protect full-length TcpP from spurious proteolysis by YaeL. Cleavage by Tsp occurs in the periplasmic domain of TcpP and requires residues TcpPA172 and TcpPI174 for wild-type activity.

  14. Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART) peptide attenuates dopamine- and cocaine-mediated locomotor activity in both male and female rats: lack of sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Job, Martin O.; Perry, JoAnna; Shen, Li L.; Kuhar, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Regulated Transcript peptide (CART peptide) is known for having an inhibitory effect on dopamine (DA)- and cocaine-mediated actions and is postulated to be a homeostatic, regulatory factor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Some sex differences in cocaine-mediated LMA and in the expression and function of CART peptide have been reported. However, it is not known if the inhibitory effect of CART peptide on cocaine-mediated locomotor activity (LMA) is sexually dimorphic. In this study, the effect of CART 55-102 on LMA due to intra-NAc DA and i.p. cocaine were determined in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. The results show that CART 55-102 blunted or reduced both the DA- and cocaine-induced LMA in both males and females. In conclusion, CART peptide is effective in blunting DA- and cocaine-mediated LMA in both males and females. PMID:24630272

  15. Molecular regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in adult male guinea pigs after prenatal stress at different stages of gestation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Amita; Leen, Jason; Matthews, Stephen G

    2008-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that maternal stress during fetal development can lead to altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and behaviour postnatally. We have previously shown adult male guinea pigs that were born to mothers exposed to a stressor during the phase of rapid fetal brain growth (gestational days (GD) 50, 51 and 52; prenatal stress (PS)50) exhibit significantly increased basal plasma cortisol levels. In contrast, male guinea pig offspring whose mothers were exposed to stress later in gestation (GD60, 61 and 62; PS60) exhibited a significantly higher plasma cortisol response to activation of the HPA axis. In the present study, we hypothesized that the endocrine changes in HPA axis function observed in male guinea pig offspring would be reflected by altered molecular regulation of the HPA axis. Corticosteroid receptors in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary were measured, as well as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and adrenal enzymes in the paraventricular nucleus, pituitary and adrenal cortex, respectively, by in situ hybridization and Western blot. PS50 male offspring exhibited a significant reduction in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA (P <0.01) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and significantly increased POMC mRNA (P <0.05) in the pituitary, consistent with the increase in basal HPA axis activity observed. In line with elevated activity of the HPA axis, both PS50 and PS60 male offspring exhibited significantly higher steroidogenic factor (SF)-1 (P <0.001) and melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2-R) mRNA (P <0.001) in the adrenal cortex. This study demonstrates that short periods of prenatal stress during critical windows of neuroendocrine development affect the expression of key regulators of HPA axis activity leading to the changes in endocrine function observed in prenatally stressed male offspring. Further, these changes are dependent on the timing of the maternal

  16. The Drosophila takeout gene is regulated by the somatic sex-determination pathway and affects male courtship behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dauwalder, Brigitte; Tsujimoto, Susan; Moss, Jason; Mattox, William

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila somatic sex-determination regulatory pathway has been well studied, but little is known about the target genes that it ultimately controls. In a differential screen for sex-specific transcripts expressed in fly heads, we identified a highly male-enriched transcript encoding Takeout, a protein related to a superfamily of factors that bind small lipophilic molecules. We show that sex-specific takeout transcripts derive from fat body tissue closely associated with the adult brain and are dependent on the sex determination genes doublesex (dsx) and fruitless (fru). The male-specific Doublesex and Fruitless proteins together activate Takeout expression, whereas the female-specific Doublesex protein represses takeout independently of Fru. When cells that normally express takeout are feminized by expression of the Transformer-F protein, male courtship behavior is dramatically reduced, suggesting that male identity in these cells is necessary for behavior. A loss-of-function mutation in the takeout gene reduces male courtship and synergizes with fruitless mutations, suggesting that takeout plays a redundant role with other fru-dependent factors involved in male mating behavior. Comparison of Takeout sequences to the Drosophila genome reveals a family of 20 related secreted factors. Expression analysis of a subset of these genes suggests that the takeout gene family encodes multiple factors with sex-specific functions. PMID:12435630

  17. CYP1A1 based on metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 regulates chicken male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Wang, Man; Cheng, Shaoze; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yilin; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, Ruifeng; Sun, Changhua; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the regulatory mechanism of metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 during the differentiation process of chicken embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and consummate the induction differentiation system of chicken embryonic stem cells (cESCs) into SSCs in vitro. We performed RNA-Seq in highly purified male ESCs, male primordial germ cells (PGCs), and SSCs that are associated with the male germ cell differentiation. Thereinto, the metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 was selected and analyzed with Venny among male ESC vs male PGC, male PGC vs SSC, and male ESC vs SSC groups and several candidates differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were excavated. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) detected related DEGs under the condition of retinoic acid (RA) induction in vitro, and the expressions were compared with RNA-Seq. By knocking down CYP1A1, we detected the effect of CYP1A1-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 on male germ cell differentiation by qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results showed that 17,742 DEGs were found during differentiation of ESCs into SSCs and enriched in 72 differently significant pathways. Thereinto, the metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 was involved in the whole differentiation process of ESCs into SSCs and several candidate DEGs: CYP1A1, CYP3A4, CYP2D6, ALDH3B1, and ALDH1A3 were expressed with the same trend with RNA-Seq. Knockdown of CYP1A1 caused male germ cell differentiation under restrictions. Our findings showed that the metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 was significantly different during the process of male germ cell differentiation and was persistently activated when we induced cESCs to differentiate into SSCs with RA in vitro, which illustrated that the metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 played a crucial role in the differentiation process of ESCs into SSCs.

  18. Faun tail nevus

    PubMed Central

    Yamini, M.; Sridevi, K. S.; Babu, N. Prasanna; Chetty, Nanjappa G.

    2011-01-01

    Faun tail nevus is a posterior midline cutaneous lesion of importance to dermatologists as it could be a cutaneous marker for its underlying spine and spinal cord anomaly. We report a 13-year-old girl with excessive hair growth over the lumbosacral region since birth. There was associated spinal anomaly with no neurological manifestation affecting the lower spinal cord. The diagnosis was made on clinical basis. The patient reported for cosmetic disability. This case is reported for its clinical importance. PMID:23130210

  19. Faun tail nevus.

    PubMed

    Yamini, M; Sridevi, K S; Babu, N Prasanna; Chetty, Nanjappa G

    2011-01-01

    Faun tail nevus is a posterior midline cutaneous lesion of importance to dermatologists as it could be a cutaneous marker for its underlying spine and spinal cord anomaly. We report a 13-year-old girl with excessive hair growth over the lumbosacral region since birth. There was associated spinal anomaly with no neurological manifestation affecting the lower spinal cord. The diagnosis was made on clinical basis. The patient reported for cosmetic disability. This case is reported for its clinical importance.

  20. Regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis function in male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) during parental care.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, J D; Cooke, S J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-08-01

    Male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) provide sole parental care until offspring reach independence, a period of several weeks. During the early parental care period when males are guarding fresh eggs (MG-FE), cortisol responsiveness is attenuated; the response is re-established when males reach the end of the parental care period and are guarding free-swimming fry (MG-FSF). It was hypothesized that attenuation of the cortisol response in male smallmouth bass during early parental care reflected modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis function. Male smallmouth bass were sampled at the beginning (MG-FE) and end of the parental care period (MG-FSF), before and/or 25 min after exposure to a standardized stressor consisting of 3 min of air exposure. Repeated sampling of stressed fish for analysis of plasma cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels was carried out. Males significantly elevated both plasma cortisol and ACTH levels when guarding free-swimming fry but not during early parental care. Control and stressed fish were terminally sampled for tissue mRNA abundance of preoptic area (POA) and hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) as well as head kidney melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc). No significant differences in either hypothalamus CRF or head kidney P450scc mRNA abundance were found across parental care stages or in response to stress. However, POA CRF mRNA abundance and interrenal cell MC2R and StAR mRNA abundances failed to increase in response to stress in MG-FE. Thus, the attenuated cortisol response in males guarding fresh eggs may be explained by hypoactive HPI axis function in response to stress. The present is one of few studies, and the first teleost study, to address the mechanisms underlying resistance to stress during the reproductive/parental care period.

  1. Trans-tail regulation of MLL4-catalyzed H3K4 methylation by H4R3 symmetric dimethylation is mediated by a tandem PHD of MLL4.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Shilpa S; Lee, Sung-Hun; Kan, Pu-Yeh; Voigt, Philipp; Ma, Li; Shi, Xiaobing; Reinberg, Danny; Lee, Min Gyu

    2012-12-15

    Mixed-lineage leukemia 4 (MLL4; also called MLL2 and ALR) enzymatically generates trimethylated histone H3 Lys 4 (H3K4me3), a hallmark of gene activation. However, how MLL4-deposited H3K4me3 interplays with other histone marks in epigenetic processes remains largely unknown. Here, we show that MLL4 plays an essential role in differentiating NT2/D1 stem cells by activating differentiation-specific genes. A tandem plant homeodomain (PHD(4-6)) of MLL4 recognizes unmethylated or asymmetrically dimethylated histone H4 Arg 3 (H4R3me0 or H4R3me2a) and is required for MLL4's nucleosomal methyltransferase activity and MLL4-mediated differentiation. Kabuki syndrome mutations in PHD(4-6) reduce PHD(4-6)'s binding ability and MLL4's catalytic activity. PHD(4-6)'s binding strength is inhibited by H4R3 symmetric dimethylation (H4R3me2s), a gene-repressive mark. The protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7), but not PRMT5, represses MLL4 target genes by up-regulating H4R3me2s levels and antagonizes MLL4-mediated differentiation. Consistently, PRMT7 knockdown increases MLL4-catalyzed H3K4me3 levels. During differentiation, decreased H4R3me2s levels are associated with increased H3K4me3 levels at a cohort of genes, including many HOXA and HOXB genes. These findings indicate that the trans-tail inhibition of MLL4-generated H3K4me3 by PRMT7-regulated H4R3me2s may result from H4R3me2s's interference with PHD(4-6)'s binding activity and is a novel epigenetic mechanism that underlies opposing effects of MLL4 and PRMT7 on cellular differentiation.

  2. The tail plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1923-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the equilibrium, statistical stability, and damping of the tail plane. The author has simplified the present theory of longitudinal stability for the particular purpose of obtaining one definite coefficient characteristics of the effect of the tail plane. This coefficient is obtained by substituting certain aerodynamic characteristics and some dimensions of the airplane in a comparatively simple mathematical expression. Care has been taken to confine all aerodynamical information necessary for the calculation of the coefficient to the well-known curves representing the qualities of the wing section. This is done by making use of the present results of modern aerodynamics. All formulas and relations necessary for the calculation are contained in the paper. They give in some cases only an approximation of the real values. An example of calculation is added in order to illustrate the application of the method. The coefficient indicates not only whether the effect of the tail plane is great enough, but also whether it is not too great. It appears that the designer has to avoid a certain critical length of the fuselage, which inevitably gives rise to periodical oscillations of the airplane. The discussion also shows the way and in what direction to carry out experimental work.

  3. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail at high activity comets. Solar radiation pressure accelerates the sodium atoms antisunward and, as strong sodium absorption lines are present in the solar spectrum, the magnitude of this force is dependent upon the Doppler shift of the incident solar radiation. Therefore the heliocentric velocity of the sodium atom directly determines its acceleration. This can produce unique effects, such as a stagnation region. Sodium is relatively easy to detect and so can potentially be used to trace mechanisms in the coma that are otherwise difficult to observe. The source of neutral sodium in the tail currently remains unknown. We have therefore developed a new, three dimensional Monte-Carlo model of neutral cometary sodium in order to facilitate testing of different source production functions. It includes weightings due to neutral sodium lifetime, variation of cometary sodium emission due to Fraunhofer absorption lines and solar flux variation with heliocentric distance. The Swings and Greenstein effects, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets, are also considered comprehensively. Preliminary results from this model are presented, focusing on a comparison of predictions of the neutral sodium tail of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with initial observations.

  4. A novel function for the Hox gene Abd-B in the male accessory gland regulates the long-term female post-mating response in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gligorov, Dragan; Sitnik, Jessica L; Maeda, Robert K; Wolfner, Mariana F; Karch, François

    2013-03-01

    In insects, products of the male reproductive tract are essential for initiating and maintaining the female post-mating response (PMR). The PMR includes changes in egg laying, receptivity to courting males, and sperm storage. In Drosophila, previous studies have determined that the main cells of the male accessory gland produce some of the products required for these processes. However, nothing was known about the contribution of the gland's other secretory cell type, the secondary cells. In the course of investigating the late functions of the homeotic gene, Abdominal-B (Abd-B), we discovered that Abd-B is specifically expressed in the secondary cells of the Drosophila male accessory gland. Using an Abd-B BAC reporter coupled with a collection of genetic deletions, we discovered an enhancer from the iab-6 regulatory domain that is responsible for Abd-B expression in these cells and that apparently works independently from the segmentally regulated chromatin domains of the bithorax complex. Removal of this enhancer results in visible morphological defects in the secondary cells. We determined that mates of iab-6 mutant males show defects in long-term egg laying and suppression of receptivity, and that products of the secondary cells are influential during sperm competition. Many of these phenotypes seem to be caused by a defect in the storage and gradual release of sex peptide in female mates of iab-6 mutant males. We also found that Abd-B expression in the secondary cells contributes to glycosylation of at least three accessory gland proteins: ovulin (Acp26Aa), CG1656, and CG1652. Our results demonstrate that long-term post-mating changes observed in mated females are not solely induced by main cell secretions, as previously believed, but that secondary cells also play an important role in male fertility by extending the female PMR. Overall, these discoveries provide new insights into how these two cell types cooperate to produce and maintain a robust female PMR.

  5. A Novel Function for the Hox Gene Abd-B in the Male Accessory Gland Regulates the Long-Term Female Post-Mating Response in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Robert K.; Wolfner, Mariana F.; Karch, François

    2013-01-01

    In insects, products of the male reproductive tract are essential for initiating and maintaining the female post-mating response (PMR). The PMR includes changes in egg laying, receptivity to courting males, and sperm storage. In Drosophila, previous studies have determined that the main cells of the male accessory gland produce some of the products required for these processes. However, nothing was known about the contribution of the gland's other secretory cell type, the secondary cells. In the course of investigating the late functions of the homeotic gene, Abdominal-B (Abd-B), we discovered that Abd-B is specifically expressed in the secondary cells of the Drosophila male accessory gland. Using an Abd-B BAC reporter coupled with a collection of genetic deletions, we discovered an enhancer from the iab-6 regulatory domain that is responsible for Abd-B expression in these cells and that apparently works independently from the segmentally regulated chromatin domains of the bithorax complex. Removal of this enhancer results in visible morphological defects in the secondary cells. We determined that mates of iab-6 mutant males show defects in long-term egg laying and suppression of receptivity, and that products of the secondary cells are influential during sperm competition. Many of these phenotypes seem to be caused by a defect in the storage and gradual release of sex peptide in female mates of iab-6 mutant males. We also found that Abd-B expression in the secondary cells contributes to glycosylation of at least three accessory gland proteins: ovulin (Acp26Aa), CG1656, and CG1652. Our results demonstrate that long-term post-mating changes observed in mated females are not solely induced by main cell secretions, as previously believed, but that secondary cells also play an important role in male fertility by extending the female PMR. Overall, these discoveries provide new insights into how these two cell types cooperate to produce and maintain a robust female PMR

  6. Repeated use of the GnRH analogue deslorelin to down-regulate reproduction in male cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, H J; Jago, M; Nöthling, J O; Human, A

    2006-10-01

    The GnRH analogue deslorelin, as a subcutaneous implant, was initially developed in Australia as an ovulation-inducing agent in mares. Its uses, for the suppression of reproduction in the domestic dog and cat and in other species, including humans, have been developed subsequently. Such implants have been used as a contraceptive modality in a variety of wild carnivores, both males and females. This paper describes the use of deslorelin implants as a contraceptive agent for cheetah males maintained in a semi-captive environment and housed in various camps together with females. Annually, male cheetahs were treated for 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 7), 3 (n = 9), 4 (n = 3) or 5 (n = 1) consecutive years with an implant containing 4.7, 5.0 or 6.0 mg of deslorelin. On the first day of treatment and then on an annual basis, blood testosterone concentrations were analysed, testicular measurements were taken, appearance of penile spikes was determined, and semen was collected and evaluated. Pregnancy rates of mated or inseminated females were determined. A dose of 6 mg of deslorelin suppressed reproduction for at least 1 year, whereas with 4.7 and 5 mg of deslorelin, 3 of 17 males had a few non-motile spermatozoa in their ejaculates. All testosterone concentrations were basal at 1 year post-implant and no side effects were observed. We concluded that deslorelin implantation, at a dose of 6 mg, was a safe and reliable method of annual contraception in male cheetahs.

  7. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE ANDROGENIC REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN INTACT AND CASTRATE ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An abstract that provides understanding for a mathematical model by Barton and Anderson, for the dynamics of androgenic synthesis, transport, metabolism, and regulation of the rodent ventral prostate.

  8. Testosterone regulation of sex steroid-related mRNAs and dopamine-related mRNAs in adolescent male rat substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased risk of schizophrenia in adolescent males indicates that a link between the development of dopamine-related psychopathology and testosterone-driven brain changes may exist. However, contradictions as to whether testosterone increases or decreases dopamine neurotransmission are found and most studies address this in adult animals. Testosterone-dependent actions in neurons are direct via activation of androgen receptors (AR) or indirect by conversion to 17β-estradiol and activation of estrogen receptors (ER). How midbrain dopamine neurons respond to sex steroids depends on the presence of sex steroid receptor(s) and the level of steroid conversion enzymes (aromatase and 5α-reductase). We investigated whether gonadectomy and sex steroid replacement could influence dopamine levels by changing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and mRNA and/or dopamine breakdown enzyme mRNA levels [catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and monoamine oxygenase (MAO) A and B] in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We hypothesized that adolescent testosterone would regulate sex steroid signaling through regulation of ER and AR mRNAs and through modulation of aromatase and 5α-reductase mRNA levels. Results We find ERα and AR in midbrain dopamine neurons in adolescent male rats, indicating that dopamine neurons are poised to respond to circulating sex steroids. We report that androgens (T and DHT) increase TH protein and increase COMT, MAOA and MAOB mRNAs in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We report that all three sex steroids increase AR mRNA. Differential action on ER pathways, with ERα mRNA down-regulation and ERβ mRNA up-regulation by testosterone was found. 5α reductase-1 mRNA was increased by AR activation, and aromatase mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy. Conclusions We conclude that increased testosterone at adolescence can shift the balance of sex steroid signaling to favor androgenic responses through promoting conversion of T to DHT and

  9. Sex steroid hormones matter for learning and memory: estrogenic regulation of hippocampal function in male and female rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyoon; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Fortress, Ashley M.

    2015-01-01

    Ample evidence has demonstrated that sex steroid hormones, such as the potent estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2), affect hippocampal morphology, plasticity, and memory in male and female rodents. Yet relatively few investigators who work with male subjects consider the effects of these hormones on learning and memory. This review describes the effects of E2 on hippocampal spinogenesis, neurogenesis, physiology, and memory, with particular attention paid to the effects of E2 in male rodents. The estrogen receptors, cell-signaling pathways, and epigenetic processes necessary for E2 to enhance memory in female rodents are also discussed in detail. Finally, practical considerations for working with female rodents are described for those investigators thinking of adding females to their experimental designs. PMID:26286657

  10. Genome-wide identification of physically clustered genes suggests chromatin-level co-regulation in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Reimegård, Johan; Kundu, Snehangshu; Pendle, Ali; Irish, Vivian F.; Shaw, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Co-expression of physically linked genes occurs surprisingly frequently in eukaryotes. Such chromosomal clustering may confer a selective advantage as it enables coordinated gene regulation at the chromatin level. We studied the chromosomal organization of genes involved in male reproductive development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We developed an in-silico tool to identify physical clusters of co-regulated genes from gene expression data. We identified 17 clusters (96 genes) involved in stamen development and acting downstream of the transcriptional activator MS1 (MALE STERILITY 1), which contains a PHD domain associated with chromatin re-organization. The clusters exhibited little gene homology or promoter element similarity, and largely overlapped with reported repressive histone marks. Experiments on a subset of the clusters suggested a link between expression activation and chromatin conformation: qRT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization showed that the clustered genes were up-regulated within 48 h after MS1 induction; out of 14 chromatin-remodeling mutants studied, expression of clustered genes was consistently down-regulated only in hta9/hta11, previously associated with metabolic cluster activation; DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed that transcriptional activation of the clustered genes was correlated with open chromatin conformation. Stamen development thus appears to involve transcriptional activation of physically clustered genes through chromatin de-condensation. PMID:28175342

  11. NODAL secreted by male germ cells regulates the proliferation and function of human Sertoli cells from obstructive azoospermia and nonobstructive azoospermia patients

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ru-Hui; Yang, Shi; Zhu, Zi-Jue; Wang, Jun-Long; Liu, Yun; Yao, Chencheng; Ma, Meng; Guo, Ying; Yuan, Qingqing; Hai, Yanan; Huang, Yi-Ran; He, Zuping; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the regulatory effects of male germ cell secreting factor NODAL on Sertoli cell fate decisions from obstructive azoospermia (OA) and nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) patients. Human Sertoli cells and male germ cells were isolated using two-step enzymatic digestion and SATPUT from testes of azoospermia patients. Expression of NODAL and its multiple receptors in human Sertoli cells and male germ cells were characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunochemistry. Human recombinant NODAL and its receptor inhibitor SB431542 were employed to probe their effect on the proliferation of Sertoli cells using the CCK-8 assay. Quantitative PCR and Western blots were utilized to assess the expression of Sertoli cell functional genes and proteins. NODAL was found to be expressed in male germ cells but not in Sertoli cells, whereas its receptors ALK4, ALK7, and ACTR-IIB were detected in Sertoli cells and germ cells, suggesting that NODAL plays a regulatory role in Sertoli cells and germ cells via a paracrine and autocrine pathway, respectively. Human recombinant NODAL could promote the proliferation of human Sertoli cells. The expression of cell cycle regulators, including CYCLIN A, CYCLIN D1 and CYCLIN E, was not remarkably affected by NODAL signaling. NODAL enhanced the expression of essential growth factors, including GDNF, SCF, and BMP4, whereas SB431542 decreased their levels. There was not homogeneity of genes changes by NODAL treatment in Sertoli cells from OA and Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCO) patients. Collectively, this study demonstrates that NODAL produced by human male germ cells regulates proliferation and numerous gene expression of Sertoli cells. PMID:26289399

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin States Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Sex-Dependent Gene Regulation in Male and Female Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sugathan, Aarathi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin state maps were developed to elucidate sex differences in chromatin structure and their impact on sex-differential chromatin accessibility and sex-biased gene expression in mouse liver. Genes in active, inactive, and poised chromatin states exhibited differential responsiveness to ligand-activated nuclear receptors and distinct enrichments for functional gene categories. Sex-biased genes were clustered by chromatin environments and mapped to DNase-hypersensitive sites (DHS) classified by sex bias in chromatin accessibility and enhancer modifications. Results were integrated with genome-wide binding data for five transcription factors implicated in growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased liver gene expression, leading to the following findings. (i) Sex-biased DHS, but not sex-biased genes, are frequently characterized by sex-differential chromatin states, indicating distal regulation. (ii) Trimethylation of histone H3 at K27 (H3K27me3) is a major sex-biased repressive mark at highly female-biased but not at highly male-biased genes. (iii) FOXA factors are associated with sex-dependent chromatin opening at male-biased but not female-biased regulatory sites. (iv) Sex-biased STAT5 binding is enriched at sex-biased DHS marked as active enhancers and preferentially targets sex-biased genes with sex-differences in local chromatin marks. (v) The male-biased repressor BCL6 preferentially targets female-biased genes and regulatory sites in a sex-independent chromatin state. (vi) CUX2, a female-specific repressor of male-biased genes, also activates strongly female-biased genes, in association with loss of H3K27me3 marks. Chromatin states are thus a major determinant of sex-biased chromatin accessibility and gene expression, with FOXA pioneer factors proposed to confer sex-dependent chromatin opening and STAT5, but not BCL6, regulating sex-biased genes by binding to sites in a sex-biased chromatin state. PMID:23836885

  13. Estrogen regulates the localization and expression of calbindin-D9k in the pituitary gland of immature male rats via the ERalpha-pathway.

    PubMed

    Tinnanooru, Pushpalatha; Dang, Vu Hoang; Nguyen, Thi Hoa; Lee, Geun-Shik; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2008-03-26

    Estrogen (E2; estradiol) plays a key role in the regulation of many pituitary hormones. It exerts its effects by binding to the intracellular estrogen receptor (ER), which then functions as a transcription factor. Although E2 has been shown to regulate calbindin-D(9k) (CaBP-9k) in the female reproductive system of rodents, the effects of E2 on the regulation of CaBP-9k in male rats remain to be elucidated. To investigate E2-induced regulation of the pituitary CaBP-9k gene, immature male rats were injected with E2 daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 40 microg/kg body weight (BW). The expression levels of CaBP-9k mRNA and protein were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively, in the absence and presence of ICI 182,780 (ICI), an E2 antagonist. In addition, the tissue localization of CaBP-9k was determined by immunohistochemistry. CaBP-9k was localized in the cytoplasm of a specific cell type (acidophils) in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and highly expressed in the intermediate lobe. Exposure to E2 increased the number of cells that stained positive for CaBP-9k. To determine which ER subtype is involved in CaBP-9k regulation in the pituitary, the immature rats were treated with propyl pyrazole triol (PPT, an ERalpha-selective ligand) or diarylpropionitrile (DPN, an ERbeta-selective ligand) for 3 days. Pituitary CaBP-9k expression was mainly mediated by PPT in immature male rats, whereas no significant alteration of pituitary CaBP-9k gene expression was observed after DPN treatment. In addition, the estrogenicity of PPT in the induction of CaBP-9k expression was completely blocked by an estrogen antagonist, ICI, indicating that pituitary CaBP-9k expression is solely induced by ERalpha. Taken together, these results suggest that pituitary CaBP-9k is induced by E2 in male rats and its expression is predominantly regulated by ERalpha, but not ERbeta.

  14. Soy Isoflavones Regulate Lipid Metabolism through an AKT/mTORC1 Pathway in Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO) Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Pang, Dejiang; Luo, Qihui; Chen, Xiaolin; Gao, Qi; Shi, Liangqin; Liu, Wentao; Zou, Yuanfeng; Li, Lixia; Chen, Zhengli

    2016-05-03

    The pandemic tendency of obesity and its strong association with serious co-morbidities have elicited interest in the underlying mechanisms of these pathologies. Lipid homeostasis, closely involved in obesity, has been reported to be regulated by multiple pathways. mTORC1 is emerging as a critical regulator of lipid metabolism. Here, we describe that the consumption of soy isoflavones, with a structural similarity to that of estradiol, could mitigate obesity through an AKT/mTORC1 pathway. Fed with soy isoflavones, the diet-induced obesity (DIO) male rats exhibited decreased body weight, accompanied with suppressed lipogenesis and adipogenesis, as well as enhanced lipolysis and β‑oxidation. The phosphorylation of AKT and S6 were decreased after soy isoflavone treatment in vivo and in vitro, suggesting an inhibition effect of soy isoflavones on mTORC1 activity. Our study reveals a potential mechanism of soy isoflavones regulating lipid homeostasis, which will be important for obesity treatment.

  15. Soy protein diet alters expression of hepatic genes regulating fatty acid and thyroid hormone metabolism in the male rat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We determined effects of soy protein (SPI) and the isoflavone genistein (GEN) on mRNA expression of key lipid metabolism and thyroid hormone system genes in young adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. SPI-fed rats had less retroperitoneal fat and less hepato-steatosis than casein (CAS, control protein)-...

  16. Floods from tailings dam failures.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Benito, G; Díez-Herrero, A

    2008-06-15

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released, and this outflow volume is difficult to estimate prior the incident. In this study, tailings' volume stored at the time of failure was shown to have a good correlation (r2=0.86) with the tailings outflow volume, and the volume of spilled tailings was correlated with its run-out distance (r2=0.57). An envelope curve was drawn encompassing the majority of data points indicating the potential maximum downstream distance affected by a tailings' spill. The application of the described regression equations for prediction purposes needs to be treated with caution and with support of on-site measurement and observations. However, they may provide a universal baseline approximation on tailing outflow characteristics (even if detailed dam information is unavailable), which is of a great importance for risk analysis purposes.

  17. Tails of Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, B. D.

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that many natural hazards satisfy power-law frequency-size statistics. Examples include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, snow avalanches, forest and wildfires, meteorite impacts, and possibly floods. Although power-law (fat-tail) distributions are commonly associated with the frequency-size distribution of earthquakes, the frequency-size statistics of many other natural hazards are presently associated (e.g. by government agencies and reinsurance companies) with distributions that are more thin-tailed. The occurrence risk for large and very-large events using power-law frequency-size distributions is often much more conservative, with a greater chance of a large event occurring in a given period of time, compared to thinner tail distributions. One potential explanation for the frequent occurrence of power-law (fractal) frequency-size distributions among natural hazards lies in cellular-automata models, and their association with self-organized criticality and inverse cascades. The power-law behavior of the sandpile cellular-automata model has been associated by some with landslides, the forest-fire model with actual forest fires, and the slider-block model with earthquakes. A relatively simple inverse-cascade of metastable regions can explain the behavior of both models and the actual natural hazards. Metastable regions grow by coalescence and are lost in `avalanches'. However, the losses are dominated by the largest events and have little influence on the inverse cascade of metastable region coalescence. This inverse cascade of metastable regions is self-similar and the number-area statistics are power-law. Although the theoretical explanations are still being debated, the increasing evidence for power-law statistics means that government agencies and reinsurance companies should include this much more conservative frequency-size distribution when calculating the occurrence risk of large natural hazards.

  18. Wind Tails Near Chimp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the rock 'Chimp' was taken by the Sojourner rover's right front camera on Sol 72 (September 15). Fine-scale texture on Chimp and other rocks is clearly visible. Wind tails, oriented from lower right to upper left, are seen next to small pebbles in the foreground. These were most likely produced by wind action.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  19. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  20. C-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Neville-Andrew; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F; Charlier, Thierry D

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stimulation results in an increased expression of transcription factors called immediate early genes (IEGs) in specific neuronal populations. In male Japanese quail, copulation with a female increases the expression of the IEGs zenk and c-fos in the medial pre-optic nucleus (POM), a key nucleus controlling male sexual behavior. The functional significance of this increased IEG expression that follows performance of copulatory behavior is unknown. We addressed this question by repeatedly quantifying the performance of appetitive (learned social proximity response) and consummatory (actual copulation) sexual behavior in castrated, testosterone-treated males that received daily intra-cerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting c-fos or control vehicle. Daily antisense injections significantly inhibited the expression of copulatory behavior as well as the acquisition of the learned social proximity response. A strong reduction of the proximity response was still observed in antisense-treated birds that copulated with a female, ruling out the indirect effect of the absence of interactions with females on the learning process. After a 2-day interruption of behavioral testing but not of antisense injections, birds were submitted to a final copulatory test that confirmed the behavioral inhibition in antisense-injected birds. Brains were collected at 90 min after the behavioral testing for quantification of c-fos-immunoreactive cells. A significant reduction of the number of c-fos-positive cells in the POM but not in other brain regions was observed following antisense injection. Taken together, the data suggest that c-fos expression in the POM modulates copulatory behavior and sexual learning in male quail. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. C-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Neville-Andrew; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.; Charlier, Thierry D.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimulation results in an increased expression of transcription factors called immediate early genes (IEG) in specific neuronal populations. In male Japanese quail, copulation with a female increases the expression of the IEGs zenk and c-fos in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM), a key nucleus controlling male sexual behavior. The functional significance of this increased IEG expression that follows performance of copulatory behavior is unknown. We addressed this question by repeatedly quantifying the performance of appetitive (learned social proximity response) and consummatory (actual copulation) sexual behavior in castrated, testosterone-treated males that received daily intracerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting c-fos or control vehicle. Daily antisense injections significantly inhibited expression of copulatory behavior as well as acquisition of the learned social proximity response. A strong reduction of the proximity response was still observed in antisense-treated birds that copulated with a female, ruling out the indirect effect of the absence of interactions with females on the learning process. After a two-day interruption of behavioral testing but not of antisense injections, birds were submitted to a final copulatory test that confirmed the behavioral inhibition in antisense-injected birds. Brains were collected 90 min after the behavioral testing for quantification of c-fos immunoreactive cells. A significant reduction of the number of c-fos-positive cells in POM but not in other brain regions was observed following antisense injection. Together, data suggest that c-fos expression in POM modulates copulatory behavior and sexual learning in male quail. PMID:23895306

  2. Inhibitor of DNA binding 4 is expressed selectively by single spermatogonia in the male germline and regulates the self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Oatley, Melissa J; Kaucher, Amy V; Racicot, Karen E; Oatley, Jon M

    2011-08-01

    Continual spermatogenesis at a quantitatively normal level is required to sustain male fertility. The foundation of this process relies on maintenance of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population consisting of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) that self-renew as well as transient amplifying progenitors produced by differentiation. In mammals, type A(single) spermatogonia form the SSC population, but molecular markers distinguishing these from differentiating progenitors are undefined and knowledge of mechanisms regulating their functions is limited. We show that in the mouse male germline the transcriptional repressor ID4 is expressed by a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia and selectively marks A(single) spermatogonia. In addition, we found that ID4 expression is up-regulated in isolated SSC-enriched fractions by stimulation from GDNF, a key growth factor driving self-renewal. In mice lacking ID4 expression, quantitatively normal spermatogenesis was found to be impaired due to progressive loss of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population during adulthood. Moreover, reduction of ID4 expression by small interfering RNA treatment abolished the ability of wild-type SSCs to expand in vitro during long-term culture without affecting their survival. Collectively, these results indicate that ID4 is a distinguishing marker of SSCs in the mammalian germline and plays an important role in the regulation of self-renewal.

  3. The role of epigenetics in idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Hekim, Gulgez Neslihan Taskurt; Asci, Ramazan

    2016-05-01

    Infertility is a complex disorder with multiple genetic and environmental causes. Although some specific mutations have been identified, other factors responsible for sperm defects remain largely unknown. Despite considerable efforts to identify the pathophysiology of the disease, we cannot explain the underlying mechanisms of approximately half of infertility cases. This study reviews current data on epigenetic regulation and idiopathic male infertility. Recent data have shown an association between epigenetic modifications and idiopathic infertility. In this regard, epigenetics has emerged as one of the promising research areas in understanding male infertility. Many studies have indicated that epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation in imprinted and developmental genes, histone tail modifications and short non-coding RNAs in spermatozoa may have a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  4. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress.

    PubMed

    Uban, Kristina A; Comeau, Wendy L; Ellis, Linda A; Galea, Liisa A M; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-10-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine (DA) systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic DA activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and DA systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and DA systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24h following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared to CVS-exposed control

  5. Basal regulation of HPA and dopamine systems is altered differentially in males and females by prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic variable stress

    PubMed Central

    Uban, Kristina A.; Comeau, Wendy; Ellis, Linda A.; Galea, Liisa A. M.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on central nervous system function include an increased prevalence of mental health problems, including substance use disorders (SUD). The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and dopamine systems have overlapping neurocircuitries and are both implicated in SUD. PAE alters both HPA and dopaminergic activity and regulation, resulting in increased HPA tone and an overall reduction in tonic dopamine activity. However, effects of PAE on the interaction between HPA and dopamine (DA) systems have not been investigated. The present study examined PAE effects on basal regulation of central stress and dopamine systems in key brain regions where these systems intersect. Adult Sprague-Dawley male and female offspring from prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE), pairfed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) groups were subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS) or remained as a no stress (non-CVS) control group. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, as well as glucocorticoid and DA receptor (DA-R) expression were measured under basal conditions 24 hours following the end of CVS. We show, for the first time, that regulation of basal HPA and DA systems, and likely, HPA-DA interactions, are altered differentially in males and females by PAE and CVS. PAE augmented the typical attenuation in weight gain during CVS in males and caused increased weight loss in females. Increased basal corticosterone levels in control, but not PAE, females suggest that PAE alters the profile of basal hormone secretion throughout CVS. CVS downregulated basal CRH mRNA in the prefrontal cortex and throughout the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in PAE females but only in the posterior BNST of control females. PAE males and females exposed to CVS exhibited more widespread upregulation of basal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA throughout the hippocampus, and an attenuated decrease in DA-R expression throughout the nucleus accumbens and striatum compared

  6. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  7. Tailed bacteriophages: the order caudovirales.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, H W

    1998-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages have a common origin and constitute an order with three families, named Caudovirales. Their structured tail is unique. Tailed phages share a series of high-level taxonomic properties and show many facultative features that are unique or rare in viruses, for example, tail appendages and unusual bases. They share with other viruses, especially herpesviruses, elements of morphogenesis and life-style that are attributed to convergent evolution. Tailed phages present three types of lysogeny, exemplified by phages lambda, Mu, and P1. Lysogeny appears as a secondary property acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Amino acid sequence alignments (notably of DNA polymerases, integrases, and peptidoglycan hydrolases) indicate frequent events of horizontal gene transfer in tailed phages. Common capsid and tail proteins have not been detected. Tailed phages possibly evolved from small protein shells with a few genes sufficient for some basal level of productive infection. This early stage can no longer be traced. At one point, this precursor phage became perfected. Some of its features were perfect enough to be transmitted until today. It is tempting to list major present-day properties of tailed phages in the past tense to construct a tentative history of these viruses: 1. Tailed phages originated in the early Precambrian, long before eukaryotes and their viruses. 2. The ur-tailed phage, already a quite evolved virus, had an icosahedral head of about 60 nm in diameter and a long non-contractile tail with sixfold symmetry. The capsid contained a single molecule of dsDNA of about 50 kb, and the tail was probably provided with a fixation apparatus. Head and tail were held together by a connector. a. The particle contained no lipids, was heavier than most viruses to come, and had a high DNA content proportional to its capsid size (about 50%). b. Most of its DNA coded for structural proteins. Morphopoietic genes clustered at one end of the genome, with head

  8. The involvement of the olfactory bulbs in the regulation of gonadal and thyroidal activities of male red-winged blackbirds, exposed to short-day light regime.

    PubMed

    Robinzon, B; Katz, Y; Rogers, J G

    1979-01-01

    Surgical removal of the olfactory bulbs (OB) was performed in mature male red-winged blackbirds, maintained under a short-day light regime. Bulbectomy caused hyperphagia, which was not accompanied by obesity. Bulbectomized (OBX) birds had incresaed thyroid follicular activity and had greater developed testes than sham-operated controls. In the adenohypophyses of the OB-removed birds there was an increase in the populations of 4 types of chromophils: alcianophils, PAS-positive basophils, orangeophils and PAS-positive acidophils. The possibility that the OB are involved in the photoperiodic regulation of the activity of the gonads and thyroids is discussed.

  9. Gestational protein restriction impairs insulin-regulated glucose transport mechanisms in gastrocnemius muscles of adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Blesson, Chellakkan S; Sathishkumar, Kunju; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Type II diabetes originates from various genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies showed that an adverse uterine environment such as that caused by a gestational low-protein (LP) diet can cause insulin resistance in adult offspring. The mechanism of insulin resistance induced by gestational protein restriction is not clearly understood. Our aim was to investigate the role of insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscles of gestational LP diet-exposed male offspring to understand their role in LP-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed a control (20% protein) or isocaloric LP (6%) diet from gestational day 4 until delivery and a normal diet after weaning. Only male offspring were used in this study. Glucose and insulin responses were assessed after a glucose tolerance test. mRNA and protein levels of molecules involved in insulin signaling were assessed at 4 months in gastrocnemius muscles. Muscles were incubated ex vivo with insulin to evaluate insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), Insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and AS160. LP diet-fed rats gained less weight than controls during pregnancy. Male pups from LP diet-fed mothers were smaller but exhibited catch-up growth. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were elevated in LP offspring when subjected to a glucose tolerance test; however, fasting levels were comparable. LP offspring showed increased expression of IR and AS160 in gastrocnemius muscles. Ex vivo treatment of muscles with insulin showed increased phosphorylation of IR (Tyr972) in controls, but LP rats showed higher basal phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 (Tyr608, Tyr895, Ser307, and Ser318) and AS160 (Thr642) were defective in LP offspring. Further, glucose transporter type 4 translocation in LP offspring was also impaired. A gestational LP diet leads to insulin resistance in adult offspring by a mechanism involving inefficient insulin-induced IR, Insulin receptor

  10. 3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, LOOKING NORTHEAST. A SIX-FOOT SCALE IS LOCATED AGAINST WALL ON LEFT. PURPOSE OF TANK IS UNKNOWN, BUT APPEARS TO HAVE FALLEN FROM ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION AT THE MILL SITE, UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. The mediating role of self-regulation between intrafamilial violence and mental health adjustment in incarcerated male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Suzanne C; Cortina, Kai S; Smith-Darden, Joanne P; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A

    2012-05-01

    This article investigates the relation between history of intrafamilial violence and self-regulatory capacity, cognitive processing, and mental health adjustment in incarcerated adolescents. Adolescents were incarcerated at the time of the study for various violent offenses, ranging from persistent delinquency to sexual assault (n = 115). A model is proposed that posits that self-regulation, cognitive ability, and cognitive processing are integral to the relation between intrafamilial violence and mental health function. The primary hypothesis of the study tests this mediation model. The relations between mental health, cognitive processing, self-regulation, and intrafamilial violence are also examined. The study was conducted during two sessions at a juvenile facility in the Midwest using survey measures, academic and intelligence testing, and cognitive tasks. Youth were between the ages of 13 and 20. Approximately 70% were previously diagnosed with a disability. Significant Pearson's correlations were found between seven out of eight mental health subscales of the Youth Self-Report (YSR) and intrafamilial violence history. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the role of cognitive processing in the association between intrafamilial violence and mental health function. Nonverbal or performance deficits, a significant difference between verbal skills and nonverbal skills, were related to intrafamilial violence. Self-regulation partially mediated the relation between intrafamilial violence and mental health function. Self-regulation ability may be compromised by intrafamilial violence and be a precursor to both internalizing and externalizing mental health problem in incarcerated youth. Educational, clinical, and research implications are discussed.

  12. Anti-Müllerian hormone may regulate the number of calbindin-positive neurons in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area of male mice.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; McLennan, Ian S

    2013-10-11

    The male brain is putatively organised early in development by testosterone, with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the medial preoptic area (SDN) a main exemplifier of this. However, pubescent neurogenesis occurs in the rat SDN, and the immature testes secrete anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as well as testosterone. We have therefore re-examined the development of the murine SDN to determine whether it is influenced by AMH and/or whether the number of calbindin-positive (calbindin+ve) neurons in it changes after pre-pubescent development. In mice, the SDN nucleus is defined by calbindin+ve neurons (CALB-SDN). The number and size of the neurons in the CALB-SDN of male and female AMH null mutant (Amh-/-) mice and their wild-type littermates (Amh+/+) were studied using stereological techniques. Groups of mice were examined immediately before the onset of puberty (20 days postnatal) and at adulthood (129-147 days old). The wild-type pre-pubertal male mice had 47% more calbindin+ve neurons in the CALB-SDN than their female wild-type littermates. This sex difference was entirely absent in Amh-/- mice. In adults, the extent of sexual dimorphism almost doubled due to a net reduction in the number and size of calbindin+ve neurons in females and a net increase in neuron number in males. These changes occurred to a similar extent in the Amh-/- and Amh+/+ mice. Consequently, the number of calbindin+ve neurons in Amh-/- adult male mice was intermediate between Amh+/+ males and Amh+/+ females. The sex difference in the size of the neurons was predominantly generated by a female-specific atrophy after 20 days, independent of AMH. The establishment of dimorphic cell number in the CALB-SDN of mice is biphasic, with each phase being subject to different regulation. The second phase of dimorphism is not dependent on the first phase having occurred as it was present in the Amh-/- male mice that have female-like numbers of calbindin+ve neurons at 20 days. These observations extend

  13. Galactic bridges and tails.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, A.; Toomre, J.

    1972-01-01

    This paper argues that the bridges and tails seen in some multiple galaxies are just tidal relics of close encounters. These consequences of the brief but violent tidal forces are here studied in a deliberately simple-minded fashion. Each encounter is considered to involve only two galaxies and to be roughly parabolic; each galaxy is idealized as just a disk of noninteracting test particles which initially orbit a central mass point. As shown here, the two-sided distortions provoked by gravity alone in such circumstances can indeed evolve kinematically into some remarkably narrow and elongated features. Besides extensive pictorial survey of tidal damage, this paper offers reconstructions of the orbits and outer shapes of four specific interacting pairs: Arp 295, M51 + NGC 5195, NGC 4676, and NGC 4038/9.

  14. Mercury Sodium Tail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-16

    This image from NASA MESSENGER spacecraft is stitched together from thousands of observations made over the past 4 years by the MASCS/UVVS instrument, which measures sunlight scattered off of Mercury tenuous atmosphere. Scattered sunlight gives the sodium a bright orange glow. This scattering process also gives sodium atoms a push - this "radiation pressure" is strong enough, during parts of Mercury's year, to strip the atmosphere and give Mercury a long glowing tail. Someone standing on Mercury's nightside at the right time of year would see a faint orange similar to a city sky illuminated by sodium lamps! Instrument: Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS)/Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19418

  15. Topographic home ranges of white-tailed deer in the central Appalachians

    Treesearch

    Tyler A. Campbell; Benjamin R. Laseter; W. Mark Ford; Karl V. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Planimetric comparisons of home range sizes of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann) from across their range may not be appropriate due to regional differences in topography. We compare seasonal topographic diversity between male and female white-tailed deer home ranges in the central Appalachians using percent increase from...

  16. Atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiomyopathy in a captive, adult red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Shrubsole-Cockwill, Alana; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Parker, Dennilyn

    2008-09-01

    An adult, male, captive red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) of at least 19 years of age presented in dorsal recumbency. The hawk was nonresponsive, and despite initial supportive care, died shortly after presentation. Gross postmortem revealed no abnormal findings. Histologic examination demonstrated atherosclerosis and ischemic cardiomyopathy. This is the first reported case of atherosclerosis in a red-tailed hawk.

  17. Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases (ERK 1/2) in the Locus Coeruleus Contributes to Pain-Related Anxiety in Arthritic Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gisela; Miguelez, Cristina; Neto, Fani; Mico, Juan Antonio; Ugedo, Luisa; Berrocoso, Esther

    2017-06-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that the Locus Coeruleus plays a role in pain-related anxiety. Indeed, we previously found that prolonged arthritis produces anxiety-like behavior in rats, along with enhanced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (a marker of plasticity) in the Locus Coeruleus. However, it is unknown how this effect correlates with the electrophysiological activity of Locus Coeruleus neurons or pain-related anxiety. Using the complete Freund's adjuvant model of monoarthritis in male Sprague-Dawley rats, we studied the behavioral attributes of pain and anxiety as well as Locus Coeruleus electrophysiology in vivo 1 (MA1W) and 4 weeks (MA4W) after disease induction. The manifestation of anxiety in MA4W was accompanied by dampened tonic Locus Coeruleus activity, which was coupled to an exacerbated evoked Locus Coeruleus response to noxious stimulation of the inflamed and healthy paw. When a mitogen-activating extracellular kinase inhibitor was administered to the contralateral Locus Coeruleus of MA4W, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 levels in the Locus Coeruleus were restored and the exaggerated evoked response was blocked, reversing the anxiogenic-like behavior while pain hypersensitivity remained unaltered. As phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 blockade in the Locus Coeruleus relieved anxiety and counteracted altered LC function, we propose that phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in the Locus Coeruleus plays a crucial role in pain-related anxiety.

  18. Relationship between tail lesions and lung health in slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    van Staaveren, Nienke; Vale, Ana P; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Teixeira, Dayane L; Leonard, Finola C; Hanlon, Alison; Boyle, Laura A

    2016-05-01

    Tail lesions are associated with poor health either because they serve as a point of entry for pathogens or because of shared risk factors. This study investigated the relationship between carcass tail lesion and lung lesion severity scores in slaughter pigs. Carcasses were scored after scalding/dehairing for tail lesion severity (0-4). Lungs were scored according to an adapted version of the BPEX pig health scheme. Severity of enzootic pneumonia (EP-like lesions) was recorded on a scale of 0-50. Severity of pleurisy was scored on a 0-2 scale with score 2 equating to severe pleurisy or those lungs that remained attached to the chest wall ('lungs in chest'). The database for assessing pleurisy lesions contained all pleurisy scores (n=5628). Lungs with a score of 2 for pleurisy were excluded from the analysis of all other lung lesions as such lungs could not be assessed for other lesions (n=4491). Associations between tail lesions and different lung lesion outcomes were analysed using generalized linear mixed models (PROC GLIMMIX) with random effect for batch. Males were more affected by moderate (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.51-2.34) and severe (OR=5.8, 95% CI 3.45-9.70) tail lesions than females. EP-like lesions and pleurisy were most commonly observed. Pigs with severe tail lesions tended to have more 'lungs in chest' than pigs with moderate tail lesions (P=0.1). No other associations between tail lesions and lung lesions were found. Males had higher odds of having EP-like lesions (OR=1.2, 95% CI 1.05-1.36) than females. Tail lesions on the carcass may not be an accurate predictor of lung health. However, tail lesions are important welfare indicators and respiratory disease is a significant infectious condition affecting pigs. Thus, recording of tail and lung lesions at meat inspection provides valuable information regarding on-farm health and welfare of pigs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic regulation of growth from birth to 18 years of age: the Swedish young male twins study.

    PubMed

    Silventoinen, Karri; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Tynelius, Per; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rasmussen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Growth is a complex process, and only little is known on the genetic regulation of it. We analyzed the effect of genetic and environmental factors on growth in a longitudinal Swedish cohort of 231 monozygotic and 144 dizygotic twin pairs born 1973-1979 with length or height measured annually from birth to age 18. The data were analyzed by two different multivariate variance component models for twin data using the Mx statistical package. At birth and 1 year of age, a substantial part of the variation in length was because of common environment (50 and 57%, respectively) and the effect of genetic factors was minor. After 2 years of age, 91-97% of the variation of height could be explained by genetic differences whereas the rest was because of environmental variation not shared by twins. The genetic correlation between heights at ages 2 and 18 was 0.73 (95% confidence intervals 0.68-0.77) showing that 53% of the genes affecting height at these ages are the same or closely linked; with increasing age the correlation with genetic effects at age 18 become subsequently stronger. Especially in mid-childhood, growth was largely regulated by the same genetic factors. During puberty new genetic factors started to affect height, but also genetic variation affecting height at previous ages remained. These results suggest that genetic regulation of growth is rather uniform, which is encouraging for further efforts to identify genes affecting growth.

  20. Emotion Regulation in Adolescent Males with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Testing the Effects of Comorbid Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Northover, Clare; Thapar, Anita; Langley, Kate; van Goozen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Although attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been linked to emotion dysregulation, few studies have experimentally investigated this whilst controlling for the effects of comorbid conduct disorder (CD). Economic decision-making games that assess how individuals respond to offers varying in fairness have been used to study emotion regulation. The present study compared adolescent boys with ADHD (n = 90), ADHD + CD (n = 94) and typical controls (n = 47) on the Ultimatum Game and examined the contribution of ADHD and CD symptom scores and callous and unemotional traits to acceptance levels of unfair offers. There were no significant differences in acceptance rates of fair and highly unfair offers between groups, and only boys with ADHD did not significantly differ from the controls. However, the subgroup of boys with ADHD and additional high levels of aggressive CD symptoms rejected significantly more ambiguous (i.e., moderately unfair) offers than any other subgroup, suggesting impaired emotion regulation in those with ADHD and aggressive CD. Correlations within the CD group showed that the rejection rate to moderately unfair offers was predicted by aggressive CD symptom severity, but not callous and unemotional traits. These findings highlight the fact that ADHD is a heterogeneous condition from an emotion regulation point of view. PMID:26371048

  1. Telling tails: selective pressures acting on investment in lizard tails.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Patricia A; Valentine, Leonie E; Bateman, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Caudal autotomy is a common defense mechanism in lizards, where the animal may lose part or all of its tail to escape entrapment. Lizards show an immense variety in the degree of investment in a tail (i.e., length) across species, with tails of some species up to three or four times body length (snout-vent length [SVL]). Additionally, body size and form also vary dramatically, including variation in leg development and robustness and length of the body and tail. Autotomy is therefore likely to have fundamentally different effects on the overall body form and function in different species, which may be reflected directly in the incidence of lost/regenerating tails within populations or, over a longer period, in terms of relative tail length for different species. We recorded data (literature, museum specimens, field data) for relative tail length (n=350 species) and the incidence of lost/regenerating tails (n=246 species). We compared these (taking phylogeny into account) with intrinsic factors that have been proposed to influence selective pressures acting on caudal autotomy, including body form (robustness, body length, leg development, and tail specialization) and ecology (foraging behavior, physical and temporal niches), in an attempt to identify patterns that might reflect adaptive responses to these different factors. More gracile species have relatively longer tails (all 350 spp., P < 0.001; also significant for five of the six families tested separately), as do longer (all species, P < 0.001; Iguanidae, P < 0.05; Lacertidae, P < 0.001; Scindidae, P < 0.001), climbing (all species, P < 0.05), and diurnal (all species, P < 0.01; Pygopodidae, P < 0.01) species; geckos without specialized tails (P < 0.05); or active-foraging skinks (P < 0.05). We also found some relationships with the data for caudal autotomy, with more lost/regenerating tails for nocturnal lizards (all 246 spp., P < 0.01; Scindidae, P < 0.05), larger skinks (P < 0.05), climbing geckos (P < 0

  2. The Control of Male Fertility by Spermatozoan Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina V.; Kirichok, Yuriy; Ren, Dejian; Navarro, Betsy; Chung, Jean-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels control the sperm ability to fertilize the egg by regulating sperm maturation in the female reproductive tract and by triggering key sperm physiological responses required for successful fertilization such as hyperactivated motility, chemotaxis, and the acrosome reaction. CatSper, a pH-regulated, calcium-selective ion channel, and KSper (Slo3) are core regulators of sperm tail calcium entry and sperm hyperactivated motility. Many other channels had been proposed as regulating sperm activity without direct measurements. With the development of the sperm patch-clamp technique, CatSper and KSper have been confirmed as the primary spermatozoan ion channels. In addition, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 has been identified in human sperm tail, and the P2X2 ion channel has been identified in the midpiece of mouse sperm. Mutations and deletions in sperm-specific ion channels affect male fertility in both mice and humans without affecting other physiological functions. The uniqueness of sperm ion channels makes them ideal pharmaceutical targets for contraception. In this review we discuss how ion channels regulate sperm physiology. PMID:22017176

  3. Cloning and characterisation of two CTR1-like genes in Cucurbita pepo: regulation of their expression during male and female flower development.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Susana; Martínez, Cecilia; Gómez, Pedro; Garrido, Dolores; Jamilena, Manuel

    2010-12-01

    Ethylene is an essential regulator of flower development in Cucurbita pepo, controlling the sexual expression, and the differentiation and maturation of floral organs. To study the action mechanism of ethylene during the male and female flower development, we have identified two CTR1 homologues from C. pepo, CpCTR1 and CpCTR2, and analysed their expressions during female and male flower development and in response to external treatments with ethylene. CpCTR1 and CpCTR2 share a high homology with plant CTR1-like kinases, but differ from other related kinases such as the Arabidopsis EDR1 and the tomato LeCTR2. The C-terminal ends of both CpCTR1 and CpCTR2 have all the conserved motifs of Ser/Thr kinase domains, including the ATP-binding signature and the protein kinase active site consensus sequence, which suggests that CpCTR1 and CpCTR2 could have the same function as CTR1 in ethylene signalling. The transcripts of both genes were detected in different organs of the plant, including roots, leaves and shoots, but were mostly accumulated in mature flowers. During the development of male and female flowers, CpCTR1 and CpCTR2 expressions were concomitant with ethylene production, which indicates that both genes could be upregulated by ethylene, at least in flowers. Moreover, external treatments with ethylene, although did not alter the expression of these two genes in seedlings and leaves, were able to upregulate their expression in flowers. In the earlier stages of flower development, when ethylene production is very low, the expression of CpCTR1 and CpCTR2 is higher in male floral organs, which agrees with the role of these genes as negative regulators of ethylene signalling, and explain the lower ethylene sensitivity of male flowers in comparison with female flowers. The function of the upregulation of these two genes in later stages of female flower development, when the production of ethylene is also increased, is discussed.

  4. Investigation of the malE Promoter and MalR, a Positive Regulator of the Maltose Regulon, for an Improved Expression System in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michaela; Wagner, Alexander; Ma, Xiaoqing; Kort, Julia Christin; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Rauch, Bernadette; Siebers, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the regulator MalR (Saci_1161) of the TrmB family from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was identified and was shown to be involved in transcriptional control of the maltose regulon (Saci_1660 to Saci_1666), including the ABC transporter (malEFGK), α-amylase (amyA), and α-glycosidase (malA). The ΔmalR deletion mutant exhibited a significantly decreased growth rate on maltose and dextrin but not on sucrose. The expression of the genes organized in the maltose regulon was induced only in the presence of MalR and maltose in the growth medium, indicating that MalR, in contrast to its TrmB and TrmB-like homologues, is an activator of the maltose gene cluster. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the binding of MalR to malE was independent of sugars. Here we report the identification of the archaeal maltose regulator protein MalR, which acts as an activator and controls the expression of genes involved in maltose transport and metabolic conversion in S. acidocaldarius, and its use for improvement of the S. acidocaldarius expression system under the control of an optimized maltose binding protein (malE) promoter by promoter mutagenesis. PMID:24271181

  5. The male-determining gene SRY is a hybrid of DGCR8 and SOX3, and is regulated by the transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed

    Sato, Youichi; Shinka, Toshikatsu; Sakamoto, Kozue; Ewis, Ashraf A; Nakahori, Yutaka

    2010-04-01

    In mammals, sex is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome that bears a male-dominant sex-determining gene SRY, which switches the differentiation of gonads into male testes. The molecular signaling mechanism turning on the switch, however, has remained unclear for 18 years since the identification of the gene. Here, we describe how this gene emerged and started to work. From amino acid homology, we realized that SRY is a hybrid gene between a portion of the first exon of DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) and the high-mobility group (HMG) box of SRY box-3 (SOX3) gene. We identified the regulatory sequence in the SRY promotor region by searching for a common motif shared with DGCR8 mRNA. From the motif search between DGCR8 mRNA and the SRY upstream sequence, we found that the transcription factor CP2 (TFCP2) binding motif is present in both. TFCP2 overexpression did not show a significant increase of SRY mRNA expression, and TFCP2 suppression by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly reduced SRY mRNA expression. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that TFCP2 acts as a regulator by directly binding to the SRY promoter. We conclude that SRY is a hybrid gene composed of two genes, DGCR8 and SOX3; and TFCP2 is an essential transcription factor for SRY expression regulation.

  6. Investigation of the malE promoter and MalR, a positive regulator of the maltose regulon, for an improved expression system in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michaela; Wagner, Alexander; Ma, Xiaoqing; Kort, Julia Christin; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Rauch, Bernadette; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the regulator MalR (Saci_1161) of the TrmB family from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was identified and was shown to be involved in transcriptional control of the maltose regulon (Saci_1660 to Saci_1666), including the ABC transporter (malEFGK), α-amylase (amyA), and α-glycosidase (malA). The ΔmalR deletion mutant exhibited a significantly decreased growth rate on maltose and dextrin but not on sucrose. The expression of the genes organized in the maltose regulon was induced only in the presence of MalR and maltose in the growth medium, indicating that MalR, in contrast to its TrmB and TrmB-like homologues, is an activator of the maltose gene cluster. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the binding of MalR to malE was independent of sugars. Here we report the identification of the archaeal maltose regulator protein MalR, which acts as an activator and controls the expression of genes involved in maltose transport and metabolic conversion in S. acidocaldarius, and its use for improvement of the S. acidocaldarius expression system under the control of an optimized maltose binding protein (malE) promoter by promoter mutagenesis.

  7. Human chimera-type galectin-3: defining the critical tail length for high-affinity glycoprotein/cell surface binding and functional competition with galectin-1 in neuroblastoma cell growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Kopitz, Jürgen; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Fiedler, Sabine; Schnölzer, Martina; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2014-09-01

    Many human proteins have a modular design with receptor and structural domains. Using adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin-3 as model, we describe an interdisciplinary strategy to define the functional significance of its tail established by nine non-triple helical collagen-like repeats (I-IX) and the N-terminal peptide. Genetic engineering with sophisticated mass spectrometric product analysis provided the tools for biotesting, i.e. eight protein variants with different degrees of tail truncation. Evidently,various aspects of galectin-3 activity (cis binding and cell bridging) are affected by tail shortening in a different manner. Thus, this combined approach reveals an unsuspected complexity of structure-function relationship, encouraging further application beyond this chimera-type galectin.

  8. Characterizing Transcriptional Networks in Male Rainbow Darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) that Regulate Testis Development over a Complete Reproductive Cycle

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, Mark E.; Servos, Mark R.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Munkittrick, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    Intersex is a condition that has been associated with exposure to sewage effluents in male rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum). To better understand changes in the transcriptome that are associated with intersex, we characterized annual changes in the testis transcriptome in wild, unexposed fish. Rainbow darter males were collected from the Grand River (Ontario, Canada) in May (spawning), August (post-spawning), October (recrudescence), January (developing) and March (pre-spawning). Histology was used to determine the proportion of spermatogenic cell types that were present during each period of testicular maturation. Regression analysis determined that the proportion of spermatozoa versus spermatocytes in all stages of development (R2 ≥ 0.58) were inversely related; however this was not the case when males were in the post-spawning period. Gene networks that were specific to the transition from developing to pre-spawning stages included nitric oxide biosynthesis, response to wounding, sperm cell function, and stem cell maintenance. The pre-spawning to spawning transition included gene networks related to amino acid import, glycogenesis, Sertoli cell proliferation, sperm capacitation, and sperm motility. The spawning to post-spawning transition included unique gene networks associated with chromosome condensation, ribosome biogenesis and assembly, and mitotic spindle assembly. Lastly, the transition from post-spawning to recrudescence included gene networks associated with egg activation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, membrane fluidity, and sperm cell adhesion. Noteworthy was that there were a significant number of gene networks related to immune system function that were differentially expressed throughout reproduction, suggesting that immune network signalling has a prominent role in the male testis. Transcripts in the testis of post-spawning individuals showed patterns of expression that were most different for the majority of transcripts

  9. Characterizing Transcriptional Networks in Male Rainbow Darter (Etheostoma caeruleum) that Regulate Testis Development over a Complete Reproductive Cycle.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde, Paulina A; McMaster, Mark E; Servos, Mark R; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2016-01-01

    Intersex is a condition that has been associated with exposure to sewage effluents in male rainbow darter (Etheostoma caeruleum). To better understand changes in the transcriptome that are associated with intersex, we characterized annual changes in the testis transcriptome in wild, unexposed fish. Rainbow darter males were collected from the Grand River (Ontario, Canada) in May (spawning), August (post-spawning), October (recrudescence), January (developing) and March (pre-spawning). Histology was used to determine the proportion of spermatogenic cell types that were present during each period of testicular maturation. Regression analysis determined that the proportion of spermatozoa versus spermatocytes in all stages of development (R2 ≥ 0.58) were inversely related; however this was not the case when males were in the post-spawning period. Gene networks that were specific to the transition from developing to pre-spawning stages included nitric oxide biosynthesis, response to wounding, sperm cell function, and stem cell maintenance. The pre-spawning to spawning transition included gene networks related to amino acid import, glycogenesis, Sertoli cell proliferation, sperm capacitation, and sperm motility. The spawning to post-spawning transition included unique gene networks associated with chromosome condensation, ribosome biogenesis and assembly, and mitotic spindle assembly. Lastly, the transition from post-spawning to recrudescence included gene networks associated with egg activation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, membrane fluidity, and sperm cell adhesion. Noteworthy was that there were a significant number of gene networks related to immune system function that were differentially expressed throughout reproduction, suggesting that immune network signalling has a prominent role in the male testis. Transcripts in the testis of post-spawning individuals showed patterns of expression that were most different for the majority of transcripts

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone and 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone in male reproductive health: Implications of differential regulation of human Sertoli cells metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Almeida, Susana P; Silva, Joaquina; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário; Silva, Branca M; Silvestre, Samuel M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a precursor of androgen synthesis whose action is partially exerted through its metabolites. 7-Oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone (7-oxo-DHEA) is a common DHEA metabolite, non-convertible to androgens, which constitutes a promising therapeutic strategy for multiple conditions. Sertoli cells (SCs) are responsible for the support of spermatogenesis, having unique metabolic characteristics strongly modulated by androgens. Consequently, disruptions in androgen synthesis compromise SCs function and hence male fertility. We aimed to evaluate the effects of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA in human SCs (hSCs) metabolism and oxidative profile. To do so, hSCs were exposed to increasing concentrations of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA (0.025, 1 and 50 μM) that revealed to be non-cytotoxic in these experimental conditions. We measured hSCs metabolites consumption/production by (1)H NMR, the protein expression levels of key players of the glycolytic pathway by Western blot as well as the levels of carbonyl groups, nitration and lipid peroxidation by Slot blot. The obtained data demonstrated that 7-oxo-DHEA is a more potent metabolic modulator than DHEA since it increased hSCs glycolytic flux. DHEA seem to redirect hSCs metabolism to the Krebs cycle, while 7-oxo-DHEA has some inhibitory effect in this path. The highest 7-oxo-DHEA concentrations (1 and 50 μM) also increased lactate production, which is of extreme relevance for the successful progression of spermatogenesis in vivo. None of these steroids altered the intracellular oxidative profile of hSCs, illustrating that, at the concentrations used they do not have pro- nor antioxidant actions in hSCs. Our study represents a further step in the establishment of safe doses of DHEA and 7-oxo-DHEA to hSCs, supporting its possible use in hormonal and non-hormonal therapies against male reproductive problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  12. 16-Dehydropregnenolone lowers serum cholesterol by up-regulation of CYP7A1 in hyperlipidemic male hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Kumar, Durgesh; Bhateria, Manisha; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2017-04-01

    16-Dehydropregnenolone (DHP) has been developed and patented as a promising antihyperlipidemic agent by CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI), India. Although DHP is implicated in controlling cholesterol homeostasis, the mechanism underlying its pharmacological effect in hyperlipidemic disease models is poorly understood. In the present study, we postulated that DHP lowers serum lipids through regulating the key hepatic genes accountable for cholesterol metabolism. The hypothesis was tested on golden Syrian hamsters fed with high-fat diet (HFD) following oral administration of DHP at a dose of 72mg/kg body weight for a period of one week. The serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total bile acids (TBA) in feces were measured. Real time comparative gene expression studies were performed for CYP7A1, LXRα and PPARα level in liver tissue of hamsters. The results revealed that the DHP profoundly decreased the levels of serum TC, TG, LDL-C and atherogenic index (AI), whilst elevated the HDL-C/TC ratio. Besides, DHP exhibited an anti-hyperlipidemic effect in the HFD induced hyperlipidemic hamsters by means of: (1) up-regulating the gene expression of CYP7A1 encoded cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, that promotes the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid; (2) inducing the gene expression of transcription factors LXRα and PPARα; (3) increasing the TBA excretion through feces. Collectively, the findings presented confer the hypolipidemic activity of DHP via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 pathway that promotes cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and bile acid excretion.

  13. Altered regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstaff, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) severely decreases plasma androgen concentrations, yet plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations remain unchanged. The mechanism by which TCDD prevents the expected compensatory increase in plasma LH was investigated. No effect on the plasma disappearance rate of LH or on pituitary capacity to synthesize or secrete LH was detected. Rather, TCDD altered the regulation of LH secretion by substantially increasing the potency of both androgens and estrogens as feedback inhibitors of LH secretion. The mechanism by which TCDD alters androgen-regulated LH secretion was further investigated. Seven days after dosing, TCDD decreased plasma testosterone concentrations but prevented the expected compensatory increases in pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, and plasma LH concentrations as seen in similarly hypoandrogenic vehicle dosed rats. Furthermore, the TCDD dose-response relationships for preventing the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number and plasma LH concentration were similar. However, in the absence of gonadal steroids (7 days after castration) TCDD did not affect the compensatory increases in pituitary GnRH receptor number, pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, or plasma LH concentration. All of these parameters increased substantially relative to intact TCDD treated rats, and to levels virtually identical to those seen in castrated control rats. Treatment of castrated rats with testosterone restored the ability of TCDD to prevent these compensatory increases. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the presence of androgens is required for TCDD to alter the regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors.

  14. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-09-06

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology.

  15. Regulation of Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Expression in Rat and Human Male Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Gurpreet; Culty, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a high affinity cholesterol- and drug-binding protein highly expressed in steroidogenic cells, such as Leydig cells, where it plays a role in cholesterol mitochondrial transport. We have previously shown that TSPO is expressed in postnatal day 3 rat gonocytes, precursors of spermatogonial stem cells. Gonocytes undergo regulated phases of proliferation and migration, followed by retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation. Understanding these processes is important since their disruption may lead to the formation of carcinoma in situ, a precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). Previously, we showed that TSPO ligands do not regulate gonocyte proliferation. In the present study, we found that TSPO expression is downregulated in differentiating gonocytes. Similarly, in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, a mouse TGCT cell line with embryonic stem cell properties, there is a significant decrease in TSPO expression during RA-induced differentiation. Silencing TSPO expression in gonocytes increased the stimulatory effect of RA on the expression of the differentiation marker Stra8, suggesting that TSPO exerts a repressive role on differentiation. Furthermore, in normal human testes, TSPO was located not only in Leydig cells, but also in discrete spermatogenic phases such as the forming acrosome of round spermatids. By contrast, seminomas, the most common type of TGCT, presented high levels of TSPO mRNA. TSPO protein was expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment of seminoma cells, identified by their nuclear expression of the transcription factors OCT4 and AP2G. Thus, TSPO appears to be tightly regulated during germ cell differentiation, and to be deregulated in seminomas, suggesting a role in germ cell development and pathology. PMID:27608010

  16. FANCB is essential in the male germline and regulates H3K9 methylation on the sex chromosomes during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yasuko; Alavattam, Kris G.; Sin, Ho-Su; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Pang, Qishen; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive X-linked and autosomal genetic disease associated with bone marrow failure and increased cancer, as well as severe germline defects such as hypogonadism and germ cell depletion. Although deficiencies in FA factors are commonly associated with germ cell defects, it remains unknown whether the FA pathway is involved in unique epigenetic events in germ cells. In this study, we generated Fancb mutant mice, the first mouse model of X-linked FA, and identified a novel function of the FA pathway in epigenetic regulation during mammalian gametogenesis. Fancb mutant mice were infertile and exhibited primordial germ cell (PGC) defects during embryogenesis. Further, Fancb mutation resulted in the reduction of undifferentiated spermatogonia in spermatogenesis, suggesting that FANCB regulates the maintenance of undifferentiated spermatogonia. Additionally, based on functional studies, we dissected the pathway in which FANCB functions during meiosis. The localization of FANCB on sex chromosomes is dependent on MDC1, a binding partner of H2AX phosphorylated at serine 139 (γH2AX), which initiates chromosome-wide silencing. Also, FANCB is required for FANCD2 localization during meiosis, suggesting that the role of FANCB in the activation of the FA pathway is common to both meiosis and somatic DNA damage responses. H3K9me2, a silent epigenetic mark, was decreased on sex chromosomes, whereas H3K9me3 was increased on sex chromosomes in Fancb mutant spermatocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that FANCB functions at critical stages of germ cell development and reveal a novel function of the FA pathway in the regulation of H3K9 methylation in the germline. PMID:26123487

  17. Acetylation of LYS-16 of H4 Histone Tail May Sequester the Tail and Inhibit its Interactions with Neighboring Nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Histone tails are highly flexible N terminal protrusions of histone proteins, which help to fold DNA into dense superstructures known as chromatin. On a molecular scale histone tails are poly-electrolites with high degree of conformational disorder, allowing them to function as bio-molecular ``switches,'' regulating various genetic regulatory processes via diverse types of covalent modifications. Because of being intrinsically disordered, the structural and dynamical aspects of histone tails are still poorly understood. Using multiple explicit solvent and coarse-grained MD simulations we have investigated the impact of the acetylation of LYS-16 residue on the conformational and DNA-binding propensities of H4 histone tail. The potential of mean force computed as a function of distance between a model DNA and histone tail center of mass showed a dramatic enhancement of binding affinity upon mono-acetylation of the H4 tail. The estimated binding free energy gain for the wild type is 2kT, while for the acetylated it reaches 4-5 kT. Additionally our structural analysis shows that acetylation is driving the chain into collapsed states, which get enriched in secondary structural elements upon binding to the DNA. We suggest a non-electrostatic mechanism that explains the enhanced binding affinity of the acetylated H4 tail. At last our findings lead us to propose a hypothesis that can potentially account for the celebrated chromatin ``fiber loosening effects'' observed in many experiments.

  18. Lift generation by the avian tail.

    PubMed

    Maybury, W J; Rayner, J M; Couldrick, L B

    2001-07-22

    Variation with tail spread of the lift generated by a bird tail was measured on mounted, frozen European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in a wind tunnel at a typical air speed and body and tail angle of attack in order to test predictions of existing aerodynamic theories modelling tail lift. Measured lift at all but the lowest tail spread angles was significantly lower than the predictions of slender wing, leading edge vortex and lifting line models of lift production. Instead, the tail lift coefficient based on tail area was independent of tail spread, tail aspect ratio and maximum tail span. Theoretical models do not predict bird tail lift reliably and, when applied to tail morphology, may underestimate the aerodynamic optimum tail feather length. Flow visualization experiments reveal that an isolated tail generates leading edge vortices as expected for a low-aspect ratio delta wing, but that in the intact bird body-tail interactions are critical in determining tail aerodynamics: lifting vortices shed from the body interact with the tail and degrade tail lift compared with that of an isolated tail.

  19. Elucidating Internucleosome Interactions and the Roles of Histone Tails

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steven C.; Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    The nucleosome is the first level of genome organization and regulation in eukaryotes where negatively charged DNA is wrapped around largely positively charged histone proteins. Interaction between nucleosomes is dominated by electrostatics at long range and guided by specific contacts at short range, particularly involving their flexible histone tails. We have thus quantified how internucleosome interactions are modulated by salts (KCl, MgCl2) and histone tail deletions (H3, H4 N-terminal), using small-angle x-ray scattering and theoretical modeling. We found that measured effective charges at low salts are ∼1/5th of the theoretically predicted renormalized charges and that H4 tail deletion suppresses the attraction at high salts to a larger extent than H3 tail deletion. PMID:23823239

  20. Melatonin administration in diabetes: regulation of plasma Cr, V, and Mg in young male Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alarcon, Miguel; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J; Blanca-Herrera, Rosa M; Kaki, Abdullah; Adem, Abdu; Agil, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    The use of melatonin, a neurohormone present in plants, represents an exciting approach for the maintenance of optimum health conditions. Melatonin administration ameliorates glucose homeostasis in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin in diabetes in relation to the levels and regulation of plasma chromium (Cr), vanadium (V), and magnesium (Mg) in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean (ZL) rats. At the age of 6 weeks, ZDF (n = 30) and ZL (n = 30) groups were each subdivided into three groups: control (C) (n = 10), vehicle-treated (V') (n = 10) and melatonin-treated (M) (10 mg kg(-1) per day; n = 10) groups for a 6 week period. After treatment, plasma mineral concentrations were measured by flame (Mg) and electrothermal (Cr and V) atomic absorption spectrometry. No significant differences were found between the C and V' groups (p > 0.05). Plasma Mg levels were significantly lower in C-ZDF vs. C-ZL rats, demonstrating the presence of hypomagnesemia in this diabetes mellitus model. Plasma V and Cr levels were significantly higher in M-ZDF vs. C-ZDF rats. Plasma Mg levels in ZDF rats were not affected by melatonin treatment (p > 0.05). Melatonin administration ameliorates the diabetic status of ZDF rats by enhancing plasma Cr and V concentrations. This appears to be the first report of a beneficial effect of melatonin treatment on plasma Cr and V regulation in ZDF rats.

  1. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second

  2. Arabidopsis MALE STERILITY1 encodes a PHD-type transcription factor and regulates pollen and tapetum development.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takuya; Nagata, Noriko; Yoshiba, Yoshu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Ma, Hong; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MALE STERILITY1 (MS1) gene encodes a nuclear protein with Leu zipper-like and PHD-finger motifs and is important for postmeiotic pollen development. Here, we examined MS1 function using both cell biological and molecular biological approaches. We introduced a fusion construct of MS1 and a transcriptional repression domain (MS1-SRDX) into wild-type Arabidopsis, and the transgenic plants showed a semisterile phenotype similar to that of ms1. Since the repression domain can convert various kinds of transcriptional activators to dominant repressors, this suggested that MS1 functioned as a transcriptional activator. The Leu zipper-like region and the PHD motif were required for the MS1 function. Phenotypic analysis of the ms1 mutant and the MS1-SRDX transgenic Arabidopsis indicated that MS1 was involved in formation of pollen exine and pollen cytosolic components as well as tapetum development. Next, we searched for MS1 downstream genes by analyzing publicly available microarray data and identified 95 genes affected by MS1. Using a transgenic ms1 plant showing dexamethasone-inducible recovery of fertility, we further examined whether these genes were immediately downstream of MS1. From these results, we discuss a role of MS1 in pollen and tapetum development and the conservation of MS1 function in flowering plants.

  3. Bisphenol A regulates the estrogen receptor alpha signaling in developing hippocampus of male rats through estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Bin; He, Ye; Song, Chen; Ke, Xin; Fan, Shi-Jun; Peng, Wei-Jie; Tan, Ruei; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Pan, Bing-Xing; Kato, Nobumasa

    2014-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the most common environmental endocrine disruptors, has been recognized to have wide adverse effects on the brain development and behavior. These adversities are related to its ability to bind estrogen receptor (ER) with subsequent alteration of its expression in the target areas. However, very little is known about whether BPA exposure also affects ER phosphorylation and its translocation to nucleus during postnatal development, two critical steps for its function. Here, we found that during development from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21, the alpha subtype of ER (ERα) in the hippocampus of male rats experienced remarkable alterations in terms of its expression, phosphorylation and translocation to nucleus. Exposure to low level of BPA had bidirectional, development-dependent effects on the expression of ERα mRNA and protein, but decreased ERα phosphorylation and impaired its translocation to nucleus throughout the period investigated. Treatment with low dose of ICI 182,780 (ICI), an ER antagonist to block the binding of ER with BPA, reversed the altered ERα following BPA exposure, highlighting critical involvement of ER. Moreover, ICI treatment rescued the hippocampus-dependent behavioral deficits in the adult rats experiencing early-life BPA exposure. Overall, our results indicate that BPA interferes with the ERα signaling in the developing hippocampus in an ER-dependent manner, which may underlie its adverse behavioral and cognitive outcomes in adult animals.

  4. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  5. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  6. AGO4 regulates entry into meiosis and influences silencing of sex chromosomes in the male mouse germline.

    PubMed

    Modzelewski, Andrew J; Holmes, Rebecca J; Hilz, Stephanie; Grimson, Andrew; Cohen, Paula E

    2012-08-14

    The four mammalian Argonaute family members are thought to share redundant functions in the microRNA pathway, yet only AGO2 possesses the catalytic "slicer" function required for RNAi. Whether AGO1, AGO3, or AGO4 possesses specialized functions remains unclear. Here we show that AGO4 localizes to spermatocyte nuclei during meiotic prophase I, specifically at sites of asynapsis and the transcriptionally silenced XY subdomain, the sex body. We generated Ago4 knockout mice and show that Ago4(-/-) spermatogonia initiate meiosis early, resulting from premature induction of retinoic acid-response genes. During prophase I, the sex body assembles incorrectly in Ago4(-/-) mice, leading to disrupted meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). This is associated with a dramatic loss of microRNAs, >20% of which arises from the X chromosome. Thus, AGO4 regulates meiotic entry and MSCI in mammalian germ cells, implicating small RNA pathways in these processes.

  7. The timing of "catch-up growth" affects metabolism and appetite regulation in male rats born with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Bérengère; Grit, Isabelle; Darmaun, Dominique; Parnet, Patricia

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a relationship between low birth weight mainly caused by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and adult metabolic disorders. The concept of metabolic programming centers on the idea that nutritional and hormonal status during the key period of development determines the long-term control of energy balance by programming future feeding behavior and energy expenditure. The present study examined the consequence of early or late "catch-up growth" after IUGR on feeding behavior and metabolic cues of male offspring of rat dams exposed to protein restriction during gestation and/or lactation. Our results suggest that early catch-up growth may be favorable for fasting metabolic parameters at weaning, as no differences were observed on plasma leptin, triglyceride, glucose, and insulin levels compared with controls. In contrast, if pups remained malnourished until weaning, low insulin concentration was detected and was accompanied by hyperphagia associated with a large increase in hypothalamic NPY and AgRP mRNA expression. At adult age, on a regular chow diet, only the meal structure was modified by fetal programming. The two IUGR groups demonstrated a reduced meal duration that enhanced the speed of food ingestion and consequently increased the rest period associated to the satiety state without changes in the hypothalamic expression of appetite neuropeptides. Our findings demonstrate that in IUGR, regardless of postnatal growth magnitude, metabolic programming occurred in utero and was responsible for both feeding behavior alteration and postprandial higher insulin level in adults. Additionally, catch-up growth immediately after early malnutrition could be a key point for the programming of postprandial hyperleptinemia.

  8. Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Cell Activation during Male Rat Sexual Behavior Regulates Neuroplasticity and d-Amphetamine Cross-Sensitization following Sex Abstinence.

    PubMed

    Beloate, Lauren N; Omrani, Azar; Adan, Roger A; Webb, Ian C; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-09-21

    , followed by a period of abstinence from sexual behavior, causes increased reward for amphetamine in male rats. This study demonstrates that activation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons during sexual experience regulates cross-sensitization of amphetamine reward. Finally, ventral tegmental area dopamine cell activation is essential for experience-induced neural adaptations in the nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and ventral tegmental area. These findings demonstrate a role of mesolimbic dopamine in the interaction between natural and drug rewards, and identify mesolimbic dopamine as a key mediator of changes in vulnerability for drug use after loss of natural reward. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/369949-13$15.00/0.

  9. Medico-Artistic Complicities on Swedish Stages: The Boys in the Band and the Regulation of Gay Male Representation in the Welfare State.

    PubMed

    Gindt, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to understand the highly unfavorable conditions for the development of gay male theater in Sweden, this essay engages in a historical study of the national opening of Mart Crowley's The Boys in the Band at Malmö City Theatre in 1970. Propelled by a Foucauldian-inspired theoretical approach, it identifies the subtle, yet highly effective, measures of control that the, at the time, social democratic welfare state exercised over representations of homosexuality on stage. State representatives, who complied with the official political and medical doctrine that homosexuality was a mental illness and posed a potential threat to social stability, interfered at various levels of the production, including the rehearsal process and post-performance talks between cast members and audiences. This alliance between Swedish theaters and members of the medical, psychological, and sexological professions constituted a medico-artistic complicity that supervised and regulated early attempts of gay representation on stage.

  10. Theseus Tail Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft is seen here being unloaded at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements

  11. Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases (ERK 1/2) in the Locus Coeruleus Contributes to Pain-Related Anxiety in Arthritic Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Gisela; Miguelez, Cristina; Neto, Fani; Mico, Juan Antonio; Ugedo, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: There is increasing evidence suggesting that the Locus Coeruleus plays a role in pain-related anxiety. Indeed, we previously found that prolonged arthritis produces anxiety-like behavior in rats, along with enhanced expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (a marker of plasticity) in the Locus Coeruleus. However, it is unknown how this effect correlates with the electrophysiological activity of Locus Coeruleus neurons or pain-related anxiety. Methods: Using the complete Freund’s adjuvant model of monoarthritis in male Sprague-Dawley rats, we studied the behavioral attributes of pain and anxiety as well as Locus Coeruleus electrophysiology in vivo 1 (MA1W) and 4 weeks (MA4W) after disease induction. Results: The manifestation of anxiety in MA4W was accompanied by dampened tonic Locus Coeruleus activity, which was coupled to an exacerbated evoked Locus Coeruleus response to noxious stimulation of the inflamed and healthy paw. When a mitogen-activating extracellular kinase inhibitor was administered to the contralateral Locus Coeruleus of MA4W, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 levels in the Locus Coeruleus were restored and the exaggerated evoked response was blocked, reversing the anxiogenic-like behavior while pain hypersensitivity remained unaltered. Conclusion: As phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 blockade in the Locus Coeruleus relieved anxiety and counteracted altered LC function, we propose that phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in the Locus Coeruleus plays a crucial role in pain-related anxiety. PMID:28158734

  12. HsfA2 Controls the Activity of Developmentally and Stress-Regulated Heat Stress Protection Mechanisms in Tomato Male Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Mesihovic, Anida; Simm, Stefan; Paupière, Marine Josephine; Hu, Yangjie; Paul, Puneet; Mishra, Shravan Kumar; Tschiersch, Bettina; Theres, Klaus; Bovy, Arnaud; Schleiff, Enrico; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Male reproductive tissues are more sensitive to heat stress (HS) compared to vegetative tissues, but the basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. Heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs) regulate the transcriptional changes required for protection from HS In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), HsfA2 acts as coactivator of HsfA1a and is one of the major Hsfs accumulating in response to elevated temperatures. The contribution of HsfA2 in heat stress response (HSR) and thermotolerance was investigated in different tissues of transgenic tomato plants with suppressed HsfA2 levels (A2AS). Global transcriptome analysis and immunodetection of two major Hsps in vegetative and reproductive tissues showed that HsfA2 regulates subsets of HS-induced genes in a tissue-specific manner. Accumulation of HsfA2 by a moderate HS treatment enhances the capacity of seedlings to cope with a subsequent severe HS, suggesting an important role for HsfA2 in regulating acquired thermotolerance. In pollen, HsfA2 is an important coactivator of HsfA1a during HSR HsfA2 suppression reduces the viability and germination rate of pollen that received the stress during the stages of meiosis and microspore formation but had no effect on more advanced stages. In general, pollen meiocytes and microspores are characterized by increased susceptibility to HS due to their lower capacity to induce a strong HSR This sensitivity is partially mitigated by the developmentally regulated expression of HsfA2 and several HS-responsive genes mediated by HsfA1a under nonstress conditions. Thereby, HsfA2 is an important factor for the priming process that sustains pollen thermotolerance during microsporogenesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. HsfA2 Controls the Activity of Developmentally and Stress-Regulated Heat Stress Protection Mechanisms in Tomato Male Reproductive Tissues1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Paupière, Marine Josephine; Theres, Klaus; Bovy, Arnaud; Schleiff, Enrico; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Male reproductive tissues are more sensitive to heat stress (HS) compared to vegetative tissues, but the basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. Heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs) regulate the transcriptional changes required for protection from HS. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), HsfA2 acts as coactivator of HsfA1a and is one of the major Hsfs accumulating in response to elevated temperatures. The contribution of HsfA2 in heat stress response (HSR) and thermotolerance was investigated in different tissues of transgenic tomato plants with suppressed HsfA2 levels (A2AS). Global transcriptome analysis and immunodetection of two major Hsps in vegetative and reproductive tissues showed that HsfA2 regulates subsets of HS-induced genes in a tissue-specific manner. Accumulation of HsfA2 by a moderate HS treatment enhances the capacity of seedlings to cope with a subsequent severe HS, suggesting an important role for HsfA2 in regulating acquired thermotolerance. In pollen, HsfA2 is an important coactivator of HsfA1a during HSR. HsfA2 suppression reduces the viability and germination rate of pollen that received the stress during the stages of meiosis and microspore formation but had no effect on more advanced stages. In general, pollen meiocytes and microspores are characterized by increased susceptibility to HS due to their lower capacity to induce a strong HSR. This sensitivity is partially mitigated by the developmentally regulated expression of HsfA2 and several HS-responsive genes mediated by HsfA1a under nonstress conditions. Thereby, HsfA2 is an important factor for the priming process that sustains pollen thermotolerance during microsporogenesis. PMID:26917685

  14. Involvement of serotonin and oxytocin in neural mechanism regulating amicable social signal in male mice: Implication for impaired recognition of amicable cues in BALB/c strain.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Social signals play a primary role in regulating social relationships among male mice. The present series of experiments investigated the neural mechanisms underlying an induction of amicable cues that facilitate social approach in male mice of the C57BL/6 (B6) and BALB/c (BALB) strains. Male mice exhibit approach behavior and suppression of territorial scent marking toward amicable counterparts. Exposure of a group-housed mouse that maintains an amicable relationship induced social approach in B6 recipient mice, as expressed by increased preference of stay in proximity and decreased scent marks relevant to those of a single-housed mouse. Nasal administration of oxytocin (OT) to stimulus mice appeared to enhance social approach in B6 recipient mice. Systemic administration of buspirone (5-HT1A agonist) to stimulus mice also increased approach in B6 recipient mice, whereas a nasal OT antagonist infusion followed by systemic buspirone injection of stimulus mice blocked this buspirone-induced approach in B6 recipient mice. BALB mice likely possess an intact signaling system as shown in B6 mice, in which the 5-HT → OT pathway is a primary modulator for social amicable signals. However, BALB mice could not exhibit signal-dependent change in approach behavior. No impairment in olfactory discrimination or approach behavior toward social stimuli was found in BALB mice. It is concluded that social cues for facilitating social approach are eliminated via the 5-HT → OT pathway, and BALB mice as a low social strain have a deficit in recognition of specific signals associated with amicability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Paglia, David N.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2–3 times) (P < .05) without alteration of osteoblast histomorphometric indices. We also demonstrated that loss of Runx1 in pluripotential myeloid precursors with LysM-Cre did not alter the number of myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow or their ability to differentiate into phagocytizing or antigen-presenting cells. This study demonstrates that abrogation of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells significantly and specifically enhanced the ability of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  16. Actions of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide on regulation of appetite and hypothalamo-pituitary axes in vitro and in vivo in male rats.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S A; Small, C J; Murphy, K G; Rayes, E; Abbott, C R; Seal, L J; Morgan, D G; Sunter, D; Dakin, C L; Kim, M S; Hunter, R; Kuhar, M; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2001-03-02

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and CART peptide are abundant in hypothalamic nuclei controlling anterior pituitary function. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of CART peptide results in neuronal activation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), rich in corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRH) and thyrotrophin-releasing factor (TRH) immunoreactive neurons. The aims of this study were three-fold. Firstly, to examine the effects of CART peptide on hypothalamic releasing factors in vitro, secondly, to examine the effect of ICV injection of CART peptide on plasma pituitary hormones and finally to examine the effect of PVN injection of CART peptide on food intake and circulating pituitary hormones. CART(55-102) (100 nM) peptide significantly stimulated the release of CRH, TRH and neuropeptide Y from hypothalamic explants but significantly reduced alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone release in vitro. Following ICV injection of 0.2 nmol CART(55-102), a dose which significantly reduces food intake, plasma prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone increased significantly. Following PVN injection of CART(55-102), food intake was significantly reduced only at 0.2 and 0.6 nmol. However, PVN injection of 0.02 nmol CART(55-102) produced a significant increase in plasma ACTH. ICV injection of CART peptide significantly reduces food intake. Unlike many anorexigenic peptides, there is no increased sensitivity to PVN injection of CART(55-102). In contrast, both ICV and PVN injection of CART(55-102) significantly increased plasma ACTH and release of hypothalamic CRH is significantly increased by CART peptide in vitro. This suggests that CART peptide may play a role in the control of pituitary function and in particular the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis.

  17. Novel Role for p110β PI 3-Kinase in Male Fertility through Regulation of Androgen Receptor Activity in Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillermet-Guibert, Julie; Smith, Lee B.; Halet, Guillaume; Whitehead, Maria A.; Pearce, Wayne; Rebourcet, Diane; León, Kelly; Crépieux, Pascale; Nock, Gemma; Strömstedt, Maria; Enerback, Malin; Chelala, Claude; Graupera, Mariona; Carroll, John; Cosulich, Sabina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The organismal roles of the ubiquitously expressed class I PI3K isoform p110β remain largely unknown. Using a new kinase-dead knockin mouse model that mimics constitutive pharmacological inactivation of p110β, we document that full inactivation of p110β leads to embryonic lethality in a substantial fraction of mice. Interestingly, the homozygous p110β kinase-dead mice that survive into adulthood (maximum ~26% on a mixed genetic background) have no apparent phenotypes, other than subfertility in females and complete infertility in males. Systemic inhibition of p110β results in a highly specific blockade in the maturation of spermatogonia to spermatocytes. p110β was previously suggested to signal downstream of the c-kit tyrosine kinase receptor in germ cells to regulate their proliferation and survival. We now report that p110β also plays a germ cell-extrinsic role in the Sertoli cells (SCs) that support the developing sperm, with p110β inactivation dampening expression of the SC-specific Androgen Receptor (AR) target gene Rhox5, a homeobox gene critical for spermatogenesis. All extragonadal androgen-dependent functions remain unaffected by global p110β inactivation. In line with a crucial role for p110β in SCs, selective inactivation of p110β in these cells results in male infertility. Our study is the first documentation of the involvement of a signalling enzyme, PI3K, in the regulation of AR activity during spermatogenesis. This developmental pathway may become active in prostate cancer where p110β and AR have previously been reported to functionally interact. PMID:26132308

  18. Ghrelin induces leptin resistance by activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression in male rats: implications in satiety regulation.

    PubMed

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung

    2014-10-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) -bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior.

  19. Ghrelin Induces Leptin Resistance by Activation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 Expression in Male Rats: Implications in Satiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il

    2014-01-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) –bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior. PMID:25060362

  20. FoxO1 Plays an Important Role in Regulating β-Cell Compensation for Insulin Resistance in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Kim, Dae Hyun; Xiao, Xiangwei; Lee, Sojin; Gong, Zhenwei; Muzumdar, Radhika; Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Wang, Rennian; Bottino, Rita; Alvarez-Perez, Juan Carlos; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Gittes, George

    2016-01-01

    β-Cell compensation is an essential mechanism by which β-cells increase insulin secretion for overcoming insulin resistance to maintain euglycemia in obesity. Failure of β-cells to compensate for insulin resistance contributes to insulin insufficiency and overt diabetes. To understand the mechanism of β-cell compensation, we characterized the role of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) in β-cell compensation in mice under physiological and pathological conditions. FoxO1 is a key transcription factor that serves as a nutrient sensor for integrating insulin signaling to cell metabolism, growth, and proliferation. We showed that FoxO1 improved β-cell compensation via 3 distinct mechanisms by increasing β-cell mass, enhancing β-cell glucose sensing, and augmenting β-cell antioxidative function. These effects accounted for increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and enhanced glucose tolerance in β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice. When fed a high-fat diet, β-cell-specific FoxO1-transgenic mice were protected from developing fat-induced glucose disorder. This effect was attributable to increased β-cell mass and function. Furthermore, we showed that FoxO1 activity was up-regulated in islets, correlating with the induction of physiological β-cell compensation in high-fat-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. These data characterize FoxO1 as a pivotal factor for orchestrating physiological adaptation of β-cell mass and function to overnutrition and obesity. PMID:26727107

  1. Sirenomelia apus with vestigial tail.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Tushar B; Nanavati, Ruchi N; Udani, Rekha H

    2005-04-01

    Sirenomelia is an exceptionally rare congenital malformation characterized by complete or near complete fusion of lower limbs. A newborn with clinical features of sirenomelia including fused lower limbs in medial position, absent fibula, anal atresia, complete absence of urogenital system (bilateral renal agenesis, absent ureters, urinary bladder, absent internal and external genitalia), a single umbilical artery and a vestigial tail is reported. Association of vestigial tail with sirenomelia is not described in the literature.

  2. Gonadotropin Inhibitory Hormone Down-Regulates the Brain-Pituitary Reproductive Axis of Male European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; Morano, Francesca; Zanuy, Silvia; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release from the pituitary of birds and mammals. However, the physiological role of orthologous GnIH peptides on the reproductive axis of fish is still uncertain, and their actions on the main neuroendocrine systems controlling reproduction (i.e., GnRHs, kisspeptins) have received little attention. In a recent study performed in the European sea bass, we cloned a cDNA encoding a precursor polypeptide that contained C-terminal MPMRFamide (sbGnIH-1) and MPQRFamide (sbGnIH-2) peptide sequences, developed a specific antiserum against sbGnIH-2, and characterized its central and pituitary GnIH projections in this species. In this study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on brain and pituitary expression of reproductive hormone genes (gnrh1, gnrh2, gnrh3, kiss1, kiss2, gnih, lhbeta, fshbeta), and their receptors (gnrhr II-1a, gnrhr II-2b, kiss1r, kiss2r, and gnihr) as well as on plasma Fsh and Lh levels. In addition, we determined the effects of GnIH on pituitary somatotropin (Gh) expression. The results obtained revealed the inhibitory role of sbGnIH-2 on brain gnrh2, kiss1, kiss2, kiss1r, gnih, and gnihr transcripts and on pituitary fshbeta, lhbeta, gh, and gnrhr-II-1a expression, whereas sbGnIH-1 only down-regulated brain gnrh1 expression. However, at different doses, central administration of both sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 decreased Lh plasma levels. Our work represents the first study reporting the effects of centrally administered GnIH in fish and provides evidence of the differential actions of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on the reproductive axis of sea bass, the main inhibitory role being exerted by the sbGnIH-2 peptide. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  3. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  4. Regulation of cyclin A localization downstream of Par-1 function is critical for the centrosome orientation checkpoint in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hebao; Chiang, C-Y Ason; Cheng, Jun; Salzmann, Viktoria; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2012-01-01

    Male germline stem cells (GSCs) in Drosophila melanogaster divide asymmetrically by orienting the mitotic spindle with respect to the niche, a microenvironment that specifies stem cell identity. The spindle orientation is prepared during interphase through stereotypical positioning of the centrosomes. We recently demonstrated that GSCs possess a checkpoint ("the centrosome orientation checkpoint") that monitors correct centrosome orientation prior to mitosis to ensure an oriented spindle and thus asymmetric outcome of the division. Here, we show that Par-1, a serine/threonine kinase that regulates polarity in many systems, is involved in this checkpoint. Par-1 shows a cell cycle-dependent localization to the spectrosome, a germline-specific, endoplasmic reticulum-like organelle. Furthermore, the localization of cyclin A, which is normally localized to the spectrosome, is perturbed in par-1 mutant GSCs. Interestingly, overexpression of mutant cyclin A that does not localize to the spectrosome and mutation in hts, a core component of the spectrosome, both lead to defects in the centrosome orientation checkpoint. We propose that the regulation of cyclin A localization via Par-1 function plays a critical role in the centrosome orientation checkpoint.

  5. Differential regulation of senescence and in vitro differentiation by 17β-estradiol between mesenchymal stem cells derived from male and female mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Seung-Chan; Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Lee, Sung-Lim

    2016-06-30

    The characterization and potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are gender dependent and estrogen influences these properties. This study demonstrated that supplementation with 17β-estradiol (E2) increases the proliferation of bone marrow-MSCs derived from male and female mini-pigs (Mp- and Fp-BMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner, with 10(-12) M E2 suggested as the optimal dose of E2 that led to the greatest improvement in BMSCs proliferation. Supplementation of 10(-12) M E2 resulted in down-regulation of β-galactosidase activity and pro-apoptotic activity in both BMSCs, while anti-apoptotic activity was up-regulated in only Fp-BMSCs. Further, E2 increased the osteogenic ability of Fp-BMSCs. Based on these findings, optimal utilization of E2 can improve cellular senescence and apoptosis, as well as in vitro osteogenesis of BMSCs, and could therefore be useful in stem cell therapy, particularly in bone regeneration for adult females.

  6. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be

  7. Structural cooperativity in histone H3 tail modifications.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Deniz; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Erman, Burak

    2011-12-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone H3 tails have crucial roles in regulation of cellular processes. There is cross-regulation between the modifications of K4, K9, and K14 residues. The modifications on these residues drastically promote or inhibit each other. In this work, we studied the structural changes of the histone H3 tail originating from the three most important modifications; tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of four types of H3 tails: (i) the unmodified H3 tail having no chemical modification on the residues, (ii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and lysine 9 H3 tail (K4me3K9me3), (iii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K4me3K14ace), and (iv) tri-methylated lysine 9 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K9me3K14ace). Here, we report the effects of K4, K9, and K14 modifications on the backbone torsion angles and relate these changes to the recognition and binding of histone modifying enzymes. According to the Ramachandran plot analysis; (i) the dihedral angles of K4 residue are significantly affected by the addition of three methyl groups on this residue regardless of the second modification, (ii) the dihedral angle values of K9 residue are similarly altered majorly by the tri-methylation of K4 residue, (iii) different combinations of modifications (tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14) have different influences on phi and psi values of K14 residue. Finally, we discuss the consequences of these results on the binding modes and specificity of the histone modifying enzymes such as DIM-5, GCN5, and JMJD2A.

  8. Celiac and the cranial mesenteric arteries supply gastrointestinal sites that regulate meal size and intermeal interval length via cholecystokinin-58 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Ayman I; Washington, Martha C; Johnson, Ruth E; Johnson-Rouse, Tanisha; Freeman, Corren; Harrison, Anna; Lucas, Jennifer; Shelby, Mandy; Fisher, Brittley; Willis, William; Reeve, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The site(s) of action that control meal size and intermeal interval (IMI) length by cholecystokinin-58 (CCK-58), the only detectable endocrine form of CCK in the rat, are not known. To test the hypothesis that the gastrointestinal tract may contain such sites, we infused low doses of CCK-58 (0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25nmol/kg) into the celiac artery (CA, supplying stomach and upper duodenum), the cranial mesenteric artery (CMA, supplying small and most of the large intestines), the femoral artery (FA, control) and the portal vein (PV, draining the gastrointestinal tract) prior to the onset of the dark cycle in freely fed male rats. We measured the first meal size (chow), second meal size, IMI and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/meal size). We found that (1) all doses of CCK-58 given in the CA and the highest dose given in the CMA reduced the first meal size, (2) all doses of CCK-58 given in the CA reduced the second meal size, (3) a CCK-58 dose of 0.15nmol/kg given in the CA and 0.15 and 0.25nmol/kg given in the CMA prolonged the IMI, (4) CCK-58 (0.05, 0.15, 0.25nmol/kg) given in the CA and 0.25nmol/kg given in the CMA increased the SR, and (5) CCK-58 given in the FA and PV had no effect on the meal size or intermeal interval. These results support our hypothesis that the gastrointestinal tract contains sites of action that regulate meal size and IMI length via CCK-58. The stomach and upper duodenum may contain sites regulating meal size, whereas the small intestine and part of the large intestine may contain sites regulating the IMI.

  9. Impact of maternal melatonin suppression on forced swim and tail suspension behavioral despair tests in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, SE; Rosca, AE; Zeca, V; Zagrean, L; Zagrean, AM

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is an essential hormone, which regulates circadian rhythms and has antioxidative and anticarcinogenic effects. As melatonin secretion is suppressed by light, this effect was examined on the offspring of the Wistar rat females exposed to continuous light (500 lux) during the second half of the pregnancy (day 12 to 21). Control rats were kept under a 12:12 light-dark cycle. The resulted male offspring have been behaviorally assessed for depression after postnatal day 60 by using Forced Swim Test (FST) and Tail Suspension Test (TST). Animals resulted from the melatonin deprived pregnancies have developed an abnormal response in the TST, but a normal FST behavior. Also, TST active movement was different in the melatonin suppression group compared to the control group. These findings suggest that intrauterine melatonin deprivation might be linked to the depressive like behavior in adult male offspring. PMID:25866579

  10. Comparative Study of Transcriptome Profiles of Mouse Livers and Skins Infected by Fork-Tailed or Non-Fork-Tailed Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; He, Jun-Jun; Hu, Shuang; Chang, Hua; Xiang, Xun; Yang, Jian-Fa; Zou, Feng-Cai

    2017-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is a worldwide spread pathogen which penetrates host skin and then induces several diseases in infected host, such as fibrosis, formation of granulomas, hepatocirrhosis, and hepatomegaly. In present study, for the first time, transcriptomic profiles of mouse livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were analyzed by using RNA-seq. The present findings demonstrated that transcriptomic landscapes of livers and skins infected by fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria or non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria were different. S. japonicum has great influence on hepatic metabolic processes. Fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria upregulated hepatic metabolic processes, while non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria downregulated hepatic metabolic processes. For the metabolism process or the metabolism enzyme expressional change, the pharmacokinetics of host could be changed during S. japonicum infection, regardless the biotypes of S. japonicum cercariae. The changes of infected skins focused on upregulation of immune response. During the S. japonicum skin infection period, fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection induced stronger immune response comparing with that immune response triggered by non-fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria. The transcription factor enrichment analysis showed that Irf7, Stat1 and Stat2 could play important roles in gene regulation during fork-tailed S. japonicum cercaria infection.

  11. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) prevents DCA effects on male mouse liver via up-regulation of CYP [correction of CXP] and preservation of BSEP activities.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Moreno; Pozzetti, Laura; Montagnani, Marco; Potenza, Giuseppa; Sabatini, Laura; Antelli, Alessandra; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Roda, Aldo

    2002-08-01

    To investigate whether ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can prevent metabolic impairment induced by deoxycholic acid (DCA), we evaluated the effects of these bile acids on murine CYP enzymes and the relationship with canalicular bile salt export pump (Bsep) expression. In Swiss Albino CD1 mice, UDCA and DCA were injected intraperitoneally either singly, concurrently, or sequentially (UDCA 1 hour before DCA) at equimolar 24.4 mg/kg body weight (BW) doses. CYP content, NADPH-CYP-c-reductase, and individual mixed function oxidases (MFO) were measured 24 hours later. Modulations were observed mainly in males: whereas DCA decreased MFO activities to various isoenzymes with respect to controls (up to 43%, CYP1A2-linked activity), UDCA boosted them (up to 6-fold, testosterone 16 beta-hydroxylase); concurrent administration of UDCA and DCA provided a preventive effect, enhancing MFO activity with respect to single administration of DCA by up to 4.4-fold in the CYP3A1/2 and CYP2B1/2 (6 beta-hydroxylase) and by 2.1-fold in the CYP2E1 (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase). In males (but not females), sequential administration (UDCA then DCA) produced a rather similar protective pattern, but the extent of recovery was generally smaller. Western immunoblotting results for the most affected isoenzymes (CYP3A1/2 and CYP2E1) and Bsep confirmed that UDCA can both prevent and reduce the CYP-dependent MFO inactivation and Bsep down-regulation caused by DCA. These findings may shed further light on the mechanisms responsible for UDCA's protective role in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease.

  12. Preferential interaction of the core histone tail domains with linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D; Vitolo, J M; Mutskov, V; Dimitrov, S; Hayes, J J

    2001-06-05

    Within chromatin, the core histone tail domains play critical roles in regulating the structure and accessibility of nucleosomal DNA within the chromatin fiber. Thus, many nuclear processes are facilitated by concomitant posttranslational modification of these domains. However, elucidation of the mechanisms by which the tails mediate such processes awaits definition of tail interactions within chromatin. In this study we have investigated the primary DNA target of the majority of the tails in mononucleosomes. The results clearly show that the tails bind preferentially to "linker" DNA, outside of the DNA encompassed by the nucleosome core. These results have important implications for models of tail function within the chromatin fiber and for in vitro structural and functional studies using nucleosome core particles.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics of Mira's cometary tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: The asymptotic giant-branch, long-period variable star Mira exhibits a 4 parsec long cometary tail in the far-ultraviolet. We address the issue of the origin of this structure and its emission process by simulating the transition of this star from the interstellar medium to the Local Bubble, which is a tenuous, high-pressure medium. Methods: We use the hydrodynamic and the magnetohydrodynamic modules of the PLUTO astrophysical code to carry out our simulations. We study the system without a cooling function, with a simplified exponential cooling function, and with a simplified nonequilibrium cooling function. Results: We find evidence that magnetohydrodynamics constrain the shape of the cometary tail and explain features of its far-ultraviolet emission. We suggest an emission process that involves C0 excitation through inelastic electron collisions and a two-photon continuum to explain the luminosity of Mira's tail.

  14. Regulation of plasma testosterone, corticosterone, and metabolites in response to stress, reproductive stage, and social challenges in a desert male songbird.

    PubMed

    Deviche, Pierre; Beouche-Helias, Benjamin; Davies, Scott; Gao, Sisi; Lane, Samuel; Valle, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    In many male vertebrates, the secretion of reproductive (gonadal androgens) and adrenocortical (glucocorticoids) hormones varies seasonally and in response to environmental stimuli, and these hormones exert numerous behavioral and metabolic effects. We performed two field studies on adult male Rufous-winged Sparrows, Peucaea carpalis, a Sonoran Desert rain-dependent sedentary species, to (a) determine seasonal changes in initial (baseline) and acute stress-induced plasma testosterone (T), corticosterone (CORT), and two metabolites (uric acid and glucose) and (b) compare the effects of two types of social challenge (song playback or simulated territorial intrusion consisting of song playback plus exposure to a live decoy bird) on plasma T, CORT, these metabolites, and territorial behavior. Initial plasma T was higher during the summer breeding period than during post-breeding molt. Acute stress resulting from capture and restraint for 30 min decreased plasma T in breeding condition birds but not in the fall, revealing that this decrease is seasonally regulated. Initial plasma CORT did not change seasonally, but plasma CORT increased in response to acute stress. This increase was likewise seasonally regulated, being relatively smaller during autumnal molt than in the summer. We found no evidence that acute stress levels of CORT are functionally related to stress-depressed plasma T and, therefore, that plasma T decreases during stress as a result of elevated plasma CORT. Thirty minutes of exposure to simulated territorial intrusion resulted in different behavior than 30 min of exposure to song playback, with increased time spent near the decoy and decreased number of overhead flights. Neither type of social challenge influenced plasma T, thus offering no support for the hypothesis that plasma T either responds to or mediates the behavioral effects of social challenge. Exposure to both social challenges elevated plasma CORT, but simulated territorial intrusion was more

  15. Magnetospheric Substorms and Tail Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded several studies of magnetospheric substorms and their effect on the dynamics of the earth's geomagnetic tail. We completed an extensive study of plasmoids, plasma/magnetic field structures that travel rapidly down the tail, using data from the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. This study formed the PhD thesis of Mark Moldwin. We found that magnetically plasmoids are better described as flux-ropes (twisted magnetic flux tubes) rather than plasma bubbles, as had been generally regarded up to that point (Moldwin and Hughes, 1990; 1991). We published several examples of plasmoids observed first in the near tail by IMP 8 and later in the distant tail by ISEE 3, confirming their velocities down tail. We showed how the passage of plasmoids distorts the plasma sheet. We completed the first extensive statistical survey of plasmoids that showed how plasmoids evolve as they move down tail from their formation around 30 RE to ISEE 3 apogee at 240 RE. We established a one-to-one correspondence between the observation of plasmoids in the distant tail and substorm onsets at earth or in the near tail. And we showed that there is a class of plasmoid-like structures that move slowly earthward, especially following weak substorms during northward IMF. Collectively this work constituted the most extensive study of plasmoids prior to the work that has now been done with the GEOTAIL spacecraft. Following our work on plasmoids, we turned our attention to signatures of substorm onset observed in the inner magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit, especially signatures observed by the CRRES satellite. Using data from the magnetometer, electric field probe, plasma wave instrument, and low energy plasma instrument on CRRES we were able to better document substorm onsets in the inner magnetosphere than had been possible previously. Detailed calculation of the Poynting flux showed energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and a short burst of tailward convective

  16. A comparison of hydration effect on body fluid and temperature regulation between Malaysian and Japanese males exercising at mild dehydration in humid heat.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Lee, Joo-Young; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2014-02-04

    This study investigated the effect of hydration differences on body fluid and temperature regulation between tropical and temperate indigenes exercising in the heat. Ten Japanese and ten Malaysian males with matched physical characteristics (height, body weight, and peak oxygen consumption) participated in this study. Participants performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake followed by a 30-min recovery at 32°C and 70% relative air humidity with hydration (4 times each, 3 mL per kg body weight, 37°C) or without hydration. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and blood pressure were measured continuously. The percentage of body weight loss and total sweat loss were calculated from body weight measurements. The percentage change in plasma volume was estimated from hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit. Malaysian participants had a significantly lower rectal temperature, a smaller reduction in plasma volume, and a lower heart rate in the hydrated condition than in the non-hydrated condition at the end of exercise (P <0.05), whereas Japanese participants showed no difference between the two hydration conditions. Hydration induced a greater total sweat loss in both groups (P <0.05), and the percentage of body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians was significantly less than in hydrated Japanese (P <0.05). A significant interaction between groups and hydration conditions was observed for the percentage of mean cutaneous vascular conductance during exercise relative to baseline (P <0.05). The smaller reduction in plasma volume and percentage body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians indicated an advantage in body fluid regulation. This may enable Malaysians to reserve more blood for circulation and heat dissipation and thereby maintain lower rectal temperatures in a hydrated condition.

  17. A comparison of hydration effect on body fluid and temperature regulation between Malaysian and Japanese males exercising at mild dehydration in humid heat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of hydration differences on body fluid and temperature regulation between tropical and temperate indigenes exercising in the heat. Methods Ten Japanese and ten Malaysian males with matched physical characteristics (height, body weight, and peak oxygen consumption) participated in this study. Participants performed exercise for 60 min at 55% peak oxygen uptake followed by a 30-min recovery at 32°C and 70% relative air humidity with hydration (4 times each, 3 mL per kg body weight, 37°C) or without hydration. Rectal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, skin blood flow, and blood pressure were measured continuously. The percentage of body weight loss and total sweat loss were calculated from body weight measurements. The percentage change in plasma volume was estimated from hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit. Results Malaysian participants had a significantly lower rectal temperature, a smaller reduction in plasma volume, and a lower heart rate in the hydrated condition than in the non-hydrated condition at the end of exercise (P <0.05), whereas Japanese participants showed no difference between the two hydration conditions. Hydration induced a greater total sweat loss in both groups (P <0.05), and the percentage of body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians was significantly less than in hydrated Japanese (P <0.05). A significant interaction between groups and hydration conditions was observed for the percentage of mean cutaneous vascular conductance during exercise relative to baseline (P <0.05). Conclusions The smaller reduction in plasma volume and percentage body weight loss in hydrated Malaysians indicated an advantage in body fluid regulation. This may enable Malaysians to reserve more blood for circulation and heat dissipation and thereby maintain lower rectal temperatures in a hydrated condition. PMID:24490869

  18. Nest-building in gray short-tailed opossums: temperature effects and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Fadem, B H; Kraus, D B; Sheffet, R H

    1986-01-01

    The effects of ambient temperature and of sex on nest-building behavior were studied in a laboratory colony of gray short-tailed opossums, small, Brazilian marsupials. At 24 degrees C, both males and females used more nesting material and built larger nests of better quality than at 27 degrees C. Although both males and females built nests using the mouth, forelegs, hindlegs and tail, females built nests more reliably at the higher temperature and used more nesting material than males at both temperatures. These findings are discussed with respect to the thermoregulatory and reproductive characteristics of marsupials.

  19. CD59 mediates cartilage patterning during spontaneous tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xue; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Cheng; Hu, Wen; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration-competent adult animals have ability to regenerate their lost complex appendages with a near-perfect replica, owing to the positional identity acquired by the progenitor cells in the blastema, i.e. the blastemal cells. CD59, a CD59/Ly6 family member, has been identified as a regulator of positional identity in the tail blastemal cells of Gekko japonicus. To determine whether this function of CD59 is unique to the regenerative amniote(s) and how CD59 mediates PD axis patterning during tail regeneration, we examined its protective role on the complement-mediated cell lysis and intervened CD59 expression in the tail blastemal cells using an in vivo model of adenovirus transfection. Our data revealed that gecko CD59 was able to inhibit complement-mediated cell lysis. Meanwhile, CD59 functioned on positional identity through expression in cartilage precursor cells. Intervening positional identity by overexpression or siRNA knockdown of CD59 resulted in abnormal cartilaginous cone patterning due to the decreased differentiation of blastemal cells to cartilage precursor cells. The cartilage formation-related genes were found to be under the regulation of CD59. These results indicate that CD59, an evolutionarily transitional molecule linking immune and regenerative regulation, affects tail regeneration by mediating cartilage patterning. PMID:26238652

  20. Faun tail naevus: a cutaneous marker of spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritika; Singal, Archana; Pandhi, Deepika

    2005-01-01

    We describe three cases (one male and two females) of faun tail nevi, which is one of the most important cutaneous marker of spinal dysraphism. One of the patients presented with acro-osteolysis leading to auto amputation of the toes of the left foot, which required operative intervention. This lays stress on the early recognition of lumbar paraspinal skin lesions and early treatment to avoid irreversible sequelae.

  1. The Human Tail: A Simple Skin Appendage or Cutaneous Stigma of an Anomaly?

    PubMed

    Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Kara, Niyazi Nefi; Bacanli, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The human tail is a term to describe skin-covered protrusions in the lumbosacral and coccygeal region, ascribing to the resemblance to the tails in the animals. The first reports dates back to second half of the 19th century, the etiological bases could not been ascertained yet. They are mainly classified as true or pseudo-tails. Five cases with human tails were diagnosed and managed in our hospital between 2010 and 2014. Their demographic and lesion characteristics are presented. Three of the 5 cases were male patients. The ages ranged between 1 day and 50 years at the time of diagnosis. The patients were diagnosed basically by the external appearance of the lesions without neurological deficits. Detailed examination revealed several associated lesions: two dermal sinus tracts, one tethered spinal cord and one club-foot in one-day preemie. Two patients had true and 3 had pseudo-tails. Four of them underwent surgery but the last one did not accept surgery. Surgery consisted of simple excision of the lesion in 2 patients with true tails and excision and removal of dermal sinus tract and untethering when necessary in the other 2 pseudo-tails. The presented study indicated that true human tails are simple skin appendages without any associated spinal anomalies. However, pseudo-tails are potentially complex lesions with a high risk of spinal dysraphisms; warranting further diagnostic work-up and more extensive surgical technique if necessary. The key to managing human tails is making a clear distinction between true tails and pseudo-tails.

  2. Tail-anchored Protein Insertion in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Silvia; Maroli, Annalisa; Vitiello, Adriana; Soffientini, Paolo; Crespi, Arianna; Bram, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    The GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins)/TRC (transmembrane recognition complex) pathway for tail-anchored protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been characterized in detail in yeast and is thought to function similarly in mammals, where the orthologue of the central ATPase, Get3, is known as TRC40 or Asna1. Get3/TRC40 function requires an ER receptor, which in yeast consists of the Get1/Get2 heterotetramer and in mammals of the WRB protein (tryptophan-rich basic protein), homologous to yeast Get1, in combination with CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand), which is not homologous to Get2. To better characterize the mammalian receptor, we investigated the role of endogenous WRB and CAML in tail-anchored protein insertion as well as their association, concentration, and stoichiometry in rat liver microsomes and cultured cells. Functional proteoliposomes, reconstituted from a microsomal detergent extract, lost their activity when made with an extract depleted of TRC40-associated proteins or of CAML itself, whereas in vitro synthesized CAML and WRB together were sufficient to confer insertion competence to liposomes. CAML was found to be in ∼5-fold excess over WRB, and alteration of this ratio did not inhibit insertion. Depletion of each subunit affected the levels of the other one; in the case of CAML silencing, this effect was attributable to destabilization of the WRB transcript and not of WRB protein itself. These results reveal unanticipated complexity in the mutual regulation of the TRC40 receptor subunits and raise the question as to the role of the excess CAML in the mammalian ER. PMID:27226539

  3. tombola, a tesmin/TSO1 family protein, regulates transcriptional activation in the Drosophila male germline and physically interacts with Always early

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianqiao; Benson, Elizabeth; Bausek, Nina; Doggett, Karen; White-Cooper, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Summary During male gametogenesis a developmentally regulated and cell type specific transcriptional programme is activated in primary spermatocytes to prepare for differentiation of sperm. The Drosophila aly-class meiotic arrest loci (aly, comr, achi/vis and topi) are essential for activation of transcription of many differentiation-specific genes, and several genes important for meiotic cell cycle progression, thus linking meiotic divisions to cellular differentiation during spermatogenesis. Protein interaction studies suggests that the aly-class gene products form a chromatin-associated complex in primary spermatocytes. We identify, clone and characterise a new aly-class meiotic arrest gene, tombola (tomb), which encodes a testis-specific CXC domain protein that interacts with Aly. The tomb mutant phenotype is more like aly and comr than like achi/vis or topi in terms of target gene profile and chromosome morphology. tomb encodes a chromatin-associated protein required for localisation of Aly and Comr, but not Topi, to chromatin Reciprocally, aly and comr, but not topi or achi/vis, are required to maintain the normal localisation of Tomb. tomb and aly may be components of a complex paralogous to the Drosophila dREAM/MybMuv-B and C. elegans DRM transcriptional regulatory complexes. PMID:17360778

  4. Magnetosphere of Earth: Geomagnetic Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The geomagnetic tail is an elongated region of the MAGNETOSPHERE OF EARTH extending from the near-Earth space in the antisunward direction. It acts as a giant energy reservoir for the magnetosphere and is therefore an important participant in dynamic processes such as GEOMAGNETIC STORMS and substorms (see MAGNETOSPHERE OF EARTH: SUBSTORMS)....

  5. Antispin-Tail-Parachute Installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidman, Oscar; Kamm, Robert W.

    1943-01-01

    Although antispin tail parachutes have been used successfully in spin demonstrations for some time, very little published information is available concerning the size of parachute, the bridle-line length, and the type and location of pack to use for particular airplane. The present paper is an attempt to supply data relating to these factors. The paper is in two parts. The first part reviews the principles of operation of the antispin parachutes, views the principles of operation of the antispin parachutes, summarized available information on actual installations, and discusses parachute loads and pack locations. The second part of the paper reports on systematic tests in the NACA-15-foot and 20-foot free-spinning tunnels at the Langley memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the minimum size and the optimum bridle-line lengths for antispin tail parachutes for current military airplanes. It is concluded that airplanes weighing between 7500 and 14,000 pounds require parachutes 8 feet in diameter and bridle-line lengths between 20 and 50 feet. A positive-ejection mechanism is desirable to throw the parachute clear of the tail and to assure rapid opening. The pack and attachment point must be so located that the equipment will not foul the tail surfaces.

  6. Counseling Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Murray, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Contains 16 articles about counseling males including: (1) gender role conflict; (2) sex-role development; (3) counseling adolescent, adult, and gay males; (4) teenage fathers; (5) female therapists and male clients; (6) career development; (7) hypermasculinity; (8) counseling physically abusive men, uncoupling men; (9) group therapy, men's…

  7. Density and distribution of cutaneous sensilla on tails of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in relation to caudal autotomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P; Lai, Erica K; Lawrence Powell, G; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    The lizard tail is well known for its ability to autotomize and regenerate. Physical contact of the tail by a predator may induce autotomy at the location at which the tail is grasped, and upon detachment the tail may undergo violent, rapid, and unpredictable movements that appear to be, to some degree, regulated by contact with the physical environment. Neither the mechanism by which tail breakage at a particular location is determined, nor that by which environmental feedback to the tail is received, are known. It has been suggested that mechanoreceptors (sensilla) are the means of mediation of such activities, and reports indicate that the density of sensilla on the tail is high. To determine the feasibility that mechanoreceptors are involved in such phenomena, we mapped scale form and the size, density, distribution, and spacing of sensilla on the head, body, limbs, and tail of the leopard gecko. This species has a full complement of autotomy planes along the length of the tail, and the postautotomic behavior of its tail has been documented. We found that the density of sensilla is highest on the tail relative to all other body regions examined; a dorsoventral gradient of caudal sensilla density is evident on the tail; sensilla are more closely spaced on the dorsal and lateral regions of the tail than elsewhere and are carried on relatively small scales; and that the whorls of scales on the tail bear a one to one relationship with the autotomy planes. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses of sensilla being involved in determining the site at which autotomy will occur, and with them being involved in the mediation of tail behavior following autotomy. These findings open the way for experimental neurological investigations of how autotomy is induced and how the detached tail responds to external environmental input. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  9. Regulation of hepatic Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in obese female and male rats: involvement of ERK1/2, AMPK, and Rho/ROCK.

    PubMed

    Stanimirovic, Julijana; Obradovic, Milan; Panic, Anastasija; Petrovic, Voin; Alavantic, Dragan; Melih, Irena; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-08-17

    In this study, we assessed whether the disturbed regulation of sodium/potassium-adenosine-triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) occurs as a consequence of obesity-induced IR in sex-specific manner. We also assessed whether alterations of IRS/PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, AMPKα, and RhoA/ROCK signaling cascades have an important role in this pathology. Female and male Wistar rats (150-200 g, 8 weeks old) were fed a standard laboratory diet or a high-fat (HF) diet (42% fat) for 10 weeks. The activity of hepatic Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Rho, and the association of IRS-1/p85 were assessed in liver. Furthermore, the protein level of α1 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in plasma membrane fractions, and protein levels of IRS-1, PI3K-p85, -p110, RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, ERK1/2, AMPKα, ERα, and ERβ in liver lysates were assessed. The expression of hepatic α1 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase mRNA was also analyzed by qRT-PCR. The results show that HF-fed female rats exhibited an increase in hepatic ERK1/2 (p < 0.05) and AMPKα (p < 0.05) phosphorylation levels, unchanged level of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α1 mRNA, decreased level of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity (p < 0.05), and decreased α1 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein expression (p < 0.01). In liver of HF-fed male rats, results show decreased levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity (p < 0.01), both protein and mRNA of α1 subunit (p < 0.05), but significant increase in Rho activity (p < 0.05). Our results indicate significant sex differences in α1 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase mRNA expression and activation of ERK1/2, AMPKα, and Rho in the liver. Exploring the sex-specific factors and pathways that promote obesity-related diseases may lead to a better understanding of pathogenesis and discovering new therapeutic targets.

  10. Lobster Tail Ice Formation on Aerosurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Glace Ice formation commonly refered to as 'Lobster Tail' by scientists and engineers, is caused to form on the leading edge of a aircraft tail section in the icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  11. Mortality of white-tailed deer in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two hundred nine white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were radiotracked in the central Superior National Forest, Minnesota, from 1973 through winter 1983-84; 85 deaths were recorded. Annual survival was 0.31 for fawns (< 1.0 years old), 0.80 for yearling (1.0-2.0 years old) females, 0.41 for yearling males, 0.79 for adult (.gtoreq. 2.0 years old) females, and 0.47 for adult males. Monthly survival rates were high from May through December (0.94-1.00), except for yearling (0.60) and adult (0.69) bucks during the November hunting season. Most mortality occurred from January through April when gray wolf (Canis lupus) predation was an important mortality source for all cohorts. Yearling males were most vulnerable to hunting and adult males to wolf predation.

  12. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2016-11-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706) of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  13. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706) of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain. PMID:27935841

  14. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment < 2 and < 6 mm deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with <4% sand and <8% < 6 mm. Several pebble count transects were placed across each pool-tail area, and three volumetric samples were collected in each of three pool tails. Pebble and grid counts both indicated a fining trend towards one or both banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the

  15. Incorporating harvest rates into the sex-age-kill model for white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, Andrew S.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.; Wallingford, Bret D.

    2013-01-01

    Although monitoring population trends is an essential component of game species management, wildlife managers rarely have complete counts of abundance. Often, they rely on population models to monitor population trends. As imperfect representations of real-world populations, models must be rigorously evaluated to be applied appropriately. Previous research has evaluated population models for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus); however, the precision and reliability of these models when tested against empirical measures of variability and bias largely is untested. We were able to statistically evaluate the Pennsylvania sex-age-kill (PASAK) population model using realistic error measured using data from 1,131 radiocollared white-tailed deer in Pennsylvania from 2002 to 2008. We used these data and harvest data (number killed, age-sex structure, etc.) to estimate precision of abundance estimates, identify the most efficient harvest data collection with respect to precision of parameter estimates, and evaluate PASAK model robustness to violation of assumptions. Median coefficient of variation (CV) estimates by Wildlife Management Unit, 13.2% in the most recent year, were slightly above benchmarks recommended for managing game species populations. Doubling reporting rates by hunters or doubling the number of deer checked by personnel in the field reduced median CVs to recommended levels. The PASAK model was robust to errors in estimates for adult male harvest rates but was sensitive to errors in subadult male harvest rates, especially in populations with lower harvest rates. In particular, an error in subadult (1.5-yr-old) male harvest rates resulted in the opposite error in subadult male, adult female, and juvenile population estimates. Also, evidence of a greater harvest probability for subadult female deer when compared with adult (≥2.5-yr-old) female deer resulted in a 9.5% underestimate of the population using the PASAK model. Because obtaining

  16. Nesfatin-1-like peptide is a novel metabolic factor that suppresses feeding, and regulates whole-body energy homeostasis in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Gawli, Kavishankar; Ramesh, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Nucleobindin-1 has high sequence similarity to nucleobindin-2, which encodes the anorectic and metabolic peptide, nesfatin-1. We previously reported a nesfatin-1-like peptide (NLP), anorectic in fish and insulinotropic in mice islet beta-like cells. The main objective of this research was to determine whether NLP is a metabolic regulator in male Wistar rats. A single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of NLP (100 μg/kg BW) decreased food intake and increased ambulatory movement, without causing any change in total activity or energy expenditure when compared to saline-treated rats. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of NLP (100 μg/kg BW) using osmotic mini-pumps for 7 days caused a reduction in food intake on days 3 and 4. Similarly, water intake was also reduced for two days (days 3 and 4) with the effect being observed during the dark phase. This was accompanied by an increased RER and energy expenditure. However, decreased whole-body fat oxidation, and total activity were observed during the long-term treatment (7 days). Body weight gain was not significantly different between control and NLP infused rats. The expression of mRNAs encoding adiponectin, resistin, ghrelin, cholecystokinin and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) were significantly upregulated, while leptin and peptide YY mRNA expression was downregulated in NLP-treated rats. These findings indicate that administration of NLP at 100 μg/kg BW reduces food intake and modulates whole body energy balance. In summary, NLP is a novel metabolic peptide in rats. PMID:28542568

  17. Early down regulation of the glial Kir4.1 and GLT-1 expression in pericontusional cortex of the old male mice subjected to traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R K; Prasad, S

    2013-10-01

    Astroglia play multiple roles in brain function by providing matrix to neurons, secreting neurotrophic factors, maintaining K(+) and glutamate homeostasis and thereby controlling synaptic plasticity which undergoes alterations during aging. K(+) and glutamate homeostasis is maintained by astrocytes membrane bound inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (Kir4.1) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 or EAAT-2) proteins, respectively in the synapse and their expression may be altered due to traumatic brain injury (TBI). Also, it is not well understood whether this change is age dependent. To find out this, TBI was experimentally induced in adult and old male AKR strain mice using CHI technique, and expression of the Kir4.1 and GLT-1 in the pericontusional cortex at various time intervals was studied by Western blotting and semi quantitative RT-PCR techniques. Here, we report that expression of both Kir4.1 and GLT-1 genes at transcript and protein levels is significantly down regulated in the pericontusional ipsi-lateral cortex of old TBI mice as compared to that in the adult TBI mice as function of time after injury. Further, expression of both the genes starts decreasing early in old mice i.e., from the first hour after TBI as compared to that starts from fourth hour in adult TBI mice. Thus TBI affects expression of Kir4.1 and GLT-1 genes in age- and time dependent manner and it may lead to accumulations of more K(+) and glutamate early in the synapse of old mice as compared to adult. This may be implicated in the TBI induced early and severe neuronal depolarization and excito-neurotoxicity in old age.

  18. Chronic Losartan Treatment Up-Regulates AT1R and Increases the Heart Vulnerability to Acute Onset of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Minwoo A; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is an important therapy in the management of hypertension, particularly in the immediate post-myocardial infarction period. Yet, the role of AT1R in the acute onset of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury still remains controversial. Thus, the present study determined the effects of chronic losartan treatment on heart ischemia and reperfusion injury in rats. Losartan (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to six-month-old male rats via an osmotic pump for 14 days and hearts were then isolated and were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury in a Langendorff preparation. Losartan significantly decreased mean arterial blood pressure. However, heart weight, left ventricle to body weight ratio and baseline cardiac function were not significantly altered by the losartan treatment. Of interest, chronic in vivo losartan treatment significantly increased ischemia-induced myocardial injury and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function. This was associated with significant increases in AT1R and PKCδ expression in the left ventricle. In contrast, AT2R and PKCε were not altered. Furthermore, losartan treatment significantly increased microRNA (miR)-1, -15b, -92a, -133a, -133b, -210, and -499 expression but decreased miR-21 in the left ventricle. Of importance, addition of losartan to isolated heart preparations blocked the effect of increased ischemic-injury induced by in vivo chronic losartan treatment. The results demonstrate that chronic losartan treatment up-regulates AT1R/PKCδ and alters miR expression patterns in the heart, leading to increased cardiac vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  19. Jupiter's magnetic tail: Voyager 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field observations by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the outbound traversal of the Jovian magnetosphere in March 1979 suggest the detection of an extended magnetic tail, which has been formed by the solar wind interaction with the planetary field. The apparent diameter of the tail is 300-400 times the radius of Jupiter but its length is not measured. When combined with the GSFC O4 model of the planetary field, this magnetosphere topology leads to polar cap auroral zones approximately 20 deg in diameter, considerably smaller than earth's. The northern zone is found to be highly eccentric, encircling neither the rotational pole nor the magnetic pole of Jupiter, and limited to System III (1965) longitudes approximately 133 deg to 190 deg and latitudes approximately 62 deg to 82 deg.

  20. Extracting aluminum from dross tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    Aluminum dross tailings, an industrial waste, from the Egyptian Aluminium Company (Egyptalum) was used to produce two types of alums: aluminum-sulfate alum [itAl2(SO4)3.12H2O] and ammonium-aluminum alum [ (NH 4)2SO4AL2(SO4)3.24H2O]. This was carried out in two processes. The first process is leaching the impurities using diluted H2SO4 with different solid/liquid ratios at different temperatures to dissolve the impurities present in the starting material in the form of solute sulfates. The second process is the extraction of aluminum (as aluminum sulfate) from the purifi ed aluminum dross tailings thus produced. The effects of temperature, time of reaction, and acid concentration on leaching and extraction processes were studied. The product alums were analyzed using x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis techniques.

  1. Environmentally safe design of tailing dams for the management of iron ore tailings in Indian context.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Mrinal K; Sen, P K

    2005-10-01

    The need for the disposal of iron ore tailings in an enviornmentally firiendly manner is of great concern. This paper investigates the soil engineering properties for the construction of iron ore tailing dam, its foundation, construction materials and design data used for the construction analysis of the tailing dam. Geophysical investigations were carried out to establish the bedrock below the spillway. A computer programme taking into account the Swedish Slip Circle Method of analysis was used in the stability analysis of dam. It also focuses on the charactierstics of the tailings reponsible for the determination of optimum size of tailing pond for the containment of the tailings. The studies on the settling characteristics of tailings indicate much less area in comparison to the area provided in the existing tailing ponds in India. In the proposed scheme, it is suggested to provide an additional unit of sedimentation tank before the disposal of tailings to the tailing pond.

  2. STS-121 Discovery Tail Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A close-up view of Space Shuttle Discovery's tail section is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crew member on the International Space Station (ISS) during the STS-121 Rendezvous Prior to Mating (RPM) survey. Visible are the space shuttle's main engines (SSME), vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and a portion of the aft cargo bay and wings. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has management responsibility for development of the SSME.

  3. Instanton calculus of Lifshitz tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaida, Sho

    2016-02-01

    Some degree of quenched disorder is present in nearly all solids, and can have a marked impact on their macroscopic properties. A manifestation of this effect is the Lifshitz tail of localized states that then gets attached to the energy spectrum, resulting in the nonzero density of states in the band gap. We present here a systematic approach for deriving the asymptotic behavior of the density of states and of the typical shape of the disorder potentials in the Lifshitz tail. The analysis is carried out first for the well-controlled case of noninteracting particles moving in a Gaussian random potential and then for a broad class of disordered scale-invariant models—pertinent to a variety of systems ranging from semiconductors to semimetals to quantum critical systems. For relevant Gaussian disorder, we obtain the general expression for the density of states deep in the tail, with the rate of exponential suppression governed by the dynamical exponent and spatial dimensions. For marginally relevant disorder, however, we would expect a power-law scaling. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding conduction in disordered materials.

  4. Design, construction and management of tailings storage facilities for surface disposal in China: case studies of failures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zuoan; Yin, Guangzhi; Wang, J G; Wan, Ling; Li, Guangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development of China's economy demands for more mineral resources. At the same time, a vast quantity of mine tailings, as the waste byproduct of mining and mineral processing, is being produced in huge proportions. Tailings impoundments play an important role in the practical surface disposal of these large quantities of mining waste. Historically, tailings were relatively small in quantity and had no commercial value, thus little attention was paid to their disposal. The tailings were preferably discharged near the mines and few tailings storage facilities were constructed in mainland China. This situation has significantly changed since 2000, because the Chinese economy is growing rapidly and Chinese regulations and legislation require that tailings disposal systems must be ready before the mining operation begins. Consequently, data up to 2008 shows that more than 12 000 tailings storage facilities have been built in China. This paper reviews the history of tailings disposal in China, discusses three cases of tailings dam failures and explores failure mechanisms, and the procedures commonly used in China for planning, design, construction and management of tailings impoundments. This paper also discusses the current situation, shortcomings and key weaknesses, as well as future development trends for tailings storage facilities in China.

  5. The Location of Jovian tail Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yasong; Russell, Christopher; Khurana, Krishan

    In the middle magnetosphere of Jupiter, signatures of tail reconnections have been observed. During reconnection, the north-south component of Jovian tail magnetic field suddenly enhanced, as is the field strength. These sudden southward (northward) turnings are similar to the middle tail dipolarizations during terrestrial tail reconnections and can signal that the spacecraft is located at the planet-ward edge (tailward side) of the reconnection site. In this study we investigate the magnetic field signatures of Jovian tail reconnection to infer the locations of the reconnection site. Jovian tail reconnection is found to occur mostly at the sectors from pre-midnight to dawn and the most possible location for reconnection is found close to -50 RJ in the Y direction and from -75 RJ to -50 RJ in the X direction. This location is mapped into the Jupiter's ionosphere by Khurana's magnetic field model to examine the correspondence between Jovian tail reconnection and Jupiter's polar aurora.

  6. Sexual selection for white tail spots in the barn swallow in relation to habitat choice by feather lice.

    PubMed

    Kose; Mänd; Møller

    1999-12-01

    Many bird species have white spots in their tails or wing feathers, and such characters have been hypothesized to be either reliable signals (handicaps) or amplifiers that facilitate the message of a signal. In barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, the size of the white spots in the tail feathers is sexually dimorphic and positively correlated with feather length. We tested whether such spots act as handicaps or amplifiers. These white spots affect sexual selection in barn swallows, as shown by an experiment in which we randomly subjected males to (1) a considerable reduction of the size of all the spots by the use of a black permanent marker pen, (2) a small reduction of the size of the spots, or (3) no reduction. There was a positive association between spot size and the number of offspring produced per season. The white tail spots were preferred by feather-eating Mallophaga as a feeding site: holes made by Mallophaga were more abundant in the white spots than expected by chance. A habitat choice experiment with Mallophaga on barn swallow tail feathers revealed that they preferred white spots over black parts of the tail feathers. We therefore expected long-tailed male barn swallows to have more Mallophaga than short-tailed males. However, the opposite relationship was observed, indicating that long-tailed males may reliably signal their quality by the presence of large white tail spots without parasite damage. Thus white tail spots in barn swallows appear to be a reliable signal of phenotypic quality. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  7. Tail position affects the body temperature of rats during cold exposure in a low-energy state.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yuki; Tokizawa, Ken; Nakamura, Mayumi; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Nagashima, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Rats place their tails underneath their body trunks when cold (tail-hiding behavior). The aim of the present study was to determine whether this behavior is necessary to maintain body temperature. Male Wistar rats were divided into 'fed' and '42-h fasting' groups. A one-piece tail holder (8.4 cm in length) that prevented the tail-hiding behavior or a three-piece tail holder (2.8 cm in length) that allowed for the tail-hiding behavior was attached to the tails of the rats. The rats were exposed to 27°C for 180 min or to 20°C for 90 min followed by 15°C for 90 min with continuous body temperature and oxygen consumption measurements. Body temperature decreased by -1.0 ± 0.1°C at 15°C only in the rats that prevented tail-hiding behavior of the 42-h fasting group, and oxygen consumption increased at 15°C in all animals. Oxygen consumption was not different between the rats that prevented tail-hiding behavior and the rats that allowed the behavior in the fed and 42-h fasting groups under ambient conditions. These results show that the tail-hiding behavior is involved in thermoregulation in the cold in fasting rats.

  8. Activity-dependent anchoring of importin α at the synapse involves regulated binding to the cytoplasmic tail of the NR1-1a subunit of the NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Rachel A.; Ch'ng, Toh Hean; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Martin, Kelsey C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Synaptic plasticity, the capacity of neurons to change the strength of their connections with experience, provides a mechanism for learning and memory in the brain. Long-term plasticity requires new transcription, indicating that synaptically generated signals must be transported to the nucleus. Previous studies have described a role for importin nuclear transport adaptors in mediating the retrograde transport of signals from synapse to nucleus during plasticity. Here, we investigated the possibility that stimulus-induced translocation of importins from synapse to nucleus involves activity-dependent anchoring of importins at the synapse. We show that importin a binds to a nuclear localization signal (NLS) present in the cytoplasmic tail of NR1-1a. This interaction is disrupted by activation of NMDA receptors in cultured neurons and by stimuli that trigger late-phase, but not early phase LTP, of CA3-CA1 synapses in acute hippocampal slices. In vitro PKC phosphorylation of GST-NR1-1a abolishes its ability to bind importin α in brain lysates, and the interaction of importin α and NR1 in neurons is modulated by PKC activity. Together, our results indicate that importin α is tethered at the PSD by binding to the NLS present in NR1-1a. This interaction is activity dependent, with importin α being released following NMDA receptor and phosphorylation rendering it available to bind soluble cargoes and transport them to the nucleus during transcription-dependent forms of neuronal plasticity. PMID:20016075

  9. The hydrogeology of a tailings impoundment formed by central discharge of thickened tailings: implications for tailings management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al, Tom A.; Blowes, David W.

    1999-06-01

    The Kidd Creek Cu-Zn sulfide mine is located near Timmins, Ontario. Mill tailings are thickened and deposited as a slurry in a circular impoundment with an area of approximately 1200 ha. Deposition of tailings as a thickened slurry from a central discharge ramp results in a conical-shaped tailings deposit with low perimeter dykes, a uniform grain-size distribution, uniform and low hydraulic conductivity, and a tension-saturated zone above the water table up to 5 to 6 m thick. These characteristics provide benefits over conventionally disposed tailings with respect to tailings management. The thick tension-saturated zone within the tailings limits the thickness of unsaturated tailings that are susceptible to rapid sulfide oxidation. The conical shape of the deposit results in the formation of a recharge area near the centre of the impoundment and discharge in the peripheral areas. In contrast, the elevated nature of many conventional, unthickened tailings impoundments results in recharge over most of the surface of the impoundment, with discharge occurring outside the impoundment through large containment dykes. Three-dimensional pore water flow modelling suggests that approximately 90% of the total discharge from the thickened tailings occurs within the tailings impoundment. When discharge is confined within the impoundment, there is improved control over low-quality effluent, and an opportunity to design passive control measures to reduce treatment costs and minimize environmental impacts.

  10. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation. PMID:27385818

  11. Tail docking dairy cattle: responses from an online engagement.

    PubMed

    Weary, D M; Schuppli, C A; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2011-11-01

    Tail docking remains a common practice on dairy farms in the United States. This paper describes the results of an online engagement designed to create discussion on tail docking, to document the reasons participants put forward for and against the practice, and to compare these reasons with the literature available on this topic. A total of 178 people responded; 30% were producers, 23% were veterinarians, 25% had no experience with the dairy industry, and 22% included a mixture of teachers, students, and industry professionals. Approximately 79% of participants were opposed to docking. Responses varied with participant demographics (e.g., females were more likely than males to oppose docking), but in every demographic subgroup (e.g., by sex, age, country of origin, and dairy production experience), the majority of respondents were opposed to tail docking. Common reasons for opposition to docking included the lack of scientific evidence that docking improves cleanliness or udder health, that docking is painful for cows, that docking is unnatural, and that tails are important for controlling flies. Some respondents in favor of docking cited cow cleanliness as an issue, despite the scientific evidence showing no positive effect of docking on cow cleanliness or udder health. Additional reasons included protecting producer safety. These results illustrate the range of reasons that are cited for supporting and opposing tail docking. This approach can be used to better target outreach efforts (e.g., improving farmer education on the lack of positive effects of docking on cleanliness and udder health while addressing concerns about producer safety). More generally, this type of online discussion provides a safe and productive format for discussions about contentious issues in the dairy industry and provides a mechanism for producers, industry professionals, and the public to share perspectives on these topics.

  12. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO/sub 3/) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/) for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Silencing of the Hsf gene, the transcriptional regulator of A. gambiae male accessory glands, inhibits the formation of the mating plug in mated females and disrupts their monogamous behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dottorini, Tania; Persampieri, Tania; Palladino, Pietro; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Discovering the molecular factors that shape the mating behaviour and the fertility of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria, is regarded as critical to better understand its reproductive success as well as for identifying new leads for malaria control measures. In A. gambiae mating induces complex behavioural and physiological changes in the females, including refractoriness to subsequent mating and induction of egg-laying. In other insects including Drosophila a group of proteins named Accessory gland proteins (Acps), produced by males and transferred with sperm to the female reproductive tract, have been implicated in this post-mating response. Although Acps represent a set of promising candidates for unravelling the mating physiology, their role in inducing behavioural changes in mated A. gambiae females remains largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that a down-regulation of a large fraction of Acp genes via silencing of the Acp regulating transcription factor Hsf, abolishes the formation of mating plug in mated females and fails to induce refractoriness of mated female to subsequent inseminations. A significant fraction of females mated to Hsf silenced males (66%) failed to receive the mating plug though seminal fluid had been transferred as documented by the presence of spermatozoa in the female sperm storage organ. Furthermore, nearly all females (95%) mated to HSF-silenced males were re-inseminated when exposed to males carrying EGPF marked sperm. Our findings provide evidence showing that Acp genes regulated by the transcription factor HSF play a key role in the function of the male accessory glands.

  14. On the classification of comet plasma tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhenkov, E. R.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2017-07-01

    The investigation of plasma tails of comets is an important part of comet research. Different classifications of plasma tails of comets are proposed. Plasma acceleration in the tails is investigated in sufficient detail. Several cometary forms are explained. Plasma tails of Mars and Venus were observed during the first studies of these planets. They are associated with the capture of ionized atoms and exosphere molecules by the solar wind magnetized plasma flow. Distinct plasma tails of Mars and Venus are caused by the mass loading of the solar wind with heavy ions. It was shown that the transverse dimension of the tails of Mars, Venus, and comets can be quite accurately determined by production rate of the obstacle to the solar wind flow. While plasma tails of Mars and Venus are investigated by in situ measurements from spacecraft, observations of comet tails from the Earth make it possible to see the entire object under study and to monitor changes in its structure. A certain similarity of cometary and planetary tails can be explained by the nonmagnetic nature of both types of bodies. Thus, it is reasonable to suppose that investigations of plasma tails of comets can supplement the information obtained by in situ methods of the study of the planets. In this paper, plasma tails of comets, presumably analogous to the plasma tails of Mars and Venus, have been identified on modern photographs of comets (more than 1500 photographs viewed). Only quasi-steady laminar tails are considered. They are divided into two types: double structures and outflows. The paper attempts to define the 3D structure of double structures and to determine certain characteristics of outflows.

  15. Ontogenetic Expression of Lpin2 and Lpin3 Genes and Their Associations with Traits in Two Breeds of Chinese Fat-tailed Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xiao-Li; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Li, Liu-An; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Xia-Li; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Lipins play dual function in lipid metabolism by serving as phosphatidate phosphatase and transcriptional co-regulators of gene expression. Mammalian lipin proteins consist of lipin1, lipin2, and lipin3 and are encoded by their respective genes Lpin1, Lpin2, and Lpin3. To date, most studies are concerned with Lpin1, only a few have addressed Lpin2 and Lpin3. Ontogenetic expression of Lpin2 and Lpin3 and their associations with traits would help to explore their molecular and physiological functions in sheep. In this study, 48 animals with an equal number of males and females each for both breeds of fat-tailed sheep such as Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) were chosen to evaluate the ontogenetic expression of Lpin2 and Lpin3 from eight different tissues and months of age by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Associations between gene expression and slaughter and tail traits were also analyzed. The results showed that Lpin2 mRNA was highly expressed in perirenal and tail fats, and was also substantially expressed in liver, kidney, reproductive organs (testis and ovary), with the lowest levels in small intestine and femoral biceps. Lpin3 mRNA was prominently expressed in liver and small intestine, and was also expressed at high levels in kidney, perirenal and tail fats as well as reproductive organs (testis and ovary), with the lowest level in femoral biceps. Global expression of Lpin2 and Lpin3 in GLT both were significantly higher than those in STH. Spatiotemporal expression showed that the highest levels of Lpin2 expression occurred at 10 months of age in two breeds of sheep, with the lowest expression at 2 months of age in STH and at 8 months of age in GLT. The greatest levels of Lpin3 expression occurred at 4 months of age in STH and at 10 months of age in GLT, with the lowest expression at 12 months of age in STH and at 8 months of age in GLT. Breed and age significantly influenced the tissue expression patterns of

  16. Condoms - male

    MedlinePlus

    Prophylactics; Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... rubber Polyurethane Condoms are the only method of birth control for men that are not permanent. They can ...

  17. The kinesin KIF17b and RNA-binding protein TB-RBP transport specific cAMP-responsive element modulator-regulated mRNAs in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese; Morales, Carlos R; El-Alfy, Mohamed; Hecht, Norman B

    2003-12-23

    Testis brain RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP), the mouse orthologue of the human protein Translin, is a widely expressed and highly conserved protein with proposed functions in chromosomal translocations, mitotic cell division, and mRNA transport, stabilization, and storage. Targeted inactivation of TB-RBP leads to abnormalities in fertility and behavior. A testis-enriched kinesin KIF17b coimmunoprecipitates with TB-RBP in a RNA-protein complex containing specific cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM)-regulated mRNAs. The specificity of this interaction is confirmed by in vivo RNA-protein crosslinking and transfections of hippocampal neurons. Combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry at the electron microscope level, a temporally sequential dissociation of KIF17b and TB-RBP from specific mRNAs is detected with TB-RBP release coincident with the time of mRNA translation, indicating a separation of the processes of transport and translation. We conclude that KIF17b serves as a molecular motor component of a TB-RBP-mouse ribonucleoprotein complex transporting a group of specific CREM-regulated mRNAs in mammalian male postmeiotic germ cells. Because KIF17b has been reported to control CREM-dependent transcription in male germ cells by regulating the intracellular location of the transcriptional coactivator activator of CREM in testis, this indicates that one kinesin links the processes of transcription and transport of specific mRNAs in mammalian male germ cells.

  18. Male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Terrie B

    2010-05-01

    It should be recognized that sexuality in the aging male is of such import that a complete sexual history must be performed. By taking a complete sexual history, facts can be obtained that will allow for appropriate focus relating to a holistic evaluation and will enable us to dispel antiquated sexual myths pertaining to the aging male. If initiated by the history taker, questions concerning sexuality may be discussed more comfortably by the patient. Erectile dysfunction, male sexual response cycle, testosterone, sexually transmitted diseases, human immunodeficiency virus, long-term illness, along with religion and culture are explored in this article with the aim of improving one's knowledge base, self reflection, and awareness of the importance of male sexuality. A complete understanding and appreciation of the aging male's medical history, surgical history, social history, and emotional history as well as his sexual, cultural, and religious concepts will allow the health care provider to better analyze information, and to recommend and provide appropriate advice and treatment to the aging male patient. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Down, But Not Out: Partial Elimination of Androgen Receptors in the Male Mouse Brain Does Not Affect Androgenic Regulation of Anxiety or HPA Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chieh V; Brummet, Jennifer L; Jordan, Cynthia L; Breedlove, S Marc

    2016-02-01

    We previously found that androgen receptor (AR) activity mediates two effects of T in adult male mice: reduction of anxiety-like behaviors and dampening of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress. To determine whether brain ARs mediate these effects, we used the Cre/loxP technology seeking to disable AR throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Female mice carrying the floxed AR allele (ARlox) were crossed with males carrying cre recombinase transgene controlled by the nestin promoter (NesCre), producing cre in developing neurons and glia. Among male offspring, four genotypes resulted: males carrying ARlox and NesCre (NesARko), and three control groups (wild types, NesCre, and ARlox). Reporter mice indicated ubiquitous Cre expression throughout the CNS. Nevertheless, AR immunocytochemistry in NesARko mice revealed efficient knockout (KO) of AR in some brain regions (hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex [mPFC]), but not others. Substantial AR protein was seen in the amygdala and hypothalamus among other regions, whereas negligible AR remained in others like the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and dorsal periaqueductal gray. This selective KO allowed for testing the role of AR in hippocampus and mPFC. Males were castrated and implanted with T at postnatal day 60 before testing on postnatal day 90-100. In contrast with males with global KO of AR, T still modulated anxiety-related behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in NesARko males. These results leave open the possibility that AR acting in the CNS mediates these effects of T, but demonstrate that AR is not required in the hippocampus or mPFC for T's anxiolytic effects.

  20. Anatomy of a lactococcal phage tail.

    PubMed

    Mc Grath, Stephen; Neve, Horst; Seegers, Jos F M L; Eijlander, Robyn; Vegge, Christina S; Brøndsted, Lone; Heller, Knut J; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Vogensen, Finn K; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2006-06-01

    Bacteriophages of the Siphoviridae family utilize a long noncontractile tail to recognize, adsorb to, and inject DNA into their bacterial host. The tail anatomy of the archetypal Siphoviridae lambda has been well studied, in contrast to phages infecting gram-positive bacteria. This report outlines a detailed anatomical description of a typical member of the Siphoviridae infecting a gram-positive bacterium. The tail superstructure of the lactococcal phage Tuc2009 was investigated using N-terminal protein sequencing, Western blotting, and immunogold transmission electron microscopy, allowing a tangible path to be followed from gene sequence through encoded protein to specific architectural structures on the Tuc2009 virion. This phage displays a striking parity with lambda with respect to tail structure, which reenforced a model proposed for Tuc2009 tail architecture. Furthermore, comparisons with lambda and other lactococcal phages allowed the specification of a number of genetic submodules likely to encode specific tail structures.

  1. Tail loss compromises immunity in the many-lined skink, Eutropis multifasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chi-Chien; Yao, Chiou-Ju; Lin, Te-En; Liu, Hsu-Che; Hsu, Yu-Cheng; Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Huang, Wen-San

    2013-04-01

    Tail autotomy incurs energetic costs, and thus, a trade-off in resource allocation may lead to compromised immunity in lizards. We tested the hypothesis that tailless lizards will favor constitutive innate immunity responses over an energetically costly inflammatory response. The influence of fasting and colorful ornamentation was also investigated. We experimentally induced tail autotomy in the lizard Eutropis multifasciata and found that inflammation was suppressed by tail loss, but not further affected by fasting; the suppressive effect of colorful ornamentation was manifested only in males, but not in females. Constitutive innate immunity was not affected by any of these factors. As expected, only costly inflammation was compromised, and a less expensive constitutive innate immunity might be favored as a competent first-line defense during energetically demanding periods. After considering conventional trade-offs among tail regeneration and reproduction, further extending these studies to incorporate disease risk and how this influences escape responses to predators and future reproduction would make worthwhile studies.

  2. Unique caudal plumage of Jeholornis and complex tail evolution in early birds

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Sullivan, Corwin; Zheng, Xiaoting; Tubaro, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2013-01-01

    The Early Cretaceous bird Jeholornis was previously only known to have a distally restricted ornamental frond of tail feathers. We describe a previously unrecognized fan-shaped tract of feathers situated dorsal to the proximal caudal vertebrae. The position and morphology of these feathers is reminiscent of the specialized upper tail coverts observed in males of some sexually dimorphic neornithines. As in the neornithine tail, the unique “two-tail” plumage in Jeholornis probably evolved as the result of complex interactions between natural and sexual selective pressures and served both aerodynamic and ornamental functions. We suggest that the proximal fan would have helped to streamline the body and reduce drag whereas the distal frond was primarily ornamental. Jeholornis reveals that tail evolution was complex and not a simple progression from frond to fan. PMID:24101506

  3. Melatonin and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjin; Zhou, Xu

    2015-06-15

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland whose concentrations in the body are regulated by both the dark-light and seasonal cycles. The reproductive function of seasonal breeding animals is clearly influenced by the circadian variation in melatonin levels. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates that melatonin has important effects in the reproduction of some non-seasonal breeding animals. In males, melatonin affects reproductive regulation in three main ways. First, it regulates the secretion of two key neurohormones, GnRH and LH. Second, it regulates testosterone synthesis and testicular maturation. Third, as a potent free radical scavenger that is both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it prevents testicular damage caused by environmental toxins or inflammation. This review summarizes the existing data on the possible biological roles of melatonin in male reproduction. Overall, the literature data indicate that melatonin affects the secretion of both gonadotropins and testosterone while also improving sperm quality. This implies that it has important effects on the regulation of testicular development and male reproduction.

  4. Lead content in soft tissues of white-tailed deer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.

    1995-12-31

    The white-tailed deer is one of the North America`s most abundant game animals and can be used to monitor the quality of the environment. During the 1994 and 1995 hunting seasons, twenty-nine white-tailed deer were harvested with the permission of the Game Biologist of the Alabama Cooperative Deer Management Assistance Program and their liver and kidney samples were analyzed for lead levels. The lead levels in the livers and kidneys, were 0.35 and 0.37 ppm, respectively. The lead levels in the livers and kidneys did not show any significant difference. The lead levels in the livers of males and females were 0.49 and 0.28 ppm and in the kidneys of males and females were 0.36 and 0.38 ppm, respectively. The lead levels in the livers and kidneys of males and females also did not show any significant difference. Likewise, the lead level neither in the livers nor in the kidneys of young and old deer showed any significant difference.

  5. Evaluation of host preferences by helminths and ectoparasites among black-tailed jackrabbits in northern California.

    PubMed

    Clemons, C; Rickard, L G; Keirans, J E; Botzler, R G

    2000-07-01

    Fifty-four black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) (five juvenile males, 22 adult males, five juvenile females, and 22 adult females) from Humboldt County, California (USA) were evaluated for sex and age-specific differences in parasite prevalences and intensities, 26 February through 30 October 1996. Nematodes found included Biogastranema leporis in 42 hares (78% prevalence), Rauschia triangularis in 26 hares (48%), Trichostrongylus calcaratus in 14 hares (26%), and Trichuris sylvilagi in two hares (4%). Cestodes found included Taenia sp. cysticerci in five hares (9%) and Taenia sp. coenurus found in one hare (2%). Ectoparasites found included the ticks Dermacentor variabilis on 10 hares (19%) and Ixodes spinipalpis (= Ixodes neotomae) on nine hares (17%), as well as the anoplurid louse Haemodipsus setoni on 12 hares (22%). No significant differences in the parasite prevalences or intensities were found between male and female jackrabbits; this was for all males and females collectively, juvenile males and females only, as well as adult males and females only. Combining male and female hosts, adult jackrabbits had a significantly higher prevalence of B. leporis and R. triangularis compared to juveniles. This is the first known report of Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Rauschia triangularis, Trichuris sylvilagi, and Dermacentor variabilis among black-tailed jackrabbits and the first known report of T. calcaratus and T. sylvilagi in the western USA. This is the first published report of I. spinipalpis, the vector for Lyme disease in California, on black-tailed jackrabbits.

  6. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

    PubMed Central

    Jusufi, Ardian; Goldman, Daniel I.; Revzen, Shai; Full, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Geckos are nature's elite climbers. Their remarkable climbing feats have been attributed to specialized feet with hairy toes that uncurl and peel in milliseconds. Here, we report that the secret to the gecko's arboreal acrobatics includes an active tail. We examine the tail's role during rapid climbing, aerial descent, and gliding. We show that a gecko's tail functions as an emergency fifth leg to prevent falling during rapid climbing. A response initiated by slipping causes the tail tip to push against the vertical surface, thereby preventing pitch-back of the head and upper body. When pitch-back cannot be prevented, geckos avoid falling by placing their tail in a posture similar to a bicycle's kickstand. Should a gecko fall with its back to the ground, a swing of its tail induces the most rapid, zero-angular momentum air-righting response yet measured. Once righted to a sprawled gliding posture, circular tail movements control yaw and pitch as the gecko descends. Our results suggest that large, active tails can function as effective control appendages. These results have provided biological inspiration for the design of an active tail on a climbing robot, and we anticipate their use in small, unmanned gliding vehicles and multisegment spacecraft. PMID:18347344

  7. Ecotechnological approach for consolidation of uranium tailings.

    PubMed

    Soni, Prafulla; Singh, Lal

    2011-07-01

    Present study has been undertaken to consolidate radioactivity in uranium mill tailings at Jaduguda, Jharkhand, India.Tailings that remain after processing of ore are released in tailing ponds specially designed for the purpose. The degraded tailing ponds have been capped with 30 cm. thick soil cover. For cosolidation of radioactivity in the tailings firstly the selected plant species should not have any socioeconomic relevance in that area and secondly, uptake of uranium by selected plants has to be low to avoid its dissemination in any form in environment. Seven native plant species of forestry origin were used for experimental trials. Above ground growth has been measured for two years under ex- situ and in- situ conditions. Distribution and concentration of uranium have been evaluated in tailing pond soil as well as tailings. Uranium uptake by plants has been evaluated and discussed in this paper. The highest concentration of uranium has been found in the order as: in tailings > soil cover on tailings > roots of selected plant species > shoots of all the selected species. These results show that among seven species tried Jatropha gossypifolia and Furcraea foetida have lowest uptake (below detectable limit), while Saccharum spontaneum and Pogostemon benghalense have comparatively higher uptake among the studied species.

  8. Optimum Tail Plane Design for Sailplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayland, K.

    1979-01-01

    Classical drag equations in a modern version were used to calculate the influence of tail modifications on the drag of a standard class sailplane. The profile drag which depends on the Reynolds number is included in the calculations. Minimum drag is compared with real drag for two lift coefficients. Some results have no clear tendency but low tail area and relatively low tail aspect ratio give some advantages. Optimum and real lift ratios between wing and tail plane are compared for the original sailplane.

  9. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-04-01

    Currently approved male-directed contraceptive methods include condoms and vas occlusion. Vas occlusion is very effective but is intended to be non-reversible. Condoms have a relatively high fai